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PITTSBURGH’S ALTERNATIVE FOR ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT SINCE 1991

JULY 11-18, 2018

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AL E E CI L ID FI DU INS OF H E P SC MA D AN A bucket list for Pittsburghers of all ages and genders, for the been-here-since-birth crowd to the newbies around ’tahn

CITY GUIDE MAGAZINE: ON STANDS THIS WEEK


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On the move? New to town, or just a new neighborhood? If you haven’t tried transit before maybe now is the time. Port Authority has convenient and frequent service to and from the urban areas of Pittsburgh. East Liberty is the heart of the East End’s transit service. Many Port Authority bus routes use the East Busway to bypass local traffic including the P1 and P3 from East Liberty’s busway station which offer quick rides to Downtown and Oakland. Various other routes have stops on Penn Ave. and serve just about anywhere in the East End of the city. Living Downtown? You CAN get anywhere from here. You can catch a bus or T to almost anywhere in Allegheny County. Groceries in the Strip District, take the 88. For all the flavor of Lawrenceville the 91 works. Nearly all of Port Authority's 100 routes travel in and out of Downtown. For more neighborhoods go to onthemove.portauthority.org and make this town your own.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor ROB ROSSI Managing Editor LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writer RYAN DETO Arts Writer HANNAH LYNN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX MCCANN, LAUREN ORTEGO

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PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

JULY 11-18, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 28

COVER STORY 6

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

A neighborhood worthy of attention

ADVERTISING

Food+Drink 16 Arts+Entertainment 21 Calendar 38

C P C OV E R I L L US T RAT I ON B Y J OE M RU K

Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

WEEKLY FEATURES Jen Sorensen 14 Free Will Astrology 36 Crossword 45 Savage Love 46

ADMINISTRATION Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN

PUBLISHER EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.


ENJOY DRINKS, FOOD & LIVE MUSIC! JOIN US ON THESE SATURDAYS ALONG WALNUT STREET IN SHADYSIDE:

JULY 21 • BRIGHTON BOYS AUGUST 18 • LUCKY ME + BYRON NASH AND PLANB ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE ANIMALS AT HUMANE ANIMAL RESCUE! WWW.HUMANEANIMALRESCUE.ORG

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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Buildings tower over Deutschtown in the North Side, as seen from James Street

.PHOTO ESSAY.

BEYOND THE MUSIC As Deutschtown Music Festival returns to the North Side, a look at a neighborhood worthy of attention CP PHOTOS BY JARED WICKERHAM

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S MUSIC FESTIVALS GO, the one that goes down every summer in Deutschtown has few rivals in our region. Heck, City Paper readers have selected it as

“Best Music Festival” each of the past two years — and for obvious reasons. A treat for all the senses (come for the sounds on Friday, come back for the food and activities on Saturday), Deutschtown Music Festival’s organizers pride themselves on having “something for everybody.” And with 300 bands, 26 indoor venues, seven outdoor stages, 20 food trucks, an artist’s market and a beer garden ... well, what else could everybody want? Inside this issue is a fourpage guide to get you through the sixth annual

Deutschtown Music Festival. (Also, be sure to look for our annual City Guide, which will come in handy for those making up bucket lists.) But before getting to any of that, flip through these pages that show Deutschtown as it is without a big music bash.

This special part of Pittsburgh has always marched to its own tune. CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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BEYOND THE MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

A September 11 memorial sits on Emlin Street behind the businesses along East Ohio Street.

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In-Home Senior Care • Personal Care • Homemaking • Meal preparation • Errands & Shopping

412-363-5500 Rich Weber, part of the demo crew for P2 Construction, stands above the second floor at St. Peter’s Evangelical and Reformed Church on Lockhart Street. Built in 1888, this newly gutted building will soon serve as a 17-unit apartment building.

CP PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK

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Become a CCAC Student in One Day!

Wednesday, July 18 |

3:00 PM–6:00 PM

Bring your high school diploma, GED or college transcripts and complete your CCAC registration in one day. • Tour state-of-the-art facilities & watch live program demonstrations.

Farmer’s Daughter 431 E. Ohio St. thefarmersdaughterflowers.com There is buying flowers for your love, and then there is buying into flowers as your love. It’s all about the latter at Farmer’s Daughter Flowers, an odoriferous, floral escape from the trappings of dull, daily doings. Nearly every offering is grown locally, and each bouquet comes with a surprise: lavender for luck, rosemary for affection, you get the idea. Visit the gift shop or sign up for a workshop that will unlock the inner floral arranger in you.

• Explore CCAC’s full range of 160+ academic & career programs. • Discover a diverse community of students & educators.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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BEYOND THE MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

TASTE THIS

Leandra Brown, of Maryland, waits for a bus along East Ohio Street.

This Nepalese/Asian restaurant is a hit with locals, though it’s easy to miss if you’re passing by. The restaurant’s windows are visible above Subway on East Ohio Street, but the entrance is a nondescript door around the corner on Cedar Avenue. Neighbors in the War Streets frequently rave on Facebook about the momos (dumplings). The restaurant also offers Chinese and Indian entrees, including a variety of curries. The interior is lackluster, but the food is great and you can’t beat the price.

Subba Asian Restaurant 700 Cedar Ave. 412-586-5764 CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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6th Annual

July 13-14, 2018 Sponsored by:

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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BEYOND THE MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

TOUCH THIS

An employee at Joey & Dolly’s North Shore Deli prepares hot dogs on East Ohio Street.

Tucked away on Foreland Street, a few blocks from the main drag, is a neighborhood gem that encourages getting your hands dirty while creating one-of-a-kind artwork. Artists Image Resource (AIR) is an artist-run, nonprofit workspace for professionals and young folks looking to master a new craft. Learn how to screen-print during open studio hours four nights a week or stop in at an occasional gallery show. It’s a popular spot for poster artists and activists. Have a catchy slogan for the upcoming election? Bring it here and start a revolution, one screen-printed T-shirt at a time.

Artists Image Resource 518 Foreland St. artistsimageresource.org

ARTIST RANDI STEWART POSES WITH HER ARTWORK INSIDE AIR // CP PHOTO BY JOHN HAMILTON

CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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Revitalize offers you our Himalayan Salt Room, Flotation Suite, and LED Light Stimulation Bed as our physical, mental, and spiritual approach to wellness. We are the only centre offering these three unique services.

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Revitalize - A Sewickley Wellness Centre Opens In an ever increasingly hectic, stressful world, Revitalize offers individuals an oasis of calm to allow the body to heal naturally while relaxing the mind. This MINDANDBODY approach to wellness is the first of it’s kind in the Tri-State Area. The Centre, located in the heart of Sewickley Village offers three proven modalities that simply require an individual to lie back and allow the body to experience temporary physical relief while calming the mind. Revitalize is the only local facility to offer these three unique services and the ONLY LOCAL FACILITY TO OFFER LED LIGHT STIMULATION THERAPY. With the LED Light Stimulation Bed and AntiAging Face Panel Revitalize can offer their clients a true game changer. In the wake of

LED Lightstim Therapy

the opioid epidemic, LED Light Stimulation Therapy has been FDA cleared to temporarily increase blood circulation and reduce inflammation naturally and without side effects to relieve chronic pain and speed healing. This therapy can also increase the body’s ability to replace ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) and Nitric Oxide, which improves post-exercise recovery and muscle regeneration and has been shown to enhance athletic performance. The Anti-Aging Face Panel is great for reducing fine lines and wrinkles or to help the healing process associated with cosmetic surgery. And, as with all the services, all that is required is to lie down and relax, take a nap, or meditate, which is helpful for the mind. Housing the largest flotation device around, the oversized

Flotation Suite

7’ x 6’ x 7’ Flotation Suite is a 1-hour session of GLORIOUS. With 150 gallons of water maintained at a constant temperature of 93.5 degrees (the temperature of your skin) and 1500 pounds of Epsom Salt it allows the body to experience anti-gravity while floating effortlessly. The suite is equipped with light, music and an internal intercom which can all be controlled by the user. If you are new to floating and want to ease your way in, the suite is roomy and comfortable, cutting back on the claustrophobic effect of float pods. Old school meditation folks can cut the lights and music and go total dark providing one of the most accommodating environments for meditation. The physical effect is an hour of total recovery for joints and

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muscles as well as relief from headaches, migraines and concussions. And the suite is large enough to accommodate two adults for that special “couples float”. The Himalayan Salt Therapy is provided in a 15’ x 15’ x 8’, 6 seat room with over 1400 genuine Himalayan salt bricks on the walls and over 2 ton of ground Himalayan salt on the floor fashioned to resemble a salt mine. The respiratory and dermatological benefits of salt is centuries old. Eastern culture has been using this therapy for centuries to provide temporary relief from sinus issues, allergies, sore throats, lung disorders such as COPD and Asthma as well as skin conditions like Eczema, Psoriasis or Seborrhea. Stop and see us, you’ll be glad you did.

Himalayan Salt Room

432 Green St. Sewickley 15143 412-356-5986

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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BEYOND THE MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Dan Washington (left) and his friend Wayne (right) hang out along Middle Street.

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

HEAR THIS

Pittsburgh Banjo Club 400 Cedar Ave. thepittsburghbanjoclub.com A Hump Day in Pittsburgh is best completed at Elks Lodge No. 339, where Wednesday evenings are known as Banjo Night. Technically a weekly rehearsal for members of Pittsburgh Banjo Club, this gathering has become equal parts cool crowd and old school, luring an audience with cheap drinks, casual conversations and ace plucking by banjo masters. Dig into our City Guide for more details on Banjo Night and other activities that belong on any Pittsburgher’s bucket list.

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JENSORENSEN


THIS WEEKEND  %.#55'5¸#..#)'5¸(14&#;5

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story

.OPINION.

