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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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A collection of tabs used as a prop in Frick Park Market video, still on display at the market

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SEPT. 19-26, 2018 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 38 Editor-In-Chief ROB ROSSI Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Marketing and Promotions Coordinator CONNOR MARSHMAN Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Senior Sales Representative BLAKE LEWIS Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Advertising Sales Assistant TAYLOR PASQUARELLI Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, GAB BONESSO, ADAM CROWLEY, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, TRACY MOLYNEAUX, BILL PEDUTO, STEVE SUCATO Intern ALEX POPICHAK Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

FIRSTSHOT BY JARED WICKERHAM

A photographic tour of the Blue Slide Park album, online now at pghcitypaper.com

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THE BIG STORY

MOURNING MAC Exploring the special connection between Mac Miller and his hometown of Pittsburgh BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HE PRIDE Pittsburghers have for their city is undeniable. Whether it’s refusing to buy any brand of ketchup other than Heinz or wearing black and gold no matter the occasion, Pittsburghers are passionately parochial. The late Mac Miller was no different. His music showed so much love for Pittsburgh that the city became part of his identity as an artist. “He was a Pittsburgh icon and always loved to support his city,” says Kyrstan Richardson, a Pittsburgh native who attended the vigil. “[That’s] what made him so great, he never forgot where he came from.” A handful of artists and musicians from Pittsburgh have made it big. Few, if any, publicly identified with the city as Miller did. In fact, he was a rare global superstar to consistently call back (and come back) to his hometown. With Miller, fans everywhere instantly connected him to Pittsburgh. Some of Miller’s lyrics made subtle references to Pittsburgh, and some were more outright, but his hometown consistently loomed large in his music. “His humility and passion are a direct reflection of growing up in a place like Pittsburgh,” local musician Hannah Jenkins says. “That’s why this loss hits a lot of people really hard, because he reminded us of home.” For those in their 20s, Miller’s music is sentimental. “It’s not often that you see a young kid really make something of himself in the music industry on a worldwide scale,” says Jenkins. It’s even less often that a young musician comes from the same town and talks about similar experiences. “I grew up listening to his music, and I have so many memories of being in high school driving around listening to Blue Slide Park. My friends and I used to drive around Squirrel Hill just blasting his music and feeling so free. That’s what his music did for a lot of people — kind of gave you a freeing and nostalgic feeling.” Michael Tuite, who attended the vigil on September 11, feels like he “grew up with” Miller, even though they attended different high schools. Miller’s sound and ideas “changed on the same path as my own,” Tuite says. “I was in high school when his first album came out, and he basically rapped about having a great life, optimistic about the future,” Tuite says. “Over the next few years, his music got more introspective, he developed a ‘weird’ sound, and his lyrics grew more philosophical as he questioned the nature of reality and tried to figure out his own place in the world.

CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

A vigil to Mac Miller was held at Blue Slide Park inside Frick Park on Tue., Sept. 11.

Steelers running back James Conner paid tribute to Miller on his cleats at Sunday’s game.

That’s something that really resonated with me and something that most young people can relate to.” Even in and around Pittsburgh, Miller resonated for reasons beyond working the city into his lyrics. There existed in his music and honesty not often heard from mainstream artists. He creatively articulated things in a relatable way that others are unable to express. “I’ve battled with depression and anxiety my whole life, and I’ve loved poetry. Mac Miller was able to see the poetic side of things and put words to how I was

feeling.” says Anna Reynolds. At the vigil, she helped with a petition to rename Blue Slide Park after Miller. “He spoke about darkness and depression in a way that made it palpable, the way no other artists did.” Brandon McCaslin credits Miller for the creation of Nightfall Records, of which McCaslin is chief executive officer. After a couple of dinners at Six Penn Kitchen, Miller offered McCaslin guidance and support for the project. “His passing was absolutely devastating, and we wanted to offer the world a

coalesced place to honor him as an icon,” says McCaslin, who organized the vigil held at Blue Slide Park. “[Miller] had such an impact on Pittsburgh, and really everybody in his life, because of his demeanor and presence. “Malcolm” — Miller’s real name was Malcom James McCormick — “was the most genuine, happy, carefree person I’ve ever met in my entire life. He had vision for creating a better environment around him, not just in Pittsburgh, but in the world. He has helped to pave the way for Pittsburgh’s music industry, and now I believe that he will be a beacon of light in the topic of mental health and addiction.” Miller used his experiences as inspiration to create art that transcended his music and affected the lives of Pittsburghers on a personal level. While each person’s connection was different and unique, Miller also made an impact on Pittsburgh as a whole. At the vigil, it was clear Miller would continue to leave a mark in death. At the vigil, his grandmother found it “astonishing that there are that many people … that my grandson was able to touch so many lives.” But it wasn’t astonishing, Pittsburghers are a people who love hard. And there clearly a love between the late Mac Miller, his hometown, and its people. It remains, as his grandmother said, “overwhelming.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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SHOOTS AND SCORES BY MICHELLE PACIS CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In March 2013, my photographer friend Heather Mull asked me to style a Pittsburgh rapper she was photographing for City Paper. The article was to be about him starting a record company. I wasn’t familiar with his music or how popular he already was, so I looked him up on YouTube. Then I quickly gathered a bunch of items for the shoot, including a Mario Lemieux Penguins jersey that had been a gift from a former boyfriend. When I walked into the studio, this kid extended his hand and politely introduced himself as Malcolm. I started unpacking the items for different looks I would assemble. He saw the jersey. He pointed at it. He started jumping up and down on the couches and said, “Yo, that’s it, that’s it!” He pulled the jersey on over his shirt, and we started shooting. His demeanor turned increasingly serious as Heather began taking photos. After the shoot, he offered me money; he wanted to keep the jersey. I respectfully declined. (I thought there was no way this kid had money to even spare — little did I know!) I had no use for the jersey and told him I would exchange it for a picture that I could post online of us together, him wearing the jersey. You can see in the picture how happy he was to make that trade. I have been told he wore the jersey on stage at his Pittsburgh show later that night. Aside from my old boyfriend (sorry, Tim!), Malcom getting that Mario jersey and wearing it while performing as Mac Miller probably put a smile on everybody’s face. • This edited version of an original Facebook post was printed with the writer’s permission. Michelle Pacis is a local stylist.

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PHOTO: KIMBERLY MCDONALD

Apple juice and cookies with Mac Miller at Taylor Allderdice

.MAC MILLER.

MALCOLM BEFORE MAC BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

AC MILLER MADE it big as a hot young talent with a bright future in the music industry. But in the wake of his death, many in his native Pittsburgh remember him for more than his music — as Malcolm McCormick, a student, a performer, and a son dedicated to and loved by his family.

for Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). “I still have the CD of examples he shared and analyzed with everyone,” says Maione. Kimberly McDonald also keeps a musical memento from her days as Miller’s 11th grade English teacher at Taylor Allderdice High School — a copy of

his art. “His early music was fun,” says Gentner. “He connected with kids in a fun way, he was always smiling” McDonald goes on to describe him as “one of those students that a teacher loved to have in class.” “He was insightful. He had intelligent comments. He added to class discussions.

“HE CONNECTED WITH KIDS IN A FUN WAY, HE WAS ALWAYS SMILING.” “I remember him as a serious music student,” says John Maione, a performing arts teacher at Winchester Thurston School who taught Miller music during his freshman and sophomore years. “His knowledge, intensity, and seriousness regarding hip-hop and rap music was inspiring.” He recalls Miller as a leader in his class

his early mixtape The Jukebox: Prelude to Class Clown with the note, “To my favorite English teacher.” “It’s one of my prized possessions,” says McDonald. She and Taylor Allderdice studentsocial worker Debra Gentner each paint Miller as a friendly, well-liked young man who injected humor into his studies and

He was great with literature and poetry. Go figure, right?” she says with a chuckle. Even after he graduated, Miller returned to Taylor Allderdice to perform at the prom. He also made an appearance at the school when he returned to Pittsburgh in 2013 to accept a Key to the City during a ceremony declaring September 20 as Mac Miller Day.


“He continued to want to have Pittsburgh be a part of him,” says Gentner. She adds that he was also very dedicated to his family, a characteristic supported by an experience once had by local music figure, Justin Strong. Miller honed his craft during emcee tournaments at Strong’s former East Liberty club, Shadow Lounge. While the two were never close, he fondly recalls seeing Miller grow as an artist “from the Easy Mac days to signing with Rostrum Records.” In 2013, Strong had a chance encounter with a member of Miller’s family when he performed as a storyteller at the Moth Mainstage at the Byham Theater. “I told the story of the beginning and survival of the first two years of the Shadow Lounge,” says Strong. “After the event, I’m mingling through the crowd. An older lady comes up to me, and says, ‘Hello, I’m Mac Miller’s grandmother. I always wonder about [Shadow Lounge] he would go to ...’ I remember giving her a big hug. We talked a little longer on Mac’s success and how proud she was of him.” He shares the moment to emphasize Miller’s image, not as a famous musician, but as an individual with a loving family, a humanizing detail that often gets lost in the hype following any celebrity death. “As impactful as Mac was on the mu-

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

A vigil for Mac Miller at Blue Slide Park on Tue., Sept. 11.

sic scene locally and internationally, the important take away is that he made his grandmother proud,” says Strong. “If we can all just live our lives — faults and all — with the goal of making our grandmothers proud, I believe we can leave the world a better place from which we found it. And Mac Miller did just that.”

McDonald has already seen the connection Miller made with students through his music. “I have students who have said that even though they did not know him, they knew him through his music and they would listen to it while they were attending high school,” says McDonald. “He

impacted even those students that came after him.” Gentner believes Allderdice students who interacted with Miller also experienced the smiling, funny kid she knew. “The kids remember that, and I know it’s also hard for them to accept that he’s gone,” she says. Maggie Cook, co-owner of Frick Park Market, fondly remembers Miller as a teen who performed and sold CDs in front of her Point Breeze business famous, where he and his family had a tab. He honored the small sandwich shop with track on his 2011 album Blue Slide Park. He also filmed a music video there. Cook says hundreds of Mac Miller fans have visited the market over the past seven years, including around 400 that have come since Miller’s death. For Maione, Miller’s legacy goes beyond music. “Most importantly, Malcolm was a kind, gentle, personable, talented young man, a deep, deep soul who wanted to embrace the world in his uncompromisingly honest music. I treasure the fleeting time I was privileged to spend with him,” he says. “The world will mourn Mac Miller, but the Malcolm I knew will always be fondly remembered.”

