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A John Waters’ Christmas: Holier & Dirtier

EVENTS 11.9 – 7pm SCREENING OF THE CHELSEA GIRLS The Warhol theater The Warhol presents Andy Warhol’s epic double-screen masterpiece The Chelsea Girls in a new digital film transfer. This film screens in celebration of the new publication Andy Warhol’s The Chelsea Girls. Free; Registration is required

11.15 – 10am MEMBERS HALF-PINT PRINTS The Factory Families work with The Warhol’s artist educators to create silkscreen prints during this members-only drop-in silkscreen printing activity for children ages 1 to 4 years old. Free for members; Registration is required

Photo: Greg German

12.8 – 8pm Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art Tickets $30/$25 members and students; $125 VIP VIP tickets include general admission seating and post-show meet and greet. Please note this performance contains adult subject matter and strong language.

The Warhol welcomes back by popular demand, the legendary writer and director, John Waters, (Pink Flamingos, Hairspray, Cry Baby), with his critically acclaimed one-man show, “A John Waters Christmas.” Torn IL[^LLUJHWP[HSPZTHUKHUHYJO`>H[LYZVɈLYZOPZOPSHYPV\ZS`PUJPZP]L[HRL VU¸*OYPZ[THZJYHa`¹ZWYLHKPUNOPZZ\I]LYZP]L`\SL[PKLJOLLYHUKS\UHJ`

11.24 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY Join artist educators for Dandy Andy, a monthly tour that focuses on Warhol’s queer history. Free with museum admission

11.30 – 7pm ART IN CONTEXT: VISIBILITY AND ERASURE The Warhol theater Pittsburgh premiere of Happy Birthday, Marsha! followed by a discussion with filmmakers Tourmaline and Sasha Wortzel, moderated by Ciora Thomas. Free; Registration is required

12.1 – 9am SENSORY-FRIENDLY EVENT FOR TEENS AND YOUNG ADULTS: PORTRAITURE This inclusive 90-minute workshop for teens and young adults (ages 13–21) focuses on the role of portraiture in Warhol’s artistic practice. Free; Registration is required

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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NOV. 7-14, 2018 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 45 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Marketing and Promotions Coordinator CONNOR MARSHMAN Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Senior Sales Representative BLAKE LEWIS Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Advertising Sales Assistant TAYLOR PASQUARELLI Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, GAB BONESSO, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, JESSIE SAGE, STEVE SUCATO Intern ALEX POPICHAK Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

FIRSTSHOT BY JARED WICKERHAM

Multiple groups of marchers make their way towards the Tree of Life synagogue last week during President Trump’s visit, three days after a mass shooting in Pittsburgh.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY DAVID POHL

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CP ILLUSTRATION: DAVID POHL

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THE BIG STORY

NOT KEEPING IT 100 BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

N THE MONTHS leading up to the 2016 election, I heard

this dude saying that he “didn’t agree with everything Barack Obama did as president 100 percent.” We were talking about imperfect candidates, Bernie Sanders supporters begrudgingly voting for Hillary Clinton, Trump supporters who didn’t like his behavior but dug his personality enough to vote for him. “Listen, I didn’t support everything Obama did 100 percent...” I had definitely heard that before, but for some reason it hit me pretty hard this time. In what world would a voter agree with everything a two-term president does 100 percent? One-hundred percent? Why in the world would that be the bar? Why is that number even on the table? I thought about it — it didn’t take long — it’s because a vote is 100 percent or nothing. If you support a candidate 50.000000000001 percent, that rounds up to a full vote. You can’t kinda vote for someone, even if you only kinda support them. That idea has a neat little TED-talky ring to it, but it’s grosser than that. Over the past two years, we’ve seen how problematic it can be when that all-or-nothing mentality goes beyond supporting a candidate and continues with blindly supporting an elected official. It’s easy to blame the current president for that — he is big on superlatives and light on nuance (a profoundly kind way to put it) — but there are instances of this across parties, and it dates back before 45. I first remember it happening back in 2008, my first presidential election. I was at Mad Mex in Oakland when it was announced that Barack Obama won the presidency. The place erupted like a Steelers Super Bowl win (which I had seen firsthand three years earlier at the same bar, so I’m not being poetic). While I was thrilled to have been a part of Obama’s historic election and couldn’t hold back my excitement, part of me felt weird. It was a milestone, but it felt more like

rooting for a team than I had expected it to. A pep rally. Blind, tribal loyalty. Over the next eight years, I tried to keep my support in check and recognize instances where I disagreed with the president, or didn’t agree 100 percent. But over that time, I learned something that’s become even more clear with the past two administrations: people like to like the president. People like to like politicians. The people who like Trump don’t just like him, they like liking him. The people who like Beto O’Rourke like liking him. It feels good to communicate political support through something as simple as “liking,” rather than doing the pain-in-the-ass work of wading through the issues.

YOU CAN’T KINDA VOTE FOR SOMEONE, EVEN IF YOU ONLY KINDA SUPPORT THEM. This isn’t super new. Michael Dukakis’ drop after his tank photo op or George W. Bush being “the sort of guy you’d want to drink with” both live in the same pop-culture-over-policy world we’re in now. But it’s gotten worse. So as we’re staring down the barrel of what is sure to be a harrowing, exhausting, ugly two years of presidential campaigning, maybe we should try to hold back on “liking” those winners we voted for. They got 100 percent of your vote, but that shouldn’t buy 100 percent of your support. And it doesn’t have to. Once inaugurated, the honeymoon should end. They won, now they work for us, so let’s put them to work.

On the pages that follow, we reached out to local activists for advice on how they think you can stay engaged after the election is over. CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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We asked local activists and influencers what still needs done in Pittsburgh, and how people can help after Election Day. SPREAD THE LOVE!

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Steel City Sisters, steelcitysisters.altervista.org WHAT STILL NEEDS TO BE DONE IN PITTSBURGH? In my personal opinion, more needs to be done for minorities in this city. Pittsburgh does not attract black professionals, and those who grew up here tend to leave as soon as they finish college. As a result, the black population has significantly higher rates of poverty than any other racial group in this city and faces more discrimination than in other cities in this region. For all the claims of Pittsburgh being the “Most Livable,” it’s hard to see it if you’re black. I wish I had an easy answer to this but I don’t, and it’s honestly one of the reasons why I myself plan on leaving Pittsburgh once I finish school in early 2020. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN DOING? Most of my direct activism is in the LGBT community, namely fundraising for organizations such as Persad, Proud Haven, the Pittsburgh Equality Center, as well as Planned Parenthood. As a gay person, these organizations are all near to my heart. And as a black person, I hope to set an example of with my activism and not feeling obligated to limit my actions to just “black” spaces. WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE NEXT? The Sisters’ goal for the new year is to focus fundraising efforts towards Persad, as well as expanding our reach and connections in Pittsburgh/Western Pennsylvania.

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* Some interviews have been edited and condensed for length and clarity.

HOW CAN PEOPLE HELP? All the organizations I listed take donations. I personally follow the philosophy of “Money talks and bullshit walks,” and non-profit organizations need funding to keep operating. If someone wants to help, that’d be a good start. And if they want to lend a more direct hand in helping the Sisters’ mission, we’re always accepting new members! CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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What pass is best for you? In for the long run. Annual Pass- Best value if you ride frequently all year long. Price includes a full year of unlimited rides. Pay for the first 11 months– the 12th month is free. Cost: $1,072.50

Take 10. Ten-Trip Pass*- So, you plan to ride but don’t know exactly when. No problem. The ten-trip pass gives you the flexibility to use according to your unpredictable schedule. Cost: $25.00

Everyday commuter? Monthly Pass- The next best option, if you prefer to pay each month instead. Receive unlimited rides, just not the free month. Valid for a calendar month beginning with the first day and ending on the last. Well worth it if you intend to ride at least 20 days per month. Cost: $97.50

Forget Cash. Stored Cash Value- Provides the same flexibility as a ten-trip pass and will save you from paying an extra $.25 if you use cash. Stored cash value is required in order to purchase a $1 electronic transfer. Cost: Load any value up to $200

Taking it one week at a time. Weekly PassA good short-term option if you plan to ride often throughout a specific week. Receive unlimited rides for a calendar week Sunday through Saturday. Cost: $25.00

Taking it day by day. Day Pass*- Your best option for unlimited rides for one service day. The pass is valid from first tap on a farebox to the end of Port Authority service that same day. Cost: $7.00 Passes are available on a Connectix, the paper version of an electronic smart card, and can be purchased at any ConnectCard Vending Machine.

One day at a time. Single Trip Pass/Single Trip Pass with Transfer- A great option for occasional riders and visitors. Perfect if you just need a one-way ride to or from an event or want to see Downtown Pittsburgh at night from the Monongahela Incline. Cost: $2.50/$3.50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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MONICA RUIZ

Casa San José, casasanjose.org

CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

WHAT STILL NEEDS TO BE DONE IN PITTSBURGH IN TERMS OF IMMIGRATION? Well, as far as the city of Pittsburgh goes, besides all the racism and anti-immigrant sentiment that runs through the veins of the horrible people that plague the city, I would say there should be a larger [Allegheny County] and even state effort to create policies that are pro-immigrant. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN DOING? I have been advocating for not arming the police at Pittsburgh Public Schools. I have also been working on creating a policing policy with Pennsylvania State Police based on recent activity they have had here, after a ProPublica article outlined the horrible treatment of immigrants. I have also been working on organizing against the Public Charge rule, [which is proposed to deny legal immigrants permanent residency if they receive any public benefits]. WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE NEXT? Our door knocking campaign, where we are going to educate folks about their immigrant neighbors. HOW CAN PEOPLE HELP? Volunteer! Go on our website and you can register there, also sign up for our newsletter, become an amigo on our website.

CP PHOTO: RYAN DETO

Jewish activists and immigrant-rights advocates march on the South Side on Jan. 30

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times in my life for many beloved people who’ve died, and being able to be publicly Jewish and feeling safe in public in solidarity with everyone that came out to support and protect us was really powerful.

ARIELLE COHEN

Community organizer with IfNotNow, facebook.com/IfNotNowPGH WHAT STILL NEEDS TO BE DONE IN PITTSBURGH? President Trump said that there should be guns in the temple and I think that’s wrong. I think that we know that when guns are brought into our place of worship and our public schools … that it actually makes places that are meant to be safe for all less safe for many. I think that what we need to be doing instead is saying exactly that, that we need to divest from police departments and state sanctioned violence, and invest in our community directly. Without getting into policy specifically, we know that our struggles are all deeply interconnected and we have to take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor and Trump has made it clear that he is working toward building a white nationalist state. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN DOING IN RESPONSE TO THE CURRENT CLIMATE? Right now what we’re thinking about is that there’s safety in solidarity. We as a community need to work together to make clear that Trump is not welcome here, white nationalist sentiment is not welcome here. Publicly mourning was really powerful to me. I’ve sat Shiva many

HOW CAN PEOPLE STAY INVOLVED? IfNotNow hosts Friday night Shabbats regularly and we’re working on how we show up for the Jewish community and our broader community to invite people in. We know that this didn’t happen in a vacuum. This is not the first time we’ve seen violence in Pittsburgh. [Make] sure that you’re involved in a community that shows up, joining organizations like IfNotNow, Casa San Jose, and DSA so that you are informed and showing up every time things like this happens. HOW CAN PEOPLE AVOID BURNOUT? One thing that I have been saying every day since Trump came into office and had the opportunity to say at our vigil, is that we will take care of ourselves and each other as a form of resistance, pain will be channeled into our fight, and they will regret being the catalyst for our liberation. Voting is the minimum level of participation but it’s not enough. We need to know our neighbors and our friends and be willing to stand up and fight for one another when we’re attacked. We really need to be really human with each other, because Trump’s administration is attempting to dehumanize us. CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PATRICK NIGHTINGALE

Pittsburgh NORML, pittsburghnorml.org

CONTINUED FROM PG. 1

WHAT STILL NEEDS TO BE DONE IN PITTSBURGH IN TERMS OF MARIJUANA? We need to get the Pittsburgh Police Department to use the Decriminalization Ordinance. While it did see some use in 2017 (200 out of a total 900 police encounters over a “small amount” of cannabis), the majority of the time the individual is still being charged with a misdemeanor. This means the individual must get fingerprinted and must appear [in court]. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN DOING? NORML is working with state Rep. Ed Gainey’s office to schedule a local “town hall” on the issue of full marijuana legalization. We are also working with his office to plan panel hearings in Harrisburg. We will be lobbying state Rep. Barry Jozwiak to eliminate the “escalation” to a misdemeanor that is part of his decriminalization bill - HB 928. The bill will be re-introduced in January. In present form it calls for a summary offense for first two offenses and then escalates to a misdemeanor for a third and subsequent. I have been speaking publicly about Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana law, to try and educate patients and the general public. I am working with a magistrate judge in Washington County to educate law enforcement in his jurisdiction.

