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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.685.9009 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

pghcitypaper.com PGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

APRIL 10-17, 2019 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 15

Members of the boys and girls junior Three Rivers Rowing Association teams practice on the Allegheny River.

FIRSTSHOT BY JARED WICKERHAM

Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Editorial Designer ABBIE ADAMS Graphic Designers JOSIE NORTON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Marketing and Promotions Coordinator CONNOR MARSHMAN Events and Sponsorship Manager BLAKE LEWIS Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Advertising Sales Assistant TAYLOR PASQUARELLI Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, GAB BONESSO, LISSA BRENNAN, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, CHARLES ROSENBLUM, JESSIE SAGE, STEVE SUCATO Interns JANINE FAUST, XIOLA JENSEN, JARED MURPHY Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2019 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

COVER ILLUSTRATION: VINCE DORSE READ THE STORY ON PAGE 6

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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THE BIG STORY

BOOSTING BUSWAYS How busways can lead Pittsburgh into an equitable public transit future BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ITTSBURGH HAS THE MOST extensive busway system in the entire country. There are about 19 miles of grade-separated, traffic-free busways that spread across three lines throughout Allegheny County. The East Busway, which runs from Downtown to Swissvale, is one of the most efficient non-heavy rail transit corridors in America. When compared to other transit lines in mid-sized Rust Belt cities, the East Busway is arguably the best, carrying around 24,000 riders a day.

CP PHOTO: JARED MURPHY

Herron Busway Station in Polish Hill

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PHOTO: IMAGE COURTESY OF PCRG

A mock-up of how the busways could be marketed, with the Purple Line extending east and the Green Line extending west

But Pittsburghers generally don’t see busways as a unique asset. In fact, many people don’t even know they exist. Most stations are cast-off under bridges or surrounded by blight. Unlike transit stations in cities like Boston or Berlin, most of Pittsburgh’s busway stops lack retail and housing development nearby. The busway lines, East, South, and West, aren’t always seen as worth expanding. When transit proposals are discussed in Pittsburgh, the ideas usually sought after are a light-rail to the airport, building new highways, or even more ludicrous ideas like the hyperloop or ziplines. Local advocates, urban-policy specialists, and public-transit experts are trying to change that. They laud the busways for their importance to the region’s transit, but they see a unique opportunity in Pittsburgh to expand them, increase their marketing, and redevelop the land surrounding their stations. Those changes could reduce traffic, lower greenhouse-gas emissions, decrease cost-of-living expenses for thousands of residents, revitalize neighborhoods, and combat income inequality.

It may sound too good to be true, but increasing affordable and convenient access to the more than 150,000 jobs in Downtown Pittsburgh, not to mention the thousands more that could be created along the busway with redevelopment near several stations, could be gamechanging in terms of fighting poverty.

“They are marketing to the public like they are just regular buses, when they are not.” Proposals exist and advocacy is growing, but backers say making improvements will come down to whether Pittsburgh leaders apply the political will and the desire to boost the

“[THE BUSWAYS] HAVE AMAZING POTENTIAL AND I FEEL LIKE PITTSBURGH ISN’T DOING ENOUGH TO MAXIMIZE THAT.” Christof Spieler is a transit expert who wrote an atlas of America’s public transit systems called Trains, Buses, People. He visited Pittsburgh last year during the Rail~Volution transit conference, and was amazed at the efficiency and practicality of Pittsburgh’s busways, but believes they can be vastly improved. “[The busways] have amazing potential and I feel like Pittsburgh isn’t doing enough to maximize that,” says Speiler.

busways. Will everyone get on board? At the time of their construction in 1977, Pittsburgh’s busways were revolutionary. Utilizing existing right-of-ways from trolley lines and the Pittsburgh Railways Company, the guideways operated like light- or heavy-rail train lines, but with buses instead of rail cars. The South Busway, which runs alongside the Blue light-rail line from Beltzhoover to Overbrook, was completed

first. The East Busway, later renamed the Martin Luther King Jr. East Busway, was completed in 1983 to Wilkinsburg and later extended to Swissvale in 2003. Before the East Busway was completed, travel times from Wilkinsburg to Downtown were about 45 minutes; now it takes about 15 minutes on the busway. In 2000, the West Busway opened and now transports passengers from Carnegie to Elliot in the West End. They are all owned and operated by the Port Authority of Allegheny County. According to the most recent Port Authority figures, average weekday ridership on the busways is about 35,500, which is about 15 percent of weekday ridership. The East Busway alone carries just a bit fewer passengers everyday than both the Red and Blue light-rail lines combined. According to Pittsburgh’s bid for Amazon HQ2, the busways could immediately accommodate up to 60 buses per hour and expand by 200 percent without major capital investments. “The idea that the busway is an inferior thing and that rail is the superior thing, I would disagree with that,” says Spieler. One of the advantages of busways CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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is buses can exit the guideway and ride on regular city streets. Spieler says this allows them to service low-density suburbs and bring in more riders to the busway, where commutes are quick. And since Pittsburgh has experienced and continues to experience suburban sprawl, busways are likely the best way to service the region, says Spieler. Busways also allow for emergency vehicles to skip traffic, something light-rail can’t offer. It’s why the East Busway, which is about nine miles long, can have the high ridership of about 23,600 people a day. For comparison, a nine-mile light rail line in Charlotte only brings in about 16,500 riders a day. Spieler says the simplest way to raise the profile of Pittsburgh’s busways, and potentially increase their already robust ridership figures, is to market them as they were originally intended. He says the Port Authority should rename the East Busway the Purple Line, the South Busway the Yellow Line, and the West Busway the Green Line, and have buses that ride on each busway match those corresponding colors. The reason each busway route starts with P, G, or Y is because each busway was originally assigned the color purple, green or yellow. Spieler says this would indicate busway buses are different than those on other lines. A busway bus only takes 11 minutes to get from Downtown to East Liberty while a car in no traffic takes 15 minutes. Even without branding

and other improvements, Pittsburgh’s busways still outperform other BRT-like systems in the country. Per guideway mile — areas where the buses are completely free of other traffic — Los Angeles busways carry about 877 passengers daily, while Pittsburgh carries about 1,921 passengers. Port Authority spokesperson Adam Brandolph says the agency is supportive of a rebranding effort for the busways. “We are interested in and have already had several discussions about branding our fixed guideways,” says Brandolph. Once a rebrand is complete, Spieler suggests making stations more accessible to pedestrians and people with disabilities. Many stations typically have access only on one side of the busway. Increased access to busway stations should be a development priority too, says Chris Sandvig of the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group (PCRG). He says more stations should be surrounded by dense mixed-use development that combines housing, retail, office space, and amenities; what he calls “transit orientated communities.” “We still have this hangover of a hangover that any development is good development,” says Sandvig about Pittsburgh. “We have extreme transit dependence along the East Busway. We need to stop building in places where there aren’t people.” PCRG studied all the areas within half a mile of all busway stations. If this was considered a neighborhood, the population would be 115,000, with an average CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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BOOSTING BUSWAYS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

of about 10,000 people living near each station. Residents in this “neighborhood” average 1.33 public transit trips for every car trip. More than 76 percent of residents near busway stations own between zero and one cars, meaning they require less parking and car infrastructure that can be costly to developers and cities. Sandvig says these areas should be attracting development, and if zoning changes were made to lower or eliminate parking minimums, that development could become affordable for low-income residents and tenants. And opportunity exists: about 18 percent of the land surrounding stations is currently vacant. “You could live all your life and not have to leave the busway corridor,” says Sandvig, noting the job centers emerging in places close to the busway in the Strip District and East Liberty. He adds that encouraging people to live car-free would help reduce congestion and greenhouse gas emissions, too. Sandvig says land near the Herron and Wilkinsburg stations would be ideal for dense, mix-use development. Currently, there are 17 acres of lightly used land surrounding the Herron busway station. According to a 2017 Urban Land Institute study, the Herron stop could accommodate more riders and

CP ILLUSTRATION: JOSIE NORTON

Port Authority ridership data from fiscal year 2018

building transit-oriented development (TOD) there “offers many transportation advantages to the city and region.” Wilkinsburg has already proposed TOD near its station, which is currently surrounded by more than 600 parking spaces in a surface parking lot.

Brandolph says the agency does have TOD guidelines that “call for dense, mixed-use, walkable, and, when possible, affordable development connected to high-quality transit service.” Port Authority also owns land near the Negley Station in Shadyside and has a detailed plan for TOD and increased pedestrian access. But for all other busway stations, those guidelines are merely suggestions and many municipalities throughout the region haven’t implemented TOD strategies into their rules. The right kind of development near the busway isn’t just a strategy to fight blight, it can help fight poverty too. A recent study from Cleveland State University found that Cleveland neighborhoods that gained access to transit saw poverty rates fall by about 13 percent after 10 years, and overall employment in those areas increased by 3.5 percent. “To be so close to the busway to help them earn income, that’s nothing to sneeze at because a lot of opportunities to earn income, you have to have a car,” said Nisha Blackwell, founder of Knotzland Bowtie Company. “It really knocks down some of the barriers people face.” Laura Wiens of Pittsburghers for Public Transit agrees. “The people who can’t afford cars, are being forced out into the peripheries,” says Wiens. “What we see in this county is areas where transit costs exceed the cost of housing.” McKeesport has seen a large influx

of low-income residents over the years, and according to Chicago’s Center for Neighborhood Technology, McKeesport residents spend 21 percent of their incomes on transit, and only 16 percent on housing. “If it takes 90 minutes on the 61C bus to commute from McKeesport, then you are not going to get out of poverty,” says Wiens. Sandvig says Monroeville is also a good candidate for a busway extension, which could have the added bonus of reducing traffic congestion on I-376, since residents could take the busway instead of driving Downtown. Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald says he supports extending the East Busway through Braddock and would eventually like to see the West Busway extended to the airport. He says developing densely around transit stops, busway and light-rail, should help improve air quality by reducing driving. “We just can’t grow with the amount of cars that want to drive on the parkway. I really want developers to use these areas,” says Fitzgerald of busway stations. “That is a big part of my economic development strategy.” Fitzgerald says he has showcased sites near busways to developers and notes that redevelopment at the Lexington Technology Park near the Homewood Busway station includes housing and offices. “We do really want to continue to grow around the busways,” says Fitzgerald. State Rep. Austin Davis (DMcKeesport) was recently placed on Port Authority’s board, and has the backing of PPT, since he supports extending the busway. State Rep. Summer Lee (D-Swissvale) tweeted in February about how important the busway is for economic development, especially in Mon Valley communities. “We can’t truly have economic development in the Mon Valley without increased affordability and accessibility to public transportation,” Lee tweeted. “We need the busway extended throughout the Mon.” And with state and federal public transit funding likely to be reworked before 2022, thanks to the expiration of the funding stream from the Turnpike Commission, Sandvig says creating a transit vision centered on the busways is timelier than ever. “We have to get behind that vision and sell it to Harrisburg, Washington, riders, and our neighbors,” says Sandvig. “Now is the time for it.”

Follow senior writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto

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THURSDAY, APRIL 18 • 6:00 P.M. TO 8:00 P.M. FILM SCREENING: THE ART OF RECOVERY THE CREATIVE AFTERSHOCKS OF A NATURAL DISASTER From chaos came creativity and hope for a broken city. When a massive earthquake shook Christchurch city, in the South Island of New Zealand in 2011, razing much of the city to its foundations, a vibrant community-led effort grows out of the quake’s aftershocks to transform the urban wasteland of the central city into a giant canvas for people to express their responses to the earthquake and their hopes for the city. The Art of Recovery documents one of the most dynamic, creative, and contentious times in the history of Christchurch. It tells an uplifting story of resilience and community spirit that informs a greater conversation about how we live together, and how we build our cities. WINNER OF THE BEST DOCUMENTARY AT THE LUND ARCHITECTURE FILM FESTIVAL (SWEDEN, 2016) AND BEST FEATURE OF THE NEW URBANISM FILM FESTIVAL (LOS ANGELES, 2016), COURTESY OF FISHEYE FILMS LTD, NEW ZEALAND.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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.GABBY NORMAL.

FRIENDLY GHOST BY GAB BONESSO CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

ATELY I’VE SEEN a lot of online

commentary about ghosting. Most .people seem to agree that it’s horrible, selfish, and cruel. I definitely think there are certain scenarios where ghosting is awful, but I would like to argue that sometimes, it’s actually the nicest and most viable option at hand. I think we can all agree that it’s pretty shitty to ghost your partner on your wedding day. A move like that definitely solidifies your spot in Hell. However, if you are about to marry someone who has been gaslighting or abusing you in a carbon monoxide sort of way (silent but deadly), then you should definitely ghost that S.O.B.! Your wedding day might be the one day your partner is distracted enough that you can disappear. Let the guests at your wedding judge you. You’re free. My point is that we generally don’t

know the specifics of any relationship when it’s behind closed doors. Don’t think the person who gets ghosted is by default the victim in every scenario. Take, for instance, ghosting your Grammy on her death bed. That should warrant spending eternity with Beelze-

bub, right? Well, what if your Grandma was an awful woman who used to lock you in a car to punish you during the summer? I think it’s okay to ghost her. She’s lucky you didn’t suffocate as a child and become a real ghost. I also think you should feel zero guilt

Follow featured contributor Gab Bonesso on Twitter @gabbonesso

ghosting people you meet on Tinder or Grindr or any social media hook-up site. If the reasons for getting together are based on superficial things such as looks and age, then ghosting is way kinder than coming out and saying, “You are uglier and older than I thought. Peace out.” I also think it’s okay to ghost someone who originally ghosted you. Meta, I know. I had a friend who ghosted me a few years back over a stupid business decision made by someone else. Recently the friend reached out to me but not with an apology. Rather, the friend acted like they didn’t know why we’re not on speaking terms. I chose to ghost this friend not because they ghosted me, but because it was the best option for me. I have already made peace with our friendship ending. I realized it was always a one-sided friendship that wasn’t necessarily good for me. You don’t get to stab me in the back and then be bummed that I ghosted you. You made me the ghost that I am today, mate. I guess I just wanted to say that it’s okay to not tell someone why you don’t want to know them anymore if that is what is best for you. In the words of Abraham Lincoln, “Actions speak louder than words.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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.RESTAURANT REVIEW.

