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Henry Rollins “Slide Show”

EVENTS 9.12 - 8pm SOUND SERIES: WAXAHATCHEE, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, ANNA ST. LOUIS AND NIGHT SHOP The Warhol entrance space Co-presented with Mr. Smalls Presents and WYEP Tickets $18/$15 members and students

9.14 – 8pm TQ LIVE! The Warhol theater TQ Live! presents a queer evening of dazzling performance, dance, poetry, comedy, resplendent fantasies, music, and more. Tickets $12/$8 members and students

9.20 – 7pm ROB MAZUREK’S FARNSWORTH SCORES ADMAN: WARHOL BEFORE POP Carnegie Museum of Art theater (Oakland) Co-presented by The Heinz Architectural Center at Carnegie Museum of Art Tickets $15/$12 members and students

9.22 – 8pm Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 members and students, $150 VIP/$145 members VIP tickets include: Early entry for front and center seating, post-show Meet & Greet and a photograph with Henry Rollins, and commemorative exclusive VIP laminate.

The Warhol welcomes back spoken word artist, musician, actor, author, and PJVUPJJ\S[\YHSNHKÅ`/LUY`9VSSPUZ/LYL[\YUZ^P[O¸:SPKL:OV^¹HZWLJPHS performance drawing on his traveling experiences, including the Middle East, Africa, Central Asia, South America and Antarctica, and his vast archive of WOV[VNYHWOZ¸-VYTHU``LHYZ0OH]LKVJ\TLU[LKT`[YH]LSZHSSV]LY[OL ^VYSK^P[OHJHTLYH¯5V^HUK[OLU0NH[OLYZL]LYHSPTHNLZZOV^[OLT[VHU H\KPLUJLHUK[LSS[OVZLZ[VYPLZ¹9VSSPUZPZILZ[RUV^UHZ[OLSLHKZPUNLYMVY[OL PU[LUZLOHYKJVYL9VSSPUZ)HUKHUK[OLZLTPUHSW\URIHUK)SHJR-SHN

9.28 – 8pm MIGUEL GUTIERREZ: SADONNA The Warhol theather Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University School of Art and School of Drama SADONNA is exactly what it sounds like: sad versions of Madonna songs. Tickets $15/$12 members and students

10.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ESSEX GREEN WITH SPECIAL GUEST THE GARMENT DISTRICT The Warhol theater Co-presented with WYEP Tickets $15/$12 members & students

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

pghcitypaper.com PGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 35 Guest Editor HANNAH LYNN

FIRSTSHOT BY JARED WICKERHAM

Point Park University students mingle in Downtown’s Village Park.

Editor-In-Chief ROB ROSSI Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Marketing and Promotions Coordinator CONNOR MARSHMAN Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Senior Sales Representative BLAKE LEWIS Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Advertising Sales Assistant TAYLOR PASQUARELLI Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, GAB BONESSO, ADAM CROWLEY, LYNN CULLEN, LAUREN ORTEGO, STEVE SUCATO Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX POPICHAK Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. C OV E R P H OTO B Y M AYA P U S K A RI C

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE

NIHILISM 101 BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONVEYING A SENSE OF Y WA A T BU H, AT DE OF E AC BR EM IT’S NOT A REAL

W

HEN I WAS IN COLLEGE, I wrote for, and then edited, a student-run satirical newspaper called The Pittiful News. We had little-to-no funding, a fluctuating staff, and medium-to-weak name recognition, but we had a lot of heart. And a lot of despair.

As a fundraising method, we’d frequently try to sell shirts, which were only ever bought by us and our parents. One year, the shirts had the paper’s name on the front and lettering on the back that said, “The pen is mightier than our collective will to live.” That sentiment was present in many of our articles, which ranged from “Local Naive Freshmen Doesn’t Know She Wants to be Dead Yet” to “Students Continue to Jaywalk in Hopes of Getting Hit by a Car.” There was a general understanding that these feelings rang true to the student population.

In a recent New Yorker piece by Jia Tolentino, “The he invesPromise of Vaping and the Rise of Juul,” she wards Ju tigates why teens have gravitated towards Juul vapes in a bizarre way that’s both enthusiastic and apathetic. On whether or not vaping relieves or enhances young people’s anxiety, one college student said “I don’t know. ... But everything we do is like Tide nPods. Everyone in this genike, eration is semi-ironically, like, we’re ready to die.” One dictionary definition of nihilism is “a viewpoint that traditional values and beliefs are unfounded and that existence is n senseless and useless.” The millennial version of nihilism is deadpanning “I need to die” after a long day of school/work/being alive. There’s a whole lexicon of phrases in that vein, used to express nihilistic feelings, like “please murder me” or “I need to die.” My favorite

CONTINUES ON PG. 8

>>> IS COLLEGE REALLY THE BEST YEARS OF YOUR LIFE? SHARE YOUR ANSWER WITH US BY USING #CPCOLLEGEISSUE ON TWITTER.

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Ope any food delivery app. The Open typical hangover food is greasy — typi greasier, the better. But, if it sounds grea appetizing in this weakened state app of being, b eat it. Food is food. The point is for excess alcohol to have something to soak into. hav While waiting for the food, crack Whi open a Pedialyte and take baby ope sips of water. It seems bizarre, but Pedialyte is packed full of electrolytes, which help retain elec water. After eating, you can drink wat a higher hi volume water, but a bunch on an empty stomach is of liquid li a recipe re for disaster. TTime to start drinking again, ‘cause college, right? ‘cau

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Into a 16-ounce glass, mix half-cups of tomato juice and half unflavored Pedialyte, a shot each unfl of ppickle juice and soda water, two crushed Aspirin, and a teaspoon of lemon juice extract. teas Stir vigorously with a stick of celery, take a deep breath, and cele chug until you see what looks chu like a white light (hence the “angel” part). You’ll feel “an nauseated. Sit still (don’t lie nau dow down) for at least 15 minutes. Stir again with the celery stick, then finish whatever remains in the glass. Eat the celery stick. Immediately take a shower with Imm cool water. Go on living your coo new newly restored life. — ROB ROSSI

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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NIHILISM 101, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

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In college, some friends and I were zooted, watching the cult non-classic movie Mystery Men. “We should get ice cream,” one friend said. We all agreed, and kept watching the movie, assuming ice cream would happen when the movie was over. Five minutes passed before my friend bolted up and said, “We need ice cream NOW.” And who were we to argue? After pausing the movie, we all walked to Rite Aid, ending up with Ben & Jerry’s Chubby Hubby and a necessary bag of salt and vinegar chips. While eating the treats back home, we had the brilliant idea to scoop some of the ice cream from the pint with the chips. The sweet! The salty! The crunchy! The creamy! I’m emotional just thinking about it. Note: This only works with a heartier chip, like Kettle brand. — HANNAH LYNN

personal favorite is “I’m gonna throw myself off a cliff.” It’s not a real embrace of death, but a way of conveying a sense of blasé despair. An understanding of misery as one of life’s constants.

THE MILLENNIAL VERSION OF NIHILISM IS DEADPANNING “I NEED TO DIE” AFTER A LONG DAY OF SCHOOL/WORK/ BEING ALIVE. There are signs pointing toward a rise in mental health problems for parts of the population. A study by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association shows diagnoses of depression have increased significantly for millennials and teens. Others show an increase in anxiety. It feels too on the nose to say “the crazy world we live in” is the cause. But, it is probably because of the crazy, dumb, nonsense world we live in. There’s research showing that, for the first time in history, the older generation is more optimistic than the younger. Usually college graduates are full of bright-eyed kids working toward a house and/or car and/or stable job. People used to get a job and then stay at that job for 30 years and CONTINUES ON PG. 10


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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JUST SAY YES TO RED LOBSTER My college sobriety was a product of Nancy Reagan. The kid who wrote “Just Say No” on all her schoolbooks as a child turned into the still-terrified college student. Add that to blaming myself for my mom’s unhappiness with her career, having me when she was 19, causing her to drop out of college. School first, no drugs, no drinking. And that’s how I ended up turning 21 and having my first alcoholic beverage at Red Lobster with my mother. It was a strawberry daiquiri. Was my mom proud I stayed in school and studied hard? Pretty sure she asked me when I was going to start dating and give her grandchildren. — LISA CUNNINGHAM

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STRIP CLUB CHICKEN WINGS My 21st birthday was a Wednesday night and I was perfectly content to stay in, but my roommate threw out a game changer. He jokingly teased, “Hey, this local strip club has a pretty good Wednesday special on wings.” Fifteen minutes later, we were walking in the door of a nice Downtown establishment. I had procrastinated on renewing my driver’s license until that week and I was still using the temporary paper one. So, I — a 5-foot-tall, newly 21-year-old, who looks young enough to routinely be offered kid’s menus — had to hand the bouncer at this strip club my old junior license (not even the over-18 version) and a flimsy license printed on thin printer paper. I think he let me in on the assumption the situation was too absurd to be worth the effort to fake it.

— MAYA PUSKARIC

then retire. Now, as entire industries collapse because of cartoon villains with dollar signs for eyes, there is no guarantee for future jobs. All jobs are now in constant danger of robot takeovers, or Silicon Valley reinvention, or destruction altogether. There is also no certainty for a sense of established sanity. Things that always seemed obvious (Nazis are bad, the President shouldn’t harass women, insult veterans, and mock the disabled) are now somehow up for debate.

CHAOS IS INEVITABLE. Students that graduated around the 2008 Financial Crisis had to watch as long-established norms of stability crumbled. But now, students know that stability is the exception, not the rule. Chaos is inevitable. Print, for example, is dying, and there’s still no way to effectively monetize online writing. I have a job now, but in three years I could end up covering the new Apple tampons for a women’s magazine published exclusively on a social-media platform powered by hologram. Maybe I’ll be forced to take a job writing tweets for Marie Callender’s, because they need to appeal to millennials, who are killing the pot pie industry. People half-joke that this collective despair is caused by the state of the world. At the end of 2016, there were dozens of articles positing whether or not it was the Worst Year Ever. How quaint, to think that things wouldn’t get exponentially worse. It’s not necessarily that there’s more chaos now than ever before, but more ways to react to it publicly. More ways to react to how other people are reacting. More memes. For every terrible news item, there is a meme. For every feeling of despondency, there is a meme. Sometimes words just can’t capture certain feelings as well as an 18-year-old screenshot from SpongeBob of a bewildered cartoon crab. The promotion for this issue included a slew of home-brewed memes, like a car salesman slapping the roof of a college student and saying, “this bad boy can fit so much emotional instability in it.” It doesn’t have to make sense, because neither does life.

Follow staff writer and this week’s guest editor Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny


TEARS FOR TEARS BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A GUIDE TO CRYING ON CAMPUS College can be an emotionally confusing place. It’s not the best four years of your life, despite what your dad’s friend might’ve said. It feels sometimes like a second round of adolescence, with weird, unexpected emotional and physical changes. Growing pains are compounded by research papers, trash diets, and constantly wondering whether a degree is worth all this time and money if it doesn’t guarantee a job — because nothing these days does. You might, due to a variety of stresses, anxieties, and sadnesses, find yourself needing to let out a tear, or 80.