CP FILE PHOTO

WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE NEXT? We will also be scheduling another rally in Harrisburg to coincide with the re-introduction of the decriminalization bills and state Rep. Jake Wheatley’s [recreational marijuana] bill. We also need to address the DUI issue for medical patients. HOW CAN PEOPLE HELP? Follow Pittsburgh NORML on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Most importantly — CALL THEIR REPS AND SENATORS.

VANESSA GERMAN

Poet, artist, performer; facebook.com/vanessa.german.1 WHAT I THINK *STILL* NEEDS TO BE DONE IT PITTSBURGH: Pittsburgh (& America) must continue to wake up to & reckon with the horrors of white supremacy & its brutal & enduring legacies of terrorism, hate, & systemic cruelty upon the lives, bodies, spirits & futures of Indigenous, Black, Brown, Queer, _______,________, human beings & the natural world. White identifying Pittsburghers must reckon with this & take on this dismantling within their hearts, families, & communities. Pittsburghers of Color, Pittsburghers at the margins, Pittsburghers who live in the “other” Pittsburgh, must know that they are Whole, Valuable & Worthy. It can be despairing to endure the silence, indifference, and hypocrisy of white supremacy. We must know that compassion, empathy & justice belong to us & our loved ones, also. & that to be denied this, to be made invisible from these living veins of humanity is an intentional & often shrug-able cruelty. Find places where you are loved & seen, protected & engaged. Run for office. Say your truth out-loud. Refuse invisibility. Own & activate your human citizenship with your own agency. WHAT HAVE I BEEN DOING? I’VE BEEN DOING THIS. What plans do I have next: to love the children in my neighborhood.to speak to their power & prowess. i plan to continue to make art that tows in an intimate & soulful reckoning with white supremacy. i plan to continue to write poems, to help myself & others, to honor, to grieve & see & hold the lives of the living, & slaughtered Black & Brown &________ children, Trans Women, fathers, sisters,_______ , Mothers, prisoners, as important, sacred & deserving of love & justice. WHAT CAN PEOPLE DO: intentionally share something that you love deeply, at least once a month, say so out-loud. White Pittsburghers can make yard signs that denounce white-supremacy, & or, acknowledge it as terrorism. They can also begin weekly community gatherings to actively learn its faces & to craft & activate plans to undo it, and its damage. Pittsburghers can offer repair to its indigenous citizens. —have a monthly poet laureate from any pps school. — prioritize affordable housing for single mothers. I could go on.

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MARIA MONTANO

Trans rights activist WHAT STILL NEEDS TO BE DONE IN PITTSBURGH? Lots of folks look to Pittsburgh as being the “most livable city” and see all the “best of” lists that we get on and think that as a city, we are doing a great job at meeting the challenges we face. But we have so much work to do in order to make it a reality. From economic inequality to racial justice to criminal justice reform and LGBTQIA rights, we have such a long way to go, and all of our struggles are so deeply connected that we must continue to work together to address the long term problems that affect all of our communities. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN DOING? I’ve been involved with a variety of local community organizing groups like One Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh UNITED, and the local chapter of the ACLU to work on a variety of issues facing our city. Over the past several weeks, I’ve been organizing around the attack on the rights of the Transgender community by the Trump administration. WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE NEXT? Voting is the first step. But we need to make sure communities get organized to hold our elected leaders accountable. It’s important that our elected officials use the tools and the power they have to protect marginalized communities and they need to hear from us on a regular basis about what needs to be done. Pennsylvania is still one of [more than 30] states in the country that doesn’t have a form of non-discrimination policy in place that protects the LGBTQIA community and currently, we just have a handful of city and county ordinances in sort of a patch-work system, but that isn’t enough. Unless you have a union-contract that protects you, there really is no way to protect yourself at work from discrimination for simply existing as a member of the community. We need to continue to push hard for statewide non-discrimination policy that protects us at work and in public life. HOW CAN PEOPLE HELP? Get involved! There are so many great organizations that are doing incredible work across the city to address the problems we face. And they are always looking for new folks to get active in talking to their friends, family, and neighbors about how we can make changes that lift up all of us. Find an issue that affects you or that you care about and connect with a local organizing group that is addressing the problem and see how you can get involved. Contact your elected officials, as often as possible. From city council to the U.S. Senate, we should be more engaged and make our voices heard. Speak at local hearings, call your federal representatives, and march in the streets with folks demanding change. Now is the time to be visible and make ourselves heard.

Compiled by Lisa Cunningham, Ryan Deto, Hannah Lynn, Jordan Snowden, and Maggie Weaver PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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“Respect my existence”: People hold up messages in support for transgender rights during a Trans-Rights Rally in Downtown Pittsburgh on Thu., Nov. 1.

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TRANS PRIDE Hundreds rallied last Friday in Downtown Pittsburgh calling for transgender rights and protections BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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N NOV. 1, light blue and pink hues fell on hundreds of people inside the portico of the City-County Building in Downtown Pittsburgh. Those soft lights reflected off a giant Transgender Pride Flag, landing on the light blue and pink stripes that make up the flag. The large crowd gathered to protest the news that President Donald Trump’s administration is considering narrowly defining gender for federal programs, which would strip away some civilrights and health-care protections for trans individuals. Coley Alston, of TransPride Pittsburgh, spoke out against this attempt. “I am queer, trans and non-binary, unapologetically, and I will not be erased,” said Alston. The rally came just a few days after the mass shooting that took 11 lives at the Tree of Life synagogue in Squirrel Hill. Pittsburgh City Councilor

Erika Strassburger represents the district where the shooting occurred and she told the crowd that even a tragedy of that magnitude can be a powerful, uniting force. “I have seen more unity in our city in the past few days than ever before,” said Strassburger. “People are crossing geographic and invisible barriers to support one another during this difficult time.” Strassburger said this unity shouldn’t fade after the grief subsides. She said the violence against the Jewish community is rooted in the same bigotry that results in violence against other marginalized groups, like LGBTQ people, and especially trans individuals and trans people of color. “Until we realize the intersectionality of all of our battles, we will never win,” said Strassburger. “Trans rights are human rights.” The rally was the collaborative work

of 16 different organizations, including the Women’s March on Washington — Pittsburgh, TransPride Pittsburgh, Trans YOUniting, the Delta Foundation of Pittsburgh, and the newly formed Transgender Task Force of Pennsylvania. The lead organizer was Dena Stanley, a Black trans woman and local advocate. Rosemary Ketchum of the ACLU of West Virginia spoke at the rally, and said the Trump administration has been emboldening the “most hateful people in our society.” But she added that this was why LGBTQ individuals must live openly and proudly because “this is exactly what scares them.” “And when the bigots are scared, we know we are doing something right.” Ketchum was encouraged by the gathering and said she believes in the “collective power of the LGBT people and our ability to activate change.”

Follow senior writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto

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The eight-member international sensation uses everything but conventional percussion instruments – matchboxes, wooden poles, brooms, garbage cans, Zippo OLJKWHUVKXEFDSV²WRÀOO WKHVWDJHZLWKPDJQLÀFHQW rhythms. STOMP. See what all the noise is about!

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FIRST RESPONSE BY GAB BONESSO // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

O

N THE Friday afternoon before

the Tree of Life massacre, I was told by a middle school boy that he is often called anti-Semitic slurs at his school. I was shocked to hear this. In the seven years that I’ve been an anti-bullying advocate in schools, this was the ďŹ rst time a child spoke to me about anti-Semitism. He told me that he is also called homophobic slurs, but being only 12, he really has no idea what his sexuality is so those comments don’t bother him as much as being called names for his faith. He also conďŹ ded to me that he deals with some mental health issues that are being exasperated by anti-Semitic and homophobic bullying. He’s contemplated taking his own life. In a moment of confession, he got teary-eyed and admitted snapping back at his bullies and calling them names. He told me he knew it was wrong and he knew he didn’t mean what he said, but he wanted to defend his religion. At this point in our private conversation, I told him that I’ll never understand why oppressed minority groups bully other oppressed minority groups. I believe that if all of the oppressed people in America teamed up, we would be bigger and stronger than X-Men. I believe this statement with all of my heart and I know it could be true.

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He agreed. He told me that he can deal with their comments better now that he’s on medication. He also told me that one of the boys has recently apologized and told him that there is nothing wrong with his Jewish faith. The boy and I both took that as a sign of progress. Then Saturday occurred. An anti-Semitic hate crime in the heart of Squirrel Hill. After initially sobbing and panicking upon hearing the news, I immediately thought of this boy.

HATE IS NEVER OKAY. I thought about the pain and anger this massacre would cause him. I prayed that this event didn’t make him feel defeated or give up on humanity. I prayed that on Monday when he returned to school that the same kids who bullied him left him alone or even better, said something nice to him. I prayed that the adults in his life will give him the support and love that he needs. Hate is never okay. If you are feeling hateful, you should seek help. Rather than looking at who you hate as the problem, realize the act of hating is the problem. Get a therapist. Hatred is not normal and I refuse to live in a world where it is.

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Follow featured contributor Gab Bonesso on Twitter @gabbonesso

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HATE BY ANY OTHER NAME BY TERENEH IDIA CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

MAGINE RECEIVING a doctor’s diagnosis and simply being told, “You are sick.” Your next logical question would be, “sick with what? How did I get it? And what is the remedy?” And yet in too many instances, like the mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue last week, we don’t ask the next question. We take the initial diagnosis of “Hate,” and leave it at that. “Hate” allows us, reasonable people, to deflect responsibility and culpability in a system. A system not simply built on some vague sense of “Hate,” but the specific Hate of white supremacy. As we witness a rise of extremist white supremacist patriarchal terrorism, we must understand that we live in a system that supports those ideas. White supremacy is the creation of

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Multiple groups of marchers made their way to the Tree of Life synagogue last week during President Trump’s visit, three days after the mass shooting in Squirrel Hill.

