January 25, 2023 - Pittsburgh City Paper

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FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY PITTSBURGH’S ALTERNATIVE FOR ENTERTAINMENT PGHCITYPAPER.COM PGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER PGHCITYPAPER JAN. 25-FEB. 1, 2023 winter guide
2 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM PGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER 4 Smithfield Street, Suite 1210 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 GOT A NEWS TIP? E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com WANT TO PLACE AN AD? EMAIL rachel@pghcitypaper.com JAN. 25-FEB. 1, 2023 // VOL. 32 ISSUE 4 IN THIS WEEK’S ISSUE: CELEBRATING 30+ YEARS GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2023 by CARS Holding, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of CARS Holding, Inc. LETTER POLICY: Letters, or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by CARS Holding, Inc. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $250 per year (52 issues), $150 per half year (26 issues), or $32 per six weeks. For more information, visit pghcitypaper.com and click on the Subscribe tab. COVER DESIGN: LUCY CHEN / MIDJOURNEY Editor-in-Chief ALI TRACHTA Director of Advertising RACHEL WINNER Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD News Editor JAMIE WIGGAN A&E Editor AMANDA WALTZ News Reporter JORDANA ROSENFELD Art Director LUCY CHEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Digital Editorial Coordinator HANNAH KINNEY-KOBRE Senior Account Executive OWEN GABBEY Sales Representatives SIERRA CLARY, MARIA STILLITANO Digital Coordinator MORGAN BIDDLE Marketing Coordinator LEE HOOD Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, NATALIE BENCIVENGA, MIKE CANTON, LYNN CULLEN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Interns PATRICK CAVANAGH, MATTHEW MONROY National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher CARS HOLDING, INC FIRSTSHOT BY PAT CAVANAGH Chinese dancers rehearse for PCCC’s 2023 Greater Pittsburgh New Year Gala, which took place at the Pittsburgh Playhouse on Sat., Jan. 21. 04 COMMUNITY // Throwing Stones 08 FASHION // Layer Up 12 FOOD // International Comfort 12 NEWS // Pittsburgh News Roundup 16 EVENTS // The Big Winter Guide 22 Crossword and Classifieds PGHCITYPAPER.COM SERVING PITTSBURGH SINCE NOV. 6, 1991 MORE PHOTOS AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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SPORTS THROWING STONES

IT TAKES A BLEND of finesse and gusto: Casual drinking is part of curling culture, but get drunk and you’ll get thrown off the ice. Communicating involves roaring at your teammates, but etiquette requires calling your own fouls. The primary tool is a 40-pound stone, but a hairline crack in the ice can ruin a game.

These dualities attract a lively blend of personalities, and, according to Dustin Devine, president of the Pittsburgh Curling Club, that’s the magic of it.

“We have members of the club ranging from their 20s into their late 60s and early 70s,” Devine tells Pittsburgh City Paper. “We have people that are athletic and then we have people that are not as athletic. We have members that use wheelchairs and they participate in curling, so it’s a very inclusive game.”

Invented more than 400 years ago in Scotland and long popularized in Canada, curling has been played in the United States since the 1800s, but never spread much beyond the upper Midwest until recent decades.

PITTSBURGH CURLING CLUB

491 McCoy Road, McKees Rocks. pittsburghcurlingclub.com

Pittsburgh has the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games to thank for its stake in the leisurely winter pastime.

Once the games were over, several Pittsburghers, energized by seeing the sport on the screen, independently reached out to the United States Curling Association to inquire about a local

chapter. There wasn’t one, they learned, but the Association brought them together to form their own.

Husband and wife Steve Buffington and Marie Rose were quickly recruited, having developed an interest in curing during a ski trip to Canada several years prior. Twenty years on, both remain active participants, on and off the ice.

“After we played a few tournaments, we were really interested,” Buffington tells City Paper. “We were hooked.”

Starting around 2002, Rose and Buffington, along with a few friends, helped build the club by renting ice time at the Robert Morris Island Sports Center. It has since grown into a nonprofit organization with 150 members.

Since 2020, the club has had its own building in Stowe Township that captures rainwater from the roof and sends

4 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
CP PHOTO: PAT CAVANAGH Pittsburgh Curling Club President, Dustin Devine
CONTINUES ON PG. 6
If playing hockey isn’t your thing. Curling may be.
5 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023
CP PHOTO: PAT CAVANAGH Curlers Ben Cassidy (left) and Amanda Marchitelli (right), sweep at the Pittsburgh Curling Club

it through a five-part filtration system ready to form pure ice.

It was the pursuit of perfect ice, more than anything else, that set the curlers in search of their own rink. Unlike hockey, curling must be played on a perfectly flat surface without the typical imperfections generated during a hockey game. But at the granular level, the ice is textured with delicate little indents that, paradoxically, generate traction for rubber souls while easing friction for granite curling stones. Without this “pebbling,” even pros can’t throw stones much beyond 50 feet.

“We considered lots of options,” Buffington says. “But the only way to get better quality ice is to build the ice rink, then you have control over it.”

It took nearly two decades to generate enough members and funds. Every four years the Winter Olympics introduced new Pittsburghers to the sport, boosting the club’s ranks.