An abridged list of reasons a college student might cry on campus: •

Overwhelmed by assignments

Homesickness

Feel bad from too many dining hall grilled cheeses

Money

Drank too much

Didn’t drink enough

Got on a bus going in the wrong direction

Thought about the future for 1 second

Apartment-hunting season

If you need to take an elevator to a class or a professor’s office, the ride is a great place to let out one brief sob. Make it a good one.

So cold for so long

Haven’t seen the sun in weeks

Near a trash can

Slipped on ice like a cartoon character

Sick and have to buy yourself soup

Read the news for 1 second

Unpaid internships

Shower flip flops

Forgot about exam

Remembered exam, but forgot to study

Remembered exam and remembered to study, but failed anyway

Math

Sex

Too much soda

Experienced the lowest rung of humanity at a frat party

Where Bathroom Obviously, bathrooms are great spots for crying — at a party, on vacation, at your partner’s house. But while on campus, it’s important to pick the right kind. Those bathrooms that have three stalls? No way. A line might pile up! Everyone will think you’re pooping for 20 minutes. Aim for bathrooms that have 10 or more stalls, so there’s enough people going in and out that no one will notice if you’re in there weeping for a long time. The basement bathrooms at the Cathedral of Learning are a great option. Let it rip.

Library No one will question it if you’re crying in the library, because there’s probably a bunch of other people crying in the library, especially near finals or late into the night. Just make sure to do it quietly or a librarian might shush your sobs. Chin up, pup.

Elevators

It just makes sense.

In the shower If you live in a dorm and can’t get any privacy, the shower is a great place because the running water will drown out the water running from your eyes. Also then your eyes won’t get puffy. You look great.

Tips ‘n Tricks Always carry tissues — both to wipe your tears, and because crying fills the nose with snot. Also, just generally carry tissues always and forever (for sneezes, nosebleeds, etc). Do not cry while walking around in freezing temperatures. The tears probably won’t freeze, but biting wind on a fresh tear is a specific sting. Like April says in that episode of Parks and Rec: “You have to wear mascara so we can see whether or not you’ve been crying.” If your cheeks are running with makeup, everyone will treat you very gently. Put in headphones and cue up a sad tune so the cry will feel more dramatic, like a movie. Always carry a water bottle. Keep those ducts hydrated, baby!

CRYING ON CAMPUS:

PLAYLIST BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“Over My Head” by Alabama Shakes Alabama Shakes’ smooth, blues-rock southern sound could soothe a thousand crying babies. In “Over My Head,” lead vocalist, Brittany Howard’s intoxicatingly beautiful voice haunts about how love given or received never goes away.

“Graduation Song (friends forever)” by Vitamin C For anyone that graduated after 1999, this was certainly played every time a diploma was handed out. Combine Vitamin C’s hit with “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life” to create a perfect nostalgia cocktail.

“Saved” by Khalid Unlike “Location,” Khalid’s upbeat breakout single, “Saved” is a slow breakup ballad with sincerity. Khalid and his ex-girlfriend decided to keep each other’s numbers on their phone as a sense of comfort, in case they needed one another.

“Not About Angels” by Birdy Birdy’s most well-known hit is a cover of “Skinny Love.” While that song almost made this list, “Not About Angels” is a ballad about loss that showcases her extraordinary voice. It was featured on The Fault in our Stars soundtrack too. Enough said.

“River” by Leon Bridges Upon first hearing Leon Bridges, you might think he’s an old-school legend like Otis Redding, but the Grammy-nominated artist is a modern-day enigma, standing out from the current style of R&B music being released. Let Bridges rock you to sleep while cuddling a tear-soaked pillow. Check out pghcitypaper.com for a longer playlist.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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SMOKE OUT The return to sobriety after a weed-induced sleep is seamless. Except for the first time I got high in college. Santa Cruz, Calif., 2008 — I was visiting a friend for the weekend of the inaugural “Smoke Out,” where thousands of college students smoke in a field surrounded by redwoods. I smoked a bowl AND took edibles before entering the dank aura. After what felt like hours, but was likely minutes, we returned to my buddy’s place where I could only lay paralyzed on the couch, pretending to sleep with my sunglasses on. Eventually I feel asleep, but awoke still high. Took a plane home, still high. Arrived at class, still high. A nice girl complimented my shirt, and all I could muster was “cool” and a blank stare. — RYAN DETO

GOT A FUNNY COLLEGE STORY?

WE WANT TO HEAR IT! SHARE IT ON OUR PAGE AT FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER CP PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: ANNIE BREWER

.COLLEGE.

THE CRAWL My first time getting absolutely smashed was at a party that my roommates and I were hosting. I made the mistake of making mixed drinks, which to this day involves one-part juice, five-parts alcohol. After many shots, I knew it was coming. I calmly crawled (on my hands and knees) to our bathroom, puked in the toilet, flushed, and brushed my teeth, thinking I was smart. As soon as I got back, my friend said, “Did you throw up? You smell like toothpaste.” Moral of the story: You’re not slick, and maybe when you’re no longer able to walk, you should slow down. — LAUREN ORTEGO

HUNGRY FOR CHANGE BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE STEREOTYPICAL cuisine for cashstrapped college students usually falls between pizza and instant ramen. But Pittsburgh students wanting to maintain a healthy diet face numerous obstacles, including limited on-campus dining and the food deserts of Oakland and Downtown. Zuri Kent-Smith, a senior at the University of Pittsburgh, lived in dorms for the first two and half years of his college career, including as a resident advisor. Throughout that time, he had a meal plan that cost thousands per semester. The Pitt website lists 2018- 2019 meal plans — required for incoming students living in the residence halls — as running

between $2,450-$3,975 per semester. The fees are comparable to nearby Carnegie Mellon University, where first year students choose from a variety of plans that range from $2,984-$3,322 per semester. Kent-Smith says that while Pitt’s meal plans make eating convenient and let him save money, the campus lacks options for students with dietary restrictions. As a result, he had to give up being vegetarian. “There weren’t enough nonmeat options that were actually good,” he says. He adds that when Pitt’s on-campus dining facilities do cater to vegetarian and vegan lifestyles, they tend to go for

“really complex, abstract meals” as opposed to focusing on just making “simple food that tastes good.” “They love doing these quinoa and tomato salads and all this stuff, and they never taste good, and they’re always dry and super cold,” he says. Kent-Smith now lives off campus in Oakland and admits that eating without a meal plan poses challenges, as the surrounding area lacks a grocery store with affordable food options. Without ready access to places such as Giant Eagle, Aldi, or Trader Joe’s, he opts for cheaper restaurants along Forbes Avenue or shopping at nearby drugstores. Fellow Pitt student Samantha Bastress, CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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HUNGRY FOR CHANGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

who is also a senior, resided on campus during her first year and had a meal plan. She agrees that the school offered limited fresh, healthy options, adding that most snacks and hot food to-go were either fried or “really calorie-dense.” However, she has seen an increase in offerings for vegan and vegetarian students, including more options at the salad bar. There is also soy milk and other alternative milks for those who are lactose intolerant. “I’m not vegan myself, but eating with my vegan friend in the dining halls was rough,” says Bastress. “She often would get the same type of meal — just a simple stir fry with black beans to make a complete protein. I think it got boring for her.”

doesn’t have enough money to buy food on campus. Costly meal plans are more essential for students living at Point Park and Duquesne universities, where choices are mostly limited to trendy, expensive restaurants or fast food. Kaylee Kearns, a junior at Point Park, commutes to school from Elizabeth and usually packs a lunch to save money. She considered a meal plan but found the ones offered too expensive and not worth the money. She occasionally purchases snacks from the school’s Point Café or at restaurants in nearby Market Square. “I’ve heard some students say they love living Downtown and it’s nice to have so many food options, but at the same time it can get really expensive,” she says.

EATING WITHOUT A MEAL PLAN POSES CHALLENGES.

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Bastress went off campus after her freshman year and now lives in Oakland with her roommates. Like Kent-Smith, she admits living close to campus often means having trouble accessing healthy, affordable food. She and her roommates get around it by buying groceries together and cooking communally, making food in bulk so they can easily microwave a meal when they get home from class. “A typical meal in my house usually involves a pasta or rice base, with lots of seasonal vegetables,” she says. “We try to make as much from scratch as possible, including our breads and vegan ice cream.” Tucked back away from the bustling traffic of Fifth Avenue, Chatham University is even more cut off from readily available food sources. While the dining page on the university’s website touts its commitment to providing fresh, healthy food for a variety of diets, Alie Davis, a senior commuter student at d that to be Chatham, hasn’t found the case. ny variety “There is rarely any ns on camas far as healthy options re pus,” she says. “There are always salads in the cafe, but usually only one vegetarian option, if any.” Available options also aren’t affordable. As a result, she keeps instant food on hand, in case she

Keith Paylo, vice president of Student Affairs and dean of students at Point Park, says he and the general manager of food services are trying to better cater to students. Three years ago, they switched food providers to CulinArt and have since expanded offerings in the school’s various dining facilities, including a larger salad bar and high-quality sushi. “I don’t see our students as large fast food eaters,” says Paylo, adding that students even opt for healthier options off campus, such as the nearby Hello Bistro. Because there are no grocery stores Downtown, Paylo says the on-campus Point Café serves as more of a convenience store for students by selling items such as microwavable meals and half-gallons of milk. The university also runs weekend shuttle services to the Waterfront and Shadyside, where students can buy groceries at Market District or Whole Foods. While improving any on-campus expe dining experience would help, Kent-Smith prefers the idea of re opening regular grocery stores with reaso reasonably priced food camp near campus. “If we did solve the issue of having no grocery store, there would be no need to get a meal plan for a lot of people, because t they’re expensive for l low quality food,” says Kent-Smith.

Follow senior writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @awaltzcp

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MEAL MAP: COLLEGE STUDENT FOOD GUIDE BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DON’T LISTEN ON AN

EMPTY STOMACH:

PLAYLIST BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

College is stressful enough without deciding where to eat next, and the lack of grocery stores in college neighborhoods doesn’t make it easier. Thanks to some helpful students, and additional research, City Paper compiled a list of restaurants, drug stores, and other places to find healthy, affordable meal options.