DON’T STAY IN YOUR LANE BY TERENEH IDIA // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

H

EDY LAMARR runs naked through

a forest in Czechoslovakia, dark wavy hair flowing to her shoulders. Her movements are as joyful and jubilant as her ebony mane. She enters a lake and swims with the grace of one who belongs in the water. Breaching through the surface, her bare breasts are exposed. We see all of this on screen. The 1933 film Extase (Ecstasy in the U.S.) makes her a controversial star. It solidifies her status as a beauty, but at what price? In Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story, an excellent documentary by Alexandra Dean, we learn Lamarr was a naturalborn scientist, taking apart and putting back together her childhood toys. As an adult, America offered her escape — from the Nazis and a first husband who was providing arms to Hitler — and stardom. But she also developed radio-controlled technology for Allied forces, though her frequency-jumping process was shelved by the U.S. military. Lamarr was told to stay in her lane. She should use her beauty as an actress. She should help the Allies by selling war bonds and entertaining troops. You might be reading this column on a computer or mobile device because of Lamarr. The technology she created is now used for satellite communications, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and GPS. She was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014. Four years later, what she was told long ago remains a constant refrain: “stay in your lane.” This is no time for staying in lanes. Like Lamarr, we can all contribute. Is that not what we pledged allegiance to as children with tiny right hands over our still-growing hearts?

“… With library and justice for all.” Can we honestly say we have achieved that goal? Martin Luther King Jr. did not stay in his lane — an Atlanta church pulpit. Fanny Lou Hamer left Mississippi’s cotton fields to run for Congress. Myrna Loy, named “Queen of the Movies” in 1936, ended up on Adolf Hitler’s blacklist and worked for civil rights her entire life. Colin Kaepernick kneeled knowing he would be a black man longer than he was a professional football player. If you’re not staying in your lane, it can be difficult to know where to begin. Do I wear white and march on Saturday or orange and march on Sunday? Do I want to block traffic and stand faceto-face with police wearing riot gear? If being out in the streets is not your thing, you can still do a lot. Paint a sign. Donate. Contact an elected official. Campaign for a candidate. Heck, run for office yourself. Educate yourself about issues. Listen to those most impacted by the injustices. Vote … for goodness sakes, vote. Channel your talents into fundraising. Send emails and tweets, post online. Form groups where you worship. Hand out water to a marching protestor. Have difficult conversations with family and friends. Say something. Do anything. Justice may seem an insurmountable goal. The process is inconvenient, and some say it is uncivil. However, only the lack of full rights for all – in our city, in this country – is truly uncivilized. “… Liberty and justice for all” is our lane.

Tereneh Idia is a contributing columnist. Follow her on Twitter @Tereneh152xx

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTOS BY JARED WICKERHAM

Chicken scallopini with mushroom marsala sauce

.FOOD.

LEGENDARY CONSISTENCY BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

POSTER on the wall outside of Legends of the North Shore

tells you all you need to know: “Best New Dining Spot.” The quote is attributed to a Post-Gazette issue from 2003, but this old school Italian joint is still among the city’s .best restaurants in 2018. How did this North Side restaurant maintain its standout status during an era of increasingly trendy food spots with increasingly inventive menus? Well, chef John Gault avoids flashier modernrestaurant trends.

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“No one comes here and puts on airs,” said Gault. Legends succeeds for the reasons that newer, hipper restaurants don’t. Most of its customers aren’t posting pictures of their meals to Instagram. The menu doesn’t include fusion of two popular cuisine styles. Nothing will shock customers. But Gault says consistency of service, atmosphere and food at Legends is what keeps people coming back. The small dining room is adorned with posters of Pittsburgh sports stars. The tables are filled with loyal customers most nights. Friday and Saturday nights are


Chef John Gault prepares fettuccini alfredo at Legends of the North Shore.

consistently packed, with reservations typically required. “The majority of the people that come here say, ‘I wish more places were like this,’” said Gault. The Deutschtown section of the North Side is in transition. In addition to welcoming one of the city’s most exciting annual musical events (Deutschtown Music Festival), the neighborhood is seeing new development pop up next to longtime staples. Breweries and tea houses now share this neighborhood with dive bars and a German restaurant that is more than 100 years old. Just a block away from Legends, new

condos sit next to old row houses. Even so, Legends remains popular with local North Siders and other Pittsburghers. Patricia Rooney, wife of the late Steelers owner Dan Rooney, still eats there twice a month. Gault says the new activity in Deutschtown has actually been a boon for Legends.

tuccine Alfredo and chicken scallopini keep people satisfied. All dishes are made to order, with lightning efficiency but attention to detail. “We have a heat lamp in the window, but I have not turned it on in five years,” said Gault. The food falls on the side of com-

“WE HAVE BEEN COMING HERE FOR YEARS AND NEVER HAD A BAD MEAL.” Italian-American classics are Legends’ bread and butter. They make focaccia bread twice daily. Veal Parmesan, fet-

fort over creativity. And this is just what Legends’ customers want. John and Peggy Weaver and their

friend Kim Spinelli were enjoying a lunch when City Paper visited Legends last week. They praised the waitstaff as friendly and authentic and said consistency was why they love Legends. “We have been coming here for years and never had a bad meal,” said Peggy Weaver. “We need more restaurants like this,” said Spinelli. “It’s nothing flashy [and] not over the top expensive.” Peggy also lauded the free slice of fudge Legends serves after every meal. It’s those touches that keep her coming back. That commitment makes Legends work for customers, but tradition isn’t the restaurant’s only focus. Gault says 75 percent of Legends is about avoiding drastic changes. The other 25 percent is about shifting towards different strategies. Gault says he regularly picks up produce at the North Side farmers market during the summer, something that wasn’t even available a decade ago. Legends runs a food truck called Cool Beans that does what Gault calls “upscale carnival food.” Legends has also partnered with Uber Eats to boost its take-out service. But focus on the old school has paid off for Legends. While trendier restaurants serve octopus tacos as a way to stand out, Legends distinguishes itself with Spots Romano, a pan-fried bass entree that is a holdover to an earlier era. Spots Romano remains one of Legends’ most-popular dishes and customers are sometimes shocked a restaurant still serves it. Gault does not see a competition between old and new. Restaurants like Legends prove there are scores of hungry customers looking for comfort and consistency when dining out. There is still a strong market for Legends’ style of food and service, even if old school eateries don’t always garner a lot of attention.

5326 Butler Street • Upper Lawrenceville

alleghenywinemixer.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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.ON THE ROCKS.

CHAIN GANG

BY CRAIG MRUSEK // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

ISCERNING DRINK enthusiasts tend to sneer at chain restaurants’ bar

programs. A usual charge is these types of eateries offer drink menus that are uninspired, derivative and geared to a lowest common denominator. Signature cocktails at chains are also assumed to use less-than-ideal ingredients, creating a double-whammy of drink disappointment. So, what happens when a chain interprets a classic? When I realized Red Robin serves a version of the Mai Tai, I had to give it a go. The Mai Tai arguably reigns as the iconic tiki drink, with fans holding passionate opinions on how to properly make it. How would it fare when run through the corporate gauntlet? I visited a local Red Robin to sample its “Tropical Mai Tai” along with veteran Pittsburgh bartender Wes Shonk. We each ordered one, comparing notes on flavor and presentation. “Not bad” said Shonk. “I’m impressed by the glass” (a squat, clear goblet patterned after traditional tiki mug designs). Flavor-wise, this drink was a steep departure from the original recipe, tasting mostly like a simple blend of rum and pineapple juice. Visually, a float of dark rum created a pleasant gradient effect, and a bright red cherry added a spot of color. Overall, it was tropical but didn’t bear much resemblance to a Mai Tai. In the interest of fairness (and scientific accuracy), I decided to try a second one from a different location. The results were unexpected. This drink came in the same fun, tiki-style glass, but was a cheerful orange-amber color that evoked a hazy sunset. The garnish was more elaborate as well, combining a fresh orange wedge and cherry on a festive-looking pick. This drink covered the bases on taste. Although it leaned slightly sweet, it was a fully realized cocktail, showcasing layers of flavor and complexity for which proper tiki-style drinks are known. While a purist would still scoff, this drink held true to the spirit of the Mai Tai. It diverged from the conventional recipe in some significant ways but nailed the important stuff. I’m happy to have given it a second chance. The lesson is that even with a near-fanatical emphasis on consistency that chain restaurants embrace, something will always be left to chance. Assume nothing, explore enthusiastically, and don’t be too dogmatic about authenticity. You might run across something better than you anticipated.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A CHAIN INTERPRETS A CLASSIC?

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CP PHOTO BY JARED WICKERHAM

Fried chicken and empanadas

.RESTAURANT REVIEW.

CHICKEN HIT

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

’VE SAID ALOUD more than once there isn’t enough good fried chicken in this town. Enter Ki Pollo, a Lawrenceville fast-casual fried chicken and empanada restaurant that opened late last year. It’s from the same folks who own neighboring noodle shop Ki Ramen. The menu is divided into two sections: chicken and the empanadas. You can choose size and sauce (served on the side). There are also sides and desserts. It is a simple and easy ordering process, which is nice if you’re someone who is made anxious by innovative and confusing ordering.

KI POLLO

4407 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. kipollopgh.com

I ordered the two-piece chicken (a drumstick and a chicken breast) and the sambal sauce. Each order is also served with a bao bun and pickles. The chicken comes out piping hot, but the skin is thin and crispy and the meat tender and moist, especially on the drumstick. The breast is also a big and awkward shape (am I right, ladies?!), and trickier to eat. The sambal sauce is sweet and spicy, with some coconut and fruity flavors. While good with the sauce, the chicken is also perfectly delicious on its own. The bao bun is a fried dough spiral with flecks of scallion, like a savory donut. While tasty, it is not what I

thought a bao bun would be, based on the time I recently cried watching the Disney animated short Bao. And it does feel heavy to have fried dough with fried chicken. I also tried the mushroom empanada, which is filled with cremini and shiitake ’shrooms. The pastry was on the pale side, but still flakey, and the filling was rich and creamy. Each empanada comes with a side of chimichurri, a parsley sauce I would happily eat with a fork and pretend it is salad. From the sides menu, I picked kimchi. The fermented vegetables are sharp and acidic, a little spicy and almost citrusy. It’s a better contrast to the fat of fried chicken than the pickles, which are just okay. The food is reasonably priced per portion size, though most orders come with a lot of chicken and would be best shared. The restaurant’s decor is clean and open, with a large bird mural on the wall. The lighting, though, is dim because Ki Pollo uses those trendy light bulbs that look like the first lightbulb ever invented. Single-occupancy bathrooms are not labeled as gender-neutral (although the only markings are paintings of male and female birds). This is a common flaw of many restaurants, since all single-occupancy bathrooms could be gender neutral if they were simply labeled as such. All in all, it was a tasty meal, which I will eat again in five minutes because I brought my leftovers to work.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER

5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BAR LOUIE MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

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330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO

1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon–midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

LEGENDS EATERY

500 EAST NORTH AVE., NORTH SIDE 412-321-8000 / LEGENDSEATERY.US Legends Eatery is a family owned, BYOB Italian restaurant located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s North Side. Get your family and friends together and make reservations today!