BRASSERO GRILL BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

ERNANDO ESPEJEL’S Brassero Grill

started in a tiny black trailer pulled by a pickup truck in 2012. He was inspired by his grandfather’s restaurant, who started in Mexico City with even more modest origins, on a tricycle. Like his grandfather, Espejel eventually moved to a brick-and-mortar location and has now been treating the city to “gourmexican” fare from its Braddock location since 2017. Inside of Espejel’s storefront in the Free Press Buildings, decorations are sparse. There’s a collection of plants, a leather couch, a few photos, and a neonlined chalkboard, but that’s about it for decor. However, Brassero Grill doesn’t feel cold. There’s a sense of welcoming that permeates the space, the kitchen, the food and the staff. Espejel describes his menu as a “fresh concept of fast food.” He puts a health-minded spin on Mexican food, marrying the cuisine with East Coast dishes. This doesn’t mean he’s let go of tradition; Espejel experiments around authentic Mexican cuisine, taking inspiration from his mother’s cooking. Fusions, like a Philly ribeye torta and Mexican grilled wings, have graced the menu. Greens show up on every plate, whether they’re wrapped in a burrito or hidden under piles of chorizo. Tacos can be ordered either streetstyle (cilantro and onion), or with a layer of melted cheese, spinach, a mound of meat, and fresh guacamole. I chose the latter style for two chorizo tacos, resulting in a sweet, smoky taste balanced with the hint of lime and sour cream.

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Mole poblano, veggie burrito, and chorizo burrito at Brassero Grill

BRASSERO GRILL

532 Braddock Ave, Braddock. brasserogrill.jimdo.com

On Sundays, Espejel offers a brunch menu of American and Mexican dishes

such as breakfast tacos, pan frances (French toast), and pancakes. I decided on chilaquiles: corn tortillas and salsa verde doused in sour cream and topped with an egg and char-grilled steak, jumbled together like an open-

FAVORITE FEATURES: DJs

Fresh chips

Kielbasa

Keep an eye on Brassero Grill’s social media — every now and again (often for Sunday brunch) the restaurant brings in a live DJ.

There are no pre-bagged chips at Brassero Grill. With every order, cooks fry up fresh tortilla chips, perfectly crispy to hold the weighty guacamole.

Brassero Grill plays to Pittsburghers hearts, offering kielbasa as a menu meat option. Always dreamed of a kielbasa burrito? Dream no more.

faced enchilada. Everything was meant to mix and work together, and it was absolutely delicious. The steak was the best thing on my plate — maybe even the table. Cut thin and remarkably tender; the flavor was rich and complex, something that only comes from a well-seasoned and well-used grill. I could spend a lot of time unpacking the flavors at Brassero Grill, but it’s best just to experience it for yourself in the restaurant. The lively, spirited kitchen truly brings a warmth to the table and makes Espejel’s food taste even better.

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav

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DINING OUT

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

LEON’S CARIBBEAN 823 E WARRINGTON AVE., ALLENTOWN / 412-431-5366 LEONSCARIBBEAN.COM Family owned and operated since December 2014. Here at Leon’s, we take pride in our recipes and quality of dishes. Simple menu with all the traditional dishes! Leon Sr. has been a chef for 30+ years, mastering the taste everyone has grown to love and can only get at Leon’s.

BAJA BAR & GRILL

1366 OLD FREEPORT ROAD, FOX CHAPEL 412-963-0640, WWW.BAJABARGRILL.COM The Baja Bar & Grill is the perfect destination any time of the year for dancing to live bands and taking in great entertainment every weekend. In addition, there’s good food along with amazing views of the Allegheny River and the Fox Chapel Marina.

BEA’S TACO TOWN

633 SMITHFIELD STREET, DOWNTOWN 412-471-8361, WWW.BEATAQUERIA.COM Authentic Mexican cuisine in the heart of Downtown Pittsburgh! Bea Taco Town offers tacos, burritos, enchiladas, quesadillas, and much more all with traditional recipes. Slow cooked meats and fresh vegetables prepared daily will have you coming back to try it all.

THE CAFÉ CARNEGIE

4400 FORBES AVE., OAKLAND 412-622-3225 / THECAFECARNEGIE.COM An excellent dining experience from James Beard Semi-Finalist, Sonja Finn featuring a locally-focused menu, full service dining, and espresso and wine bar.

CARMELLA’S PLATES & PINTS

1908 EAST CARSON STREET, SOUTHSIDE 412-918-1215, CARMELLASPLATESANDPINTS.COM Featuring an upscale ambiance, Carmella’s is located in the heart of South Side, serving a variety of refined comfort cuisine for dinner and brunch. The décor features a lodge-like feel with a wood beamed cathedral ceiling, stained glass and open fireplace. A local purveyor delivers fresh ingredients daily, which are crafted into unique and inventive meals, served alongside a curated cocktail list and comprehensive wine selection.

COLONY CAFE

1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

EIGHTY ACRES

1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-totable products.

ELIZA HOT METAL BISTRO

331 TECHNOLOGY DRIVE, PITTSBURGH 412-621-1551, ELIZAHOTELINDIGO.COM Set on the site of former iconic iron works, Eliza Furnace, Eliza is an American Bistro exploring classic Pittsburgh flavors, beloved by those that worked the furnaces, combined with the fresh perspective and seasonal sourcing that define what we eat in our region today. Relax with great food, cocktails, and enjoy live entertainment on the rooftop bar.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

The best gifts are edible. 1910 New Texas Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15239 724.519.7304 EightyAcresKitchen.com

PAD THAI NOODLE 4770 LIBERTY AVE, BLOOMFIELD 412-904-1640 PADTHAINOODLEPITTSBURGH.COM This new café in Bloomfield features Thai and Burmese specialties. Standards like Pad Thai and Coconut Curry Noodle are sure to please. But don’t miss out on the Ono Kyowsway featuring egg noodle sautéed with coconut chicken, cilantro and curry sauce.

OPEN 11AM-4PM

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history, and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. They also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

AAuutthheennttiicc

TACOS • CHIMICHANGAS BURRITOS • ENCHILADAS 633 SMITHFIELD ST. P G H , PA 15222 4 1 2 .4 7 1 . 83 6 1

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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Thai & Burmese Specialties!

Pad Thai

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IN DEFENSE OF SPICY BEER BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

F YOU’RE ANYTHING like me, your friend John once tried to convince you that pouring Frank’s RedHot® into a can of Natural Light would make it taste better. “Like an IPA,” he’d say, stupidly. And of course, you would do it to prove a point and discover it tastes nothing like an IPA and everything like bottom-shelf cayenne peppers floating in mop water. Thankfully, both John and spicy beer have come a long way since then. Done right, a good spicy beer can mimic the chest burn of a good whiskey. Done wrong, it creates a nightmarish loop of trying to cool off a palate with the same substance that caused the heat (a “putting out the fire with gasoline” type thing). As with any powerful ingredient, brewing with spicy peppers is all about balance. On one hand, your customer has decided to drink a spicy beer with words like “atomic” and “burning” and “fever” in the name, so they know what they’re getting into. Give them the heat they signed up for. On the other hand, they should be able to drink it without dying. “Brewing with pepper is not much different than using some other vegetable ingredients – it’s about proportioning and flavor,” says Cary Shaffer, head brewer of Couch Brewery, who makes a habanero amber ale called Atomic Meltdown. “It’s also important to us to showcase the flavors of the pepper.” If that flavor combination sounds like your kind of thing, but luckily, there’s a handful of Pittsburgh breweries doing great things with spicy beer, none of which involve Frank’s or Natty Light. Here are a few favorites.

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COUCH BREWERY: ATOMIC MELTDOWN 1531 WASHINGTON BLVD., LARIMER. COUCHBREWERY.COM

Couch controls the heat by blending this brew with its non-spicy forbearer, Atomic Clock amber ale, which allows them to pinpoint exactly how much heat gets through (which is still a lot). If you’re the type to keep hot sauce at your desk and car, Shaffer says this beer is for you.

FULL PINT: CHINOOKIE EN FUEGO 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE. FULLPINTBREWING.COM

This is a special take on Full Pint’s flagship Chinookie IPA, paring down its bitterness with habanero peppers. Probably the only one on this list that you can drink two of in one sitting.

BUTLER BREW WORKS: TOKOLOSHE CHOCOLATE HABANERO PORTER 101 S. MAIN ST., BUTLER. BUTLERBREWWORKS.COM

Tokoloshe is a mischievous hairy dwarf in Zulu folklore who can become invisible by drinking water, and apparently, served to inspire this spicy, sweet porter. It’s brewed with cocoa, molasses, and habanero peppers, producing a milder, but still formidable heat.

11TH HOUR BREWING CO.: BURNING PHOENIX JALAPENO PALE ALE 3711 CHARLOTTE ST., LAWRENCEVILLE. 11THHOURBREWS.COM

Even the most amateur palates will be able to pick out the jalapeño from several blocks away, and that’s not a bad thing. The jalapeño brings heat, but there’s a whole lot of flavor there that has nothing to do with spiciness. Get a glass of water, too.


.FOOD.

WASTE MANAGEMENT BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

OOD WASTE IN AMERICA falls along

so many tributaries that it can be difficult to track. But even small changes, like the way stores market food, can affect the amount of food waste. According to research published in the Journal of Marketing in December, consumers are less likely to pick “ugly produce” because doing so negatively affects how they think about themselves. The team of researchers included Jillian Hmurovic and Cait Lamberton of the University of Pittsburgh, Lauren Grewal of Dartmouth College, and Rebecca Walker Reczek of Ohio State University. Hmurovic says that the team felt there was something missing in the explanation of why shoppers pass up perfectly good food just because it has a weird shape or color. “When you imagine consuming it, you actually start feeling more negative about yourself, and as a result, you actually are willing to pay significantly less for the produce,” says Hmurovic. For their research, the definition of ugly produce included food that was healthy and edible but cosmetically damaged. They also focused their research more on “average” customers and not those with special interests in food who might specifically pick ugly produce for socially conscious reasons. Studying consumer behavior included setting up at a grocery store in Sweden and posting signs like “You are fantastic! Pick ugly produce!” around the produce section. “If you preemptively boost consumer self-perception, then they’re not as negatively impacted and they’re willing to pay the same amount for the ugly

produce as for the attractive produce,” says Hmurovic. According to the Department of Agriculture (USDA), Americans waste 30 to 40 percent of their food supply each year (in 2010, it was 133 billion pounds totaling $161 billion). Researchers at the USDA have also found that those who eat more fruit and vegetables are the most wasteful. Hmurovic says that produce waste happens at every stop along the chain, from grower to retailer to consumers. Sometimes growers won’t pick ugly produce because they know it won’t sell. Grocery stores might not put it out for the same reason. And even if the shopper buys the ugly produce, it might still rot before it’s used. Programs that sell exclusively ugly food have grown in popularity. Giant Eagle started selling Produce with Personality in 2016 but has since discontinued it. Delivery programs, such as Hungry Harvest, that claim to rescue food from farms have been wildly successful (though they also have their critics, who claim that for-profit ugly produce programs source food that would otherwise go to food banks, restaurants, or canning). There are also more localized versions that source from nearby growers, like the Ugly CSA program from 412 Food Rescue. Ultimately, Hmurovic hopes that addressing consumers at the point of sale will help reduce the amount of produce wasted by growers, retailers, and shoppers. “We find when we say, ‘Your choices don’t really reflect who you are,’ then people are more likely to pay more for ugly produce.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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CP PHOTO: LISA CUNNINGHAM

The Government Center on the North Side

.MUSIC.

FOR THE RECORD BY JORDAN SNOWDEN //JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN VINYL and record players

made a resurgence in the mid2000s, many thought it to be little more than a pretentious fad. But unlike bell bottoms and jelly sandals, which emerged just to disappear again, records are still here, and the industry is thriving. Although 2019 marked the close of longtime Bloomfield vinyl store, Juke Records, two new ones have appeared since the beginning of the year. One opens on Saturday, the official international Record Store Day (RSD). Since the first RSD in 2008, there are

businesses that participate in every continent except Antarctica. A way for customers, musicians, and staff to come together and celebrate the unique culture of vinyl, special releases are made exclusively for the occasion. Below you can find out which record stores in Pittsburgh are taking part in RSD and what exactly they are providing.

until April 20, Jerry’s Records will have over 10,000 LPs for a dollar each. The sale takes place during regular business hours and occurs in the basement in front of the main store. Owner Chris Grauzer explains: “Being an all-used store, we won’t have the RSD releases, however, we will be well stocked with tons of great used LP’s, 45’s and 12” singles.”