Restaurants When dining out in college, it can be economical to eat somewhere with large portions you can save for later, like a hamster storing seeds in its cheeks. “I normally get Chinese at [Szechuan Express] because it’s cheap and relatively good … It’s either there or Chipotle because they’re relatively cheaper. I can save my leftovers for later on.” – Zuri Kent-Smith • Chipotle Mexican Grill (4611 Forbes Ave. or 3615 Forbes Ave., Oakland) • Szechuan Express (125 Oakland Ave., Oakland) - Zuri Kent-Smith recommends the Shrimp Pad Thai ($6.50-6.75) • Moe’s Southwest Grill (210 Forbes Ave., Downtown) • Hello Bistro (292 Forbes Ave., Downtown)

DruGstores When there aren’t any grocery stores nearby, drugstores can fill in the gaps with dry goods and snacks. They even have milk, if you’re into that kind of thing. “I’ll go to Rite Aid to get my bread and peanut butter and jelly or eggs.” – Zuri Kent-Smith • Rite Aid (Locations in Oakland, Downtown, Squirrel Hill) “Most [Point Park] students try to run to CVS if they need something desperately.” - Kaylee Kearns • CVS (Locations in Oakland, Downtown) • Walgreens (5956 Centre Ave. #4, Shadyside)

GrocerY (walkinG distance) Neither Oakland nor Downtown have full-service grocery stores, but there are smaller marts that have produce, meats, and other foods that make a fridge look like it belongs to a functioning human. Pitt students often shop at Groceria Merante and Las Palmas, recognizing the latter has been hit with multiple food-code violations. “Their produce is really excellent and affordable though, and the owners are lovely. You can tell they love the students and want to provide for us as much as possible.” - Samantha Bastress • Groceria Merante (3454 Bates St., Oakland) • Las Palmas (326 Atwood St., Oakland)

GrocerY (bus or car) For a lot of students in the area, grocery stores are only accessible by bus, which is easier to manage than it sounds. Just don’t be the kid whacking everyone on the head with a loaf of bread while walking down the aisle. The 71A and 71C buses take shoppers close to Market District and Aldi. The 75 bus heads to Trader Joe’s. And 61 buses travel to Squirrel Hill. For South Oaklanders, the 93 bus will take riders to Squirrel Hill via Boulevard of the Allies. • Aldi (Locations in Friendship, Bloomfield, and South Side) • Giant Eagle-Squirrel Hill (1901 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill) • Market District-Shadyside (5550 Centre Ave., Shadyside) • Trader Joe’s (6343 Penn Ave., East Liberty) • Whole Foods (5880 Centre Ave., Shadyside)

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“Cheeseburger in Paradise” by Jimmy Buffett Vegetarians and vegans, cover your ears. Jimmy Buffett’s famous 1978 song, is an ode to carnivorous habits. Lucky for super fans, there are also restaurants of the same name in Omaha and New Jersey.

“Ham ‘N’ Eggs” by A Tribe Called Quest Unlike Dr. Suess’ Green Eggs and Ham, A Tribe Called Quest advocates against consuming the classic American breakfast. But, the 1990s rap group lists plenty of other foods throughout the song that will have your stomach rumbling.

“Vegetables” by The Beach Boys Listen carefully. In this 1967 homage to veggies by The Beach Boys, Paul McCartney can be heard chomping celery in the background.

“Honey” by Moby With only four lines throughout the entirety of the song, I recommend turning this on, zoning out and cooking a slow and savory dish.

“Cigarettes and Chocolate Milk” by Rufus Wainwright From Rufus Wainwright’s 2001 album, Poses, this is a song about desire and the subtle addictions that consume our lives, like cigarettes. And chocolate milk? Check out pghcitypaper.com for a longer playlist.


SEPTEMBER 8 – 30, 2018 A hysterical and historical comedy about four badass women out to change the world.

Lauren Gunderson DIRECTED BY Jade King Carroll BY

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

USE CODE CITYCITY TO SAVE $5 ON SINGLE TICKETS

PH#

What is THAT building?

412-431-CITY

WEB

CityTheatreCompany.org

SOUTH SIDE

Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum 4141 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-621-4253 www.soldiersandsailorshall.org WELCOME TO ONE OF PENNSYLVANIA’S MOST WELL KNOWN LANDMARKS AND TREASURES.

Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum is a unique military memorial dedicated to honoring the men and women of all branches of service, from all generations and conflicts.

Visit us at: soldiersandsailorshall.org

Tour the museum today. Free admission with your PITT ID!

-THANKS, PITT ARTS! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

17


DO YOU HAVE STUDENT LOANS? 35.1% YES NO

64.9%

DO YOU HAVE A FULL OR PART-TIME JOB WHILE IN SCHOOL? 16.7%

PART-TIME FULL-TIME

69.4%

CP PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: ANNA BONGARDINO

.COLLEGE.

MONEY TALK

DOES YOUR FAMILY PAY FOR SOME OR ALL OF YOUR TUITION AND/OR RENT? 36.1%

BY CP STAFF // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE ADAGE used to be “you can’t put a price on a college education.” Now, it’s “you can put

a price on a college education, it’s massive, and you’ll spend the rest of your life paying it.” Talking about money can be squirmy, and while having open and honest discussions about it won’t necessarily level the playing field, it will at least make the playing field less mysterious. City Paper surveyed a few dozen college students to understand the financial realities they face.

E TRADD! & L L E S SE BUYE, W AND U ES - UKEIRSS S A N - BAOSNS - REP S R GUITPAS - LESS AM

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al c i s u M r ou ere. S: Y e H HOUR11AM-8PM u n n i o t i M t -THU 11AM-5P N O ConEduca M -SAT FRI SERVING BEGINNER THRU ADVANCED PLAYERS SINCE 1979!

1305 E. CARSON ST. • SOUTH SIDE • 412.431.0700 • PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM 18

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NO JOB WORK STUDY 8 HOURS A WEEK

TWO PART-TIME JOBS EVERY SEMESTER, OCCASIONALLY ANOTHER ODD JOB ON TOP OF THAT UNPAID INTERNSHIP

SOME ALL

33.3% 30.6%

NONE

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MONEY SURVEY

Kayla

Kelly

Jon

Annie

Austin

Senior at Chatham University (out-of-state)

Junior at University of Pittsburgh (in-state)

Senior at Allegheny College (in-state)

Senior at Point Park University (out-of-state)

Junior at University of Pittsburgh (in-state)

MONEY IN BANK ACCOUNT:

$3,000

-$58.12

$750

$450

$14,000

STUDENT LOANS:

$45,000

$40,000

$42,000

$40,000

$12,000

$10,000 yearly

$425 monthly

$10,000 yearly

$430 monthly

$800 monthly

Part-time

Multiple part-time

Part-time

Full-time

Internship

$10 hourly

$8.50 hourly, plus stipend

$7.25 hourly

$11.50 hourly

None

None

Tuition

40-50% of tuition, room and board

None

80% of tuition, room and board

“I’m graduating a year early to try and save some money because I still have medical school to go to. I’m very fortunate I got the amount of scholarships I did but I still have a lot of debt already.”

“Pitt needs to institute a living wage.”

“Student loans are the only form of debt that stays with you even if you declare bankruptcy. I could get a lower rate on a $20,000 car loan over a $15,000 student loan, and my credit score has been 750 for the past five months. Doesn’t seem quite fair.”

“I’m dying.”

“I run a small business to pay some expenses. And I use credit card bonuses to make money and responsibly build credit.”

RENT/ROOM AND BOARD: JOB: WAGE: FAMILY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE: COMMENTS:

In-Home Senior Care The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

• Personal Care • Homemaking • Meal preparation • Errands & Shopping

412-363-5500

don’t drink & drive. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

19


.COLLEGE.

GET CARDED BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

COUPLE YEARS after graduating from the University of Pittsburgh, .I attempted to board a 71D with an expired college ID and was kicked off by a hawkeyed driver. I had flashed the card at him the way I’d practiced: quicklybut-not-suspiciously-quickly, nonchalant but not aloof. But he didn’t fall for it. A few steps in, the other passengers motioned at me to take off my headphones. The driver was yelling. He demanded to see the ID again, told me it was expired, and confiscated it (put it in his front shirt pocket). He barked, “You owe me $2!” I asked if I could get my ID back (sentimental value) and get off at that stop. He said “no” and “yes,” respectively. My years as a fraudulent Panther were over. I was bummed. Of all my many college-era regrets, not taking full advantage of all the perks that came with my college ID is at the top. I used it to ride buses and buy food, but ignored all the more noble pursuits it afforded (gym membership, museums, discounts on newspapers). It wasn’t until my run-in with the bus-fuzz that I realized how much I had missed out on, how much money I could have saved, how much cooler and smarter I’d be if I’d just left the house more often. So, to help you avoid making the same mistakes, here’s a partial list of perks that come with many of the college IDs in Pittsburgh. Each school has its own rules, so double check before heading out.

Follow associate editor Alex Gordon ordon on Twitter @Shmalexgordon

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


MUSEUMS

Feed that big old brain of yours with either free or heavily-discounted admissions at: Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History; Andy Warhol Museum; Mattress Factory; Heinz History Center; National Aviary; Phipps Conservatory; and the Carnegie Science Center.

TRANSPORTATION

A student ID will get you around town by buses and the T, but you can also snag reduced priced trips out of the city through MegaBus’ UNiDAYS promotion.

MOVIES

A handful of theaters — including AMC at the Waterfront, the Manor Theatre in Squirrel Hill, and Row House Cinema in Lawrenceville — offer discounts if you have a student ID or a university email address. Also, marketing companies sometimes do free screenings for students to gauge millennial interest, so keep an eye out for those.

SPORTS

Obviously, there are student tickets for your school’s teams, but the Riverhounds soccer team also have deals for youths, and the Penguins have their fabled Student Rush. The Pirates also offers deals on tickets for students through its unfortunately sponsored Papa John’s Student Pass program.

GYMS

Not only do most colleges in Pittsburgh have fitness centers on campus, but a number of gyms have discounts for students. CrossFit has discounts for full-time students, which is stipulated as at least 13 credits a semester, but it’s unclear exactly how or if there is verification. Part-timers might want to roll the dice on that one.

STREAMING

Students can grab bundled Spotify Premium and Hulu Limited Commercial plans for $4.99 a month, which is a heck of a deal. Amazon Prime for students focuses more on deals for supplies (pencils and Post-its, presumably), and all the general awesomeness of Prime (streaming, free shipping). Netflix has no student discount yet.

COLLEGE NIGHTS

Maybe it’s just me, but most of the characteristics of college nights at bars are dumb. There are discounts on fluorescent drinks you don’t want and party gimmicks no one has ever asked for. Go for places that have reasonable prices and likable clientele to begin with.

THE NON-OFFER

Even if there’s no college discount posted, whip out your ID and see if they’ll cave for a pity-discount. It never hurts to ask.

HALF PRICE

DEALS!

justpayhalfpittsburgh.com for half price deals!

Go to

als include:

Some of our de

Restaurants • Events • Family Fun Activities • And More! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

21


Outdoor B a n ds a l l g Summer Lon Aug. A ug 31 Th The Shiners (8pm) Sept. 1 Ridgemont High Band (8pm) Sept. 2 Jill West & Blues Attack Band (2pm) Sept. 2 DJ Grover (7pm) Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Sept. 3 Flow Band (2-6pm)

Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM

*FREE Sunday Summer Concert Series!

Best Live Bands Every Weekend!

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

it’s a destination!

1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com University of Pittsburgh The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences

Jewish Studies Program What is it?

What do we offer?

