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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL

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Editor ROB ROSSI Managing Editor LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writer RYAN DETO Arts Writer HANNAH LYNN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Featured Contributors GAB BONESSO, ADAM CROWLEY, TERENEH IDIA Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX MCCANN, LAUREN ORTEGO

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JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 30

DRINK ISSUE 6 Something for everybody who has ever been thirsty.

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

C P C OV E R P H OTO B Y JA RE D W I C K E RHA M

Food+Drink 24 Arts+Entertainment 28 Calendar 38

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives BLAKE LEWIS, KAITLIN OLIVER Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

WEEKLY FEATURES Jen Sorensen 14 Free Will Astrology 36 Crossword 44 Savage Love 45

ADMINISTRATION Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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.DRINK ISSUE.

WHERE BARTENDERS DRINK

BY JARED WICKERHAM // JWICKERHAM@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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GO TO WHERE BARTENDERS GO OUT.

O

VER THE NEXT FEW PAGES, we show a side of some Pittsburgh

barkeeps they usually keep hidden. Photographer Jared Wickerham went where they head for a night “off.” And while we’re not suggesting you make their special spots your new hangouts, we do suspect bartenders probably know best when it comes to where to drink.

BARTENDER: Jackson Allen WHERE HE WORKS: Carmella’s Pints

WHERE HE DRINKS:

& Plates, South Side

Ruggers Pub, South Side

I play rugby for the owners of the bar as part of Pittsburgh Force. They have great pub grub and friendly people.

FAVORITE DRINK: Mystery

Beer (Guess the beer correctly and the drink is free. It was Crispin Cider.)

CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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WHERE BARTENDERS DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

.ESSAY.

DRINKING LIKE A BARTENDER BY TRACY MOLYNEAUX INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

What should we do this weekend? This simple question is asked in relationships across America. But for people “in the industry,” the answer is usually “I have to work.” People in The Biz, aka the service industry, usually begin the work week on Wednesday or Thursday (depending on bar or restaurant type, atmosphere, etc.) and ends on Sunday (or after Monday Night Football in Steelers Country). Weekends off are few and far between. So, when that rare occasion occurs, where does the bar staff like to go out? First things first: weekends are the lifeline of our industry. All of our money depends on you, the customer. A Saturday night off can be a huge swing in the wrong direction; money spent instead of money earned can really add up. So, if you see bartenders out on a Saturday night, we are ready to get the party started. As observed from my years behind the bar, staffers tend to go places where we “know someone.” Whether it’s the security guard at the front door, a bartender or a waitress — it doesn’t really matter. A friendly face in the crowd makes the night immediately better. When I first entered The Biz, I would often introduce myself to the staffer whom I didn’t know at bars I frequented; told them where I worked, too. This behavior seemed silly to friends from the outside, but my familiarizing with Biz brothers and sisters made a huge difference. At one point, I knew someone on every shift at Jack’s Bar, Smokin’ Joe’s Saloon and all the clubs in Station Square (RIP). Knowing somebody on staff afforded me perks: skipping lines, getting drinks faster and not getting kicked

BARTENDER: BobbiLyn Anthony WHERE SHE WORKS: Industry

Public House, Lawrenceville

WHERE SHE DRINKS: Gooski’s,

I love the bartenders, drinks, and food. Awesome vegetarian food. Great punk music. Best jukebox in Pittsburgh.

Polish Hill FAVORITE DRINK: Old German

and a shot of Corralejo

CONTINUES ON PG. 10 CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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WHERE BARTENDERS DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8 DRINKING LIKE A BARTENDER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

out if a friend stole the tip horn from behind the back bar and honked it at random people. Where staffers go on a night off is not so much about the place, but what the place represents. Bar life creates a family of employees by bringing together people from all different backgrounds. Staffers usually end up at our places of work at some point on a night off. Why? It’s a safe zone. No matter how much we’ve had to drink, how many times we’ve gone behind the bar or how many dance parties we’ve started in the service station, we have the blessing of those enforcing a bar’s rules that evening. These places we call work are our homes away from home, so our colleagues working know they needn’t worry about us as they would other rules-stretching patrons. It’s fun for staffers working when employees show up after we’ve had a little too much somewhere else. Now they get to make fun of us if we make out with a stranger on the dance floor or fall asleep in a booth after last call. Gives them a bit of ammo if we try to sneak out of our shift the next day, too. • Tracy Molyneaux, a longtime bartender at Carson City Saloon on the South Side, is now part of the ownership group at Coughlin’s Law Kitchen and Ale House in Mount Washington.

BARTENDER:

Byron Nash WHERE HE WORKS:

Lorelei, East Liberty

WHERE HE DRINKS: Mad Mex Shadyside FAVORITE DRINK: Margarita with Grand Marnier

Mad Mex is a place where they know what I like and can still do work. It’s a warm feeling and they’ve supported me over the years. CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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WHERE BARTENDERS DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

I love pool and shuffleboard. They have fun games to play when you’re out. My friends typically hang there and it’s nearby.

BARTENDER: Travis Buick WHERE HE WORKS: 5801, Shadyside WHERE HE DRINKS:

Let us know where you go to drink by sending an email to info@pghcitypaper.com or tweet us @pghcitypaper.

P Town, Shadyside FAVORITE DRINK: Vodka cranberry and a shot of Patron

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The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

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BARTENDER: Dustin Klein WHERE HE WORKS: Il Tetto (Sienna Mercato), Downtown

Laid back atmosphere. Stand-up comedy nights are great. Good food.

WHERE HE DRINKS:

Hambone’s, Lawrenceville FAVORITE DRINK:

East End Big Hop IPA

N O RTH S H O R E / 330 NORTH SHOR E DR., BLDG 1B PITTSBU RG H, PA 15212 412.500.7530

TH E WATE R FR O NT / 244 W BR I DG E ST. WEST HOM ESTEAD, PA 15120 412.462.6400

CONTINUES ON PG. 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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WHERE BARTENDERS DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

Friendly staff. Nearby. A lot of fun cocktails.

BARTENDER: Constance Zotis WHERE SHE WORKS: Modern Cafe, North Side

WHERE SHE DRINKS: Threadbare

Cider House, Spring Garden FAVORITE DRINK: Farmhouse Cider

JENSORENSEN

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.DRINK ISSUE.

DOUBLE VISION BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE URBAN Dictionary definition for “beer goggles” — the phenomenon that alcohol makes the drinker think others are more attractive than when they’re sober — offers this example: “When I took her to bed, she looked like Halle Berry. When I woke up, she looked like Keith Richards!” Think of any movie where a beautiful publicist gets broken up with, goes on a bender and wakes up next to a pizza delivery boy. This is a well-researched phenomenon that can even affect non-humans. A study done by researchers at Penn State found that when fruit flies were exposed to alcohol, the males were less picky and more forward with their potential mates. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have turned to humans, gathering and analyzing data from existing studies to show how alcohol impacts perceived attractiveness. Conducted by psychology professor Michael Sayette and graduate student Molly Bowdring, the study aims to provide a better understanding of why some people drink in excess. “A lot of the work so far in this field has focused on the impact of alcohol on emotion, and what we’re saying is this is another type of effect that alcohol may not be directly impacting emotion but rather impacting our perception of others,” says Bowdring. The study, recently published in the journal Addiction, shows a link between attractiveness perception in heterosexual participants, but Bowdring also notes that there were only six available

studies that even included non-heterosexual participants. This, along with research methods, are one of the things she would hope to change in future research. Studies on alcohol and perception more often take place in a lab, as opposed to a bar setting, and use static, expressionless images for rating attractiveness instead of dynamic video.

attractive when drunk, but also rated ugly landscapes to be more beautiful. A study in the British Journal of Psychology, excellently titled “Beauty is in the Eye of the Beer Holder,” shows that alcohol causes participants to see themselves as more attractive. Research published in Clinical Psychological Science shows that couples with relationship

what we say when inebriated is what we want to say sober but don’t have the courage. Like the true trope of drunk women in public bathrooms excessively complimenting each other. Maybe deep down inside, we’re all scared to tell people we actually think they’re beautiful! But this is the idea that Bowdring says is harmful, that rewarding aspects of alcohol can lead to excess and dependence. “It may be that we perceive others as more attractive when we drink, and being around attractive others is rewarding and it’s nice to be around beautiful people, but then if that leads us to drink every night or drink to a great extent on a single occasion, then it can become hazardous,” says Bowdring. “Beer goggles” is a funny concept that’s almost endearing when you think about it, then bleak when you think about it longer. At its most extreme, “beer goggles” take the route of something like Shallow Hal, wherein Jack Black’s character sees heavy women as skinny models, causing confusion in chaos. Alcohol doesn’t work like that, magically making everyone around you hot, but its benefits can impede your enjoyment of sobriety. If it can make people and landscapes more beautiful and relationships easier, then what’s the problem? “It’s important to understand that many people do drink and gain reward from it, and we can think of these rewards as being kind of double-edged swords,” says Bowdring. “It might be

MAYBE DEEP DOWN INSIDE, WE’RE ALL SCARED TO TELL PEOPLE WE ACTUALLY THINK THEY’RE BEAUTIFUL! Variations on this study have been researched before. A study published in Alcohol and Alcoholism showed that participants not only rated people more

problems get along better with the use of alcohol. Part of this feels like “drunken words, sober thoughts” — the idea that

that the things we really enjoy when we drink can potentially become reasons that we continue to drink and maybe drink to a problematic degree.”

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IX-PACKS are finally available at more than just that one smoky, neighborhood bar. No more timidly asking if IC Light Mango is for sale. More purchasing guilty pleasures with a bit of anonymity. Over the last few years, Pennsylvania has become more lenient with its archaic drinking laws. Wine and beer are widely available. State-owned liquor stores have extended hours. Gov. Tom Wolf spokesperson J.J. Abbott says it’s been a top priority for the administration to make liquor laws “much more customer friendly.” But, this doesn’t mean liquor, beer and wine are now available everywhere at all hours; this is Pennsylvania after all. State laws still must be followed, and special rules obeyed. Here’s a rundown of some of the changes and some rules you might not be aware of.