JERRY’S RECORDS 2136 MURRAY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL

Can’t make it out on RSD? No problem. Starting on that Saturday and running

THE GOVERNMENT CENTER 519 E. OHIO ST., NORTH SIDE

New to Pittsburgh, The Government

Center opened Sat., March 23. Owner Josh Cozby hopes that his shop can become a community space for young and old music lovers alike. So, The Government Center is having a party. “Every day is Record Store Day,” says Cozby. “Our plan is to celebrate music we love, especially local stuff. We will open up at our normal time, 11 a.m., with free food and lots of giveaways. We’ll have a bunch of rare, weird, and unusual releases hitting the shelves in addition to the extensive used and new selection already in the store. From 2 p.m. on there will be CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

19


FOR THE RECORD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

PRESERVING HARDCORE 1102 FOURTH AVE., NEW KENSINGTON BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP FILE PHOTO

PHOTO: PRESERVING HARDCORE

Inside Jerry’s Records in Squirrel Hill

Preserving Hardcore Sneak Preview

After years spent working in the Pittsburgh music scene, A.J. Rassau accumulated such an extensive record collection that his basement was overflowing. In January he started thinking about opening a store. Now, Preserving Hardcore, a record store tending to hardcore music fans, makes its debut on RSD. “If I was realistic I should have waited until May 1 to open with the amount of work I had to do to be ready,” says Rassau, “but how could I justify missing RSD when it’s that close? I’ve been putting in about 12 hours of work a day for a month now prepping the place.” Open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on April 13, Rassau hopes to make Preserving Hardcore a substance-free space where music fans of all ages can relax and have fun. “I personally feel like the RSD concept got high-jacked pretty quickly by major labels but I think it’s still an important day to remind people of the importance of both physical media and the stores that provide it. It’s not just about ownership, it’s about curating your own library and not facing any of the censorship or politics that are already becoming inevitable on streaming platforms. With my space also serving as a performance space and Hardcore Museum I hope that it provides a place where kids can hopefully become enthralled with some combination of punk rock, live music, or physical media.” •

RECORD STORE DAY

Sat., April 13. Multiple Locations. Multiple Times. recordstoreday.com

live music in the shop.” Lindsay Dragan (solo set) plays at 2 p.m., Ryan Hoffman & the Pioneers at 4 p.m., Old Game at 6 p.m., and Fuck Yeah Dinosaurs at 8 p.m.

SUPERMONKEY RECORDING CO. 813 E. WARRINGTON AVE., ALLENTOWN

Opening at 8 a.m., SuperMoney will only sell new, mint, and unopened vinyl.

Attic’s biggest draw is that they order every limited release available. There will also be 20-percent off all used and 10-percent off all new records and CDs. “We will be providing yummy food from local establishments and live DJs,” says owner Fred Bohn. “Every year it gets bigger, and we work hard to make sure everyone has a great time.”

VINYL REMAINS

GET HIP RECORDS

2907 GLENMORE AVE., DORMONT

1800 COLUMBUS AVE., NORTH SIDE

Get 20-percent off Get Hip’s entire selection of new and used vinyl. Along with free beer, giveaways, and other surprises, Get Hip will have DJ sets by the host of Flipside Scotty’s Flashback on Radiocore.org from 12-3 p.m., then DJ Jesse Novak, host of WYEP’s Roots and Rhythm Mix, will take over the turntables from 3-6 p.m. In the Get Hip Warehouse, performances by local punk rock legends, The Cheats, plus the Scratch and Sniffs and the Chokers will begin at 7 p.m. Get Hip Records will remain open during the performances for all your record needs.

ATTIC RECORD STORE 513 GRANT AVE., MILLVALE

After almost 40 years of supplying Pittsburgh with all its vinyl needs,

Small but mighty, Vinyl Remains generally avoids major label offerings and specializes in getting super limited horror movie soundtracks. This year, there will be a four-for-$1 sale on the $1 record bins. “I also always have secret gifts for those who spend over $100,” says owner Greg Anderson. “I will be getting a ton of horror movie t-shirts that will be available.”

THE EXCHANGE

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

Vinyl fans know that the special RSD titles are often in very short supply, and this year promises to be no different. Jerry Micco, Exchange buyer, explained that some manufacturer partners have reached out and “in some cases, we will be receiving a fraction of what we had ordered. Because of this, it is best

to shop early to avoid disappointment. We hope that the usual high spirits and camaraderie won’t be in short supply.”

DESOLATION ROW

410 S. CRAIG ST., OAKLAND

Taking part in RSD since its creation, this North Oakland store turns 15 this year. “We’ll have a lot of the RSD special releases in stock (fingers crossed — you’re never guaranteed the items that you’ve ordered),” says Kristofer Collins. “The day is always a fun one at the shop, and we’re really looking forward to it.”

MUSIC TO MY EAR

3003 BABCOCK BLVD., NORTH HILLS

Starting at 8 a.m., customers can get 20-percent off all used vinyl, 99 cent CDs, 10-percent off new vinyl (excluding Record Store Day releases), and 15 percent off all electronics at Music To My Ear and upstairs at Northern Audio. Hundreds of new and used vinyl and CD titles are being added to the store, including exclusive Record Store Day releases, highly sought-after Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab titles, and new audiophile pressings from Analogue Productions. The Hawkeyes are also playing live from noon to 3 p.m., and a few more surprises are in store, like chances to win pairs of tickets to Stage AE concerts.

Follow staff writer Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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SEVEN DAYS OF CONCERTS SINGLE JO RELEASE SHOW FRIDAY, APRIL 12

The formation of Single Jo proves there’s no age cap on creating a band. Fronted by Mark Jeffries (formerly FLY.), the rock group rounded out last July after Jeffries, 31, met Garrett Grube, the drummer from Pittsburgh band O’Hara, and invited Josh Chamberlain, and Evan Lawrence to jam out in Grube’s Oakland basement. Now, less than a year later, the foursome is commemorating the release of their debut LP, Kailua, with a party at Cattivo. “We would love nothing more than to celebrate this insanity with you,” reads Single Jo’s Facebook event page. “Because for the past eight months, we have been honing the most explosive, colorful, catchiest rock ‘n roll songs we can come up with. From gigging at Gooski’s and Club Cafe, to dozens of hours in the recording studio, we are ready to unleash the fruits of our labor.” 6 -11:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. singlejomusic.com PHOTO: SARAH KRIEBEL

Single Jo

FULL LIST ONLINE pghcitypaper.com

THURSDAY APRIL 11

FOLK/FUSION CARSIE BLANTON. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

ROCK/METAL

JEAN ROHE. Hospitality House. 7:30 p.m. Downtown.

KNOCKED LOOSE. Rex Theater. 6:30 p.m. South Side.

SEE THE SUMMER. Spoonwood Brewing. 7 p.m. Bethel Park.

LAURA JANE GRACE AND THE DEVOURING MOTHERS. Spirit. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville.

MULTIPLE GENRES

MIKE DILLON BAND. Cattivo. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. PADDY THE WANDERER, MARIAGE BLANC. Brillobox. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. HOREHOUND, REBREATHER, AND ENHAILER. Gooskis. 9 p.m. Polish Hill. THE BREATHING PROCESS. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

WHEN PARTICLES COLLIDE. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 8 p.m. Millvale.

NO BAD JUJU, AMANDA NOAH, JAMES GRAFF (PMHF BENEFIT BASH). Stage AE. 5:30 p.m. North Side.

ENUFF Z’NUFF. Crafthouse Stage and Grill. 7:30 p.m. Whitehall.

CLASSICAL/OPERA

PUNK

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. City of Asylum. 7 p.m. North Side.

LESS THAN JAKE. Mr. Smalls Theater. 7 p.m. Millvale.

DAGGERMOUTH, BROADWAY CALLS, DANVERS. The Smiling Moose. 8 p.m. South Side. MR. AIRPLANE MAN. Get Hip Records. 7 p.m. North Side.

JAZZ/R&B THE DRIFTERS. Byham Theater. 7 p.m. Downtown. THOTH TRIO. Kingfly Spirits. 7 p.m. Strip District.

WORLD GYPSY STRINGZ. Huszar. 7 p.m. North Side.

COVERS RIDGEMONT HIGH 80’S COVERS. Cioppino Restaurant and Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District.

ANQWENIQUE WINGFIELD, COURTNEY PORTER. KST’s Alloy Studios. 6 p.m. Bloomfield.

FRIDAY APRIL 12 JAZZ/BLUES THE CONTENDERS. Cioppino Restaurant and Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District TONY JANFLONE JR. BAND. Baja Bar and Grill. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel. RON YAROSZ AND THE VEHICLE. Moondogs. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox.

EXPERIMENTAL

ROCK/METAL

BASIC PRINTER. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

HATEBREED. Stage AE. 5:30 p.m. North Side.

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JIMMY MAC AND THE ATTACK. 565 Live. 8 p.m. Bellevue.

HIP HOP/ RAP

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

SUGARHILL GANG. Jergels. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

TYLER FARR. Jergels. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

WEST. Haus Of Vain. 7 p.m. Shadyside.

DJS

THE JAKOBS FERRY STRAGGLERS. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 8 p.m. Millvale.

PUNK NIGHT. Dee’s Cafe. 10 p.m. South Side

WORLD

SATURDAY APRIL 13

ITALIAN INVASION 2. Moondogs. 7:30 p.m. Blawnox.

ACOUSTIC

SUNDAY APRIL 14 WORLD MARIACHI SUNDAY. La Palapa. 5 p.m. South Side.

ROCK/METAL BILLY THE KID’S STEEL TOWN ALL-STARS. The R Bar. 7 p.m. Dormont.

ELECTRONIC

THE NËRD HËRDËRS. McNeillys Beer 6 Packs & Dogs. 6 p.m. Brookline.

CHILDREN OF BODOM. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 6:45 p.m. Millvale.

ADVENTURE CLUB. The Rex Theater. 8 p.m. South Side.

WAVE TRAILS. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 9 p.m. Millvale.

JAZZ

JACQ JILL (HOUSE/TECHNO). Hot Mass. 12 a.m. Downtown.

DJS

ROCK/METAL

JUNCTION DANCE PARTY. Brillobox. 10 p.m. Bloomfield.

GEORGE HEID III. Wallace’s Whiskey Room. 7 p.m. East Liberty.

IN TRANSIT BAND (COVERS). Baja Bar and Grill. 9 p.m. Fox Chapel.

SADDERDAY. Belvederes. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

FOLK

ON LOVE AND SUBLIMATION. The Smiling Moose. 6:30 p.m. South Side.

RICH ZABINSKI QUARTET. NOLA on the Square. 8 p.m. Downtown.

ANTZ MARCHING (DAVE MATTHEWS BAND TRIBUTE). Hard Rock Cafe. 9 p.m. Station Square.

POP/HIP HOP

TODD AND DALE. Bar 3. 8:30 p.m. Millvale.

GARTER SHAKE. Howlers. 9 p.m. Bloomfield.

WORDS AND SOUNDS VOL. 3. Full Pint Wild Side Pub. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

US. The Smiling Moose. 6 p.m. South Side.

OCEANS TO ASH. Gooskis. 10 p.m. Polish Hill.

DRAM. Activities Board. 7 p.m. Oakland.

ADULT., VOID VISION. Spirit. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

REGGAE KEYSTONE VIBE. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

CLASSICAL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA OF PITTSBURGH. First Unitarian Church. 7:30 p.m. Shadyside.

ACOUSTIC ZENITH SUNN. The Church Recording Studio. 6 p.m. Carrick. DARYL SHAWN. Backstage Bar. 5 p.m. Downtown.

JAZZ

GOLD CASTLE, YOUNG GUY BURKETT. Mr. Roboto Project. 6 p.m. Bloomfield.

THREE RIVERS JAZZ COLLECTIVE. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Main. 2 p.m. Oakland.

BELA FLECK, ABIGAIL WASHBURN. Carnegie Lecture Hall. 8 p.m. Oakland. MIKE EDEL. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield. ZOE MULFORD. Friendship House Concerts. 4 p.m. Friendship.

CLASSICAL ARSENAL DUO. East Liberty Presbyterian Church. 3 p.m. East Liberty. DUQUESNE WIND SYMPHONY. Carnegie Music Hall. 7:30 p.m. Oakland.


Record Store Day 2019 Saturday, April 13

PHOTO: LIZA NELSON

NEYLA PEKAREK

Neyla Pekarek

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

The Lumineers cellist, Neyla Pekarek, first discovered Rattlesnake Kate in college. A frontierswoman who singlehandedly killed 140 snakes as they surrounded her and her son, Rattlesnake Kate then proceeded to make a flapper-style dress, necklace, and shoes out of the skin. Pekarek found out about this true story at Greeley, Colo.’s History Museum, where the snakeskin apparel is on display. Fascinated, the cellist and classically trained vocalist used Rattlesnake Kate as a muse for her debut solo album, Rattlesnake. Go back in time to rural early 20th century life on Saturday when Pekarek’s tour makes a stop at Cattivo. Previously scheduled for the Thunderbird Cafe, all tickets bought for that venue will be honored. 8-11 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $18. cattivopgh.com

MONDAY APRIL 15

JAZZ

ROCK

REGGIE WATKINS QUARTET. Backstage Bar. 5 p.m. Downtown.