• Study of Jewish culture, religion, philosophy, literature, and artistic expression, past and present. • Jewish culture is used as a lens to examine issues of diaspora, acculturation, interactions of minority and majority groups, and constructions of identity

• Courses in Jewish history, religion, literature, and the arts • Courses that fulfill general education requirements • Hebrew language study (fulfills language requirement) • Certificate that can complement any major • Funding for study abroad and research • Internship and independent study options

Contact Us Email: jsp@pitt.edu Twitter: @PittJSP Facebook: pittjewishstudies Webpage: www.jewishstudies.pitt.edu Blog: jewishstudiesatpitt.blogspot.com 22

PGHCITYPAPER.COM


PITTSBURGH PRIMER BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING PITTSBURGH’S PRESENT, POLITICS, AND PLAYGROUNDS Rust Belt Rebound

Politics and Elections

You’ve heard the stories of Pittsburgh’s steel-industry past. The city was the epicenter of steel manufacturing in the nation back then. Today, there’s one mill left. Modern-day Pittsburgh is known for its education and medicine (“eds and meds”), and a growing tech industry. Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh are more than top-tier universities; they’re driving the region’s innovation economy. Uber and Ford are testing self-driving vehicles on Pittsburgh streets because CMU’s robotics and AI departments pioneered much of the technology. The popular language-learning app Duolingo is headquartered in Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood, as are the local offices of Google. As the region’s largest employer – by a considerable margin – University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) is the U.S. Steel of modern Pittsburgh. If there’s any doubt about that comparison, look to the UPMC logo that now sits at the top of the former U.S. Steel Tower building downtown. While education, medication, and tech have contributed to the post-1980s Rust Belt Revitalization and helped the city rebound economically, there are negative consequences to that growth. Economic inequality is growing in the region. Certain neighborhoods, such as the aforementioned East Liberty, was developed at the cost of displacing or pushing out mostly poor black residents move out while richer residents moved in. Lawrenceville is also losing its poorer residents. Pittsburgh has taken a few steps to address this problem, but some say the issue is only getting worse.

You may have heard about Pittsburgh area state Rep. candidates, and Democratic Socialists, Summer Lee and Sara Innamorato, but neither represents areas where most college students live. With college students congregating in Oakland, Shadyside, South Side, and Downtown, most city needs (street light out, roads needs plowing, etc.) can be handled by contacting Pittsburgh City Councilors. For North Oakland and Shadyside residents, contact Erika Strassburger. For South Oakland and South Side, contact Bruce Kraus. Downtown residents can contact Daniel Lavelle. Bill Peduto is the mayor of Pittsburgh and his office also fields questions and complaints. If you have bones to pick about state politics (fracking, transportation, college tuition), state Reps. Dan Frankel, Harry Readshaw, or state Sen. Jay Costa can address those concerns. If national politics have you riled up, U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle is the man to call. Robert Morris University (RMU) students are currently represented by Democratic U.S. Rep. Conor Lamb, who won a well-publicized special election in March. Because Pennsylvania threw out its old gerrymandered districts, RMU and other suburban students have an opportunity to participate in a competitive race between Lamb and Republican U.S. Rep Keith Rothfus. Pennsylvanians must register at least 30 days before voting, and for the most part, must vote on Election Day. U.S. citizens can register at votespa.com and polling locations can be located at vote.org. If voting at the polling place for first time, you must show some sort of identification. Drivers’ license or student ID will suffice. Go vote.

PITTSBURGH:

PLAYLIST

BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“Loves No Stranger” by Nardo Says Put J. Cole and Parliament in a blender, sprinkle in jazz elements and what emerges is local hip-hop artist Nardo Says.

“Smooth” by Sierra Sellers Sierra Sellers embodies a smooth, sultry sound that will have you dancing around your room exotically (or is that just me?).

“Crystal Ball Part 1” by Fortune Teller This one’s for you, garage-y stoner rock fans. The six-minute doozy ranges from raw rock to percussion-heavy beats and back again.

“Room to Roam” by Northern Comfort Northern Comfort has all the elements of a typical country band. Singing about drinking, love, and driving on an open road, you can get your country fix, locally.

“Hold On” by Brooke Annibale This song is the first on Brooke Annibale’s fourth album, Hold to the Light. With an airy and dreamlike sound, “Hold On” sets the tone for Annibale’s indie-pop self-release.

“Wop De Wop” by Beauty Slap This electro-brass-thunder-funk group can often be found playing around Pittsburgh. Beauty Slap is phenomenal live and listening to them at home doesn’t fully encompass their groovy-ness. Check out pghcitypaper.com for a longer playlist.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

23


CP PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: JARED WICKERHAM

.COLLEGE.

AGING OUT BY ELI ENIS // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

RANK MALTA NEVER wanted to

drop all-ages shows from the lineup of live performances at Cattivo in Lawrenceville. And an argument can be made that it wasn’t him who made the call. “The insurance company doesn’t allow me to do them anymore,” says Malta, Cattivo’s owner. “Basically, my insurance company dropped me. … I had to sign a waiver with my new insurance company

[stating] that [it] won’t cover me if I have any all-ages shows.” All-ages concerts are on shaky ground in Pittsburgh after long helping form the foundation of the city’s livemusic scene. The trend is especially concerning for college undergrads, around half of whom are under 21. Cattivo staged all-ages shows four of the past five years, but Malta was facing a doubling of his previous rate from a new insurance company if he

EXCITED FOR AN ALL-AGES SHOW? LET US KNOW ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER.

24

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

kept with the practice. “So, it’s kind of dumb to pay an extra $10,000 a year to have shows that don’t bring any money in,” he says. “Basically, we were covering our expenses. It was more a courtesy thing to the minors and to the promoters. “They’re all young kids. They don’t buy a lot. They don’t have a lot of money.” Lack of money for young concert goers isn’t the only factor forcing a squeeze on venues such as Cattivo, Mr. Smalls, and The Smiling Moose. Pennsylvania’s liquor codes can make a rat’s nest out of putting on all-ages shows.

Logistics are difficult for venues serving alcohol, since each is required to have a different section for alcoholconsuming patrons when minors are allowed entry. Even without an incident or infraction — and Malta says there was neither at Cattivo (“not even band members were allowed to bring alcohol on stage [with] minors [present],” he says) — the convoluted stipulations put venue owners in a no-win situation when it comes to all-ages shows. Malta is concerned other venue operators may face similar challenges that lessen the likelihood of


all-ages shows. Leigh Yock, of Spirit Lodge, has no intention of halting all-ages shows at her venue. She is keen on creating for this generation the memory-making evenings that existed for previous Pittsburghers. “Everyone remembers those epic nights at Laga,” Yock says, referring to a now-closed all-ages venue in Oakland. “Venues that can pull it off logistically can literally influence an entire generation’s memories and help rally the scene.” Mr. Roboto Project may serve as the hub for rallying the all-ages scene. The DIY venue in Bloomfield is all-ages for every show because it doesn’t permit alcohol. It took on an upcoming show from Frankie Cosmos that was dropped by Cattivo because of that venue’s new policy. “Live music should be accessible to everyone, and if you want to cultivate and nurture a music scene, you have to start with the youth,” says Brett Shumaker, booking coordinator for Mr. Roboto Project. “They are quite literally the future. For me, personally, going to shows as a teenager changed my life and gave me a place I felt I belonged. Everyone deserves to feel that.”

ALL AGE VENUES The Mr. Roboto Project 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield therobotoproject.com

Stage AE 400 N. Shore Drive ,North Side

stageaepittsburgh.com

The Rex Theater 1602 E Carson St., South Side

rextheater.net

PPG Paints Arena 1001 Fifth Ave., Downtown

ppgpaintsarena.com

KeyBank Pavilion 665 Route 18, Burgettstown

livenation.com/venues

’ LET S

GET S CIAL

Mr. Smalls Theatre, Funhouse 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

mrsmalls.com

The Smiling Moose 1306 E. Carson St., South Side

smiling-moose.com

Join us for a FREE reading with 2018 Drue Heinz Lit Prize winner

BRAD FELVER Author of The Dogs of Detroit

And 2018 final judge LYNNE SHARON SCHWARTZ Author of Leaving Brooklyn and the poetry collection No Way Out but Through

“His stories evoke the style and themes of writers ranging from Richard Russo to Cormac McCarthy.”

—KIRKUS REVIEWS

Wednesday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m. City of Asylum | 40 W. North Ave. | Pittsburgh, PA 1521

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

25


STUDENTS:

WHAT’S IN YOUR FRIDGE?

CARLOW UNIVERSITY

CP PHOTO: ANNIE BREWER

Inside the fridge of Keith, a Point Park University senior, living in South Side with three roommates

SHARE YOUR PHOTOS ON INSTAGRAM WITH US USING #CPCOLLEGEISSUE IN YOUR CAPTIONS

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

.COLLEGE.

WELCOMING COMMITTEE BY ANNA BONGARDINO // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

It can only get better after the forced fun with strangers brought on by welcome week. See our full photo essay at pghcitypaper.com.

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UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH


BUS GUIDE FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

RIDING THE BUS:

PLAYLIST

BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BY LAUREN ORTEGO // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Students old and new probably have questions about taking transit in and around Pittsburgh.

We have some answers.

):

My first time taking the bus as a college freshmen, I was going back to my dorm Downtown from Oakland and didn’t know which bus to take or how much it cost (not everyone gets to ride free with their ID). I spotted a group of other young people who looked familiar and put all my trust in drunk 18-year-olds who were just as new to the city as I was. I followed the group onto a bus that I was halfway sure would at least take me Downtown. When I got on the bus, all I had was a ten dollar bill, so I shoved it in the fare slot. The bus driver looked at me like I just offered him meth. “Did you… just put a ten in there?” “Yep.” “You know it doesn’t give change, right?” “Nope.” If you’re a student, old or new, you probably have some transit questions. Don’t worry, the City Paper is here to help.

When is the next bus? There are several apps to help a student plan for a bus ride. If using Google Maps, click on the bus icon to get a look at arrival times, stop locations, and costs. Moovit is similar, but does better at exactly pinpointing time before a bus arrives. Try the Transit app to best gauge exact bus location, including a map tracking in real-time. Try not to watch a bus pass by as you’re running out the door. It is best to consider all estimates of arrival times as rough guesses. Make use of these apps, just don’t necessarily trust them all the time.

Which route? Students might need to ride a bus for any number of reasons: parties, groceries, exploring, etc. It’s important to remember a couple of numbers and the many letters that go with them.

The 61 and 71 busses are students’ best friends. All variations travel between Downtown and Oakland, the latter from which they splinter into many directions; letters signify different routes headed east from Oakland. The 61 and 71 busses each can transport students to the following neighborhoods: Shadyside, Squirrel Hill, the Waterfront, Highland Park, Point Breeze, and Regent Square.

How late is too late? It’s the modern-age question: chance taking a bus or catch an Uber or Lyft? Unfortunately, end-times for buses are inconsistent. Some buses run into the early morning, others stop before 11 p.m. Those 61 and 71 buses are generally going until 1:30 a.m. But lesser popular buses, such as the 58 to Oakland via Greenfield, makes its last trip around 11:20 p.m. A student never regretted checking the Port Authority’s website (portauthority.org) for updated information. Never hurt to carry some of those printed schedules, either.

What does this cost? Are you a student at any of these universities: Pittsburgh, Chatham, or Carnegie Mellon? If so, consider yourself lucky. A student-identification card from those colleges allows for free transport on all Port Authority vehicles. (And by “free,” we mean “built into tuition.”) Students at Point Park, Carlow and Robert Morris are afforded discounted rates during certain times and on holidays. And while that isn’t as sweet a deal as the deals for others, it’s at least better than paying in full to take transit. What is full-price for a bus ride? If paying with cash, it’s $2.75 each way. Save 25 cents by purchasing a ConnectCard, which can be recharged at various locations throughout the region. A quarter might not sound like much, but it will seem like gold when you’re scouring a laundromat for loose change.