“racial” designations and hierarchies, based on skin color and/or national

The

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origin, in our one human race. “Whiteness” is not inherent. “Whiteness” was invented as an attempt to justify the transatlantic trade of enslaved Africans, by distinguishing “full” human beings from others. Later, it became the 1787 constitutional compromise known as the Three-Fifths Compromise, in which people of African descent were deemed 3/5 human. The flexibility and malleability of “whiteness” is shown again in American history as Irish and Italians immigrants, after facing their own discrimination, were eventually given white status. Additionally, Syrians and some Latinx people are considered white according to the U.S. Census. People from North Africa and the Middle East consistently debate the “white” designation. And a recent Harvard University affirmative action case seeks to place Asians as the main aggrieved party vs. Latinx and African-Americans. Most of us are not white supremacist extremists, but how do we perpetuate white supremacist ideology and practices? We look for connections to this system — whiteness and/or maleness as a way to connect to power. The white supremacist patriarchy says to a little girl that a boy pulls her hair because he likes her. A teacher

can impose harsher punishments on African-American children than white students for the same infraction. White supremacist patriarchy tells a woman that she is being pushy and bossy, while rewarding a man, he is being decisive and strong. It is the reason that, as reported by the Economic Policy Institute, “Women can’t educate their way out of the gender wage gap.” This system allows a local TV station to broadcast a mug-shot like headshot of a Black murder victim, but a sunny family photo of the white alleged perpetrator. It means a white person rarely fears for his life when getting pulled over by the police. It kills an unarmed Black child but allows an armed white male perpetrator to be captured alive. The question is not what is the opposite of white male supremacist patriarchy - that linear, binary thinking is in itself patriarchal. The answer lies in a balanced, sustainable system not based on color, gender, or sexual identity, faith, or physical ability. The word hate relieves us of responsibility because we don’t see ourselves in that word. But when we call this system by its real name, we can look at ourselves and how we contribute to an unjust system. Then we can work together for real equity and justice.

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152xx


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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.FOOD REVIEW.

CILANTRO & AJO BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

Y AREPA was overflowing, but I had to scoop up every bite. The filled-and-toasted corn pancakes at Cilantro & Ajo, a new South Side street-food joint, were just too good. Cilantro & Ajo (cilantro and garlic) opened in the sea of South Side bars in September, as a counter-service eatery serving up Venezuelan street food. Venezuelan cuisine, like most Latin American cooking, is based on corn, yucca (a starch similar to a potato), beans, rice, and plantains. At any Venezuelan restaurant, arepas are front-page items. On a traffic-ridden Tuesday night, I made my way to the South Side. Cilantro & Ajo was easy to spot, the large front window spilling light onto the sidewalk. Next to its gray neighbors, the restaurant stuck out with a bright orange exterior. Cilantro & Ajo followed a build-ityourself model for arepas. I took the server’s advice and chose one of the restaurant’s traditional offerings, pabellon, the corn bun filled with black beans, plantains, shredded beef, and queso fresco. To pair with the arepa, I ordered a sweet plantain and cheese empanada, yucca fries, quesillo (Venezuelan flan), and brown lemonade. Within two minutes, my lemonade, flan, and arepa were in front of me. I sat at one of the many small, circular tables to eat, bouncing my feet to the boisterous music blasting from speakers. The arepa was a sight to see. It was barely self-contained, the fillings a feat of balance. After analyzing the dish, I decided I was just going to have to make a mess. (Thankfully, the server knew and already brought me a giant stack of napkins.)

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

The Pabellon Bowl from Cilantro & Ajo

It was worth the mess. All of the elements worked together, especially the addition of queso fresco and plantain. The shredded beef was juicy in the style of pulled pork. Unlike other Latin American cuisines, the plantain wasn’t caramelized with sugar. The slight sweetness from the fruit balanced the tang from the restaurant’s namesake cilantro and garlic sauce. The brown lemonade, made with limes instead of lemons, tasted like Arnold Palmer. The citrus barely appeared at the end of each sip. It wasn’t

CILANTRO & AJO VENEZUELAN STREET FOOD

901 East Carson St., South Side. venezuelanrestaurantpittsburgh.com

cloying or juice-like thanks to the use of sugar cane, a mild, brighter, vanilla flavor. When I was halfway done attacking my arepa, the empanada and crispy yucca arrived. The empanada was simple, just cheese and plantain. It was

FAVORITE FEATURES:

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My own bottle of sauce

Sunday especiales

Options on options

When the server walked out with my tray of food, one thing stood out. A bottle of sauce. My own bottle of cilantro and garlic heaven. I reached for the bottle again and again, sending silent “thank you” messages to sauce gods.

Unfortunately, I didn’t make it to Cilantro & Ajo on a Sunday. But, to celebrate the “day of rest,” the restaurant features a traditional Venezuelan dish. Follow them on social media to stay updated on the week’s special.

Cilantro & Ajo’s menu is deep, but thankfully not overwhelming. The options are appealingly endless. There are items that I didn’t get to touch like patacones and chachapas. I’ll just have to keep going back until I’ve tasted everything on the menu.

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the perfect street food, a five-bite, selfsupported meal. I wasn’t completely sold on the combination but doused it in cilantro and garlic sauce to add a little zest. For years, I have been plagued with a serious love affair with fries, especially yucca fries. These thick slices of yucca were crunchy on the outside but stayed soft on the inside. The yucca outperformed the city’s best French fries. Cilantro & Ajo smothered the starch in garlic sauce and crumbled cheese. The fries were heavenly. I finished with the quesillo, a beautiful ombre of color from the custard’s caramelization. It was smooth, not too sugary, swimming in syrup, and melted in my mouth. After a few sweet bites, I was happily full. Cilantro & Ajo gives Pittsburgh a peek into the heart of Venezuelan street food. Ditch the pub grub for these two-bite pockets of flavor.

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav


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.ON THE ROCKS.

CHUGGING CYNAR

BEEF NOODLE SOUP

BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Y

HAPPY APPY HOUR: HOUR MONDAY MONDAY-FRIDAY FRIDAY 4 4-6PM 6 ES, I ENJOY booze made from

artichokes. Cynar (pronounced chee-nar) is an Italian liqueur that can be found in many Pittsburgh bars. It is made from 13 different herbs and plants, but the most notable is the artichoke. The bittersweet liqueur has been around since the 1950s and it’s actually a relative newcomer into the world of amaros, aka bitter Italian liqueur. Campari was first produced in 1904 and Fernet-Branca has been enjoyed since 1845. I got my introduction at Tina’s in Bloomfield. Little Italy Days is a time of frustration for Bloomfield residents like me. The event has devolved from a quaint festival celebrating Italian heritage to people puking in the streets and out-of-state vendors hawking chicken fingers and funnel cakes. Luckily, Tina’s offered me a reprieve: a special Little Italy Days cocktail called the Bitter Guiseppe, made of Cynar, sweet vermouth, orange bitters, and lemon. Every since that bitter, sweet, sour and refreshing cocktail touched my lips, I have been hooked. At first, Cynar might scare some drinkers. It has a blackish-brown color with a slightly syrupy consistency. It doesn’t actually taste like artichokes; it’s herby, but not too dry or overpow-

ering. Sure, the giant artichoke on the bottle doesn’t exactly scream “refreshing cocktail,” but the slight bitterness quickly moves to sweetness on your tongue, and the consistency allows this effect to happen multiple times before a smooth swallow.

1124 Freeport Rd, Fox Chapel

412-781-4131

Bitter Guiseppe: • 2oz Cynar • 1oz sweet vermouth • 4 dashes Angostura bitters • 4 dashes orange bitters • 6 drops lemon juice Pour over ice and stir. Try it with a light pilsner, it will go down smooth. It’s also a digestivo, and will help you digest a heavy meal. Getting drunk and feeling less bloated, sign me up! And Cynar isn’t just a vehicle to enjoy some bitter, sweet, and sour flavors. Some people even mix it with coconut cream and pineapple juice to make a Cynar Colada. If I find a way to serve this out of a hollowed-out artichoke, I will become a legend. Find Cynar at your most local bars or at Fine Wine and Good Spirits stores.

Follow Senior Writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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DINING OUT

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

LEON’S CARIBBEAN 823 E WARRINGTON AVE., ALLENTOWN 412-431-5366 / LEONSCARIBBEAN.COM Family owned and operated since December 2014. Here at Leon’s, we take pride in our recipes and quality of dishes. Simple menu with all the traditional dishes! Leon Sr. has been a chef for 30+ years, mastering the taste everyone has grown to love and can only get at Leon’s.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER

5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BAR LOUIE

330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO

1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

THE CAFÉ CARNEGIE

4400 FORBES AVE., OAKLAND 412-622-3225 / THECAFECARNEGIE.COM An excellent dining experience from James Beard Semi-Finalist, Sonja Finn featuring a locally-focused menu, full service dining, and espresso and wine bar.

COLONY CAFE

The best gifts are edible. 1910 New Texas Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15239 7124.519.7308 EightyAcresKitchen.com 20

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1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious housemade bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

EIGHTY ACRES

1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined,

modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-to-table products.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM

5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon– midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT AND WHISPER’S PUB

3400 HARTS RUN ROAD, GLENSHAW 412-767-3500 / HARTWOODRESTAURANT.COM A hidden treasure in the Pittsburgh suburbs. Outdoor dining, full bar, eclectic atmosphere. Casual elegance at its finest. Daily specials. Open Tuesday through Saturday. Hope to see you soon!

LIDIA’S PITTSBURGH

1400 SMALLMAN ST., STRIP DISTRICT 412-552-0150 / LIDIAS-PITTSBURGH.COM Lidia’s Pittsburgh is a warm Italian restaurant offering signature classics from Lidia Bastianich. Featuring brunch, lunch and dinner menus as well as private dining.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PAD THAI NOODLE

4770 LIBERTY AVE, BLOOMFIELD 412-904-1640 / PADTHAINOODLEPITTSBURGH.COM This new café in Bloomfield features Thai and Burmese specialties. Standards

like Pad Thai and Coconut Curry Noodle are sure to please. But don’t miss out on the Ono Kyowsway featuring egg noodle sautéed with coconut chicken, cilantro and curry sauce.

SAGA HIBACHI

201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SPIRIT

242 51ST ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4441 / SPIRITPGH.COM/SLICEISLAND Every day we bake fresh focaccia from unbleached flour, pull our own mozzarella, and curdle our own ricotta to put on your pizza with fresh toppings from the best local farms, butchers, and purveyors.

SUPERIOR MOTORS

1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR

660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org


.FOR THE WEEK OF NOV. 8.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The best thing one can do when it is raining is let it rain.” That brilliant formulation came from poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Does it seem so obvious as to not need mentioning? Bear with me while I draw further meaning from it, and suggest you use it as an inspiring metaphor in the coming weeks. When it rains, Sagittarius, let it rain; don’t waste time and emotional energy complaining about the rain. Don’t indulge in fruitless fantasizing about how you might stop the rain and how you’d love to stop the rain. In fact, please refrain from defining the rain as a negative event, because after all, it is perfectly natural, and is, in fact, crucial for making the crops grow and replenishing our water supply. (P.S. Your metaphorical “rain” will be equally useful.)

sensitivity, procrastination, and fear of success.” —Lanira Kentsler, astrologer, 2018. (P.S. What you do in the next 12 months could go a long way toward permanently refuting the last prediction.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I am not currently a wanderer or voyager or entrepreneur or swashbuckler. But at other times in my life, I have had extensive experience with those roles. So I know secrets about how and why to be a wanderer and voyager and entrepreneur and swashbuckler. And it’s clear to me that in the coming weeks you could benefit in unforeseen ways from researching and embodying the roles of a curious wanderer and brave voyager and savvy entrepreneur and prudent swashbuckler.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Every true love and friendship is a story of unexpected transformation,” writes activist and author Elif Shafak. “If we are the same person before and after we loved, that means we haven’t loved enough.” I bring this to your attention because you’re in a phase when your close alliances should be activating healing changes in your life. If for some reason your alliances are not yet awash in the exciting emotions of redemption and reinvention, get started on instigating experimental acts of intimacy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I suspect you will be an especially arousing influence in the coming weeks. You may also be inspiring and disorienting, with unpredictable results. How many transformations will you unleash? How many expectations will you dismantle? How many creative disruptions will you induce in the midst of the daily grind? I hesitate to underestimate the messy beauty you’ll stir up or the rambunctious gossip you’ll provoke. In any case, I plan to be richly amused by your exploits, and I hope everyone else will be, as well. For best results, I will pray to the Goddess of Productive Fun, begging Her to ensure that the commotions and uproars you catalyze will be in service to love and kindness.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson wasn’t always a wild and crazy writer. Early in his career, he made an effort to compose respectable, mea-

sured prose. When he finally gave up on that project and decided he could “get away with” a more uninhibited style, he described it as being “like falling down an elevator shaft and landing in a pool full of mermaids.” I foresee a metaphorically comparable development in your future, Pisces.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1994, Aries pop diva Mariah Carey collaborated with an associate to write the song “All I Want For Christmas Is You.” It took them 15 minutes to finish it. Since then it has generated $60 million in royalties. I wish I could unconditionally predict that you, too, will efficiently spawn a valuable creation sometime soon. Current planetary alignments do indeed suggest that such a development is more possible than usual. But because I tend to be conservative in my prophecies, I won’t guarantee anything close to the $60-million figure. In fact, your reward may be more spiritual in nature than financial.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): An interactive post at Reddit.com asked readers to write about “the most underrated feeling of all time.” One person said, “When you change the sheets on your bed.” Another extolled “the feeling that comes when you pay all your bills, and you’ve still got money in the bank.” Others said, “dancing under the rain,” “physical contact like a pat on the back when you’re really touch starved,” and “listening to a song for the first time and it’s so good you just can’t stop smiling.”