Now, curlers can be found on the ice nearly all days of the week, with regular league games on Mondays and Wednesdays, practice on Thursdays, and a healthy rotation of weekend programming. Throughout the year, the Pittsburgh club also hosts national and regional events, from the Special Olympics to the Grand National Curling Club Senior Women’s Championship.

Beginners can get a feel for the sport during a “learn to curl” session, offered most weeks for $50, which includes the equipment rental.

“I’ll have you playing a regular game of curling within two hours,” says Devine. “It’s very easy to pick up.”

While the basics come quickly, seasoned players can always find new ways to improve their game. This is part of the appeal for Erin McManus, who joined the club after watching the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

6 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM THROWING STONES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 4
CP PHOTOS: PAT CAVANAGH Curler Ben Cassidy concentrates while tossing the rock at the Pittsburgh Curling Club in McKees Rocks.

“I’m a competitive person,” McManus tells CP. “[Curling] is about thinking ahead — I like the strategy.”

Anyone familiar with bocce or lawn bowls can grasp the fundamentals of curling by imagining the same concept translated onto ice.

All of this means seasoned players are thinking several steps ahead in anticipation of their opponents’ next moves.

“They call it chess on ice,” says Carson Turner, a club member since — you guessed it — the 2018 Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

Two teams of four compete over 10 “ends” (think innings). Each player has to slide two stones down 130 feet of ice into a 12-foot circular target. At the conclusion of each end, every stone within the rings counts for one point. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

But curling is not so much about getting your stones in as keeping your opponents’ out. That’s where strategy comes in. Types of shots — aided by sweepers softening the ice with brooms — include “guards,” “draws,” and “take-outs,” as well as offshoots, such as the “peel,” the “hit-and-roll,” and the “come-around.”

What attracts people of all ages and abilities to curling is not just the sport, but equally the off-ice socializing that’s built into the culture.

The custom of wining, dining, and mingling at the end of a curling game is so much a part of the experience that it has its own term: broomstacking.

Whether playing at the elite level or in a beginners league, curlers are never just there for the exercise. Pittsburgh curlers say that’s a great reason why you should get involved.

“If you come by yourself to a curling club you’re going to meet people,” McManus says. •

7 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023
Follow News Editor Jamie Wiggan on Twitter @JamieWiggan.
Whether playing at the elite level or in a beginners league, you’re never just there for the exercise.

FASHION LAYER UP

The best shoes, clothing, and other items for trail running, hiking, and more, according to a local expert.

3 RIVERS OUTDOOR CO.

1130 South Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 3riversoutdoor.com

BEING ABLE TO recommend outdoor equipment means actually spending time outdoors. In an effort to help readers prepare for their next coldweather adventure, Pittsburgh City Paper reached out to 3 Rivers Outdoor Company, a local, independently-owned purveyor of equipment and apparel for hiking, climbing, backpacking, camping, and more. More than just a retailer, 3ROC also organizes events for area outdoor enthusiasts.

Wren Wann, a store manager at 3ROC, has a love for hiking, running, and crosscountry skiing, and attended mountaineering school with the Explorers Club of Pittsburgh.

Wann provided a list of items she recommends to stay warm, safe, hydrated, and fed while hiking or trail running in the many parks and trail systems in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

Trail Run

Start with a base layer of a moisturewicking shirt and full-length running tights. Add fleece for a middle-layer and finish with a protective hooded outer layer. In terms of footwear, Wann recommends cushioned running socks and specially designed trail-running shoes.

Wann says runners can add helpful accessories to their outfit, including traction spikes, gloves, and a beanie.

WANN RECOMMENDS:

BASE LAYER: Syncrino top from the Rab company and Peak Mission Tights from Patagonia

MIDDLE LAYER: Otero quarter-zip fleece from Cotopaxi

OUTER LAYER: Ferrosi Hoodie by Outdoor Research

FOOTWEAR: Cushioned socks by Darn Tough, the Speedgoat 5 sneaker by Hoka

ACCESSORIES: Traction spikes by Black Diamond, Backstop Sensor Gloves by Outdoor Research, lightweight, Merino wool beanie by Buff

Winter Hike

Like winter trail running, winter hiking is best enjoyed with three layers of clothing. For footwear, Wann slips on cushioned hiking socks and waterproof boots.

In terms of accessories, Wann recommends traction spikes, lightweight trekking poles, and gloves.

WANN RECOMMENDS:

BASE LAYER: Long-sleeved tops and tights from Rab’s Forge collection, or from Patagonia’s Capilene Air collection

MIDDLE LAYER: R1 Air quarter-zip fleece from Patagonia

OUTER LAYER: Rab Kinetic 2.0 waterproof jacket, Cotopaxi Fuego down jacket, Rab Khroma Ascendor pants

FOOTWEAR: Cushioned hiking socks by Darn Tough, Groove Mid G-Dry boot by Garmont.

