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SY O MO PIT NA F S UR TS GO QU NS BUR GU IRR VIC GH E EL TI SH H M OO ILL S TI NG

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ELECTION ISSUE

Another Pennsylvania is Possible

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

pghcitypaper.com PGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 44 Guest Editor RYAN DETO

DIDN’T GET A VOTING STICKER? WE’RE HERE TO HELP. Cut one of our helpful voting tags out and tape it to your chest with pride.

Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Marketing and Promotions Coordinator CONNOR MARSHMAN Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Senior Sales Representative BLAKE LEWIS Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Advertising Sales Assistant TAYLOR PASQUARELLI Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors GAB BONESSO, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, JESSIE SAGE Intern ALEX POPICHAK Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

C OV E R P HOTO B Y JA RE D W I C K E RHA M

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Flowers, candles, and letters are left at Tree of Life Synagogue on Mon., Oct. 29, 2018 in Squirrel Hill. CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

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THE ELECTION ISSUE

PENNSYLVANIA POSSIBILITIES Elections throughout history led to big changes, and this year’s midterms should be no different. BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

S OUR STAFF prepared Pittsburgh City Paper’s 2018 Election Guide to be printed this week, tragedy struck our city. When something as horrific and unexpected as Saturday’s shooting occurs, our priorities are shaken and things that seem important suddenly feel small. Details about word counts and photo captions mean very little by Monday morning. It’s a safe assumption many Pittsburghers feel similarly this week. The issue was planned to convey a mostly positive message about civic engagement. Summer Lee was on our cover, because she symbolizes to us a positive change for Pittsburgh: the first black female state legislator from our region. And yet, it’s hard to focus on anything except mourning. We knew we needed to honor the victims. But we also wanted to honor the community. During the vigil on Saturday, residents realized they could turn their tragedy into political action. Scores of people could be heard chanting “Vote, Vote, Vote.” So, we kept our theme, with some adjustments. There was no approach that felt appropriate here, because there’s nothing appropriate about what happened. But we felt that this election — even in its ugliest iterations as political theater — is worth focusing on at a time like this. Even after events like this weekend’s, or maybe especially now, Pittsburghers need to understand that another Pennsylvania is possible.

The laws and policies in action today can change tomorrow, but it takes a powerful will on the part of the electorate. Even at a time like this, when stakes are high and stances are hard-fought, citizens can struggle to channel that passion into actual change. Voters don’t know all their representatives, and it’s understandable why. Between school boards, state senators, and federal offices, each resident has at least a dozen elected officials making choices on their behalf. It’s hard for most people to care deeply about all of them. However, most people are aware of their state’s laws and policies. Most Pennsylvanians know it is relatively easy to purchase firearms within the state and that just about anyone can buy semi-automatic assault rifles. Most Pennsylvanians know smoking marijuana recreationally is illegal, and they know their property taxes provide funding for their school districts. Most LGBTQ Pennsylvanians know they can be fired for their sexual orientation, left with little legal recourse. However, those realities don’t have to remain the same. Another Pennsylvania is possible; it just depends on how people vote. This City Paper Election Guide highlights several policies, protections, and laws that can become a reality if they receive enough support at the polls. Some will be harder to achieve than others, but they are all possible. This issue also includes thoughts from the women on CP’s staff about why they feel it is im-

portant to vote, plus Hannah Lynn provides a Jewish perspective on this weekend’s tragedy. Additionally, several portraits of local political candidates are featured throughout these pages. Each candidate symbolizes a fresh face of Pennsylvania politics — people who buck the state’s oldermale dominated status quo. With Democrats projected to flip the U.S. House, and President Donald Trump still in the White House, gridlock is likely on the federal level. Harrisburg is another story. CP highlights several state-level polices that voters want to see changed: gun control, LGBTQ nondiscrimination, Medicare-for-all, the abolishment of property taxes, $15 an hour minimum wage, abortion restrictions, and recreational marijuana. The state House and Senate are currently controlled by Republican majorities. The governor’s mansion is occupied by Democrat Tom Wolf. Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Wagner could win, giving the GOP a chance to push through many of their priorities. Though many predict Republicans will maintain control of the state House, research scientist Jonathan Tannen gives Democrats a 13 percent chance to flip that chamber. The state Senate is likely out of reach for Democrats, but even flipping a few seats could have a big impact. If Wolf wins re-election, and Democrats make inroads, then many of their priorities will likely move forward.

Follow senior writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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GUN CONTROL BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

R

OBERT BOWERS allegedly brought four guns to carry out the grisly killings of worshippers at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Squirrel Hill. One of those was an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle. Pennsylvania recently passed a modest gun-control bill, but that measure wouldn’t have stopped Bowers, who killed 11 people. Bowers had no criminal record and was not known to police, but did have an extensive history of making anti-Semitic and antiimmigrant posts on social media. The ease with which Bowers accessed guns is decried by gun-control activists. And it’s not just them. According to progressive pollsters at Data for Progress, Democrats say gun control is their most prioritized state-level issue. But getting strong gun-control laws through the Republican-controlled Pennsylvania legislature has proved elusive. The GOP often receives support from rural and suburban Democrats on this issue. However, a recent universal background check bill was co-sponsored by more than 70 House members, including some Republicans. It failed to clear committee by one vote, but proponents are confident about its chances next year. Adding pro gun-control legislators to the state House could be monumental in getting that bill and others passed. Gov. Tom Wolf says he would support those efforts if re-elected, while Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Wagner opposes universal background tracks.

CHAMPIONS: HAMPIONS: State te Rep. Rep Ed Gainey (D-East Liberty) introduced an assault weapon ban; State Rep. Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill), co-chair of SAFE caucus

OPPONENTS: State Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Marshall); State Rep. Joseph Petrarca (D-Vandergrift) INTEGRAL CANDIDATES: Gov. Tom Wolf (D-York), Michele Knoll (D-Ohio Township), Emily Skopov (D-Marshall) support universal background checks.

BY THE NUMBERS According to a March 2018 poll, 86 percent of Pennsylvanians want enhanced background checks. *FRANKLIN & MARSHALL POLL

“Ultimately, we know we can make our community safer by having some common-sense gun laws,” said Squirrel Hill state Rep. Dan Frankel the Sunday following the Tree of Life mass shooting. 8

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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FRESH FACES

Summer Lee

Summer Lee will be Southwestern Pa.’s first black female state legislator, ever. A graduate of Howard University School of Law, she has experience advocating for school reform, and decries the disproportionate effect pollution has on minority communities. “We need to expand our vision of what a candidate looks like,” says Lee. “The progressive message, even when delivered by a young black woman in an overwhelmingly white area, can win.” 10

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

30, Democrat Swissvale, Pa. House 34


WHAT IS POSSIBLE:

LGBTQ NONDISCRIMINATION

I

BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

N MOST OF Pennsylvania, people can

be fired, evicted, or denied public accommodation if they identify as LGBTQ. In Southwestern Pennsylvania, only in Allegheny County do residents have legal protections against LGBTQ discrimination.

For Pittsburgh-area voters, the choice is clear regarding which party supports civil rights protections for LGBTQ individuals and which doesn’t.

State Rep. Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill), PA Fairness Act prime sponsor

OPPONENTS: State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Cranberry) and House Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Marshall) INTEGRAL CANDIDATES: Emily Skopov (D-Marshall) and openly gay candidate Dan Smith Jr. (D-Adams) both support and both could unseat Turazai and Metcalfe, respectively.

After calling openly gay state Rep. Brian Sims (D-Philadelphia) a “lying homosexual” on Facebook, Daryl Metcalfe proceeded to write “I block all substantive Democrat legislation sent to my committee and advance good Republican legislation.” BY THE NUMBERS

About 8.6 million

Pennsylvanians live in towns without LGBTQ non-discrimination protections. *SUBURBAN AND RURAL ALLIANCE OF PENNSYLVANIA

E S P Æ C E A PIECE BY AU R É LI E N BO RY

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No Southwestern Pennsylvania Republican state legislator supports a statewide non-discrimination bill, aka the PA Fairness Act. Almost every Pittsburgh-area Democratic legislator supports it. With the Trump administration considering the removal of some civil rights protections for transgender individuals, a statewide law could be the only way to ensure them protections. Statewide, the bill likely has enough bipartisan support to become law without flipping the state House and Senate out of Republican control. But House Speaker Mike Turzai consistently assigns the bill, which has been introduced for several years running to anti-LGBTQ legislator Daryl Metcalfe’s committee. Metcalfe has never brought the bill up for a vote. Until that dynamic changes, many LGBTQ Pennsylvanians will go without protections.

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MEDICARE-FOR-ALL BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

REVIOUSLY, a Medicare-for-all health care system had been mostly considered a fringe idea on the left. But over the last couple of years, the idea of Americans getting insurance from a single government insurance plan, or singlepayer, has taken off in popularity. According to a recent poll, 52 percent of Pennsylvanians support Medicarefor-all, while 29 percent oppose it. State Democrats are joining the public. Progressive candidates like Sara Innamorato and Summer Lee won competitive primaries while advocating for Medicare-forall. Moderate Democratic state Rep. Adam Ravenstahl said he would support singlepayer if Democrats took control of the legislature. Even Democrats running in very red districts, like Terri Mitko in Beaver County, are considering backing single-payer. State Republicans, on the other hand, are attacking Democrats for their support. Mailers linked to GOP state Senate candidate Jeremy Shaffer’s campaign called his Democratic opponent, Lindsey Williams, a radical for her single-payer support. For Medicare-for-all to stand a chance at becoming a reality, Democrats must take the state House and Senate, and then some. Even then, it would be a heavy load with several details to finalize. And it’s still unclear where Gov. Tom Wolf stands on the issue, but rapidly growing public pressure could be persuasive.