I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I suspect that the next two weeks will bring you a flood of these pleasurable, underrated feelings.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer,” wrote Gemini author Henry Lawson. Do you have any methods for making yourself feel like you’ve drunk a few beers that don’t involve drinking a few beers? If not, I highly recommend that you find at least one. It will be especially important in the coming weeks for you to have a way to alter, expand or purify your consciousness without relying on literal intoxicants or drugs. The goal: to leave your groove before it devolves into a rut.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Study the following five failed predictions. 1. “There is no likelihood man can ever tap the power of the atom.” —Robert Miliham, Nobel Laureate in Physics, 1923. 2. “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.” —Western Union internal memo, 1876. 3. “Rail travel at high speeds is not possible because passengers, unable to breathe, would die of asphyxia.” – Dionysius Lardner, scientist, 1830. 4. “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” —Ken Olson, president of Digital Equipment Corporation, 1977. 5. “Most Cancerians will never overcome their tendencies toward hyper-

German scientists have created cochlear implants for gerbils that have been genetically modified, enabling the creatures to “listen” to light. The researchers’ work is ultimately dedicated to finding ways to improve the lives of people with hearing impairments. What might be the equivalent of you gaining the power to “hear light”? I understand that you might resist thinking this way. “That makes no sense,” you may protest, or “There’s no practical value in fantasizing about such an impossibility.” But I hope you’ll make the effort anyway. In my view, stretching your imagination past its limits is the healing you need most right now. I also think that doing so will turn out to be unexpectedly practical.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here’s useful wisdom from the poet Rumi. “Our defects are the ways that glory gets manifested,” he said. “Keep looking at the bandaged place. That’s where the light enters you.” Playwright Harrison David Rivers interprets Rumi’s words to mean, “Don’t look away from your pain, don’t disengage from it, because that pain is the source of your power.” I think these perspectives are just what you need to meditate on, Virgo. To promote even more healing in you, I’ll add a further clue from poet Anna Kamienska: “Where your pain is, there your heart lies also.” (P.S. Rumi is translated by Coleman Barks; Kamienska by Clare Cavanagh.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Artist David Hockney is proud of how undemanding he is toward his friends and associates. “People tell me they open my e-mails first,” he says, “because they aren’t demands and you don’t need to reply. They’re simply for pleasure.” He also enjoys giving regular small gifts. “I draw flowers every day and send them to my friends so they get fresh blooms.” Hockney seems to share the perspective expressed by author Gail Godwin, who writes, “How easy it was to make people happy, when you didn’t want or need anything from them.” In accordance with astrological omens, Libra, I suggest you have fun employing these approaches in the coming weeks.

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CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

Ashley McKinney rehearses Hollow Moon

.STAGE PREVIEW.

HAUNTINGLY IMMERSIVE BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

EAN COLLIER IS known for a lot of things — he’s a writer, comedian, and host of both radio and podcast shows. Now he adds another credit to his resumé: theatrical producer. Collier, along with Dana Custer, Ariella Furman, and Renee Rabenold, co-founded the Vigilance Theater Group, a new addition to the already vibrant Pittsburgh immersive theater scene. Beginning on November 7, the newcomers present their first show, Hollow Moon. To make matters even spookier, the show takes place at a secret location in Lawrenceville disclosed only to ticket buyers.

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Inspired by the classic Shirley Jackson horror novel, The Haunting of Hill House, and mid-century haunted-house films, the thriller invites 12 audience members to a historic, possibly haunted house for a supposed ghost hunt. Once the doors close, however, the true nature of the visit is revealed as various actors (the cast includes John Feightner, Karen Forney, Tyler Ray Kendrick, Lee Lytle, Michael McBurney, and Ashley McKinney) shift between scripted segments and interactive scenes, with the ending determined by audience choices throughout the show. Collier says Vigilance came to be after he took a trip to New York City, where he saw two amazing

immersive theater shows, Sleep No More and Then She Fell. “It really sparked something in me to be a creator of this, not just a fan,” he says. At the beginning of this year, he reached out to Furman and Custer, two local film professionals (who also happen to be married), and Rabenold, an improv performer who produces shows for Arcade Comedy Theater. At the end of May, they launched a Kickstarter to raise money for the venue rental and surpassed their $5,500 goal. Furman and Custer serve as producers and stage managers for Hollow Moon, with Rabenold acting as


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Cast member Mike McBurney

the director. Collier is, as he puts it, “best credited” as the writer. The show comes not long after Netflix released its own hit adaptation of The Haunting of Hill House. Collier calls it “a happy coincidence,” but adds that it speaks to an overall trend of audiences wanting horror and thrillers “that are a little smarter than the genre can sometimes be.” He believes Vigilance’s focus on Jackson’s work also aligns with the tradition of immersive theater telling old stories in new ways – for example, Sleep No More draws on Shakespeare’s Macbeth while Then She Fell combines a hospital ward setting with the writings of Alice in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll. For Hollow Moon, the team took an intimate approach by inviting only a small group into each performance. Doing this allows audience members to interact with the characters and have more of a role in the show. But, as Collier explains, there are also stretches scripted almost like a traditional play, so guests can hang back and watch if they so choose.

“There are moments that will appeal to whichever kind of audience member you are,” says Collier. “If you want to be involved, you have that opportunity.”

HOLLOW MOON

Runs from Wed., Nov. 7 to Sun., Nov. 18. $50. vigilancetheater.com

While Vigilance adds another voice to Pittsburgh’s ever-growing immersive theater community, with companies like Bricolage, Quantum, and Uncumber Theatrics all helming their own distinct productions, Collier isn’t worried about competition. Rather, he sees the group as helping to fulfill a growing demand among the city’s theater fans. “There’s a sizable audience for this right now and I think there is room for there to be, not just a couple of immersive shows going on in Pittsburgh every year, but a large quantity of shows going on throughout the year,” says Collier. “We want to do a lot of work and we want to see these other companies do a lot of work at the same time.”

Follow Senior Writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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.PGH PAGES.

TRUTH TO POWER

BY REGE BEHE CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR

MASHA GESSEN

Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures’ Ten Evenings. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10 students/$15-35 otherwise. pittsburghlectures.org

BETWEEN THE LINES City Books in North Side will present a memorial reading honoring the victims of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting. Poets and writers Jennifer Bannan, Tuhin Das, Kevin Haworth, Tereneh Idia, Joy Katz, Adriana Ramirez, and Shannon Reed are scheduled to appear, along with erhu soloist Mimi Jong. All proceeds from the $5 admission will benefit the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS). 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 10. City Books, 908 Galveston Ave., North Side. 412-321-7323 or citybookspgh.com

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

DA TARBELL’S groundbreaking expose of Standard Oil, published in McClure’s Magazine in 1904, led many to consider her one of the first and most influential muckrakers of her time. But that’s not how she saw things. Tarbell, who was born south of Erie, bristled at the label of “muckraker,” a term coined by President Teddy Roosevelt referring to journalists who exposed corruption or scandal. “She did not see herself as a firebrand or a muckraker,” says Anne Trubek, the publisher of Belt Publishing, which is reissuing The History of the Standard Oil Company, adding that Tarbell considered herself to be a historian. Tarbell may not have been the first female investigative journalist – Elizabeth Catte, in her introduction, notes the contributions of Ida B. Wells, an AfricanAmerican journalist who wrote about race and discrimination. But Tarbell may have been the most accomplished, regardless of gender. “There was a strong muckraking movement at the turn of the last century,” Trubek says, “which we would now call investigative journalism. And it was extremely powerful. But nothing came close to what Tarbell did, which was an in-depth investigation that ended up

bringing down Standard Oil.” If there’s a modern counterpart to Tarbell, it might be the Russian-American journalist Masha Gessen, who appears at Carnegie Music Hall as a part of Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures’ Ten Evenings series on November 6. Gessen, like Tarbell, has written extensively about corruption and abuse of power. She’s covered the regime of Russian president Vladimir Putin both as a staff writer for New Yorker, and in her books The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin and Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot. Her latest is The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia, which traces how the Putin administration came to power in the wake of a post-Soviet Union generation hoping for change. “[Gessen and Tarbell] are both not only not afraid of the repercussions of those in power, but not afraid of those who side with them or like them,” Trubek says. “They have strong convictions. … They do the work they want to do, they’re secure and confident in it, and they’re fearless.”

What will you discover today? As books are so much more than words on a page; your Library is so much more than books on shelves. We are a vibrant community dedicated to forging vital relationships and connecting with our global neighborhoods.

carnegielibrary.org ®

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COMING NEXT WEEK! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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PHOTO: SARAH BADER

.ART AND MUSIC.

Jerome Charles and Max Gonzales

GLOWED UP BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T WASN’T UNTIL local artists Jerome

Charles and Max Gonzales were arrested in 2016 for being, as the police put it, the “Most Wanted Graffiti Artists in Pittsburgh,” that they were given a chance to show their work. “We were arrested, and our names were plastered in the media,” says Gonzales. “Once our names were on those platforms, we were given art opportunities.” Now the artists are the curators of The Glow Up, an event that brings together people of color, or POC, artists together to show case their work.

On Nov. 9, Charles, who is black, and Gonzales, who is Mexican-American, will join an all-POC band of artists at the Ace Hotel. For one night only, 42 visual artists and eight musicians will perform and showcase their work. There is no direct theme other than the common thread of being a POC. Skill levels vary from newcomers who have not shown their work before, to classically trained artists. But most are underrepresented artists. “We’re working on two different sides of exposure,” says Gonzales. “One, we want to expose the regulars of the event

space, the people that can afford Ace Hotel, to the visual, culinary, and music of POC. Not everyone is going to go out of their way to look for it, so in some sense, we’re going to put it in their face and let them engage with it.” The art from POC is out there. They’re active, and they’re pushing their work, but not everyone is looking at it or knows where to find it. Gonzales and Charles experienced this struggle firsthand when they were arrested. But, as the saying goes, all press is good press, and The Glow Up creators

Follow Staff Writer Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

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used it to their advantage. Before the arrest, Charles had never been in a show. Now, Charles says that “Any space that [Gonzales] and I hold shows in, we have a built-in audience of people who recognize our art from the street. We entered the art world at a pretty rapid pace. [We] went from doing tags on a wall to people asking to be in our next show. It’s a pretty interesting trajectory.” The Glow Up was made possible by a Lift Grant from the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. When the pair found out the council was accepting applications,


they immediately applied. Gonzales and Charles had previously put on a show at the Frame Gallery – a CMU exclusive gallery – that showcased artists that represented Pittsburgh, not just the university. Their show was the first at the venue to have a majority of CMU outsiders. “We knew that we had already had one successful show with multiple artists,” said Charles. “So, we figured we could do something similar but on a grander scale.” After applying and interviewing, Gonzales and Charles were awarded the grant. The Glow Up attempts to highlight the diversity amongst POC and show that they don’t fit into stereotypes. Gonzales explained that the spaces in which POC are represented are, “outsider spaces. In a way, POC are considered the outsider artist, not the fine artist or craft artist. It’s not being seen as legitimate or deserving of high, fine-art spaces.” The two chose Ace Hotel as the location for The Glow Up because they

felt the space represents the people the venue wants to see, not the people that have been there before. Charles saw it as a “great opportunity to use a space that used to belong to the people of the neighborhood. “Now they’ll have access to Ace Hotel’s upscale clientele to redistribute the wealth back into the community.”

