December 8, 2021 — Pittsburgh City Paper

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Planned Parenthood Pennsylvania Advocates holds a rally at Schenley Plaza for National Bans Off Our Bodies Day of Action on Wed., Dec. 1.

DEC. 8-15, 2021 VOLUME 30 + ISSUE 49 CELEBRATING 30 YEARS SERVING PITTSBURGH SINCE NOV. 6, 1991

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COVER PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM READ THE STORY ON PAGE 4


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FIRST PERSON ESSAY

BEARING WITNESS BY DANIELLE INEZ WALKER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HERE WEREN’T ENOUGH

characters to type out the feelings trapped in the pit of my stomach as I watched my timeline fill with posts about the tragedy. I had spent the better part of the postmidnight hours scrolling through tweets under the Astroworld Festival hashtag. It felt like a fever dream all of humanity shared in those 72 hours following the November concert in Houston, Texas. Concertgoers had compressed toward the stage and caused a crowd surge, leading to mass injuries and deaths. Each viral post, comment, and story, adding more pieces to a puzzle I wish we didn’t have to put together. There were hundreds of videos I couldn’t bring myself to play. Later, reports showed 10 people died, and countless others were hospitalized, including several people age 18 and younger.

I didn’t need to view collapsed concertgoers or EMTs rendering chest compressions to imagine how helpless onlooking attendees must’ve felt. I couldn’t help thinking out loud, “These people will need so much help sorting through the grief of this.” We all experience death and grief, but there is something about witnessing sudden death that shatters who you are. You are never the same, no matter how much you want to be. I was 14 years old when my family was involved in a double-fatal car crash. I distinctly remember hearing an engine getting closer and a lone shard of glass moving perfectly in slow motion across my line of sight. I remember the silence after impact and being relieved that all of my family members in the car were alive, though badly injured. Overwhelmed, I exited the vehicle, I took a few steps forward and looked left to view the other vehicles involved.

It was a sight that I prayed I would forget. There were two people in a car that didn’t make it, and I immediately felt my knees give. My cousin consoled me as best she could, but I remember repeating, “They’re gone” until she sat me down on a set of nearby steps. At 14, I knew these perfect strangers were pieces of the fabric of other people’s lives and, in an instant, they were gone. It didn’t matter that I didn’t know them. They mattered. I was the least physically injured of my family, but I was the only one who had seen the bodies. I was discharged from the hospital after staying overnight, but I physically felt disjointed. I felt empty, yet heavy. I was afraid to get in the car to ride home. I’d always had my own room, but I remember wanting to be wedged between my parents, like a baby. I was afraid to sleep alone, afraid that the bodies I’d seen would replay in my dreams.

I would ask my family to turn the TV off, afraid the news would yet again cover our story or that I’d have to hear the victims’ names and see their faces. I forced myself out of a normal circadian cycle and became almost nocturnal. I had no idea that what I was going through was a response to mental trauma. I just knew that I wasn’t myself. I remember bursting into a fit of tears while watching an episode of my favorite cartoon, clueless as to why. A lonely numbness and heaviness cycled, taking turns that entire summer. I slowly began to hermit myself, choosing solitude to cope. When people on social media discussed the Astroworld tragedy, they talked about it like it was a coffee table conversation and not in ways to support the thousands of people who had just witnessed a traumatic life event. As both a musician and a survivor of trauma, the event triggered the painful memories of my adolescence. CONTINUES ON PG. 6

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PublicSource and Pittsburgh City Paper partnered to co-publish this first-person essay.