“52 PERCENT SUPPORT MEDICAREFOR-ALL.”

CHAMPIONS: State representativeselect Sara Innamorato (D-Lawrenceville) and Summer Lee (D-Swissvale); State Reps. Austin Davis (D-McKeesport), Ed Gainey (D-East Liberty), Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill)

OPPONENTS:

All Allegheny County Republicans INTEGRAL CANDIDATES: Jon McCabe (D-Lower Burrell), Lindsey Williams (D-West View), support and running in GOP-held districts.

“The more people understand it, the more they realize it is a good way forward,” said U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Forest Hills) of Medicare-for-all. BY THE NUMBERS National single-payer: $32 trillion in new government health-care spending, over 10 years; 30 million more Americans covered; $2 trillion in overall government savings

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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FRESH FACES

Jon McCabe

As a student at Penn State New Kensington, McCabe co-founded the My Vote Matters organization. Now, at just 22 years old, the political newcomer and Lower Burrell native champions issues such as Medicare for All, affordable education (including free tuition at community colleges), and legalized recreational marijuana. “I may be young, but when I knock doors people are thrilled to see the next generation step up to lead us out of our current mess,” says McCabe. “I’m also coming from a working class family, and I’ve experienced the day-to-day struggles that face many Pennsylvanian families.”

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

22, Democrat Lower Burrell, Pa. House 54


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FRESH FACES

Valerie Gaydos

A first-time candidate who won a four-way primary in May, Valerie Gaydos wants to bring her entrepreneurial experience to Harrisburg. She has a successful track record of investing in start-up businesses. “I don’t think people want a different kind of Pennsylvania just because it’s different; they want a Pennsylvania that simply works,” says Gaydos. “Bucking the status quo starts with believing things can be done differently than they have been done before, then acting on it.”

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

50, Republican Aleppo, Pa. House 44


WHAT IS POSSIBLE:

ABOLISH PROPERTY TAXES BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

OMETIMES DESCRIBED as the “white whale” of Pennsylvania politics, the elimination of state property taxes has been a goal of several advocates and state legislators, mostly conservatives, for years. Property taxes currently provide 41 percent of state revenue for public schools. Advocates want to replace that revenue stream with modest increases in income and sales tax, about 2 percent and 1 percent, respectively. Critics say this wouldn’t cover school funding obligations, and the tax increases would disproportionately hurt low-income residents.

But proponents say rising property taxes in rural areas are hurting homeowners, in some cases costing them hundreds of dollars a month on top of mortgages. In 2015, the state Senate came within one vote of passing this bill with support on both sides of the aisle. But Lt. Gov. Mike Stack (D-Philadelphia) cast the tiebreaking vote against the initiative. If the state Senate keeps a similar make-up, this vote could come down to the next lieutenant governor: either Democrat John Fetterman, who opposes, or Republican Jeff Bartos, who supports the bill.

WHY I’M VOTING Two years ago after the 2016 election, a good friend married his fiancé. He is an immigrant, brought to the United States by his parents. The marriage was described as “too fast” despite the fact that the couple dated for years and were engaged. I watched as he was threatened with deportation. He and his husband, as newlyweds, were forced to consider a separated future. The law blamed him for a fraud he didn’t commit. His life was reduced to legal jargon. He became a subject to be passed between lawyers. Months later, the court weighed in his favor. But many aren’t so lucky. — MAGGIE WEAVER, STAFF WRITER

CHAMPIONS: State Rep. Jason Ortitay (R-South Fayette) co-sponsored several bills to end property taxes

OPPONENTS: Lt. Gov. candidate John Fetterman (D-Braddock) INTEGRAL CANDIDATES: Scott Wagner (R-York), Michael Puskaric (R-Elizabeth), Josh Nulph (R-Harrison)

“I heard Pennsylvanians loud and clear: They want property taxes eliminated,” said Scott Wagner to Sunbury’s Daily Item. “I am the only hope that people have to have their school taxes eliminated.” BY THE NUMBERS

14 of 19 school districts in Beaver County recently proposed property tax increases between 1.75-4 percent. *BEAVER COUNTY TIMES

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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FRESH FACES

Betsy Monroe 48, Democrat Fox Chapel, Pa. House 30 March, Monroe decided to throw her hat in the political ring. As a healthcare professional, she believes in protecting the Affordable Care Act and women’s reproductive health rights, including abortion access. She also favors a severance tax on fracking and natural gas drilling, and raising the minimum wage. “We only have a few representatives with a professional background in health care, so our representatives have to lean on lobbyists and their party for their information,” says Monroe. “We need more people who can bring their own expertise to the table and make decisions based on fact rather than bias.”

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Inspired by the 2017 Women’s


WHAT IS POSSIBLE POSSIBLE:

$15 AN HOUR MINIMUM WAGE BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

E

ACH NEIGHBORING state has a higher minimum wage than Pennsylvania, despite some having weaker economies. Pennsylvania’s $7.25 minimum wage is the lowest in the Northeast. There’s bipartisan consensus for raising the minimum wage, but disagreement over how much. Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Wagner proposes increasing to $8.75 an hour. Gov. Tom Wolf wants to go up to $12 an hour. With housing costs in parts of Pittsburgh and the state rising fairly quickly, public support for a $15 minimum wage is following. Bills have been introduced in the state legislature raising the wage to $12 immediately, then to $15 by 2024. Those bills are co-sponsored by half of state Senate Democrats and about 80 percent of state House Democrats.

CHAMPIONS: Most Allegheny County Democratic legislators

Open to the public!

No Republican state legislators support an increase to $15 an hour. So, flipping both chambers or coming close enough to pressure Republicans in moderate districts — as well as re-electing Gov. Wolf — may be necessary for this bill to become law.

BY THE NUMBERS

2009 marks the last time Pennsylvania raised its minimum wage, thanks to a federal increase.

WHY I’M VOTING When I was 16, my mom gave me a wire hanger necklace that belonged to my grandma. I wore it until this past spring when on the same day as the abortion referendum in Ireland the necklace broke. My mom said, “Maybe the necklace got too excited about the referendum and tried to jump off its chain.” She sent me a new one, made by an artist who donates proceeds to Planned Parenthood. It’s taboo to be a “single-issue voter,” but access to abortion is not just one issue; it encompasses reproductive rights, bodily autonomy, healthcare access, gender inequity, childcare, sexual assault, and poverty. I don’t believe that any candidate who is against abortion access actually cares about the physical and mental health of women and their children both born and unborn. — HANNAH LYNN, STAFF WRITER

OPPONENTS: S

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INTEGRAL CANDIDATES: Lindsey Williams (D-West View), Betsy Monroe (D-Fox Chapel), Emily Skopov (D-Marshall), Michele Knoll (D-Ohio Township), support the minimum wage increase and are running in GOP-held districts

“Pennsylvania’s done nothing,” said then Pittsburgh City Councilor Dan Gilman in 2017 of failure to raise the minimum wage. “We aren’t competitive. It stifles innovation. It hurts small business and it hurts the core of our communities.”

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19


FRESH FACES

Jay Walker

Walker – who is AsianAmerican – vows to focus on racial justice, workers rights, and environmentalism. He supports unions, ending gerrymandering, and singlepayer healthcare, as well as strengthening transportation infrastructure for public transit, bicyclists, and pedestrians. “I’m 28 [years] old, mixedrace, working class,” says Walker. “Trying my best to be exactly who I would want as my dream representative.”

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

28, Green Party Shadyside, Pa. House 23


WHAT IS POSSIBLE:

WHY I’M VOTING

ABORTION MADE ILLEGAL

One of the reasons I am motivated to vote this year is the legalization of marijuana. And no, it’s not because “oh, this young girl just wants to get high.” In 2015, my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer. When medical marijuana became legal in Pennsylvania earlier this year, my dad — who is not a fan of taking a bunch of pills every day — started to phase out some of his medicine, replacing it with THC/CBD tinctures, creams, and oils. My dad now has a natural way to fall asleep. My dad no longer experiences nausea. My dad is no longer in pain. I do not want his access to this therapeutic plant taken away. I vote for him and every other person who has benefited from medical marijuana. — JORDAN SNOWDEN, STAFF WRITER

BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN SUPREME COURT Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed this October, the possibility of repealing the landmark Roe V. Wade abortion-rights case became a lot more plausible. Kavanaugh called Roe “settled law,” but he was nominated by President Donald Trump, who campaigned on appointing judges that would end legal abortion. Kavanaugh’s prior record indicates a more conservative stance on abortion access. He represents the fifth conservative justice to the liberals’ four.