LEONA’S ICE CREAM

412-709-5275 LEONASPGH.COM Small batch ice cream sandwiches and pints made with local dairy and ingredients whenever possible. Available at 60 retail, restaurant and brewery locations.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE

2128 MURRAY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL 412-521-2053 / MINEOSPIZZA.COM Mineo’s Pizza House is celebrating 60 years! Since 1958 when John Mineo opened in Squirrel Hill, we continue the family tradition of hand-grating cheese, slow simmering our sauce and making everything fresh daily.

NINE ON NINE

900 PENN AVE., DOWNTOWN 412-338-6463 / NINEONNINEPGH.COM Nine on Nine has been a popular dining venue known for serving some of the finest culinary dishes in the city since opening in 2006.

PIAZZA TALARICO

3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI

201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce.

Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SENTI RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 3473 BUTLER ST, LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4347 / SENTIRESTAURANT.COM Senti is a modern Italian Restaurant combining the tradition of Italian home cooking with European fine-dining. Taste different fine wines from the selfserve wine dispenser.

SPIRIT

242 51ST ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4111 / SPIRITPGH.COM Two-level pizzeria, bar and event hall in Upper Lawrenceville located in a converted moose lodge.

SUPERIOR MOTORS

1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

SUSHI FUKU

120 OAKLAND AVE., OAKLAND 412-687-3858 / SUSHIFUKU.COM Sushi should be fun and personal! Come customize your own sushi roll, burrito or bowl with our great selection of fresh ingredients!

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR

660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

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ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

CP ILLUSTRATION BY XIOLA JENSEN

.ESSAY.

JEFF GOLDBLUM: AN APPRECIATION BY SARAH JAMES // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HAT MAKES Jeff Goldblum … well, so Jeff

Goldblum? Is it the way he can pull off a sweater so bold most of us can’t look directly at its pattern? Maybe it’s how he transforms a simple Hawaiian button-up into chic, stylish formal wear. Part of it has to be that hair — you know, the hair that’s not gray or silver, but rather shines with the incandescence of a rare mineral hunted by the cast of a superhero movie.

His wild-but-perfect outfits, the incredible hair, that infamous laugh — put them all together and you’ve got a picture of someone who seems to have access to a never-ending reservoir of joy. Jeff Godliness, it seems, means knowing how to live. I could say almost anything about Jeff Goldblum’s life and it would sound at least plausible. He plays with a jazz band weekly at a small club in Hollywood — that’s actually true. He once claimed his favorite color

CONTINUES ON PG. 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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JEFF GOLDBLUM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

was rainbow — saw it on Reddit. He owns a small surf shop in Santa Barbara and spends his free time investigating unsolved murders — OK, that one I made up. But you can picture it, can’t e perfect you? The surf tousling those ller locks, the Zodiac killer within his grasp? That’s because a life lived Goldblum, a life lived with und abashed glee, could lead down any path. Godacin life’s liness is about embracing y, weird and lovely corners wholly, unironically. It’s not just embracing the higheaters. brow stuff, like jazz and sweaters. m One senses that while Jeff Goldblum would know the perfect fine wine to pair with any meal, he’d be just as ecstatic if you handed him a $3 can of fizzy rosé. Jeff Goldblum loves Dvorak’s New World Symphony, but his face will still light up at a Dua Lipa song. “Oh, this is catchy,” he’d say, bobbing his head along to ‘New Rules.’ “I like this.”

Jeff Goldblum’s Harold Hill was exactly like every other Jeff Goldblum performance: trading overbearing charisma for a “golly, aw shucks”-ness that ch charms you all the more because you ar aren’t expecting to be charmed. You can steel your heart against those who are obviously trying to win you over, but with a Goldblum performance, y you’re in love before you even reali al alize what’s happening. There’s a little grease there, maybe — but you love him all the more for embracing it, for no trying to hide his not r rough spots. There’s another key to Jeff Godliness: no matter which sl pair of slightly different glasses ned for f a particular part, he’s he’s donned always fundamentally Jeff Goldblum. Your Willem Dafoes and Ethan Hawkes transform for each new character, but Jeff Goldblum retains his same signature vocal affection, his same sly, pursed-lip smile. Because all his performances are so similar, we can only

“JEFF GOLDBLUM IS SUMMER PERSONIFIED: ENJOYING EVERYTHING, QUESTIONING NOTHING, LEAVING US ALL SLIGHTLY SWEATY.” Jeff Goldblum is summer personified: enjoying everything, questioning nothing, leaving us all slightly sweaty. Perhaps Pittsburgh can take credit for some of the Goldblumian down-toearth qualities. (Let’s be honest, this is Pittsburgh: we’re going to take credit for it anyway.) “He’s from here,” we can say. He may have left West Homestead for fancy big cities and learned about the finer things, but he could still crack open a beer at a Steelers game with the best of them. There’s some evidence for this: Jeff Goldblum hasn’t forgotten about us, coming back in 2004 to play sleazy salesman Harold Hill in The Music Man (and later making a mockumentary of the experience called simply Pittsburgh.) That production of The Music Man was my first introduction to Jeff Goldblum — maybe yours was something a tad more niche, like Jurassic Park, but that’s part of the charm of Jeff Goldblum. There’s a Jeff Goldblum for everyone.

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conclude this is how he must be in real life. He doesn’t act, unless he’s acting all the time.

“JEFF GOLDBLUM DAY” July 13 was designated “Jeff Goldblum Day” in Pittsburgh in 2004. Artisan Tattoo (5001 Penn Ave., Garfield) and Row House Cinema (4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville) will celebrate Goldblum with separate events.

Perhaps the most Goldblumian trait of all is that we’ll never know for sure. All the fun quirks, the openness, the zest for being alive, create an intimacy that seems so real. “He’s from here,” we can say, ignoring the part where he left. For all the praise we can lavish on his zany sweaters, they are still Prada and still cost thousands of dollars. Is the effortlessly charismatic essence of Jeff Goldblum just the comforting illusion that we can understand a man we don’t even know? Maybe. But maybe it’s just the hair. Seriously, the hair is fantastic.


PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT POLK

John Hickok, Kevin Massey, Dan Deluca, Randy Donaldson and Matt Newberry in The Full Monty

.STAGE.

DELIGHT FULL BY TED HOOVER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

F THERE WAS ever the wrong man

at the wrong time, it’s composer/ lyricist David Yazbek. He hit Broadway in 2001 with his adaption of The Full Monty. Reviews and business were great and a lot of Tony awards seemed in the offing. But then Mel Brooks opened The Producers … In 2005, Yazbek provided music and lyrics for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, but did so in the same season as Spamalot and Light in the Piazza. The year 2011 looked to be his with Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown starring Patti LuPone. Can’t miss, right? The Book of Mormon begs to differ.

THE FULL MONTY

Continues through July 15. Benedum Center for the Performing Arts, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-456-6666 or pittsburghclo.org

Our story does have a happy ending. This year, Yazbek’s The Band’s Visit swept the Tonys, winning 10 “Bests,” including for score, lyrics and musical. But to my mind, the honors were 18 years late. The Producers may be fun, but there’s no way it’s a better written show than The Full Monty… and I offer this first-rate Pittsburgh CLO production as proof. Set in an economically depressed Buffalo, Full Monty is about a bunch

of laid-off steel workers so strapped for cash they put on a male strip show promising the “full monty” (i.e. remove all the clothing.) The joke of the piece is that the six men are supposedly the last six you’d ever want to see naked; too fat, old, bald, skinny, etc. But thanks to a terrifically fun book by Terrence McNally, you fall in love with them immediately and remain firmly on their side through the whole evening. McNally doesn’t neglect the distaff side either, and the various wives and ex-wives are every bit as endearing. The whole thing is fueled by Yazbek’s propulsive, high-energy score filling every corner of the story with color, intensity and an insane amount of showbiz razzle dazzle. Barry Ivan directs and choreographs, giving this CLO production a perfectly swift pace, and he drives the big emotional beats. On opening night, maybe the production was a little sketchy toward the end, but by the time you read this, that problem will have absolutely righted itself. This powerhouse cast’s singing and dancing ignite the Benedum stage. I gleefully mention our six heroes: Andy Kelso, Matt Dewberry, Kevin Massey, John Hickok, Randy Donaldson and Dan DeLuca. And I point out the great work of Natalie Charle Ellis, Sarah Uriarte Berry and, especially, a sidesplitting Anita Gillette.

Tickets: 412-624-4129

www.chambermusicpittsburgh.org

$25 Concert (8PM) w/cash bar $75 Concert & Dinner (6:30PM)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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.INSTAGRAM.