GAS STATION BOOZE

As of May 1, the state has approved 660 locations that can sell beer and wine. Customers are allowed to purchase up to two six-packs and three liters of wine per transaction. Not all Pennsylvania gas stations, grocery stores and restaurants have beer and wine, as each one has to apply for a permit to sell. Notable Pittsburgh spots for on-thego booze include GetGo gas stations in Bloomfield, South Side and Wilkinsburg. For drinking-age students, Thirsty Scholar Bar & Grille on Fifth Avenue in Oakland is also a bottle shop. And beer distributors no longer sell just cases; six-packs and growlers are available.

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BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CRAFT COLLABORATION

Starting in 2017, Pennsylvania-licensed breweries, wineries and distilleries could sell each other’s products. East End Brewing can sell Wigle Whiskey and vice versa. These booze producers can also open five satellite facilities, up from two. Farmers markets are now fair game, too. Producers can sell and sample while customers buy fresh produce. There are a lot more places to get locally-made hooch.

LIQUOR-STORE HOURS

In 2016, Pennsylvania started allowing state-run Fine Wine and Good Spirits stores to operate on Sundays.

More than 320 liquor stores are now open Sundays, typically with hours from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Pittsburgh liquor stores with Sunday hours are located in Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, South Side, North Side, Mt. Washington, Lawrenceville and Westwood.

TO-GO BEERS FROM THE BAR

There are still plenty of bars in Pennsylvania that sell six-packs to take home. This was a primary way to get sixpacks before changes started around 2015. Just ask the bartender what’s available and go on your merry way. There’s a two six-pack limit per transaction. With more lenient liquor laws, many bars have stopped selling six-packs, and many more will likely follow. Call ahead.

OUTSIDE DRINKING

With an abundance of summer festivals, questions about the legality of drinking in the street or park will arise. Worry not. As long as organizers apply for a Special Occasion Permit ahead of time, drinkers can enjoy the summer breeze. Organizers likely have necessary permits for big festivals such as Pride. For smaller, hastier festivals, you might want to ask before cracking a cold one. Also, Erie has no open-container laws in its downtown business district, so drinking in the street is always allowed. Head north, good drinkers. •


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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.DRINK ISSUE.

DRINKING WHILE PEDALING

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ARTY BIKES, those large, pedalpowered vehicles that drunkenly roam the city, combine three of my least favorite things: drawing attention, being in the way, and biking. Over the past few years, they’ve become commonplace in cities of all sizes. The Pittsburgh edition, called the Party Pedaler, came to town in 2013, and sightings have become more frequent, with routes going through Downtown/Strip District and the North Shore. Contrary to how it appears, these bikers aren’t actually drinking while biking (due to Pennsylvania open container laws). Or at least not visibly. “We do allow groups to bring coolers and cups, like red Solo cups, to drink out of,” says Kevin Campbell, operations director of Party Pedaler. Mostly the party bike stops at bars along the way. These pedalers always seem to be having a great time, whoo-ing and singing as they pedal their hearts out. But there’s a dissonance between the people who ride and love the party bikes, and those who look upon them like a parasite. I put out a call on Twitter, asking for people with strong feelings about these vehicles (good or bad) to send me their thoughts. Someone who lives in Boise, Idaho, messaged to say the party bikes

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CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

The Party Pedaler travels through Market Square.

are all over that city. “Bike bars are symptomatic of the rapid expansion and gentrification of the city, but on a less serious note, they’re always playing the worst music and are populated by people held together and bound to look publicly entertained and entertaining,” this someone said. “It feels like being haunted by a demon.” Campbell says the customer breakdown is about 50/50 for local and outof-town customers. Reading reviews on

Yelp, TripAdvisor and Google shows that many of the customers, even if not from another state or city, come from the suburbs or closer to central Pennsylvania. It’s the kind of novel activity a friend’s mom might suggest while visiting, because it’s a quirky way to see the city. But city residents might feel embarrassed at having to move 5 mph, loudly singing on a street where they might see someone recognizable on the sidewalk. My sister, who lives in the Bay Area, said of these party bikes: “I think they exist for the sole purpose of bachelor/ bachelorette parties where you go to a city without really seeing the city in any way.” Another responder, from Pittsburgh, described it as “a perfect pregame for a romantic night at the Cheesecake Factory.” As fun as it might be, party biking is not a unique experience. Party bikes are in New York City, Nashville and Minneapolis — and also Tuscon, Ariz.; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Appleton, Wis. Customer reviews rave about party bikes, giving five stars and saying they’re a “MUST” for a “fun and unique” tour of Pittsburgh. And Campbell says pedestrians who see the bike are always welcoming. “People are very receptive to us,” he says. “Most people are smiling and waving.” The bikes are also not the only genre

of transportation in the growing groupdrinking vehicle trend. Just a few months ago, a company called Crusin’ Tikis introduced boats decorated to resemble a Tiki shack that sail along the city’s rivers. The BYOB cruise is $400 for two hours, holds six people and has no bathroom. (Some of the incredulity towards these activities comes from the fact that something so expensive doesn’t even include drinks.) Just a few weeks ago, Pittsburgh Pedal Boats launched. It operates like the bikes in that a large group powers the boat by pedaling while a captain is steering. Boats are less prominent than bikes, and there remain some questions on where we’re at with group activities. One reviewer exemplifies the enjoyment gap, noting “a great group of 16 friends, a sing out loud playlist and a wonderful driver made this the most fun thing I’ve done in Pittsburgh.” If a group of friends are the type of people who enjoy traveling in extra-large packs and singing in public, then, of course, this is a great activity. Party groups are not for people who walk down the street alone with headphones on. They’re for people who walk together with arms linked, taking up the whole width of the sidewalk without a second thought. They could care less, as long as they’re having fun together.


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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.DRINK ISSUE.

WHERE EVERY HOUR IS HAPPY HOUR BY CP STAFF // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

OR THE ANNUAL Drinks Issue, City Paper staff selected its favorite spots to drink and be merry in and around Pittsburgh. These are our picks. Feel free to share yours by way of email or Twitter (our handle is @pghcitypaper, as if you didn’t know!).

||| Biergarten at The Commoner 620 WILLIAM PENN PL., DOWNTOWN Seeking a hard day’s night after working in the city? This rooftop haven for European beers is cool even when the weather is hot. And you can’t compile a list of great happy hours until you’ve spent a couple of hours playing a life-sized game of Jenga with one of Biergarten’s cocktails fueling the strategy.

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Hidden Harbor in Squirrel Hill

||| Bierport

||| Blue Moon

4115 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE No matter your taste, you’ll find a beer you like. There are hundreds of bottles to pluck off the shelves and get chilled on the spot. Or head downstairs to choose from 19 brews on tap. There’s also a Sega Genesis.

5115 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE Dubbing itself the “Friendliest Gay Bar in Pittsburgh,” this spot often features drag shows and themed dance nights. Past ones include an emotional night called “Songs 2 Cry 2” and a Passover-themed evening of “Let My People Ho!”

||| Bigham Tavern

||| Brew Gentlemen

321 BIGHAM ST., MOUNT WASHINGTON This classic pub is known for its wings, available in more than 30 flavors. They come in tequila lime, honey garlic habanero and “cluckin’ hot.” The latter is accompanied by extreme danger, or so goes the menu’s warning. (Maybe order a couple of beers?)

512 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK This renovated electrical supply shop has earned that distinction by providing beers with simple recipes and designating them for seven categories. Closed Monday-Tuesday, a midweek visit is recommended. Ask for the 15104 Series, a rotation selection that never disappoints.

||| Bistro Penn 922 PENN AVE., DOWNTOWN The fifth and newest in the Sharp Edge family, this spot boasts a 35-tap draft list specializing in Belgian beers. Appetizers range from mussels and sesame sashimi tuna to good ol’ Buffalo wings.

||| Blue Dust 601 AMITY ST., HOMESTEAD One of the region’s best bars, this is far enough away from the often-crowded Waterfront. Blue Dust has an interesting rotation of beers and some of the best pub-grub around. Worth the trip to Homestead for anybody not nearby.

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or a rosé saison and a scotch egg (if that’s more your speed).

||| Eleventh Hour Brewing 3711 CHARLOTTE ST., LAWRENCEVILLE The beer is brewed on-site and there is a killer tap room featuring a handful of games to play while drinking. (A favorite: Connect Four.) Added bonus: daily visits from a rotation of Pittsburgh’s finest food trucks.

||| Federal Galley 200 CHILDREN’S WAY, NORTH SIDE This hipster cafeteria? It’s more than a food hall. It’s an outdoor beer garden with 30 drafts, half-off drinks during happy hour, and the bar is a former bank vault. All this, plus four amazing restaurants.

||| Butterjoint

||| Fuel & Fuddle

214 N. CRAIG ST., OAKLAND Avoid much of Oakland’s college crowd and check out this complement to Legume, the bistro next door. Try a grass-fed burger or potato- and cottage cheesefilled pierogis — and figure out which wines pair best.

212 OAKLAND AVE., OAKLAND University of Pittsburgh students will need no reminder of the deals here: cheap eats reign supreme from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. daily, and there’s a fantastic assortment of beer and cocktails for the juniors and seniors.

||| Cinderlands Beer Co.

||| Shiloh Grill

3705 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE Upscale and traditional vibes combine for an appealing mix of adventurous but accessible food and original brews. You can get its Dad Beer and a Diner Burger,

123 SHILOH ST., MOUNT WASHINGTON Any place that serves BacondoublecheeseburgherChimichangas (no spaces) and Cheese Dip con Queso with Cheese (that’s a cheese dip, if you were unsure)

is worth stopping by. Service Industry Nights begin at 6 p.m. on Sundays, and drinks are discounted by $1 at the Shiloh Grill.

||| Independent Brewing

Company and Hidden Harbor 1704 AND 1708 SHADY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL These sibling bars share an owner and a street corner. Hidden Harbor offers fancy Tiki cocktails adorned with flowers, scorched with flames, and served in a pineapple cup. Independent offers a wide selection of beers and cocktails, with a record player spinning handpicked tunes.

||| Mixtape 4907 PENN AVE., GARFIELD This bar and café serves hand-crafted cocktails (named after songs), as well as coffee and smoothies. The vibe is relaxed, with couches to lounge on and board games to play. The drinks might seem pricier at first glance, but that’s because it’s a no-tipping establishment.

||| Modern Cafe 862 WESTERN AVE., NORTH SIDE This has one of the longest happy hours in the city, usually going from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. This Allegheny West staple has great beer, a lively atmosphere and tasty snacks. A must if looking to escape the North Shore’s scene.


CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

On tap at Sharp Edge’s Bistro Penn

||| Over the Bar Bicycle Cafe 2518 E. CARSON ST., SOUTH SIDE Affectionately known simply as OTB, this bicycle-friendly bar and restaurant offers draft beers and eclectic pub food. Try the Dirt Rag Delight, a cheeseburger topped with peanut butter and pickles. Sounds like something to wash down, yes?

||| Paradise Island Bowl & Beach 7601 GRAND AVE., NEVILLE ISLAND Order a cocktail from the island bar, then lounge on the beach. Vacation? Staycation. OK, it’s just a river, not an ocean. But if it gets hot, you can go inside and bowl.

seafood-heavy menu, cheap buckets of domestic and all-you-can-eat crab legs.

||| Sidelines Bar & Grille 621 EVERGREEN AVE., MILLVALE Hit hard by recent flooding, Sidelines persevered and again will be a staple for sports fans when the NFL and NHL seasons fall back into action. Even without those games, this spot is no secret for beer lovers; the bottle list’s length rivals that of season-ticket waiting list for the Steelers or Penguins. And who doesn’t dig a late happy hour that begins at 10 p.m.?

||| Smokin’ Joe’s Saloon

5719 BRYANT ST., HIGHLAND PARK The limited beer selection is no issue, because all the beers are solid. (They pair well with burgers at an attached restaurant.) Park Place Pub is never too crowded, but also never too empty, and there is a humongous patio in the back. A neighbor is seemingly always willing to chat.

2001 E. CARSON ST., SOUTH SIDE If Pittsburgh has a real-life version of the classic sitcom Cheers, its setting would be this bar that regulars affectionately call “The Joe.” Won’t take long for the staff to know your name. A traditional happy hour offers discounts on each of the over 60 beers on tap. And if you stay past 7 p.m., expect to hear jam bands playing on the music machine.

||| Primanti Bros. (Penn Ave.)

||| Squirrel Hill Cafe

5491 PENN AVE., GARFIELD Since opening in 2017, this sandwich chain has become the neighborhood bar for Bloomfield, Friendship and Garfield residents. There is always a diverse crowd to watch sports or hang. Happy hours extend late on weekday nights and Saturdays.

5802 FORBES AVE., SQUIRREL HILL Technically called the Squirrel Hill Café (only by nerds), this dimly lit, smoky bar is lovingly known only as The Cage. It is home to great wings, cheap drinks, and TVs always playing Turner Classic Movies. Also, the chillest bartenders.

||| Redfin Blues

120 S. WHITFIELD ST., EAST LIBERTY “Never end the night at Ace Hotel, always at Taco Bell.” That’s a saying, right? There is not a Taco Bell in the East End, so that leaves only one spot to end an evening. Ace Hotel’s tavern offers great cocktails in a hip yet not-too-pretentious setting.

||| Park Place Pub

100 WATERFRONT DR., TROY HILL The first time you stumble on this spot at Washington’s Landing, it’s perfectly normal to wonder if you’ve somehow wormholed to Martha’s Vineyard. It’s a summer-only waterfront grill with a

||| Whitfield at Ace Hotel

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTO BY JARED WICKERHAM

Showcase BBQ in Homewood

.FOOD.

SHOWTIME FOR BBQ BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

B

ARBECUE DOESN’T have a particularly strong association with Pittsburgh. The most famous style of cooking meat is Pittsburgh rare: throwing raw steak on a blast-furnace so it’s charred to a crisp on the outside, but bloody on the inside. Typically, barbecued meats are slow-cooked over a wood smoker for hours. The result is succulent meat, with a delicate crust on the meat’s outside. Showcase BBQ in Homewood nods to the Pittsburgh-rare approach, except nothing is undercooked. When I visited, the pork ribs and chicken wings had a substantially charred, chewy

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

crust, but the meat was still tender in the middle. As showcase pitmaster Drew Allen told the Post-Gazette in 2017, he calls this “Northeastern style” (it’s similar to backyard grilling in the Northeast). Not many people in Pennsylvania are smoking meat for 12 hours to share with friends. Cooking starts when the friends arrive, and they have to eat within a couple of hours. I think of Showcase as Pittsburgh-style: unique and quirky. And the restaurant space pays homage to backyard barbecues that proliferate here in warm weather. The inside of Showcase is barebones and begs you to sit at the outside tables.


W E ’ R E D O N AT I N G OF OUR

15%

RECEIPTS

TO

LET ’S GET

CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

Takeout ribs from Showcase BBQ

Ordering can be a bit intimidating. Most customers appear to be regulars, so study the menu before getting in line. The ladies working behind the counter are friendly, but not cloying. Know what you want and they will get it to you — fast. Showcase also does a ton of takeout service. If you have time, enjoy the patio. When the sun sets over the nearby abandoned railroad bridge, it’s a sweet spot to chow down. Food is the real show at Showcase. The pork ribs are super smoky. The cherry wood smoke flavor punches you in the face, and the best reprieve to the overwhelming flavor is a tangy mustard sauce that comes with the ribs. You can get the sauce smothered on the ribs or on the side. Despite being cooked relatively quickly, the meat still falls off the bone with ease. Some portions can be a bit chewy, but multiple chews only intensify flavor. If you’re lucky enough to find a crispy edge, dunk it in the barbecue sauce for a chewy, tangy, sweet-smoky treat. Like a Now and Later, but meaty. At times, the flavors were almost too intense. Consuming each item on its own can be a bit overwhelming. The ribs are best eaten in combination with sauce, or interspersed with bites of a side dish. I am a side guy. Years ago in Nashville, at an iconic “meat-and-three” cafeteria, the cashier looked at my plate puzzlingly and said “you have six sides, sir.” (The idea is to get three sides, hence the name). I need my sides! At Showcase, I ordered four sides: mac n’ cheese, green beans, cabbage, and yams. The mac cheese was sharp, with a

hint of black pepper. The green beans and cabbage appeared to be like any other, but were packed with a spicy-pepper kick. Normally in Pittsburgh, stewed cabbage is a bit of a fish-fry throwaway. Not at Showcase. And the yams. Oh, the yams. Whole roasted in a caramel-y syrup, I expected a mash of sweet mush, but these yams held their shape, yet could still be cut with a plastic fork. With all the smokiness and spiciness of the other dishes, the sweetness of the yams is welcomed.

S CIAL

The Pennies from Heaven Fund gives financial assistance to the families of children who are undergoing treatment at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

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SHOWCASE BBQ

6800 Frankstown Ave., Homewood. showcasebbq.net

I suspect the cooks at Showcase know their yams are so good that they blend some of them into their signature sauce. Mustard hits you first upon tasting the sauce, then vinegar, then the sweet. And the sauce is thick. It’s worth getting an extra cup or buying a bottle to keep in your fridge. The chicken, like the ribs, is smoky with a good crust. But the chicken skin didn’t crisp up as much as the pork ribs. The meat was moist enough. Turkey ribs are also popular at Showcase — so much so that when I arrived on a Tuesday evening they were all gone. Prices are more than reasonable. Four ribs, six chicken wings, two sides and two pops only cost $17. Items can be purchased individually or in special combinations. It’s time for Pittsburgh to show off one of its best barbecue joints. Give Showcase a try.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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5326 Butler Street • Upper Lawrenceville

alleghenywinemixer.com

.ON THE ROCKS.

BARTENDER TIPS BY CRAIG MRUSEK // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE / 412-621-6220 MERCURIOGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER

LEGENDS EATERY

BAR LOUIE

LEONA’S ICE CREAM

5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO

1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

500 EAST NORTH AVE., NORTH SIDE 412-321-8000 / LEGENDSEATERY.US Legends Eatery is a family owned, BYOB Italian restaurant located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s North Side. Get your family and friends together and make reservations today! 412-709-5275 LEONASPGH.COM Small batch ice cream sandwiches and pints made with local dairy and ingredients whenever possible. Available at 60 retail, restaurant and brewery locations.

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE

2128 MURRAY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL 412-521-2053 / MINEOSPIZZA.COM Mineo’s Pizza House is celebrating 60 years! Since 1958 when John Mineo opened in Squirrel Hill, we continue the family tradition of hand-grating cheese, slow simmering our sauce and making everything fresh daily.

NINE ON NINE

900 PENN AVE., DOWNTOWN 412-338-6463 / NINEONNINEPGH.COM Nine on Nine has been a popular dining venue known for serving some of the finest culinary dishes in the city since opening in 2006.

PIAZZA TALARICO

COLONY CAFE

1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon–midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI

201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SENTI RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 3473 BUTLER ST, LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4347 / SENTIRESTAURANT.COM Senti is a modern Italian Restaurant combining the tradition of Italian home cooking with European fine-dining. Taste different fine wines from the selfserve wine dispenser.

SPIRIT 242 51ST ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4111 / SPIRITPGH.COM Two-level pizzeria, bar and event hall in Upper Lawrenceville located in a converted moose lodge.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

SUSHI FUKU 120 OAKLAND AVE., OAKLAND 412-687-3858 / SUSHIFUKU.COM Sushi should be fun and personal! Come customize your own sushi roll, burrito or bowl with our great selection of fresh ingredients!

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequilabased drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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CP ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE KLUG

ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

.FILM.

CITY FLICKS BY R. TYLER DAGUE // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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D

OWNTOWN was once home

to a handful movie theaters, or “movie palaces,â€? built in the early to mid 20th Century. Stanley, Warner and Fulton were a few notable names. Stanley is now the Benedum; Fulton is the Byham; Warner became a shopping mall. Only Harris Theater, on Liberty avenue, remains. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust would like to give it some company. The Trust has raised $8 million of the projected $11 million required to begin work on a new multiplex cinema in the former Bally’s Sports Club, next to the Renaissance Hotel on Sixth Street. This envisioning of a ďŹ rst-run movie theater began about four years ago, said J. Kevin McMahon, the Trust’s president. The building that housed Bally’s was the home for decades of Gateway Theater, and before that the J.P. Harris Theater and the Alvin. The cinema permanently closed in 1980, as suburban multiplexes became fashionable. Keeping it local, the Trust is working with North Shore-based WTW Architects on plans to ďŹ t up to six screens, a bar and restaurant in the proposed new cinema. McMahon estimated the signiďŹ cant repurposing of the building would should take between 18-24 months, though the project could exceed two years. “When you repurpose a building, sometimes you take a wall down and discover things that you didn’t know were there,â€? McMahon said. “We’ve redone a lot of older buildings in the Cultural District, and inevitably, there’s always a surprise or two.â€? McMahon also said this new theater will show independent and art house

CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

Is this the location of a new multiplex cinema in Downtown?