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Mac Miller fans at the candlelight vigil in Blue Slide Park on Tue., Sept. 11.

.MAC MILLER.

THE DEATH CYCLE BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HEN REPORTS spread on social

media that Mac Miller was dead of an apparent overdose, the backlash was almost immediate. Not towards Miller himself, but the reporting around his death. TMZ was the first to announce Miller’s death and did so with its trademark recklessness. The initial report referenced Miller’s past struggles with substance abuse, and included “Miller has had trouble recently with substance abuse ... in the wake of his breakup with Ariana Grande.” This seemed to imply Grande was at fault for Miller falling back into drugs, ignoring that his struggles with substances were public since 2012.

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At the same time that some fans expressed shock and sadness on Twitter, they also shared anger and frustration about the way TMZ and other outlets blamed Grande for Miller’s struggles. The article’s phrasing was later changed to “Miller has battled substance abuse issues for years ... something that came up again in the wake of his breakup with Ariana Grande.” Better, but barely. Separately, but related, there were trending articles with headlines along the lines of “Ariana Grande’s Ex Mac Miller Dead,” with more fans angry that Miller’s accomplishments had been eclipsed. And of course, there was the eternal constant in celebrity deaths: articles

compiling Tweets from other celebrities reacting to the death. These are always published quickly after a death, and there was no exception with Miller. The Tweets are mostly heartfelt, but they can also feel performative, almost as if celebrities know by tweeting heartfelt condolences they’ll end up in a trending article. These are all typical pieces of the modern celebrity death reaction cycle. There is often a misstep in the original reporting of the death, backlash to the misstep, and a hefty amount of public grieving. It’s an exhausting rigmarole. In 2017, CBS reported that Tom Petty had passed away, hours before he was

actually pronounced dead. Other musicians started pouring out praises for their fallen idol — even Bob Dylan gave a statement — all while Petty was still technically alive. In the middle of the public’s reminiscence about Petty’s life and career, his daughter had to angrily release a statement that her father was “not dead yet.” Before Aretha Franklin died in August, when it was publicly announced that her health was failing, her family told the press that she was still alert and had watched TV, gently warning not to start airing remembrances yet. Michael Jackson’s death in 2009 was the first major celebrity passing in a post-


Twitter world, and crashed that site along with TMZ, Google, and the Los Angeles Times. The excess of coverage included helicopters flying over Jackson’s estate. “I think [social media] definitely complicated things more and I think it puts more pressure on news organizations, because if everyone else is saying that someone’s died, and you haven’t, it looks like there’s something wrong with your reporting or your reporting skills,” says Andrew Seaman, ethics committee chair of the Society of Professional Journalists. Once a gossip-website reports anything significant, it can quickly snowball into an outpouring of opinions. This isn’t necessarily misguided, since gossip-websites, while not reputable, are often correct. But the frenzy of social media puts pressure on more reputable publications to verify the information as quickly as possible. “What happens a lot of times is TMZ will say ‘so-and-so died,’ and then an-

other organization, they’ll tweet out ‘oh so-and-so dies,’ and they’ll say ‘according to media reports.’ Then, if that news organization is more reputable than, say, TMZ or some celebrity gossip website, another news organization might say ‘so and so died, according to NBC News,” says Seaman. There has always been a collective grieving process for the death of beloved celebrities, but Twitter created a sped-up, frenzied way of announcing and reacting to death. Journalism that feeds off and caters to social media is now equally quick to announce a death, provide commentary, or write a eulogy. There is little time to think about what the artist or actor or athlete meant to you personally, before also being faced with everyone else’s memories. There is no time to react before there are more updates on exactly how and when the person died. Then again, maybe it’s not so bad to be so beloved that people are tripping over themselves to say goodbye.

FIVE QUINTESSENTIAL MAC TRACKS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In Mac Miller’s short, yet accomplished career, he grew from a naïve, teenage rapper to a tortured, seasoned musician. From slow jams to funky upbeat tunes, here is a collection of music to remember the late Pittsburgh native.

“Knock Knock” – K.I.D.S. In the beginning of Miller’s career, he was a fresh-faced adolescence who rapped about partying, money, and sex. “Knock Knock” is a prime example of Miller’s feel-good, upbeat early work with lyrics that focused on having a good time and had a simple melody to back it all up.

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“Fight the Feeling” – Macadelic After his first album, Miller’s music started to venture deeper into R&B, with slower tempos and percussion-soaked harmonies. “Fight the Feeling” showcases Miller’s move away from party-style songs with raw, and increasingly clever lyrics.

“The Star Room” – Watching Movies with the Sound Off The first track on Miller’s second studio album opens with the voice of Delusional Thomas: Miller’s alter ego. This is one of the only times Delusional Thomas makes an appearance on Mac Miller’s mainstream music; the alter ego was reserved for Miller’s later trippy, psychedelic mixtapes. Here, Miller remains introspective and poetic, while exploring darker themes.

“Dang!” – The Divine Feminine After Watching Movies ..., this one features Miller seeming to re-discover the fun in making music. It’s upbeat, expertly produced, and insanely funky.

“So It Goes” – Swimming Emotionally-rich and tender, Miller’s artistry on Swimming is dynamic, soulful and transcendent. It sounds like an album from an artist much older and experienced than 26. “So It Goes” closes out the album and showcases a Miller who’s masterfully honed his craft. •

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Mementos left at Mac Miller’s memorial at Blue Slide Park

.MAC MILLER.

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I had the opportunity to meet with Mac Miller a couple of times. I called him Mac, and he never corrected me, so I always kept with it. We met in my office on business. An attorney friend suggested the meeting, as did his manager, saying he really wanted to talk about ways he could give back to Pittsburgh. This was during my first term, probably 2015 or ’16. We had a phone call earlier with his accounting people and legal team, and he was looking to create a charitable foundation. Anyway, at this meeting, he told me of this idea: create playgrounds around the world that would be safe for kids and families — and they would be identifiable by a blue slide. He wanted the first one to be in Pittsburgh. And that began a discussion that went into after-school programming to teach digital music and computer coding to kids. Mac thought there was potential to partner with Wiz Khalifa to create this after-school programming for Pittsburgh’s schools. I think about that time I met him in my office and two subsequent times, and I found Mac to be a very caring person. He was genuine about wanting to help. He had a deep love for Pittsburgh. His family and friends will have the opportunity to memorialize and remember Mac in a way they feel is best. If that would be by going forward with the partnerships he proposed, the city would be honored to be part of it. If it’s through other

initiatives, the city would be interested in that, as well. Our public works crews saved all the things that people left at his memorial at Blue Slide Park. They’ve already started planting the flowers people left, and saved the mementos for Mac’s family. Nobody had to ask, and I think that’s a testament to Mac, too. He had very good friends. I know that from meeting many of them. Mac had a whole crew of friends that went back through his lifetime, and he took them on this ride he had. If you met his mom and dad, which I did at an album-release party at Spirit in Lawrenceville, you’d see that same sort of light in them that he had. It was just based upon kindness and friendliness. They’re Point Breezers. So was he. I lived in the same neighborhood for 20 years, and I like telling the story that Mac’s Little League coach was (Allegheny County Executive) Rich Fitzgerald. It reminds of how small Pittsburgh is. The nice thing about Mac is that it didn’t matter where you came from or what you did, he just treated everybody the same way — and it was always with kindness. I was in Europe a couple of years ago, passing through Paris, and he was playing. I contacted him on Twitter. He was, like, “Yo, come to the show!” I was, like, “OK, maybe I can make it.” I never made it to that show, and now I regret it.

Mayor Bill Peduto collaborated on this essay with editor-in-chief Rob Rossi.


.VOICES.

BY TERENEH IDIA // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HERE IS PROBLEM with “diversity.” It’s a noun best used to describe variety in things, styles, and thoughts. But people? When used this way, diversity puts human beings in the state of being a thing, an other. It misguidedly defines a “normal” thing, and then diversity as another thing. While attempting to create equity, it actually focuses the conversation on dominate-culture. It is dehumanizing. A few years ago, I was sitting around a table talking about “young people in Pittsburgh” and how to attract them — blah, blah, and blah. I said, Well, we need to focus on diversity. A white woman at the table said, “Well, I was at an event last night and it was diverse, there were guitar players, some drummers, a piano player …” You see where she was going with this right? Guitarists, drummers, piano players — that’s diversity. So, my point about representing people across cultures and colors was lost. Maybe that was her goal. And how often does conversation about isms get railroaded, sidetracked, muddled to the point of … what were we talking about again? Now, I appreciate that many wellmeaning people work on diversity issues. Some of my friends have the word printed on business cards. However, I would like to offer another word. Reality. As in, we are moving to reflect the reality of our customers/community/ country/world. At the workplace.

As part of curriculum, media, arts, science. Across all manner of disciplines and ideas. We are moving to show reality of cultures, of people, and representing this in a qualitative and quantitative manner. The antonym of reality is fantasy. As in, the fantasy we create when we have an over-representation of white men in the workplace, curriculum, government, media, arts, and more. We are living in this is very destructive fantasy where people who are considered “diverse” are “other.” Not worthy of full consideration. Not of equal value. “Diversity” also allows for the laziness of “one voice.” As in, Well, we made a diverse hire, here they are (points to one African-American, Latinx, Asian, or multicultural employee). If people running companies thought about reality instead, we would make some progress on real equity — and with that, justice. In “The Danger of a Single Story,” a widely-vied TED Talk by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, she points to the problem of hearing one person’s story and applying that monolithic view to a multilayered, complex culture or people. That danger also extends to placing “one voice” as the only representation. The next time you want to use the word “diversity” to advocate for equity in representation of all people, use the word “reality” instead. See how it makes the point more clearly, and wait for the reaction. It will speak volumes.