HOUSE HUNTING BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INSTAGRAM.COM/ >> HOUSESOFPITTSBURGH I’ve recently started feeling like I should follow more localized Instagram accounts. While I love following celebrities and their insane workout schedules, it would also be nice to keep up with the community in which I’m directly involved. @Housesofpittsburgh is an account posting exactly that: photos of houses across the city that stand out for their color, architecture, or just embodying quintessential Pittsburgh characteristics. Most of the photos on the account are curated and culled from #housesofpgh. Scrolling through their feed, you’ll see Victorian mansions in Highland Park, pastel row houses in Millvale, and the packed hills of South Side Slopes. Local architecture might seem pretty apolitical, but the women who run the account found a way to use their popularity. In March, they did a special series featuring houses with Conor Lamb yard signs, asking residents why they were voting for him. As a bonus, the account has several Instagram stories saved at the top so you can virtually explore specific neighborhoods, like Troy Hill, Point Breeze, and Friendship. •

Outdoor B a n ds a l l g Summer Lon J l 13 July July 14 July 15 July 15 July 20 July 21 July 22

Tony Janflone, Jr. Band (8pm) Move Makers Band (8pm) Vagrants (12-4pm) Buffettman (5-8pm) DJ Grover (7pm) Ferris Bueller’s Revenge Band (8pm)

TBA (2-6pm)

*FREE Sunday Summer Concert Series!

Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM Best Live Bands Every Weekend!

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

it’s a destination!

1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL LESKO

The Prince Project

.MUSIC.

PRINCE AMONG PAUPERS BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

O

NE HALLOWEEN a few years ago,

DaVaughn Weber dressed up as Prince and won a costume contest. And a second. And a third. And a fourth. People had been telling Weber that he was a dead ringer for the late pioneering pop icon since his early teens, but those contest wins — and $2,000 in prizes that came with them — convinced him something special was going on. Weber, a Prince fan since he was a toddler, began to work as an impersonator at mostly private events. Around the same time, Michael Lesko’s newly formed Prince and the Revolution tribute band hit a wall. Its lead singer — Lesko says “[he] didn’t look much like Prince but could really sing” — quit. Lesko needed to quickly find another singer and asked his bandmates to give him a week. It took him two. But then he saw a video of Weber on YouTube. Even though Weber was listed as living in South Carolina, Lesko gave him a call and asked if he was interested in joining his band, based in Columbiana, Ohio. In a twist of fate, Weber had just moved from South Carolina back to his hometown of Akron — just an hour west of Columbiana. “So, Prince is in Akron, we got the Revolution an hour outside Pittsburgh in Columbiana … we’re like, we’ve gotta get these two together,” Lesko says. Over the past year and a half, the Prince Project has honed what Lesko says

are the three keys to having a successful and accurate tribute band: the music, the look and the performance. “You have to be as accurate as possible, and people really connect to that,” he says. “They remember little details in songs, these very famous songs: ‘Let’s Go Crazy,’ ‘Purple Rain,’ all that. … If you catch those, then people go crazy.” It’s not an easy process, though. Much of Prince’s music is sonically complex and very difficult to replicate in a studio, let alone in a live performance.

THE PRINCE PROJECT

6 p.m. Thu., July 12. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. $10 in advance, $12 day of. jergels.com

“There’s a ton of production in [the music]. Trying to bring that same sound to the live stage was our big challenge,” Lesko says. By combining musical skill and a talented sound guy with complex lighting and detailed costumes, the Prince Project transports attendees back to the 1980s. Recreating the ‘80s is part of why Lesko wanted to form a Prince tribute band in the first place. “My wife never had a chance to see [Prince],” he says. “And I swear to God, to this day, I almost think that’s another reason why I started this band, so I could get her as close to a Prince concert as I could.”


3WS

alleghenycountyparks

ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US/SUMMER

FOOD TRUCKS AND HOP FARM BREWING COMPANY CRAFT BEER AT ALL CONCERTS BEGINNING AT 6:00 PM

SOUTH PARK

HARTWOOD ACRES PARK

JULY 13: Jim Donovan & Sun King Warriors with special guest The Hawkeyes (ROCK)

JULY 15: Phillip Phillips with special guest Striking Matches (POP ROCK, FOLK ROCK)

JULY 20: Thompson Square with special guest Timothy Earl (COUNTRY)

JULY 22: Nitty Gritty Dirt Band with special guest Angela Autumn (FOLK ROCK, COUNTRY ROCK)

JULY 27: Jefferson Starship with special guest Working Breed (ROCK)

JULY 29: Lucius with special guest Brooke Annibale

AUG. 3: Better Than Ezra with special guest Two Birds (ALTERNATIVE ROCK)

AUG. 5: Toots & The Maytals with special guest

AUG. 10: Sweet Crude with special guest Donora (ALTERNATIVE/INDIE POP)

AUG. 12: BNY Mellon Jazz presents Larry Carlton with special guest Frank Cunimondo (JAZZ)

AUG. 17: BNY Mellon Jazz presents Jean Luc Ponty with special guest Lyndsey Smith (JAZZ)

AUG. 19: Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre (BALLET)

AUG. 24: Shawn Mullins with special guest Northern Gold (ALTERNATIVE ROCK, COUNTRY ROCK) AUG. 31: Paul Luc & Kayla Schureman (FOLK, ALTERNATIVE/INDIE)

(INDIE ROCK, INDIE POP)

(REGGAE, SKA)

AUG. 26: Sinkane (FREE JAZZ, FUNK ROCK) SEPT. 2: 19th Annual Allegheny County Music Festival:



Uprooted feat. Michael Glabicki of Rusted Root with special guests Meeting of Important People, Starship Mantis and The Living Street. 5WIIGUVGFRGTXGJKENGFQPCVKQPDGPGÅ¿VUVJG Allegheny County Department of Human Services (OPENING BANDS AT 5:00 PM, UPROOTED AT 8:00 PM)

ALL CONCERTS ARE FREE AND BEGIN AT 7:30 PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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WE BUY RECORDS & CDS

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YES! YES! YES!

BY DAN MADER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ATTICRECORDS@VERIZON.NET

ANIEL BRYAN is a superhero to

many. And any opportunity for him to perform in front of the WWE Universe is sure to generate headlines because everyone thought his career was over. Bryan wasn’t actually a superhero. He was seriously injured and unable to perform because of damage from years of hard bumps in the ring. But now, Bryan is back, and his return to Pittsburgh as a wrestler for WWE Extreme Rules at PPG Paints Arena is the headline for Sunday night. He is coming back to wrestle in the city where he first met a boy who embodied heroism. In December 2012, Connor Michalek — then only 6 — was grappling with cancer of the brain and spine. Bryan “Daniel Bryan” Danielson instantly connected with Connor “the Crusher” Michalek. It was beautiful to see a megastar

It was in Pittsburgh that WWE superstar Daniel Bryan formed a friendship with the late Connor Michalek. For the Extreme Rules show at PPG Paints Arena on Sunday, Bryan returns to wrestle in Pittsburgh for the first time in years.

such as Bryan being a fan of somebody else, smiling every time he caught up with Michalek. They became fast friends, meeting again in October 2013, and staying in touch until Michalek’s death in April 2014. Their friendship transcended the human body’s limitations. Bryan is arguably the most famous advocate for the pediatric cancers charity that honors Michalek: Connor’s Cure. Upon inducting Michalek into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2015, Bryan noted the “fiction” of a professional wrestler’s matches to contrast the “real” fight Michalek put up against cancer.

WWE EXTREME RULES

PPG Paints Arena, Sunday, 7 p.m. Available on WWE Network and pay-per-view

WWE has formed a real partnership with Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. Chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon sits on its board and co-founded Connor’s Cure. McMahon has feuded with Bryan as part of WWE stories, but she, he and all of the company’s talent break character when visiting sick kids at the hospital before shows in Pittsburgh. But it’s the character Daniel Bryan — an undersized underdog who is always overcoming obstacles — that

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fans are most excited to see perform Sunday night. He has not wrestled a match in Pittsburgh in more than three years. Concussion symptoms sidelined him from February 2015 until this past April, when he wrestled in front of 70,000-plus at WrestleMania in New Orleans. Bryan received a hero’s welcome that evening for a return to the ring that was a triumph of scripted entertainment and human spirit. It’s fitting that Bryan has reformed the Team Hell No tag team with Kane to wrestle Sunday night, because this duo was WWE’s most popular unit when Bryan met Michalek. Bryan and Kane haven’t held a tag-team championship since 2012. Their opponent at Extreme Rules, the Bludgeon Brothers, hold WWE’s Smackdown tag title. Extreme Rules is smaller in scale than WWE’s big pay-per-view events (WrestleMania, SummerSlam, Royal Rumble, etc.), but this show’s size is likely to be eclipsed by an unforgettable moment. Connor “the Crusher” Michalek’s story is still being written because of Connor’s Cure. And his favorite wrestler, Daniel Bryan, is coming back to wrestle in Pittsburgh.

For more information about Connor’s Cure visit givetochildrens.org/aboutconnorscure


TOP 5

PITTSBURGH DADS In honor of Matt “Dad” Cullen returning to the Penguins

LIVE MUSIC JULY 12

Truth & Rites Reggae

JULY 19

Joel Lindsey

(starting 8-9 pm)

(starting 8-9 pm)

EatShady.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Mia Wasikowska stars in Damsel Pittsburgh Dad

.FILM.

MILD MILD WEST BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

ODERN WESTERNS often try to tackle tropes. In the slapstick dramedy

Damsel, directors David and Nathan Zellner hone in on the “damsel in distress,” twisting the classic image of a heroic cowboy rescuing a helpless woman. The movie dips its toe into an interesting subject, but it never fully commits to a message or tone. Samuel (Robert Pattinson) is a lovesick cowboy dressed like a member of Mumford and Sons, who hires a parson (David Zellner) to help him rescue his fiancée, Penelope (Mia Wasikowska), from a kidnapping. They ride horses, get in a gun fight and sing songs around the campfire before finally finding Penelope. It is then that we learn Samuel’s intentions are not as pure as they seem, and that Penelope was not exactly taken against her will. Without giving away the twist, we see just how dangerous men can be when they feel wronged by a woman. Penelope and the parson then set out on their own journey, encountering Penelope’s angry brother-in-law and a Native American man along the way. Every male character in the film both tries to rescue Penelope and hit on her while she gets increasingly fed up. There’s more shooting, dynamite, a miniature pony and expansive landscapes. The characters don’t know where they’re going and never really figure it out.