There are different challenges to Roe currently in federal courts, which could be heard by the Supreme Court within a year. If Roe is overturned, Pennsylvania legislators have a chance to pass bills severely restricting abortion or making it illegal, since Pennsylvania lacks abortion protections in its constitution. And many Republican legislators have track records that indicate a desire to do just that, having introduced several abortion-restriction bills over the last few years. With control of both state House and Senate, the only thing stopping bills to end legal abortions in Pennsylvania is Gov. Tom Wolf, who has already vetoed abortionrestriction bills during his first term and has vowed to protect abortion access. The easiest path forward for abortion opponents is to elect gubernatorial candidate Scott Wagner, who has an antiabortion stance.

“Senseless, elective abortions stand contrary to every principle that makes America great. And we need to come together to stop as many abortions as we can.” — Scott Wagner said in a statement of support at the March For Life rally in January.

CHAMPION: AMPION

State House Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Marshall) has backed several abortionrestriction bills. starring the original

DJs from WXXP www.wxxp.com

OPPONENTS: Gov. Tom Wolf (D-York) INTEGRAL CANDIDATES: Gubernatorial candidate Scott Wagner (R-York)

BY THE NUMBERS According to an August poll,

30 percent of Pennsylvanians want abortion legal in all circumstances, while

15 percent support making abortion illegal. *FRANKLIN & MARSHALL POLL

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21


FRESH FACES

Sara Innamorato

Sara Innamorato, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America, knocked off a ten-year incumbent in the May primary. Her father passed away in part due to an opioid addiction, which has fueled her passion for policies like Medicare-for-all. “I believe in a Pennsylvania that works for the many, not corporate interests,” says Innamorato. “I believe there is a Harrisburg where bold, people-centered policies can be championed. We can do this while restoring healthy debate and logic.”

22

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

31, Democrat Lawrenceville, Pa. House 21


WHAT IS S POSSIBLE: OSS

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

CCORDING TO a 2017 poll, 59

percent of Pennsylvanians support legalizing recreational marijuana. Fully legal marijuana could bring significant revenue to Pennsylvania and save money by not charging minor offenses. But getting to that point in Pennsylvania is tricky. Current high-profile state leaders like Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf and Republican state House Speaker Mike Turzai don’t support recreational marijuana. Chris Goldstein of marijuana advocacy group PhillyNORML says Black state legislators, like Pittsburgh’s Jake Wheatley and Ed Gainey, have taken the lead on marijuana legalization. Growing their caucus could give weed a boost. Goldstein also notes that “any real holdup is going to come from Republicans,” who sometimes privately support legalization, but not publicly. This means flipping the state House and state Senate, which would require many marijuana-supporting Democrats to win in GOP territory. If that occurs, and Wolf wins re-election, Goldstein believes the governor won’t veto a legalization bill, since his running mate and the Pennsylvania Democratic Party are pro-legalization.

CHAMPIONS: S State Rep. Jake Wheatley (D-Hill District), recreationalmarijuana bill prime sponsor. Lt. Gov. candidate John Fetterman (D-Braddock)

BY THE NUMBERS

$580 million annually

INTEGRAL CANDIDATES:

*ESTIMATES FROM STATE AUDITOR GENERAL

Growing up on a working dairy farm exposed me to the many ways climate change affects a person’s life. My parents, who work around 200 acres of land, have withstood increasingly difficult summers, with draughts and crop destruction caused by unusually heavy rains. I’m seeing another side of environmental stress as a resident of Pittsburgh, a city with notoriously bad air and water quality. I recognize now that this is a social justice issue, as the poorest, most vulnerable populations are disproportionately impacted by the effects of climate change. We need leaders who are committed to tackling it. — AMANDA WALTZ, SENIOR WRITER

OPPONENTS: House Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Marshall), Gov. Tom Wolf (D-York)

to state coffers if marijuana is legalized in Pennsylvania

WHY I’M VOTING

Jon McCabe (D-Lower Burrell), Emily Skopov (D-Marshall), James Craig (D-Washington), Steven Toprani (D-Monongahela) all support and are running in GOP-held districts.

“Revenue generated from legalizing marijuana, along with the savings that could be realized by unburdening our criminal justice system, deserves a serious conversation … As I have said before, this is an idea whose time has come.” — State Rep. Jake Wheatley PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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★ PENNSYLVANIA GOVERNOR ★

HARRISBURG HAVOC A millionaire from York County will be elected Pennsylvania’s governor. Both Democratic incumbent Gov. Tom Wolf and Republican challenger Scott Wagner hail from there, and both have led successful businesses. Wolf, consistently ahead in polls, has stayed quiet throughout the campaign. Wagner has been vocal, even espousing violent rhetoric at times, including saying he would stomp on Wolf’s face with “golf spikes,” a comment he later apologized for.

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Gre up in York, Pa. Started first Grew business at age 19. A self-proclaimed “garbage man,” Wagner developed Penn Waste into one of the largest recycling plants in the nation. Wagner was elected state senator in 2014 as a write-in candidate, the first time in Pennsylvania history. He resigned that seat in May to focus on running for governor.

Grew up in Mount Wolf in southcentral Pennsylvania. Holds degrees from Dartmouth, the University of London, and MIT. Prior to becoming governor, ran a family lumber business. Wolf was elected governor in 2014, defeating Tom Corbett, marking the first time in 160 years an incumbent Pennsylvania governor lost re-election.

Wagner has criticized Wolf over education funding. On his website, Wagner proposes ending “property tax reliance” for state education funding, which leaves some uncertainty to how schools are funded. He wants to change the state employee pension program. Wagner supports education for STEM jobs and skilled labor.

Supports a “fair funding formula” for education, but only if no school would lose funding as a result. The formula would favor districts with high poverty rates, but would likely cut funding to some rural districts, which are seeing declining enrollment. The shift would come with significant government costs, though Wolf has proposed boosting education funding for years.

Wagner opposes a severance tax on natural-gas drilling and supports the fracking industry. Wagner has stated several stances on the cause of climate change, ranging from the earth moving closer to the sun to being caused by human body heat.

Wolf supports a severance tax on natural-gas drillers and action to ban drilling in the Delaware River Basin. Enacted a moratorium on drilling in state parks. Also supports the ethane cracker facility in Beaver County, which would boost natural-gas production. The plant is expected to have a large environmental impact on air quality, potentially affecting Pittsburgh.

Economic issues are essentially the entirety of Wagner’s platform. His economic plan involves reducing regulations on businesses and individuals, investing in infrastructure and workforce training. Wagner says that regulations are “harmful to business.”

He supports a $12 minimum wage and touts eliminating the Capital Stock and Franchise Tax on corporations. Wolf also approved $1 million to several manufacturing training centers across Pennsylvania. State budget impasses have occurred nearly every year under Wolf, as compromises have been elusive with the Republicancontrolled legislature.

Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, National Federation of Independent Small Business, National Right to Life PAC, Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation, Associated Builders and Contractors, President Donald Trump, Republican Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan

Fraternal Order of Police, Black Economic Alliance, Human Rights Campaign, Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund, United Mine Workers of America, Pennsylvania Professional Fire Fighters Association, Pennsylvania AFL-CIO Labor Council, Pennsylvania Sierra Club, Bucks County Courier Times, York Daily Record

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ELECTION ECSTASY BY TERENEH IDIA CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

HORE, OBLIGATION, duty, guilt. There are many ways to describe voting but very rarely do we talk about the joy of casting a ballot. Let’s turn the clock back to June 19, the Juneteenth of my 18th birthday. Now, imagine that popular GIF of the “Bambi”-like deer jumping on a beach in a brilliant ruby-gold sunrise. That was me walking/skipping/running from Manchester to the City-County building to register to vote. I don’t remember if it was sunny, rainy, cloudy, or gray. But I vividly remember ascending the steps and feeling like a hundred arms were embracing me; that a hundred pairs of eyes were watching me and a hundred pairs of legs were climbing the stairs with me. I was so thrilled to finally have a say in what was happening to me, my community, my country. Politics, history, and culture were no longer just theoretical

concepts. Before I could vote, I would volunteer for political campaigns and get out the vote efforts. Yes, I am a dork. I never have and never will be cool, if being cool means not voting. So, for me there is real joy in voting. It’s one of my most favorite things to do, even when I don’t have a candidate to support for office – I write in a name or leave it blank. I have happily voted by saying, “no, not you.”

Voting is a thrill, but it can also be bittersweet. Those imagined arms of embrace, those eyes and legs urging me to vote represent my ancestors – family members of past generations who were barred and discouraged from registering to vote. Used to be, people could lose their jobs or lives because a clerk or bystander would tip off a white boss. “Your girl [domestic worker, sharecropper, maid] registered to vote

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152xx

today,” they would say. That was a sign of “uppityness.” Of not being happy as a second- or thirdclass citizen, actually wanting full citizenship in a country whose wealth, history, and culture has been shaped by Black Americans. But we do not have to look back into mid-20th history to see voter suppression tactics. Here in Pennsylvania, we had an entire congressional map dismantled because it was so unfair. We are currently witnessing the disenfranchisement of African-American, Latinx, and First Nation voters in Georgia, Florida, and North Dakota. In 2018, a U.S. citizen has to check their voting status as often as their bank account. And here we are again, on the eve of another election. People say voting does not matter. People say vote-shaming does not work. But if your vote did not matter, the “powers that be” would not be trying to take it away. To my ancestors who could not vote: Can you see me voting?! I am doing it for you, for me. For now and the future. To everyone afraid of this Black woman voting: Can you see me?!? With a big ass smile on my face, voting all the way. Bam!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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WHY I’M VOTING My best friend was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer at the age of 31. Since then, she’s received chemo, radiation, a double mastectomy, reconstruction surgery, physical therapy, counseling, and what seems like a never-ending cycle of tests and biopsies. Last month, she had her 21st surgery, a lung biopsy which resulted in a celebration: 10 years cancer-free. Still, she constantly worries about recurrence and whether she’ll get to watch her children grow up. What she doesn’t worry about, though, is hospital bills. That’s because she lives in Canada. Would she have made it this far without universal health care? When I vote, I think of her. I think of pre-existing conditions. I think of my dad, who was just diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. I think of people who passed away because they couldn’t afford to go to the doctor. When I vote, I think about a better health care system for our future. — LISA CUNNINGHAM, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

People lit candles while attending an interfaith vigil at Sixth Presbyterian Church in Squirrel Hill.