ENJOY DRINKS, FOOD & LIVE MUSIC! Join us on these saturdays along walnut Street in shadyside: September 22 : Good Guys Band + No Bad JuJu CORN HOLE CONTEST! winning team drinks for free + receives a Magic Hat prize package!

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Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152xx PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

Elizabeth A. Douglas’ “Chanteuse,” from Art on the Walls

.ART.

WOMEN ON THE WALLS BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE PITTSBURGH Downtown Gallery

Crawl honors one of the city’s longest standing organizations focused on black women visual artists with the opening of Art on the Walls: A Retrospective Moment. Presented as part of the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council’s (GPAC) Art on the Walls program, which uses office spaces to showcase local and regional artists, the show features work by members of Women of Visions, Inc. Founded in 1981,

the group — described by GPAC artist relations manager Christiane Leach as a “a testament to the enduring creativity of black women” — boasts around two dozen members. The exhibit includes prints, mixed media painting, sculpture, and more by artists such as 2017 Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Artist of the Year winner Jo-Anne Bates, Christine Bethea, and City Paper columnist, Tereneh Idia. “The thing about Women of Visions

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is [its] work is so spiritual, powerful and colorful,” says Leach. “If anything, people should expect a lot of vibrant color.” Leach joined Women of Visions, Inc., in the early 1990s after returning to Pittsburgh from months traveling and “studying philosophy and tai chi and making art” in the Southwest. She credits its members, particularly president Tina Williams Brewer, for helping her gain a foothold in the city’s arts community. She believes the group show aligns closely with GPAC’s work of promoting “equity, accessibility and inclusion” in the Pittsburgh arts scene, an issue with which

the office is all too familiar. Last May, GPAC released Racial Equity and Arts Funding in Greater Pittsburgh, a comprehensive, 52page report showing ALAANA (African, Latinx, Asian, Arab, and Native American) arts organizations received less funding than white-majority organizations. The report came after a 2016 GPAC survey of the region’s arts community found that 84 percent of non-white respondents thought Greater Pittsburgh’s arts funding was inequitable. GPAC tries to combat the disparity by showcasing artists of color through Art on the Walls — previous shows include CONTINUES ON PG. 16


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Taking it one week at a time. Weekly PassA good short-term option if you plan to ride often throughout a specific week. Receive unlimited rides for a calendar week Sunday through Saturday. Cost: $25.00

Taking it day by day. Day Pass*- Your best option for unlimited rides for one service day. The pass is valid from first tap on a farebox to the end of Port Authority service that same day. Cost: $7.00 Passes are available on a Connectix, the paper version of an electronic smart card, and can be purchased at any ConnectCard Vending Machine.

One day at a time. Single Trip Pass/Single Trip Pass with Transfer- A great option for occasional riders and visitors. Perfect if you just need a one-way ride to or from an event or want to see Downtown Pittsburgh at night from the Monongahela Incline. Cost: $2.50/$3.50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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WRITING ON THE WALLS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

Your help is making all the difference in the world! BBF can not thank the people of the Greater Pittsburgh Area enough for their boundless generosity and compassion in the wake of last years many natural disasters. As BBF turns 60, we look forward to making tomorrow even better, side by side with you!

60 Anniversary th

Connecting People’s Resources with People’s Needs Since 1958 1200 Galveston Ave., Pittsburgh PA 15233 • 412-321-3160 • www.brothersbrother.org

$88

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er us tom c w e -n al* -

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NONOTAK at Wood Street Galleries

Reflective Locations, a collection of work by black male visual artists that was curated by BOOM Concepts co-founder D.S. Kinsel and the recently closed Karmalogue, which featured paintings by Indian-American artist Francis Cleetus, and Nepali artist A.A. Leach hopes Art on the Walls: A Retrospective Moment brings attention to the important and necessary work being done by Women of Visions, Inc. “Pittsburgh is full of many incredible legacies, and an organization like this that’s been around for 37 years is rare,” says Leach. “I would love for people to take away that fact, celebrate it and support it more.” Art on the Walls: A Retrospective Moment. Sept. 21-Jan. 2019. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. 810 Penn Ave., Suite 600, Downtown. www.pittsburgh artscouncil.org

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

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* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.

Take A Look Carnegie Mellon University advanced sculpture students will take over Future Tenant for Object + Body, a show that examines the body in relationship to sculpture and as sculpture. Object + Body. Sept. 21. 6-10 p.m. Free. Future Tenant, 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. futuretenant.org Young artists show off their mechanical side with Machine Culture, an exhibition that curator Murray Horne says incorporates the “kinetic qualities of gears in motion and motorized moving parts produce both ironic and amusing results.” Machine Culture. Sept. 21-Dec. 9. Times vary. Free. SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. trustarts.org View kinetic and sculptural works at the world premiere of Antumbra, an exhibit showcasing works by artist, Keny Marshall, who uses found objects and hand-built devices to construct mechanisms that act as parodies of the technology that surrounds us. Antumbra | Kent Marshall. Sept. 21-Dec. 9. Times vary. Free. 707 Penn Gallery, 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. trustarts.org There will be light at Wood Street Galleries when the arts duo NONOTAK present the U.S. premiere of three new installations. The works combine the interests of visual artist, Noemi Schipfer, and architect musician, Takami Nakamoto, to immerse viewers in bright, futuristic-looking environments full of light and sound. NONOTAK | Noemi Schipfer & Takami Nakamoto. Sept. 21Dec. 31. Times vary. Free. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. trustarts.org

Follow senior A&E writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

17


Open to the public!

BEST LIVE BANDS EVERY WEEKEND ALL YEAR LONG! September Headliners: On the Outside Deck

No Bad JuJu Tony Janflone Mercedez Band Walk of Shame DJ Grover Dancing Queen The House Band

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PHOTO: BEA NYILIS

Catherine Gowl, Erin Krom, and Sam Tsoutsouvas in The Father

.STAGE.

MEMORY LAPSE BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

1366 OLD FREEPORT ROAD • PGH, PA 15238 412.963.0640 • WWW.BAJABARGRILL.COM

HE TRADITIONAL portrayal of

Alzheimer’s disease on screen or stage often presents suffering characters as vegetative and blank, or zanily scatterbrained, all misremembered names and detached paranoia. Florian Zeller takes a different approach in his 2012 play, The Father. Here, the audience shares in the character’s confusion. The events on stage are as confounding and illogical to the character as they are the audience. It’s infuriating and saddening to be so isolated in your own reality, so when the suffering lead explodes into bouts of anger and or pouting tantrums, the audience is right there with him.

THE FATHER

Continues through Sun., Sept. 23. $36. 13 and older. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. kinetictheater.org

The Father, staged by Kinetic Theater at New Hazlett Theater through September 23, tells the story of a middle-aged woman named Anne in her attempts to take care of her aging father, Andre. He is suffering, and though words such as “Alzheimer’s” and “dementia” are never spoken, his symptoms are clear and getting worse. Andre and Anne live together in Paris with Anne’s increasingly exasperated partner, Pierre. The story is told in a series of vignettes, punctuated by stage lights being abruptly shut off, then turned back on, essentially resetting Andre’s reality. With each tran-

sition, the set of the interior apartment loses a few items; what starts as a wellgroomed, handsome, lived-in apartment is cold and blank by the end. As with the furniture, the characters are reconfigured when the lights come back on. A short, warm brunette nurse from one scene is blond-haired and curt in the next. Anne has plans to move to London, then, when pressed by Andre about it several scenes later, she has no idea what he’s talking about. Her response is patient pity, and the audience feels his bewilderment and frustration at a deep level. A few of these reality-shifting transitions led the audience to audibly gasp. It’s exasperating. Sam Tsoutsouvas is magnetic as Andre. His helplessness and anger are expected and relatable, but Tsoutsouvas’ performance is best when expressing the person Andre was once. Though diminutive and in pajamas for most of the play, the character is portrayed as someone who was once very charming, but with the capacity to be cruel and aloof. Those traits still swirl around in there somewhere and it’s mesmerizing watching them seep out of Tsoutsouvas as if beyond his control. It’s probably not surprising to hear that The Father is a bleak outing. Then again, its job isn’t really to uplift. What it aims to do, and succeeds at, is putting the audience in the shoes of this suffering character and telling a familiar story in a way that it hasn’t been told. Its effects linger long after the lights go off for good.

Follow associate editor Alex Gordon on Twitter @shmalexgordon

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Mindy McHale

.COMEDY .

FUNNY FITNESS

BY GAB BONESSO // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

INDY MCHALE is a certified per-

sonal trainer at Stronger Now Fitness and Pittsburgh Kettlebell & Performance. She is also the host of Celebrity Sofa and a comedian in the improv troupe Jeffrey the Plant, which has been featured at the Detroit Comedy Festival and the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival. I’M NOT A TRAINER, BUT I FIND EXERCISE TO BE THERAPEUTIC. DO YOU THINK EXERCISE IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT FOR PEOPLE WHO CHOOSE COMEDY AS THEIR PROFESSION? I think most performers struggle with self-doubt and other things that can negatively affect a performance, or make them feel low even after a performance has finished. Working out helps release feelings and energies like these and can even help change them long-term. Working out increases your physical strength and your mental capacity. When I am feeling particularly self-confident because of the strides I make in the gym, I think my improv performances are better. I use more stage-space. I do more daring things in a scene, I am more patient with my scene partners, and I have the stamina to get through the show. WHAT IS THE FUNNIEST THING THAT HAS EVER HAPPENED TO YOU WHILE WORKING OUT? I was just reminded by my own personal trainer (Chris Leventis) about the time I accidentally pulled the top of my shirt all the way down to my belly button with a landmine bar during one of our sessions.