DAMSEL

DIRECTED BY: David and Nathan Zellner STARRING: Mia Wasikowska, Robert Pattinson Opens July 13 at the Harris Theatre

Tonally, the movie can’t decide what genre or mood it’s going for. It’s unclear whether we’re supposed to laugh at the ridiculousness of both Samuel and the parson asking for her hand, or when her brother-in-law, dying from an arrow wound, tries to grope her in his final breaths. The marketing for Damsel includes indirectly billing it as “a Western for the #MeToo era,” implying that there is something about this movie that is reactionary to the wave of confessions about Hollywood’s abuse of women. This is an easy and topical (but inaccurate) way to sum up what the movie says about women, which isn’t a whole lot. Sure, Penelope fends off unwanted attention, but the movie doesn’t do enough to either implicate the sleazy men or assert Penelope’s independence. In one semi-climactic scene, Penelope yells “I don’t need anybody’s saving!” at the men who are constantly trying to rescue her. But just like much of the movie’s dialogue, the tone is off. Her anger feels less like a moment of empowerment and more like a half-hearted attempt to give her character agency. In other words, there is only so much a Western written by men can do to rectify the wrongs of other Westerns written by men.

PITTSBURGH DAD Well, that was easy.

GEORGE OWENS According to our new arrival, life was more than mere survival when Bob Uecker is playing the family patriarch in a sitcom about an English butler arriving in Beaver Falls.

WILLIE STARGELL The “We Are Family”-era Pirates remain beloved around here for obvious reasons. But most loveable amongst “the Lumber Company” was “Pops.”

Outdoor seating, food and drink ŸŞåÎĜ°ĬŸƉŅýåųåÚƉ°ƋƉÅŅƋĘƉĬŅΰƋĜŅĹŸ

GRADY TRIPP OK, so we’re banking on the possibility that one of Michael Chabon’s great literary characters did better as a father than leading up to fatherhood in Wonder Boys.

WILLIAM PITT Well, that was even easier.

LIVE MUSIC JULY 14

JULY 21

Koz (Matthew Kozlovac)

Bill Henry (12-4 pm)

(12-4 pm)

BakerySocial.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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CP PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JARED WICKERHAM

The cast of Star Wars arrives at Heinz Hall

.FILM.

NO NEW HOPE BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

LONG TIME AGO in a galaxy far, far away … those words meant nothing. There was a time when Star Wars didn’t exist, when the names Obi-Wan and Leia meant nothing, when George Lucas was a young director who had failed to land filmmaking rights for his beloved Flash Gordon comic books. It’s quite hard to imagine the world before Star Wars. In fact, many aren’t even old enough to remember life preStar Wars. The original Star Wars film, later subtitled A New Hope, was released just over 41 years ago. According to the CIA World Factbook, just 28.5 percent of Americans are younger than

55 years old, meaning a majority of us can’t remember life before lightsabers, stormtroopers, and Wookiees. Age aside, it’s also quite difficult to imagine the world before Star Wars because it’s absolutely everywhere. It took a week shy of 28 years for the first six movies bearing the Star Wars name to be released. By 2020, six films will have been released in six years. That will push the number of full-length Star Wars films to 13: the nine of the main saga, the three anthology films (Rogue One and Solo are the two others) and the animated Clone Wars movie. The silver screen is far from the

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

7 p.m. Thu., July 12 and Fri., July 13. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-105. pittsburghsymphony.org

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only place Star Wars lives. It’s everywhere, even that why-did-it-even-goviral, not-funny-in-the-slightest, stopsharing-on-Facebook-please video of a woman in a Chewbacca mask giggling hysterically. Online, communities on reddit and Facebook have hundreds of thousands of members. They thrive on jokes and memes about everything from the end of net neutrality to a standalone Obi-Wan Kenobi movie starring Ewan McGregor. On TV, we’ve had the Clone Wars micro-series and two 3D animated series, The Clone Wars and Rebels. A liveaction series involving Jon Favreau is also in the works. It’s all … a bit much, isn’t it? It wasn’t always like this. I remember the first time I watched Revenge of the Sith, the climactic film that would tie the prequels to the original trilogy.


A friend of a childhood dhood friend had somehow gotten his hands on a boothe film before the legged DVD copy of the release. Watching it, I was more hooked er. on Star Wars than ever. tory like that. But Every fan has a story now, things don’t seem to be going too well. mbers for Solo, this The box office numbers ry (the fourth year’s Star Wars entry entioned of six in that aforementioned one- eve r y -ye ar meat m eat egrinder), seem to rem flect that. The film brought in just underr o$200 million at the dout that’s mestic box office, but the worst showing — by on far — for a live-action Star Wars movie. tar The next-worst Star forWars box office performance came from 2002’s nes, which Attack of the Clones, llion domestically brought in $310 million n, that goes up to (adjusted for inflation, hat movie’s “weak” $429 million). And that performance came three years after ce was met with The Phantom Menace mixed critical and fan reactions for, among other reasons, overuse of computer-generated imagery and all-tooironic toilet humor.

WHEN DID STAR WARS STOP BEING FUN? Because of Solo’s “failure,” Disney has decided to put further anthology films on the back burner until fans respond better. (Except the 2020 one, it seems, since it’s already in production.) Some fans have responded in an even worse manner. They’re trying to remake The Last Jedi, the most recent entry to the sequel trilogy. Apparently, they’ve somehow managed to muster over $400 million in pledges. The internet sure is wonderful. Well, I’m sure it’ll go about as well as Anakin attacking Obi-Wan when the latter had the high ground. But part of the problem these fans have with The Last Jedi has absolutely nothing to do with the actual movie. It has to do with everything leading up to it. At the end of The Force Awakens, Rey returns Luke Skywalker’s old lightsaber to him. Fans spent two years theorizing about what he’d do, what

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but make the right choice,

he’d say. Maybe he’d train Rey, or turn out to be a Sith, or join up with her and Leia and Billy Dee Williams’ Lando Calrissian and the reanimated corpse of Darth Maul to fight emo crybaby baddies Kylo Ren and General Hux. If you’ve seen The Last Jedi, though, you know what Luke does with his lightsaber: He nonchalantly tosses it over his shoulder and off a cliff. Maybe that’s a sign of how Star Wars needs to be treated. After all, these are space movies with talking aliens, laser swords and planets that have exactly one climate. They’re not meant to have overwhelming gravitas or be perfect in every way. Every Star Wars film has some imperfections: the song “Jedi Rocks” in Return of the Jedi, Luke’s “power convertors” line in A New Hope, basically all of Attack of the Clones. But I’ll be damned if they aren’t fun. Lightsaber duels, podracing, Death Star explosions, our heroes inexplicably triumphing over the villains — things like that are why we all fell in love with Star Wars in the first place. The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will perform the music of Star Wars: A New Hope in time with the film on Thursday and Friday. Nothing could be more fun than that. Imagine a world without Star Wars. I guarantee it’s not as fun, and that’s all that really matters.

don’t drink & drive.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

^ Elias Khouri in Polish Hill < A vase by Talon Smith

.FESTIVAL.

PARTY ON THE HILL BY LISA CUNNINGHAM // LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

OLISH HILL funk and soul musician

Elias Khouri is only 17 and already becoming “Pittsburgh famous.” He looked and sounded like a young Jimi Hendrix while jamming on stage earlier this summer at Three Rivers Arts Festival. His Elias Khouri and the E.K. Band was recently featured at the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership’s Night Market and Free Concert Series. He’s also a cover model, currently gracing the front of Whirl magazine, where he’s listed as a “rising musical phenom.” He also already has a few groupies. “And I appreciate each and every one of them,” he said. But his first gig ever? The Polish Hill Arts Festival in 2015. “I was born in Polish Hill and have a connection to this neighborhood,” Khouri said. “My Polish Hill neighbors would knock on my door and tell me, ‘Hey, we’ve been listening to you from outside. Keep up the good work!’”

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Khouri will return with his band on Sunday for the 11th annual Polish Hill Arts Festival, featuring live music, food vendors, hands-on activities and over 40 artists selling their work. This event is a community affair. When the neighborhood’s civic association lost federal funding years ago, Polish Hill resident Aubrey Halliburton stepped up and recruited a group of volunteers to keep the festival alive.

POLISH HILL ARTS FESTIVAL

Noon-8 p.m. Sun., July 15. Corner of Brereton and Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. tinyurl.com/polishhillfest

“She was determined not to lose this amazing treasure of an event that we all love so much,” said festival volunteer Kim Teplitzky. This weekend’s family-friendly festi-

val marks a third year it will be organized by this small, but dedicated group of volunteers. Halliburton said this year’s event is going to be bigger than ever, including more artist booths. Like Khouri, many of the artists also live and/or work in Polish Hill. The festival volunteers give preference to vendors in the neighborhood, “keeping our fees low so that these amazing and creative artists have a place to showcase and sell their handiwork,” said Teplitzky. “It’s pretty special.” Ceramics artist Talon Smith will be selling her soda-fired pottery, which uses sodium bicarbonate in the kiln to create lovely minimalistic textures. Smith lived in Polish Hill for two years before moving to Bloomfield, but she continues to share a studio space across from Gooski’s with Three Rivers Clay Works (also selling at the fest). “The other vendors are always

amazing,” said Smith. “It’s basically a full day of high fives, friends and the added bonus of selling some work.” Other Polish Hill artists include Zsofia Molgaard, whose colorful quilted bags are influenced from where she grew up in Hungary, and Corey Lyons of Forged Signature, whose metal jewelry is the perfect fit for Polish Hill’s punk scene. Hands-on activities include a live welding and arts demo from the Mobile Sculpture Workshop, a community outreach program for youth and neighbors, started by folks who live in Polish Hill. Program Director Tim Kaulen said they’ll be working on miniature models and early fabrication for a sculpture the workshop will present to the neighborhood of Hazelwood when completed later this year. The festival kicks off at noon. Pro tip: get there a little early and grab a latte from popular neighborhood spot Kaibur Coffee before things get started.