ACCESSORIES: Traction spikes by Yaktrax, lightweight trekking poles by Leki Makalu, Quest Infinium gloves by Rab, 150 Sensor Liners and Flurry Mitts by Outdoor Research

8 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
CONTINUES ON PG. 10
PHOTO: COURTESY OF WREN WANN

Roses

in the

Are

for

Show nature some love this February. Discover a variety of hand-crafted, nature-inspired hearts in the gardens and woodlands. Bring the kids to experience the Winter Wonderland, learn all about Plants of Love, and treat yourself with a Self-love Floral Arrangement Workshop. Don’t miss a beat – find out more at PittsburghBotanicGarden.org.

9 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023
canopy
hours
activities
garden hours October 1-March 31 • Tuesday-Sunday: 9am-5pm • Monday: Closed
cafe
• 10am-3pm
• Hearts in the Garden February 10-19 Included with admission child education • Seedlings: Winter Wonderland Wednesday afternoons in February adult education • Plants of Love February 9, 6pm • Self-love Floral Arrangement February 14, 6pm • Community Accupuncture Session times vary
Are Red, Violets Are Blue, These Hearts
Garden
Especially
You Registration required for classes. Visit PittsburghBotanicGarden.org/program-calendar or call 412-444-4464 or for more information.
images : Scott Goldsmith Photography

Safety

For journeys lasting three or more miles, especially those in “wilderness areas,” Wann says hikers or runners should bring an emergency bivy sack (a kind-of sleeping bag/tent hybrid), a first-aid kit, and fire-starting supplies. For an extra boost on a long hike, Wann recommends energy-giving snacks, as well as hydration supplements that add electrolytes to water.

Wann says a headlamp is “always good to have” as winter brings earlier sunsets. Speaking of the sun, Wann notes sunglasses are “especially important” to protect your eyes from being damaged by “snow blindness” from UV rays reflecting off snow and ice.

Food/Drink

Wann tells City Paper , “Hydration is very important in the winter. The body’s natural ‘thirst’ response doesn’t occur as frequently as it does in the warmer months.” She adds that if adventurers are worried about their water supply freezing, they should find a hydration backpack with an insulated hose or travel with water bottles inside a backpack.

Wann says “favorite snacks” are a requirement for any hike. She says that 3ROC staff preferences include Clif bars or the Pittsburgh-made Best Ever Granola.

RECOMMENDS:

Pets

For those bringing dogs along for a run or hike, Wann says Musher’s Secret products protect paws from “painful salt burns and snow buildup.” She also suggests the Kurgo Loft Jacket made for fourlegged friends. •

10 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
CONTINUED FROM PG. 8
Follow A&E Editor Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP WANN
Osprey Hikelite hydration backpack Osprey Duro/Dyna hydration vest
SNACKS: Bloks energy chews, peanut M&M’s, Trail Butter, Kate’s Real Food bars HYDRATION SUPPLEMENT: Nuun SUNGLASSES: goodr
WANN RECOMMENDS:
PHOTOS: COURTESY OF WREN WANN Wren Wann
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FOOD INTERNATIONAL

PITTSBURGH WAS famously built on the labor of immigrants who crossed the ocean to mine coal and forge steel. They also built its food culture by bringing old world staples like pierogies, halusky, and macaroni.

But even now, with the collapse of heavy industry, new waves of immigrants continue to pour into the Steel City, fending off population decline and contributing their own rich traditions.

Bhutan

Khara Timsina vividly remembers the first time he saw snow. Growing up in a village in southern Bhutan near the Indian border, he was used to tropical temperatures and rainy winters. After the fifth grade, he tells City Paper, he was sent to attend school in the Himalayan mountains where he experienced snow for the first time on New Year’s Day 1990. He remembers that he and his schoolmates weren’t sure it was safe to play in

Over the past two decades, Pittsburgh has opened its arms to refugee communities from around the world. As of 2015, nearly 2,500 refugees speaking more than 30 languages had been resettled in Allegheny County, with Bhutanese, Somali, and Congolese communities among the largest. Since then, hundreds of Afghan refugees have also made Pittsburgh their home.

Of all seasons, winter in Western Pennsylvania calls for an edible line of defense: soups and stews — any combination really of dense calories and steam.

Pittsburgh City Paper talked to representatives of two refugee communities about their food tradition, and what they might turn to for comfort and sustenance on a cold gray day.

the fluffy white stuff, but were so excited they romped around in the knee-deep drifts anyway.

Although much of Bhutan doesn’t have the same cold winter weather we do, Timsina says most Bhutanese food is served hot, making it a tasty and hearty option for a Pittsburgh winter.

“We normally don’t eat cold food. Even the so-called salad vegetables are normally eaten cooked in curry,” he says.

Momos, which are steaming hot dumplings filled with cooked vegetables and/or meat, are another staple wellsuited to Pittsburgh winter, Timsina says, and many Bhutanese people may choose a spicier-than-usual dipping sauce for their momos when the weather is chilly.

Timsina is the executive director of the South Hills-based Bhutanese Community Association of Pittsburgh, which he helped found. He has lived in Pittsburgh with his family since 2010.

12 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
CP ILLUSTRATION: LUCY CHEN
... most Bhutanese food is served hot, making it a tasty and hearty option for a Pittsburgh winter.
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Iraq

Iraqi cuisine, just like the national culture, has been formed by waves of ancient and modern influences.