48th Annual

.ESSAY.

PITT

INGRAINED HATE BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

EOPLE OFTEN say that hate is a

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strong word. Sometimes I catch myself thinking things like “God I hate this cashier,” and then think again, “No, that’s too harsh. I just wish they were moving faster.” But sometimes the word isn’t strong enough. After the shooting allegedly carried out by Robert Bowers with an AR-15 that left 11 dead and six injured at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Squirrel Hill, people are saying what they always say after identity-based shootings. “We have to stop spreading hate” or “There’s no place for hate in this city.” Describing the carnage of mass shootings as “spreading hate” feels childish, like you were explaining the incident to a kindergartner. It’s not hate so much as learned disgust, bolstered by history and unobstructed by the government. It’s not spreading a feeling so much as inflicting a contained, but deep and gushing wound. I never even felt that Jewish growing up, because I always knew people that

were more Jewish. Sure, I went to Sunday school every weekend and Hebrew school twice a week and became a bat mitzvah. I’ve only been to Jewish funerals and weddings. But I didn’t pray or believe in God or keep kosher or go to Jewish summer camp or speak Hebrew. Then I moved to southwestern Pennsylvania, where I made friends with people who had never met a Jewish person until college. I’ve never been inside a synagogue in Pittsburgh and I don’t feel especially connected with the Jewish community here, except that I know it’s similar to my Jewish community in Washington, D.C., and all the other progressive, reform communities like it. It’s hard to explain, even outside of this context, that Judaism is a religion and a culture, but not always both. It’s hard to explain, because if I wanted to, I could blend in, pretend I wasn’t Jewish, with no obvious name or facial identifiers to give me away. Rarely is Jewish identity a simple concept.


Flowers, candles, and letters left at a memorial near the Tree of Life Synagogue

Some people are Jewish on both sides of the family, some only half. Some have a lineage fractured by the Holocaust. Some weren’t raised with religion, sometimes because the Holocaust wiped out their faith. Others are only Jewish culturally, raised with the food and humor. Some look at Israel with love and adoration, others with disgust. If someone asks if you’re Jewish, you could give the answer that feels truest to your identity, or you could give the answer that would’ve counted in the concentration camps. But Robert Bowers only cared about one of those things when he yelled “all Jews must die.” After learning about the shooting, one of Trump’s initial responses was to say, “If there was an armed guard inside the temple, they would have been able to stop him.” He is apparently unaware that most places of Jewish worship have security guards, sometimes only during the High Holidays, sometimes year-round. Most people who have never attended Jewish services are probably unaware of this fact. As a kid, I thought it was silly and unnecessary. But I knew that terrorist attacks were possible — there were at least two in the D.C. area by the time I turned 7. And I knew our people’s history, and that even though anti-Semitism didn’t feel as prominent as other forms of discrimination or bigotry, it was always ready to make a return. It was surreal when, during the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va., white men in polo shirts marched through the square with tiki torches, yelling “Jews will not replace us!” But then someone died and the president wouldn’t even let the murderers take the blame. The shooting hurts most deeply because, when I think about what I’ve retained from Judaism, it’s the simple idea

that we should all, at the end of the day, be working toward a better world. Because so many of our ancestors fled persecution (Holocaust, pogroms, or otherwise), there is a sense of duty to make sure that other minorities, other immigrants, other people who are suffering in ways our people once did, have our support. Robert Bowers was particularly infuriated by the Tree of Life synagogue’s work with HIAS, a refugee organization originally founded in 1881 to help Jewish refugees, and now helps refugees from all over the world. Bowers called them “invaders that kill our people.” He understood the concept of Judaism helping those in need, he just didn’t think they deserved help.

IT’S NOT HATE SO MUCH AS LEARNED DISGUST, BOLSTERED BY HISTORY AND UNOBSTRUCTED BY THE GOVERNMENT. To both Jews and gentiles, the definition is foggy. It’s unclear what exactly makes someone Jewish, and whether it’s something that must be actively practiced or whether it’s in your DNA. After the shooting, there’s been plenty of infighting about identity. It doesn’t really matter in the end though. Not Nazis, not Robert Bowers, not the next person to inflict an anti-Semitic attack, care whether you fast on Yom Kippur or eat shellfish every day. To them, you’re Jewish, and that’s enough.

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^ strawberryluna creates voting posters every election year. ART: STRAWBERRYLUNA

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.ELECTION.

THE ART OF VOTING BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

V

OTER SUPPRESSION is as prevalent as ever.

In North Dakota, laws requiring voters have a permanent residential address disproportionately affect Native Americans who live on reservations, many of whom use a P.O. box instead. In Georgia, voter ID laws requiring exact name matches have put thousands of voter registrant applications on hold, 80 percent of which are from people of color. Even the fact that voting takes place on a Tuesday, and employers are not required to give time off for voting, is a form of voter suppression. These roadblocks, combined with a general sense that the government doesn’t function, can cause people to lose sight of the importance of voting in a democracy. But local design studios Alternate Histories and strawyberryluna are doing their part to change that. Both have made voting signs to encourage people to participate in this year’s midterm elections. Strawberryluna, a local design studio consisting of Allison Glancey and Craig Seder, designed a vote poster for Washington, D.C., design agency Wide Eye’s The Poster Project, a site featuring downloadable and shareable election posters. They range from specific — like a poster featuring Texas U.S. Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke — to more general like stawberryluna’s design depicting a hand sliding into a ballot box, spelling out the word “vote.” “The piece that we did for Wide Eye was more

< Matt Buchholz of Alternate Histories cleaned up a vintage women’s suffrage poster ART: 1919 ARTWORK RESTORED BY ALTERNATE HISTORIES

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THE ART OF VOTING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

generic just like, ‘vote, just please vote, and get engaged,’” says Glancey. “It’s easy to just feel like your voice or your vote doesn’t matter in a sea of other people’s votes, but you look at the statistics of how few Americans vote, it’s astounding and heartbreaking, so we really like to get people politically engaged.” Strawberryluna has made posters that encouraged voting in previous elections, and they usually feature both blue and red hues, signaling the importance of voting regardless of party affiliation. Others though are more explicit, like a raised fist in the space between a woman’s legs that says “Grab ‘Em By The Midterms.” Some of strawberryluna’s designs came from signs they made for protests. Matt Buchholz, creator of Alternate Histories, adds sci-fi touches to pre-existing historical works, like maps and landscape paintings. He was having trouble figuring out how to combine his style with a political message until a friend shared an image of a women’s suffrage-era poster. It read: “A woman here has registered to vote thereby assuming responsibility of citizenship.” The image wasn’t in great shape, so he cleaned it up and made it available for sharing and downloads. “I wanted to be respectful to the original designers, to the original way it was intended, which was a rallying cry after the 19th amendment was passed, and I thought it’s [just] as important today,” says Buchholz. He feels that in the wake of Brett Kavanaugh’s sexualassault allegations and his subsequent confirmation, women voting seems like an especially political act. Partisan or not, the signs are meant to highlight the values of voting in a democracy, not point toward a specific candidate. “It’s the single most important thing you can do as a citizen,” says Buchholz. Historically, more women show up to the polls than men, but it’s still easy for women to feel like their voices aren’t being heard. For those who want to make their own signs to encourage voting, there are plenty of resources. Pole-2-Polls is an organization that meets periodically, providing fabric, stencils, and other materials to make pro-voting textiles. Organizations like Artists Image Resources make digital and screen-printing tools available to the public. But Glancey’s No. 1 tip for making a sign is simply “Do it.”

Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny

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.FOOD.

POLITICAL MEALS BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

OLITICIANS: they’re just like us. Well, they try. Eating in public is a burden faced by every politician. When she was running for governor of New York, Cynthia Nixon made the wrong bagel choice (lox on cinnamon raisin), and the internet attacked. Countless politicians have been ridiculed for eating hotdogs and pizza with cutlery. Mitt Romney made the mistake of calling a ‘hoagie’ a ‘sub’ at a Wawa while campaigning in Pennsylvania. Barack Obama was caught using a spoon to eat ice cream out of a waffle cone. The average American can scarf down a hot dog in peace, but a politician has to do it on camera. Over the years, notable politicians have stopped in Pittsburgh for a meal, and in the spirit of election season, here are some of the best political meals spotted in the Steel City.