CITIZEN COPE. Byham Theater. 8 p.m. Downtown. CARBON LEAF. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

ACOUSTIC MARK EITZEL. Living Room Show. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

JAZZ IAN KANE, RONNIE WEISS, TOM BOYCE. Hambone’s. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville.

TUESDAY APRIL 16 ROCK ABSOLUTELY NOT. Gooski’s. 8 p.m. Polish Hill.

DJS HOT HONEY (DEEP HOUSE). The Summit. 9 p.m. Mt. Washington.

SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS. Jergels. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

PHAT MAN DEE. Black Forge Coffee House. 6:30 p.m. Allentown. MILES OKAZAKI’S TRICKSTER. City of Asylum. 7 p.m. North Side.

COVERS THECAUSE. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7:30 p.m. Millvale. TUPELO AND NOAH. Point Perk Café. 6 p.m. Downtown.

CLASSICAL DUQUESNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Carnegie Music Hall. 7:30 p.m. Oakland.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 17 INDIE/POP

ACOUSTIC

WILD BELLE. Stage AE. 7 p.m. North Side.

ACOUSTIC TUESDAYS. Bigham Tavern. 6 p.m. Mt. Washington.

HARBOUR. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

OPEN AT 8AM 20% OFF all USED vinyl & CD’s! 10% OFF all new titles (Excluding RSD titles) Over 400 exclusive releases 513 GRANT AVENUE • MILLVALE Questions? Call Us 412-821-8484

ATTICRECORDS@VERIZON.NET

ROCK/METAL NEW CANDYS. Brillobox. 8 p.m. Bloomfield. LIFE IN VACUUM. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side. THE 69 EYES. Crafthouse Stage and Grill. 7:30 p.m. Whitehall. ULTHAR. Howlers. 7 p.m. Bloomfield. DRIFT MOUTH. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 9 p.m. Millvale. SEAX. The Smiling Moose. 8 p.m. South Side.

JAZZ LUCARELLI JAZZ. Rivers Club. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. LISTEN LOCALLY DOWNSTAIRS WITH KENIA. Carnegie Free Library Music Hall. 7 p.m. Carnegie. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY JAZZ ORCHESTRA. Carnegie Music Hall. 7:30 p.m. Oakland.

HIP HOP/RAP KIDMENTAL. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 4 p.m. Millvale.

These listings are curated by Pittsburgh City Paper’s music writer Jordan Snowden and include events from our free online listings. Submit yours today at www.pghcitypaper.com/submitevent PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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.ART . .

POUR ONE OUT BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

PHOTOS: MORGAN GLASS GALLERY

Hap Sakwa’s “Red Can Rolling”

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ECORATIVE TEAPOTS — that gift you buy your grandmother every year when you can’t think of anything else she could possibly want (it’s either that or birdhouses — my own Nana preferred the latter). But at the Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery in Shadyside, the item takes on a much more artistic form as part of Teapots!13, an exhibition showcasing vessels from Pittsburgh and abroad. Now in its 13th iteration, the show —on display through June 8 — features more than 60 new teapots made from glass, ceramic, and other materials. The pieces are loosely categorized into four themes: the more imagery-driven nature and animal, and the material-driven industrial and fiber art, chosen to coincide with the upcoming Fiberart International exhibition coming to Pittsburgh during the last week of the show. Teapots from previous shows are also displayed in the front of the gallery. All the teapots are for sale and will remain on display until the show’s conclusion, even if they’ve been purchased. Gallery owner and director Amy Morgan says she was inspired to start Teapots! by a late friend who hosted her own teapot shows at her art gallery in California. Since then, the show has evolved from exclusively featuring glass teapots to ones made of metal, found objects, and other media. The criteria are simple: each piece must have the basic components of a teapot (a spout, a handle, and a lid). Functionality is optional; only a few of the items on display can be used to pour hot liquid. Part of the show’s appeal is that Morgan often requests artists who have never before made teapots to apply their own style to a piece. That aspect is showcased throughout the current show, notably in “it’s always tea time ...” by Jennifer Halvorson, a haunting, frosty blue, cast-glass piece resembling a ghostly dress topped with a tam o’ shanter as the lid. Along with several others, another first-timer is Jen Violette, who contributed a set of glass, curio cabinet-ready, prickly-pear cacti.


APRIL 6 – MAY 12, 2019

THE BURDENS A dark comedy for the digital age, The Burdens explores pop culture, connection, and the value of actual face time.

WORLD P R E M IE R E

MATT SCHATZ DIRECTED BY MARC MASTERSON

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell’s “Agony of the Leaf” and “Sweet Teazzz”

While some pieces lean more traditional, such as the gorgeously ancientlooking stoneware teapot by Derek Decker, others play freely with the parameters of what, in this case, constitutes a teapot, the results veering wildly from beautifully detailed and delicate to downright strange. One of the most outstanding pieces, “Tea for Two” by Julia and Robin Rogers, uses blown glass and oil paint to create a topless, armless woman, her erect nipples serving as the spouts (yes, this is one of the functional ones). It manages to convey surreal sexuality (it immediately reminded me of the milk bar in the film A Clockwork Orange) and gentle femininity, with accents like bluebirds and soft tufts of fur.

TEAPOTS!13

Continues through June 8. 5833 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. Free. morganglassgallery.com

On the other end of the spectrum are the more fanciful works of Jean Shortall, which feature little creatures like raccoons, birds, and anthropomorphic bears, and “Cloud Maker” by Natasha Dikareva, an eye-catching stoneware piece seemingly inspired by the fantastical imagery of early maps. There’s also American sculptor and photographer Hap Sakwa’s “Red Can Rolling,” a large metal and plywood piece on wheels that wouldn’t look out of place in an out-ofthe-way antique barn.

Like any artwork, many of the teapots go beyond conversation pieces by commenting on a number of issues. Some are overt, like the two pieces by Meryl Ruth emblazoned with #MeToo text and Rosie the Riveter imagery. Others are more subtle, like Mike da Ponte’s “I’m a Little Teapot,” an effectively creepy blown and inscribed sculpted glass piece topped with a toothy, grinning Xenomorph-like head. As explained by gallery assistant, Alexis Henry, “I’m a Little Teapot” serves to comment on the opioid crisis in the U.S. and the artist’s own struggles with substance abuse (to drive the point home, it’s displayed surrounded by little red and white pill capsules). Hawaii-based artist A. Kimberlin Blackburn sends a clear environmentalist message with “A Farmer’s Life with Luna at the Waterfall,” a teapot made from a combination of glass beads, acrylic, thread, ceramic, and bamboo. How Teapots! has managed to continue for so long could be contributed to an enduring culture of teapot enthusiasts and collectors (in 2018, for example, a rare, early-American teapot was sold at auction to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art for $520,000). It makes sense, as teapots have for centuries been a staple to tea-drinking cultures all over the world, most notably China and Great Britain. With its diverse new show, perhaps the Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery will not only surprise visitors but create a few teapot-obsessed converts along the way.

Follow senior writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

25


.DANCE.

OTHERWORLDLY PARTNERS BY STEVE SUCATO CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

S PART OF Pittsburgh Dance Week,

STAYCEE PEARL dance project .& Soy Sos premiere their latest dance work sym, commissioned by and presented at East Liberty’s Kelly Strayhorn Theater, April 12 and 13. Choreographed by company coexecutive director Staycee Pearl, sym is a dance work by her and husband Herman Pearl (Soy Sos) inspired by the writings of award-winning African-American science fiction author, Octavia Butler. “We’re sci-fi and fantasy fans,” says Herman Pearl, company co-executive director and sound designer. “Her perspective as a Black woman and a humanist is very appealing to us.” Staycee agrees: “She mirrors reallife situations in culture, community, and politics through stories of otherworldly beings.” If you’re unfamiliar with Butler’s work, don’t worry, so was STAYCEE PEARL dance project (SPdp) dancer LaTrea Rembert. The Cincinnati native says he didn’t know Butler existed before starting work on sym two years ago. But since then, he’s become a fan. One of seven children, Rembert grew up dancing in church. A love of theater guided his career in the arts and eventually sent him to Pittsburgh and Point Park University in 2012. It was there he met Staycee and rekindled a passion for dance. In addition to his work with SPdp, he has worked with several theater companies in town,

PHOTO: JOHN ALTDORFER

Dancers in STAYCEE PEARL dance project & Soy Sos’ sym

STAYCEE PEARL DANCE PROJECT & SOY SOS PERFORM

including Pittsburgh Playwrights and Pittsburgh Musical Theater. Rembert’s theatrical acumen has proved an advantage in playing his sym character, a man coming to accept that he is a being not of this world. Inspired by Butler’s 2005 novel Fledgling, about the symbiotic relationship between humans and vampires, sym, says Rembert, is a non-linear abstract interpretation of the book’s storyline and characters.

Rembert describes the Pearls’ creative process as another form of symbiosis. Conversations between dance and sound are being developed simultaneously. As for Staycee’s choreography, which mixes club and street-style movement with contemporary dance, he says, “… Her movement can feel good on the body and other times not. It is an endurance builder, and for him, a learning experience.” The soundscape for the 50-minute

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SYM

8 p.m. Fri., April 12. Also Sat., April 13. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay What Makes You Happy. 412-363-3000 or kelly-strayhorn.org

work takes an unusual turn in that Herman, bassist Sadie Powers, and sound artist Bonnie Jones will perform a live, improvised score alongside the five dancers. The work will also include projections by visual artist and Guggenheim Fellowship recipient Barbara Weissberger. For those new to SPdp and to Butler’s writings, Rembert says, “While you will see traditional dance styles in this work, it is not a traditional dance piece. You will get a full theatrical experience and new ideas to think about.”

Follow featured contributing writer Steve Sucato on Twitter @ssucato


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Dolina

DARING DOLINA

WASHINGTON, PA LOCATION

BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

FEW UNEXPECTED adjectives stand

out when Kasia Reilly describes .her contemporary dance performance project, Dolina. “Absurd” comes up, as does “surreal.” As Reilly explains, these themes play out in a variety of ways, from bursts of tense laughter, to dancers uncannily mirroring each other, to a warped sense of time. In a promotional video for the piece, Reilly expresses wanting Dolina to appeal to more than just dance fans, all while being “bizarre” enough to “scare some people off.” But the show — staged April 11-12 at the New Hazlett Theater — is more than a strange bit of fun. At its core, Dolina tells the story of four people trying to survive in a hostile world, all of which unfolds through a series of vignettes performed by Reilly and fellow dancers Alayna Baron, Maddy Joss, and Johnny Mathews. “Especially the last half of the work flows quite quickly through solos, duets, and trios that I think of almost like small poems,” Reilly says. “Rather than making an ‘essay’ or ‘narrative’ out of the work, my approach has been more like making a collection of small poems that evoke related emotions and themes, but are not otherwise connected.” The distinctive show is hardly surprising for Reilly, a choreographer and dancer whose website cites her artistic vision as seeking “to make performance with healthy doses of both form and

chaos.” She says she draws influence from “particular visual art and literature that deals in this tricky territory of the inarticulable-yet-clear,” including the Surrealists, modernist, and postmodernist writers.

DOLINA

Thu., April 11-Fri. April 12. 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25. newhazletttheater.org

Adding to the unconventional vibe of the performance is music by Maya Chun, a musician and producer whose past projects include working with hardcore or metal acts like Youth Novel and Bonzo. Chun is now part of The Cheeseburger Picnic, an Ann Arborbased band that references the cult Canadian television show Trailer Park Boys and uses terms like “utterly chaotic mathcore” to describe its sound (think fast drums and screaming). But don’t expect Dolina to sound anything like The Cheesburger Picnic. “Much of the music is atmospheric, almost ambient sound, rather than rhythmic music that we’ll be dancing on the beat to,” says Reilly. “[Chun] has made a score that moves between being brooding, beautiful, and sometimes a little cheeky.” Also featured are tracks by English musician The Caretaker, whose style Reilly

NORTH SHORE LOCATION 127 Anderson Street - Suite 101 Timber Court Building, PIttsburgh, PA 15212 Phone: (412) 322-4151

.STAGE.

calls “crackly, nostalgic ballroom pop.” Presented as part of the New Hazlett’s Community Supported Artist (CSA) program, the piece marks the first evening-length performance for Reilly – previously, the longest piece she had ever choreographed was eight-minutes long. Through the program, she was able to develop Dolina from a short piece she choreographed in 2017 during her final year at the University of Michigan. The original piece now constitutes a section of the show. Though “some change of circumstances” led her to move back to her hometown of Milan, Mich. in September 2018, she applied for the CSA while residing in Pittsburgh for a year, as the program works to support emerging local artists. Many of her collaborators also come from her native state, including Chun, Joss, and Mathews, who both attend the University of Michigan. Baron, meanwhile, is a Baltimore-based independent dancer and choreographer. While she no longer lives in Pittsburgh, Reilly credits the CSA program for allowing her to not only create her first full-length production, but to challenge herself by integrating more theatrical elements of speaking, writing, and acting into Dolina, a piece defined by highly physical contemporary dance. “I tend to approach learning by throwing myself in the deep end,” says Reilly.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

27


.LITERATURE.