ďŹ lms, as well as popular blockbuster fare. “There’s nothing wrong with having popular entertainment forms in the Cultural District,â€? McMahon said. “Sometimes people think of culture as high arts and not for everyone. We’ve been working very hard for a couple of decades now to open the doors as wide as possible to eliminate, as much as we can, the stereotype of high arts, low arts. We see all of those things blending together.â€? A $750,000 state redevelopment assistance capital grant kicked the cinema project into high gear as the Trust narrowed its list of potential operators. (All have connections to Pittsburgh.) A decision has not yet been made. One potential client is Rick Stern, owner of Squirrel Hill’s historic Manor

In-Home Senior Care

Theatre. The building holds sentimental value; Stern’s family once owned the Gateway and several other Downtown movie theaters. The Trust discussed the project with Stern in June. “As a young man, I actually worked in the theater and helped my father run his theater circuit and book theaters,â€? Stern said. “I’ve been in the business over 40 years. It’s kind of in my blood, so to speak.â€? Another option is Mark Cuban’s Landmark Theaters, which operates multiplexes in several major cities, including Philadelphia. A representative with Landmark Theaters conďŹ rmed a meeting with the Trust but offered no speciďŹ cs on dates of discussions. A third possibility is the Strip District-based Theatre Historical Society of

America (THSA), a national organization that also operates the Hollywood Theater in Dormont. Bow Tie Cinemas’ chief operating ofďŹ cer Joseph Masher is the board president of THSA. Masher was included in meetings with the Trust, though Bow Tie Cinemas is not directly involved. THSA president Richard Fosbrink said the organization laid out plans for a multipurpose facility. In addition to multiple movie screens, THSA would maintain space on the second oor to house its vast archives, curate museum exhibits and create educational programming for the public. “I think that we could work together to make all of that happen in that particular space,â€? Fosbrink said. “The added bonus to this whole scenario is, because our members are all over the country and the world, we have a fundraising pool that isn’t just Pittsburgh-centric.â€? Fosbrink was inspired to propose a live performance and restaurant space in the proposed theater’s basement — akin to Manhattan’s famous Feinstein’s/ 54 Below. “Pittsburgh has a tremendous jazz scene and music scene, and there’s just not as many places to perform like there were even in the 1990s,â€? Fosbrink said by phone. “We thought that would be a really interesting thing to put into the lower level of the building.â€? The Trust and THSA have not discussed the project since last December. Still, McMahon said he remains optimistic about the project. “We’re really looking to make this a world-class facility,â€? McMahon said. “Certainly, it’s ďŹ lling a need for the Downtown neighborhood.â€?

•

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF IMAGE42

Matthew J. Rush, Candice Fisher and Damon Spencer in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

.STAGE.

DIRTY FUN

BY TED HOOVER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

ET’S TAKE A MOMENT to welcome back the “book musical.” For those of you

lucky enough to have avoided wasting your life in theater, a show’s “book” is .everything in the script that isn’t music and lyrics. And a book musical features a story and dialogue at least as strong as the songs. Book musicals fell out of fashion in the 1980s. As with so many other theatrical ills, this can be linked to Andrew Lloyd Webber. But when Mel Brooks opened The Producers in 2001, people were, like, “Wow, shows can be entertaining even when people stop singing” and book musicals were back. Which brings us to 2004’s Dirty Rotten Scoundrels with a score by David Yazbek and book by Jeffrey Lane from the 1988 film starring Michael Caine and Steve Martin. (The latter was, in turn, based on the 1964 David Niven/Marlon Brando movie Bedtime Story.) As much as I enjoy Yazbek’s tunes, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is even better when Lane gets to ply his trade.

DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS

Continues through July 29. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall. Carnegie. 412-429-6262 or stage62.com

On the French Riviera, an excessively suave con man, Lawrence Jameson, is busily swindling wealthy women out of their money when Freddy Benson, an outrageously crass, small-time grifter, busts onto his turf. The two eventually bet to see who can bilk (and bed) Christine Colgate, the “Soap Queen” of Cincinnati. To say more would ruin some of the story’s fun. But it’s not just surprises keeping Dirty aloft. Lane’s book is a genuinely funny comedy with big laughs throughout. What I especially enjoyed is the script’s breaking of the fourth wall, calling attention to itself and reminding us that theater is, after all, the world’s most elaborate con. Director TJ Pieffer and choreographer Kaitlin Schreiner stage a thoroughly respectable production for Stage 62. With comedy (no less a musical), nothing is more important than pace. Each works overtime keeping this show gliding forward in entertaining style. Matthew J. Rush brings plenty of panache to the roué Lawrence, putting the word “art” into con artist. Damon Spencer’s Freddy is exactly as shameless as he needs to be, starting at over-the-top and going on triumphantly from there. Stephanie Ottey makes the twists and turns of Christine immediately believable and fun. Leon S. Zionts and Cynthia Dougherty are charming as nascent lovebirds, Candice Fisher is a hoot in a small, but hilarious, featured role. Kudos to this hard-working and talented ensemble.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT PATRICK GREEN/AMAZON STUDIOS

Joaquin Phoenix stars in Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot

.FILM REVIEW.

UNSURE FOOTING BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

B

ASED ON THE true life of paraplegic nist confront reality. While the first half cartoonist John Callahan, Gus Van moves at a nice clip, the second is full of Sant’s Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get monologues that are too long, too on-theFar on Foot tells a poignant but overnose, too much like a self-help TED Talk. wrought story of alcoholism and disability. Callahan pointedly moves through the John Callahan (Joaquin Phoenix) is a 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous and at raging alcoholic barely keeping it together times it feels like a PSA for the program. when he gets into a drunken car crash Then there’s the confusing way with his friend Dexter (Jack Black). women in the movie are treated. Dexter walks away completely A female doctor, explaining to E R MO intact, but John is paralyzed. John how his erections work IE MOV S He continues drinking after differently now, encourages REVIEWE the crash, but eventually gets him to solicit sex from his ONLtIN a r e sober with the help of Alconurse, which felt like an abp a p pghcity .com holics Anonymous and Donnie surd dream sequence. Rooney (Jonah Hill), a charismatic sponMara plays his counselor-turnedsor who refers to God as “Chuckie.” girlfriend and, despite appearing on Eventually, John turns to cartooning, the movie’s poster, has very few lines. She poking fun at his own disability in the mostly exists to smile at John and tell him process. The cartoons get picked up by a he’s handsome and a good cartoonist. local paper, then national publications. The big catharsis of the movie occurs Sober and successful, he begins atoning when John finally accepts that he started for his past behavior. drinking because he felt unwanted by his birth mother and adopted family. Howeva cursory glance at the real Callahan’s DON’T WORRY, HE WON’T er, story reveals that he partly blamed his GET FAR ON FOOT alcoholism on childhood sexual abuse. It DIRECTED BY: Gus Van Sant feels like an omission Van Sant made only STARRING: Joaquin Phoenix, Jonah Hill because it made the story a little neater. Opens July 27 at Manor Theatre The acting is Don’t Worry’s stronand AMC Waterfront gest asset. Phoenix plays Callahan with Van Sant goes a non-linear route, flipheart and humor, showing dark, absurd, ping between Callahan pre- and postand funny sides of his disability and the crash, before and after sobriety. Somealcoholism that got him there. Plus, it’s times it works, giving the story texture. nice to see a rare movie where he smiles Other times, it’s confusing and difficult to and laughs. We are currently in a confuspiece together. ing iteration of Hill, but he fully commits The tone, too, is off. There are some to Donnie, a disco-loving, silk pajamagreat jokes, many coming from Callahan’s wearing mentor. real cartoons, which occasionally appear It’s a decent watch for insight into onscreen as bookends. But it feels like alcoholism and disability, but this movie one of those young adult “illness” movies misses too many marks to leave a real in which rag-tag misfits help a protagoimpression.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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CP PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON

Gab Bonesso talks comedy with Aaron Tarnow

.COMEDY.

COMEDY CRASH COURSE BY GAB BONESSO // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

N ITS FIFTH YEAR, the Pittsburgh

Comedy Festival stretches across multiple venues throughout South Side from Aug. 22-26. Executive director Aaron Tarnow discussed this year’s event with comedian and City Paper featured contributor Gab Bonesso at Dobra Tea in Squirrel Hill. ARE MOST OF THE COMEDIANS IN THE FESTIVAL FROM PITTSBURGH? The goal of the festival is to show off the Pittsburgh comedy scene. We have a scene that is really good compared to a lot of other small cities around the nation, but people didn’t really know about that — either in Pittsburgh or externally. So, the goal was always to bring people in from out of town, show them what a good time Pittsburgh is, to do comedy and then have them want to come back. Because of that, we built the festival deliberately so that a very small percent-

age is Pittsburgh comics. The goal is to put on the best of the best in Pittsburgh as a minority of the festival and the majority are people from out of town who come through and meet us and meet each other. Everyone drinks in the same place and they all leave saying, “Pittsburgh’s a great place to do comedy. I want to come back.” WHO ARE YOU BRINGING IN THIS YEAR? We’re doing something new this year, where in addition to our headliners, we are bringing in featured acts. So, I have six people to tell you about. On the improv side, we have The Cast from NYC as our main headliner. Our featured improv acts are long-time favorite from Baltimore, Casually Dope, and we have Limboland, which is a one-man musical improv show from NYC. On our standup side, the featured acts are: JC Coccoli — originally from Pittsburgh, but she now lives in Los

PITTSBURGH COMEDY FESTIVAL

Aug. 22-26. Various locations, South Side. pittsburghcomedyfestival.org

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Angeles. We have Todd Barry, a favorite of our generation, and our headliner this year is Marina Franklin. DO YOU STRIVE TO HAVE DIVERSITY IN YOUR FESTIVAL? I can’t say that we always did a great job from year one of the festival. This was started by mostly improvisors who didn’t know much about the standup world, and we had a lot to learn. But I can honestly say that in the last few years we have really tried to put on a lineup of comedy that more than one person can enjoy, and I say this as a cisgendered, straight, white man who has every privilege imaginable. But comedy by straight, white, cis men only appeals after a while to straight, white, cis men. I’m not saying there aren’t great straight, white, cis male comics, but what I am saying is that the whole point to comedy is to provide a new perspective. Comedy is looking at society with a unique perspective, so how good could a festival be if it only provided the same societal perspective?