“IT TOOK A WHILE TO REALIZE THE EVENT I WITNESSED HAD PERMANENTLY REWIRED MY BRAIN. THIS WAS THE NEW NORMAL.” CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Danielle Inez Walker

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER DECEMBER 8 - DECEMBER 15, 2021

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BEARING WITNESS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 5

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Danielle Inez Walker

The following school year, I’d only made it a month before it became too much for me to attend classes in person. My parents were so patient with me and never made decisions concerning me without asking how I felt first, but therapy wasn’t negotiable. They understood I needed more help than they could provide. At first, I resisted, saying, “I don’t want to go. I’m not crazy.” This was a misconception I held, not knowing my therapist would save my life 100 times over. I was reluctant to try therapy because I thought I would be on a couch with a condescending person gliding their pen and pad over my hurt. My mom assured me that if I didn’t like the first therapist, we’d keep searching until we found one I did like. But by the end of the first hour, I was so comfortable with the therapist she’d found, I stayed under her care until she closed her practice many years later. A super heroine of a Black woman who gently guided me through the burdens of my mind and confirmed my parents suspicions; she confirmed I was suffering with PTSD, an anxiety disorder, and depression.

“I WAS RELUCTANT TO TRY THERAPY BECAUSE I THOUGHT I WOULD BE ON A COUCH WITH A CONDESCENDING PERSON GLIDING THEIR PEN AND PAD OVER MY HURT.“ In therapy, some sessions felt like a conversation with a friend, others felt like immovable boulders, but that chair and room helped me in so many ways. There would be times when I felt like I didn’t even need to go because I’d had a string of good days. No sleeping during the day, no panic attacks, no sudden onset of heaviness, no hiding away in my bedroom. I thought therapy fixed me. It was a normal thought for a teenager to have, but, surely, the next blindside wave of depression would knock me back to reality.

It took a while to realize the event I witnessed had permanently rewired my brain. This was the new normal. Therapy wasn’t going to be a six-month certificate program. It’d be a lifelong necessity. It took more than therapy to coax me out of my bedroom. Looking back, I realized how blessed I was with the family, church family, and friends I had. I didn’t want to talk much then, but I had so many cousins, aunties, and family, by faith, who simply let me sit with them in gentle and care-filled silence. There were times when

my anxiety wanted me to stay in bed or leave a place early, and they never pushed me beyond my level of comfort. I had many safe, familial places where I and my feelings were welcomed. They let me share what I was ready to and didn’t prod. I know I was totally covered in love and, without that, I don’t think I would have made it. Trauma recovery is a pendulum. I would go from feeling everything so intensely to feeling nothing — there are still times when I wish to emote, but can’t. I would have extended periods free from episodes and then hit a two-month downward spiral. I would go from laughing and enjoying a social gathering to feeling isolated and alone. It is absolutely devastating to go through the mental and emotional whiplash; you’re simply along for the ride. Losing adolescence and early adulthood to recovery made me feel behind on an imaginary life clock. I desperately wanted to feel a sense of normalcy like I thought the lives of the people around me had. The pressure I’d placed on myself to keep from “falling behind in life” kept me in a vicious cycle of stagnancy and CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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BEARING WITNESS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 6

“LOSING ADOLESCENCE AND EARLY ADULTHOOD TO RECOVERY MADE ME FEEL BEHIND ON AN IMAGINARY LIFE CLOCK.”

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Danielle Inez Walker

disappointment. I would go from staying on top of my college coursework to falling behind and sometimes failing a course. I would be afraid to speak up for myself with friends, at work, or dating because I didn’t want people to think less of me, not ready to share my struggles with the people who could possibly help see me through. Trauma responses, fear, and doubt easily took the driver’s seat, and would have control for almost nine years. I grew weary of the ways I set myself up for failure. I had to have my moment of realization. Stillness is as beneficial to my mental health as movement is. Once I realized I had to operate within my mental capacity and means, things got easier. All the dreams I held, I could still accomplish. I just had to work to release unrealistic expectations, use discernment, learn patience, and carry grace for myself. At 30, depressive and anxiety episodes still happen, as do some of my triggers, but I still hold so much gratitude in my heart. I am purpose-filled and get to use the full

spectrum of my musical and intellectual gifts to create a life I dreamed about, in spite of my traumas. I get to be the embodiment of love, compassion, and support. I have a light in my eyes, and a desire to live, despite the many moments where I had neither. Each time I hear, “You carry it well,” I want to reply with, “I wish I didn’t have to carry it at all.” However, my desire is to use the transparency of my journey to help someone find the inner strength to keep fighting on another day. My unwavering hope is that we can find ways to be more constructive, supportive and mindful of those who are going through life’s invisible pains. Whether we are speaking about those who witnessed the tragedy at Astroworld or those who are navigating a mental health crisis, I hope that we can be more mindful of the support, regard and care to those in trauma recovery. Be kind. You never know what the soul next to you is wading through.