John McCain at Primanti Bros. On the presidential campaign trail, John McCain popped into the Strip District restaurant in 2008. He was searching for a local “hot spot” to sway undecided voters. Instead of talking to locals, the presidential candidate traveled 2,000 miles and ended up chatting to a family, also visiting, from his home state of Arizona. He and his wife, Cindy, both ordered cheese steaks. Before the sandwiches were off the grill, McCain chased media from the restaurant,

CP FILE PHOTO

John Kasich eats a fish sandwich at The Oyster House in 2016.

dodging a viral, sauce-dribbling, sandwich-attacking photo.

The Obamas at Pamela’s Since 2008, the Obamas have nursed a love affair with Pamela’s. While in Pittsburgh campaigning for primaries, the couple stopped at Pamela’s for breakfast. Barack Obama ordered a plain pancake and fell under Pamela’s spell. After eating, he was tossed a few questions, but pancakes took precedence. Before answering, he made sure to tell the press, “these really were maybe the best pancakes I’ve tasted in a very long time. Get some take-out,” as reported by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The Obamas’ love for Pamela’s did not

end there. In 2009, at a Memorial Day breakfast in the White House, the family featured Pamela’s pancakes. Owners Gail Klingensmith and Pam Cohen were invited to D.C. to dish out Steel City hotcakes.

Hillary Clinton and Primanti Bros. On the road for the 2016 presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton made a stop at Primanti’s in Market Square to eat and talk with local union members. Confident in her ability to neatly eat a giant sandwich, Clinton bravely allowed media to document her meal. Clinton chose a classic: capicola and cheese topped (of course) with fries and slaw. Her method was poised. She picked

up the massive sandwich from its edges and dove in, earning a few cheers of, “Madam President!” from onlookers.

John Kasich at The Oyster House John Kasich paid a visit to The Oyster House in 2016 during his presidential campaign. The Ohio governor, surrounded by media, campaigned to have his picture put on the wall. But the owner didn’t budge: only presidents are put up on The Oyster House walls. His meal, a simple fish sandwich, desperately needed a knife (which he loudly proclaimed) and was documented bite for bite. He touched on “Pittsburgh Values” before leaving with this one-liner: “All I wanted to do was come and have a fish sandwich, bro.”

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav

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RED HOT COCKTAIL BY GAB BONESSO // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

E

LECTION DAY is right around the corner. And if you’re anything like me, the word “election” alone feels like a stressor after 2016. This might shock you, dear readers, but I did not vote for Mr. Trump. I know you were on the fence as to where I stand politically, but I assure you I’m a “bleeding heart” lefty. The election of 2016 left me more empty than any other election in my lifetime. It wasn’t Republicans vs. Democrats for me. It was the possibility of having representation in the highest office. It was going to be the biggest step forward towards gender equality in my lifetime, and then, it wasn’t. I remember texting my sister after Hillary conceded and telling her it felt like we lost our mother all over again. The level of grief was unparalleled. That’s why, in honor of this year’s extremely important election, I created a cocktail in honor of my favorite Presidential Candidate of all-time and the only woman in American history to win the popular vote for president.

I present to you … THE RODHAM! The RODHAM is a scotch-based concoction that I invented for one of the strongest women who has ever existed. The drink starts with two ice cubes to represent how cool Hillary is under pressure. (Y’all remember the Benghazi hearings, right?) Then I pour two ounces of the finest scotch known to man ... Laphroaig. You only use the best when you are representing the best. Next is a half ounce of fresh orange juice and half an ounce of simple syrup. Hillary’s critics find her to be acidic, but I find her to be sweet as syrup. Finally, in honor of Hillary’s love of hot sauce, I add three dashes of Red Hot. She can handle the HEAT! Regardless of what side of the aisle you’re on, this drink will help you medicate if the results do not go in your favor on election night. Red or Blue, this one is for you! (Note: I garnished the drink with a banana pepper and some cherries to add some flare. Not at all necessary.)

Follow contributing writer Gab Bonesso on Twitter @gabbonesso

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PAD THAI NOODLE

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SAGA HIBACHI

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242 51ST ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4441 / SPIRITPGH.COM/SLICEISLAND Every day we bake fresh focaccia from unbleached flour, pull our own mozzarella, and curdle our own ricotta to put on your pizza with fresh toppings from the best local farms, butchers, and purveyors.

SUPERIOR MOTORS

1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR

660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

The best gifts are edible. 1910 New Texas Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15239 7124.519.7308 EightyAcresKitchen.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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ELECTION DAY PLAYLIST BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Smile, cry, and scream along. All the emotions of election day in one playlist.

“Burn The House Down” – AJR

.MUSIC.

The first single from this pop trio of brothers’ sophomore album, The Click, was selected by the March for Our Lives campaign to promote its Road to Change tour.

POLITICIAN’S PLAYLISTS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“Die For Your Government” – Anti-Flag Even though you just voted, think about how anti-government you are while screaming along to the lyrics from this Pittsburgh band.

“Here Comes The Change” – Kesha Since Kesha is performing at Countdown 2 Vote Downtown on November 3, it’s only fitting to listen to this equal-rights ballad from the soundtrack to On the Basis of Sex — the upcoming biopic about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

“Fight Song” – Rachel Platten Did you forget this was Hillary Clinton’s campaign song, instead thinking it was by Katy Perry? Four out of five people in the CP office did.

“Good As Hell” – Lizzo Don’t let the man get you down! You voted, now it’s time for some self-care so you can feel “good as hell.”

“What’s Going On?” – Marvin Gaye

What is going on in our world today? The lyrics from this 1971 Motown hit are just as potent now as they were 47 years ago.

“All These Governors” – The Evens “When things should work but don’t work that’s the work of all these governors.” But, hopefully, your vote will help change that. •

E

VER WONDER what politicians listen to during elections? Do they go for overtly political stuff like Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are a-Changin’,” or do they prefer jazz to unwind and take their minds off the race? Pittsburgh City Paper talked with a few local politicians to see what they had in their music library.

Jay Walker for Pa. State House Representative District 23 I almost exclusively listen to Matt & Kim and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra radio on Pandora. Mostly though, I listen to podcasts. I listen to podcasts about transit, the environment, socialist politics, sports activism, Pennsylvania policies, and the Riverhounds!

Valerie Gaydos for Pa. State House Representative District 44 These are some tunes I listen to at the gym or long car trips. In my music list, I’m still pretty old school and listen by artists and albums not just songs, like the Avett Brothers, Robert Randolph, Demarco,

and Pink Floyd. I have no idea the political affiliation of the artists and don’t care. Artists should be free of those labels and affiliations. My two favorite albums to relax to are Home (music from the movie Home) and Planet Ocean (music from movie Planet Ocean). I also listen to George Ezra, Hot Tuna/ Jorma Kaukonen, Peter Frampton, and Fun.

Jon McCabe for Pa. State House Representative District 54 One particular song that usually pumps me up is “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield. It reminds me that when there is a lack of justice, it’s our job to stand up and fix what’s happening around us. Other than that, I have a constant cycle of Led Zeppelin, Neil Young, Radiohead, and NPR.

Follow staff writer Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

LIKE US ON ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK

@PittsburghCityPaper Keep up to date on the latest news and events in the city.

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

PYLON PICS The Pittsburgh Steelers observe a moment of silence for the victims of the mass shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue.

JENSORENSEN

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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.FOR THE WEEK OF NOV. 1.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke suggested that we cultivate an alertness for the ever-present possibility of germination and gestation. On a regular basis, he advised, we should send probes down into the darkness, into our unconscious minds, to explore for early signs of awakening. And when we discover the forces of renewal stirring there in the depths, we should be humble and reverent toward them, understanding that they are as-yet beyond the reach of our ability to understand. We shouldn’t seek to explain and define them at first, but simply devote ourselves to nurturing them. Everything I just said is your top assignment in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“Penetralia” is a word that means the innermost or most private parts, the most secret and mysterious places. It’s derived from the same Latin term that evolved into the word “penetrate.” You Scorpios are of course the zodiac’s masters of penetralia. More than any other sign, you’re likely to know where the penetralia are, as well as how to get to them and what to do when you get to them. I suspect that this tricky skill will come in extra handy during the coming weeks. I bet your intimate adeptness with penetralia will bring you power, fun, and knowledge.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’re in a phase of your cycle when your influence is at a peak. People are more receptive than usual to your ideas and more likely to want the same things you do. Given these conditions, I think the best information I can offer you is the following meditation by Capricorn activist Martin Luther King Jr. “Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice, and justice at its best is power correcting everything that stands against love.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey spent much of his life rambling around in the great outdoors. He was an emancipated spirit who regarded the natural world as the only church he needed. In an eruption of ecstatic appreciation, he once testified that “Life is a joyous dance through daffodils beneath cerulean blue skies and then, then what? I forget what happens next.” And yet the truth is, Abbey was more than a wild-hearted Dionysian explorer in the wilderness. He found the discipline and diligence to write 23 books! I mention this, Aquarius, because now is a perfect time for you to be like the disciplined and diligent and productive version of Abbey.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For renowned Piscean visual artist Anne Truitt (1921–2004), creating her work was high adventure. She testified that artists like her had “to catapult themselves wholly, without holding back one bit, into a course of action without having any