I remember him being totally surprised, and he yelled, “Whoa, what happened there?!” and I shrugged it off. I told him I figured he’s seen way worse than my bra and he agreed with me. By the way, I haven’t worn that shirt in a session with him since. WHAT WAS THE MOST PHYSICALLY DEMANDING THING YOU’VE EVER DONE IN AN IMPROV SCENE? One of my teammates was playing a physically looming and intense character to my novice character. He was close to my face, growling words at me and he kept leaning into me as I leaned back to the point that I was on the floor. So, I just slid around while he stayed in my face until his rant was over. That was fun! IF YOU COULD ONLY DO ONE EXERCISE FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE AND YOU HAD TO CHOOSE BETWEEN BURPEES AND TURKISH GET-UPS, WHICH WOULD YOU CHOOSE? Turkish get-ups ALL DAY LONG! I love them! This is one of the few full-body exercises that leaves me feeling powerful and exhausted at the same time. Plus, when you tell people you do Turkish Get-Ups, I’m pretty sure they think you’re talking about sex. Learn more about Mindy as a personal trainer by contacting info@strongernow fitness.com. Watch her perform with Jeffrey the Plant at various local venues around town. Celebrity Sofa is currently on hiatus.

Follow featured contributor Gab Bonesso on Twitter @gabbonesso PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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LIVE MUSIC SEPT 20

SEPT 27

(starting 8-9 pm)

(starting 8-9 pm)

Eddan Sparks Trio

Open Mic w/ Jay Constable

EatShady.com

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PHOTOS: TONY PISCITELLI, THRIVAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Scenes from last year’s Thrival Festival

.MUSIC.

BEYOND THE MUSIC BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

Outdoor seating, food and drink ŸŞåÎĜ°ĬŸƉŅýåųåÚƉ°ƋƉÅŅƋĘƉĬŅΰƋĜŅĹŸ

LIVE MUSIC SEPT 22

SEPT 29

Bill Henry

The EK Band

(12-4 pm)

(12-4 pm)

BakerySocial.com

ROM THE WINDOW of the offices of Ascender, a nonprofit coworking space next to Bakery Square, the disparity created by the technology boom in Pittsburgh is clear. On the left are apartment buildings with monthly rent prices in the thousands. To the right are communities with affordable housing. Dan Law, business director at Ascender and creator of Thrival, acknowledges that significant growth in Pittsburgh’s technology sphere has been good for a lot of people in the city, but not for everyone. “There’s a responsibly for our community, this tech and innovation community, to try to be more proactive about solving these problems,” says Law. That’s the aim behind Thrival Festival: bring to light this gap between worlds and bring together the people of Pittsburgh and the world. “[We want to] elevate the ecosystem [of the city] to a level we think Pittsburgh can achieve. But the point isn’t to get

Pittsburgh excited, the point is to connect Pittsburgh to a region, country, an entire globe of people and leaders and thinkers,” says Law. “As the city continues to experience such significant change and evolution, there needs to be some sort of platform there that is very intentional about sharing that story … and Thrival can be a vehicle. Not [the vehicle], because it should be a collective effort, but it can help push us forward.” By connecting the people of Pittsburgh with thought leaders from around the world, Pittsburgh can grow and improve. In turn, the city can establish a blueprint for other areas not as far along in advancement. “The world needs a strong Pittsburgh story to help identify the path for other Midwest cities that are all seeing the same things coming up for them, but there’re just a few years further out,” explains Kenny Chen, Innovation Director at Ascender.

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THRIVAL FESTIVAL

Sept. 19-21. Multiple times. $15–$275. Multiple venues. thrivalfestival.com

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“As Pittsburgh continues to amass talent and influence and retain more of the students and young professionals, you need the complementary growth in the arts and music,” says Chen. “A lot of people don’t understand why these two parts of Thrival go together, but when you look at it through that economic development lens of what it takes for a really thriving ecosystem, there’s so much potential for each of them.” Since the Chainsmokers played at Thrival in 2016, Ascender has seen its reach improve significantly. But the music component was designed to draw attention to the event. It was never meant to be the focus of the entire festival. “What it is, is a complement to the efforts we put forth in our Human X Tech program,” says Law. “Music X Arts is a unique live experience, [with an] emphasis on ‘live experience.’ We want people to share with one another, instead of living behind screens or doing things in isolation.” With Human X Tech, Thrival aims to cover the relationship between humans


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completely unchained Van Halen Tribute Friday September 21 and technology, and its impact on business, culture, and society. With Music X Arts, it celebrates art, music, and communal human gathering. The events are carefully curated to provide the audience with a holistic experience. “If you show up at 9 p.m. to [Music X Art], you’re missing the point,” says Law. “And that doesn’t even account the two full days we contribute to advanced technology, robotics, art and life sciences,

all the things [Chen] helps design. It’s all together. It’s like going to a 10-course meal and just showing up for dessert.” A plan is being formed for Thrival to respectfully honor the late Mac Miller. Law was in discussion with a team at Live Nation. “When you think of your community and this music ecosystem, and our innovation ecosystem, Mac was an innovator and entrepreneur, just as much as any tech guru,” Law says.

tammy PESCATELLI FRIDAY NOVEMBER 9

The Tubes

Friday October 26 8pm $45

Follow staff writer, Jordan Snowden, on Twitter @snowden_jordan

Twelve Twenty Four

WHAT NOT TO MISS AT THRIVAL

The Holiday Rock Orchestra

SATURDAY DECEMBER 22

Future of Work Symposium WED., SEPT. 19. 6-8 P.M. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER Yes, technological advances like self-driving cars are cool and all, but what about the millions of workers that will potentially be displaced? How will these advances impact the future? With opening remarks from Mayor Bill Peduto and discussions with journalists and tech professionals, Thrival starts off with an introspective look of the future of Pittsburgh.

LIFE.CODE Interactive Experience THU., SEPT. 20. 5-11 P.M. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART & CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Thought talks with tech and culture leaders from around the world, over a dozen one night only art instillations, and interactive activities, LIFE.CODE bridges technology and the commutative human experience into one event.

Thrival After-Party with Chicano Batman THU., SEPT. 20. 11 P.M.-2 A.M. REX THEATER End the night with Chicano Batman’s funky, psychedelic jams. The four-piece Latino band from L.A. has opened for Jack White, Alabama Shakes, and The Claypool Lennon Delirium.

Thrival Music X Arts FRI., SEPT. 21. 4-11 P.M. HIGHMARK STADIUM While Dillion Francis and Matt and Kim are the headliners, show up early to support local Pittsburgh artists: Mars Jackson, Paul Luc, Bastard Bearded Irishmen, and Brooke Annibale. There will also be interactive art and design at the concert site, created intentionally by Ascender program director, Jenny Sharpe. Music is just one component of the evening; with maker and art spaces, Music X Arts is set to be an engaging multi-sensory experience.

box of rain

Grateful Dead Tribute

trucks

Cars Tribute

Sat. Sept. 22

fri. Sept. 28

creature feature fest 3 nights of double features oct. 22-24 eaglemania danny dash

Eagles Tribute

Sat. & sun. oct. 27 & 28

Michael Jackson Impersonator

lotus land

Rush Tribute

hollywood nights ted vigil

Sat. nov. 10

Bob Seger Tribute

shiva Skydriver

mon. oct. 29

Sat. nov. 17

CD Release

wed. nov. 21

John Denver Tribute

Sat. dec. 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

21


.FILM.

SILK SCREENERS BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

OR THE PAST 13 years, Asian-Amer-

ican film festival Silk Screen has showcased a diverse array of movies of varying genres, languages, and countries of origin. This year, the 10-day festival features 25 full-length films (and 10 shorts) at theaters and venues across the city. City Paper watched a few so you don’t have to. Just kidding, go see these.

Abu DIRECTOR: Arshad Khan GENRE: Documentary Khan’s film explores his own coming out story as a gay man and son of Pakistani Muslim parents. Raised in Pakistan before immigrating to Canada as a teenager, he never quite fit in. He was too gay for Pakistan, then he was too Pakistani for Canada. It’s a touching story about coming of age, identity, religion, abuse, and family. This movie is structured less like a traditional documentary and more like a collage-presentation of Khan’s life. While narrating the whole film, Khan incorporates footage from his childhood and young-adult life, clips from old Bollywood movies, and the music he grew up with — both South Asian and Western. Abu also uses original animations to bring to life scenes for which there is no footage, like Kahn’s prescient dreams or faint memories. This film is a compassionate look on how a divide between parent and child is created, and whether or not it can be repaired. Sun., Sept. 23 at Regent Square Theatre. Sat., Sept. 29 at Harris Theater.

PHOTO: ICARUS FILMS

Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts

Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts DIRECTOR: Mouly Surya GENRE: Western/thriller Marlina (Marsha Timothy) is still mourning the death of her husband, whose mummified body sits in her living room, when a group of men knock at her door, tell her to make dinner, and plainly explain that they are going to rape her while stealing her cattle. And they do, but Marlina gets her revenge via poisoning and head slicing. While hitchhiking to the police station, severed head in tow, Marlina runs into her pregnant friend Novi (Dea Panendra), who is due any second. Together they end up on a journey trying to evade the men who are after Marlina, while also trying to coax out Novi’s baby. Set on the Indonesian island of Sumba, the movie employs tropes of a traditional Western film, only this time

they’re used to tell a story of a woman’s rightful revenge against men who treated her worse than cattle. There are panning shots of barren land and music filled with trotting rhythms and eerie guitar strings. Marlina is an honest, enthralling, and visually stunning film about womanhood and survival. Worth noting for viewers is that while the movie isn’t continuously violent, there are scenes at the beginning and the end of the movie that depict rape and violence. Sun., Sept. 23 at Frick Fine Arts Auditorium. Sat., Sept. 29 at Harris Theater.