COMPOSING A COMPOSER BY REGE BEHE CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

SK TEN RANDOM people if they’ve

heard of Erik Satie, and maybe .one will say yes. But the majority of us have heard the French composer’s music. Notably, Satie’s Gymnopedie No. 1 has been featured in films such as Fahrenheit 451 and Green Book, and television shows including The Blacklist, Doctor Who, and How I Met Your Mother. “He’s very obscure in the U.S.,” says Caitlin Horrocks, author of The Vexations (Little, Brown), a novel in which the Michigan-based writer imagines the life of Satie. “Nine out of ten Americans might not know the name, but that one out of ten sees him as a cult figure. A lot of people have an affinity for him.” Horrocks will appear April 11 at Frick Fine Arts Auditorium as a guest of the Alexandra L. Rowan Foundation. Horrocks’ is an accomplished shortstory writer who has published works in numerous publications including The Paris Review and The New Yorker, but The Vexations is her first novel. The enormity the project became apparent during a trip to France for research. “I hadn’t quite realized how much a national hero [Satie] is there,” Horrocks says. “It was very sobering. I was made to feel kind of like, who are you to write this book.” In many ways, Horrocks is the perfect writer to attempt a novel about Satie. She studied piano as a child and was familiar with the composer’s work. “As a piano student, I found his catalog so odd, all these miniatures and fragments and jokes,” she says. And in Horrocks’ short stories, she exhibits a keen sense of character and place, invaluable assets for any writer, but especially for one attempting to flesh out a novel with historical facts.

Caitlin Horrocks

THE ALEXANDRA L. ROWAN FOUNDATION PRESENTS:

CAITLIN HORROCKS

7:30 p.m., April 11, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6506 or alexrowanfoundation.org

After reading numerous biographies about Satie, Horrocks realized an important element was missing: A rendition of daily life in Paris during the late 19th century. Once that color was infused in the story, the author knew she had further fleshed out the story. She found

BETWEEN THE LINES The Glass City Poetry Collective, curated by poet and musician Scott Silsbe, will feature four local poets in its next event on April 12. Kristopher Collins, Kurt Garrison, Richard Gegick, and Bob Pajich will read at the collective’s venue in Jeannette. Acoustic music provided, BYOB, and free, although donations will be accepted. 406 Clay Ave., Jeannette. 724-578-3332 28

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

an alternate viewpoint in Phillippe, a character based on Jose Maria Patricio Contamine de Latour, a Spanish poet who collaborated with Satie. But the heart of the story emerged with the inclusion of Satie’s sister, Louise. At first, Horrocks found only footnotes about Louise Satie: After marrying a doctor, Satie’s sister lost custody of her child to in-laws and eventually emigrated to Argentina, where she taught piano. Then came an unexpected gift: an Argentinian radio documentary about Louise, including interviews with her former students that unearthed biographical facts about the character Horrocks used in the novel. The birth of Horrocks’ own child during the writing of The Vexations also enabled the author to view Louise in a new light. “She initially struck me as more quirky than tragic,” Horrocks says. “... But after having a child, I realized this is not quirky, this is not strange, there’s a story there.” Satie’s life put him in close proximity to many of the leading creative types in Paris. There’s a wonderful scene in a

theater with Sergei Diaghilev, founder of the Ballet Russes, and the playwright and filmmaker Jean Cocteau, in which Satie expresses his indignation about being physically crowded by his peers. This might seem like a remarkable confluence of talents, but for Satie, who also counted Claude DeBussy and Maurice Ravel as contemporaries, such encounters were commonplace. Satie sought and achieved a fair amount of success and acclaim during his lifetime. But he wrestled with his accomplishments and questioned his good fortune. “When he had money, he would immediately spend it,” Horrocks says. “When he had success he didn’t quite know what to do with it. … He was self-sabotaging. His attitude toward fame does seem conflicted. He certainly didn’t act in a way that would ensure it would continue. And he was absolutely uncompromising as an artist.”

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR


.COMICS.

THINK TANK GIRL BY LISA CUNNINGHAM LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

O HELL with comic book heroines

only portrayed as princesses or sex objects with substandard plot lines targeted to a male audience. What female comic book fans need isn’t another superhero sidekick in a bustier, but a resurgence of the greatest comic heroine of all time: Tank Girl. But nah, they shouldn’t remake the 1995 film based on the comics from the late ‘80s. “They should re-release it,” agrees actor Lori Petty, raising her already high-pitched voice to an excited squeak. She played the title role and says she would “love” to help bring it back to theaters. Despite not becoming a box office hit when first released, the film remains a cult classic. Tank Girl was the ultimate punk-rock, post-apocalyptic hero: a tough as nails, foul-mouthed, sex-positive woman who didn’t take

Lori Petty as Tank Girl

STEEL CITY CON

10 a.m. Fri., April 12-Sun., April 14. Monroeville Convention Center. $50 3-day pass ($23 Friday, Sunday; $35 Saturday). Children 10 and under, free with paid adult. Celebrity autographs and photos cost extra. steelcitycon.com

shit from anyone. Sure, Tank Girl had a slim build and nice titties, but unlike so many other women portrayed in comics, she also had a bazooka, got her rocks off with a mutant kangaroo, and lived in a goddamn tank. Hundreds of fans still dress up as Tank

Follow editor-in-chief Lisa Cunningham on Twitter @trashyleesuh

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Girl to meet her at conventions, like Steel City Con, where Petty will be greeting fans in Monroeville this weekend. She says women have asked her to sign their breasts and then show up at the next con with her autograph tattooed. Does it feel weird? “No, not anymore,”

Petty says. “I love making people happy.” And it’s not just her Tank Girl character fans are drawn to. Ask people where they know her from, and you’re likely to get different answers from everyone. “60-year-women come up to me and say Orange is the New Black,” Petty says of her portrayal of inmate Lolly Whitehill on the Netflix show. Point Break and League of Their Own are two other fan favorites. Petty said she doesn’t get star-struck by other celebrities, but she does admit she was excited when singer Anita Baker followed her on Twitter, and she does often tweet other celebrities. Recently, Petty tweeted Macaulay Culkin about poop. “He posted something about juicing, and I told him he needs to eat the whole orange.” In the past week, she has also tweeted to writer Roxane Gay and repeatedly calls Donald Trump out on his bullshit. “You have to,” she says. When asked if there’s anyone she’d love to meet but hasn’t, she says, “No, they’re all dead.” But then she pauses and answers, “Beyoncé,” explaining how empowering she is and how much she admires her work. As she’s going on and on about her being a feminist icon, I can’t help but think, “Damn, it sounds like she’s describing Tank Girl.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

29


ANOTHER DIMENSION BY AMANDA WALTZ AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

.FILM.

SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: CBS PHOTO ARCHIVE

“The Masks” episode from the original The Twilight Zone

Even if you’ve never watched the original The Twilight Zone, you’ve likely seen some reference to the show’s most famous episodes, like Burgess Meredith’s tragic post-apocalyptic bookworm (“Time Enough at Last”), William Shatner’s in-flight freak out (“Nightmare at 20,000 Feet”), or the bratty little boy with reality-altering superpowers (“It’s a Good Life”). But the show, which originally ran from 1959-1964, has plenty of lesser known gems among its 156 episodes. With that in mind, check out these recommendations now that The Twilight Zone is streaming on Amazon Prime, Hulu, and Netflix.

“THE INVADERS” SEASON 2, EPISODE 15 With its early sci-fi special effects, nearly dialogue-free storytelling (a feat managed through an excellent performance by Agnes Moorehead), and twist ending, “The Invaders” stands out as one of the most ambitious episodes in Twilight Zone’s history.

“NOTHING IN THE DARK” SEASON 3, EPISODE 16 A paranoid, elderly recluse lets her guard down when she allows an injured police officer (young Robert Redford) into her basement apartment. But the man may not be exactly who he seems.

“SPUR OF THE MOMENT” SEASON 5, EPISODE 21 What begins with a reluctant bride being terrorized by a mysterious woman on horseback unfolds brilliantly into a devastating, time-bending tale of regret.

“THE MASKS” SEASON 5, EPISODE 25 Helmed by Hollywood screen actressturned-director Ida Lupino, this macabre tale of vengeance finds four greedy family members waiting for the death of a rich patriarch, all against the backdrop of a Mardi Gras celebration. •

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE REBOOT OF The Twilight Zone

is not actually a reboot at all, but a continuation. It is, technically, one entry in a franchise that includes the original 1959 series as well as several other entries since then, but really, the Twilight Zone is not a show; it’s a place, and the show is a vehicle to document its mysteries. The 2019 vehicle features Jordan Peele as the narrator (and executive producer). The episodes are not available on TV or popular streaming channels like Netflix. Instead, they will be released two at a time on CBS All Access, a streaming site exclusive for CBS, which is in itself a kind of Twilight Zone. Have you ever met a real person who pays $5.99 a month just to watch CBS?) Like the original, some of the episodes hit the mark, while others fall short. Unlike the original, they are all too long (ruining the half-hour format was a mistake). The first episode, “The Comedian,” follows Kumail Nanjiani as a struggling stand-up comedian named Samir Wassan. His material consists of overwrought political jokes about the Second Amendment. The audience gets bored, their eyes glaze over, they look at their phones. When Samir gets encouragement to rely more on his personal life for material, he takes the advice and finds some success, but it comes with a cost. Each friend, family member, or pet he lauds onstage then disappears from his life. It offers some refreshing critique of comedians who care more about success than preserving relationships. Samir’s existential crisis — success versus his personal life — lasts a little too long, which is a running theme in this version of the show. Two of the episodes deal with completely preventable, yet seemingly unsolvable disasters. The first, “Nightmare at 30,000 Feet,” follows journalist Justin Sanderson (Adam Scott), trapped on a plane. There he finds an MP3 player in his seat pocket loaded with a podcast about the disappearance of the very flight he is on. Justin becomes convinced

PHOTO: ROBERT FALCONER/CBS

Sanaa Lathan in The Twilight Zone

he must do everything possible to save the flight, with little success. To be fair, no flight attendant is going to take action because one haggard passenger heard a weird podcast. It’s a well-done episode, combining modern fears like unsolved plane crashes, terrorism, and the futility of AirPods. Scott, as always, is well-cast in an anxious, fidgety role like this. One passenger believes Justin, noting that humans were never supposed to be this high in the sky. At its best, The Twilight Zone examines behavior humans should never have developed in the first place.

THE TWILIGHT ZONE

Now streaming on CBS All Access.

“Replay” (streaming April 12) tackles a human-made disaster of a different variety. Nina Harrison (Sanaa Lathan) is driving her son to his freshman year of college and grows increasingly desperate to protect him from police violence. When she realizes her old camcorder has the ability to rewind time, Nina uses it to erase a confrontation with a white police officer. But no matter what route they take, where they stop, how nice they are — the cop always finds them, and always accosts her son. Any mother’s worst fear is not being able to protect her kids, but “Replay” asks what there is to do when even the powers of the Twilight

Zone aren’t enough. She cannot rewind far back enough to undo institutional racism, and the burden looms like a storm cloud. Unlike in “Nightmare,” Nina is able to convince her son and brother of the rewinding and repeated police confrontations, because it’s probably not hard for them to imagine. The wildcard of the series so far is “A Traveler” (streaming April 12), set at a police station in tiny Iglaak, Alaska on Christmas Eve. Cocky Captain Pendleton (Greg Kinnear) is gearing up for his favorite Christmas party tradition, where he pardons one lucky criminal. Officer Yuka (Marika Sila) assumes it will be her recently apprehended brother, until a slick interloper in a pinstripe suit shows up, begging to be pardoned. He claims to be a travel vlogger by the name of A Traveler (Steve Yeun), but he’s clearly up to no good. The “no good” ends up involving Russia, aliens, and power grids. This episode feels more X-Files than Twilight Zone — at any moment, Yuka could dial in Mulder and Scully for help — though it is the most visually impressive, full of strange angles and shadows. As the show’s intro states, the Twilight Zone exists “between the pit of one’s fears and the summit of one’s knowledge.” It’s not about what you know to be true about the world, but how the knowledge of consequences doesn’t always provide an easy solution.


The Romeo Club of MASD proudly presents

“America’s Premier Showman”

Mark Milovats And His Orchestra Saturday, May 4th 7PM

McKeesport High School Auditorium 1960 Eden Park Blvd, McKeesport, PA 15132 Featuring the McKeesport Band & Choir

PHOTO: MORIAH ELLA MASON

Moriah Ella Mason

.DANCE.