Danielle Inez Walker is a musician, songwriter, producer, and teaching artist from Homewood. Learn more at inez.us. THIS ESSAY WAS MADE POSSIBLE WITH FINANCIAL SUPPORT THROUGH THE PITTSBURGH MEDIA PARTNERSHIP

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER DECEMBER 8 - DECEMBER 15, 2021

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Hazelwood Green in 2019

.NEWS.

NEW VISIONS BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN DEVELOPMENT PLANS for

Hazelwood Green, originally called Almono, were proposed, the vision for the large project at the former industrial site in Hazelwood was clear: a “Complete Streets” office park and multiuse housing development designed for high-quality use by pedestrians, cyclists, public transit users, and drivers. After the infrastructure for the development was complete, the 178-acre Hazelwood Green had a lot of that, including high-quality bike infrastructure, streets designed for slow driving, safe pedestrian crossings, and wide sidewalks, and a rerouted bus route to serve the area. There were even somewhat controversial plans for automated shuttles to carry passengers between the development and Oakland.

Hazelwood Green was heralded as the region’s first Complete Streets neighborhood, and it was praised as a “world-class sustainable development.” And in some ways, it still is those things. But recent moves by Pittsburgh’s incoming mayor and changes to Hazelwood Green’s zoning have brought some uncertainty to that vision of an environmentally friendly, vibrant, and sustainable neighborhood. As first reported by Technical.ly Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Mayor-elect Ed Gainey announced on Nov. 24 that when he takes office in January, he will place the city’s Mon-Oakland Connector project on hold. The project proposes improved infrastructure from Hazelwood through Junction Hollow and up to Oakland, with

the eventual addition of potentially autonomous shuttle vehicles to carry passengers between the two neighborhoods. The connector has generated opposition over the years from residents in Greenfield’s FourMile Run neighborhood and public-transit advocates, but proponents have said it’s necessary to service the growing job sector in Hazelwood Green and connect it to the talent at Carnegie Mellon University. With the Mon-Oakland Connect project on shaky ground, that would likely deprive Hazelwood Green of an additional alternative-transit connection. The new neighborhood is currently served by Port Authority of Allegheny County bus route 57, as well as the 93 and the 56, which stop at the entrance to Hazelwood Green, giving passengers a short walk into the development. CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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NEW VISIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

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There is also a bike trail running through Hazelwood Green that connects to the Jail Trail multi-use path that runs all the way to Downtown. But part of the overall vision and success of Hazelwood Green is to provide several high-quality transit options that aren’t personal vehicles to the neighborhood. The possible loss of the Mon-Oakland Connector isn’t the only setback for alternative transit at Hazelwood Green. On Nov. 23, Pittsburgh’s City Planning Commission approved a request by the Hazelwood Green developers that could create as many as 5,500 additional surface parking spaces in the neighborhood. This would nearly triple the amount of parking, though the additional spaces are said to be temporary. These plans also include lowering building height limits, which could open up the possibility of making Hazelwood Green less dense, making it harder to sustain walkability. Laura Wiens is the director at Pittsburghers for Public Transit, an advocacy organization that has been critical of the Mon-Oakland Connector. She said it’s common consensus that adding more parking spaces brings in more cars, and that is antithetical to Hazelwood Green’s vision. “It seems concerning that at a site that was looking to be a beacon of climate change policy, help to improve air quality, be a responsibly developed neighborhood, and improve alternative transit use, would think to develop it as if it is a similar to suburban community,” said Wiens. “I think that everyone would be critical about that.” In an October meeting, some Hazelwood residents echoed this sentiment. Resident Eric Day said increasing parking and lowering density is “against the fundamental beginning of this entire development,” according to WESA. “This development cannot support individual trips in automobiles.” Wiens said it would be better to expand public transit service into Hazelwood