2018

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NOW THROUGH JULY 15 AT MIDNIGHT General admission tickets available at cooltix.com Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss our celebration of the year when we award the winners of BEST OF PGH 2018 ! Featuring live music, DJs, games, food sampling, drinks, and much more!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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.FOR THE WEEK OF JULY 12.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I’m feeling a bit helpless as I watch you messing with that bad but good stuff that is so wrongbut-right for you. I am rendered equally inert as I observe you playing with the strong-but-weak stuff that’s interesting-but-probably-irrelevant. I fidget and sigh as I monitor the classy-but-trashy influence that’s angling for your attention; and the supposedly fast-moving process that’s creeping along so slowly; and the seemingly obvious truth that would offer you a much better lesson if only you would see it for the chewy riddle that it is. What should I do about my predicament? Is there any way I can give you a boost? Maybe the best assistance I can offer is to describe to you what I see.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Psychologist Paul Ekman has compiled an extensive atlas of how emotions are revealed in our faces. “Smiles are probably the most underrated facial expressions,” he has written, “much more complicated than most people realize. There are dozens of smiles, each differing in appearance and in the message expressed.” I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because your assignment in the coming weeks — should you choose to accept it — is to explore and experiment with your entire repertoire of smiles. I’m confident that life will conspire to help you carry out this task. More than at any time since your birthday in 2015, this is the season for unleashing your smiles.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Lucky vibes are coalescing in your vicinity. Scouts and recruiters are hovering. Helpers, fairy godmothers, and future playmates are growing restless waiting for you to ask them for favors. Therefore, I hereby authorize you to be imperious, regal, and overflowing with self-respect. I encourage you to seize exactly what you want, not what you’re “supposed” to want. Or else be considerate, appropriate, modest, and full of harmonious caution. CUT! CUT! Delete that “be considerate” sentence. The Libra part of me tricked me into saying it. And this is one time when people of the Libra persuasion are allowed to be free from the compulsion to balance and moderate. You have a mandate to be the show, not watch the show.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Emily Dickinson wrote 1,775 poems — an average of one every week for 34 years. I’d love to see

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

I pay tribute to your dizzying courage, you wise fool. I stage-whisper “Congratulations!” as you slip away from your hypnotic routine and wander out to the edge of mysterious joy. With a crazy grin of encouragement and my fist pressed against my chest, I salute your efforts to transcend your past. I praise and exalt you for demonstrating that freedom is never permanent, but must be reclaimed and reinvented on a regular basis. I cheer you on as you avoid every temptation to repeat yourself, demean yourself, and chain yourself. you launch an enduring, deep-rooted project that will require similar amounts of stamina, persistence, and dedication. Are you ready to expand your vision of what’s possible to accomplish? The current astrological omens suggest that the next two months will be an excellent time to commit yourself to a great work that you will give your best to for the rest of your long life!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): What’s the biggest lie in my life? There are several candidates. Here’s one: I pretend I’m nonchalant about one of my greatest failures; I act as if I’m not distressed by the fact that the music I’ve created has never received the listenership it should it have. How about you, Sagittarius? What’s the biggest lie in your life? What’s most false or dishonest or evasive about you? Whatever it is, the immediate future will be a favorable time to transform your relationship with it. You now have extraordinary power to tell yourself liberating truths. Three weeks from now, you could be a more authentic version of yourself than you’ve ever been.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now and then you go through phases when you don’t know what you need until you stumble upon it. At times like those, you’re wise not to harbor fixed ideas about what you need or where to hunt for what you need. Metaphorically speaking, a holy grail might show up in a thrift

store. An eccentric stranger may provide you with an accidental epiphany at a bus stop or a convenience store. Who knows? A crucial clue may even jump out at you from a spam email or a reality TV show. I suspect that the next two weeks might be one of those odd grace periods for you.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Reverse psychology” is when you convince people to do what you wish they would do by shrewdly suggesting that they do the opposite. “Reverse censorship” is when you write or speak the very words or ideas that you have been forbidden to express. “Reverse cynicism” is acting like it’s chic to express glee, positivity, and enthusiasm. “Reverse egotism” is bragging about what you don’t have and can’t do. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to carry out all these reversals, as well as any other constructive or amusing reversals you can dream up.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Emily Dickinson once revealed to a friend that there was only one Commandment she ever obeyed: “Consider the Lilies.” Japanese novelist Natsume Sōseki told his English-speaking students that the proper Japanese translation for “I love you” is Tsuki ga tottemo aoi naa, which literally means “The moon is so blue tonight.” In accordance with current astrological omens, Pisces, I’m advising you to be inspired by Dickinson and Sōseki. More than any other time in 2018, your duty in the coming weeks is

to be lyrical, sensual, aesthetic, imaginative, and festively non-literal.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your key theme right now is growth. Let’s dig in and analyze its nuances. No. 1. Not all growth is good for you. It may stretch you too far too fast — beyond your capacity to integrate and use it. No. 2. Some growth that is good for you doesn’t feel good to you. It might force you to transcend comforts that are making you stagnant, and that can be painful. No. 3. Some growth that’s good for you may meet resistance from people close to you; they might prefer you to remain just as you are, and may even experience your growth as a problem. No. 4. Some growth that isn’t particularly good for you may feel pretty good. For instance, you could enjoy working to improve a capacity or skill that is irrelevant to your long-term goals. No. 5. Some growth is good for you in some ways, and not so good in other ways. You have to decide if the trade-off is worth it. No. 6. Some growth is utterly healthy for you, feels pleasurable, and inspires other people.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You can’t sing with someone else’s mouth, Taurus. You can’t sit down and settle into a commanding new power spot with someone else’s butt. Capiche? I also want to tell you that it’s best if you don’t try to dream with someone else’s heart, nor should you imagine you can fine-tune your relationship with yourself by pushing someone else to change. But here’s an odd fact: You can enhance your possibility for success by harnessing or borrowing or basking in other people’s luck. Especially in the coming weeks.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You wouldn’t attempt to cure a case of hiccups by repeatedly smacking your head against a wall, right? You wouldn’t use an anti-tank rocket launcher to eliminate the mosquito buzzing around your room, and you wouldn’t set your friend’s hair on fire as a punishment for arriving late to your rendezvous at the café. So don’t overreact to minor tweaks of fate, my dear Gemini. Don’t over-medicate tiny disturbances. Instead, regard the glitches as learning opportunities. Use them to cultivate more patience, expand your tolerance, and strengthen your character.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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EARLY WARNINGS SPONSORED UPCOMING EVENTS FROM CITY PAPER’S FINE ADVERTISERS

3W S

FOOD TRUCKS AND HOP FARM BREWING COMPANY CRAFT BEER AT ALL CONCERTS BEGINNING AT 6PM

SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER

WED., JULY 25 GET THE DIRT ON DIRT!

JIM DONOVAN & SUN KING WARRIORS

1 P.M. NORTH PARK FLAGSTAFF SHELTER NORTH PARK. Free event (registration required). Alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms.

+ THE HAWKEYES

WED., JULY 25 ROB ZOMBIE & MARILYN MANSON

FRIDAY, JULY 13 | 7:30 PM

HARTWOOD ACRES AMPHITHEATER

PHILLIP PHILLIPS

7 P.M. KEYBANK PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN. $18-125. 724-947-7400 or livenation.com.

+ STRIKING MATCHES

WED., JULY 25 LIVE AT THE FILLMORE 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $15-30. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., JULY 31 DAVID CROSS

THU., JULY 26 RADIOHEAD 7:30 P.M. PPG PAINTS ARENA DOWNTOWN. $85. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000.

THU., JULY 26 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE 7 P.M. HEINZ HALL DOWNTOWN. $25-105. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org.

FRI., JULY 27 RASCAL FLATTS 7:30 P.M. KEYBANK PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN. $24-98. 724-947-7400 or livenation.com. With special guests Dan + Shay & Carly Pearce.

l SUNDAY, JULY 15 | 7:30 PM

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL

SAT., JULY 28 CHICAGO & REO SPEEDWAGON

7 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. All-ages event. $20-30. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Slaves, Royal Thunder & Awaken I Am.

7:30 P.M. KEYBANK PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN. $29-129. 724-947-7400 or livenation.com.

SUN., JULY 29 LUCIUS & BROOKE ANNIBALE

SAT., JULY 28 JEFF DANIELS

7:30 P.M. HARTWOOD ACRES MANSION HARTWOOD ACRES PARK. Free event. 412-767-9200.

8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $26-39. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Ben Daniels Band.

MON., JULY 30 POWERMAN 5000

SAT., JULY 28 SWORN ENEMY

ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US/SUMMER

Great Outdoors

DHY 2018

7 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. 412-653-2695. $15-17. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Vyces, Shattered, Venus in Furs.

FRI., JULY 27 MIKE DILLON BAND

8 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $16. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Thy Will Be Done.

11 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $14-17. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com.

SUN., JULY 29 BOY GEORGE & CULTURE CLUB

8 P.M. PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER OAKLAND. $23-67. 412-648-3054 or ticketmaster.com. With special guest Mini Mansions.

FRI., JULY 27 JEFFERSON STARSHIP

6 P.M. STAGE AE NORTH SIDE. $35-200. 412-229-5483 or ticketmaster.com. With special guest Tom Bailey.

TUE., JULY 31 DAVID CROSS

7:30 P.M. SOUTH PARK AMPITHEATER SOUTH PARK. Free event. 412-835-5710. With special guest Working Breed.

SUN., JULY 29 CKY

8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $39.75. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., JULY 31 ARCTIC MONKEYS

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US

Sunday, July 15 12:00 noon-4:00 pm North Park Tennis Court Road

(road along lake by boathouse, Food trucks will be on site!)