“Sunshine” by POWERS This song sounds like pure joy, with lyrics including, “Sunshine is gonna come now/Rain down/All over you.” That’s exactly what it will feel like while listening to this synth-pop song on the not-so-sunny bus.

“All Night” by Big Boi One of those good earworms you don’t mind rattling around your head for a few days. It’s a jazzy, upbeat piano-driven beat colored with Big Boi’s feel-good lyrics from his 2017 record Boomiverse.

“Goldmine Junkie” by Big Grams The urge to experiment and venture outside of music style lines is what brought Big Boi and Phantogram together to form Big Grams. The 2015 album, also titled Big Grams is an alternative hip-hop explosion.

“Lasso” by Phoenix Lyrics like, “Where would you go with a lasso?” beckon the imagination to all the places you’d rather be than on the bus. I’d go to Bali.

“I Need A Dollar” by Aloe Blacc Blacc’s gritty, rustic voice is hard to duplicate and oh-so-enjoyable to the ears. Turn this on and reflect on how being a broke college student sucks.

“LEAVE ME ALONE” by KAYTRANADA The title describes the way many people feel on public transit. With headphones on and this song blasting, you can fully embrace the solitude and tune out the rest of the world. Check out pghcitypaper.com for a longer playlist.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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.COLLEGE.

2 1

3

BUY SOME HAPPINESS BY LISA CUNNINGHAM // LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HAT SHOULD YOU DO when the overwhelming

6

7

PG

8

HC V FO ITYP ISI R AP T LI DIR ER NK E .C S! CT OM

5

weight of the world starts to crush you, and you have to spend more time with a laptop than you do with friends? Buy some happiness! Because we know money’s tight, we thought we’d help out by highlighting some local stickers and pins that won’t break the budget. At least your laptop and schoolbag will make you happy while you work, right?

Pittsburgh’s lone liberal talkshow host for 30+ years You need to hear what Lynn said last week: The founding fathers WEREN’T SO BRIGHT. (Aug. 21) Democrat’s next presidential pick MUST BE YOUNGER. (Aug. 23) We’re all extras in a GROTESQUE REALITY SHOW. (Aug. 24) Missed a show? Past episodes of Lynn Cullen Live are available for download or streaming in our audio and video archives.

Listen live every weekday at 10 a.m. at pghcitypaper.com 28

PGHCITYPAPER.COM


STICKERS 1: Go Away by Ashley Olinger; yeahyelhsa.com 2: Pizza by Zenspire Designs; etsy.com/shop/ZenspireDesigns 3. Sometimes People Suck by Polliadesign; teepublic.com/user/polliadesign

2

4. Parking Chair by Commonwealth Press; compressmerch.com 5: Incline by StckrsUS; etsy.com/shop/StckrsUS 6. Pierogie by Emily McGaughey; etsy.com/shop/ShopEmilyM 7: Anxiety by DJ Balogh; teepublic.com/user/dj_balogh 8: PGH by 1FlyChicken; etsy.com/shop/1flychicken

1

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Henry-Taylor Law, PC provides litigation-based legal services to residents located within the counties of Allegheny, Beaver, Westmoreland and Butler in western Pennsylvania. Practice focuses on Criminal Law, including Summary Offenses and Juvenile Cases; Family Law, including Protection from Abuse (PFA), Custody, and Support; Benefits Rights Law, including Social Security and Welfare matters. As a former prosecutor and as chief law clerk to two President Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, Ms. Henry-Taylor has had the unique opportunity to view the judicial system from the perspective of both the Commonwealth and the Court, and such experience will be beneficial to clients when determining case strategies. With respect to the field of Family Law, Ms. Henry-Taylor has handled domestic disturbance cases, appeared in Juvenile Court on both Dependency (abused and neglected children) and Delinquency (criminal conduct of children) matters, and she has been representing pro-bono PFA clients for many years. She has objectively evaluated her clients’ needs and has resolved their egal issues. Ms. Henry-Taylor works closely with the Firm’s Law Clerk, Danielle Guarascio, and Attorney Laura Delarosa who is a 2015 Graduate of the University of Pittsburgh Law School. Delarosa received Honors for Outstanding Achievement upon graduation from law school. She received her B.A. from John Jay College of Criminal Justice with a major in Criminal Justice and a minor in Spanish.

Nicola Henry-Taylor, Esq. • Henry-Taylor Law, PC 445 Fort Pitt Boulevard, Suite LL500 • Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-275-0220 • www.henry-taylorlaw.info PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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LIVE MUSIC SEPT 6

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THE COLLEGE TALK BY GAB BONESSO // CPCONTRIBUTOR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HE MOST awkward conversation I ever had with my mom was about college. What made it awkward was telling her I didn’t want to go. She didn’t see it coming. After picking her jaw off the floor and some deep-breathing exercises, we had “the talk.” I explained that it seemed silly taking out student loans to become an artist who might not make any money for the first 20 years of my career. Building my case, I mentioned Woody Allen and (hometown favorite) Michael Keaton dropping out of college but becoming successful sans degrees. My mother couldn’t fathom a student who had taken AP classes in high school skipping college. She tried a guilt trip; she and my father had not gone to college because they were “too busy raising kids.” I started crying, having a full-blown, manic anxiety attack. It was then my mom realized there was more to my fear of college than student-loan debt. I’ve always struggled with social and separation anxiety, the latter specifically from my mom. My first major depressive episode was as a high-school freshman at band camp, the first time I was ever away from mom for more than a night. I stopped eating, sleeping, and smiling. The band director was so concerned he actually called my parents.

To get me to college, my mom had to figure out a way make it work for me. I was unravelling. I couldn’t stand change. I couldn’t leave her. I really was not emotionally ready. She decided I should go to Duquesne University because it was small, private, safe, and clean. (I was a really bad germaphobe when I was younger.) I could commute, which would alleviate the separation anxiety. The best part was that I could drive to campus without taking the highway. (I’m terrified of merging into ghost-cars). Other than extremely high tuition, Duquesne was the college for me — or so my mom was convinced.

I WAS UNRAVELLING. I COULDN’T STAND CHANGE. Why are moms always right? It really was the perfect school for me. Naturally, there were challenges. Dad was diagnosed with cancer when I was a freshman and died during my junior year. But at Duquesne, I found theater and a community to help me work through the grief. I also learned how to truly learn. From kindergarten through high school, I had

memorized my way to success, learning absolutely nothing. As a Duquesne freshman, I was expected to read Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, and that is when I fully began to understand the importance of reading comprehension. You can’t just flip through the pages of that one, friends. A lot changed for me while in college. I learned from diverse and brilliant professors who expanded my thinking and challenged me in ways I didn’t know were possible. I was given freedom to create original work and have it produced and performed — a wonderful benefit of going to a smaller school. I received mental health help, found my passion for performance, and truly began to develop my artistic voice. My mom is no longer with me in the physical world. (You can imagine how bad my separation anxiety is these days.) Still, I thank her daily for making me go to college. Had she not, I wouldn’t be the experimental artist that we’ve all grown to love. I never say I love myself, so that last statement was huge. Therapy works! To all you scared freshman moving onto a college campus, I promise you’ll be fine. If 18-year-old Daffy Duck Bonesso could make it through four years of college, you can do it, too.

Ȱȏȶȍ5IRR&ZI'EOIV]UYEVI

Follow featured contributor Gab Bonesso on Twitter @gabbonesso

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Pittsburgh Tattoo Company & Piercing 103 Smithfield Street, Downtown Pittsburgh • 412-201-9075 • tattoo-Pittsburgh.com ig: @Pittsburghtattoocompany PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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Pad Thai Noodle

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HOME OF THE BAR-BA-CONE

BY CRAIG MRUSEK // CPCONTRIBUTOR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

O YOU EVER wish you could give

some advice to your younger self? The college-aged version of me definitely needed some tips on drinking, so when time travel becomes a reality, here’s a few bits of wisdom I’ll pass along:

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If the choice is between going to a bar or a party, always choose the party.

Learn a little about wine. Just enough to find a few styles and brands you like. It’ll come in handy more often than you think.

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Likewise, keep some kind of sports drink handy for the morning after — or for the night before, if you need something to dump your vodka into.

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If you’re at a party, don’t spend too much time wondering why your hosts chose that particular keg. They got it because it was the cheapest one.

Restaurant: (412) 381-4566 75 S 17th St., 15203 • www.southsidebbqcompany.com

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Learn to make a handful of standard cocktails. Nothing fancy. Things like Margaritas, Daiquiris, and Manhattans are easy to make and appeal to almost everyone.

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151 proof rum is not the spirit to build an evening of drinking around.

Doing a few shots during the course of the evening is fine. However, don’t make it your primary mode of consumption. If a bottle of wine costs $4, there’s a reason.

You will meet a remarkable number of people who claim to have supernatural beer pong abilities. It’s best to simply agree with them and move on.

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Visit neighborhood dives more often. Get to know the grouchy old guys. You may learn something.

Attempting to drink all the beer available is unnecessary. An amount less than that is perfectly acceptable, despite what your friends tell you.

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Sure, it’s fun to say you closed down a bar. But as a rule, get out before last call.

There will be much better whiskey in about 20 years.

Always keep a bottle of vodka in your room. Since it doesn’t taste like anything, you can dump it into whatever mixer you have lying around. (When you’re older, you’ll refer to this as “versatility.”)

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Just because a bar is crowded doesn’t mean anything good is going on in there.

Join us for our Wednesday “Yuengs and d Wings”

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I know technicolor phalanx of schnapps bottles looks enticing, but keep walking. The liquor store rewards discretion. Having a few really good friends to drink with beats a roomful of strangers every time.

Follow featured contributor Craig Mrusek on Twitter @DoctorBamboo


DINING OUT

CP PHOTO BY JARED WICKERHAM

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT LEGENDS EATERY 500 EAST NORTH AVE., NORTH SIDE 412-321-8000 / LEGENDSEATERY.US Legends Eatery is a family owned, BYOB Italian restaurant located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s North Side. Get your family and friends together and make reservations today!

BAR LOUIE

330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO

1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon– midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

KAYA

2000 SMALLMAN ST., STRIP DISTRICT 412-261-6565 / KAYA.MENU The cuisines of Kaya are inspired by the sea and sun, melding fresh, high quality ingredients with bold flavor and alluring preparation.

LIDIA’S PITTSBURGH

1400 SMALLMAN ST., STRIP DISTRICT 412-552-0150 / LIDIAS-PITTSBURGH.COM Lidia’s Pittsburgh is a warm Italian restaurant offering signature classics from Lidia Bastianich. Featuring brunch, lunch and dinner menus as well as private dining.

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1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space. 472 WOOD ST., DOWNTOWN 412-586-5738 / CORNERMERCANTILE.COM Corner Mercantile is the premiere Downtown spot for all your scratch-made: breakfast/lunch/grab and go items. We offer vegan and allergen friendly options daily.