Green, and her group has been advocating for extending Port Authority’s 75 bus into the neighborhood. “Residents have been demanding a real look of what this development means,” said Wiens. “It would be more effective and efficient and sustainable to use our existing transportation resources rather than build something that would become obsolete.” When the Mon-Oakland Connector, to which Wiens was referencing, was being championed by the administration of Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, the city was only projecting that 1,244 people would use it on its opening day. That is just a fraction compared to the potential drivers that would use 5,500 additional parking spaces. This is one reason why Wiens thinks expanding public transit is the best option to help fulfill Hazelwood Green’s vision. Todd Stern, a managing director for U3 Advisors, which is advising on Hazelwood Green’s development, said at the October meeting that the developers have no interest in undermining the good work and vision of Hazelwood Green. However, he added he doesn’t believe there is enough demand to bring more mass transit to the site just yet. According to PublicSource, at the November planning commission meeting, the developers said the additional parking is necessary to attract residents and businesses to Hazelwood Green, and had no incentive to create more parking than absolutely needed. Stern said in October that the decision to add in temporary parking spaces and lower building heights is just an interim decision, and the eventual goal for Hazelwood Green is to boost public transit and alternative transit. “We’re talking about interim solutions that are necessary to help us kickstart development activity,” said Stern, according to WESA. “But ultimately, we’re going to have to find mass transit solutions to really enable growth in this region.”

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“I BELIEVE THAT YOU SHOULD JUST BE UNAPOLOGETICALLY WHO YOU ARE, WEAR WHATEVER MAKES YOU FEEL GOOD, WHATEVER MAKES YOU FEEL CONFIDENT, THAT’S WHAT YOU SHOULD BE WEARING.”

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Angel Ford, CEO of Lavish Lamb

.BLACK-LED COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT.

A LAVISH LIFE BY DANI JANAE // DANIJANAE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

ANY PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO

fall and winter to dress up in their best fashions. The cold presents an opportunity to combine and layer pieces that you normally wouldn’t put on together if the temperatures were higher. For Angel Ford of Lavish Lamb, style, regardless of the season, is about dressing the way you want, so you can be your truest self. “I believe that you should just be unapologetically who you are, wear whatever makes you feel good, whatever makes you feel confident, that’s what you should be wearing,” she says. “While not all sizes are created equal, I believe all styles are created equal. You should definitely wear whatever makes you feel the best and

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whatever makes you feel confident because then you’re projecting that confidence out into the world.”

LAVISH LAMB lavishlamb.com

Ford was born and raised in Pittsburgh, splitting her time between Homewood and Garfield. Growing up, she saw her biological mother work as a seamstress for a boutique located on Centre Avenue in the 1980s. This served as an early inspiration for her. Watching her mother made her want to learn, but she didn’t get into sewing herself until a few years ago.

“I took a free six-week sewing class at the East End Cooperative Ministries in 2017, and it was just a free class that I’ve always wanted to do. Plus, my granddaughter was getting ready to be born at the time,” she says. “So it just seemed like the perfect fit. And when I took that class, I guess they saw something in me and they were like, ‘Hey, would you be interested in starting your own business? We’ll pay for your paperwork and help you get your LLC established.’ And so, that’s what they did.” Her business was established in January 2018, and started with Ford making head wraps and turbans for her granddaughter, who has alopecia. The line, which she started in honor of her granddaughter, named Ava Monroe, includes

bright, colorful headpieces that can be worn for any occasion. Ford says she also has alopecia, so the topic of hair is a tender subject for her. She felt for her granddaughter’s struggle and started sewing the headpieces by hand and making them available for purchase by others. In 2020, she decided to pivot her brand to include clothing and other accessories. If you visit the Lavish Lamb website, the Ava Monroe line is one of the first things you’ll see. Then, you’ll have the option to either Shop All or Shop Accessories. Accessories include everything from statement earrings to handbags. The Ava Monroe collection now also includes cloth face masks in stylish prints.