“It’s the most historical country in the world,” says Kamel Albrahin, a server at Samovar Mediterranean Grill in Pittsburgh, noting the lingering influence of the Ottoman empire on popular dishes like Dolma.

Alhabrin says Iraqis prefer to eat produce in its right season. And this, more than anything, impacts what is eaten when, with root vegetables available in the winter months, while fruits like grapes and watermelon grace tables in the summer and fall.

Most of the country doesn’t experience harsh winters like Pittsburgh, but temperatures can still drop below freezing in the North. During those days, Alhabrin says, many like to warm up with the nation’s signature drink — hot black tea infused with cardamom and, sometimes, cinnamon.

Also during winter months, Alhabrin says, steamy meat soups are eaten with bread at the start of the day to ward off the cold.

“They eat it early in the morning,” he says. “It has a lot of calories and so you’re not going to feel hungry until, you know, noon.”

14 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
CONTINUED FROM PG. 12
Follow News Editor Jamie Wiggan on Twitter @JamieWiggan. Follow News Reporter Jordana Rosenfeld on Twitter @rosenfeldjb
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CP

PITTSBURGH NEWS ROUNDUP

PROPOSED ENFORCEMENT OF YOUTH CURFEW SPARKS PUBLIC CRITICISMS

PITTSBURGH

CITY COUNCIL President Theresa Kail-Smith introduced a resolution Jan. 18 directing council to convene a committee to review Pittsburgh’s existing youth curfew law.

tical and financial nightmare,” arguing such centers are not an effective use of resources.

NEWS REPORT ARGUES

The law requires that the police pick up unaccompanied minors found in public places or private businesses after the designated curfew time and take them to a city-operated curfew center where they will receive counseling and be held until a parent or guardian picks them up.

City controller candidate and former city youth services manager Tracy Royston told Pittsburgh City Paper the last city-run curfew center was “a logis-

Racial justice advocates told City Paper that a police-enforced curfew would likely be harmful to local youth and communities of color.

Any practice “that increases contact with the police” is dangerous for young people, especially young Black people, according to Muhammad Ali Nasir, who coordinates advocacy, policy, and civic engagement for nonprofit advocacy group 1Hood Media.

Kail-Smith told WESA she’d rather see the city’s social workers and outreach staff enforce the curfew.

ANEW REPORT by the American Economic Liberties Project considers the negative impacts of UPMC’s dominance over the region’s healthcare economy.

“Like the steel corporations of the last century, UPMC has used its power to depress wages, degrade working conditions, extract money from the public, and, ultimately, create a crisis for the communities in which it operates and in which we live,” write State Rep. Sara Innamorato (D-Lawrenceville) and U.S. Rep. Summer Lee (D-Swissvale) in their introduction to the report.

The report calls for state and local leaders to strengthen and enforce antitrust laws meant to encourage economic competition and to investigate and reform UPMC’s tax-exempt status, among other recommendations.

DUGAN CALLS FOR MORE COLLABORATIVE, PREVENTATIVE APPROACH TO PUBLIC SAFETY

ALLEGHENY

COUNTY’S Chief Public Defender Matt Dugan last week announced his intention to challenge District Attorney Stephen Zappala in the Democratic primary this spring.

In particular, Dugan says he wants to focus the county’s resources on “competently prosecuting violent crime,” and he plans to do so, in part, by implementing “true diversion” programs that redirect those with low-level, nonviolent charges away from the criminal legal system.

Although Zappala has touted the establishment of specialty courts for cases involving drugs, mental health, and veterans as successful diversion efforts, Dugan says these do not amount to “true diversion.”

“There’s an opportunity to get in front of this, to be more proactive, to focus more on prevention than to be reactive and focus on punishment.” •

15 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023 NEWS
on Twitter @rosenfeldjb
Follow News Reporter Jordana Rosenfeld
NEWS
PITTSBURGH IS A UPMC COMPANY TOWN
Allegheny County Chief Public Defender Matt Dugan
Racial justice advocates told Pittsburgh City Paper that a police-enforced curfew would likely be harmful to local youth and communities of color.

THE BIG WINTER GUIDE

ONGOING EVENTS

THROUGH FEB. 10

ART • GARFIELD

Gentle Landing and Still Standing. Silver Eye Center for Photography. 4808 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. silvereye.org/exhibitions

THROUGH MARCH 4

ART • POINT BREEZE

Trying To Relate by Kimberlyn Bloise Pittsburgh Center for Arts and Media. 1047 Shady Ave., Point Breeze. Free. pghartsmedia.org

THROUGH MARCH 18

ART • LAWRENCEVILLE

Transformation 11: Contemporary Works in Glass. Contemporary Craft. 5645 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. contemporarycraft.org

THROUGH MARCH 20

ART • NORTH SIDE

Andy Warhol’s Social Network: Interview, Television and Portraits The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Included with museum admission. warhol.org

Andy Warhol’s Social Network: Interview, Television and Portraits at The Warhol

EVENTS
CONTINUES ON PG. 18
CP PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ
FIND SPECIFIC EVENTS ON PAGES 18-21
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FRI., JAN. 27