Village Rockstars DIRECTOR: Rima Das GENRE: Coming-of-age A young girl named Dhunu (Bhanita Das) is being raised by a single mother in a flood-prone village in Assam, a state in Northeast India. To dismay of village elders, she spends her time hanging out

with boys, climbing trees, and boating down the river. What she wants most in life is a guitar, but they are too pricey, so she carves a guitar shape out of Styrofoam. Mostly though, this movie focuses on Dhunu’s relationship with her mother, who teaches Dhunu to swim so she won’t drown — as did her father — and scolds the elders for trying to constrain her daughter. The movie is a slow burn that doesn’t build to a climax but instead immerses viewers in the daily life of the Chaygaon village. It’s aimless without being pointless, almost akin to The Florida Project in terms of the joy and wonder kids find in simple things such as using a leaf as an umbrella or riding a bike for the first time. The cinematography, too, is impressive, panning across a sunset on a marsh or the expansive sky. Tue., Sept. 25 at Waterworks Cinema. Wed., Sept. 26 at Cranberry Cinemas.

Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny

WORLD PREMIERE SEPTEMBER 25-30 BENEDUM CENTER TRUSTARTS.ORG

BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-4800 GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

PART OF THE

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.FOR THE WEEK OF SEPT. 20.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): As he stepped up to use an ATM in a supermarket, a Scottish man named Colin Banks found £30 (about $40 U.S.) that the person who used the machine before him had inadvertently neglected to take. But rather than pocketing it, Banks turned it in to a staff member, and eventually the cash was reunited with its proper owner. Shortly after performing his good deed, Banks won £50,000 (about $64,500 U.S.) in a game of chance. It was instant karma in dramatic action — the positive kind! My analysis of the astrological omens reveals that you’re more likely than usual to benefit from expeditious cosmic justice like that. That’s why I suggest you intensify your commitment to doing good deeds.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): As you dive down into your soul’s depths in quest for renewal, remember this testimony from poet Scherezade Siobhan: “I want to dig out what is ancient in me, the mistaken-for-monster . . . and let it teach me how to be unafraid again.” Are you brave and brazen enough to do that yourself? It’s an excellent time to douse your fear by drawing wild power from the primal sources of your life. To earn the right to soar through the heights in November and December, delve as deep as you can in the coming weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): According to author Elizabeth Gilbert, here’s “the central question upon which all creative living hinges: Do you have the courage to bring forth the treasures that are hidden within you?” When I read that thought, my first response was, why are the treasures hidden? Shouldn’t they be completely obvious? My second response was, why do you need courage to bring forth the treasures? Shouldn’t that be the easiest and most enjoyable task imaginable? Everything you just read is a perfect riddle for you to contemplate during the next 14 months, Sagittarius.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A blogger named Sage Grace offers her readers a list of “cool things to call me besides cute.” They include dazzling, alluring, sublime, magnificent, and exquisite. Is it OK if I apply those same adjectives to you, Capricorn? I’d like to add a few more, as well: resplendent, delightful, intriguing, magnetic, and incandescent.

own and others’ — you’ll opt for an approach more like Winarko’s than Waseso’s.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Virgo businessman Warren Buffett is among the top five wealthiest people on the planet. In an average year, his company Berkshire Hathaway adds $36 billion to its already swollen coffers. But in 2017, thanks to the revision of the U.S. tax code by President Trump and his buddies, Buffett earned $65 billion — an increase of 83 percent over his usual haul. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re entering a year-long phase when your financial chances could have a mild resemblance to Buffett’s 2017. I’m not predicting your earnings will increase by 83 percent. But 15 percent isn’t unreasonable. So start planning how you’ll do it! I hope that in response you don’t flinch with humility or protest that you’re not worthy of such glorification. According to my astrological analysis, now is one of those times when you deserve extra appreciation for your idiosyncratic appeal and intelligence. Tell your allies and loved ones that I said so. Inform them, too, that giving you this treatment could help mobilize one of your half-asleep potentials.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Many educated Americans and Europeans think of reincarnation as a loony delusion, even though it’s a cornerstone of spiritual belief for over 1.5 billion earthlings. I myself regard it as a hypothesis worthy of intelligent consideration, although I’d need hundreds of pages to explain my version of it. However you imagine it, Aquarius, you now have extra access to knowledge and skills and proclivities you possessed in what we might refer to as your “past lives” — especially in those past lives in which you were an explorer, maverick, outlaw, or pioneer. I bet you’ll feel freer and more experimental than usual during the next four weeks.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “When the winds of change blow,” says a Chinese proverb, “some people build walls while others build windmills.” Since the light breezes of change may soon evolve into brisk

gusts of change in your vicinity, I wanted to bring this thought to your attention. Will you be more inclined to respond by constructing walls or windmills? I don’t think it would be foolish for you to favor the walls, but in the long run I suspect that windmills would serve you better.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “The flower doesn’t dream of the bee. It blossoms and the bee comes.” So says poet and philosopher Mark Nepo in The Book of Awakening. Now I’m transmitting his observation to you. I hope it will motivate you to expend less energy fantasizing about what you want and devote more energy to becoming the beautiful, useful, irresistible presence that will attract what you want. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make plans to produce very specific blossoms.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Budi Waseso, the former head of the Indonesian government’s anti-narcotics division, had a radical plan to prevent escapes by people convicted of drug-related crimes. He sought to build detention centers that would be surrounded by moats filled with crocodiles and piranhas. But his replacement, Heru Winarko, has a different approach. He wants addicts and dealers to receive counseling in comfortable rehabilitation centers. I hope that in the coming weeks, as you deal with weaknesses, flaws, and sins — both your

In one sense, a “patron saint” is a Catholic saint who is a heavenly advocate for a person, group, activity, thing, or place. St. Jude is the patron saint of lost causes, for instance. St. Francis of Assisi is the guardian of animal welfare and St. Kentigern is the protector against verbal abusers. “Patron saint” may also be invoked poetically to refer to a person who serves as a special guide or influence. For example, in one of his short stories, Nathaniel Hawthorne refers to a veteran nurse as “the patron saint of young physicians.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I invite you to fantasize about persons, groups, activities, things, or places for whom you might be the patron saint. To spur your imagination, here are some appropriate possibilities. You could be the patron saint of the breeze at dawn; of freshly picked figs; of singing humorous love songs in the sunlight; of unpredictable romantic adventures; of life-changing epiphanies while hiking in nature; of soul-stirring music.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In August 1933, author Virginia Woolf wrote a critical note to her friend, the composer Ethel Smyth, lamenting her lack of emotional subtlety. “For you,” Woolf told Smyth, “either things are black, or they’re white; either they’re sobs or shouts — whereas, I always glide from semitone to semi-tone.” In the coming weeks, fellow Cancerian, you may encounter people who act like Smyth. But it will be your sacred duty, both to yourself and to life, to remain loyal and faithful to the rich complexity of your feelings.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “People think of education as something they can finish,” said writer and scientist Isaac Asimov, who wrote or edited over 500 books. His point was that we’re wise to be excited about learning new lessons as long as we’re on this earth. To cultivate maximum vitality, we should always be engaged in the processes of absorbing new knowledge and mastering new skills and deepening our understanding. Does that sound appealing to you, Leo? I hope so, especially in the coming weeks, when you will have an enhanced ability to see the big picture of your future needs for education.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

PYLON PICS City Paper photographer Jared Wickerham captured Sunday’s Steelers game against the Kansas City Chiefs. Running back James Conner wore shoes that paid tribute to the late Mac Miller; the Steelers lost 42-37 and now have the unexpected record of 0-1-1.

JENSORENSEN

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.FOOD.

BALANCED ALGORHYTHM BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

IEMPRE ALGO snuck onto Pittsburgh’s restaurant scene without a grand opening or a party. Chef/ owner Brian Hammond simply opened the doors to his eatery on East Ohio Street. This understated approach is woven throughout the restaurant’s design and menu. Beyond a busy dining room, low lighting draws your eyes to the open kitchen, and subtle details in decor pop out. A geometric pattern lines the kitchen wall. A poster of Godzilla sits underneath a sign reading “Don’t worry, everything is going to be amazing.” And it was. After being seated, the server welcomed us with complimentary prosecco (not a bad start) and provided a description of the menu. Siempre Algo’s menu offers a take on tapas-style dining. There’s a limited variety of entrees, but I’m a sucker for shareable plates. I ordered some house favorites, as recommended by our server: ceviche, homemade pretzels, sweetbreads, white gazpacho, and the evening’s feature, an heirloom tomato salad. This is a restaurant that understands balance. The dishes’ flavors were seamless; no component overpowered its companions. The ceviche was fresh and light, matched perfectly with jicama and a touch of heat from serrano chilis. It’s a one-bite dish, but it stays in your mind. Sweetbreads are a rare find, and Ham-

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Wild Alaskan halibut, handmade Bavarian-style pretzels, heirloom tomato salad and a Boyd & Bumble cocktail

mond has created harmony between a crispy shell on the tender meat with juicy mushrooms and a mild corn puree. The mushrooms stole the show, giving the plate an earthy savor.

SIEMPRE ALGO

414 East Ohio St., North Side. Open Tue. to Sat., 5 p.m.-12 a.m. siemprealgopgh.com

A native of Lancaster County, my expectations are high when it comes to soft pretzels. Siempre Algo’s pretzels blew away mine. Every bite was fluffy

goat’s milk feta cheese. with the mix of chew from the crust, The evening was capped with a chocoleaving a heavenly, sweet taste. late mousse that I would happily eat again Gazpacho is a love-it-or-hate-it food, and again. It was rich, but not sickeningly but this white-bean variety is a gateway sweet, and had layers of cocoa flavor. I gazpacho. It’s light, releasing ingrediconsidered ordering three more. ents of fresh mint, cucumber, finThe concept behind Siemishing with honey, and guiding E R O M pre Algo is not new. Translated you through flavors before endPHOTOES IN into Spanish, it means “always ing with the sweetest. ONLw t w w. er a something.” The restaurant p The heirloom tomato salad a p ty ci h pg .com presents a small-plate centric showcased sweet, juice-dribbling menu that allows food to shine. It deliciousness of a midsummer offers basic, traditional recipes with harvest (even though tomato season a seasonal twist. The restaurant lived up is wrapping). This salad won my heart to the name. with smoky, crispy speck, and a creamy

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

25


PH0TO: NICK PARADISE

Grandma Cyl’s Homemade Pierogi at last year’s Pittsburgh Pierogi Festival

.FOOD.