Admission: $20 Tickets available through 412.999.9922 or Romeotickets@yahoo.com

WORK IN PROGRESS BY MAGGIE WEAVER // MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HAT CAN BE found between

the lines of our sacred texts?” This question is one of many explored in artist Moriah Ella Mason’s new work Queer, Jewish WorkinProgress, an original dancetheater piece presented on April 11 at The Space Upstairs. The work is built around Mason’s identity as a queer, Jewish Pittsburgher. It leans into the gaps left by sacred texts, interpreting stories, both traditional and personal, in the context of a “queerJudeo-diasporic-futuristic aesthetic.” Still in the early days of creation (Mason and the cast, Ru Emmons and Sarah Friedlander, have completed at least seven rehearsals), the work is a well-organized collection of concepts. A few ideas form the show’s foundation: an exploration of the richness of the people as a diaspora, Barbra Streisand as a Jewish and gay cultural icon, the narratives of Yiddish folklore, as well as the Torah and other religious texts. Queer, Jewish is seeded in a piece Mason staged years ago called Funny, She Doesn’t Look Jewish, which reflected on anti-Semitic experiences during her childhood in Westmoreland County. For the work-in-progress show, Mason adapted two stories: the invasion of Jericho and the story of Rahab, a Canaanite sex worker who aided the Israelites. The pieces explore discomfort with the ideas of boundaries, borders, and conquests. “We’re going back to the texts, looking at the role of women and possible queer narratives and finding space for ourselves in between the lines of these texts,” Mason says. “I want to invite myself, and

other Jews that have felt marginalized, into the space to participate in historic conversation, in an embodied way, in an envisioned way, in a poetic way.” Mason, using historical garments and movements, also places the rituals in a modern framework, asking how they can be gifted to upcoming generations in new ways.

QUEER, JEWISH WORKINPROGRESS

Thu., April 11. 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs. 214 N. Lexington St., Homewood. Suggested donation $5-10. Search “Queer, Jewish” on Facebook.

Streisand comes into play through movement. The star’s storylines, Mason emphasizes, are often intertwined with the concept of otherness. Streisand’s work is a natural companion to Queer, Jewish. Dancers pay tribute to the star through gestures and ideas echoed from Streisand’s films. The final element in Queer, Jewish is community. It’s part of Mason’s identity, and the performance “feels only right to be wrapped up in community.” The artist plans to host post-show discussions for reflections and feedback. As the piece grows, Mason hopes to expand community involvement through workshops. In August, Queer, Jewish will run as an evening-length show presented by off the WALL productions. It will be a mix of everything: ancient texts, folklore, pop culture, and autobiographical stories, set to original composition and spoken word.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

31


A Lolita fashion show at Tekko 2018

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.CULTURE.

DRESSED TO IMPRESS BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T’S COMMON FOR FASHION not to

be taken seriously as a medium, but even more so when the genre of fashion is mostly made by and for women. Lolita fashion is a feminine style in which appealing to the male gaze isn’t even a factor. At Tekko, an annual Japanese pop culture convention at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center (April 11-14), Lolitas from all across the country will converge to show off and celebrate their love of the fashion. “Tekko is one of the few conventions that takes its fashion track seriously,” says Puvithel Rajan, a local designer who creates Lolita fashion and other Jfashion (Japanese fashion) styles under her brand, Puvithel. “We have a major problem right now where conventions don’t value fashion — Japanese style fashion — at all.” Rajan attributes the problem to the fact that conventions are often run by men who don’t necessarily understand the value or popularity of the fashion. Emma Bottari, who runs Lolita Collective, an online store that sells dozens of independent Western designers out of Chicago, and helps bring designers and personalities to Tekko, has similar feelings about the convention world. “We, on the whole, don’t find that people take this content seriously and part of the problem is that, historically speaking — and this is definitely a larger conversation about handiwork and women’s labor and stuff like that — convention fashion tracks have been entirely volunteer labor,” says Bottari. According to Sara Mariacher, J-fashion manager at Tekko, the convention is “currently the only convention on the East Coast with consistent high caliber fashion guests.” As part of her role, Mariacher coordinates fashion shows, tea parties (big in the Lolita community), and other logistics. Lolita fashion began in Japan, before expanding to the United States and other Western countries. The fashion draws inspiration from European Victorian-era fashion, relishing in ruffles, petticoats, bows, and other details to

PHOTOS: MAYA ELAINE

Puvithel’s fashion show at Tekko 2018

make up carefully coordinated outfits. The aesthetic can vary from cutesy to Goth, but the color palettes often veer toward lighter pinks, whites, and pastels. (And to clear up any confusion, Lolita fashion has no correlation with the Vladimir Nabokov book.)

TEKKO

April 11-14. David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. teamtekko.us

Lolita fashion is known for its distinct hyper-femininity. The outfits are intricate, elaborate, and costly, all things that are the antithesis of the current minimalism fashion trend and fast-fashion production. But these aspects are also what Lolitas value so much about their community. While the outfits can seem expensive — a full look can easily cost over $200 — the price reflects the amount of labor

and material that goes into each piece, something the average person would rather not consider when buying clothes. “It’s not actually that expensive, just fast fashion has trained us to not know what actual clothes are worth anymore,” says Rajan. Whereas fast fashion relies on cheap labor and clothes that are seemingly disposable, Lolita fashion celebrates independent designers and a way to dress deliberately, while also creating an aesthetic that can feel freeing to those who wear it. Many Lolitas find comfort and safety in the way the Lolita fashion allows them to express themselves. Rajan notes that many Lolitas have a similar origin story of growing up hating dresses and other “girly” clothing, but pivoted when they discovered Lolita fashion. “It’s about femininity and girliness but for women’s gaze, not for the male gaze,” she says. “I think at the time I had never seen anything like that before.” For Bottari, who says she wore baggy clothes growing up as a protective

mechanism, Lolita fashion gave her an outlet. “It really was a way to be hyperfeminine and be comfortable with being female, [and] be comfortable with a lot of different aspects of being a woman that I hadn’t really felt safe in before, and Lolita created a safe space for me,” she says. A standard Lolita outfit includes a dress or jumper skirt, a blouse with sleeves, a petticoat or crinoline (bloomers are suggested), a headpiece, overthe-knee socks and/or tights, and any variety of accessories. While Lolita fashion has historically had rules about things like skirt length and color coordination, Bottari says many of those rules have softened in the years since she grew up in the community, and those wanting to become part of it shouldn’t be intimidated. “The most important part of Lolita to me has always been self-expression, like finding a way to live your life how you’d like to and express it through clothing.”

Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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PHOTO: SEAN O’CONNOR

Bridges album cover

.MUSIC.

ALL GROWN UP BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.CO

F

OR MOST FRESHMEN, college is

the first time away from parental authority, a chance to grow and learn beyond the traditional classroom setting. For Connor Murray, the creator of Pittsburgh independent record label Crafted Sounds, his time at the University of Pittsburgh not only introduced him to the local scene but also made way for a thriving small business. What started out of Murray’s dorm room his freshman year at Pitt is now an active member of Pittsburgh’s music community. Crafted Sounds is also now a subsidiary label — along with Wild Kindness Records, Dadstache Records, and Epifo Music — of Misra Records, founded in 1999. “At first it was me wanting to be a part of something bigger than [myself],” says Murray. “I tried to make music, but I sucked at it. At the same time, I was looking to still be involved in [the scene].”

On April 12, the eve of Murray’s 21st birthday, Crafted Sounds will hold a release party at Spirit for Bridges, a 21song compilation record featuring various artists from Pittsburgh, many from the label. The release celebrates three years of Crafted Sounds and serves as a personal birthday present for Murray. On his 18th birthday in 2016, Crafted Sounds released its first record. “I was satisfied freshman year when we just had a handful of releases,” he says. “We could have just been done there, and I would have been totally fine with it.” But Murray kept going. He was networking, learning the business, and growing his label. “To a point, the music stuff has opened up a social window that I didn’t really expect to have coming into college. I didn’t even think twice about the fraternity stuff because I had all these people. It’s cool because a lot of them are older. But it’s weird because I, in a sense, am managing them.”

BRIDGES RELEASE SHOW

Fri., April 12. 9 p.m. – 2 a.m. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $6-7. craftedsounds.net

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Age has been a recurring issue throughout the existence of Crafted Sounds. Murray notes that his biggest challenge is getting people to take him seriously as a young professional. But he knows he is still learning, and outsiders will continue to question his ability throughout his twenties. “Nothing’s going to be perfect, this has been a learning process entirely,” he says. “Sure, there were people that were there early that might not have gotten the same experience that I’m exploring now with these other artists, but it was definitely like ‘What can we do better?’ every time. I’ve grown up a lot through doing it because it’s a very personal industry.” In 2017, Murray released a compilation, Have a Nice Day. In many ways, Crafted Sounds’ upcoming show and Bridges mirrors the previous release. The first time around, Murray determined proceeds would benefit Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania via a Twitter poll and did the same poll with the same results this time around. In addition, the artists on both compilations

include Pittsburgh staples and along with budding acts — like AllegrA and Jack Stauber, who at the time of the Have a Nice Day release, were only starting to build their brands. “In a matter of two years, it’s so cool to see what they’ve done. I wanted to capture that again because a lot of these bands are going to do similar things,” says Murray. “I think doing the show at Spirit is more of a visibility thing. Even though the show is 21-plus, it’s almost like a sense of symbolism like ‘Yeah, we’re growing up,’ because I want people to take me seriously.” Bridges will be available to stream via Bandcamp on April 13. At the release party, physical tapes and an accompanying zine booklet will be for sale. “We distributed disposable cameras to various venues across the city to document what goes on at a show regardless of whether artists are on a stage or in a basement,” says Murray. “Images captured from those cameras will be the focus of the zine.” Remaining tapes, zines, and shirts be available to purchase on Bandcamp as well.


.FASHION.

THE PROBLEM WITH POCKETS BY TERENEH IDIA CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T WAS A 1940S oatmeal tweed jacket

that I “borrowed” from my dad, which means he never saw it again (unless I was wearing it). This tweed jacket had pockets where my then-teenaged girl self had no idea pockets could exist. Not two, but three slash pockets: two on the right and one on the left. A breast pocket with the audacity to contain a mini-pocket inside. I doubt the English tailors made this diminutive area for Bonnie Bell Bubble Gum lip balm, but it fit perfectly. Carefree. That’s how I felt whenever I wore the jacket. Everything I needed was on me. I could swing both arms and skip down the street. I could hold a drink in one hand and eat a sandwich in the other. It was a revelation. Have you experienced this conversation? “Oh, what a beautiful dress,” you say. “Thank you, it has pockets!” They will then proceed to put both hands in the pockets and do little a 60-degree swayingturn beaming with joy. I understand. As a fashion designer, I can make as many pockets as my heart desires. A

CP PHOTO: TERENEH IDIA

Rayne Eleese and Ronnell wearing items (with pockets) from The Blue Collection, a collaboration of Idia’Dega + OMWA + The Beading Wolves

dress could have six pockets or a jacket 15, even 20. But do I? No, not always. The reasons are as layered as the

pocket itself. And as a feminist fashion designer, I don’t believe it’s a conspiracy to make women buy handbags. I have to consider the pattern (blueprint) of

the garment, the final silhouette of the dress, the fabric, where and how the pockets will lay, and what it will happen to the side seam — where the front and back of the garment is sewn together. A seam is at least two layers of fabric. When you add lining, that makes four layers; adding pockets makes it six. Pockets need to sit in a place where your hands can rest comfortably. That often means around the hips and thighs. For many — but not all — women and femmes, this is an area where a smooth silhouette is preferred — following the natural shape of the body without obvious seams, stitch lines, or bumps. I have designed dresses with pockets and then ended up removing them because they didn’t work with the final garment: the hand in the pocket creating an unsightly bump, stretching the fabric too much or making a seam line too thick, distorting the line of the dress. Should more womenswear have pockets? I would have to say yes. Should every womenswear garment have pockets? Unequivocally, no. As a woman who wears clothes, I understand the desire to have more pockets, but as a designer who decides when and where I place pockets, I also understand why they don’t always appear when you want them. But the choice and power is yours: 1. You can exclusively buy garments with pockets. 2. You can get a tailor to add pockets. 3. You can add them yourself — online DIY videos are here to help. Just make sure to practice on an old garment before cutting up something you love.

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152XX

NO EXCUSED ABSENCES! YOU MUST ATTEND THIS FUNDRAISER! Help raise awareness and promote education for all.

Join us for a festive evening benefiting a serious cause, as 3,500 children in our region are unstably housed at a given time. To honor the importance of community and education, we are raising funds so that youth will have someone in their corner, and their educational needs will be honored.

APRIL 19TH 7PM–10PM

Excuses Bar and Grill 2526 E. Carson St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 Entertainment: Jimmy Adler Band Suggested Donation: $10 at the door Sponsored by the Jack/Affinito Family.

TO LEARN MORE, GO TO HOMELESSFUND.ORG - OR VISIT: crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/fund-raiser-for-the-homeless-childrens-education-fund PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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.STAGE.