THE ATTIC • 513 Grant Avenue, Millvale

Record Store Day

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THE GLOW UP

Fri., Nov. 9. 6 p.m. – 12 a.m. Free. Ace Hotel. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty

While the show is free and accessible to all, Gonzales and Charles urge those who can purchase art to do so. The pair says that everything will be reasonably priced. “For artists there that have never shown before, that could be the first purchase that starts their entire art career,” says Charles. “Someone just has to be there to do it.”

THE GLOW UP ARTISTS ■ Clara Kent Smooth, soulful, and spiritual, Kent’s music urges her listeners to face the difficult parts of life in order to heal and grow. ■ Benji. Formerly known as Courtesy, Benji. is an energetic Pittsburgh rapper who’s extremely involved in the Pittsburgh music scene. He’s performed at Thrival Music Festival multiples times and has worked with a plethora of local artists, including Mars Jackson and Zaneta Grant. ■ Jordan Montgomery A member of the arts and activism collective 1Hood Media, Montgomery is a born and raised Pittsburgher who raps, writes, and designs clothes. His sound can be best described as Jay-Z circa early 2000s, with commentary on racial relations in America. ■ Jack Swing Comprised of Isaiah Ross, Jonathan Lightfoot, and Rowdy Kanarek, Jack Swing is a local rock ‘n roll band known for its fiery live performances. They blend classic rock, hard rock, and blues, and have performed regionally and nationally. ■ Brittney Chantele Chantele aims to inspire emotionally, mentally, and physically with her creations. A singer-songwriter, artist, poet, and activist, she describes her style

as “movement” in hopes that her work can be the catalyst or vehicle for a social movement.

Questions? Call Us 412-821-8484 • ATTICRECORDS@VERIZON.NET

■ Black N’ Mild Drawing on the influences of Nas, A Tribe Called Quest, OutKast, and Wu-Tang Clan, Black N’ Mild hopes to keep old-school hip-hop alive with his music. To him, the lyrical wordplay is key.

starring the original

DJs from WXXP www.wxxp.com

■ DJ Jaybee DJ Jaybee can be found playing at local parties around the city like Make Sure You Have Fun at Spirit and Jordan Montgomery’s No Requests. He has received praise for his music selection because he plays whatever he’s in the mood for at the time, creating a variety not found with other local DJs. ■ Livefromthecity Another member of 1Hood Media, Livefromthecity’s mission is to “bring life through light.” His most recent album, King Of The Sun 2, is mumble rap with a positive message. ■ Ranch God & Prof. Ooak New to the music scene, Ranch God & Prof. Ooak is a rapper/producer duo from Baltimore. Alonzo Claiborne, aka Ranch God, relocated to Pittsburgh and has been developing relations with the local music and arts community to bridge a gap between the Pittsburgh and Baltimore.

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CP PHOTO: HANNAH LYNN

.ART.

Katie Ott’s “Vanity Sizing”

NEW IDEALS BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

USEUMS ARE slow to change. They are typically institutions built on honoring, not questioning art. But a new generation of students studying museum curation and exhibition is developing a better sense of how to reflect the political climate into the structure of the museum, and how to display art without necessarily endorsing it. This is Not Ideal, a new exhibit at the University Art Gallery (UAG) at the University of Pittsburgh, is curated by students, mostly from the university’s own collection, with a few pieces from the Nationality Rooms and Pitt’s library collections. The project began in January 2018 with a curatorial research class and continued in fall 2018 with an exhibition seminar, both taught by professor Alex Taylor. The students decided to tackle the broad topic of gender in art history, narrowing in on how art has historically depicted beauty ideals, sexual assault, and gender-bending. “The title

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itself takes on the fact that no, this isn’t ideal, not the representations, not the way women were collected,” says Sylvia Rhor, director and curator of the UAG. “This exhibition really makes the collection do something it wasn’t intended to do.”

THIS IS NOT IDEAL

Open through Fri., Dec. 7. Frick Fine Arts Building, Oakland. uag.pitt.edu

During the first class, students, with help from Taylor and other professors and graduate students, culled art from Pitt’s collections, which consists mostly of donated prints. The class in the fall semester followed up by planning and executing the exhibition design, including writing labels for the pieces. Along with prints and sculptures dating back to the 18th century, the exhibit includes select works from local contemporary artists. The title of the exhibit comes from a piece by contemporary woodwork

artist Katie Ott. The piece consists of a mirror with the words “this is not ideal” printed on the glass. Ott has several pieces in the exhibit, and her work features unusable furniture that questions gender or beauty roles. “Vanity Sizing” features a vanity set blocked off by metal bars. “Locker Room Talk” features an end table with a top that flips to reveal quotes from Donald Trump’s Access Hollywood tapes. Another section of the exhibit explores paintings of sexual assault and challenges how, traditionally, museums shy away from directly addressing the assault. The cover art for the exhibit comes from the Giuseppe Cozzi painting “Susanne au Bain” (1850), which depicts the biblical tale of Susanna and the Elders, and shows a naked woman in distress as two men grab her body. The cover art shows only the woman’s face. There are also paintings by William Hogarth, like “Before” (1736), which depicts a hectic scene in a bedroom as a hungry-looking man grabs the dress of

a scared-looking woman. While most labels in the exhibit are white, the students chose gray for the labels for art depicting assault. For Rhor, how the students chose to describe and present the works depicting assault was reflective of a new direction in museum exhibition. “When we were editing student labels, we said, I’ve never seen a Hogarth label that basically addresses what the content is in an explicit way,” says Rhor. “The students really articulated the moment we’re in, in a way that reflected back to us as older art historians in a different way.” Other works in the collection include a “hallway of transgressions” that features early depictions of cross-dressing, feminist zines and pins, and works by contemporary digital artist Adam Milner. The front desk of the UAG has a stack of worksheets visitors can fill out, asking them to describe what an ideal art world might look like. “Where do we go next? How do we start creating the ideal? Is there one?” asks Rhor.


.PLAY REVIEW.

PIPELINE

BY ALEX GORDON ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T’S OK TO laugh at Pipeline. It’s OK to make noise. Playwright Dominique Morisseau laid down the permissions in the program like this: “My work welcomes a few ‘um hmmms’ and ‘uhn uhnnns’ should you feel the need to use them. Just maybe in moderation... This can be a church for some of us, and testifying is allowed.” Thank God. Pipeline — directed by Reginald L. Douglas, at City Theatre through Nov. 18 — is an electrifying, angry, deflating, joyful thing, and trying to bed down those emotions would be difficult and a disservice to its performers and producers. The title alludes to the system of criminalizing behavior in students to the point of suspension/expulsion from school, leading young people, particularly Black people, into incarceration at a young age. This story follows a group of people trying to cut off that sequence before it’s too late. As the play opens, Omari (Carter Redwood) is facing expulsion from a private boarding school for an unnamed bout of violence in a classroom. The players in his support network are his mother Nya (Nambi E. Kelley), who works as a public school teacher with Laurie (Sheila McKenna) and security guard Dun (Gabriel Lawrence), as well as Omari’s girlfriend Jasmine (Krystal Rivera) and father Xavier (Khalil Kain). Though Omari’s potential expulsion drives the story, his struggle — and that of Black families navigating white systems in general — is echoed in every supporting character. Jasmine is

PHOTO: KRISTI JAN HOOVER

Krystal Rivera (Jasmine) and Carter Redwood (Omari) in Pipeline

PIPELINE

Continues through Sun., Nov. 18. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $29 for adults, $15 for those under 30. citytheatrecompany.org

also a person of color at a white school, though she handles it differently than Omari. Xavier, divorced from Nya, has moved on from the old neighborhood, both literally and figuratively, and sees the private school as his son’s ticket to vertical mobility. Laurie is a veter-

an white teacher in a predominantly Black school. Dun is just trying to keep school calm and safe for the students (and teachers). As they push and pull to help Omari, each character reveals a healthy supply of flaws, bad judgment, and misdirected anger, but they are deeply likable and relatable. There are no angels or villains here, just people in tough situations making tough decisions. Morisseau, recent recipient of a MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant,” packs the story with moral ambiguities and gives no easy answers;

the ending delivers no full stop. The racial systems at work here exist outside the play, and the audience is left understanding that they’ll continue after the lights come up. I didn’t see any testifying myself, but laughing, crying, and the occasional gasp was audible throughout. Whether it’s the spirited performances, the pitch-perfect original music provided by 1Hood Media Academy, Morisseau’s crackling script, or the powerful use of stage and light design, you’ll want to make some noise at Pipeline.

Follow managing editor Alex Gordon on Twitter @shmalexgordon

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STILL PLAYING BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

The Hate U Give starring Amandla Stenberg

The Hate U Give The Hate U Give, a film adaptation of Angie Thomas’ young adult novel of the same name, directed by George Tillman Jr., centers on Starr (Amandla Stenberg), a 16-year-old girl who finds herself thrown into activism after witnessing an incident of police brutality. At points, the movie feels too long and the subject matter makes it emotionally exhausting. But in dragging the story past a comfortable stopping point, Tillman demonstrates the sheer scale of it all. Every time a shooting like this comes to national attention, it endures the same timeline of public grief and anger. And it all repeats if/ when the cop is not convicted. The movie is long because the cycle is long, and by the time it has truly ended, more shootings have already happened.

PHOTO: 20TH CENTURY FOX FILM

Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury

.SCREEN.

NO PLEASURE CRUISE

PHOTO: WARNER BROS. PICTURES

A Star is Born starring Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga

A Star is Born Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) is a country-rock star slightly past his prime, with many suede jackets and a heavy drinking problem. He stumbles into a bar and quickly becomes enamored with Ally (Lady Gaga). They begin a whirlwind romance and Jackson drags her away from her waitress gig and onstage with him. They flourish, briefly, until fame and alcohol get in the way. This version of Star is like a perfect white t-shirt or a nice bowl of spaghetti. The acting, the singing, and the characters are all things we’ve seen before, but they’re done very well. The actors are well cast, the songs memorable, the melodrama high. The movie was always going to succeed with Cooper and Gaga as the stars because both are such genuinely corny people. They’re artists who take on all their projects without irony, just like their characters. •

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE MAKING of Bohemian Rhap-

sody was a ridiculous, impossible journey that almost never was, just like the song “Bohemian Rhapsody,” just like the band Queen itself. But unlike the band and the song, which found the exact right formula of heart and insanity to make something magic, the movie fails to synthesize the band and Freddie Mercury’s life. It can’t decide whether it’s a Freddie Mercury biopic or a Queen biopic, and is instead neither, falling closer to an extended tribute with a light backstory. Original plans for the movie began in 2010 with Sacha Baron Cohen as Mercury before he walked away due to vague creative differences, then another Mercury was cast and walked

away before the film finally settled on Rami Malek (it only took three tries to find someone who, like Mercury, was not white).