DUMPLING DAY

BY ALEX POPICHAK // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

WO OF Pittsburgh’s great loves

are hooking up: pierogis and Kennywood. The Pittsburgh Pierogi Festival returns for its fifth year on Sun., Sept. 23, and it promises a variety of adventurous re-inventions and traditional recipes. There will be 37 vendors offering takes on the traditional comfort foods. From BRGR’s pierogi burger to Las Chicas Food Truck’s pierogi taco, there should be something for every taste. Other highlights include Oh My Grill’s “Polish Tailgater” and Pittsburgh Smokehouse’s “Smokey ‘Rogi.” Traditionalists can seek Grandma Cyl’s traditional potato-and-cheese pierogi or satiate a major appetite with Stromboli-sized “Pieroli” with steak and provolone.

PITTSBURGH PIEROGI FESTIVAL

Sun., Sept. 23. 1 p.m.-6 p.m. $24 (adults), $12 (kids). Kennywood, 4800 Kennywood Blvd., West Mifflin. pghpierogifestival.com

In addition to food, the event promises a pop-up marketplace for allthings-pierogi art and merchandise. There is also a beer garden open for guests 21 and over. In 2013, organizers held the festival as a free event in a park to test the viability of a pierogi-specific festival. Response was overwhelmingly positive, and last year was the first time Kennywood staged the event. This

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year’s festival features 16 new pierogi vendors and select Kennywood rides and games. Event organizers say there is no happier or authentically Pittsburgh place than Kennywood, and several roller coasters and rides will be available for pierogi lovers. The MerryGo-Round, Thunderbolt, Jack Rabbit, Racer, Turtle, and Noah’s Ark will be open throughout the festival. An excellent music lineup features folk, polka, and contemporary dance. Pandemic will be the resident DJ throughout the festival, bringing a mix of traditional folk and cutting-edge dance music from the world over. Mon Valley Push is described as “Southwestern PA’s newest Polka Sensation,” while Unnecessary Polka delivers a mix of pop and country. You may not have known “Četiri Jedan Dva” is Croatian for “Four One Two,” and five-piece eastern European ensemble Četiri Jedan Dva Bend intends to bring traditional folk songs to a Pittsburgh audience. This local band specializes in music from eastern Europe and it has performed at festivals and weddings across the United States and Canada. Garage-pop band and longtime regional favorite Meeting of Important People rounds out the lineup. Buying tickets online will knock $4 off the price, and admission gets you free parking, rides, and giveaways. Food, beverages, and games are not included in the ticket price.


DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BAR LOUIE

330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO

1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

THE CAFÉ CARNEGIE

4400 FORBES AVE., OAKLAND 412-622-3225 / THECAFECARNEGIE.COM An excellent dining experience from James Beard Semi-Finalist, Sonja Finn featuring a locally-focused menu, full service dining, and espresso and wine bar.

COLONY CAFE

1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM

5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon– midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT AND WHISPER’S PUB

3400 HARTS RUN ROAD, GLENSHAW 412-767-3500 / HARTWOODRESTAURANT.COM A hidden treasure in the Pittsburgh suburbs. Outdoor dining, full bar, eclectic atmosphere. Casual elegance at its finest. Daily specials. Open Tuesday through Saturday. Hope to see you soon!

LEGENDS EATERY

500 EAST NORTH AVE., NORTH SIDE 412-321-8000 / LEGENDSEATERY.US Legends Eatery is a family owned, BYOB Italian restaurant located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s North Side. Get your family and friends together and make reservations today!

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA

5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PAD THAI NOODLE

4770 LIBERTY AVE, BLOOMFIELD 412-904-1640 / PADTHAINOODLEPITTSBURGH.COM This new café in Bloomfield features Thai and Burmese specialties. Standards like Pad Thai and Coconut Curry Noodle are sure to please. But don’t miss out on the Ono Kyowsway featuring egg noodle sautéed with coconut chicken, cilantro and curry sauce.

PIAZZA TALARICO

3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI

201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SPIRIT

242 51ST ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4441 / SPIRITPGH.COM/SLICEISLAND Every day we bake fresh focaccia from unbleached flour, pull our own mozzarella, and curdle our own ricotta to put on your pizza with fresh toppings from the best local farms, butchers, and purveyors.

SUPERIOR MOTORS

1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR

660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Z-BEST BARBEQUE

1315 5TH AVE., UPTOWN 412-235-7163 / ZBESTBBQ.COM Z-Best Barbeque Chicken & Ribs offers Pittsburgh a savory taste of home cooked delciousness. Hearty and delightful plates of ribs, chicken, pulled pork with appetizing sides of mac & cheese, greens, cabbage, baked beans, potato salad and more.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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“tips to win” when ordering drinks at your local watering hole. When you walk in the door, be aware of what type of bar you are in. Not every bar on the planet has the correct ingredients to make a proper Old Fashioned or a that Tutti Fruity-baloney you had while vacationing in Mexico. In order to receive the best drink possible, go with what makes sense for the atmosphere.

ingredients seem awesome, the drink is most likely awesome. Ask the bartender which ones she prefers; most staffers will engage and tell you more about the flavor profiles of each drink. If there isn’t a cocktail menu available and you are still feeling unsure, that person behind the bar has a wealth of knowledge. After a few simple questions, a bartender should be able to whip together something that

THAT PERSON BEHIND THE BAR HAS A WEALTH OF KNOWLEDGE. Once seated, ask for a cocktail menu and pay attention to the ingredients. Is pink passionfruit puree one of them? Maybe they can make your Tutti Fruitydreams come true. If not, you probably should pick something else. Tweet us your favorite drinks: @pghcitypaper

&

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ERE ARE your friendly bartender’s

The cocktail menu opens the door for possibilities in your drink order. Read ingredients carefully, and don’t automatically be turned off because of the liquorbase. Most people know their basic limits. (First-timers should stick to the easy stuff: rum and vodka.) I cannot drink whiskeyor bourbon-based drinks. For years I also never attempted to drink gin because of one bad night involving shots at a house party. A bartender friend of mine opened my eyes to the world of gin, and now I enjoy it. It’s the complementing ingredients that make a drink. If 90 percent of the

will satisfy. Want something sweet? Maybe try the simple Bay Breeze or a Sex on the Beach. Something without pop? Maybe an “Adult” Vitamin Water or a Tom Collins. Shots are a different animal. There seems to be a new shot invented every day, and it’s impossible to keep up. If a customer has no clue what to order, most staffers tend to go with crowd pleasers or a “shot of the day.” Basically, this is the shot for which customers have been asking over and over again. If you try to order a Four Horseman for someone’s 21st birthday, do not be surprised if you get a water instead. Orders of something random or a drink we’ve never heard of helps keep us bartenders on our toes. We may never have heard of a “Bear Fight” or “Cranberry Cookie,” but we’d love to add it to our arsenal. If ordering something the bartender hasn’t heard of, know what’s in it. You might just have created the “shot of the day.”


Sponsored by

EARLY WARNINGS SPONSORED UPCOMING EVENTS FROM CITY PAPER’S FINE ADVERTISERS

WED., OCTOBER 3 GAB SQUAD 10 A.M. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER DOWNTOWN. $10. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

WED., OCTOBER 3 CAMERON ESPOSITO 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $25. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest Helen Wildy.

WED., OCTOBER 3 WEDNESDAY WINE FLIGHTS 6:15 P.M. GREER CABARET THEATER DOWNTOWN. Over-21 event. $41.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

WED., OCTOBER 3 CAMERON ESPOSITO

THU., OCTOBER 4 DEMUN JONES 7 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. $18-20. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Charlie Farley, MYZTERY N SNEEK & Needless Output.

THU., OCTOBER 4 EDDIE REYES EMO NIGHT 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $10-12. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guests Fate’s Got a Driver & August Winters.

THU., OCTOBER 4 OFF THE RECORD XVIII 8 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $31.25-81.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FRI., OCTOBER 5 INSANE CLOWN POSSE 7:30 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $35. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guests Clownvis Presley & Chronic Zombiez.

FRI., OCTOBER 5 PHIL VASSAR 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $33-48. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest The Dawn Savage Band.

FRI., OCTOBER 5 JOAN DIDION’S

REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE

THE WHITE ALBUM 7:30 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $35. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., OCTOBER 6 DOORS OPEN 10 A.M. MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. All-ages event. $20. Doorsopenpgh.org.

SAT., OCTOBER 6 NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD 50TH ANNIVERSARY 8 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $51.25-176.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., OCTOBER 6 EXPLORING THE NIGHT SKY WITH A PARK RANGER 8 P.M. HARTWOOD ACRES PARK HARTWOOD ACRES. Free event (registration required). 412-767-9200 or alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms.

SAT., OCTOBER 6 THE STORY OF JOHNNY APPLESEED WITH A PARK NATURALIST 11 A.M. NORTH PARK LATODAMI NATURE CENTER NORTH PARK. Free event (registration required). 724-935-2170 or alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms.

SUN., OCTOBER 7 BAT HOUSE 6:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE UPSTAIRS SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $10-12. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Altar Boy & Good Grief.

SUN., OCTOBER 7 LUCKY CHOPS 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $17-22. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

MON., OCTOBER 8 STEELY DAN 7 P.M. HEINZ HALL DOWNTOWN. $70.50-150.50. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org.

TUE., OCTOBER 9 HAYLEY JANE & THE PRIMATES 8 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $10. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., OCTOBER 9 GEORGE JONES NEW VIEW TRIO 5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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PHOTO: ERIC ROSÉ

Maria Caruso in “Lamentation”

.DANCE.