CONVENTION • MONROEVILLE

Western Pennsylvania Home and Outdoor Living Show. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Sun., Jan. 29. Monroeville Convention Center. 209 Mall Blvd., Monroeville. wpahomeshow.com

THEATER • SOUTH SIDE

What the Constitution Means to Me 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 12. City Theatre. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $30-81. citytheatrecompany.org

SAT., JAN. 28

CONVENTION • DOWNTOWN

For the first time ever, the World Oddities Expo comes to Pittsburgh, bringing with it a variety of artists, vendors, performers, and others who specialize in the weird. Head to the David L. Lawrence Convention Center and shop for macabre gifts in the Lost Curio Marketplace, get tattoos in the Oddity Ink Parlor, or enjoy live burlesque, painting, and more. There will also be classes for taxidermy, butterfly pinning, and owl-pellet dissection. 12-8 p.m. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $5-175. woetothee.com/pittsburgh2023

MUSIC • NORTH SIDE

Sound Series: counter)induction 8 p.m.

Doors at 7 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $15. warhol.org

WED., FEB. 1

DANCE • DOWNTOWN

Step Afrika. 7 p.m. Continues through Thu., Feb. 2. Byham Theater. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $10-40. trustarts.org

THEATER • DOWNTOWN

A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Harlem 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 19. Pittsburgh Public Theater at The O’Reilly Theater. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $32-80. ppt.org

LIT • DOWNTOWN

Speaker Series: Erik Larson. 8 p.m. Heinz

THU., FEB. 2

ART • SOUTH SIDE

Lay Bare Continues through April 1. Brew House Association. 711 South 21st St., South Side. Free. brewhousearts.org/exhibitions

LIT • OAKLAND

Words & Pictures: Natasha Tarpley 6 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. Registration required. pittsburghlectures.org

COMEDY • UPTOWN

Impractical Jokers: The DRIVE DRIVE DRIVE DRIVE DRIVE Tour. 7:30 p.m. PPG Paints Arena. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $25-215. ppgpaintsarena.com

FRI., FEB. 3

ART • FRIENDSHIP

The Pittsburgh Glass Center and Netflix have worked together on Blown Away, a reality competition show gathering exceptional glass artists from all over the globe. Finalists from all three seasons of the show will be showcased at PGC for Undefined. See works by Minhi Su England, John Moran, and John Sharvin. Opening reception 6 p.m. Continues through July 30. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. pittsburghglasscenter.org

OCCULT • NORTH SIDE

Theresa Caputo The Experience Live. 7 p.m. Doors at 6 p.m. Rivers Casino Pittsburgh. 777 Casino Drive. North Side. $39-119. riverscasino.com

MUSIC • NORTH SIDE

Sound Series: Buffalo Nichols. 8 p.m. Doors at 7 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $15-20. warhol.org

SAT., FEB. 4

KIDS • NORTH SIDE

Opposites Abstract: A Mo Willems Exhibit. Continues through Sept. 3. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. 10 Children’s Way, North Side.

OUTDOORS • PLUM

Boyce Park SnowFest. 12-5 p.m. Boyce Park Ski Slopes. 901 Centerview Drive, Plum. $5-10. alleghenycounty.us

MUSIC • SHADYSIDE

Chatham Baroque presents The Isle of Delos. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 5. Calvary Episcopal Church. 315 Shady Ave., Shadyside. $20-40. chathambaroque.org

SUN., FEB. 5

MUSIC • NORTH SIDE

Big Thief with Buck Meek. 7 p.m. Stage AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $34.50-75. promowestlive.com

MON., FEB. 6

THEATER • DOWNTOWN

Rapunzel 10:15 a.m. Byham Theater. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $12. trustarts.org

WED., FEB. 8

COMEDY

• UPTOWN

Adam Sandler Live. 7:30 p.m. PPG Paints Arena. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $86-440. ppgpaintsarena.com

FRI., FEB. 10

EVENT • DOWNTOWN

Jurassic Quest 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 12. David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $19-36. jurassicquest.shop/pittsburgh-pa

EVENT • UPTOWN

Monster Jam. 7 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 12. PPG Paints Arena. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $23-130. ppgpaintsarena.com

BALLET • DOWNTOWN

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre presents Dracula. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 12. Benedum Center. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. pbt.org/performances

SAT., FEB. 11

ART • EAST LIBERTY

Kelly Strayhorn Theater and BOOM Concepts joined forces to present Neighbor to Neighbor, a group art exhibition described in a release as challenging viewers to “consider the possibilities around equitable, active neighboring.” Presented in KST’s lobby, the show will include works by Takara Canty, Sophia Fang, atiya jones, Maggie Lynn Negrete, Jameelah Platt, and Danielle Robinson. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. Continues through May 27. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. kellystrayhorn.org/events/neighbor-to-neighbor

EXHIBITION • NORTH SIDE

VIKINGS: Warriors of the North Sea. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4. Carnegie Science Center. One Allegheny Ave., North Side. Included with museum admission. carnegiesciencecenter.org

MUSIC • NORTH SIDE

Sound Series: Ensemble Dal Niente 8 p.m. Doors at 7 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $15. warhol.org

THE BIG WINTER EVENTS GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17
WED. FEB 1
PHOTO: EMMAI ALAQUIVA Pittsburgh Public Theater presents A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Harlem CP PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ Andy Warhol’s Social Network: Interview, Television and Portraits at The Warhol

THU., FEB. 16

LIT • OAKLAND

Words & Pictures: Sara Shepard

6 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. Registration required. pittsburghlectures.org

FRI., FEB. 17

CONVENTION • DOWNTOWN

Pittsburgh International Auto Show 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Continues through Mon., Feb. 20. David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. pittautoshow.com

TATTOOS • SOUTH SIDE

Pittsburgh Tattoo Expo. 10 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 19.