BACKSTAGE BY LISSA BRENNAN CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NAME: Cheryl El-Walker, Wilkinsburg WORK: Resident makeup, special effects, and costume artist at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company

DO STAGE ACTORS ALWAYS USE MAKEUP ARTISTS? Oh no. I might work with a whole cast or one person. There might be something that’s complicated the actor can’t do, or that takes me two minutes and would take them 20. “COMPLICATED” MEANING NOT ALWAYS THE BEST VERSION OF THEMSELVES? Yes, not all sculpted cheekbones. It’s also nails in people’s heads, skin falling off. WHUT? That’s the special effects part. We did a play with [special effects artist] Steve Tolin. I loved all of that! We did projectile vomit. I made up this thing called Cheryl’s Hurl. We put it in these little packets and stuck it in the actors’ clothes and then they would push it out — vomit! It came in different colors. OH MY. I got to do skin for a zombie that ate her own arm. Just chewed on it. It was so much fun. I won’t give you the recipe. THAT’S OK. HOW DID YOU START? I was 14, selling Mary Kay with my mom. I always acted in school, did all the makeup for all the plays. I study on the internet, look up videos, research, practice. All the time. ARE YOU FINISHED ONCE THE CURTAIN RISES? Not always. In Jitney, the guy got beat up. I had to climb into the back of a car and put blood on his lips and give him a black eye between his scenes because he never left the stage. I had to lay down on my back with the makeup kit on my chest in the dark. SO YOU’RE SHOWING PHYSICALLY WHAT THE CHARACTERS HAVE GONE THROUGH. And it can be progressive depending on how time is passing. You’re not going to

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO: JARED MURPHY

Cheryl El-Walker

get an immediate black eye. It might turn blue. Your bloody lip might turn into a scab. We take the audience on a journey, and they can get lost and out of the play if something’s off. “His eye should have been a different color by then, that happened three days ago.” People will come backstage and say that to me. One of them was my sister because she’s a nurse and she knows. WHAT ELSE HAVE YOU DONE IN ADDITION TO BEAUTY AND SPECIAL EFFECTS? One of my favorites was Gem of the Ocean. Chrystal Bates, beautiful Chrystal Bates. I had to take her and make her 400 years old. Taking someone from a beautiful,

beautiful young face is challenging. DO YOU FEEL LIKE IT’S HARDER FOR WOMEN TO BE UNATTRACTIVE THAN MEN? Extremely. We have to be careful that we don’t look haggard. Men, it’s just like, “Oh, look at him being rugged.” Rugged. One of the hardest makeups to do is a natural face. But you can’t go with nothing. You’re washed out, you can’t be seen under the lights, all your features disappear. WHY THEATER INSTEAD OF TV OR FILM? Oh! Theater is alive! You can’t get a better ticket in town. It’s never the same and I love the fact that it’s similar. It’s close. But

every night, it’s a different show. I like that energy, that whatever happens, happens. WHAT’S THE BEST PART? Transforming people so they’re unrecognizable? I love it. In Heat of the Night, the same woman played both this yokel and this sophisticated mother, and people kept saying, “Why didn’t the mother come out and take a bow? Why wasn’t she at curtain call?” And I said, “That’s her.” I’m telling you, when I get that kind of feedback, I soar to the stars. I fooled you! When I transform the actors, I’m giving them range. You don’t have to be in this one little box that people put you in, where you can only be this one thing, one person. You have more.


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WED., APRIL 24 ADAM DOLEAC 7 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. $12-15. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Frank Vieira & Justin Wade Band.

WED., APRIL 24 THE DOUBLE-THREAT TRIO 7:30 P.M. CLO CABARET DOWNTOWN. $31.25-41.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

THU., APRIL 25 TINKERGARTEN 10 A.M. SOUTH PARK MAPLE SPRINGS GAZEBO SOUTH PARK. Ages 1.5-8. $120 (registration required). 412-835-4810 or tinkergarten.com.

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SAT., APRIL 27 SUNN O))) CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL

8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $26-39. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

7 P.M. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER NORTH SIDE. $7.95-9.95. 412-237-3400 or carnegiesciencecenter.org.

8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $30-45. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Papa M.

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8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $12.50-15. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

FRI., APRIL 26 GALLERY CRAWL 5:30 P.M. MULTIPLE VENUES DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FRI., APRIL 26 YOU BRED RAPTORS? 7 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $12. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com.

FRI., APRIL 26 THE WERKS 7 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $15. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest Trailheads.

FRI., APRIL 26 THE DARK CRYSTAL: RANGOS GIANT CINEMA

8 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $46.25-66.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., APRIL 27 MUSICAL MURDER MYSTERY DINNER THEATER 6 P.M. HARTWOOD ACRES MANSION HARTWOOD ACRES. $60-75 (registration required). 412-767-9200 or alleghenycounty. us/parkprograms.

SAT., APRIL 27 LITZ 7 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $12-15. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Voodoo Circuit.

SAT., APRIL 27 JOHNNY ANGEL & THE HALOS 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $15-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

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8 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $7-160.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SUN., APRIL 28 TAPESCAPE 3.0 10 A.M. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH NORTH SIDE. 412-322-5058 or pittsburghkids.org.

SUN., APRIL 28 L.L. BEAN YOGA HIKE 1 P.M. PIE TRAYNOR FIELD NORTH PARK. Over-8 event. Free (registration required). 412-350-4636 or llbean.com/pittsburgh.

MON., APRIL 29 ULI JON ROTH 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $20-33. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., APRIL 30 GEORGE HEID III 5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

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.FOR THE WEEK OF APRIL 11.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I hope that sometime soon you’ll acquire a new source of support or inspiration. Now is a phase of your astrological cycle when you’re likely to attract influences that are in alignment with your deep values. This addition might be a person or animal. It could be a vibrant symbol or useful tool. It may even be a fantasy character or departed ancestor that will stimulate vitality you haven’t been able to summon on your own. Be on the lookout for this enhancement.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Poet David Hinton analyzed the Chinese word for “poetry.” Its etymological meaning is “words spoken at the fertility altar.” Let’s make that your theme, even if you don’t write or read poetry. I suspect the coming weeks will be a favorable time to take a vow or utter a solemn intention in front of a homemade fertility altar. The oath you speak might express a desire to boost your use of your physical vitality: your lust for life, your adoration of the natural world, or your power to produce new human life. Or your vow to foster your fertility could be more metaphorical and symbolic in nature: the imaginative intimacy you will explore or the creativity you’ll express in future works of art or the generous effects you want to have on the world.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Christopher Robin Milne was the son of author A. A. Milne, who wrote the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. He said there are two ways to navigate through life. Either you “take a bearing on something in the future and steer towards it or take a bearing on something in the past and steer away from it.” So in his view, “There are those who look ahead and pull and those who look behind and push.” I’m hoping that in the coming weeks and months, you will make a delighted commitment to the first option: taking a bearing on something in the future and steering towards it. I think that approach will inspire you toward the most interesting success.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The national animal of Finland is the brown bear. The national insect is the ladybug and the national instrument is a stringed instrument known as the kantele. As for the national author, it’s Aleksis Kivi, who produced just one

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

The Qing Dynasty controlled China from the mid-17th century to the early 20th century. It was the fifth biggest empire in world history. But eventually it faded, as all mighty regimes do. Revolution came in 1911, forcing the last emperor to abdicate and giving birth to the Republic of China. I’m inclined to think of your life in 2019 as having some similarities to that transition. It’s the end of one era and the beginning of another; a changing of the guard and a passing of the torch. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to be very active in deciding and visualizing the empire you want next. novel that took him ten years to write. He also published a short collection of odes and a few plays, adding up to a grand total of fewer than 800 pages of work. I think that the efforts you make in the coming weeks could have a disproportionately large impact, as well, Leo. What you lack in quantity will be irrelevant compared to the sheer quality you generate.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I follow the blogger Evanescent Voyager because she makes me cry with sad joy and exultant poignance on a regular basis. One of her other fans wrote her a love note I could have written myself. It said, “Your emotional brilliance and thoughtful passion break me into pieces and then weave me back together with more coherence than I had before reading you. I revere your alchemical talent for undoing me so you can heal me; for lowering my defenses so I can be open to your riches; for demolishing my habitual trance so you can awaken my sleeping genius.” I believe that in the coming weeks, life itself will offer to perform these same services for you, Virgo. I urge you to accept!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Love is no assignment for cowards.” That’s a quote attributed to the ancient Roman poet Ovid. What did he mean? Was he foreshadowing the wisdom of pop singer Pat Benatar, who in 1983 told us, “Love is a battlefield”? Was Ovid implying that to succeed in the amorous

arts we must be heroic warriors prepared to overcome fears and risk psychological dangers? Probably. But I will also point out that it takes as much courage to create fun, interesting togetherness as it does to wrestle with the problems that togetherness brings. You need just as much bravura and panache to explore the sweet mysteries of intimacy as you do to explore the achy mysteries of intimacy. Keep these thoughts in mind as you marshal your audacity to deepen and expand your best relationships in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The literal meaning of the French term jolielaide is “pretty and ugly.” Bloggers at wordsnquotes.com define it as follows: “It’s a fascinating quirkiness that’s irresistible, like a face you want to keep looking at even if you can’t decide whether it is beautiful or not.” Jolie-laide overlaps with the Japanese term wabi-sabi, which describes a person or thing that is lovely because of its imperfection and incompleteness. I bring these facts to your attention because I think you have extraordinary potential to be a master embodier of both jolie-laide and wabi-sabi in the coming weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As Czech playwright Vaclav Havel (1936–2011) matured, he became a political dissident who opposed the Soviet Union’s authoritarian grip on his country. Eventually, he became a key

player in the Velvet Revolution that banished Communism. When Czechoslovakia emerged as a new democracy, its people elected him president. Havel later thanked Lou Reed and the band the Velvet Underground for fully awakening his liberationist leadership. He said their unruly music stoked his longing to establish a culture where total creative freedom was possible. I mention this, Sagittarius, because now is a favorable time to identify the music or art or films or literature that might fuel your emancipation in the coming months.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author J. R. R. Tolkien toiled on his masterpiece The Lord of the Rings for twelve years. Once he finished, it wasn’t published for more than five years. So seventeen years passed between the time he launched his precious project and the time when it reached an audience. I don’t think you will need that much patience in shepherding your own venture to full expression, Capricorn. But I hope you’ll summon as much faith in yourself as Tolkien had to rouse in himself. To do so will bring out the best in you!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Released in 1998, The Prince of Egypt is an animated film that tells the story of the Hebrew prophet Moses. In the climactic event, the hero uses magic to part the waters of the Red Sea, allowing his people to run across the sea floor and escape the army that’s chasing them. To make that seven-minute scene, 28 professional animators labored for 318,000 hours. In the coming months, you could create your own version of that marvel, Aquarius. But you’ll need a team to help you, and that team is not yet ready to go. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get it ready, though.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean businessman Steve Jobs testified that taking LSD was “one of the two or three most important things” he ever did in his life. It opened his mind in ways he felt were crucial to his development. What are the three most important things you’ve ever done, Pisces? I invite you to revisit at least one of them and see if you can take it to the next step of its power to inspire you. What if it has even more to offer you in your efforts to become the person you want to be?

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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SEVEN DAYS OF ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

^ Sat., April 13: Annual Latin American and Caribbean Festival

THURSDAY

get ready for an uplifting, comical set at Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. 10 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave, Munhall. $49-69. librarymusichall.com

COMEDY

FRIDAY

APRIL 11

Inspired by a mini comedy tour last fall with Hotels.com (called “Hotels.Comedy”), Jonathan Van Ness is now on a comedy tour of his own. His Road to Beijing stand-up makes a fierce appearance in Pittsburgh. Van Ness, known for his styling skills and flawless hair on Netflix’s Queer Eye, claims he is at his funniest when on stage. If his over-the-top antics on the show are any indication of his of live show,

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

APRIL 12 FILM

See three days of creepy shorts when the Parkway Theater hosts the Pittsburgh Horror Film Festival. Presented by ColdFront Productions, the event showcases works from international

and local talent. Enjoy craft beer from Parkway’s on-site brewery, Abjuration Brewing, while watching dozens of films with eye-catching titles like Terrordactyl, Beware the Goatman, Attack of the Killer Chickens, and The Witches of Dumpling Farm. Continues through Sun., April 14. Showtimes vary. 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $5 per film block. communityreelartscenter.org

RACING

If a person on the hunt for a new car saw one listed for $500, they would be justified to keep walking. But at the Pitt Maneuver,

part of the endurance racing series 24 Hours of Lemons, all cars entered in the race must cost $500 or less. Don’t believe cars that cheap exist? Follow the advice on the event’s website: “See a $1,000 car on Craigslist? Bring $400 cash and a 12er of Old Milwaukee.” Check out these clunkers trying their damndest at the Pittsburgh International Race Complex. 8 a.m. Through Sun., April 14. 201 Penndale Exd., Wampum, Pa. $30. Free for 16 and under. 24hoursoflemons.com

MUSIC

Fans of microtonal music, Steve Reich’s


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^ Tue., April 16: The Book Of Mormon

Drumming, and propulsive, hypnotic group percussion should join the University of Pittsburgh for A Night of Gamelan at Bellefield Hall Auditorium. If you’re unfamiliar, gamelan is a traditional Indonesian percussion ensemble that sounds similar to a group of xylophones or gongs, but there’s really no way to explain its sound. So, hear it yourself. The program features Pitt graduate student Devon Tipp on the shakuhachi (bamboo flute) for a performance of “Cloudrest,” by renowned composer Elizabeth Brown. 8 p.m. 315 S. Bellefield, Oakland. $8.50. music.pitt.edu

SATURDAY APRIL 13 FAIR

The 2019 Refugee and Immigrant Health and Wellness Fair, held at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center, seeks to make health and wellness services in the city more accessible to new residents. The fair, planned and hosted by 15 different partners including the Allegheny Health Network and Literacy Pittsburgh, is open to all Pittsburghers interested in networking and learning ^ Fri., April 12: A Night of Gamelan PHOTO: THOMAS ALTANY

how to promote health and wellness. There will be opportunities for health screenings, information provided by more than 30 organizations that focus on health and inclusion, free international cuisine, and family and children’s activities. Interpreters of many languages and transportation services are available. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free and open to the public. facebook. com/pg/ajapo pittsburgh/events