idea where they will end up. They are like riders who gallop into the night, eagerly leaning on their horse’s neck, peering into a blinding rain.” Whether or not you’re an artist, Pisces, I suspect your life in the coming weeks may feel like the process she described. And that’s a good thing! A fun thing! Enjoy your ride.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You have officially arrived at the heart of the most therapeutic phase of your cycle. Congratulations! It’s an excellent time to fix what’s wrong, hurt, or distorted. You will attract more help than you can imagine if you summon an aggressive approach toward finding antidotes and cures. A good way to set the tone for your aggressive determination to feel better is to heed this advice from poet Maya Angelou: “Take a day to heal from the lies you’ve told yourself and the ones that have been told to you.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): U2’s singer Bono, born under the sign of Taurus, says that all of us suffer from the sense that something’s missing from our lives. We imagine that we lack an essential quality or experience, and its absence makes us feel sad and insufficient. French philosopher Blaise Pascal referred to this emptiness as “a God-shaped hole.” Bono adds that “you can never completely fill that hole,” but you may find partial fixes through love and sex, creative

expression, family, meaningful work, parenting, activism, and spiritual devotion. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I have a strong suspicion that in the coming weeks you will have more power to fill your God-shaped hole than you’ve had in a long time.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Most of our desires are clichés, right? Ready to wear, one size fits all. I doubt if it’s even possible to have an original desire anymore.” So says a character in Gemini author Tobias Wolff’s short story “Sanity.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Gemini, is to refute and rebel against this notion. The cosmic rhythms will work in your favor to the degree that you cultivate innovative yearnings and unique urges. I hope you’ll make it your goal to have the experiences necessary to stir up an outbreak of original desires.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you’re a typical member of the Cancerian tribe, you’re skilled at responding constructively when things go wrong. Your intelligence rises up hot and strong when you get sick or rejected or burned. But if you’re a classic Crab, you have less savvy in dealing with triumphs. You may sputter when faced with splashy joy, smart praise, or lucky breaks. But everything I just said is meant to be a challenge, not a curse. One of the best reasons to study astrology is to be aware of the potential

shortcomings of your sign so you can outwit and overcome them. That’s why I think that eventually you’ll evolve to the point where you won’t be a bit flustered when blessings arrive. And the immediate future will bring you excellent opportunities to upgrade your response to good fortune.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Each of us needs something of an island in [her] life,” said poet John Keats. “If not an actual island, at least some place, or space in time, in which to be [herself], free to cultivate [her] differences from others.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Leo, you’ll be wise to spend extra time on your own island in the next two weeks. Solitude is unlikely to breed unpleasant loneliness, but will instead inspire creative power and evoke inner strength. If you don’t have an island yet, go in search! (P.S.: I translated Keats’ pronouns into the feminine gender.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’m rooting for you to engage in experimental intimacy, Virgo. I hope you’ll have an affinity for sweet blends and incandescent mixtures and arousing juxtapositions. To get in the right mood for this playful work, you could read love poetry and listen to uplifting songs that potentize your urge to merge. Here are a few lyrical passages to get you warmed up. 1. “Your flesh quivers against mine like moonlight on the sea.” —Julio Cortázar 2. “When she smiles like that she is as beautiful as all my secrets. —Anne Carson 3. “My soul is alight with your infinitude of stars . . . The flowers of your garden blossom in my body.” —Rabindranath Tagore 4. “I can only find you by looking deeper, that’s how love leads us into the world.” —Anne Michaels

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Of course I want you to have more money. I’d love for you to buy experiences that expand your mind, deepen your emotional intelligence, and foster your ability to create inspiring forms of togetherness. My soul would celebrate if you got access to new wealth that enabled you to go in quest of spiritual fun and educational adventures. On the other hand, I wouldn’t be thrilled about you spending extra cash on trivial desires or fancy junk you don’t really need. Here’s why I feel this way: to the extent that you seek more money to pursue your most righteous cravings, you’re likely to get more money.

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WED., NOVEMBER 14 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH PRESENTS: DISH!

North Park Basic Yoga Flow: Tuesdays, November 6-27, 7-8 pm

6:30 P.M. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH WOODS RUN. Free event (registration required). 412-761-3730 or eventbrite.com.

$30 FOR RESIDENTS & $40 FOR NON-RESIDENTS FOR EACH FOUR-SESSION CLASS

WED., NOVEMBER 14 SPOSE 6:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $12-15. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Alec Munson, Happy Clouds & John$.

WED., NOVEMBER 14 JASON EADY 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. All-ages event. $11-13. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guest Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley.

THU., NOVEMBER 15 ICE SKATING LESSONS 4:40 P.M. NORTH PARK ICE RINK NORTH PARK. Over-5 event. Free event (registration required). 724-935-1280 or alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms.

THU., NOVEMBER 15 BRANDON RAY 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $10.47-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

FRI., NOVEMBER 16 EVERLAST 7 P.M. FOXTAIL SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $25-30. Ticketfly.com.

FRI., NOVEMBER 16 BILLY GARDELL 7:30 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. All-ages event. $39-89. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FRI., NOVEMBER 16 YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $25-30. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

SAT., NOVEMBER 17 ALAN DOYLE

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MON., NOVEMBER 19 GIVE HOCKEY A SHOT

8 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $36.25-46.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

5:30 P.M. NORTH PARK ICE RINK NORTH PARK. Ages 4-8. Free event (registration required). 724-935-1280 or alleghenycounty.us/ parkprograms.

SAT., NOVEMBER 17 ALAN DOYLE 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $28-30. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest Whitney Rose.

SAT., NOVEMBER 17 DAVID ALLAN COE 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $32-42. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Andy Davis Band.

SUN., NOVEMBER 18 DOUBLE DARE LIVE! 3 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $34.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SUN., NOVEMBER 18 NEW YEARS DAY 5:30 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $15. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest Dematus.

TUE., NOVEMBER 20 BRETT WILLIAMS 5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

TUE., NOVEMBER 20 PEPPA PIG LIVE! 6 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $41.25-144.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

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TUE., NOVEMBER 20 FIDDLER ON THE ROOF 7:30 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $35-135. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

TUE., NOVEMBER 20 DRAG QUEEN CHRISTMAS 8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. $22-152. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

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37


CALENDAR NOVEMBER 1 -7

^ Fri., Nov. 2: Espæce

THURSDAY NOV. 1

to every performance. Continues through Nov. 10. Times vary. Bricolage Production Co., 937 Liberty Ave, Downtown. $25-35. bricolagepgh.org

RADIO

TRIVIA

It’s alive! And it’s live! Midnight Radio keeps the spirit of the season going with its take on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. The classic novel roars to life as it takes the form of a 1940s radio drama. Complete with Foley artistry, commercial spoofs, and a live studio audience (that’s where you come in), the Midnight Radio series is a blast from the past that is neither on the radio nor at midnight. Special performances offer a Foley workshop, a pay-what-you-want night, and a free Happy Half-Hour prior

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Most iterations of trivia are, to put it bluntly, boring as shit. They move slowly through topics like mountain geography, dead authors, and movies everyone’s forgotten. Enter Trapology, a trivia competition returning for its sophomore run at the Ace Hotel, hosted by podcast and radio duo Straight To The League. The night covers all things related to Southern hip-hop, including the music and personalities of 2 Chainz, Future, Migos, and more of their peers. Winners

get a cash prize, a trophy, and a mug that says “Corporate Thuggin’.” Audience members are welcome, so you can still attend even if trivia or southern hip hop isn’t your area of expertise. 6:30 p.m. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. $20 per team. 18 and older. acehotel.com

NOV. 2

photography books, including the Candor Arts, Deadbeat Club, and the Pittsburgh-based bookstore Spaces Corners. The two-day event will also feature an appearance by renowned photographer and artist, Duane Michals, and a book release by Sue Abramson. A panel will be led by local artists Sue Abramson, Melissa Catanese, Anastasia Davis, and Alisha B. Wormsley. 5-10 p.m. Also Sat., Nov. 3, 11–6 p.m. 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. silvereye.org

BOOK FAIR

GHOST HUNT

FRIDAY Find the perfect holiday gift for the photography fan in your life at the Silver Eye Book Fair. Browse titles from publishers and artists working in art

Only amateurs kick the spooky stuff after Halloween. The pros go year round. Join local paranormal experts Ghosts N’at for a night of ghost hunting at the beautifully


PHOTO: BRIAN COHEN

^ Fri., Nov. 2: Murder Mystery at the Museum Adult Science Sleepover

spooky Renaissance Hotel downtown. Visitors have reported seeing apparitions in “old timey clothes” — classic ghost garb — and other strange occurrences. So grab a flashlight and pal and get hunting. Plus, there’s a discount rate for ghost hunters ($169 plus tax) looking to book a room if you’re too pooped afterwards. 7:30 p.m. 107 Sixth St., Downtown. $65. Folks 12-17 permitted with parent or guardian. ghostsnat.com

MURDER MYSTERY

Did you spend childhood sleepovers telling ghost stories and stealing sips from your parents’ liquor cabinet? Get ready to feel like a kid again. Grab your jammies and sleeping bags and head to Carnegie Science Center for Murder Mystery at the Museum Adult Science Sleepover. A crime scene will be introduced as the evening begins, then guests will spend the night searching for clues … and drinking booze. Admission price includes a continental breakfast in the morning. 7:30 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $95. (Members receive 10 percent discount.) carnegiesciencecenter.org