Sheraton Pittsburgh Hotel. 300 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $30-45, free for kids under 12 and under with paying adult. pittsburghtattooexpo.com

THEATER • DOWNTOWN

Blue Man Group 7:30 p.m.

Continues through Sun., Feb. 19. Benedum Center. Seventh St. and Penn Ave., Downtown. $36.25-105. trustarts.org

MUSIC • NORTH SIDE

Sound Series: Claire Rousay with special guest Merce Lemon. 8 p.m. Doors at 7:30 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $15-20. warhol.org

MON., FEB. 20

LIT • OAKLAND

Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures: Patricia Lockwood. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Virtual tickets: $15. In-person tickets: $18-$39. pittsburghlectures.culturaldistrict.org

FRI., FEB. 24

BEER • DOWNTOWN

Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest 2023 6:30-11 p.m. Continues through Feb. 25. David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $25-85. 21 and over. pittsburghbeerfest.com

FILM • NORTH SIDE

Miss Fifteen Minutes of Fame. 6:30 p.m. Doors at 6 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Registration begins soon. warhol.org

SAT., FEB. 25

FEST • NORTH SIDE

Pittsburgh Chocolate, Wine & Whiskey Festival. 11:30 a.m-9 p.m. Rivers Casino. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. $55-80. 21 and over. chocolatewinewhiskey.com

MUSIC • UPTOWN

Carrie Underwood with Jimmie Allen. 7:30 p.m. PPG Paints Arena. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $66-250. ppgpaintsarena.com/events

19 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023
CONTINUES ON PG. 20
FRI. FEB 10
AVAILABLE NOW AT PGHCITYPAPERSTORE.COM THEY’RE BACK! ORDER YOURS TODAY LIMITED TIME ONLY BUY 5 GET 1 FREE! $5 EACH #NSFW
PHOTO: COURTESY OF FELD ENTERTAINMENT Monster Jam at PPG Paints Arena
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TUE., FEB. 28

THEATER • DOWNTOWN

Lucy Loves Desi: A Funny Thing

Happened On the Way to the Sitcom 7:30 p.m. Byham Theater. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $25-50. trustarts.org

THU., MARCH 2

KIDS • UPTOWN

Discover why “no dream is too big” at PPG Paints Arena when Disney on Ice presents Into the Magic. Watch as Elsa, Moana, Mickey Mouse, and other animated characters carve up the rink. Expect theatrical routines of classic Disney tunes from Beauty and the Beast and gravity-defying magic carpet rides from Aladdin. New Disney films will also appear, so prepare to be wowed by performances from recent hits such as Frozen and Coco. 7 p.m. Continues through March 5. PPG Paints Arena. 1001 Fifth Ave., Downtown. $26-135. ppgpaintsarena.com

FRI., MARCH 3

CONVENTION • DOWNTOWN

Pittsburgh Home & Garden Show

10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through March 12. David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $4-10, free for kids under 6. pghhome.com/phgs

PARTY • STRIP DISTRICT

History Uncorked: A Beautiful Night in the Neighborhood. 6:30-11 p.m. Heinz History Center. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Tickets on sale Jan. 30. 21 and over. heinzhistorycenter.org

FILM • BETHEL PARK

Horror Realm Con 2023. 5-10 p.m. Continues through March 5. Crown Plaza Hotel. 164 Fort Couch Road, Bethel Park. $15-40, free for kids 10 and under with paying adult. horrorrealmcon.com

THEATER • NORTH SIDE

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 8 p.m. Continues through March 12. New Hazlett Theater. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $19-39. newhazletttheater.org/events

SAT., MARCH 4

MUSIC • OAKLAND

Sound Series: Bill Callahan with special guest Pascal Kerong’A. 8 p.m. Doors at 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-20. warhol.org

THU., MARCH 9

LIT • OAKLAND

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures presents Ibram X. Kendi. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. 4440 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25. pittsburghlectures.culturaldistrict.org

DANCE • DOWNTOWN

Le Patin Libre. 8 p.m. Continues through March 11. UPMC Rink at PPG Place. 100 Three PPG Place, Downtown. $15-70. trustarts.org

FRI., MARCH 10

BOXING • NORTH SIDE

Donnybrook 2023. 7-11 p.m. Pittsburgh’s Grand Hall at the Priory. 614 Pressley St., North Side. $27.50-100. donnybrook2023.ticketleap.com