LIVE MUSIC JULY 26

Open Mic w/ Jay constable

AUG 2

Juan and Co. (starting 8-9 pm)

(starting 8-9 pm)

EatShady.com

Radiohead, the band

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.MUSIC.

CHASING RAINBOWS BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

RIOR TO LEAVING for a summer

abroad in London in 2008, I met with a guy named Jeff who loved soccer scarves. He was my student advisor at Pitt. Our meeting was intended to prepare for my trip and explain how to best make the most of it. In a barrage of good-intentioned clichés, he told me how it was vital to really “grab life by the horns” over there, and gestured to the scarves covering his office walls to illustrate his point. Jeff had collected them from his travels. He encouraged me to pick a kind of souvenir and buy one from each place on the trip. It didn’t have to be a scarf, I was assured. Foreign tchotchkes might seem cheap and kitschy on the shelf, but they would evolve to become something symbolic. Studying abroad was important. It could change the direction of my life if I grabbed enough horns. I’m not sure I hit my quota. Here’s what did happen … I took classes, bought two sweatshirts and ate a lot of doner kebab. I took photos at Tate Modern, was briskly told to delete them, asked if I could “just leave” and the docent said “sure.” I got too stoned in Amsterdam, ate too much in Paris, and finally saw Radiohead. I had been taking a stab at that last one since I was a tween. As an angsty kid, I was seduced by “Creep.” Listening to The Bends made me want to learn guitar. Watching the video for “Paranoid Android” made me want to buy a beanie and chop down street lights. From OK Computer on, I bought every Radiohead CD on the day of its release, which is to say that once every year or

so until 2004, I begged my dad to “lend” me $15 and drive me to Tower Records on Tuesday nights. Seeing Radiohead in concert isn’t so easy. This is not a band that often tours the States. I had closed in on tickets a few times, always falling through. Once, a friend landed tickets to a New Jersey-show on the Amnesiac tour, and a friend of his parents tried to secure extras. A few hours before the show, the call for which we’d be waiting happened. “Mmm hmm … OK.” After he hung up, my friend turned to us and said, “Only I ... get to go.” What a prick.

RADIOHEAD

WITH JUNUN

7:30 p.m. Thu., July 26. PPG Paints Arena. Sold out.

Then on June 25, 2008, I was leaving my classroom in London and saw a piece of loose-leaf paper hastily pinned to a bulletin board which read, “RADIOHEAD TICKET, TONIGHT, £90,” and a phone number. It was the In Rainbows tour. Victoria Park, which is like London’s Central Park with classier pigeons. It was eight hours before the show. I didn’t have the money; £90 was $180 in U.S. currency, and I was pretty sure back then that no one actually had $180 at any given moment. But seeing something so seductive on something as flimsy as a loose-leaf piece of paper, I figured this was exactly what Jeff had talked about. Soccer scarf or not, this was something I could do on the fly, something I might not ever get the chance to do again. Nobody had ripped

down the paper. I was meant to see Radiohead. Only I would get to go. OK, getting all dewy-eyed about a Radiohead show on a study-abroad trip reeked of privilege and tacky narcissism. But spontaneously buying that ticket and seeing that show clarified something about expectations and Jeff’s seize-the-day spiel. Things like study abroad or college in general, when young people are told that it’s the most important, most fun, lifechanging experience they’ll ever have, can feel more like pressure than freedom. I’ve always folded under expectations for high-stakes fun. I don’t think I’m alone in that. Had I purchased the ticket weeks before, pressure to have fun would have spoiled everything. It would have all just been too much: the years of failed Radiohead sightings; the chance-encounter with the ticket; the sunset start-time; the location; the setlist. By falling backwards into the situation, stakes were appealingly low, and I was able to enjoy it without feeling like I had to. The specifics of the concert are a little hazy. Here’s what did happen … On the way there, my backpack caught in the doors of the tube and every passenger in the car jumped to pull me in (Brits are mad nice). Radiohead played 25 songs, unexpectedly opening with “Reckoner.” There were two encores, including “Karma Police” and “Paranoid Android.” Thom Yorke wore fabulous red jeans. The show didn’t change my life as much as it happened during my life, I remember it fondly, and that is enough for me.

Outdoor seating, food and drink ŸŞåÎĜ°ĬŸƉŅýåųåÚƉ°ƋƉÅŅƋĘƉĬŅΰƋĜŅĹŸ

LIVE MUSIC JULY 28

AUG 4

The EK Band

Chase Baron

(12-4 pm)

BakerySocial.com

(12-4 pm)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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.FASHION.

CLOTHES MAKE ... BY TERENEH IDIA // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

LOTHES MAKE the man,” Mark Twain said. “Naked people have little to no influence on society.” And William Shakespeare wrote: “For the apparel oft proclaims the man.” Far be it from me to disagree completely with Twain and, in part, Shakespeare, but I do. Let’s begin with Mr. Twain. While clothes are important — and I suspect you have a regular habit of wearing clothes — Mr. Twain misses the complex reasons why we dress. What did you wear today, yesterday? Why? Discuss ... There are many reasons why we dress the way we do: protection, modesty, attraction, identification and adornment. My favorite is adornment; we humans just cannot help ourselves, we have a will to adorn. Other considerations (consciously or unconsciously): Cultural: Can I wear this where I live/

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work/play? Is it culturally appropriate? Economic: Can I afford the new Air Jordans? Will someone steal my new Jordans? Managerial: Can I manage/maintain these clothes; do I dry-clean, hand or machine wash? Do I have the closet space? Will my dog eat these shoes? So, let’s go back to Twain and his proclamation that naked people are irrelevant. He is wrong. Because there are very few totally nude people on this planet now or at any time in human history. A truly naked culture is hard to find, and not without reason.

cio-psychology of fashion has uncovered two key phenomena: appearance management and appearance perception. Appearance management is dressing yourself considering what your clothes communicate about you. How you may dress for a date, job interview, and special event, yes — but we do this every day. “That belt with these pants, how does my butt look in the jeans or do I look too sexy for my shirt?” Appearance perception is how we assess others. It is walking into a room and trying to decide who to ask where the bathroom is, deciding if some-

HUMANS JUST CANNOT HELP OURSELVES, WE HAVE A WILL TO ADORN.

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART, HEINZ FAMILY FUND

A history of fashion: Photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris’ 1954 photograph of Barbara Lee and Delilah Hargrove, cast members of play “Take a Giant Step,” in dressing room of Pittsburgh Playhouse

Adornment is any decoration or alteration — temporary or permanent — of the body’s appearance. Mascara, hair color, hairstyle, tattoos, necklace, fig leaves or a tuxedo; it may not qualify as “clothing” in a Western Eurocentric view, but it is a form of dressing the body. What is or is not dress is socio-cultural, not scientific. A Surma man in Ethiopia wearing intricate, geometric, whiteclay mud designs painted on his body would laugh heartily if you told him he was naked. Now what Shakespeare wrote does ring true, but it is also incomplete. The so-

one looks like the artist or the gallery owner, whom to dance with or who to avoid. But it is Coco Chanel who puts the t-pin in the pincushion: “Look for the woman in the dress, without the woman, there is no dress.” Mademoiselle Chanel’s statement hits to the core of why we dress. It is us — our dreams, desires, aspirations and hopes. The most important thing is the life we live in what we wear. Clothing is the “costume” to our real-life adventure. Or, to update Twain: Man makes the clothes.

Tereneh Idia is a contributing columnist. Follow her on Twitter @Tereneh152xx


.MUSIC.

MORE WITH LESS

BY SHAWN COOKE // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HERE ARE well-worn clichés to use when writing about an artist like Lucy Dacus: bookish, vulnerable, wise beyond her years. I doubt she likes to hear these, but there’s no getting around that she is often the smartest person in the room and also happens to be a brilliant writer and musician. She proves as much on Historian, her first album for Matador Records and second overall; it brims with epics that rarely impose as heavily as the word “epic” tends to imply. Dacus emerged in 2015 with the transitional and whip-smart “I Don’t Wanna Be Funny Anymore.” What followed was her strong debut album, No Burden, and the kind of label bidding war you almost never see in indie rock these days. If this is your first encounter with Dacus, I’d steer you to Historian’s slow-burner of an opener. “Night Shift” is a song about volleying guilt and pain with an ex-lover, but just keeping most of it for yourself anyway. It’s a monster. City Paper talked to Dacus about other things ahead of her show at Club Cafe on Friday.

LUCY DACUS

WITH DEAU EYES 7 p.m. Fri., July 27. Club Cafe, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 21 and over. clubcafelive.com

WHAT’S THE MOST INSPIRING THING ABOUT MUSIC TO YOU RIGHT NOW? I’m liking the trend of quieter, thoughtful music. I really like the Haley Heynderickx album from this year, and Lomelda, and Phoebe Bridgers, and Big Thief. There’s a lot of really good music that has a softness to it that’s really comforting to me, because the world doesn’t really seem soft right now. If that’s the trend — having meaningful, comforting music — I’m down. I feel like I’m learning a lot from people who can do more by doing less. I SAW YOU TWEET RECENTLY A LIST OF THE TOP FIVE PLACES WHERE YOU’VE FALLEN ASLEEP, AND I HAVE TO ASK ABOUT ONE OF THEM. YOU FELL ASLEEP HALFWAY THROUGH RUNNING THE MILE IN HIGH SCHOOL. HOW DID THAT HAPPEN? I’m basically clinically a big baby — like I’m a sensitive, weak child. And if I do cardio, I lose my vision, my blood just does not know what to do. And I told the gym

PHOTO COURTESY OF DUSTIN CONDREN

Lucy Dacus

teachers my freshman year, “Hey, I really shouldn’t do the mile, it messes with me,” like “Yeah right, get out there, everybody hates the mile, you’re gonna hate it just as much as everyone else.” And so, I did what I could, and then I started losing my vision so I went to a grassy patch and laid down and everyone was like, “Are you OK?” Then I think the gym teachers were maybe a little embarrassed and let me be, and I napped through the rest of the period and woke up and went to my next class. WHAT’S SOME ADVICE YOU WISH YOU HAD KNOWN BEFORE GETTING INTO MUSIC? You become a vehicle for a lot of people’s baggage, and that’s a pretty heavy weight to hold. Specifically, in your immediate life, at least for me, being more well-known — like I’m not even famous — but being slightly more well-known, it triggers something in other people like resentment or jealousy or some sort of vague negativity that’s actually about their own place in life. And that’s been the hardest part about all of this for me, is just having to be the vehicle for a lot of people’s negative emotions wherever they’re coming from. I feel like you should recognize those changes that would happen in your life ’cause a lot of people want to do this, but I don’t think that it’s worth it for some people. And occasionally I think about how to regain a sense of security that I’m not just a symbol of people’s discontent. On the flip side, you have the opportunity to improve a lot of people’s lives and provide solace or comfort or understanding, and that does make it worth it. But the dozen or so people that really hate you or your position — I don’t know, they stick with me.