“I BELIEVE THAT YOU SHOULD JUST BE UNAPOLOGETICALLY WHO YOU ARE ...” Ford doesn’t have a physical storefront and sews her Ava Monroe collection from her home workshop. Right now, Ford sources her clothing for her online store from a list of about 500 vendors who are spread out nationally, but she hopes to work with some local talent in the future. The clothing includes plus-sized offerings, something that can be hard to find in local boutiques. “Fashion is just very important to me because it makes me feel good about myself. There is not the best selection out there in terms of plus-size clothes, everything is pretty much fast fashion,” says Ford. “It’s just not enough — it’s not enough color, it’s not enough variety, it’s not enough style for me. And so, that’s what I really want to bring to the table.” Fast fashion refers to clothes and accessories produced at high rates for low cost. Often associated with retailers like H&M, Forever 21, and Old Navy, the fast fashion industry has come under fire for human rights violations, as products are often made in overseas shops with exploitative worker conditions. It has also become an environmental concern, as products that are not sold or quickly discarded by consumers end up in landfills. As a result, shoppers are becoming more conscientious, leading to the rise of

“sustainable fashion.” Part of this movement is spending more money on higher quality, longer lasting pieces that are also more unique, giving you a look that can be original and make you stand-out. This aspect is important for Ford, who says she tries to abide by that principle. While there are unique fashion pieces that will set you apart from the average consumer, there are also style essentials that Ford says every woman should have. “A blazer because that can be dressed up or down. A pair of pumps or flats — a pair of high-quality flats can be a necessity,” she says. “For my more established dressers, either a statement necklace or earrings. I don’t recommend wearing both at the same time. A good pair of fitted jeans. That’s important because those could easily be dressed up or down, and a nice dress shirt.” She says she has just about all of these pieces in her personal wardrobe, and includes the suggestion of a good quality leather jacket, in multiple colors if you can find them. What’s next for Ford and Lavish Lamb? “In my mind, I would like to design my own clothes and have them manufactured at a higher level,” says Ford. “I would like to have a Target brand and then I would like to have a higher-end brand for women.”

Follow staff writer Dani Janae on Twitter @figwidow PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER DECEMBER 8 - DECEMBER 15, 2021

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.ART.

VOICES FROM SERBIA BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AMONG WOMEN: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM SERBIA Continues through Sun., Jan. 9, 2022. 937 Gallery. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. amongwomenserbia.org

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Follow a&e editor Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP

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CP PHOTO: REGE BEHE

Jan Beatty

.LITERATURE.

AMERICAN BADASS BY REGE BEHE // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE COVER PHOTO shows a young girl

smiling as she points a toy gun at the camera. At first glance, the book’s title seems to be American Badass. But the correct name of Jan Beatty’s memoir is American Bastard. Both titles ring true. Beatty, a poet and writer from Regent Square who was adopted just after birth, calls herself a bastard throughout the book. And the sobriquet “badass” exemplifies Beatty’s determination and doggedness in searching for her birth parents. “I knew what the cover was going to be if I ever did this book,” Beatty says of her memoir, “and I knew it was going to be red and black, and I knew what the name was going to be. I just had a vision of it, and I had this photograph from many years ago of me with a toy shotgun. I was six years old and already in high tops and shooting people, so my personality was already there.” American Bastard (Red Hen Press) is the oft-harrowing story of Beatty’s search for family and identity while navigating life as an adoptee. Beatty recounts how she felt lost through much of her childhood,

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“AS AN ADOPTEE, YOU’RE ERASED. YOUR HISTORY, YOUR NAME, EVERYTHING IS ERASED.” constantly afraid of being sent back to Roselia Asylum and Maternity Hospital in Pittsburgh’s Hill District. The story took years to germinate and unfold, if not understand. About 20 years ago, Beatty wrote a story for Creative Nonfiction about being adopted, but “I couldn’t keep going,” she says. “I was already in therapy, but I needed to work on it more in therapy because there was a lot of emotional stuff in the book. And I needed to mature also as a writer because I didn’t know how to handle the material, especially in prose.” For Beatty, being adopted came to mean never being accepted or believed. When a peeping tom climbed a ladder to her second-floor bedroom, the incident was initially dismissed as being a creation of her imagination.