FRI. MAR 10 FEBSAT. 11

MUSIC • NORTH SIDE

Adam Green, singer-songwriter, filmmaker, and one-half of the indie group Moldy Peaches, brings his protean talents to the The Andy Warhol Museum as part of Sound Series. In addition to an acoustic set, Green will screen his animated film MDVL: 1,000 Years of Dark Ages, described as a 45-minute surrealist journey into “a plant orgy, mandatory corneal implants, a crusade to Silicon Valley, and the future world becoming medieval again,” among other things. Stick around for a Q&A with Green and the other filmmakers. 7:30 p.m. Doors at 7 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $12-15. warhol.org

WRESTLING • UPTOWN

WWE Friday Night Smackdown. 7:45 p.m. PPG Paints Arena. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $20-550. ppgpaintsarena.com

MUSIC • DOWNTOWN

Soul Sessions: Meshell Ndegeocello. 8 p.m. August Wilson African American Cultural Center. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $68. awaacc.org

SAT., MARCH 11

OCCULT • MONROEVILLE

3 Rivers Psychic Fair 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Comfort Inn Conference Center. 699 Rodi Road, Wilkins Township. $5. 3riverspf.com

THEATER • SOUTH SIDE

Native Gardens. 5:30 p.m. Continues through April 2. City Theatre. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $20-66. citytheatrecompany.org

SUN., MARCH 12

MUSIC • DOWNTOWN

Black Violin. 7 p.m. Byham Theater. 101 6 St., Downtown. $37-57. trustarts.org

MON., MARCH 13

LIT • OAKLAND

Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures: Ruth Ozeki. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $18-39. pittsburghlectures. culturaldistrict.org

20 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
THE BIG WINTER EVENTS GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19
PHOTO: COURTESY OF SIREN’S CALL PR Meshell Ndegeocello at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center PHOTO: COURTESY OF KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER Neighbor to Neighbor at Kelly Strayhorn Theater

SUN. MAR 19

SAT., MARCH 14

MUSIC • MCKEES ROCKS

International Anime Music Festival Tour.

6:30 p.m. Roxian Theatre. 425 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks. $43-130. iamf.live

FRI., MARCH 17

FEST • MONROEVILLE

Pittsburgh Arts & Crafts Spring Fever Festival 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 19. Monroeville Convention Center. 209 Mall Blvd., Monroeville. $3-6. familyfestivals.com/spring-fever-festival

FILM • LAWRENCEVILLE

Pittsburgh Japanese Film Festival brings two weeks of nothing but classic and contemporary Japanese films to Row House Cinema. The screened films will be from a variety of genres, so there’s something for everyone, cinephile or otherwise. Scratch that Akira Kurosawa film off your watchlist,

check out a coming-of-age flick, or laugh along to a new-release animated film. One of the most prominent Asian film festivals in the Rust Belt, the festival promises a proper overview of “Japan’s innovative and prolific film industry.” Showtimes vary. Continues through March 30. Row House Cinema. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $49-84. jffpgh.org

DANCE • NORTH SIDE

Rediscover. 8 p.m. Continues through March 19. New Hazlett Theater. 6 Allegheny Square East, Downtown. $24-34. newhazletttheater.org

SUN., MARCH 19

KIDS • DOWNTOWN

Big Bubble Bonanza 11 a.m. Continues through March 20. Byham Theater. 101 6 St., Downtown. $12. trustarts.org

MUSIC • OAKLAND

The Killers. 7:30 p.m. Petersen Events Center. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. $78-604. peterseneventscenter.com

now at wyep.org

21 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023
Contact Us! 412 682 7000 515 S. Aiken Ave, Suite 100 Pittsburgh, PA 15232 mozartrents com info@mozartrents.com
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PHOTO: OLIVIA BEE The Killers at Petersen Events Center

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public Auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy the lien at 3200 Park Manor Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 on February 8th at 1:15pm.

2245 Shawyhane Crawford and 3245 Michael Miller. The auction will be listed as advertised on www.storagetreasures.com.

Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at the location indicated: 902 Brinton Rd Pittsburgh, Pa 15221. February 8th 2023, at 1:30p. Lolita Chrisler 1165, Noranne Yarbough 3027, Shaquana Grant 3049, Chimere Moore 3164, Bijani Davis 3189, Shelly Nowlin 3200, Tammy Casteel 3203, James Poole 3083. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com.

Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at the location indicated: 1005 E Entry Drive Pittsburgh PA 15216, February 8, 2023 at 11:30 AM. Jeffrey Unger 4124. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at the location indicated: 880 Saw Mill Run Blvd, Pittsburgh PA 15226 February 8, 2023, at 1:15 PM.

1070 Melissa Lucente, 1091 Henry Reid, 1127 Amy Vicario, 2126 Robert Pruett, 2155 Clayton Holloway, 2163 Shaquay Lowry, 2185 Bessiejay Taylor, 3052 Montrey Rasin, 3074 Soel Pineda, 3085 Breanna Venable, 3121 Eduardo Rodriguez-Santana, 3158 Bethany Vega, 3261 Denise Williams, 4038 Christopher Green, 4186 Johnathan Etienne, 4189 Chris Zimmerman, 4236 Aesha Jones. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com.

Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at the location indicated: 7535 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15208, 11:00am February 08, 2023. 2099 Dinisha Smith; 6038 Carletta Byford and 6084 Umoja Shaw. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at the location indicated: 6400 Hamilton Ave, Pittsburgh PA 15206 February 8, 2023 at 1:45 PM. 2020 Thomas Apitsch , 2056 Jenn Bakal, 3009 Robert Parham, 3052 Moses Marquis Nelson, 3060 Cetia Carter, 3066 Ashley Rivers, 3074 Robert Parham, 4052 Jazmine Jones. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at 110 Kisow Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 on February 8th, 2023 at 11:15 am. Stephanie Padilla 413, Sheraden Wright 462. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell the contents of leased spaces to satisfy Extra Space’s lien at the location indicated: 700 E Carson St, Pittsburgh PA 15203 on February 8, 2023 at 12:15 PM. Unit 2005 Michael Martin, Unit 2018 Sage Velasquez, Unit 2143 Lolesha Clark, Unit 3011 Chavonne Tigney, and Unit 4056 Justin Bock. The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com.

Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

McKean

A.M.

22 WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM
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SUBOXONE TREATMENT Professional and private setting Fee for service Southside area (412) 681-1406 We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on January 16, 2022, at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Bellefield Entrance Lobby, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on February 7, 2023, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION of the SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS VARIOUS BUILDINGS • Water Cooler Replacement Phase 6 • Plumbing and Electrical Primes VARIOUS BUILDINGS • Carbon Monoxide Detectors Phase V • Mechanical and Electrical Primes PGH. SCHILLER 6-8 • Finish Floor Replacement and Miscellaneous Work (REBID) • General Primes ONLY PGH. STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT CENTER • Elevator Construction & Renovations (REBID) • Electrical Primes ONLY PGH. CARMALT PREK-8 • Window Replacement and Envelope Repair (REBID) • Electrical Primes ONLY
We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Project Manual and Drawings will
purchase
Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration
prevailing
for: OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION of the SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS PGH STERRETT CLASSICAL ACADEMY, PGH FULTON PREK-5, PGH. LINCOLN PREK-5, PGH. DILWORTH K-5 AND PGH LINDEN K-5 • Whiteboard Installations • General Primes PGH. PERRY HIGH SCHOOL • PA System Upgrades • Electrical Primes
be available for
on January 23, 2022, at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127
Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00
and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.
Building, Bellefield Entrance Lobby, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on February 14, 2023, until 2:00 P.M., local
time

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF GRANGER, DARIA, DECEASED OF PITTSBURGH, PA

Daria Granger, deceased of Pittsburgh, PA No. 022207479 of 2022. Dennis Brunner, Adm., 206 Santa Fe Drive, Bethel Park, PA 15102. Or to D. Scott Lautner, Esquire. 68 Old Clairton Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236.

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF MINJOCK, JOHN H., DECEASED OF FORWARD TOWNSHIP, PA

John H. Minjock, deceased of Forward Township, PA No. 022207478 of 2022. Cindy L. Minjock, Ext., 4163 Miracle Ridge Road, Monongahela, PA 15063. Or to D. Scott Lautner, Esquire. 68 Old Clairton Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15236.

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF WARNER, BEATRICE J., DECEASED OF PLEASANT HILLS, PA

Beatrice J. Warner, deceased of Pleasant Hills, PA No. 022206261.

Donna M. Kuhn, Ext., 220 Tiffany Drive, North Huntingdon, PA 15642. Or to D. Scott Lautner, Esquire. 68 Old Clairton Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236.

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF GUTHRIE, VIRGINIA L., DECEASED OF SWANTON, MD

Virginia L. Guthrie, deceased of Swanton, MD No. 022207110 of 2022. Audra Ihrig, Ext., 3616 Oakleaf Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227. Or to D. Scott Lautner, Esquire. 68 Old Clairton Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236.

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF CRAWFORD, JACQUELINE H., DECEASED OF PLEASANT HILLS, PA

Jacqueline H. Crawford, deceased of Pleasant Hills, PA No. 022207894.

Michael H. Crawford, Ext. 251 Colleen Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Or to D. Scott Lautner, Esquire. 68 Old Clairton Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236.

ESTATE NOTICE ESTATE OF HIGGINS, JEAN M., DECEASED OF PITTSBURGH, PA

Jean M. Higgins deceased of Pittsburgh, PA No. 022300145 of 2023. Andrew Higgins, Adm., 310 Jacob Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15210

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF MUELLER, RICHARD L., DECEASED OF CARNEGIE, PA

Richard L. Mueller, deceased of Carnegie, PA No. 022207444 of 2022. Kathleen Wallace, Ext., 202 Quarry Drive, West Newton, PA 15089. Or to D. Scott Lautner, Esquire. 68 Old Clairton Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15236.

FINANCIAL

SAVE YOUR HOME! Are you behind paying your MORTGAGE? Denied a Loan Modification? Is the bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line NOW for Help 1-855-4395853 Mon-Fri 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Sat: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm(all times Pacific) (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL

Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

plans ...

23 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 1, 2023
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