WAIT FOR IT

BY STEVE SUCATO // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

ORNINGWORKS opened its dance

season with the premiere of Beth Corning’s the waiting room. An hour-long dance-theater piece at North Side’s New Hazlett Theater, it has the feel of a one-act play. Jacob Goodman portrays Samuel, a shomer (part of the Jewish religious ritual of Shemira) tasked with watching over a coffined body. Circumstances leave Samuel not knowing the identity of the person with whom he is sitting, and without a prayer book. With little to occupy his time, Samuel engages in a one-sided conversation between himself and the deceased, who he named Phil; he imagines Phil asking Samuel to recount memories from his life. Through those poignant recollections, we discover how Samuel became the man that he is. An introspective work bordering on the surreal, and laced with humor, the waiting room brings to the surface those fearful and uncomfortable things many

of us seek to suppress: that which haunts us, the sense of our own mortality, and the specter of death that surrounds us and those we love. The cast, especially Goodman and dancer Catherine Meredith as “the naked lady,” performed solidly. And while the waiting room lacks the emotional punch of past Corning works such as Beckett & Beyond and Remains, like a mental shomer, it sits with you. < Jacob Goodman in the waiting room PHOTO: FRANK WALSH

COMING ATTRACTIONS STAYCEE PEARL dance project & Soy Sos perform for the opening of sculptor Atticus Adams’ installation “There’s a Pink Poodle in My Arcadia,” on Fri., Sept. 28, at 7 p.m. This exhibit about not fitting in, coming out, and being yourself, runs until November 4, and was inspired by an early memory of Adams in which his dad won a pink poodle at a carnival but wouldn’t let him keep it because of its color. Through November 4. $5. Pitts-

burgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Downtown. center.pfpca.org/exhibitions/ upcoming Artistic director Maria Caruso will reprise Martha Graham’s iconic “Lamentation” solo for a final time on Sat., Sept. 29. Also on the program is the Caruso-choreographed “Doors and Windows” and “Break the Verse,” which will be featured on Bodiography’s European Tour in March. Sat., Sept. 29. 8 p.m. $20. Succop Theater, 250 College St., Butler. bc3.edu Fans of Pittsburgh’s Kyle Abraham will want to make a trip to nearby Akron, Ohio, on Sat., Oct. 6, to see this MacArthur Genius Award-winning choreographer perform with his company A.I.M. This troupe will present four works that have not been shown in Pittsburgh: Abraham performing his new solo “Indy”; “Meditation: A Silent Prayer,” featuring text, voiceover and images by award-winning photographer Carrie Mae Weems; the energetic “Drive”; and — new for A.I.M, — a work choreographed by someone other than Abraham, Andrea Miller’s trio for women, “State.” Sat., Oct. 6. 7:30 p.m. E.J. Thomas Hall, 198 Hill St., Akron, Ohio. dancecleveland.org

Follow featured contributor Steve Sucato on Twitter @ssucato

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Le’veon Bell

.SPORTS.

BETTER LATE THAN NEVER BY ADAM CROWLEY // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

E’VEON BELL skipped training camp. It doesn’t make him a pariah. He shouldn’t

be public enemy No. 1. It makes him human. I was at the Steelers’ training camp. It rained every day. By the final day, it smelled like a wet frat party. I suppose being around sweaty men is part of Bell’s job description. Bunking with said sweaty men, though, isn’t fun. Unless you’re Joey or Chandler on Friends, you don’t need to have a roommate when you reach the real world. Bell didn’t need to be playing Bert to Antonio Brown’s Ernie. The strip club in Miami seems more his style. Also, had he gone to camp, Bell would have missed Gucci Mane’s performance at Lollapalooza. Bell skipped the preseason. It doesn’t make him a pariah. He shouldn’t be public enemy No. 1. It makes him human. I was there. The games were boring. Like, Pirates-playing-Royals-in-September boring. What could Bell have hoped to gain from playing in the preseason? Praise from the coaching staff? A pat on the back from his peers? A gold star sticker, cookie, and juice box after the game? He chose to stay in Florida, where the oranges are as fresh as he is hoping to keep his legs. Fellow running back Derrius Guice of the Washington Redskins blew out his knee this preseason. Bell likes his knees. And they’re still intact. Bell skipped the preseason. It doesn’t make him a pariah. He shouldn’t be public enemy No. 1. It makes him human. I was there. James Conner did fine. The Steelers don’t need Bell … yet. Rumor has it that Le’Veon Bell is a hell of grill master. Had he shown up on time, Bell would have missed a chance to show off his skills at his Labor Day barbecue. Playing corn hole is much better for his health than trying to run through a hole into 300-pound defensive linemen. As the weather turns in the north and we all start wearing flannel and drinking pumpkin-spiced-macchiato-cappuccino-espresso from Starbucks, Bell’s working on his tan in South Beach. Halloween’s right around the corner, and Bell has to decide whether he wants to dress up like a good teammate or attend an elaborate Miami costume party. Bell skipped the preseason. It doesn’t make him a pariah. He shouldn’t be public enemy No. 1. It makes him human. But Bell has also skipped the real season (so far). I don’t what that makes him. And I don’t know when Bell will show up at the UPMC Rooney Sports Complex. All I know is Bell has to consider all the things he could miss if he does report to work.

LE’VEON BELL IS NOT PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

Follow featured contributor Adam Crowley on Twitter @_adamcrowley PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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CALENDAR SEPT. 20-26

PHOTO: TRAFALGAR RELEASING

^ Thu., Sept. 20: An American in Paris: The Musical

THURSDAY SEPT. 20 FILM

Typically, the movies shown on extra big screens are fast-spaced action flicks, or highly detailed nature documentaries. But the immersive quality of bigger-thanaverage movie screens can be applied to any genre, even musicals. Rangos Giant Cinema at the Carnegie Science Center will show the screen version of An American in Paris: The Musical, a Broadway show based on the movie of the same name, originally starring Pittsburgh’s own Gene

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Kelly. The story follows a WWII veteran trying to make it as a painter in Paris, when he falls into a love triangle and has to sing/dance it out. There are very few opportunities in life to see that famous 17-minute dance sequence on a Giant Screen. 7 p.m. Also Sun., Sept. 23 at 3 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $11.95. carnegiesciencecenter.org

STAGE

The Little Lake Theatre website promises a “modern and seductive version” of the Shakespearean tragedy about Lord and Lady Macbeth’s bloody path to rule Scotland and their subsequent descent into murder, guilt, and madness. With its

enticing mix of witches, ghosts, and tense soliloquies, it’s no wonder theaters still risk the supposed curse of the Scottish Play. Performances continue Thu., Sept. 27 to Sat., Sept. 29; Tues., Oct. 3 to Thu., Oct. 6. 7:30 p.m. 500 Lakeside Dr., Canonsburg. $21-22.50, $14 for kids. littlelake.org

FRIDAY SEPT. 21 ANIME

Some classic Japanese animated films return to the big screen when Row House Cinema presents Anime Week. Get revved

up for the theater’s 30th anniversary presentation of Akira, the dark 1988 masterpiece about bikers and supernatural powers in a dystopian future Tokyo. See the sci-fi noir selection Cowboy Bebop: The Movie or director Satoshi Kon’s psychological thriller Perfect Blue, or attend a one-time screening of the space adventure Mobile Suit Gundam I. The event continues through Thu., Sept. 27. Showtimes vary. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8-10, $19 for a week pass. rowhousecinema.com

COMEDY

The Lit AF Tour hits PPG Paints Arena with Martin Lawrence, DeRay Davis,


University, before working his way into the D.C music scene. His music embodies a message of love and joy, but also explores topics of freedom, violence, and spirituality in Black America. He last stopped through town to headline the 2016 Pittsburgh International Jazz festival, and this time he’ll play at the August Wilson Center. 9 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $13.25. culturaldistrict.org/awc

Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, and Benji Brown. Unless you’re a weirdo, you know Lawrence from his eponymous 1990s TV show, Bad Boys, assorted Big Mommas, and the criminally underrated medieval time-travel flick Black Knight. But the whole lineup is crazy talented, particularly Davis, who’s attained what some refer to as “that guy-status” (meaning he’s familiar from a ton of films and TV show appearances, but not necessarily known by name). 7:30 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Downtown. $39. ppgpaintsarena.com

SATURDAY SEPT. 22

EXHIBIT

As topics go, “nuclear war” might be the last one of which we’re all in agreement. It’d be a bad thing. Very. Bad. Deadly, even. 50 Cities — 50 Traces highlights the diversity, beauty, and daily life in Mayors for Peace cities, of which Pittsburgh is one. Basically, if you’re against the destruction of cities by way of nuclear weapons, Mayors for Peace has the platform for your liking. If you’re in favor of nukes end-gaming everything — well, good luck with that. Mayor Bill p Peduto leads a group of guest speakers at a reception that opens this exhibit that runs through December 9. 7:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, 937 Liberty rts.org/ Ave., Downtown. Free. trustarts.org/ es exhibit/15245/50-cities-50-traces

FILM

MUSIC

^ Fri., Sept. 21: 50 Cities —50 Traces

The iconic hardscrabble Detroit oit rock band MC5 celebrates 50 yearss at Mr. Smalls, with an all-star lineup:: frontman/ founder Wayne Kramer, Kim Thayil of Soundgarden, Brendan Canty of Fugazi, Dug Pinnick from King’s X, and d Marcus Durant from Zen Guerrilla. Though hough not as well known as some of its 1960s contemporaries or the punk scenes cenes that followed in its wake, MC5’s three hree albums released from ‘69 to ‘71 are wildly fun and sound like nothing else se from that time. Kick out the jams with this her amazing crew, joined by another Motor City gem, The Detroit Cobras. 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. ale. $35. mrsmalls.com

STAGE

The Filipino term “halo-halo” translates into “mix-mix,” making it an appropriate term for this evening of eclectic entertainment at Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. Discover the arts and culture of the Philippines when 40 dancers, musicians, and singers take the stage to perform traditional dances influenced by the Spanish, Muslim, and indigenous people of the archipelago. Featured works include the famous Tinikling polejumping dance, Banga, and the graceful bamboo-pole balancing act, Pangalay. 4 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay what you can. kelly-strayhorn.org