DINETTE

5996 CENTRE AVE., EAST LIBERTY 412-362-0202 / DINETTE-PGH.COM Celebrating 10 years serving hyper-fresh small plates and thin crust pizzas, using the best local ingredients, many from our garden. 20 wines by the glass.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location

PAD THAI NOODLE

4770 LIBERTY AVE, BLOOMFIELD 412-904-1640 / PADTHAINOODLEPITTSBURGH.COM This new café in Bloomfield features Thai and Burmese specialties. Standards like Pad Thai and Coconut Curry Noodle are sure to please. But don’t miss out on the Ono Kyowsway featuring egg noodle sautéed with coconut chicken, cilantro and curry sauce.

PIAZZA TALARICO

3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food

on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI

201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SUNNY BRIDGE NATURAL FOODS 30 GALLERY DRIVE, MCMURRAY 724-942-5800 / SUNNYBRIDGENATURALFOODS.COM Made-to-order wraps, pizza, salads, soups, fresh juices and smoothies prepared from organic, local and gluten-free ingredients and freshly baked items.

SUPERIOR MOTORS

1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR

660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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ARFIELD LEMONIUS has pulled out all the stops for his first full season of programming works for Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company. The 2018-19 campaign is a stellar repertory mix that includes works by choreography giants Nacho Duato and Christopher Wheeldon, as well as Pittsburgh-native Kyle Abraham. “For this news season, we wanted to bring in a little bit of the old, a little bit of the new, and a little bit of the future,” says Lemonius, the Conservatory Dance Company’s new chair. The choreographic bounty celebrates Point Park’s new, $60-million Pittsburgh Playhouse. “Winter Dance Concert” is the debut production at the 560-seat PNC Theatre. It runs December 7-16. Born in Jamaica, raised in Toronto, and a former principal dancer with Dallas Black Dance Theatre, Lemonius’ repertory aesthetics will stamp the upcoming season. Still, department faculty and dance students were involved in his decisions. “I find I am more of a facilitator,” says Lemonius. “That is what works for me and my leadership style.” The new season from Conservatory

Dance Company would make many professional dance companies envious. A brief look:

+

The annual Contemporary Choreographers program opens the season and runs October 11-18 at George Rowland White Performance Studio. Included is a re-staging of “Rendezvous,” by Christopher Huggins, and “Into the Light,” from Complexions Contemporary Ballet resident Jae Man Joo. Premieres from faculty member Mark Burrell and award-winning Peter Chu are also scheduled.

POINT PARK UNIVERSITY’S CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY 2018-19 SEASON

October 2018 - April 2019. Thu.-Sat. $10-24 (individual), $74-84 (subscription). Various venues, Downtown. pittsburghplayhouse.com

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Dancers take turns choreographing each other in a couple of showcases: “Student Choreography Project I,” November 16-18, and “Student Choreography Project II,” April 5-7, 2019 — each

at the GRW Performance Studio.

+

“Winter Dance Concert” is this season’s jewel, as it will feature Nacho Duato’s “Las Palmeras” set to music with Spanish, Moorish, and North African influences; BalletMet artistic director Edwaard Liang’s virtuosic “The Art of War,” inspired by calligraphy; and Aszure Barton’s “Happy Little Things.” Also, Tyce Diorio of So You Think You Can Dance will rework his group jazz number from the television show with a Charlie Chaplin theme.

+

Faculty members will display their considerable talents in the annual “Faculty Dance Concert,” February 21-24 at the GRW Performance Studio.

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“Spring Dance Concert” will conclude the Conservatory Dance Company’s season with a program featuring Christopher Wheeldon’s “The American” danced to music by Dvořák, Kyle Abraham’s emotionally intense “Drive” to music by Theo Parrish, and two works from alumni — visiting guest artist Kiki Lucas’ “The Vessel,” and Henry Steele performing David Parsons’ iconic solo work “Caught.”

Follow featured contributor Steve Sucato on Twitter @ssucato


PHOTO: RICHARD KELLY FOR THE PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECTc

Sherrie Flick

.PGH PAGES.

WORKING LIFE BY REGE BEHE // CPCONTRIBUTOR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

F SHERRIE FLICK isn’t writing short stories, she’s editing a manuscript or penning a food piece for publications such as The Wall Street Journal. This South Side resident’s versatility allows her a rare work-a-day independence, but it also requires solitude. That’s why Flick relishes every class she teaches in the MFA and Food Studies programs at Chatham University. “The work we do, we do alone,” says Flick of writers. “There’s no real way around that. But I never feel isolated in the classroom. There’s a great, vibrant energy, and exchange of knowledge that keeps me buoyed up on bad writing days, for sure.” Flick is releasing two new books with local publishers. Thank Your Lucky Stars (Autumn House) is a collection of short stories. She’s also the series editor of The Best Small Fictions (Braddock Avenue Books). Each volume features extremely short stories, or flash fiction. Some of the stories are less than a page long. “I like the idea of compression, being able to take a larger work and put it into the small form,” says Flick, who’s been experimenting with flash fiction since 1987. “I also like the sense that there’s almost a required interaction between the reading

and the writing. As the reader reads the compressed scene, he or she is filling in more details than are on the page.” Flick was born in Beaver County, but left when she was 18. She lived in New England, the Bay Area, Wyoming, and Nebraska before returning to Pittsburgh in 1998. Her works reflect her travels: There are no Western Pennsylvania landmarks in the stories, which are often set in anonymous, and sometimes Midwestern, locales.

///////////////////

Welcome Back

MORE INFORMATION: sherrieflick.com

“Some writers come here or grow up in this region, and the landscape and atmosphere of Western Pennsylvania, or Pittsburgh in particular, becomes imbued in their writing,” she says. “For me, and maybe it’s because I grew up here, the landscape here is neutral to me as a far as being a writer. … This landscape has never sparked a creative interest for me. I write best when I’m in a kind of place I don’t understand.” Flick will appear September 7 with writers from Autumn House Press at Miller Gallery on the campus of Carnegie Mellon University.

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR

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The Bridge Series returns for a discussion on the region’s air quality. “Breathing” will be explored by poet Barbara Edelman, a senior lecturer at the University of Pittsburgh; Nathaniel Broadus, youth projects coordinator at Partner4Work Pittsburgh and author of The Police State Saga; Grant MacIntyre of the University of Pittsburgh Law School, and former counsel for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; and City Paper’s Amanda Waltz. Proceeds benefit the Group Against Smog and Pollution. Wed., Aug. 29. $5. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. brillobox.com/events PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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Former Steelers wide receiver Santonio Holmes visited City Paper’s office to catch up with editor-in-chief Rob Rossi. Check out their interview to hear Santonio’s bucket-list items and his advocacy for fighting Sickle cell disease through the III & Long Foundation.

JENSORENSEN


.FOR THE WEEK OF AUG. 30.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

I foresee the withering of a hope or the disappearance of a prop or the loss of leverage. This ending may initially make you feel melancholy, but I bet it will ultimately prove beneficent — and maybe lead you to resources that were previously unavailable. Here are rituals you could perform that may help you catalyze the specific kind of relief and release you need: 1. Wander around a graveyard and sing songs you love. 2. Tie one end of a string around your ankle and the other end around an object that symbolizes an influence you want to banish from your life. Then cut the string and bury the object. 3. Say this ten times: “The end makes the beginning possible.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“If a man treats a life artistically, his brain is his heart,” wrote Oscar Wilde. I’ll translate that into a more complete version: “If a person of any gender treats life artistically, their brain is their heart.” This truth will be especially applicable for you in the coming weeks. You’ll be wise to treat your life artistically. You’ll thrive by using your heart as your brain. So, I advise you to wield your intelligence with love. Understand that your most incisive insights will come when you’re feeling empathy and seeking intimacy. As you crystallize clear visions about the future, make sure they are generously suffused with ideas about how you and your people can enhance your joie de vivre.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“My tastes are simple,” testified Sagittarian politician Winston Churchill. “I am easily satisfied with the best.” I propose that we make that your motto for now. While it may not be a sound idea to demand only the finest of everything all the time, I think it will be wise for you to do so during the next three weeks. You will have a mandate to resist trifles and insist on excellence. Luckily, this should motivate you to raise your own standards and expect the very best from yourself.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Russian playwright Anton Chekhov articulated a principle he felt was essential to telling a good story: If you say early in your tale that there’s a rifle hanging on the wall, that rifle must eventually be used. “If it’s not going to

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Romanian philosopher Emil Cioran loved the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. “Without Bach, God would be a complete second-rate figure,” he testified, adding, “Bach’s music is the only argument proving the creation of the Universe cannot be regarded as a complete failure.” I invite you to emulate Cioran’s passionate clarity, Virgo. From an astrological perspective, now is an excellent time to identify people and things that consistently invigorate your excitement about your destiny. Maybe you have just one shining exemplar, like Cioran, or maybe you have more. Hone in on the phenomena that in your mind and embody the glory of creation. be fired, it shouldn’t be hanging there,” declared Chekhov. We might wish that real life unfolded with such clear dramatic purpose. To have our future so well foreshadowed would make it easier to plan our actions. But that’s not often the case. Many elements pop up in our personal stories that ultimately serve no purpose. Except now, that is, for you Capricorns. I suspect that in the next six weeks, plot twists will be telegraphed in advance.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Would it be fun to roast marshmallows on long sticks over scorching volcanic vents? I suppose. Would it be safe? No! Aside from the possibility that you could get burned, the sulfuric acid in the vapors would make the cooked marshmallows taste terrible and might cause them to explode. So, I advise you to refrain from adventures like that. On the other hand, I will love it if you cultivate a playful spirit as you contemplate serious decisions. I’m in favor of you keeping a blithe attitude as you navigate your way through tricky maneuvers. I hope you’ll be jaunty in the midst of rumbling commotions.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

People will be thinking about you more than usual, and with greater intensity. Allies and acquaintances will be revising their opinions and understandings about you, mostly in favorable

ways, although not always. Loved ones and notso-loved ones will also be reworking their images of you, coming to altered conclusions about what you mean to them and what your purpose is. Given these developments, I suggest that you be proactive about expressing your best intentions and displaying your finest attributes.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, our heroine encounters a talking caterpillar as he smokes a hookah on top of a tall mushroom. “Who are you?” he asks her. Alice is honest: “I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.” She says this with uneasiness. In the last few hours, she has twice been shrunken down to a tiny size and twice grown as big as a giant. All these transformations have unnerved her. In contrast to Alice, I’m hoping you’ll have a positive attitude about your upcoming shifts and mutations, Aries. From what I can tell, your journey through the Season of Metamorphosis should be mostly fun and educational.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

Juan Villarino has hitchhiked over 2,350 times in 90 countries. His free rides have carried him over 100,000 miles. He has kept detailed records, so he’s able to say with confidence that Iraq is the best place to catch a lift. Average wait time there

is seven minutes. Jordan and Romania are good, too, with nine- and twelve-minute waits, respectively. In telling you about his success, I don’t mean to suggest that now is a favorable time to hitchhike. But I do want you to know that the coming weeks will be prime time to solicit favors, garner gifts, and make yourself available for metaphorical equivalents of free rides. You’re extra magnetic and attractive. How could anyone resist providing you with the blessings you need and deserve?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

One of the big stories of 2018 concerns your effort to escape from a star-crossed trick of fate —to fix a long-running tweak that has subtly undermined your lust for life. How successful will you be in this heroic quest? That will hinge in part on your faith in the new power you’ve been developing. Another factor that will determine the outcome is your ability to identify and gain access to a resource that is virtually magical even though it appears nondescript. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that a key plot twist in this story will soon unfold.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Potential new allies are seeking entrance to your domain. Existing allies aspire to be closer to you. I’m worried you may be a bit overwhelmed; that you might not exercise sufficient discrimination. I therefore urge you to ask yourself these questions about each candidate. 1. Does this person understand what it means to respect your boundaries? 2. What are his or her motivations for wanting contact with you? 3. Do you truly value and need the gifts each person has to give to you? 4. Everyone in the world has a dark side. Can you intuit the nature of each person’s dark side? Is it tolerable? Is it interesting?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

While a young man, the future Roman leader Julius Caesar was kidnapped by Sicilian pirates. They proposed a ransom of 620 kilograms of silver. Caesar was incensed at the small size of the ransom—he believed he was worth more—and demanded that his captors raise the sum to 1,550 kilograms. I’d love to see you unleash that kind of bravado in the coming weeks, Leo—preferably without getting yourself kidnapped. In my opinion, it’s crucial that you know how valuable you are, and make sure everyone else knows, as well.