“As an adoptee, you’re erased,” she says. “Your history, your name, everything is erased. So it’s really hard to be seen at all, and, then, if you have stories people don’t think are real, that’s a problem.” To isolate herself, Beatty climbed a ladder to the attic of the family home and closed the hatch behind her. There, amid boxes and rolls of pink insulation, she lost herself in books, preferring the Hardy Boys over Nancy Drew because Carolyn Keene’s character was “too nice and they were putting her in dresses,” she says. “I’m sitting on 2x4s and bracing myself up there,” Beatty adds about her attic refuge, “but I just needed to get the hell away from everybody and read and make little notes. I think that was me writing and saving myself because I had to live somewhere else because I couldn’t really live where I was.”

She says it wasn’t that it was horrible, but that it “didn’t have anything to do with me.” After meeting her birth mother, Beatty sought her birth father. Going on scant clues — Beatty only knew that he had played hockey for the minor league Pittsburgh Hornets and was the team’s best player — she eventually discovered Bill Ezinicki was a golf pro in Massachusetts who had been a member of three Stanley Cup winning teams during his professional career. He was also known as a ferocious competitor, willing to doff his gloves and fight. “You never know what you’re going to find,” Beatty says, “and I did ambush him, so he didn’t have time to prepare. I got a view of him as a human, and I really liked him.” But two weeks later, Ezinicki called to say he wanted nothing more to do with his daughter. About 10 years ago, Beatty traveled to her father’s birthplace in Winnipeg, Manitoba in Canada to get a sense of his life and her heritage. As a child, Beatty had been especially competitive at racquetball and softball, and she grew to believe that was due to her father’s athleticism.


American Bastard by Jan Beatty

But the connection she made in Winnipeg, where she got a private tour of a Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum to view some of her father’s memorabilia, was even deeper. “Before I knew about my birth father or that I was half Canadian, I had already been riding trains back and forth across Canada, maybe four times,” Beatty says. “That’s inexplicable. Who does that? I was just driven to run around Canada before I knew, and that’s why, when I found out, everything made sense and all my history of being an athlete made sense, and fighting everyone made sense.” While Beatty wanted to tell her story, the gist of American Bastard is about what she calls “the big lie, and the big whitewash” of adoption. Families who adopt children are often viewed as saviors, rescuing

kids from lives of neglect. But Beatty believes adoption “is not fair to anyone,” she says. “It’s not fair to the kid because everything is erased, their history is erased. It’s not fair to the adoptive parents, either, because if they’re set up to be saints, which they are, but nobody is, they have to be saints. But they need to be human, and that’s the same with all mothers,” she adds. “There’s this thing that is placed on all women, that they’re either saints or sinners. Let’s just let people be people with their flaws and their good parts,” Beatty says. “Let’s not make everybody a savior because it’s not real. And especially for an adoptee, you need something that is real because everything real has been taken away from them, and all they have is this lie about how they got there.”

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER DECEMBER 8 - DECEMBER 15, 2021

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SEVEN DAYS IN PITTSBURGH

IRL / IN REAL LIFE EVENT VIRTUAL / STREAMING OR ONLINE-ONLY EVENT HYBRID / MIX OF IN REAL LIFE AND ONLINE EVENT

PHOTO: COURTESY OF TEKKO

^ Tekko

THU., DEC. 9 TALK • VIRTUAL Get a sense of what the Pittsburgh Racial Justice Summit has in store for 2022 with an online pre-event. The Racial Justice Town Hall is part of what’s described as a “multicultural initiative of the Black and White Reunion,” and primarily addresses issues affecting the Black community. The town hall will present two panels on disability justice and environmental justice, respectively, with several experts speaking on these topics. The event will also have ASL interpreters and live transcription. 6-8:30 p.m. Takes place over Zoom. Registration required. pittsburghracialjusticesummit.org