This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists.

Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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.FOR THE WEEK OF JULY 26

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Since 1358, the city of Paris has used the Latin motto Fluctuat nec mergitur, which can be translated as “She is tossed by the waves but does not sink.” I propose that we install those stirring words as your rallying cry for the next few weeks. My analysis of the astrological omens gives me confidence that even though you may encounter unruly weather, you will sail on unscathed. What might be the metaphorical equivalent of taking seasick pills?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

As you wobble and stumble into the New World, you shouldn’t pretend you understand more than you actually do. In fact, I advise you to play up your innocence and freshness. Gleefully acknowledge you’ve got a lot to learn. Enjoy the liberating sensation of having nothing to prove. That’s not just the most humble way to proceed; it’ll be your smartest and most effective strategy. Even people who have been a bit skeptical of you before will be softened by your vulnerability. Opportunities will arise because of your willingness to be empty and open and raw.

The Spanish word delicadeza can have several meanings in English, including “delicacy” and “finesse.” The Portuguese word delicadeza has those meanings, as well as others, including “tenderness,” “fineness,” “suavity,” “respect” and “urbanity.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I’m making it your word of power for the next three weeks. You’re in a phase when you will thrive by expressing an abundance of these qualities. It might be fun to temporarily give yourself the nickname Delicadeza.

just in relation to whom and what you love but also with everything that rouses your passionate interest. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you’re due for some big, beautiful, radiant zeal.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Uninformed scientists scorn my oracles. Reductionist journalists say I’m just another delusional fortuneteller. Materialist cynics accuse me of pandering to people’s superstition. But I reject those naive perspectives. I define myself as a psychologically astute poet who works playfully to liberate my readers’ imaginations with inventive language, frisky stories, and unpredictable ideas. Take a cue from me, Scorpio, especially in the next four weeks. Don’t allow others to circumscribe what you do or who you are. Claim the power to characterize yourself. Refuse to be squeezed into any categories, niches or images — except those that squeeze you the way you like to be squeezed.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I have no notion of loving people by halves; it is not my nature. My attachments are always excessively strong.” So said Sagittarian novelist Jane Austen. I don’t have any judgment about whether her attitude was right or wrong, wise or ill-advised. How about you? Whatever your philosophical position might be, I suggest that for the next four weeks you activate your inner Jane Austen and let that part of you shine — not

“There are truths I haven’t even told God,” confessed Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector. “And not even myself. I am a secret under the lock of seven keys.” Are you harboring any riddles or codes or revelations that fit that description, Capricorn? Are there any sparks or seeds or gems that are so deeply concealed they’re almost lost? If so, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to bring them up out their dark hiding places. If you’re not quite ready to show them to God, you should at least unveil them to yourself. Their emergence could spawn a near-miracle or two.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): What are your goals for your top two alliances or friendships? By that I mean, what would you like to accomplish together? How do you want to influence and inspire each other? What effects do you want your relationships to have on the world? Now maybe you’ve never even considered the possibility of thinking this way. Maybe you simply want to enjoy your bonds and see how they evolve rather than harnessing them for greater goals. That’s fine. No pressure. But if you are interested in shaping your connections with a more focused sense of

purpose, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to do so.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

you kiss. Create a blessing that surprises you and everyone else. Sing new love songs. Change something about yourself you don’t like. Ask yourself unexpected questions, then answer them with unruly truths that have medicinal effects.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your past is not quite what it seems. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to find out why — and make the necessary adjustments. A good way to begin would be to burrow back into your old stories and unearth the half-truths buried there. It’s possible that your younger self wasn’t sufficiently wise to understand what was really happening all those months and years ago, and as a result distorted the meaning of the events. I suspect, too, that some of your memories aren’t actually your own, but rather other people’s versions of your history. You may not have time to write a new memoir right now, but it might be healing to spend a couple of hours drawing up a revised outline of your important turning points.

In Janet Fitch’s novel White Oleander, a character makes a list of “27 names for tears,” including “Heartdew. Griefhoney. Sadwater. Die tränen. Eau de douleur. Los rios del corazón.” (The last three can be translated as “The Tears,” “Water of Pain” and “The Rivers of the Heart.”) I invite you to emulate this playfully extravagant approach to the art of crying. The coming weeks will be en excellent time to celebrate and honor your sadness, as well as all the other rich emotions that provoke tears. You’ll be wise to feel profound gratitude for your capacity to feel so deeply. For best results, go in search of experiences and insights that will unleash the full cathartic power of weeping. Act as if empathy is a superpower.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Be extra polite and deferential. Cultivate an exaggerated respect for the status quo. Spend an inordinate amount of time watching dumb TV shows while eating junk food. Make sure you’re exposed to as little natural light and fresh air as possible. JUST KIDDING! I lied! Ignore everything I just said! Here’s my real advice: Dare yourself to feel strong positive emotions. Tell secrets to animals and trees. Swim and dance and meditate naked. Remember in detail the three best experiences you’ve ever had. Experiment with the way

One of the most famously obtuse book-length poems in the English language is Robert Browning’s Sordello, published in 1840. After studying it at length, Alfred Tennyson, who was Great Britain’s poet laureate from 1850 to 1892, confessed, “There were only two lines in it that I understood.” Personally, I did better than Tennyson, managing to decipher 18 lines. But I bet that if you read this dense, multi layered text in the coming weeks, you would do better than me and Tennyson. That’s because you’ll be at the height of your cognitive acumen. Please note: I suggest you use your extra intelligence for more practical purposes than decoding obtuse texts. Ready for your financial therapy session? For your first assignment, make a list of the valuable qualities you have to offer the world and write a short essay about why the world should abundantly reward you for them. Assignment #2: Visualize what it feels like when your valuable qualities are appreciated by people who matter to you. #3: Say this: “I am a rich resource that ethical, reliable allies want to enjoy.” #4: Say this: “My scruples can’t be bought for any amount of money. I may rent my soul, but I’ll never sell it outright.”

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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WED., AUGUST 8 TODD RUNDGREN

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8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $39.75-59.75. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

WED., AUGUST 8 YOGA ON THE LAWN

+ WORKING BREED

6 P.M. HARTWOOD ACRES MANSION HARTWOOD ACRES. $30-40. 412-767-9200 or alleghenycounty.us /parkprograms.

FRIDAY, JULY 27 | 7:30 PM

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8 P.M. CLUB CAFÉ SOUTH SIDE. OVER-21 EVENT. $12. 412-431-4950 or ticketweb.com/opusone.

SUNDAY, JULY 29 | 7:30 PM

THU., AUGUST 9 BLINK 1-80 TRUE 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $11-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Safety Last.

FRI., AUGUST 10 THE FIXX 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $23-38. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

FRI., AUGUST 10 BLACK MOTH SUPER RAINBOW 8 P.M. MR. SMALLS THEATRE MILLVALE. All-ages event $18.412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

FRI., AUGUST 10 WITHIN THE RUINS 6 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. All-ages event. $15. 412-687-2157 or ticketmaster.com. With special guests Phineas & Great American Ghost.

FRI., AUGUST 10 SWEET CRUDE 7:30 P.M. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER SOUTH PARK. Free event. 412-835-5710. With special guest Donora.

SAT., AUGUST 11 THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND

WED., AUGUST 8 TODD RUNDGREN

ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US/SUMMER

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL, MUNHALL

8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $69.75-99. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

SAT., AUGUST 11 JEFF BECK 8 P.M. HEINZ HALL DOWNTOWN. All-ages event. $75.75-175. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org. With special guest Ann Wilson.

SAT., AUGUST 11 ROD STEWART & CYNDI LAUPER 7:30 P.M. PPG PAINTS ARENA DOWNTOWN. $28-476. 412-642-1800 or ticketmaster.com.

greyareaprod.com. With special guest The Dirty Grass Players.

SUN., AUGUST 12 LARRY CARLTON 7:30 P.M. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER SOUTH PARK. Free event. 412-835-5710. With special guest Frank Cunimondo.

MON., AUGUST 13 ALLEGHENY ALL-STAR BASKETBALL CAMP 10 A.M. SETTLERS CABIN PARK BASKETBALL COURTS SETTLERS CABIN PARK. Ages 10-17. $30-38. 412-787-2750 or alleghenycounty.us /parkprograms.