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY DIRECTED BY: Bryan Singer STARRING: Rami Malek Now playing

Two-thirds of the way through filming Bohemian Rhapsody, director Bryan Singer stopped showing up to set, claiming he was tending to a sick relative. Coincidentally, this happened at the same time he was being sued for assaulting a minor (not the first time). Singer was fired and Dexter Fletcher

joined to direct the final third of the movie, but still the project is credited to Singer. Before he was Freddie Mercury, lead singer of Queen, he was Farrokh Bulsara, airport employee. One night, after watching a local band perform, he saunters over and asks if he can join. From there, it’s a quick journey to becoming Queen, and the triumph of the first singles and global success. In between, there are snippets of Mercury’s personal life — his relationship with fiancée/best friend Mary Austin, his scattered romances with men, his loneliness disguised with intoxication and lavish parties. There is not enough background on Mercury’s life for it to be a comprehensive

Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny

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biopic, but there’s also not a deep enough understanding of the band to be about them either. There are glimpses into Mercury’s family life and childhood, how he was born on an island off of Tanzania to Indian Parsi parents before immigrating to England. He changed his first name to fit in, and his last name to be a rockstar. The movie only skims the surface of his relationship with his culture and identity. In one of the band’s first recording sessions, one of the members says, seemingly out of nowhere, “we have to get experimental,” leading them to play their instruments in zany ways. This, along with Mercury’s flamboyant charm, is supposed to explain how the band found its unique sound but offers little to no explanation as to how Queen really came to be. It’s difficult to explain the implausibility of Queen and Freddie Mercury, who managed to become bigger-than-life, but still full of heart and generosity. Against all odds, the band worked. And against all odds, Bohemian Rhapsody got made but failed to capture the passionate absurdity of its subject. And while Bohemian Rhapsody doesn’t omit Mercury’s sexuality or the complications from AIDS that eventually killed him, it does skim over the details, leading to an after-school-special feel. There isn’t much insight into how Mercury handled his illness, and the reactions are instead filtered through the point of view of his bandmates, who seem very understanding and non-judgmental of the whole thing. Then again, the movie had heavy input from said bandmates. What makes Bohemian Rhapsody seem the most like a self-mythologizing tribute is the way they incorporated Mercury’s real singing voice. There is no pretending that anyone could ever match Mercury’s vocal talents, which were so unique they prompted scientific studies. Instead, Malek passionately lip-syncs to the real thing, which almost works. It begs the question of whether or not watching this movie is any better or worse than watching a good tribute band. The movie culminates with that legendary Live Aid performance. They don’t recreate it in full but come close. The recreation feels nearly like a dream, with a CGI rendering of the 72,000 person crowd at Wembley Stadium. It’s an impressive moment when Malek does a call and response, demonstrating an intoxicating power over the crowd. But that can’t be attributed to Malek, or the CGI, or Bryan Singer, or even the other band members. That’s all Freddie.

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ALONG THE WAY

SCENIC GAMBLING BY AMANDA WALTZ AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

It goes without saying – but I’ll say it anyway – that Las Vegas and Southwestern Pennsylvania have very little in common. But nestled in the Laurel Highlands, about 70 miles south of Pittsburgh, is Nemacolin Woodlands Resort, a 2,000-acre playground for travelers looking to indulge in more food, golf, and gambling than they can handle. In the late 1940s, Pittsburgh industrialist Willard F. Rockwell bought 60 acres and, overr the next several years, added moree land, built a summer home, and established hunting and fishing grounds forr his family. Between en 1968 and 1987, the he site transformed from rom a private estate into to a posh resort, and,, after an acquisitionn by 84 Lumber Company any founder, Joseph A. Hardy III, continued to expand into what it is today. What was once a place exclusive to the rich is now open to everyone as a glammed-up detour for those headed to the outdoorsy wonders of Maryland or the gritty charm of Pittsburgh. For the adults, travel down Route 40 to hit the slot machines or play a few games of blackjack at Lady Luck Casino. For the kids, there are exotic animals and pony rides at the Wildlife Academy, gymnasiums outfitted with trampolines and foam pits, arcades, and more. This year, for the foodies, Nemacolin unveiled a new culinary program focused on indigenous foods of the Allegheny Mountains and introduced new dining venues, including Rockwell’s and The Pantry. •

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PHOTO: TIMOTHY JACOBSEN, GARRETT COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

On the lake at Deep Creek, Maryland

.ROAD TRIP.

DIVING INTO DEEP CREEK BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

H

AVING TROUBLE choosing be-

tween a wilderness getaway or a weekend at the beach? Looking for all the comforts of a hotel suite while still being close enough to nature that you have to lock your garbage away from hungry bears? Consider Deep Creek Lake, Md. Located just two hours — or 106 miles — south of Pittsburgh, the lakeside community offers more than enough for everyone. Two years ago, some friends and I stayed in one of the many cabins available to rent through the company Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations and Sales. (I use the term “cabin” liberally, as it’s less the musty, old wooden structure used by your grandpa during hunting season, and more a four-bedroom, four-bathroom Lincoln Log McMansion complete with an outdoor hot tub and sauna). During the day, we went hiking (the surrounding region of Garrett County has eight state parks and two state forests) and strolled along the

shores of Deep Creek Lake, the state’s largest freshwater lake. We also took the young kids in the group to the Deep Creek Lake Discovery Center, a 6,000-square-foot facility where you can view rescued owls and other birds of prey, as well as native fish, turtles, and frogs. At night, we built fires in the backyard or went inside to play a few competitive rounds of games like Coup and Codenames.

THE LAKESIDE COMMUNITY OFFERS MORE THAN ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE. While we didn’t explore the dining options, my husband did buy donuts for everyone at Deep Creek Donuts, a “micro-factory” where everything is made-

to-order by a machine right in front of you. My excursion doesn’t even begin to cover the Deep Creek experience. During the summer, go fishing, kayaking, swimming, or canoeing, or rent a boat at a marina and dock it at several restaurants. There are numerous spas, including ones that offer in-home massages, pontoon boat tours, horsedrawn carriage rides or nature walks. Take a trip to Muddy Creek Falls, the state’s highest free-falling waterfall, or head to Adventure Sports Center International, described as the world’s only mountaintop re-circulating whitewater course. In the cold months, there’s skiing at Herrington Manor State Park and other areas (the Visit Deep Creek website boasts that the area gets an average of 120-inches of snow annually, nearly double that of Fairbanks, Alaska). No matter the season, Wisp Resort has fun for the whole family, including winter sports, ziplining, and mountain biking.


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.DANCE.

CELEBRATING THE PAST BY STEVE SUCATO CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

IREWALL DANCE Theater is going back to its theatrical roots for its fifth season, with new dancetheater work Past Lives at the intimate Carnegie Stage. “While the show has some of the abstract feel of our more recent works, I feel like as in our earliest works, audience members are going to feel really involved in the production without actually being involved in it,” says artistic director Elisa-Marie Alaio. The idea for Past Lives grew out of this summer’s fireWALL Junior Summer Intensive showcase, in which Alaio and her students created dances that reflected on memories of birthdays. Alaio, along with founding company member Jenna Rae Smith, took that premise and choreographed a work about happiness, disappointment, change, and expectation. The hour-long performance takes place at a present-day birthday party in which a group of six adult friends (Alaio, Smith, Alexis Bomer, Glenna Clark, Elijah Ruane, and Adrianna Amodei) reminisces about important times in their lives. A convergence of the past and present, two things happen simultaneously onstage. “We see this group of friends seated around a table and someone telling their story for the first time,” Alaio says, “while on the other side of the stage, we see that story being acted out in dance.” Alaio says the fictionalized stories are pulled from her memories and of those she has known over the years:

PHOTO: CHELSEA HAYBARGAR

fireWall Dance Theater dancers rehearse Past Lives.

FIREWALL DANCE THEATER PERFORMS

PAST LIVES

8 p.m., Wed., Nov. 7-Fri., Nov. 9. Carnegie Stage, 25 W Main St., Carnegie. $10-20. For ages 18-29, bring in a sticker to the box office that says you voted for a $5 ticket. firewalldance.com or carnegiestage.com

no one showing up to a party a woman threw when she turned 15, or the joy a five-year-old boy received getting a toy truck as a present. And while some the scenarios may delve into painful subject matter, Alaio says overall the production isn’t heavy on drama and audiences will feel good in the end. The work is set to a collection of 15

songs by Michigan singer/songwriter Børns — recreated and constructed into a score by Reni Montiverde, along with some of her original music. After its Pittsburgh-area premiere, the company will tour the production to New York, Nov. 15-17, for four shows at Manhattan’s Royal Family Performing Arts Space.

Follow featured contributor Steve Sucato on Twitter @ssucato

Texture Contemporary Ballet dancer Madeline Kendall PHOTO: MARK SIMPSON PHOTOGRAPHY

AT CARNEGIE TOO Also at the Carnegie Stage on Sat., Nov. 10, Texture Contemporary Ballet will present the 11th installment of their annual WIP Choreography Project with shows at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. The 10 choreographers presenting work include: Elisa-Marie Alaio, Allegra Golembiewski, Shane Kesneck, Katie Miller, Jamie Erin Murphy, and Alexandra Tiso. Enjoy wine, beer, and snacks and mingle with the artists before and after the show. Tickets are $20-25 and available at textureballet.org.

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PHOTO: DAVID BACHMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Corrie Stallings, Marianne Cornetti and Ashley Fabian in Hansel & Gretel

.PLAY REVIEW.

HANSEL & GRETEL BY LISA CUNNINGHAM // LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN THE curtains are pulled back for Pittsburgh Opera’s Hansel & Gretel, it’s as if someone has opened the pages of a children’s pop-up book. The set design is minimal, but effective: a crooked house, a forest full of cut-out trees. From the very beginning, there’s no mistaking this is a fairy tale. This rendition of the classic story, first composed by Engelbert Humperdinck in the 19th century, opens with siblings Hansel (Corrie Stallings) and Gretel (Ashley Fabian) goofing off, avoiding chores. These are poor children, singing funny songs about being hungry. It’s a heavy subject, starvation, but the actresses — yes, both Hansel and Gretel are portrayed by women — play up the silliness, and the mood stays light. When their mother (Leah Heater) comes home and catches them disobeying orders, a jug of milk is broken — their dinner spilled! — and she sends them off to the forest to forage for food. When their father (Craig Verm) comes home soon after, he’s drunk but jovial, carrying plenty of food for everyone to eat. The chemistry between the two parents is a joy to watch, and Verm’s playful rendition a delight. But when he realizes the children are gone, he sings of the dangers of the witch in the woods who eats children, and the two rush off to find them. The bulk of the story follows the children on their journey. Their songs, while performed in English, had subtitles above the stage and at times, proved necessary. The vocals, while pleasant, were often overpowered by the brilliant orchestra. It was apparent some of the audience was

reading along, as laughter occasionally erupted from the seats before the lines were sung. Humperdinck’s opera is based on the Brothers Grimm fairy tale, but this plot has some twists. A majestic scene brings glitter and fog to the stage, along with some surprise characters that are sure to be appreciated by a younger audience. The true standout performance of the evening, however, was undoubtedly Marianne Cornetti as the witch. She doesn’t sing until the third act, but with just a strut across the stage early on, she receives gasps of joy from the audience.

HANSEL & GRETEL

Through Sun., Nov. 11. Pittsburgh Opera at the Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $7-165. pittsburghopera.org

When the children finally make their way to her gingerbread house, Cornetti is radiant. Her whimsical portrayal of the witch is worth the price of admission, her over-the-top dramatic gestures the perfect fit for a fairy tale villain. One solemn note: on opening night on Saturday, the evening began with the orchestra playing Verdi’s “Va, pensioro,” the “Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves,” in memoriam to the victims of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting. The music echoed throughout the still room, with the faint sound of some audience members, encouraged to sing along if they so wished, paying their respects through song. Afterward, a moment of silence. An appropriate touch for anyone who might feel guilty for enjoying a night out after the tragedy.