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WED., SEPTEMBER 12 THE EARLY NOVEMBER & THE DANGEROUS SUMMER 7 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $18-20. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guests Jetty Bones & Save Face.

WED., SEPTEMBER 12 WAXAHATCHEE 8 P.M. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM NORTH SIDE. Over-18 event. $15-18. 412-237-8300 or warhol.org. With special guests Anna St. Louis & Night Shop.

WED., SEPTEMBER 12 JAY ASTON’S GENE LOVES JEZEBEL 8 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. 412-653-2695. $13-73. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Doors In The Labyrinth.

THUR., SEPTEMBER 13 MINI KISS

THU., SEPTEMBER 13 A KILLER’S CONFESSION NORTH PARK ^/zK'&>Kt Tuesdays, Sept. 4-25 7-8 pm BOYCE PARK YOGA IN THE PARK Thursdays, Sept. 6-27, 5:30-6:30 pm

ZKhE,/>>WZ< W/zK>/s Thursdays, Sept. 6-27, 6:30-7:30 pm SOUTH PARK BASIC zK'&>Kt Thursdays, Sept. 6-27, 7-8 pm t,/dK<WZ< YOGA IN THE PARK Sundays, Sept. 9-30, 9-10 am

6:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE UPSTAIRS SOUTH SIDE. 412-431-4668. Over-21 event. $15. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Tallah & New Fiction.

THU., SEPTEMBER 13 AMERICAN IDOL: LIVE! 2018 7 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $49.75-495. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Kris Allen & Forever In Your Mind.

THU., SEPTEMBER 13 MINI KISS 7:30 p.m. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. $23-55. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

FRI., SEPTEMBER 14 CHATTERTON 8 P.M. QUANTUM THEATRE EAST LIBERTY. $85. 412-362-1713 or quantumtheatre.com.

FRI., SEPTEMBER 14 MICHALE GRAVES

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Register at alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms 38

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10 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $13-15. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guests Only Flesh & Rocky Dennis Face.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE

SAT., SEPTEMBER 15 LITTLE ANTHONY & THE IMPERIALS 7 P.M. THE PALACE THEATRE GREENSBURG. $43-68. 724-836-8000 or thepalacetheatre.org. With special guests Terry Johnson’s Flamingos.

MON., SEPTEMBER 17 PATTERNIST 6:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE UPSTAIRS SOUTH Side. All-ages event. $10-12. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com.

MON., SEPTEMBER 17 PAUL SIMON

SAT., SEPTEMBER 15 NAUGHTY PROFESSOR

8 P.M. PPG PAINTS ARENA DOWNTOWN. $47-152. 412-642-1800 or ticketmaster.com.

9 p.m. REX THEATER South Side. All-ages event. $9. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest The Clock Reads.

TUE., SEPTEMBER 18 TUBBY DANIELS BAND

SUN., SEPTEMBER 16 L.L. BEAN YOGA HIKE AT NORTH PARK 1 p.m. NORTH PARK PIE TRAYNOR FIELD North Park. Over-8 event. Free event (registration required). Llbean.com/pittsburgh.

SUN., SEPTEMBER 16 CELTIC THUNDER X 8 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $39.25-79.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

5 P.M. AGNES KATZ PLAZA DOWNTOWN. Free event. Trustarts.org.

TUE., SEPTEMBER 18 PAWS UP BASIC DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS 7:15 P.M. SOUTH PARK MUSEUM BUILDING SOUTH PARK. $100. Pawsupdogtrain.com.

TUE., SEPTEMBER 18 WAR ON THE CATWALK 8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $22-152. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US


CALENDAR AUG. 30-SEPT. 5

PHOTO: PAWS ACROSS PITTSBURGH

^ Mon., Sept. 3: Pooches in the Pool

THURSDAY AUG. 30

FUNDRAISER

Got a few extra bucks to help put pencils and crayons in the hands of young Pittsburgh students on their first day of school? Bakery Square is holding a supply drive for the kids at Lincoln PreK-5, which emphasizes technology in its education. Supplies requested include chart paper, notebooks, hand sanitizer, Kleenex, construction paper, pocket folders, ruled paper, staples and writing

implements. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Through Mon., Sept. 3. Donations can be dropped off at Bakery Square Office 1 or Bakery Square Office 2, 6425 Penn Ave., Bakery Square. bakery-square.com/bksq-events/

FOOD

The annual five-day festival dedicated to all things ribs returns to Heinz Field. The Kickoff and Rib Fest, in its 28th year, features live music, national rib vendors, games, and rides. Vendors are spread across Art Rooney Avenue, Heinz Field and the parking lot adjacent. The event showcases the culinary artistry of 15 rib vendors, including four first-timers. Admission is

free. Coolers and outside food are not permitted. Through Mon., Sept 3. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. Free. All ages. heinzfield.com

TALK

Celebrated chef and historian Michael Twitty returns to Pittsburgh to talk about his James Beard award-winning memoir, The Cooking Gene, which explores the integral and controversial role Southern food plays in the American culinary tradition. The event promises a fresh perspective on how what we eat reflects our country’s ongoing struggle around race, as Twitty traces his ancestry — black and white — through food, from Africa to America, and from slavery to freedom. The presentation takes place at Heinz CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

PHOTO: EAST END BREWING COMPANY

^ Sat., Sept. 1: East End Boating

History Center. 6 p.m., 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. heinzhistorycenter.org

ART

The Sweetwater Center for the Arts welcomes Pittsburgh-based artist Scott Hunter for a talk on his solo exhibition Three Foot Square. Hunter — whose oil-and-acrylic painting Bluffs is on permanent display at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art — discusses the process behind his abstract impressionistflavored work, which his website describes as being “rooted in tradition, drawn from life and constructed with imagination.” Three Foot Square will be on display at Sweetwater through Sept. 7. 7-8:30 p.m., 200 Broad St., Sewickley. $5 suggested donation. Registration required. sweetwaterartcenter.org

TALK

In many American cities, a person earning

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minimum wage cannot afford the average 1-bedroom apartment. It’s not hard to conclude the housing system is broken. But it’s also difficult to imagine a different alternative. The Pittsburgh Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) believe housing is a human right and shouldn’t be commodified. The DSA is playing host to a Reading Group on Alternatives to an Unjust Housing System at Community Forge in Wilkinsburg to explore alternative ideas about housing. Some of the questions participants hope to have ^ Thu., Aug. 30: Michael Twitty

answered: Are there housing alternatives that exist outside the market? How can housing and land be made public and how can it become affordable for all? A “Homes for All” pamphlet, available for free on its website, is suggested reading before attending. 7-9 p.m. 1256 Franklin Ave., Wilkinsburg. Free. pghdsa.org

FRIDAY

AUG. 31 TALK

Police and prison abolition may be radical ideas to some, but they are gaining mainstream acceptance. Soon-to-

be state Rep. Summer Lee (D-Swissvale) won an election while campaigning for prison abolition. And BOOM Concepts is playing host to an event for those looking to join the movement. Authors Alex Vitale and David Correia will be in Pittsburgh to discuss the topic and their books: The End of Policing (Vitale) and Police: A Field Guide (Correia). The Stop Police Violence book talk is co-hosted by The Big Idea Bookstore and Steel City Autonomous Movement (SCAM). The upcoming nationwide prison strike will also be a topic of discussion. 7-9 p.m. 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. (Facebook search “BOOM Concepts”)

CHARITY

Given locals’ love for hometown football icons and 1970s music, it’s fair to wonder which is the bigger attraction at the HM3 Celebrity Care Fest: Dan Marino or Earth Wind & Fire? At least attendees of


this event needn’t choose. Marino and Jerome Bettis — they share Hall-of-Fame status, but only Bettis was a Super Bowl champion — are the biggest names amongst celebrities attending this event, which will include intimate performances by Earth Wind & Fire and Grand Funk Railroad. Proceeds benefit the Dan Marino Foundation, the Jerome Bettis Bus Stops Here Foundation, and Steelers Charities. Good luck finding a more locally star-studded way to start Labor Day-weekend festivities. 5:30 p.m. 405 Avonlea Court, Gibsonia. $300 ($500 VIP). hm3independencefund.org

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SATURDAY SEPT. 1

PHOTO: FRED SALINAS

Flow Tribe

EVENT

Media coverage of young black men in America all too often focuses on bleak statistics or unsubtle racist stereotypes. In an effort to provide education and inspiration to counter those popular narratives, Pittsburgh Black Legacy created the Black Manhood Summit: From Boys To Men at August Wilson Center. The topics are: “Black Business and Community Support,” “Community Violence and Solutions,” “Act and Think Like a Man,” and “Police Brutality and The Just-Us System.” State Rep. Ed Gainey moderates. The summit is tailored for young men, but all family members are welcome. 5 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. pittsburghblacklegacy.com/

BOATING

Boat season is short, especially in Pittsburgh. Temperatures will probably be scorching well into October, but the general sense is that summer is ending and everyone’s gotta get the warm-weather activities in now. While it’s still warm and shining, get out on the water with East End Boating, a fancy booze cruise from East End Brewing Company. The three-hour boat ride features a variety of beers. Despite all the delicious, healthy seafood available in our pungent, murky rivers, the cruise will feature food provided Justin Severino of Morcilla and Cure. 5:30 p.m. Docks next to Carnegie Science Center, North Side. $65. 21 and older. eastendbrewing.com

PARTY

Grab your girls and your tallest platform sneakers: it’s the 5th annual Spice Night at Blue Moon, hosted by drag queen Bambi and promised to be replete with no shortage of sass, spunk, and girl power. Make sure to brush up on your Spice Girl lyrics (“Zig-a-Zig-ah”) to ensure proper singalong ability. Spice World (the movie) will continuously play in the background. Keep an eye out for the drag show at

THURSDAY Counting Crows 7 p.m. KeyBank Pavilion, Burgettstown. livenation.com

FRIDAY Beauty Slap 9 p.m. Spirit, Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com

SATURDAY Rumours ATL: A Fleetwood Mac Tribute 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

SUNDAY

Were you an INDUSTRIAL or CONSTRUCTION TRADESMAN? • Machinist • Boilermaker ̽3LSHͤWWHU • Insulator • Millwright • Electrician • Steel Mill Worker • Shipyard Worker • Power Plant Worker • Industrial Plant Worker • Maintenance Worker • Railroad Worker AND recently diagnosed with LUNG CANCER?