MUSIC

What has three cellists, a drummer, mmer, ht? and guarantee of a great night? how, That would be a Cello Fury show, and this one at Hard Rock Café fé promises a particularly great time. ets its The band’s third album, X!, gets official release. With the band’s d’s debut, mphony Cello Fury, and follow-up, Symphony of Shadows, this independentt outfit has established its prog-rock credentials. s. But What’s next is anybody’s guess. this party’s show should build on Cello Fury’s reputation for highghenergy performances. And it’ss open to minors who attend with a parent > Fri., Sept. 21: Aaron aron Abernathy

Ever go to movie and put on a blindfold? Us neither. But we’re thinking about it. As part of Blind Cinema, audience members will test the limits of language, sitting blindfolded a row behind children as they describe a film that has had dialogue removed from the soundtrack. So, not only are you unable to see, but you’ll only know what’s happening on the screen by how children make sense of it. Oh, and the children describing the film have never seen it before. Bizarre? Perhaps. Brilliant? Absolutely. This experience might restore the reputation of blindfolds in cinema that was sacrificed on the altar of the 50 Shades trilogy. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m. $25. Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown. trustarts.org/production/ 60087/blind-cinema-britt-hatzius

FOOD PHOTO: ROSS HALFIN

^ Sat., Sept. 22: Henry Rollins

or guardian. 8:30 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $10-15. cellofury.com/shows

MUSIC

Cleveland-born R&B musician Aaron Abernathy is the dictionary definition of soulful. His voice is strong and his stage presence is infectious, as he blends traditional and modern R&B, jazz, hip hop, and gospel. He got his start at Howard

Gone are the days when Tom’s Diner was the go-to for those hungry in Dormont. But anybody’s who’s been of late to this part of the South Hills already knows about its expanding eating options. A Taste in Domont welcomes vendors such as the Bella Terra and Hot Dog wineries, and food trucks for Let It Slide, Hoshi Hibachi, Parrot Bay Café, and Sinker & Suds. Also, an expansion of the libations testing should please locals who are used to swaying along West Liberty Avenue on a Saturday night. (Don’t worry; there will be time enough for that after.) 5 p.m. Thomas Lloyd Recreation Center, 1801 Dormont Ave., Dormont. Facebook (search: taste in Dormont) CONTINUES ON PG. 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

33


CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: DARK ROOMS

Dark Rooms

THURSDAY Moon Hooch with Big Blitz 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

FRIDAY Aaron Abernathy 9 p.m. August Wilson Center, Downtown. aacc-awc.org PHOTO: CLIVE GRAINGER

SATURDAY Dark Rooms 9 p.m. Spirit, Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com

SUNDAY Chromeo with Steven A. Clark 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

MONDAY Shakey Graves 7 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. promowestlive.com

TUESDAY Justin Timberlake 7:30 p.m. PPG Paints Arena, Downtown. ppgpaintsarena.com

WEDNESDAY Terrapin Flyer 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. rextheater.net

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE

AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM 34

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

^ Sun., Sept. 23: Native Voices

ART

There’s a fascinating, if untold, history of an African-American community in Sewickley. The 19th century saw an influx of African Americans coming from the south to work in this Pittsburgh suburb. In the 1850s-60s, its St. Matthews AME Zion church (still there) served as a safe haven for escaped slaves in the Underground Railroad. Learn more about this compelling, unknown story with MAVUNO: Reflection and Remembrance, a new photo exhibit chronicling African-American life in Sewickley at Sweetwater Center for the Arts. 6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 20. 200 Broad St., Sewickley. sweetwaterartcenter.org

EVENT

Henry Rollins has never been mistaken for a closed book. The Black Flag frontman, comedian, author, actor, and artist is outspoken on pretty much every

topic he speaks on. So it’s fitting that he’s opening up his personal photo collection for a “Slide Show” at Andy Warhol Museum. He’ll be sharing his archive from a lifetime of travel across the Middle East, Africa, Antarctica, Asia and South America, and dishing on the stories behind the photos. VIP ticket-holders can meet the dude afterwards and go home with a “commemorative exclusive VIP laminate.” Hardcore. 7 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. warhol.org

FUNDRAISER

The forces of indie rock and dark pop combine to support CureRock’s efforts of fighting childhood cancer. Local indie rockers Dinosoul will bring its fusion of hip-hop/metal beats and indie ^ Sat., Sept. 22: Mx. Pittsburgh Pride Pageant PHOTO: MIA DONNER MANEER

rhythms, and Scratchy Blanket will follow up with its self-described “polite” indie rock. The night will take a turn for the folksy when Buffalo-based Tiny Rhymes takes the stage with its alt-folk chamber group. Rounding out the lineup is Merce Lemon, a band blending lo-fi music with sweet pop vocals in short songs. Proceeds benefit CureRock’s initiatives raising awareness and fighting the onset of childhood cancer. 7 p.m. Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. curerock.org.

PAGEANT

The traditional beauty pageant is definitely not welcoming to all. It’s only open to women, and only those who fit outdated standards of beauty and talent. The first annual Mx. Pittsburgh Pride Pageant, held at the Glitter Box Theater, is an antidote to traditional pageants, created for nonbinary performers to showcase their creativity. Much like a traditional pageant, contestants will be judged on outfits, talent, and question responses. But unlike a traditional pageant, this one has a theme: Club Kid. Prizes include cash, a performance and vehicle at Pittsburgh Pride 2019, and of course, a sash and crown. 7 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10. 18 and older. theglitterboxtheater.com


PHOTO: STUART LEWIS

^ Sat., Sept. 22: Merce Lemon

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

EVENT

EVENT

SEPT. 25

SEPT. 23

While the work of Familylinks focuses on recovering from addiction or hardship, the fourth annual Recovery in the Community reflects on the progress made and celebrates recovery. The event is highlighted by music, free food, raffles, and giveaways throughout the day. Former Penguin Kevin Stevens, who has been open about his struggle with drug addiction, will be the special guest, and recovery organizations from throughout the county will have information and free screenings set up. 11 a.m. 401 N. Highland Ave. East Liberty. familylinks.org

Bring the kids to Opening Weekend: Native Voices and experience the fascinating cultures of five New England Native American tribes. Meet members of the Passamaquoddy and Penobscot of Maine, the Narragansett of Rhode Island, and the Aquinnah Wampanoag and Mashpee Wampanoag of Massachusetts as they reveal how they balance traditional practices with life in the modern world. There are also hands-on activities with artifacts, photos, music, and more. The event takes place at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. Included with museum admission. pittsburghkids.org

MUSIC

MONDAY SEPT. 24 ART

BOOM Concepts presents an artist talk for the gallery’s current exhibition Relief. Curated by Nginyu Ndimbie, Relief contains drawing, photography, paper

^ Sat., Sept. 22: MAVUNO: Reflection and Remembrance

arts, writing, painting, and collage works by various Pittsburgh artists, including Ndimbie, Beth Emery, Sakony Burton, Stephen Wuchina, and Jordan Chu. As stated by BOOM, the show demonstrates

an “affinity for puns and wordplay” as it “toys with the sculptural element of relief, as well as the emotions evoked through relief.” 6:30-8:30 p.m. 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free and open to the public.

“Balkan-Klezmer-Gypsy-Party-Punk-Super Band” Lemon Bucket Orkestra brings a wild night of brass to Brillobox. If you’re unfamiliar, it’s a Canadian collective that makes flamboyant, adventurous music inspired by Eastern European songwriting and instrumentation (clarinet, fiddles, tuba, accordion, a big ol’ drum). If you’re unfamiliar, start with the most recent record called If I Had The Strength and work your way backwards. It’s a blast. 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $12. brillobox.com •

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 19-26, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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FIGUREHEADS

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ACROSS

1. Some PTA members 5. Taxiing spot 11. With 72-Across, fast food chain, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 15. Organs are part of it: Abbr. 16. Beethoven symphony 17. “So much ___” 18. Go back and forth between types of sparkle? 20. Rooms with foosball tables 21. “Mon ___!” 22. Stepped on 24. Game 1 starter, often 25. Brute in a touring band’s vehicle? 29. Fifth Harmony singer Jauregui 31. Choler 32. Buffoon 33. Band with a noteworthy Bass 34. Its national dish is ceviche 36. Calculus expert’s deg. 37. Locate 39. Thor’s weapon? 42. Myrrh carrier 45. __ in Nancy 46. Rice cookers 50. Tune publisher 51. Jaguars have

four of them 53. Switch grandaddy 54. Possessive on a candy wrapper 56. One rotating a sizable tub? 58. Model Alexis 59. Time to give up? 61. Bounce up and down 62. Wild-___ 64. Cover up a baseball field? 69. Sushi seaweed 70. “Lorna Doone” setting 71. Liver spread 72. See 11-Across 73. Displays of military might 74. Like molasses

DOWN

1. Cuban man? 2. When challenged 3. Seattle athlete 4. Ocular irritations 5. Digits in a signature file, briefly 6. NFC West team, briefly 7. Turn bad 8. Winter covering 9. ASUS rival 10. ___ Danvers (Captain Marvel) 11. Bouquet delivering co. 12. “Loud ‘n clear!” 13. Actor D’Onofrio 14. Substance

19. Unincorporated US territory with a palm tree on its flag 23. Writer who went through Hell for his masterpiece 25. Top dog 26. Russian spirit 27. Shakespearean forest 28. Mild fuck 30. Move in on 35. Iris layers 37. Rather dapper 38. “Let’s do this” 40. Urge on 41. Author Seton 42. “Regulate” rapper 43. “Bad hiding spot, dude”

44. Play ground? 47. Soccer defender blunder 48. Attach by a rope 49. Chivalrous address 51. Binger’s allotment 52. “___ Dupa Fly” (Missy Elliott’s debut album) 55. Number of players on an ultimate team 57. Easy victories 60. On deck 63. Put down 65. ___ Alamos 66. Small point 67. Audit org. 68. Blade dampener LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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September 19, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 38

September 19, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 38