SAT., AUGUST 11 THE SUITCASE JUNKET

TUE., AUGUST 14 BREAKING BENJAMIN & FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH

7 P.M. CLUB CAFÉ SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $12. 412-431-4950 or ticketweb.com/opusone.

6 P.M. KEYBANK PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN. $18-100. 724-947-7400 or livenation.com.

SAT., AUGUST 11 THE TRAVELIN’ MCCOURYS

TUE., AUGUST 14 JAMES MOORE

8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $20. 412-381-1681 or

5 P.M. AGNES KATZ PLAZA DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US

NORTH PARK ADULT AQUATICS PROGRAMS

CLASSES MEET TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS JULY 31-AUGUST 23 AQUA STEP ‘N’ STRETCH: 5:00-5:45 PM

AQUA SOUNDTRACK SIZZLERS: 6:00-6:45 PM

AQUA FITNESS HIGH-INTENSITY: 7:00-7:45 PM

$30 for residents | $38 for non-residents Register online at alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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CALENDAR JULY 26-AUG. 1

CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS

^ Thu., July 26: Wiz Khalifa

THURSDAY JULY 26 STAGE

Not to be all “I-knew-this-band-beforethey-were-cool,” but I saw the play Stupid F*cking Bird five years ago, during its original run in D.C. And it was f*cking great. You can see it in Pittsburgh for a three-week run at 12 Peers Theater in the Cathedral of Learning. The dramedy, based on Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull, follows a family of actors and writers, and their intertwined love interests as they all struggle to find what they

really want. The darkly funny and sad adaptation strays from the source material, both in plot and in the actors breaking the fourth wall. Continues through Sun., Aug 12. 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $20. 12peers.org

BLOOD DRIVE

Celebrate Mick Jagger’s 75th birthday by donating blood at WQED Studios. What does Jagger’s birthday have to do with the WQED Community Blood Drive? Nothing, unless you consider how often WQED airs a vintage Rolling Stones concert as part of its pledge programming. Thing is, Jagger isn’t even the Stone most commonly associated with blood; it is his

fellow Glimmer Twin Keith Richards who allegedly had a full-body transfusion to help him kick heroin. Did that happen? Probably not. But it couldn’t have happened without a hearty supply of blood. And truth is, there is never enough blood for people who really need it. For this reason, or simply because you’re a good human, make a point to stop by the home of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood and donate; parking in the WQED lot is free to donors, and lunch is provided by honeygrow. 12-6 p.m. 4802 Fifth Ave., Oakland. centralbloodbank.org/wqed

FILM

André Leon Talley has broken fashion

barriers in his work for publications such as Women’s Wear Daily, W and Vogue. In 2007, he was included in Out magazine’s top 50 most powerful LGBTQ people. So what’s the story behind his success? To answer that question, Style Week Pittsburgh has partnered with The Frick to screen The Gospel According to André, a documentary looking into the life and history of a man who does it all. Why in Pittsburgh? Hint: his career started with the help of a strange man in a silver wig. 6 p.m. The Frick Art and Historical Center, 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Pay What You Will. styleweekpittsburgh.wordpress.com CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 38

PHOTO COURTESY OF LUCAS DANIELS

^ Sat., July 28: Jeff Daniels Band

TRIVIA

As Lil Jon once said, “Yeah!” For trivia buffs who happen to be hip-hop heads or vice versa, Trapology will test players’ knowledge on everything from Gucci Mane’s birth name (Radric Delantic Davis) to how the three members of Migos are related (Offset is Quavo’s cousin; Quavo is Takeoff’s uncle). If you knew those without checking Wikipedia, form a team of four players and head to the Ace Hotel to show off some knowledge. Slim Tha DJ will spin records during the trivia, and winners will advance to the Aug. 2 championship rounds. 6 p.m. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. $20 per four-person team, free to attend. acehotel.com/Pittsburgh

MUSIC

A tour named “Dazed and Blazed” had to have Wiz Khalifa headlining, right? Right. And anybody heading to KeyBank Pavilion should know what to expect from what passes as a homecoming for Pittsburgh’s most famous rapper. Wiz is a big enough star — especially in these parts — to not need the likes of Rae Sremmurd, lil skies, and O.T. Genasis, but each will join the “Black and Yellow” Main Eventer for this show. We’ll be fine with whatever Wiz does, so long as it includes walking back

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his regrettable public stance that eating whole bananas renders men “sus.” Be better, Wiz. You’re representing Pittsburgh. 6 p.m. KeyBank Pavilion, Burgettstown. $29-99. pavilionburgettstown.com

ADULT CIRCUS

Every kid has a dream about running away to the circus, flying through the air and hanging with elephants. But as you get older, you realize you don’t wanna live in a trailer and eat cotton candy for dinner (and the elephants are probably sad). But if you still have an itch to learn the tricks, check out the Adult Circus Class hosted by Pittsburgh Aerial Silks

and Circus Thursday nights. The class requires no previous experience, and covers two circus props, which might include aerial silks, trapeze, rings, or lyra. Then, if you have a midlife crisis, you’ll be prepared to run away to the circus. 6 p.m. 6800 Brighton Rd., Ben Avon. $20. pittsburghaerialsilks.com

SINGALONG

There are a lot of gre great singalong songs — “Don’t Stop Believin Believin’,” “Mr. Brightside,” “Bohemian Rhapsod Rhapsody” — that everyone jams to when they ccome on the jukebox. But most nights, she shelling out a dollar to play a song from Rent or The Rocky Horror Picture Sho Show would draw the ire of your fellow d drinkers. Broadway After Dark Singalon Singalong: Yinzcon edition is not most nights. G Grab a card and belt out a song from The Book of Mormon or Avenue Q at the Hard Rock Cafe, as part of Yinzc Yinzcon, the annual Rocky Horro Horror Picture Show ce celebration. 8 p.m. 230 W Station Square Dr. W. Free. F hardrock.com/ c cafes/pittsburgh < Tue., July 31: David Cross PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIEL BERGERON

FRIDAY JULY 27 EVENT

Want to hear from women in politics who are excelling on the campaign trail in Pittsburgh? Want to do that and take part in the most important meal of the day, a.k.a. breakfast? Women for the Future Pittsburgh, and other female candidates, will be holding a Power Breakfast Forum at the Rivers Club to discuss victories and what’s next. Join candidate for PA State Representative Summer Lee, candidate for State Representative of the 21st District Sara Innamorato, candidate for District 44 of the PA House of Representatives Michele Knoll and many other kickass women who want to hear from voters. 7:30 a.m. 301 Grant St., Downtown. Suggested donation $100.49. wtfpittsburgh.com

FILM

The Pittsburgh International Children’s Film Festival looks to celebrate children’s cinema and allow kids to be just that — kids. This week-long ordeal will include both classic and new movies such as Won’t You Be My Neighbor, Incredibles 2 and Willy Wonka


7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Lucius

THURSDAY Lord Huron 7 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. promowestlive.com

FRIDAY The Mike Dillon Band, Spish 11 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. cattivopgh.com

SATURDAY Run the Meat with The Summercamp and Spices Peculiar 9 p.m. Squirrel Hill Sports Bar, Squirrel Hill. sqhillsportsbar.com

IMAGE COURTESY OF TOTAL HELPART T.H.A.

^ Fri., July 27: The Oddsockeaters at The Pittsburgh International Children’s Film Festival

and the Chocolate Factory. Included in the lineup are Pittsburgh premieres of The Oddsockeaters, a story about where your socks go when you wash them, and Microcosmos, which explores the lives of insects. Noon. Continues through Aug. 2. Row House Cinema, 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-35. cffpgh.org

MUSIC

Thirty bands, two labels, one festival — today marks the beginning of Migration Fest, a mecca for underground metal fans looking to scope out the newest groups on the scene. This festival was originally started by 20 Buck Spin founder David Adelson and Gilead Media boss Adam Bartlett and is meant to showcase each label’s roster, as well as other affiliated artists. Bands will come from out of state (Yellow Eyes from New York City and Pelican from Des Plaines, Illinois), and within Pennsylvania (Zombi, a local synthwave duo). Whether you’re an avid metalhead or a newcomer, Migration Fest has got you covered. 4 p.m. Continues through July 29. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $45-228.12. Migrationfest.com

WORDS

Storytelling is undoubtedly important to society, but add a real-time soundtrack, comedians, actors, writers and everyone in between, and you get WordPlay. Featuring real people telling real stories, and with DJ Tracksploitation setting the scenes, you’ll become immersed in a tale and learn more about the strangers on stage than you thought possible. It’s theater, it’s comedy, it’s poetry, and it covers a wide range of topics and experiences. Audience participation isn’t required, but it does happen. 8 p.m., Also Sat., July 28. Bricolage Production Company, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25. bricolagepgh.org

SATURDAY JULY 28 EVENT

Getting a letter from an inmate or prisoner can be an eye-opening experience. It’s a cut-to-the-core reminder that incarcerated people deserve to be treated as people. BOOM Concepts in Garfield chooses to

SUNDAY remind people through art. At Letters & Liberation: Art Show and Fundraiser for Prison Justice, more than 40 artists will be featured. Former inmates and current inmates will display ceramics, textiles, silk screen, collage, stained glass, drawing and photography. Proceeds of artwork sold will go to organizations dedicated to prison reform and prisoner-support services. 12-4 p.m., 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. (Facebook search “Boom Concepts”)

Lucius with Brooke Annibale 6 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. alleghenycounty.us/special-events

MONDAY Rata Negra, Empty Beings, De Rodillas 8 p.m. The Shop, Lawrenceville.

TUESDAY Arctic Monkeys

EVENT

Unlimited tastings of local libations sounds enticing. And by enticing, we mean awesome. Or whatever the word is that has replaced awesome. Anyway, Imbibe Northside features said “unlimited tastings” of samples from more than 10 local breweries, wineries and distilleries. (Obviously, this is a 21-plus event.) And if you were counting on live music and snacks, we can point you in the direction of the Beagle Brothers and on-site food trucks. What with everything going down at the Mattress Factory, there is also the perk of checking out art exhibits. At this

8 p.m. Petersen Events Center, Oakland. peterseneventscenter.com

WEDNESDAY Summer Salt 8 p.m. Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE

AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

point, you’re probably either in or out; but did we mention that attending allows you to leave with a customized Imbibe Northside tasting glass? That should close the deal. 6-9 p.m. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. $40 ($50 at the door). mattress.org/calendar

MUSIC

In the late 1970s, Jeff Daniels bought a guitar and started writing songs as a creative outlet to supplement his acting career. The acting took off; the songs went in a black notebook, which he shared with absolutely no one. As he writes on his website: “I will be dead in the ground before anyone sees or hears those attempts.” He’s not so cagey with his tunes these days. Often backed by his son Ben Daniels’ band, Jeff has toured and released a handful of roots-inspired country and folk albums dating back to the early 2000s. For a look at another side of this award-winning actor, check out Jeff Daniels with Ben Daniels Band at Jergel’s. 8 p.m. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. $26 advance; $28 day of show. Folks under 21 must be accompanied by parent or legal guardian. jergels.com

SUNDAY JULY 29 PICNIC

If you’ve ever found yourself missing the traditions of Croatia, celebrate like grandma used to with the Annual Croatian Center Picnic. To get the picnic started, pick up a jello shot on your way to the table. On the menu is cevapi, haluski, pierogies, ierogies, ty of lamb, drinks, and of course, plenty dancing. This picnic has everything g you need for a good ol’ fashion Croatian summer party. Music will be provided by Trubaduri and lamb will be provided by Mezik. 11 a.m. Croatian Center Picnic Grounds, 80 Shuetzen Park Rd., Millvale.