Flow Tribe 9 p.m. Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. ticketmaster.com

MONDAY Stone Sour 8 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. ticketmaster.com

TUESDAY Nonpoint 5:30 p.m. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Whitehall. tickeyfly.com

WEDNESDAY Fall Out Boy 7 p.m. PPG Paints Arena, Downtown. ticketmaster.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

PHOTO: NICK FANCHER

^ Tue., Sept. 4: Saintseneca

midnight featuring Phoenix Fatale as Sporty, Tootsie Snyder as Ginger, Cindy Crotchford as Baby, Alora Chateaux as Scary, and Bambi as Posh. 11 p.m. 5115 Butler St., Lawrenceville.

SUNDAY SEPT. 2 BBQ

Everybody knows barbecues aren’t just about meat. Sure, that part’s delicious, but there are also the crucially important side dishes, cold beer, lawn games, music, even the moist towelettes. The East Side BBQ Fest, located on the Homewood Football Field, will feature over 30 vendors battling for the best barbecue in the East End. There will also be a junior cook-off for kids ages 7-16 to showcase their prodigious

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culinary skills. 11 a.m-8 p.m. 540 North Lang Ave., Homewood. Free. (Facebook search “East Side BBQ Fest”)

MONDAY SEPT. 3 POOCHES

Ever gone for a nice refreshing dip in the pool and thought, “Damn, I wish my dog were here.” Now that dream is within reach. Allegheny Parks and Paws Across Pittsburgh are playing host to Pooches in the Pool, a Labor Day event > Tue., Sept. 4: Maxwell King

at North Park, South Park, and Boyce Park pools (even the wave pool) where pups are allowed in the water. Entry includes goodie bags for a furry friend, including treats and, holy sh*t, a tennis ball! Just make sure the pooches are wearing tags showing up-to-date vaccinations. 4-6 p.m. Multiple locations. $15. allegheny county.us/special-events

TUESDAY SEPT. 4 EVENT

Remake Learning grantees are invited to network with other grantees at Great Grantee Mixer. In addition to sharing ideas, Remake invites grantees

to share input for its showcase event. Remake Learning is a network for initiatives in Pittsburgh that support young people’s education with engaging learning practices. Drinks and refreshments will be provided. Tuesday and Thursday options are available to grantees. The Remake Grantee Mixer will be held at Glitter Box Theater today, and at Remake Learning headquarters’ lower level on Thursday. 5:30 p.m. Also Thu., Sept. 6. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. All ages. remakelearning.org

CRAFT

Frugal unwashed knitting novices have no excuse to miss this one. Rita J. is holding a free workshop for knitting your very own washcloth as a part of Carnegie Library’s Hands-On Workshop Series. Materials and expert tutelage will be provided, so don’t worry if you’re a first-timer. Registration


is not required, but there are only 20 seats available on a first-come, first-serve basis, so come early. Once you’re done, go home, run the bath and put that bad boy to use. 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. carnegielibrary.org

BOOKS

Fifty years after the debut of his iconic show, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, the late Fred Rogers has re-entered public consciousness with the recent release of the acclaimed documentary Won’t You Be My Neighbor? and the announcement of a biopic starring Hollywood nice-man Tom Hanks. The Heinz History Center adds to the fervor with an appearance by Maxwell King. The author and Pittsburgh Foundation president/CEO discusses his new book, The Good Neighbor: The Life and Works of Fred Rogers, an in-depth look at the career, personal life, and religious beliefs of a television pioneer. (Even better — the audio version of the book is read by Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton.) 7-9 p.m., 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $15-45. heinzhistorycenter.org

MUSIC

Warm Thoughts, aka Dad Punchers, aka Elliot Babin, showcases remarkable songwriting skill on his latest LP, I Went Swimming Alone. If you missed it, the ten tracks present an honest and diary-like vulnerability, whose themes revolve around nostalgia and isolation. The former Touché Amore member brings his I Went Touring Alone tour to The Mr. Roboto Project, with Canadian Rifle, Jimmy Mayo, and Nightmarathons. 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8-10. All ages. brownpapertickets.com

MUSIC

When Saintseneca released its first full length a little over a decade ago, it was

ART: SCOTT HUNTER

^ Thu., Aug. 30: Three Foot Square

met with praise and a bit of confusion. Beyond the boilerplate “not fitting into one genre,” the five-piece weaved folk, country, rock and punk with gothic, literary lyrics and unexpected instrumentation (balalaika, baglama, dulcimer). And it sounded really good. Now four LPs into its career, neither the praise nor its idiosyncratic sound have wavered. 2014’s Dark Arc is a career highlight and a good place to start, but there are no duds in the catalogue. At Spirit, expect to hear songs from the new album, Pillar of Na, where you can,

in the words of its title track, “weep with [them] in 4/4 time.” 9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $12-14. spiritpgh.com

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 5

CASTING CALL

When the Netflix drama Mindhunter started filming around town in 2016, there was a rumor that its title was one of those fake

titles given to projects in production so people didn’t know what they’re actually filming. But it’s real, and a crime drama set in the 1970s, following the early days of serial killer profiling. If you want in on the fun, and probably fake blood, there will be an opening casting call for Mindhunter extras at Wigle Barrelhouse. The call is for participants of all ages and backgrounds. There will also be drinks from Wigle Whiskey, live music, and a food truck. 5-9 p.m. 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side. wiglewhiskey.com •

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Securitas Security Services Inc., is lookŝŶŐƚŽŚŝƌĞǀĞŶƚ^ƚĂīĂŶĚŝĚĂƚĞƐ͘dŚĞ ŝĚĞĂĐĂŶĚŝĚĂƚĞŵƵƐƚŚĂǀĞĂŵŝůŝƚĂƌLJ͕ůĂǁ ĞŶĨŽƌĐĞŵĞŶƚŽƌƐĞĐƵƌŝƚLJďĂĐŬŐƌŽƵŶĚ͘ dŚŝƐƉŽƐŝƟŽŶŝƐŝŶƚŚĞĚŽǁŶƚŽǁŶWŝƩƐďƵƌŐŚĂƌĞĂ͕ǁŝƚŚĂƉĂLJƌĂƚĞŽĨΨϭϯͬ,Z͘

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on September 7, 2018 until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for a Service Contract for the following:

ƐƐĞŶƟĂůĨƵŶĐƟŽŶƐĂŶĚƌĞƐƉŽŶƐŝďŝůŝƟĞƐ͗ • /ŶƚĞƌĂĐƚƐǁŝƚŚŐƵĞƐƚƐ͕ĂŶƐǁĞƌƋƵĞƐƟŽŶ͕ĂŶĚĂĐƚƐĂƐĂŵďĂƐƐĂĚŽƌĨŽƌ ^ĞĐƵƌŝƚĂƐĂŶĚŽƵƌůŝĞŶƚ͘ • WĂƚƌŽůƐĂŶĚŵŽŶŝƚŽƌƐŝŶƚĞƌŝŽƌĂŶĚ exterior of facility to ensure safety of ƚĞĂŵŵĞŵďĞƌƐ͕ŐƵĞƐƚƐĂŶĚƉƌŽƉĞƌƚLJ͘ • /ŶƐƉĞĐƚƐŐƵĞƐƚƐďĂŐƐ͕ĂŶĚƐĐƌĞĞŶƐĂůů ŐƵĞƐƚƐĞŶƚĞƌŝŶŐƚŚĞĨĂĐŝůŝƚLJ͕ǁŝƚŚĂ ĨŽĐƵƐŽŶĐƵƐƚŽŵĞƌƐĞƌǀŝĐĞ͘ /ŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚĐĂŶĚŝĚĂƚĞƐĐĂŶŐŽŽŶůŝŶĞƚŽ ǁǁǁ͘ƐĞĐƵƌŝƚĂƐũŽďƐ͘ĐŽŵƚŽĂƉƉůLJ͘KŶĐĞ LJŽƵĂƉƉůLJƉůĞĂƐĞĐĂůůƚŚĞŽĸĐĞĂƚϰϭϮͲ ϵϮϮͲϮϯϯϭƐŽŝŶƚĞƌǀŝĞǁƐĐĂŶďĞƐĞƚƵƉ͘

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PGH OLIVER •Air Conditioning for Offices •Mechanical, Electrical, and Asbestos Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on August 7, 2018 for Pittsburgh Oliver at Modern Reproductions (412488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Document is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time September 18, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

Xerographic Paper General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/ default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid. M. Jordan Purchasing We are an equal rights and opportunity school district


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BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS

1. House style 6. Artist’s digs 10. Fountain’s point 13. Room with a concierge, often 15. “Milk’s Favorite Cookie” 16. Logical conclusion? 17. Question to a “Rolling In The Deep” impersonator? 20. Printer’s meas. 21. “That’s gonna hurt!” 22. Speedy Ortiz singer Dupuis 23. With 58-Across, give “Believe” singer a hard time? 25. With 40-Across, three things you need to have a selfpampering afternoon while listening to “Single Ladies”? 29. Statesman Arafat 31. The Lorax creator 32. Rolls on the ground? 33. Neither’s partner 35. Word in either blank of “Good ___/bad ___” 36. Lungful 37. Agt.’s take 40. See 25-Across 43. Rapper Chelsea Handler called “Korea’s Ricky Martin” 44. Anonymous name 45. “Un momento,

___ favor” 46. ___ standstill (unable to move) 48. Pitching stat. 49. Transitional piece 51. “Gladiator” Oscar-winner 55. Religious figures who love “9 to 5”? 58. See 23-Across 59. Still sleeping 60. Foo Fighters’ label 62. Grazing field 63. Things figured out by the “Because You Loved Me” singer? 68. ___ Niagen (antiaging vitamin brand) 69. Unique style 70. “Tuesdays with ___” 71. NNW’s opposite 72. Cry of pain 73. Ralph who is a government watchdog

like yesterday 11. Last release in Sufjan Stevens’ aborted Fifty States project 12. Take everything from 14. “Butt out,” briefly 18. Has to pay back 19. Morse code noise 24. Germanic one 26. Etiquette 27. “___ giorno!” 28. Grp. with some stray observations? 30. Tight end Gronkowski 34. Turn away 37. Tries to imagine a better tomorrow 38. They work with a bunch of stiffs

39. Color similar to turquoise 41. Downwardfacing dog activity 42. “You get the idea” 47. Softball’s path 49. Australia’s biggest city 50. Viscount’s peer 52. “Give me a break!” 53. Cookout meat 54. Art Gum, e.g. 56. Garland for greetings 57. Jerks 61. Many, many 64. Yale student 65. Easily duped fellow 66. Singleton 67. Vehicle for retirement LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

DOWN

1. Cheap and shoddy 2. Perfect location 3. Ancient Celtic priests 4. Salad dressing choice 5. Trump lawyer Giuliani 6. Two-time NBA Sixth Man of the Year Williams 7. Sphere 8. Doctor’s cost 9. Glass-raising words 10. Must have,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 29-SEPT. 5, 2018

45


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August 29, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 35

August 29, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 35