This is a free event to learn about: [ CAMPING AM MPIN PING G [ LOC LOCAL AL ANIMALS ANIMAL AN MALSS [ BIKING [ WOOD CARVING [ HIKING [ FISHING AND MORE!

alleghenycounty.us/specialevents PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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CALENDAR JULY 12-18

ANDY WARHOL’S FEMALE FASHION FIGURE / IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM

^ Fri., July 13: Window Dressing: An Evening of Fashion from the Eons Archive

THURSDAY JULY 12 MUSIC

If you’re the type that likes throwing plastic spoons at The Room or clocking coconuts during The Holy Grail, it’s time to step up to the ultimate cult-film interactive screening experience of sitting quietly and enjoying Star Wars: A New

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Hope with a live orchestra. The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will perform John Williams’ score in real time along with a screening of the film at Heinz Hall. You’ll surely recognize the brilliant, unforgettable themes from this iconic film composer, whose credits include Stepmom (1998) and SpaceCamp (1986). Leave the coconuts at home and don’t throw anything. Alex Gordon 7 p.m. Also 7 p.m., Fri., July 13. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25. pittsburghsymphony.org

FRIDAY JULY 13 TALK

The Frick Art and Historical Center’s summer program Regional Writers Series: Women, History, and Place seeks to celebrate local female authors who tell compelling stories about women. Marie Benedict, a lawyer and author of

Carnegie’s Maid: A Novel and The Other Einstein: A Novel, is this month’s speaker. The series takes place in the Community Room, which is conveniently located across from the Car and Carriage Museum exhibition, Driving the Disenfranchised, which looks into the automobile’s role in women’s suffrage. Drink coffee and enjoy pastries as Benedict shares her story — it might just inspire you. Lauren Ortego 10 a.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $12. thefrickpittsburgh.org


’ LET S

GET S CIAL IMAGE COURTESY OF CHRISSY COSTA

^ Fri., July 13: Can’t Help But Laugh Comedy Show

HOLIDAY

You might know him from wearing a black t-shirt really well in Jurassic Park, or from turning into a fly in The Fly, or from playing a timeshare salesman on Portlandia, but regardless of where you recognize Jeff Goldblum from, you definitely recognize him. The West Homestead native has become a cult favorite on the internet — for his acting/ singing chops and definitely not his sultry y ways. In 2004, Pittsburgh City ity Council made July 13 Jefff Goldblum Day, and this year ar you can celebrate at Artisan with trivia, cosplay, y, and t-shirts. There will even be flash tattoo o specials if you wantt to permanently declare e your love. Hannah Lynn 12-7 p.m. 5001 Penn Ave., Garfield. Artisanpittsburgh.com

TALK

Conservation is a necessary sary conversation, and who better to provide a space for that at conversation than the Pittsburgh tsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium? Voices ices for Conservation will be hosted ed by renowned conservationist Julie Scardina. Audience members rs of all ages can learn about the importance of saving and researching searching wildlife. Scardina has worked d for SSeaWorld and Busch Gardens as the director of their animal ambassador programs and as curator of animal training. Drink and food will be available for purchase, and to top it all off, all proceeds ^ Fri., July 13: Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest

collected for the ticket go directly towards the Pittsburgh Zoo’s Science and Conservation program. LO 6 p.m. 7370 Baker St., Friendship. $10 ($1 processing fee). pittsburghzoo.org

FILM

It’s the last day of school and you have one shot to deliver that creepy letter to your me crush cr longtime who’s just been dumped by her red-shirted red-shirt boyfriend; also, your best friend might have sex with Seth Green in a bathr bathroom. The 1998 teen comedy Can’t Ha Hardly Wait screens at Oaks Theater Theate alongside a beer tasting K from Knockin Noggin. The event will be hosted by Lance Parkin Loc Street Entertainment. of Locust Don worry: Despite what Don’t undercover-nerd und William say in the film, you can drink says the beer. The beer has not gon bad. AG 6:30 p.m. gone A 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakm Oakmont. $8. 21 and over. Theoak Theoakstheater.com

FASHION FASHIO

Everybody knows kno Andy Warhol artist, but what do you was an iconic art know a about pre-fame, pre-po pre-pop art Warhol? The Warhol Museum Andy W is diving into Warhol when he was still a virtually unknown artist during his first decade in New York City with its event, Window Dressing: An Evening of Fashion from the Eons Archive. With music from DJ Soy Sos, live models will bring some of Warhol’s earliest commercial fashion work to life. It’s a night of 1950s-era fashion, curated by Eons Fashion Antique owner Richard Parsakian. Period-appropriate

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

^ Fri., July 13: Cracker

cocktail attire isn’t necessary, but it is encouraged. LO 7 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free. warhol.org

PSYCHEDELICS

You might be familiar with the increasingly popular movement to legalize weed, but you might not know about the less common movement to legalize psychedelics. The Sleeping Octopus Assembly on Psychedelics (SOAP) is a conference held at a historic mansion in Wilkinsburg. The three-day event features speakers discussing medicine, research, and culture around psychedelics — including opioid treatment, the racialized war on drugs, and Peyote habitat loss. Of course these are psychedelics we’re talking about, so there has to be a little fun: comedian Shane Mauss and a Grateful Dead tribute from jam-band Fungus. HL Runs 7 p.m. through Sun., July 15. 1300 Wood St., Wilkinsburg. $50-$100. pittsburghsoap.com

BEER

Craft beer isn’t exactly the niche hobby it used to be, but that shouldn’t stop anyone from exploring all it has to offer in 2018. The Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest is the perfect opportunity to do so. The entrance

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fee includes unlimited ed samples. If you keep it together, her, you can try hundreds of craft ft brews. Many local brews will be on tap, as will beers from as far ar as Oregon, Florida, and Utah. Gose, Amber ales, IPAs — the options tions are limitless. The festival al will take over Stage AE and will last two days. Organizers rs encourage attendees es to take public transit; it; the venue is a short walk to the North Side ide T station. Ryan Deto to July 13 7:30-11 p.m. July 14 6:30-11 p.m.,, 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side; $45-$65. 5. com Pittsburghbeerfest.com

FILM

Anon Mess Age Sage ge is a sburgh, band formed in Pittsburgh, and a new surrealistt poparco documentary by Marco ^ Sat., July 14: Dixie Surewood hosts Christmas In July

Zingrone, Welcome To M My World, brings the viewer into its wo world. The film is being screened at R Regent Square Theaterr and is sure to be just as confusing and mys mysterious as the band itself, while a answering as many questions as it creates. So come get a peek into band members’ m minds, and take a step into their world. p 1035 S. LO 8 p.m Bradd Braddock Ave., Regent Squa $8 ($7 for Square. senio seniors/students). cinem cinema.pfpca.org

MUSIC MU

Anyo who listened Anyone to ro rock radio in the 199 is familiar with 1990s Cra Cracker’s monster 19 hit “Low” (it’s 1993 ea easily one of the be singles to use best th term “junkie the co cosmonaut”). But Cracker, led by fformer Camper Van Be Beethoven vocalist/ guitaris guitarist David Lowery,

has churned out a handful of solid releases in the years since, most recently 2014’s Berkeley to Bakersfield. The band’s sound is far more Americana and roots-inspired than “Low” would have you suspect, but the smart songwriting and catchy constructions runs thick throughout the discography. If it’s been a while, check back in with Cracker at Hard Rock Cafe. AG 9 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $20-22. 412-481-7625

COMEDY

When life gets you down, sometimes you can’t help but laugh. That’s the message at Club Cafe’s Can’t Help But Laugh Comedy Show. Come see talented comedians and take your mind off impending doom for a while. Hosted by local pundit and podcaster Nate Nulph, the opener is up-andcoming talent Roni Shanell, a comedian from Detroit. Featured is Chrissy Costa, a local queer writer and comedian, and headliner Marcus Cox. It’s a lineup that might make you forget all of your troubles — because there are a lot. LO 10:30 p.m. 56-58 S. 12th St., Southside. $15. ClubCafeLive.com


certifications must be medically verified, cost $150 and scheduled beforehand. AM Noon. 730 Brookline Blvd., Brookline. Free. thriveonhealth.com

FILM

It’s easiest to remember The Beatles for changing music forever, but the Fab Four ventured from the recording studio to the film studio several times. A Hard Day’s Night and Help! were both trendsetters for music videos and 1960s camp humor Let It Be gave an inside look into the band’s final recording sessions. And Magical Mystery Tour … well, we don’t talk about Magical Mystery Tour. But Yellow Submarine, an animated adventure that features some of that band’s biggest hits, is well-loved by Beatles superfans and critics alike. It’ll be shown at Manor Theatre at midnight. Alex McCann Midnight. Also Sat., July 14 at 1 p.m. and midnight; Sun., July 15 at 1 p.m. 1729 Murray Ave., East End. $9.75; $8 for children, seniors and students. manorpgh.com

KIDS

If your kid has a talent for making people laugh, start them early with the Penny Arcade: All Ages Comedy Show. This show is designed for kids ages 5-12, and provides an opportunity to flex their still-in-development comedy skills. Kids can draw, write and hone their craft at stations throughout the Arcade Comedy Theater. At the end of this event, the Penny Players will bring the kids’ ideas to life with a 45-minute show, during which some of the audience is given the chance to get on stage. LO 1 p.m. 943 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10 adults, $5 kids, or Pay As You Wish. arcadecomedytheater.com

SATURDAY

FESTIVAL

JULY 14

There’s an odd mixture of awe and inferiority that comes from someone younger than you being way, way more successful — think child actors or 17-year-old Olympic gold medalist Chloe Kim. Rico Nasty, a rapper who turned 21 in May, fits into that category. She’ll be performing at Freek Show, an “all-night warehouse extravaganza” that will celebrate the work of women, people of color and the LGBTQ community. Nearly 20 other performers and several DJs will take the stage to keep the party going until 3 a.m. The festival’s proceeds will be donated to My Mind Matters, a group that fights mental health stigmas in local black communities. AM 6 p.m. 829 Industry St., Allentown. $25. freekshowfestival.com