FEST

The Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh is hosting its annual festival at Wesley W. Posvar Hall for the 39th year. The event highlights Latin American and Caribbean food, arts, and crafts, while providing information on local and regional organizations. Vendors sell handmade and authentic Latin American products, and cultural performances take place throughout the day. 12-8 p.m. 230 S. Bouquet St., Oakland. Free. ucis.pitt.edu/clas/festival

ART

Phosphor Project Space, an artist-run, non-commercial gallery that showcases emerging artists, presents its latest exhibition Null Island. Curated by Emma Vescio, the show includes works by visual artist and musician, Shani Banerjee, and interdisciplinary artist Tsohil Bhatia. A description of the event says both artists have been working within the meditative realms of photography, video, and sculpture CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

^ Sat., April 13: An Evening of Balinese Shadow Puppet Theater

in relation to the ocean and ideas of loneliness. The pieces also encourage viewers to consider the journeys taken by water, bones, and archival objects. Continues through May 11. 7-10 p.m. 7720 Waverly St., Wilkinsburg. Free. phosphorpgh.com

OPERA

Since 2015, Co-Opera has mined some of the city’s most talented composers, performers, directors, and designers for intensive collaborations to produce new operatic works. Now, Pittsburgh Opera and Carnegie Mellon University present the results of a two-year partnership with three new English-language operas: Mel Rides the Bus Alone from composer Joshua Brown and librettist Lauren D’Errico; languagemachine from composer Ramin Akhavijou and libretist D’Errico; and Not Our First American from composer Marina Lopez and librettist Daniel Burns. Each piece is approximately 25 minutes. A meet-and-greet with the artists follows the performance. 7:30 p.m. Also 5:30 p.m. Sun., April 14. Pittsburgh Opera, 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. Free. pittsburghopera.org

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PUPPETS

Experience the culture of Bali with a night of puppetry at the University of Pittsburgh. An Evening of Balinese Shadow Puppet Theater: Tales from the Ramayana uses a traditional art form to depict the ancient, epic story of Rama, a legendary prince of the Kosala Kingdom. The performance includes puppetry by Ida Bagus Anom Suryawan, Ida Ayu Kumalayoni, and Gender Wayang, music by Meghan Hynson, Yang Shuo, Wangcaixuan Zhang, and Annie Valdes, and a pre-performance lecture by Dr. Meghan Hynson. The event will take place in the Frick Fine Arts auditorium. 8-10 p.m. 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $12. pitt.edu

SUNDAY APRIL 14 FEST

Lawrenceville is known as one of the most quickly developing neighborhoods in Pittsburgh, but does it live up to the hype? Decide for yourself at Taste of

Lawrenceville, a lively celebration of all things Lawrenceville. Eat from stands by Ki Pollo, Arsenal Cider House, NatuRoll Creamery, Spirit, and more, set to the sounds of DJ Selecta, DJ Nugget, and Byron Nash. And don’t miss the chance to drink like a king at the event’s Game of Thrones pop-up bar. 12 p.m. Bay 41, 4107 Willow St., Lawrenceville. Free. Search “Taste of Lawrenceville” on Facebook or Eventbrite

MONDAY APRIL 15 FILM

Thomas E. Starzl left behind an impressive legacy after his passing in 2017. The Pitt professor and surgeon is often referred to as “the father of modern transplantation” for his medical work, which included performing the first successful human liver transplant in 1967. The documentary film Burden of Genius follows Starzl’s revolutionary impact on his field, focusing on how he turned the idea of taking an organ from one person and transplanting it into another

from a science-fiction fantasy into an everyday procedure. The first public showings of the film are scheduled to premiere at the Carnegie Science Center’s Rangos Giant Cinema. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. every day April 1218. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. Tickets $9.95 for non-members; $7.95 for members. 412-237-3400 or carnegiesciencecenter.org

MIXER

Meet and mingle with arts-minded folks at New Hazlett’s Theater Industry Mixer. Network and learn with people from all branches of theater — students, professionals, on-stage talent, and behind-the-scenes experts. Snacks and apps are provided alongside a cash bar. Registration is required to attend. 6-9 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East. North Side. Free. newhazletttheater.org

TUESDAY APRIL 16 STAGE

In many ways, The Book Of Mormon adheres nicely to Broadway tradition. The


PHOTO: PATOS ARCHIVES

^ Fri., April 12: 24 Hours of Lemons

lead characters are a mismatched duo of Mormons on a mission in Uganda: one schlubby, inept, and loveable, the other straight-laced, ego-driven, and handsome. The initial friction gives way to real friendship and growth, supplemented by no shortage of excessive mugging, outsized dance numbers, and sugary melodies. But nobody talks about that, and why would they? The musical was penned by South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone with Avenue Q’s Robert Lopez — and it shows. Both the incisive, shocking humor, and the loving but snarky homages to Broadway history of the creators’ past works are alive and executed beautifully here, more than earning its absurd number of accolades (nine Tony Awards, international tours, star-making in the form of its original leads Josh Gad and Andrew Rannells). And now it’s back by popular demand at Heinz Hall. Don’t miss out. 7:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $150. pittsburgh-theater.com

WEDNESDAY APRIL 17 EVENT

Most judges in Pennsylvania are elected ^ Sat., April 13: Co-Opera PHOTO: DAVID BACHMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

officials and there is technically no requirement for judges to be experts in the legal system before making rulings. Advocates like Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts see this system as extremely flawed and are fighting to change it with the hopes of having judges selected based on merit, not elections. And Pittsburghers can join that fight at the Spring Into Action Benefit fundraiser. The event will include a speaker program, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and the opportunity to mingle with “others who support fair courts, civic education, and equal access to justice,” according to PMC’s website. Tickets start at $75, but there are also options to donate much larger amounts that come with perks. 6 p.m. 300 Fifth Ave., Downtown. $75. pmconline.org

SELF-CARE

Musicians, industry professionals, and creative people convene at Zenith for a dose of self-care. Hosted by local musician Angela Autumn, Musicians for Well-Being provides an open, inclusive space for people to discuss issues specific to the artistic community at one of Pittsburgh’s long-standing vegetarian and vegan restaurants. Guests will also have access to resources designed to help simplify the stressful, often complicated lifestyles of musicians and artists. 7:30 p.m. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. Free. zenithpgh.com •

SPRING THRIFT & DESIGNER SALE APRIL 11-14 A NONPROFIT ENTERPRISE OF

25-50% OFF thrift clothing, shoes, & accessories PLUS, the premiere of thousands of spring & summer items from our newly expanded Designer Days Boutique

125 51st Street in Lawrenceville Free Parking! Bring this ad for $5 off your $25+ purchase! Valid April 11 - May 31, 2019. One coupon per person, per day. Not valid with other offers.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 10-17, 2019

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-005199, In re petition of Arielle Sagbohan parent and legal guardian of Nathaniel Luke Mari, for change of name to Nathaniel Luke Mari Vossah. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 8th day of May, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

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TECHNOLOGY EntIT Software LLC is accepting resumes for the position of Quality Engineer in Pittsburgh, PA (Ref. # ENTPPAUGQ1). Design and integrate quality requirements, processes, and practices into the development, design, manufacturing, and continuous improvement of products or solutions for a customer segment or business unit. Analyze and review new product and solution designs and specifications for potential quality issues. Mail resume to EntIT Software LLC, Attn: Jim Brooking, 5325 Elkhorn Blvd, Suite 343, Sacramento, CA 95842. Resume must include Ref. #, full name, email address & mailing address. No phone calls. Must be legally authorized to work in U.S. without sponsorship. EOE.

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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD 19-003522, In re petition of Carl Lester Farmer for change of name to Jamal El-Amin. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 3rd day of May, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for. Attorney for the Petitioner Dorothea S. Hall, Esq., 7202 Susquehanna Street #402, Pittsburgh, PA 15208. 412-339-7914

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-3339. In re petition of Bruce William Rutherford for change of name to William Issac Gainsborogh. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 29th day of April, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for


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52. Show set in labs 53. Coach Hagen 54. Sneaky 56. “She’s getting away!” 58. Strings around the neck 61. Affirmative that sounds like a pronoun 62. Upset with the government? 63. You can build on them, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 68. Skiing mecca 69. Tim who is roughly the 256th Democrat running in 2020 70. Nintendo villain with a W on his cap 71. Compost heap piece 72. Counting-off word 73. Bar none

DOWN

1. Reggae lover’s god 2. Chill 3. Braves on boards 4. Scribbling in the margin 5. Orange tree spot 6. Activity tracker meas. 7. Get ready for 8. Open up a window, e.g. 9. Lumberjack’s equipment 10. Lift provider 11. Give someone a seat?

12. Senile one 13. Nighttime picture? 18. Glowing reviews 22. The Crimson Tide, familiarly 23. Secretary’s stat. 24. First state to allow women to practice law 25. Tidal type 26. Small songbird 31. “The Godfather” actor 33. Choir voice 35. Yes guitarist Steve 37. Enjoy heartily, as on Thanksgiving 39. Grazing spots 40. Jobs, so to speak 41. Carve into steel 42. First blank in the

palindrome “___ to vote, ___!” 46. Second blank in the palindrome “___ to vote, ___!” 47. Wheel covering 48. “Becket” actor 49. Cook with oil 50. Saluting phrase 51. How one might address a couple 55. French 101 book 57. “La Vie En Rose” singer 59. Buddy 60. PDF image, maybe 64. “I can’t decide” 65. Dormitory overseer, briefly 66. French pronoun 67. Our sun LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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PEEPSHOW A sex and social justice column BY JESSIE SAGE // PEEPSHOWCAST@GMAIL.COM

A

SHLEY ADDISON vividly remembers the first time she squirted. “A girlfriend of mine was using a Bodywand on me while she held down my bucking hips and out of this beautiful building intensity came three huge squirts from me,” she says. “It was truly magical!” Though she was very young when it happened, Maya Morena also remembers her first time. She was a teenager living at home when she had the following experience while fantasizing: “While I was fingering myself, I reached a point where I started to get really heated, and rather than stopping I just kept going and I felt a blast. I ended up messing my sheets that night, but it felt amazing.” And Eleven was with a partner the first time they squirted. They say, “I was riding him, and I just, let go, and soaked him from his nipples to knees. I was proud of myself.” What all of these stories have in common is an element of surprise, but a surprise that was particularly intense: magical, amazing, and something to be proud of. Perhaps the surprise can be traced to how little people understand about female ejaculation, even though there is consistent interest in how it happens, what it is made of, and what it means. Professor Sarah Alison Miller, author of Medieval Monstrosity and the Female

CP ILLUSTRATION: XIOLA JENSEN

“IT WAS TRULY MAGICAL!” “...IT FELT AMAZING.” “I WAS PROUD OF MYSELF.” Body (Routledge Press), comments that the debate about female bodily fluids is not new. “There is a long-standing history in Western medical and psychological discourse that women are ‘wet’ by nature; they leak excess body fluids.” Miller says that while it was acknowledged that excess bodily fluids needed to be purged to maintain health and balance, it mattered how this was done. “Historically speaking, the policing of

the female body boundaries and body fluids is linked to the policing of female sexual practices.” In our current framework, this leads to a lot of debate as to whether or not squirting is “real,” or “just pee.” Though Eleven’s first squirting experience was overwhelmingly positive, that wasn’t the case for all future instances. “Years later, [a different partner] immediately insisted I [had] peed all over him. Now I can’t squirt like that,

I hold back, afraid of pee.” While Morena was alone when she squirted the first time, her mother noticed the next day. “My mom got mad because she thought I peed the bed and I didn’t correct her,” she says. The debate about what female ejaculatory fluid is made up of is less interesting than the fact that so many women report these contradictory experiences of very intense sexual satisfaction, coupled with a shaming that is just as intense. Miller comments, “The degree to which wetness is considered desirable becomes mixed with more complicated ideologies concerning the parsing of body fluids: Which ones are desirable? Which ones are considered abject? And — perhaps most important for this topic — how does one categorize these fluids and how they are purged, displayed, and shared.” I am not a scientist and don’t know what makes up the fluid that accompanies squirting, and you can get a hundred different answers if you look it up. What I can say is that most squirters, myself included, will describe the experience as profoundly pleasurable or freeing, that is, unless or until they are shamed for it. A little pee, if in fact that’s part of the equation, seems less important in the scheme of things. Good sex is sometimes messy and we should let it be. Sex blankets exist for a reason.

JESSIE SAGE IS CO-HOST OF THE PEEPSHOW PODCAST AT PEEPSHOWPODCAST.COM. HER COLUMN PEEPSHOW IS EXCLUSIVE TO PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER. FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER @PEEP_CAST. HAVE A SEX QUESTION YOU’RE TOO AFRAID TO ASK YOUR FRIENDS? ASK JESSIE! EMAIL INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM. QUESTIONS MAY BE CONSIDERED FOR AN UPCOMING COLUMN.

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

April 10, 2019 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 30 Issue 15

April 10, 2019 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 30 Issue 15