Follow editor-in-chief Lisa Cunningham on Twitter @trashyleesuh PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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Senior writer Ryan Deto and editor-in-chief Lisa Cunningham

PITTSBURGH CITY PODCAST Pittsburgh City Paper has teamed up with Point Park University’s Center for Media Innovation for the Pittsburgh City Podcast, hosted by Paul Guggenheimer. Listen to senior writer Ryan Deto and editor-in-chief Lisa Cunningham discuss how the paper adapted to covering last week’s tragic shooting days before they went to press.

JENSORENSEN

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EARLY WARNINGS SPONSORED UPCOMING EVENTS FROM CITY PAPER’S FINE ADVERTISERS

WED., NOVEMBER 21 REAL FRIENDS 7 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. $22. 412-381-1681 or mrsmalls.com.

WED., NOVEMBER 21 SAVED BY THE 90S 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $16-30. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

THU., NOVEMBER 22 THE GRINCH 3D 12 P.M. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER NORTH SIDE. $9.95. 412-237-3400 or carnegiesciencecenter.org.

FRI., NOVEMBER 23 DOYLE 7:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE UPSTAIRS SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $10-20. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Only Flesh & Sissy Baby Boys.

SAT., NOVEMBER 24 JASON MRAZ 8 P.M. HEINZ HALL DOWNTOWN. $39.50-99.50. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org.

SAT., NOVEMBER 24 STOMP 8 P.M. THE PALACE THEATRE GREENSBURG. $28-75. 724-836-8000 or thepalacetheatre.org

SAT., NOVEMBER 24 WHY? 8 P.M. SPIRIT LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-18 event. $16. 412-586-4441 or mrsmalls.com.

SAT., NOVEMBER 24 WARRIORS ROCK 7 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $35. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., NOVEMBER 24 THAT ARENA ROCK SHOW 9 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. $15. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com. With special guests HDK & School of Rock House Band.

SAT., NOVEMBER 24 FADE TO BLACK: A TRIBUTE TO METALLICA

SUN., NOVEMBER 25 ALLEN STONE CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL 10:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $12-14. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guest Outlined In Blood.

MILLVALE. All-ages event. $10-12. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com. With special guest SeeYouSpaceCowboy & Chamber.

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8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-18 event. $20-25. 412-381-1681 or mrsmalls.com. With special guest Litz.

SUN., NOVEMBER 25 ALLEN STONE 8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $26-32. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Nick Waterhouse.

SUN., NOVEMBER 25 A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS 2 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $30-45. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

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4 P.M. HARTWOOD ACRES MANSION HARTWOOD ACRES. $6-8. 412-767-9200.

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TUE., NOVEMBER 27 THE CONTORTIONIST 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $22-79. 412-381-1681 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Intervals.

TUE., NOVEMBER 27 BENNY BENACK & FRIENDS 5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYPARKS.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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PHOTO: BESS DUNLEVY/PITTSBURGH VINTAGE MIXER

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BY MAGGIE WEAVER // MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T’S OUT WITH the new and in with

the old at the Pittsburgh Vintage Mixer, a biannual market founded in 2012 by friends Michael Lutz, Jason Sumney, and Bess Dunlevy. The event celebrates a passion for kitsch, love for vintage, and nostalgia. The mixer is an elaborate side hustle for Lutz, Sumney, and Dunlevy, who all have full-time jobs. For them, it’s a “labor of love” born from their shared passion for mid-century modern housewares. For years, the trio curated personal vintage collections (Sumney’s favorite piece is a 3-and-one-1/2-foot, Icee-style red ice cone lamp, while Lutz loves a Gidget board game).

PITTSBURGH VINTAGE MIXER

6-9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 9, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m., Sat., Nov. 10. Teamsters Hall Local 249. 4701 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-15, Free for 12 and under. pghvintagemixer.com.

In 2008, the mixer’s founders opened an online shop, Red Pop Shop, to sell their groovy goods. Once Red Pop Shop was in full swing, the trio realized there was no vendor fair for local sellers and vintagelovers. In the summer of 2012, the Pittsburgh Vintage Mixer held its inaugural market, the city’s first vintage-only event. The 2012 mixer was a hit. Lutz, Sumney, and Dunlevy’s continued growth of the event met a devoted community of Pittsburghers. For three years, they paired with Heinz History Center in celebration of Vintage Pittsburgh. In June, the trio landed a spot on Rick Se-

bak’s Nebby docuseries. Alongside the biannual markets, they’ve also hosted specialized pop-ups, such as last year’s Naughty Valentine’s Day Market. From the beginning, Lutz, Sumney, and Dunlevy had a clear vision of the fair. No handmade or upcycled items, all vendors were strictly vintage. This clear line kept the mixer from overlapping with other events such as the Handmade Arcade. They wanted to bridge between a flea market and antique sale, showing affordable but high-quality vintage items. Every vendor is hand-picked. Local sellers fill out an application and the three sit down to curate the show. Spaces are kept as local as possible, but always open to unique vendors from outside Pittsburgh. The mixer is cooking with gas in its 12th season. More than 1,500 shoppers are expected to fill the Teamsters Hall Local 249 in Lawrenceville at the 2018 fall market. The upcoming mixer extended to two days with the addition of a “Night-Owl” pre-shopping, pre-party ticket. More than 30 vendors will be selling vintage fashion, furniture, houseware, vinyl, and who knows what else. Move your feet with live music by DJ Alternate Histories and others. Guests can mingle with a glass of wine from Allegheny Wine Mixer, an antique soda from Natrona Bottling, pizza from A’Pizza Badamo, or a slice of pie from Pie Bird Bakery and Cafe. As Lutz says “It’s like you’re at a party with your friends, but everything’s for sale.”


CALENDAR NOVEMBER 8-14

PHOTO: SHAUNA MILLER

^ Fri., Nov. 9: Bat Zuppel

THURSDAY NOV. 8 COMEDY

There’s a country bent to comedian Nate Bargatze’s material — in one bit on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, his Tennessee accent comes through as he explains the process of moving a dead horse and mountain climbing, not necessarily in that order. Voted as a talent to watch by comedy veterans Jim Gaffigan and Marc Maron, Bargatze has appeared on talk shows and at festivals. His debut

album, Yelled at By a Clown, topped the iTunes and Billboard comedy charts. He’s performing at Pittsburgh Improv through Sunday. 8 p.m. 166 East Bridge St., Homestead. $20-70. improv.com/pittsburgh

EVENT

Calling all helping hands and wouldbe helping hands: Community Forge is hosting Help or Highwater: Volunteer Fair to connect Pittsburghers with groups seeking volunteers for various causes. More than 40 nonprofits will be on site to share ways to support their causes through volunteering, donating, and in some cases, joining a board of

directors. The event is free to attend for all ages and abilities. There will be food trucks, raffle prizes and a cash bar benefiting Pittsburgh Cares. 6-10 p.m. Community Forge. 1256 Franklin Ave. Wilkinsburg. pittsburghcares.org

SPELLING

Brush up on word origins and get ready for Pittsburgh’s Spelling Bee for Adults. Hosted by PublicSource and the Wilkinsburg nonprofit Civically, the event invites spellers to the Ace Hotel for a night of vowels, consonants, I’s before E’s (except after C’s), and more. Impress a panel of judges, including Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

columnist Tony Norman, CMOA archivist Dominique Luster, and PublicSource managing editor Halle Stockton, for the chance to win prizes. Helpful tip: it’s close to the mid-term elections, so expect to have your knowledge of political terms tested (V-O-T-E, for example). Proceeds benefit by PublicSource and Civically. 6:30-9:30 p.m. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. $20-100. acehotel.com/pittsburgh

POETRY

Critically-acclaimed poet, writer, commentator, activist, and educator Nikki Giovanni gives a reading at August Wilson Center for its TRUTHSayers speaker CONTINUES ON PG. 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: JARROD HARKER

Vancouver Sleep Clinic

PHOTO: THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM

^ Fri., Nov. 9: Chelsea Girls

THURSDAY Wuki 9 p.m. Scenario, South Side. scenariopgh.com

FRIDAY Saves The Day with An Horse, Kevin Devine 7 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theater, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

SATURDAY Hot Rize 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, Oakland. calliopehouse.org

SUNDAY Dianne Reeves 8 p.m. August Wilson Center, Downtown. trustarts.org

MONDAY Mike Peters & The Alarm 7 p.m. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Whitehall. crafthousepgh.com

TUESDAY Kasbo with Vancouver Sleep Clinic 8 p.m. The Rex Theater, South Side. rextheater.net

WEDNESDAY Yowler, Rue, The Moon 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. therobotoproject.com

MORE LISTINGS ONLINE

AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM 40

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

series. Her accolades are too many to list in full (NAACP Image Award, a Grammy nomination, listed on Oprah’s 25 Living Legends), so just start by typing in “Nikki Giovanni” into YouTube and watching her sharp, incisive, funny speeches about Bill Cosby and Condoleezza Rice. 7 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $38.75. aacc-awc.org

will be food (of course) along with beverages, live art and music, raffles, and a silent auction. Head down to the American Serbian Club in South Side to get your fill and help a good cause. 7 p.m. 2524 Sarah St., South Side. $35. eventbrite.com

FRIDAY NOV. 9 FILM

When Andy Warhol made art, he didn’t really care about whether or not the masses would approve. His 1967 film Chelsea Girls, which is screening at the Andy Warhol Museum in a new digital transfer, is a three-hour experimental journey into the lives of young women living at the Hotel Chelsea in New York. Upon its release, Roger Ebert described the film as “employing perversion and sensation like chili sauce to disguise the aroma of the meal.” So, that probably means it’s a great time. The screening is in celebration of the recent release of Andy Warhol’s The Chelsea Girls, a book detailing the making and impact of the film. 7 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. warhol.org

EVENT

Everyone is invited to chow down at the Hot Metal Bridge Faith Community. The fifth annual Hot Metal Hullabaloo is a party to celebrate the community and raise funds that help HMBFC to continue providing services for those in need and keep its kitchen open to all. The foundation supports Pittsburgh by offering a place to worship, free meals, necessities, and much more. There

SATURDAY NOV. 10 RUNNING

Run wild through one of Pittsburgh’s most challenging courses at the Pittsburgh Zoo’s ZooZilla 5K. Participants of the 5K must be registered prior to the event, as day-of registration isn’t available. Run, jog or walk through the hills and dales of the zoo and stick around after the event, as admission is included with registration. 8 a.m. race begins and ends in zoo parking lot. 7370 Baker St., Highland Park. $25. pittsburghzoo.org

EVENT

^ Thu., Nov. 8: Nikki Giovanni

MUSIC

Following the success of Bat Zuppel’s fuzzy, electric debut album, Dylar, the Pittsburgh based group is dropping its sophomore release, MIRROR|RORRIM. The 12-track headbanger builds on the blended punk, psychedelic rock sound of Dylar, with a fresh assortment of winding and abrupt psych-punk. So, strap yourself in and prepare for an intoxicating, heady ride with Bat Zuppel as they super-charge the halls of Spirit along with local punk rock bands Rave Ami and The Gotobeds. 8 p.m. $7.25. Spirit, Lawrenceville. redfishbowl.com

Hidden Characters Crew, an Allentown-based B-boys group that has spanned three generations and 18 members, celebrate 16 years together with a breakdance battle at Carnegie Mellon University. B-boy teams from all over the East Coast come together to compete for cash prizes and trophies, judged by founding Hidden Characters members Icon, Sole, and Drako, and others. Watch as dancers from teams like Pittsburgh’s own CMU Street Styles, Flock of Philadelphia, and Retro Flow of South Jersey break out their freshest moves during bouts of five vs. five or one-on-ones. 2-10 p.m. 5032 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10; $5 with CMU ID.