TUESDAY JULY 31 BOOKS

In the wave of accusations and activism surrounding the #MeToo o movement, actress Amber Tamblyn yn became a strong voice after writing ng Op/Eds for New York Times and Teen Vogue about her experience with h harassment in the industry. Tamblyn lyn has previously published books off poetry, but her latest release, Anyy Man, is a novel following the life and crimes of a female serial rapist. st. It’s certainly a tricky topic, but if done right, could add a more complex layer to the conversation. n.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK CALOIER

^ Sun., July 29: Annual Croatian Center Picnic

White Whale Bookstore will stage a reading with Tamblyn, with a Q&A and book signing. 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. whitewhalebookstore.com

COMEDY

David Cross emerged as one of the most caustic, cutting and intelligent voices in comedy during the post-9/11-two-warsterrible-president early 2000s. He’d already made a name for himself with his standup, Mr. Show, The Ben Stiller Show and blueing himself on Arrested Development, but his unique political slant came through clearest and strongest on his specials Shut Up, You F*cking Baby!! (2002) and It’s Not Funny (2004). Though 2018 has plenty of bananacakes

insanity to compete with 2003, Cross has calmed down a bit these days, while remaining whip-smart and sharp. He’s as good as he’s ever been; don’t miss his “Oh Come On” tour landing in Pittsburgh at Carnegie Library Music Hall. 7 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $39.75. librarymusichall.com

MUSIC

Tarriona “Tank” Ball first made waves in New Orleans as a slam poet. After meeting several other musicians at an open mic night in 2011, poetry took a backseat to music. In the years since then, Tank and the Bangas has been making waves wave both in New Orleans and across the country. This group’s blend of funk, soul, hip-hop and rock often ofte incorporates spoken spo callb word — a callback to Ball’s roots in poetry — and it wo won the editio of 2017 edition NPR’s Ti Tiny Desk Concert. Conce Local psych-funkpsyc rock band the Buckle Downs Do will open the show s at Mr. Smalls S Theatre. Thea 8 p.m. p.m 400 Lincoln Lin Ave., Millvale. M $16-18. mrsmalls.com mrsmal < Tue., July 31: Tank an and Ban the Bangas PHOTO COURTESY C OF GUS BENNETT B JR.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 1 ART

Game of Thrones will forever be remembered for the infamous “Red Wedding” scene. No spoilers here. (But if you haven’t watched Game of Thrones yet, what are you doing?) The Red Wedding is partially based on the Black Dinner, a 15th century event in which the king of Scotland murdered the chieftains of Clan Douglas at a dinner. (Did I spoil it? Seriously, go watch it.) Anyway, much of Game of Thrones is based on medieval happenings, so much so that Tourism Ireland unveiled a medievalstyle tapestry based on the show’s events. Art like that is tough to make, but the Crash Course in Medieval Art at the Carnegie Museum of Art is a great place to start. Runs through Aug. 22. 10:15 a.m. and 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $88, $72 for Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh members, $48 for students. cmoa.org

FILM

Head over to Glitter Box Theater for the Underappreciated Moviemakers Festival to experience films by prolific creators whose careers haven’t received the attention or fanfare they deserve. Featured filmmakers include Pittsburgh’s tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE, Rotterdam’s Florian Cramer, Paris’ Dick Turner, and more; subjects range from a day-in-the-life documentary compilation to a short about influential band Half Japanese, to a story about a city “where everyone is obsessed with plumbing, food and excrement.” 8 p.m. Continues daily through Fri., Aug. 3. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. “0 to $20 (be generous if you can afford it, get in for free if you’re broke)” theglitterboxtheater.com •


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• ROCK SALT AND ICE MELT General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/ default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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MARKING ONE’S TERRITORY BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS

1. It landed in the South Pacific Ocean on 3/23/01 4. Urban sun blocker 9. Go toe to toe 13. Hatred 14. Easy minigolf shots 16. Riding mower brand 17. ___ Sherman 18. Taunting comeback 19. Grp. whose motto is “Semper Fidelis” 20. Pay money owed 23. Fictional captain born in Riverside, Iowa 24. O on some cards 25. Chest protector 27. Avoid paying, say 32. Epiglottis’s spot 34. Lunacy 36. Back in the day 37. Like someone with an unpredictably dual nature 42. “Allow me to demonstrate” 43. Conductor Georg 44. Processes metal 47. Drinks of the gods 51. UK honour 52. Chapter 3 54. Bread spread 56. Ecological effect studied at the South Pole 62. Horror writer Stoker

44

63. Olympus rival 64. Head down? 65. Disaster agcy. 66. Nice lady? 67. Blowhard’s idiosyncrasy 68. Spill the beans, with “up” 69. “Tut tut” 70. Drops in the morning

DOWN

1. Belarus’s capital 2. Dinar patrons 3. Boomerang 4. Classic soul label 5. Titan of anticapitalism 6. Zenith 7. Sunblock ingredient 8. “___ Arden” (Tennyson) 9. Render speechless 10. Spring from the clink 11. Cold War struggle 12. Bird in Sinbad stories 15. Pub selection 21. Speedy Jaguar 22. “I don’t want to hear it” 26. Polished off 28. “Sharp Objects” star Adams 29. Penn of “Designated Survivor” 30. Australian New Wave band originally named

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

The Vegetables 31. New York gubernatorial candidate Cynthia 33. Author Arundhati 35. Car bar 37. Lavish party 38. They can get you contacts 39. Approximately five-eighths of a mi. 40. New Wave band with a euphoric-sounding name 41. Smash 42. CNN, MSNBC, NYT, et al. 45. Some Apple Pay passes, briefly

46. Dinner time, maybe 48. On the money 49. Poured 50. Puppet 53. “___ Worth Spreading” (TED Talks slogan) 55. Be a benefactor 57. Present time, for short 58. Within: Prefix 59. Academic committees: Abbr. 60. Holy man 61. Marked, as a ballot, and as the territories in this puzzle’s theme 62. #squadgoals sharer LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’ve been faithfully reading your column in the Chicago Reader for years, and now I’m reaching out to you about my own problem. I’ve been dating this guy for almost a year. Everything is great, except one thing: He wants me to kick him in the nuts. It really bothers me, and I’m not sure what to do. He’s very serious about it, and he brings it up every single day. It makes me really uncomfortable that this is some sort of fetish of his and I need help taking steps forward. TO KICK OR NOT TO KICK

P.S. I play soccer and I kick hard. It’s a kink called “ball busting,” TKONTK, and as long as you don’t kick him full force — or even half force — you’re unlikely to do permanent damage. That said, childless guys who are into ball busting are often advised to freeze their sperm just in case. And while it’s not a hugely popular kink, it’s common enough that ball-busting porn exists, and ballbusting Tumblrs, ball-busting blogs, etc. Take it slow at first, particularly if your guy has only fantasized about this and not experienced it. P.S. A guy who brings up his kink every single day deserves to be kicked in the nuts — unless he’s into ball busting, in which case he doesn’t deserve to be kicked in the nuts. My husband and I were married in Toronto, Canada, in 2005, before marriage equality came to the United States. Does the US government recognize our Canadian marriage or do we need to remarry in the US? Can you find out from one of your legal friends? DOES OUR MARRIAGE APPLY?

“The US government does recognize your marriage,” said Robbie Kaplan, one of my legal friends — and the attorney who represented Edith Windsor before the US Supreme Court and won. In United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court ruled that the federal government was required to recog-

nize legal same-sex marriages, thereby gutting the Defense of Marriage Act. “We did the same thing,” Kaplan added. “We were married in Toronto in 2006, and the US recognizes our marriage. No need to get married again here.” Hi Dan, I am getting in touch because I thought you might be interested in the following article: “Getting to the Bottom of Pegging.” For open-minded people who are open to butt play, pegging is a great way to spice things up in the bedroom. But what exactly is pegging and why is it a thing now? Sex and relationships expert, Tami Rose, knows how important it is to try new things in the bedroom. She would be able to provide an article explaining what pegging is and tips for your more adventurous readers who want to give it a go. I look forward to hearing your thoughts. [REDACTED] PR AGENCY

it’s boring, but he loves my companionship. How do I deal with this so we can move forward together as an incompatible couple? SEX ADDICT PARTNER

A romantic partner who says something as cruel and negating as what this man has said to you, SAP, either wants out of the relationship or is grooming (a) partner for much worse treatment to come. If he wants out of the relationship, the verbal and emotional abuse will escalate until you finally leave him. If he doesn’t want out, the verbal and emotional abuse will escalate a bit more slowly, so that, like the proverbial frog in the pot of boiling water, you don’t realize exactly how bad it’s getting and how much damage it’s doing to you — and your kids. I know it’s not what you wanted to hear, SAP, but I’m going to say it anyway: DTMFA. What’s the fairest way to determine who should get tied up? BONDAGE BOTTOM BOYFRIENDS

Pegging? Never heard of it. Wait — what’s that, Wikipedia? “Pegging is a sexual practice in which a woman performs anal sex on a man by penetrating the man’s anus with a strap-on dildo… The neologism “pegging” was popularized when it became the winning entry in a contest in Dan Savage’s Savage Love sex advice column [in 2001].”

Whoever was tied up last time does the tying up this time and vice versa. Do you ever wear panties, Dan? Would you post a picture of yourself in panties online? I think you would look good in panties. PANTIES ARE NICE TO YOU

I’m in a six-year relationship with a guy you will probably deem DTMFA-worthy but I deem round-up-able to The One. My kids already regarded him as their stepdad before we moved in together about eight months ago. That’s when I learned he’s an addict: He drinks, smokes weed, and jerks off to porn for about two hours every day. He has been this way for more than 20 years, and I have zero delusions he will change for me. Recently he told me he has very little sexual desire for me, that he knows my p*ssy in and out and

While I have no particular aversion to wearing panties, PANTY, and while I will not deny the allure of the models at xdress.com, I’ve never worn panties and have no plans to start. As a consequence, I won’t be able to post a picture of myself in panties online to delight you and horrify everyone else. How much sex is too much sex? NUMB OVER NUMBERS

“Enough is as good as a feast.” — Mary Poppins

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 25-AUG. 1, 2018

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

July 24, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 30

July 24, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 30