ART

Experience a spectacular take on dance and visual theater when the August Wilson Center presents the U.S. premiere of Espæce for the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. Created by French theater director, Aurélien Bory, and Compagnie 111, the show blends dance, music, magic, and the circus arts for a tribute to Georges Perec, a French writer orphaned by the horrors of World War II. The production features design, scenography, and direction ^ Thu., Nov. 1: Brett Goodnack in Frankenstein PHOTO: HANDERSON GOMES

by Bory, as well as acrobatics, dance, contortion, and opera. 8 p.m. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. trustarts.org

HOLIDAY

You can’t shop for Halloween decorations without seeing aisles full of sugar skulls. But the cute, colorful painted skulls actually stem from Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), honoring the lives of loved ones who have passed on with colorful festivals, food, gifts, and dancing. Local ad agency Acrobatique is teaming up with the Pittsburgh Metropolitan Area Hispanic Chamber of Commerce to bring the celebration to Kimpton Hotel Monaco. There will be Latin food, music, dancing,

and tequila. Costumes are encouraged, and VIP guests can get their faces painted to look like, yes, sugar skulls. 8-11 p.m. (7 p.m. for VIPs). 620 William Penn Place, Downtown. $50 VIP, $11.02 general admission. diadelosmuertospgh.com

FEST

If you ever find yourself asking the question “Am I gross?” then it’s already too late. Luckily, you’re not alone, as plenty of other filthy weirdos will be congregating for Am I Gross? Fest at Babyland. The two-day festival features punk and hardcore bands, like local rockers Calyx, Hearken, and Medium Ugly, as well as non-local acts, like Florida punks Early Disclaimers and Indiana power-pop group Byrne Bridges. The show is also a benefit for Prevention Point Pittsburgh, a harm reduction organization focuses on reducing drug problems through needle exchange, HIV testing, overdose prevention, counseling, and other services. 5 p.m. Also Sat., Nov. 3, 5-7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10-20 CONTINUES ON PG. 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: SHERVIN LAINEZ

Ryan Montbleau

THURSDAY Mothers 8:30 p.m. Spirit, Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com

FRIDAY Lane 8 9 p.m. The Rex Theater, South Side. rextheater.net

SATURDAY The Ten Band – A Tribute to Pearl Jam 8 p.m. Jergel’s, Warrendale. jergels.com

SUNDAY Spark the Forest, Foxture, Dive 6:30 p.m. Black Forge Coffee House, Allentown. blackforgecoffee.com

MONDAY Peaer / Calyx / Merce Lemon 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. therobotoproject.com

TUESDAY Ryan Montbleau 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. clubcafelive.com

WEDNESDAY Julien-K 7 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theater, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE

AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM 40

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

^ Sat., Nov. 3: Elkhound

STAGE

tendencies in adolescents. Participates can compete as singles or teams around North Park’s Harmar Grove for the grand prize and will also have a chance to compete in a 22-pushup challenge which honors the 22 veterans a day that lose their lives to suicide. 9 a.m. S. Ridge Drive, Allison Park. $25. thesuiciderebellion.org

Written during the Great Depression, Of Mice and Men’s plot still resonates: two unemployed, lonely men search for the great American dream and come up empty. Prime Stage Theatre, known for bringing literature to stage, opens its newest season with this classic tearjerker at the New Hazlett Theatre. Cast members include Bennie, a 10-year-old German Shepard/Lab mix, whose bio states, “He will be accepting treats and ‘good boy’ compliments following each performance.” 8 p.m. Continues through Nov. 11. 6 Allegheny Square, North Side. $12-25. primestage.com

BEER

SATURDAY NOV. 3

COSTUME RUN/WALK

It is often said that those battling depression wear a mask. And because of that mask, friends and family are unaware of that person’s struggles until it’s too late. The Suicide Rebellion, a foundation created in memory of Garret Sinagra, the lead singer of The Whiskey Rebellion who took his life in 2015, is hosting Take Your Mask Off for Depression 5K Costume Run/ Walk and 1K Kids Trick-or-Treat. Proceeds

MELISSA CATANESE’S VOYAGERS, FROM THE F COLLECTION OF PETER J. COHEN, THE ICE PLANT 2018

^ Fri., Nov. 2: Silver Eye Center for Photography Book Fair

will benefit the foundation and Dr. Lisa Pan and her colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh. Their research specializes in identifying biological markers for treatment-resistant depression and suicidal

Toast the coming of winter during the Beers of the Burgh festival at the Hunt Armory. Sample beer from over 30 Western Pennsylvania breweries like the Pittsburgh-based Cinderlands Brewing, Grist House, and Brew Gentlemen. It also welcomes brewers from outside the city, including ShuBrew of Zelienople, Big Rail Brewing of Grove City, and Levity Brewing Company of Indiana. The event will feature live music and entertainment and raise awareness for Variety’s “My Bike” Program, a charity that provides adaptive, customized bicycles for eligible kids with disabilities. 4-8 p.m. 324 Emerson St., Shadyside. $20-59. beersoftheburgh.com

FOLK

Local folk-band Elkhound has been touring and releasing snippets of its music for years but is only now releasing its first full-length album


Along the Highway with a show at Capital Cathedral. The sound is a familiar blend of folk, rock, and alt-country, with clear influences from the likes of Neil Young and Bob Dylan. Sprawling songs, like “Lonesome” or “Empty Bottle” cover love, longing, and loss through slow and melancholic tunes. The release show will feature performances from other local artists, including country crooner Molly Alphabet, melodic acoustic group Jenny and the Jags, and the gravelly folk of Bryan McQuaid. 6 p.m. 200 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10.

MUSIC

Join Christopher Mark Jones (former pro basketballer, French professor, singer/ songwriter with almost 40 years of performing under his belt) backed by Roots Ensemble at Club Cafe. Check out his latest release, 2017’s Incantations, for a taste of his sweet, clean, restrained acoustic songwriting (particularly “Railway Track”). If you’re looking to pair it with something a little more high-energy, make sure you get there in time for the heavy funk of iconic Pittsburgh guitarist Byron Nash. 6 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 21 and over. clubcafelive.com

PHOTO: PRIME STAGE THEATRE

^ Fri., Nov. 2: Of Mice and Men

SUNDAY

performances from Abstract Theory (oldschool jazz beats), My Favorite Color (dark, Southern-influenced rap), Alec Munson and Collin McEwen (catchy lo-fi), Sikes (noisy, high-energy, inventive), and NVSV (minimalist, clean, abstract). It’s BYOB. 6 p.m. 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. blackforgecoffee.com

NOV. 3 FOOD

Have you ever wondered, “How many pierogis can I eat in one sitting?” Test your limits at St. George Ukrainian Catholic Church for its 3rd Annual Pierogi Fest. The event will feature seven unique pierogi flavors including: potato and cheese, sauerkraut, loaded potato, and lekvar (prune plum). Entry is free with a pay-per-pierogi policy in place. Not dying for dumplings? Pick up hot soup or fill up your pockets with baked goods instead. 11 a.m. 3455 California Ave., Brighton Heights. Free. (search “3rd Annual Pierogi Fest” on Facebook)

MOVIE

MONDAY NOV. 5 EVENT

Every veteran has a story. For some, it’s a story of triumph and heroism, and for others it’s of unimaginable loss. The mission of the Veterans Breakfast Club (VBC) is to create a community of listeners around veterans’ stories. Vets are invited to share their stories of times in combat and in peace. As the name suggests, most of these events are held over breakfast, however this event of memory and fellowship takes place on a Monday evening. In addition to stories, VBC is providing free food and a cash bar. 6-8 p.m. Spoonwood

^ Mon., Nov. 5: Tastebuds

Brewing. 5981 Baptist Rd. Bethel Park. veteransbreakfastclub.com

FUNDRAISER

Save your appetite for Tastebuds at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. The big tasting event serves up dishes from talented, Greater Pittsburgh-area chefs, including Kevin Sousa of Superior Motors, Kate Laskey of Apteka, and Justin Steel of Bar Marco, who team up with participants from Best Buddies, a nonprofit dedicated to providing social and economic opportunities to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Enjoy an array

of culinary delights, drinks at the open bar, auctions, and live entertainment, all for a good cause. 7-10 p.m. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $100 general admission. Cocktail attire. bestbuddies.org

WEDNESDAY NOV. 7 MUSIC

It’s Hip-Hop Night at Black Forge Coffee House. That means three unbroken hours of diverse, challenging, smart-as-hell

Millions of Americans are affected by poverty, even in ways you might not expect. There are the physical struggles, like scraping together money for food, bus fare, clothing, rent, and medicine. But there are psychological effects too that can continue once someone is no longer living in poverty. Repair the World will host a screening of We Wear the Mask: the Hidden Face of Women in Poverty, a locally made film by Michael Savisky and Tammy Thompson follows the stories of three women who live differently but have all dealt with poverty in either the past or present, and grapple with the emotional toll it takes. 6:30 p.m. 6022 Broad St., East Liberty. wewearthemaskfilm.com

MOVIE

Jorma Taccone (Lonely Island, SNL, Hot Rod, Parks and Recreation) drops by Row House Cinema to relive his directorial debut, 2010’s MacGruber. If you don’t remember, it’s an SNL sketch-turned cult classic (meaning it got bad reviews and lost money) about an inept, mulletted, emotionally unstable MacGyver-type played by Will Forte. There’s an on-stage interview with Taccone beforehand and a live Q&A session after. 9 p.m. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. rowhousecinema.com •

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

HELP WANTED

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

ESTATE NOTICES

ADOPTION

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

CLARK, Charlotte E., Deceased of Pittsburgh, PA. No. 021806235 of 2018. William D. Clarke, Extr., 16997 Abby Circle, Northville, MI 48168

Pregnant? Considering Adoption? Text or call a MAYA Counselor 24/7 and meet an adoption professional in you area. 412-501-3191.