ART

Eat your art. As part of the FEAST dinner series, a meal that immerses diners in art from paintings on the wall to culinary adventures on a plate, the Carnegie Museum of Art welcomes chef Kate Romane to its kitchen. Romane, the owner and head chef of Black Radish Kitchen in Point Breeze, will prepare a


PHOTO: MIKE HOLOHAN

^ Fri., Nov. 9: Hot Metal Hullabaloo

multi-course, family-style dinner and drink pairing. For the Nov. 10 event, CMOA is partnering with Carnegie International and Cinematheque on the theme “beauty.” Reserve a seat in the theater before dinner or skip out on the screen and just join CMOA for a beautiful dinner. 6:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $90-100. cmoa.org

MUSIC

Their powers combined, Jeff Rosenstock and Chris Farren deliver witty, unfancy, heartsick pop music in Antarctigo Vespucci. Here, as in their individual projects and other bands (Rosenstock in Bomb the Music Industry!; Farren in Fake Problems), the songs sound almost effortless but are packed with smart pop songwriting (“Breathless on DVD” is a good place to start). The duo brings its latest, Love in the Time of E-mail, to Mr. Roboto Project with

Katie Ellen and Teenage Halloween. 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $13. therobotoproject.com

MUSIC

During SNL’s first season, creator Lorne Michaels asked composer Leonard Bernstein to host the show, while they were both at Kurt Vonnegut’s birthday party. Bernstein declined, because he took his work seriously. Michaels wanted to do a goofy SNL rendition of one of Bernstein’s most famous pieces, West Side Story. But Bernstein was and is a legend in the world of composition, from conducting dozens of orchestras to scoring Peter Pan and On the Waterfront. In celebration of his works and his 100th birthday, the Bach Choir will put on a performance based on Bernstein’s repertoire, at the Katz Performing Arts Center. Also 4:30 p.m., Sun., Nov. 11. 5738 Darlington Road, Squirrel Hill. $12-27. jccpgh.org

SUNDAY NOV. 11 FILM

A good film nerd spends hours after watching a movie reading related reviews and interviews. But a great film nerd discusses at length just exactly how a movie might have gotten made, from the moment the idea is born to the final cut. The Pennsylvania Film Industry Association will host Anatomy of a Movie at Regent Square Theater, with a screening of 1979 Academy Award Winner Breaking Away, a movie about friendship and biking. After the screening, screenwriting experts will dissect how the filmmakers went about creating and executing the story. 2 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Regent

Square. Free to PFIA members, $10 for non-members. pafia.org

MUSIC

Music alone is one thing, but when combined with art, lights, and sound installations, get ready for one incredibly immersive experience. Petty Hit Machine singer, BjORDAN is ushering in a night consisting of the latter at, where else but, Spirit. The electro-pop artist is set to perform, as well as local acts Jonathan Russell, The Rubix, G.R. Zombie, Eric Weidenhof Quartet, and Josephine — who’s playing her first show ever. While getting lost in the music, look out for drag queens Agnes and Victoria Pope, who take the stage in between performances. All of this goes down inside of Ian Brill’s VAULT 3.0 installation, with a sound show before, after, and during intermission by Samir Gangwani. 7 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10. spiritpgh.com CONTINUES ON PG. 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

^ Sat., Nov. 10: FEAST

MONDAY

TUESDAY

MEAL AND MOVIE

TALK

NOV. 12

When it comes to lifestyle choices in Middle Earth, Hobbits really take the cake. They do a little farming, a little reading, drink tea, dance, get drunk, eat a lot, and don’t wear shoes. Cheers to that Shire way of life with Lord of the Rings meal and movie from Row House Cinema and The Vandal, pairing a screening of the Peter Jackson movies with meals inspired by the books. And don’t be a fool of a Took and order a lager: Hobbits drink ales. Everyone knows that. Option 1: 4 p.m. The Lord of the Rings: Two Towers at Row House Cinema, 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville, followed by 8 p.m. supper at The Vandal, 4306 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Option 2: 6 p.m. dinner at The Vandal, followed by 8:10 p.m. The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King at Row House Cinema. $75. rowhousecinema.com

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NOV. 13

Join the Pittsburgh Public Theater’s new artistic director for a fireside chat and a performance of SWEAT. Marya Sea Kaminski previously served as associate artistic director of Seattle Repertory Theater and took the helm of the Pittsburgh Public Theater earlier this year. Kaminski will be joined by actor and voice-over artist Jamie Agnello. A performance ^ Wed., Nov. 14: Ron Stallworth

of SWEAT, a critically-acclaimed drama about the consequence of a battered economy, will follow the discussion. SWEAT was awarded the 2017 Pulitzer Prize. 5 p.m. Pittsburgh Emerging Arts Leaders Network, 810 Penn Ave., Downtown. $16 for students and $25 general admission. Call 412-316-8200 for tickets.

MUSIC

Fall in love with the Portland via Montana band Strange Ranger, a mellow, bittersweet post-rock trio that can do a whole lot with four chords and two minutes. Start with the latest EP, How It All Went By, and work your way backwards. They come to Roboto with a stripped-down set of the new album, alongside locals Shin Guard, Swither,

and baseball dad. 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. therobotoproject.com

WEDNESDAY NOV. 14 TALK

Forty-something years ago, Ron Stallworth made history with a truly unbelievable story. As the first African-American police officer in the Colorado Police Department, he infiltrated a new Ku Klux Klan chapter by answering a newspaper ad looking for new members but sending a white officer in his place. Stallworth went on to write a book about it called Black Klansman, which was adopted into a Spike Lee joint in 2018 called BlacKkKlansman. No matter how many times you hear/read about it, the story doesn’t get any less crazy, but it might help to hear from Stallworth himself, when he tells his story at Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium. 7 p.m. 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. hillhouse.org •


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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-18-012315, In re petition of Bonnie Johng Nicklas for change of name to Bonnie Grace Nicklas. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 3rd day of December, 2018, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for.

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Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time November 13, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

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General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid. M. Jordan Purchasing We are an equal rights and opportunity school district

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. Squeeze boxes? 5. Cheap Super PAC attack 10. Kissing sound 14. Latin lover’s flower 15. Chop in two 16. Canned fruit brand 17. Ice cream brand 18. Drunk as a skunk 19. Tests in a tube, for short 20. Ignoramus 23. Durable wood 25. Ignoramus 26. Democrat megadonor Steyer 27. Just ducky 30. Bullshitted 32. Mickey of Hollywood 34. Disney princess with a blonde braid 35. They’re all true 39. Germ of an idea 40. Lifelong wrestler’s affliction 43. Length of time 44. “Check your ___ at the door” 45. Bothers 46. Chill 48. Bruins, on scoreboards

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49. Casino machines 51. In its own gravy 53. Weakling’s giveaway 56. Hurt 57. “You can count on me” 58. Competes 60. Dog biter 61. Band-Aid rival 62. Impressive panache 63. Marries 64. Gives off 65. Scream

DOWN 1. “You ___ a life saver” 2. Make some changes to, briefly 3. Fills with passion 4. Pageant band 5. Hotdogs 6. Hotel staff 7. Vogue rival 8. Turn away 9. War’s steed, in the Apocalypse 10. Molly, chemically 11. Scrabble addict in a Stefan Fatsis book 12. Rah ___ (Nicki Minaj BFF) 13. Bros 21. Feedbag morsel 22. Moody punk, or

moody punk offshoot 23. He plays Donald on 59-Down 24. Deane of the Continental Congress 28. Michelle of U.S. women’s soccer 29. Some kings and queens 31. Tibetan spiritual leaders 33. Website’s feedback, say 36. Amber colored drink 37. Gear’s tooth 38. Snake eyes total 41. Disguised, for short

42. Spanish wine 47. Values 48. Constructs 49. Went undercover 50. Nail down 51. Attorney follower 52. “I’m taking a photo here!” 53. New client, so to speak 54. It goes round and round 55. Apply plumber’s putty 56. Internet initialism to go along with a reaction pic 59. See 23-Down LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


PEEPSHOW A sex and social justice column

TRANS RIGHTS MUST BE PROTECTED BY JESSIE SAGE // PEEPSHOWCAST@GMAIL.COM

I

N ALLEGHENY COUNTY, any transgender person seeking to legally change their name and gender marker schedules a hearing with Judge Christine Ward. Once a month she conducts a closed-door court ceremony where each person gets to come forward with their family or support persons and be legally recognized for the first time as the person they already know themselves to be. These ceremonies are highly emotional; they feel more akin to a wedding ceremony than to a bureaucratic process. I know this because I am the mother of a transgender teenager. As such, I have spent years interfacing between doctors, therapists, lawyers, and my son in order to reach this defining moment where he, too, could stand in front of this judge. That day at the courthouse, we watched as several other trans folks were called to the judge’s bench, and we anxiously awaited our turn. My son was called up last, and I walked with him. The judge told him that there was a processing issue with his paperwork and that we would need to wait until the next ceremony. Being a mother of a trans kid means that I have seen my kid in a significant amount of pain: the pain of

transphobia, bullying, and exclusion. But I have never seen him experience such raw devastation as I did on that day. For the first time since he was a little kid, he sobbed on my shoulder; the kind of uncontrollable sobbing that broke my heart. He is now bigger than me, so I stood in front of the judge’s bench, trying to bear the weight of my son’s body along with his heavy sadness. We walked out

THIS IS NOTHING SHORT OF A CRISIS FOR THE TRANS COMMUNITY. of the courtroom deflated. This must have been palpable throughout the courthouse because the judge walked out to the hallway and put her arms around my son, and told us, through her own tears, that she was going to fix this, she couldn’t turn him away. And she did; the clerks and the judge and the law interns who were around scrambled for an hour or so and then called us back into the courtroom, and in an after-hours cer-

emony that was just our family, my son was legally recognized for the first time as male and granted his chosen name. On October 21, President Trump issued a memo proposing to redefine gender or gender identity based exclusively on sex assigned at birth. This redefinition has a very specific purpose: to make gender markers unchangeable for federal administrative purposes. While it is not within the administration’s purview to dismantle the processes of a county court, the motivation behind the memo is the suppression or eradication of trans identity. As such, we should see it as the first concrete step in a political agenda that would seek to rob trans folks of the legal recognition that my son was afforded in the courtroom that day. This is nothing short of a crisis for the trans community. Official recognition and validation are significant; it signals to trans folks that they are a meaningful and valued part of our society. Conversely, refusing such recognition signals that the state will not protect trans people, emboldening those who would commit transphobic acts of violence against them. We cannot stand by and let this recognition be stripped away.

Jessie Sage is co-host of the Peepshow Podcast, which addresses issues related to sex and social justice. Her column Peepshow is exclusive to City Paper. Follow her on Twitter @peep_cast.

Peepshow Podcast, Ep. 31 In Episode 31 of The Peepshow Podcast, we talk to Julian Gill-Peterson, University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor and author of Histories of the Transgender Child. While the trans community is reeling from President Trump’s Memo, Gill-Peterson offers a historical perspective, one that comes from the archival work that they have done for the book on the history of transgender children in the 20th century. And this history is important in such a fraught political climate. In Gill-Peterson’s words, “Having trans history available is, now more than ever, something that can provide context, but also a different kind of reassurance: you are not the first person to go through this, and our community has experienced this before.” In regards to this particular Memo, Gill-Peterson’s archival work is important because it points to a rich history of trans folks that cannot be erased. Indeed, they say, “For all the power the government has, it doesn’t have the power to define people’s existence. You cannot make trans people go away because in fact they are not created out of language, they are human beings that exist in the world.” For more, listen to Peepshow Podcast, Episode 31 peepshowpodcast.com/ peepshow-podcast-episode-31

Pittsburgh’s lone liberal talkshow host for 30+ years Listen live every weekday at 10 a.m. at lynncullen.pghcitypaper.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER NOV. 7-14, 2018

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November 7, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 45

November 7, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 45