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EVENT • IRL Head to the David. L. Lawrence Convention Center this weekend to celebrate all things anime. Tekko, the region’s premier anime convention, is a four-day convention where anime fans can dress up and take in all the event has to offer. The convention will feature cosplay, fashion, music, vendors, and special guests who have appeared in anime projects. The event will be COVID-cautionary by requiring either proof of vaccination or a negative test result, as well as mask-wearing. 2 p.m. Continues through Sun., Dec. 12. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $50-150. tekko.us

FRI., DEC. 10 EVENT • IRL If you’re a pop culture hound, you won’t want to miss Steel City Con at the Monroeville Convention Center. Meet some of your favorite celebrities, artists, and voice actors from sci-fi and fantasy television shows, films, and video games. This year, meet several actors from The Goonies, including Sean Astin, Corey Feldman, and Ke Huy Quan; Peter Weller of Robocop; and many more. You can also meet notable comedians and pro wrestlers. 10 a.m. Continues through Sun., Dec. 12. 209 Mall Plaza Blvd., Monroeville. $23-125. steelcitycon.com

MARKET • IRL Shop from a variety of local makers during the Workshop Holiday Pop Up. The market will feature 12 vendors, including several from Wilkinsburg, where the studio is located. Besides finding unique gifts, guests can also enjoy DIY projects like mini-wreath making, as well as treats and hot coffee. 3-9 p.m. 321 Pennwood Ave., Wilkinsburg. Free. workshop-pgh.square.site

SAT., DEC. 11 EVENT • IRL Have a happy and safe holiday at the Heinz History Center this month. Socially distanced photos with Santa will be available to take inside the Center’s A Very Merry Pittsburgh


FEATURED ON INK MASTER :ANGELS

PYRAMID

TATTOO & Body Piercing

PHOTO: LUCY FRIEDMAN-BELL/ COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH CUTLTURAL TRUST

^ Siegfried Tieber in Sixty-Seven Keys

exhibition during Saturdays with Santa. Saint Nick will visit every Saturday leading up to Sat, Dec. 25, seated in an exact replica of the chair from Kaufmann’s Santaland. The exhibition will also allow guests to explore Pittsburgh’s holiday traditions through the decades. 11 a.m.2 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Included with regular admission. heinzhistorycenter.org

SUN., DEC. 12 BENEFIT • IRL Threadbare Cider is hosting a Cat Café event benefiting the Humane Animal Rescue of Pittsburgh. Come meet some adorable, adoptable cats from Humane Animal Rescue and maybe leave with a new friend. There will also be pizza, cider, and cocktails to enjoy while you get to know these curious felines. A portion of food and drink sales will benefit the shelter. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 1291 Spring Garden Ave., North Side. Free. threadbarecider.com

EVENT • IRL Expand your vinyl collection during the Pittsburgh Record Event at Spirit. Presented by Pittsburgh Record Fest, the afternoon features tons of opportunities to buy, sell, and trade records of all kinds. Find a special gem for yourself, or get some holiday shopping done for the music lover in your life. There will also be DJ sets and drink specials. 2-6 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $3, $10 early admission. All ages. facebook.com/pittsburgh.fest

MON., DEC. 13 MUSIC • IRL Iconic British rock band Genesis heads to PPG Paints Arena as part of The Last Domino? tour. Members Phil Collins, Tony

Banks, and Mike Rutherford will be joined by Nic Collins and Daryl Stuermer to play the band’s decades-spanning hits, including “Invisible Touch,” “I Can’t Dance,” and more. This tour will be the band’s last, according to Phil Collins, so Pittsburgh fans should not miss this show. 8 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Downtown. $75-300. ppgpaintsarena.com

TUE., DEC. 14

Working from Home? Stay up-to-date with the latest news, updated daily at pghcitypaper.com