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 Weekly Mailing Brochures from Home Genuine Opportunity. Helping home workers since 2001! Start Immediately! www.IncomeCentral.net (AAN CAN)

Phipps Conservatory will be holding OPEN INTERVIEWS for GUEST SERVICE ASSOCIATES (PT) on Mondays 9:30 am – 4pm, Thursdays 9:30 – 11:30 am, 2 – 4 pm, Fridays 2 – 4 pm, Saturdays 9:30 am – noon through November 19.

ADOPTION

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ROOMMATES

Help me fulfill my dream of becoming a Mom through the gift of adoption. Kelly 800-554-4833 Exp. Pd.

Pregnant? Free prenatal classes, counseling, diapers, baby items. Ask about our free cribs. Call 412-945-7670 x102 mayaorganization.org

Need a roommate?

REHEARSAL

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Rehearsal Space

Lung Cancer?

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

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And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 844-898-7142 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. (AAN CAN)

Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

HEAR AGAIN! Try our hearing aid for just $75 down and $50 per month! Call 866-787-3141 and mention 88271 for a risk free trial! FREE SHIPPING! (AAN CAN)

Permanent positions, as well as seasonal opportunities for the upcoming holiday season, are available. Interested candidates should come to the Welcome Center located at One Schenley Park, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, with a cover letter and resume. For more information, visit www.phippsjobs.org.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on November 6, 2018, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on November 6, 2018, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Service Contracts for the following: Service Contracts for the following:

• Elevators and Vertical Transportation • Boilers and Burners • Chillers and Refrigeration

Masonry Roofing General Security Systems Plumbing Fire Hoses and Extinguishers Concrete

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on October 19, 2018 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on October 15, 2018 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yin yoga ÁRZ\RJD meditation

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time November 13, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

Classroom Supplies Musical Instruments Interscholastic Athletic Supplies General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

TIGER SPA Best of the Best in Town!

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Open 8am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

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Credit Cards Accepted

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district

Bring this ad for a special treat!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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FORMULA FOR HOPE

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. Vodka that comes in an Ohranj flavor, briefly 6. Some family symbols 12. Closing key 15. Poison 16. Not of uniform consistency 17. Plastic inventor Baekeland 18. Copying a couch? 20. ___-Tse 21. Totally committed 22. Opposite of oui 23. Safe spot? 24. Bombay bread 25. Trivial Pursuit and Mother May I?, e.g.? 29. First responder, briefly 30. Snapchat post 31. Kabayaki fish 32. Hold to be 34. Swampland 35. Tooth puller 37. Spliff that’ll put years on you? 40. Went around in a circle 43. Tennis partner? 44. Klutzes 48. Small touch 49. Flake, e.g.: Abbr. 50. Thick locks 51. Thing that holds your helmet down and digs into your chin?

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55. Italian dear 56. Ostracize 57. Bread selection 58. Whole Foods owner 60. That dude 61. Bright side, or what the first words in the theme answers have 64. Landing guess 65. National adjudicator 66. Present moment 67. The Black Keys singer Auerbach 68. Put in the guillotine 69. Ruffle feathers

DOWN 1. Besmirched 2. Star 3. Get rusty 4. Bed covering 5. “Picnic” playwright 6. Ryzen product 7. Duke supervisors: Abbr. 8. Of a culture 9. Son 10. Revealing swimsuit 11. Thesaurus abbr. 12. Singer with the 2018 hit “Boo’d Up” 13. Sailor’s bearings 14. Calms down 19. Books reviewer: Abbr.

23. “Are you game?” 26. Throw cash around 27. Checkerboard piece 28. “Guardians Of The Galaxy” director 33. Spot to doodle 34. Shakespearean outburst 35. 2018 Physics Nobelist Strickland 36. German cubes 38. Highland valley 39. Heckle 40. Hid away 41. Kansas’s largest city 42. Barbaric 45. Mind-ripping 46. “Make an

exception just this time!” 47. Guy in a boxer’s corner 49. Wonder on the keys 52. Filth 53. Mythological spirit 54. Amigo 55. Minolta rival 59. ___ Harker (“Dracula” heroine) 61. Two-handed lunch 62. “___ Vulgaris” (Queens of the Stone Age album) 63. Pomegranate color LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


PEEPSHOW A sex and social justice column

WHAT MIDTERMS MEAN TO THE SEX WORK INDUSTRY BY JESSIE SAGE // PEEPSHOWCAST@GMAIL.COM

I

N LIGHT OF the upcoming midterm

elections, I take a step back to talk about the way in which elections impact the lives of the sex work community. Sex work is an umbrella term that encompasses a wide array of erotic services: stripping, webcam modeling, nude modeling, escorting, street-based prostitution, phone sex operating, porn performing, etc. Sex work needs to be distinguished from sex trafficking. While some sex workers have histories of trafficking and coercion, those who identify as sex workers typically see their work as a profession, and often, as a political identity. A mantra of the sex workers’ rights movement is “Nothing about us without us.” There is good reason for this. The stories of sex workers are intriguing and journalists have often used these stories for their own career advancement, turning the lives of sex workers into peep shows with little regard for the consequences of their writing. Academics have often theorized about the working conditions, motivations, and psychological well-being of sex workers without measuring their theories against sex workers’ own voices. Law enforcement and non-profit organizations are running well-funded anti-trafficking campaigns

on the assumptions that all sex workers are victims in need of saving, contrary to sex workers insistence that they need “rights, not rescue.” Along these lines, public officials make and enforce policies that severely impact the lives of sex workers without understanding the needs of the community or what the impact of these laws will be. Never has this been more true than in April when President Trump signed FOSTA-SESTA into law.

SEX WORKERS TYPICALLY SEE THEIR WORK AS A PROFESSION, AND OFTEN, AS A POLITICAL IDENTITY. Marketed as an anti-trafficking bill, FOSTA-SESTA moved through the U.S. House and Senate at breakneck speed. The intent of the bill is to penalize websites that “promote or facilitate prostitution.” Yet the language is so vague as to hamper sexual freedom more broadly. Many niche sex/dating sites, fearing that

they may be held liable should a transaction occur, have drastically changed their terms of service or shut down altogether. Craigslist personals, FetLife, and even the furry dating site are perfect examples. The stated purpose of the bill was to protect (mostly) women from the harms of sex trafficking. By removing sexual services from websites, women would no longer be victimized by pimps, traffickers, and bad johns. Ironically, in practice it made sex work more dangerous, removing sex workers’ ability to safely screen and disseminate information about bad clients, as well as organize other harm reduction efforts. If lawmakers would have listened, they would have heard a chorus of sex workers vocally decrying this as a looming disaster. But unfortunately, as is often the case, those most impacted by the implementation of policy are not the ones who are at the decision-making table, and those who make these decisions are not the ones who are directly impacted by them. As is the case with every election, the question isn’t just who an official is and what their stated positions are, but whom are they willing to recognize and listen to?

Jessie Sage is co-host of the Peepshow Podcast, which addresses issues related to sex and social justice. Her column Peepshow is exclusive to City Paper. Follow her on Twitter @peep_cast.

Pittsburgh’s lone liberal talkshow host for 30+ years

Peepshow Podcast, Ep. 30 In Episode 30 of The Peepshow Podcast, we talk to writer, sex worker, and community organizer Lorelei Lee. Last year, Lee published “Once You Have Made Pornography,” an article which eloquently describes the way in which making pornography changes sex workers’ lives. Specifically, she describes the way that porn becomes the primary lens through which performers are viewed. She says, “After you have made pornography, it will be viewed as a part of you forever, and because it is viewed this way, it will be a part of you forever.” In our interview, we talk to Lee about how this dynamic diminishes performers, making them one-dimensional in the eyes of people outside of the industry. She says, “It is so infuriating when you go outside of the sex work support network and interact with civilians in a way that is generous and vulnerable.” Feminist theory is one of the places that this is particularly problematic. “They have a model of what they think of sex work is, as a symbol of misogyny. That is objectifying. If flattens sex workers real lived experiences into some symbol for their benefit.” In our conversation, we talk about the importance of representing sex workers as multi-dimensional people and why they should require platforming of many sex worker voices in all of their abundance. For more on this connection, go to peepshowpodcast.com/peepshowpodcast-episode-30

Tune in this Monday as Pittsburgh City Paper senior writer Ryan Deto joins Lynn in the studio to discuss this week’s issue before Tuesday’s election. Call in with questions: 412-200-5686

Listen live every weekday at 10 a.m. at lynncullen.pghcitypaper.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER OCT. 31-NOV. 7, 2018

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Pennsylvania's only Medical Marijuana Education Center is now open! Come visit us to learn about this natural form of medicine in a relaxing community space. Be sure to browse our library and check out our retail store!

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 31, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 44

October 31, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 44