PYRAMIDTATTOO.COM

BRIDGEVILLE, PA

MUSIC • IRL Experience the most epic alt-metal ballad of the early-aughts live when Evanescence x Halestorm comes to the Petersen Events Center. Best known for their 2003 hit “Bring Me To Life,” Evanescence, the defining project for singer and pianist Amy Lee, released their fifth studio album The Bitter Truth in March. Joining Evanescence is Halestorm, a metal band out of Pennsylvania that also released new music this year. Lilith Czar will serve as the opener. Proof of vaccination or negative test is required within 72 hours of show. 7 p.m. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. $36.50-450. peterseneventscenter.com/events

WED., DEC. 15 MAGIC • IRL Lovers of magic and storytelling should check out Sixty-Seven Keys with Siegfried Tieber. Inspired by the 1913 book The Seven Keys to Baldpate, the latest show at Liberty Magic is described as blurring the line between “the improbable and the impossible,” as Tieber uses his skills to guide the audience through an “unlikely journey” unlocked by a single key selected each night. There will also be “obstacles to overcome” as mysteries unfold during each performance. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Jan. 2, 2022. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40-65. trustarts.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER DECEMBER 8 - DECEMBER 15, 2021

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I’M SICK

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. Chic NYC neighborhood 5. Spoken in a monotonous way 11. Old Indian rule 14. Remove, as part of an image 15. “Let’s beat those guys!” 16. “Woman Power” singer 17. “Step aside, critics, or you’ll get sick!”? 20. Wine classification 21. Perk up 22. Gunts when you’re sick? 27. Wetland bird 28. Characters in a toddler’s book? 29. Hunter’s gear 30. Hard to clean up 31. Press kit sheet 32. Job for a plunger 33. Brain scan, briefly 34. “I’m sick, think about it!”? 38. Some chessplaying programs, e.g. 39. Letters on dreidels 40. City with “dirty feet bars,” for short 43. Bright flash 46. Actress Taylor-Joy 47. Dude in the sticks 48. Cooler brand with a cryptozological name

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49. Dignified sounds of sickness? 51. Yogurt, fruit, and granola treat 53. Who said “the time is always right to do what is right,” initially 54. Wellness achieved after a head cold? 60. Sport ___ 61. Company with a “Become a host” section on its website 62. River through Northern Ireland 63. ‘60s hipster 64. Red marks 65. Cannon of Hollywood

DOWN 1. Building that regularly breaks for recesses: Abbr. 2. “___ pro nobis” 3. Winter warmer 4. Met expectations 5. 3-pointers in the NFL 6. High hit 7. Come ___ price 8. Genre trailblazed by Kraftwerk 9. Canoeing spots 10. Community org. with a pool 11. GPS showings 12. Tees off 13. TV actor Galecki 18. Seek office

19. Tex-Mex brand 22. Chew the fat 23. DH’s stat 24. ___ Verdes (LA suburb) 25. “Here ___ ...” (Old McDonald line) 26. “Ya can’t talk me outta this!” 30. Unimpressed sounds 32. Drink voucher 33. Some lab burners 35. Terry and the Pirates cartoonist Milton 36. Van ___ (LA suburb) 37. Sleight of hand 41. “Ew, gross” 42. Green lights

43. Mineral in chalk 44. Hovel 45. “Gave it my shot” 46. Makes a few changes 47. Split in two 49. Paramecia propellers 50. Health plan selection: Abbr. 52. Way off in the distance 55. Last president of the Reconstruction, initially 56. Compass pt. 57. United States of Al network 58. Strand in a test tube 59. Strong urge LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-20-006469 In re petition of Karina Suzanne Mueller (f/k/a) Karina Suzanne Hauck for change of name to Karina Mueller (a/k/a) Karina Hauck. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 7th day of January, 2022, at 10:00 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for.

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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-21-13686 In re petition of Loraine Rebecca Ziegler for change Of name to Loraine Ziegler Montanye To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 10th day of January, 2022, at 9:30 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER DECEMBER 8 - DECEMBER 15, 2021

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