OUTDOORS

Southwestern Pennsylvania is home to many amazing mountain biking trails. It’s not well-known there are terrific biking routes to the north, south, east and west. Heck, Pittsburgh city-proper even has some trails of its own. Though riding trails can be a bit harrowing, The Wheel Mill in Homewood wants to teach you how to handle them safely. The Take It To The Trails bike clinic teaches riders simple techniques such as body position and pressure control, and advanced skills like jumping and wheel lifts. The clinic starts at Wheel Mill and rides into the trails of Frick Park. Participants must be capable of riding 8 miles in an hour. Bring your bike and gear. Barbecue and refreshments follow the clinic. RD 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 6815 Hamilton Ave., Homewood; $15. thewheelmill.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF FELICIA ABBAN/ATLANTIC RECORDS

^ Sat., July 14: Rico Nasty at Freek Show

EXPO

In April 2016, Gov. Tom Wolf signed legalization of medical marijuana in Pennsylvania into law; two years later, dispensaries are beginning to open. Learn details about the laws and qualifying conditions at Dispense with the Nonsense Expo at Thrive on Health. Presented by Dispense Magazine,

this expo will bring together growers, dispensary representatives, health workers and patients. A discussion panel at 3 p.m. will feature physician and cannabis researcher Dr. John Metcalf, holistic health practitioner Mandi Babkes and hypnosis practitioner Joseph Onesta. Metcalf will also be on hand to give medical cannabis certifications. Those

DRAG

Hot and sticky temps making you dream of snow? Gorgeous drag stars shaking their jingle bells making you feel, well, CONTINUES ON PG. 42

ALREADY MISSING THE FURRIES? Meet Rika, one of Pittsburgh’s own! Check out “Behind the Mask” to learn more about this local artist and YouTube star.

pghcitypaper.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

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CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Joan Jett

THURSDAY Greyhaven, 156/Silence, Hymnless, Altar Boy 7 p.m. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. therobotoproject.com

FRIDAY The Lone Bellow 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

SATURDAY

CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

^ Sat., July 14: Take It To The Trails

Styx, Joan Jett & the Blackhearts

England won a penalty shootout and three favorites to win — Spain, Portugal and Argentina — lost in the round of 16. It’ll all come to head with the World Cup Final, and Row House Cinema will be showing the drama on a theater screen. Cheer, jeer or just sit back and watch the show, but don’t be that person who shows up blabbering about how American football is superior. AM 10:30 a.m. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. rowhousecinema.com

7 p.m. KeyBank Pavilion, Burgettstown. burgettstownpavilion.net

SUNDAY Slum Village 8 p.m. Spirit, Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com

MONDAY Kelsey Waldon, The Beagle Brothers

WEDNESDAY

8 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. clubcafelive.com

JULY 18

TUESDAY Shania Twain 7:30 p.m. PPG Paints Arena, Downtown. ppgpaintsarena.com

WEDNESDAY Brahms in da Haus 7 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. pittsburghsymphony.org

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE

AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 42

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MUSIC IMAGE COURTESY OF SUBAFILMS LTD.

^ Fri., July 13: Yellow Submarine

hot and sticky? Merry Christmas, queens! You still have 164 days until the real Santa comes, but the gift of cropped Christmas sweaters and holiday tunes arrives early at Blue Moon Bar for Christmas In July. Hosted by reigning “Miss Blue Moon” Dixie Surewood and featuring six fierce performers, including former City Paper cover model Lola LeCroix, this event promises to make this summer Yuletide gay. Very, very gay. Lisa Cunningham Midnight. 5115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 21+. No cover. facebook.com, search ‘blue moon bar’

SUNDAY JULY 15 SPORTS

If you’ve been keeping tabs on the FIFA World Cup, you’re well aware this year’s event has been unpredictable. Defending champion Germany lost in the group stage, lowest-ranked side Russia has reached the quarterfinals,

Influenced by artists ranging from Ella Fitzgerald to Radiohead, Avi Diamond slides herself into a peculiar but endearing niche of sound. Diamond’s most recent EP, Wolfmother, is sometimes almost pure folk, but it often draws from alternative music, jazz influences and Celtic harmonies. She’ll perform at Buhl Community Park in the second of eight weekly performances of the Solar Concert Series. The 11th annual edition is a joint project of the Saturday Light Brigade and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. AM 12:15 p.m. Allegheny Square, North Side. Free. pittsburghkids.org •


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Rehearsal Space

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

Uber Technologies, Inc. has MULTIPLE POSITIONS open in Pittsburgh, PA for the following:

Software Engineer (Ref#18JUNSWPITT) Dsgn/archtct, dev &/or test SW apps using Uber’s tech stack. Refer to Ref# & mail resume to Uber Technologies, Inc, Attn: A. Aldrich, 685 Market St, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94105

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

HELP WANTED Open Interviews Phipps Conservatory will be holding OPEN INTERVIEWS for GUEST SERVICE ASSOCIATES (PT) every Thursday from 9:30-11:30 am and 2 – 4 pm from July 12 -September 27. Permanent positions, as well as seasonal opportunities for the upcoming holiday season, are available. Interested candidates should come to the Welcome Center located at One Schenley Park, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, with a cover letter and resume. For more information, visit https://www. phippsjobs.org.

ADOPTION Adopt: Loving couple dreams of adopting your newborn. Promising secure life and forever love. Monica & Tony 1-800-499-0887 Exp. Pd.

EMPLOYMENT PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 Weekly Mailing Brochures from Home Genuine Opportunity. Helping home workers since 2001! Start Immediately! www.IncomeCentral.net (AAN CAN)

MISCELLANEOUS CHEAP AIRLINE FLIGHTS! We get deals like no other agency. Call today to learn more 800-767-0217 (AAN CAN)

General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/ default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yin yoga ÁRZ\RJD meditation

teacher training ashtanga yoga prenatal yoga family yoga

MISCELLANEOUS HughesNet Satellite Internet - 25mbps starting at $49.99/mo! FAST download speeds. WiFi built in! FREE Standard Installation for lease customers! Limited Time, Call 1-800-490-4140 (AAN CAN)

ROOMMATES Need a roommate? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time July 17, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

• WINDOW CLEANING • CALCULATORS

get your yoga on!

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

east liberty squirrel hill north hills CAREER TRAINING Massage Therapy at Career Training Academy Our accelerated Massage Therapy program teaches many different techniques of massage and bodywork. At CTA, you won’t just learn what it takes to do the job well; you’ll learn what you need to stand out from the crowd, adapt, and succeed. To plan a visit to our Pittsburgh Campus, call 412-385-7903 or visit careerta.edu.

MASSAGE

24/7

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And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 844-898-7142 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. (AAN CAN)

TIGER SPA Best of the Best in Town!

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to East Market Street. End of downtown Warren, on right hand side.

Open 8am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted Bring this ad for a special treat! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

43


Recovery United

JADE Wellness Center

NOW OPEN IN SOUTH SIDE Locations in Monroeville, Wexford and South Side, PA

Premiere, Family Owned and Operated Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment:

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL • Group and Individualized Therapy

Pittsburgh, Inc.

THERE ARE MANY PATHS TO RECOVERY

NEED HELP? CALL TODAY INSURANCES ACCEPTED

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Treatment for Opiate Addiction Methadone/Suboxone

PITTSBURGH Methadone 412-255-8717 • Suboxone 412-281-1521 NOW ACCEPTING MEDICAID - info@summitmedical.biz

PITTSBURGH • SOUTH HILLS Methadone 412-488-6360 • info2@alliancemedical.biz

BEAVER COUNTY Methadone 724-857-9640 • Suboxone 724-448-9116 • info@ptsa.biz 44

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

412-291-8039

409 DINWIDDIE STREET PGH., PA 15219 • WWW.RECOVERYUNITEDPITTSBURGH.COM


HOOVER

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS

1. “Hmmm...” 7. “Me too!” 14. Like a cappella music 15. Heavy partier 16. Textbook fuck-ups 17. Like a rout 18. Heel 19. Long lunches 21. Univ. period 22. Out on a boat, say 24. Locality 26. Chevy SUV 30. Jam band behind the Curveball festival 32. Some paintings 34. Wearing kicks 36. Lunchtime 37. High energy 38. “2001” nutjob 40. Priced 42. Enormous amount 43. Affirmative vote 44. Friends 45. Sport whose ref is called a gyoji 47. “Life in the Fast Lane” singer 50. Diminutive and playful 53. Hung it up 54. Go overboard with the drugs 56. Graphing calculator function 57. Mormons: Abbr. 59. Make up class?: Abbr. 61. Broncos run for it 62. Of the lungs’ air cells

66. Rucker of country 68. Backward dance move 69. “You bet” 70. Beyoncé’s singing sister 71. Children’s story character who bakes a loaf of bread

DOWN

1. Cold topping? 2. Anthrax’s genre 3. Place where a rowdy crowd might be exiled? 4. Money for later: Abbr. 5. Baseballers who’s mascot is Screech, for short 6. ___ Mikaelson (vampire-werewolf on “The Originals”) 7. Sanders, e.g.: Abbr. 8. Poems in some Classics classes 9. Wash off one’s palate? 10. Mannerless sort 11. Metacafe stream, for short 12. Weathervane dir. 13. “I didn’t think ___ be this long” 15. Anchor who has no idea what he’s talking about? 20. About Me words 23. Barbecue pit leftover

25. “The Time Machine” peaceniks 27. What one does in a sack race? 28. Cookie in a sundae 29. “Get Up!” channel 31. Put some goose feathers in a pawn shop? 33. Some superfan gatherings 35. Slay 38. Stevenson alter-ego 39. Unimaginably long stretch 41. Normandy battle town 46. Org. that hopes and prays for an

increase in interest post-World Cup 48. Montana’s capital 49. Twelfth word of “Silent Night” 51. Soak with 52. Country legend Willie 55. Bottommost spot 58. Smeltery leftovers 60. ___ Modern (London museum) 62. Mornings, briefly 63. Hull head 64. Spotify setting: Abbr. 65. Drink with a full-bodied and fruity taste 67. Unburden (of) LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JULY 11-18, 2018

45


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Longtime Savage Love fanboy with a bit of a conundrum — and it’s your fault! I’m a bi man in my 30s. To use Charles M. Blow’s word, my bisexuality is “lopsided.” This means that I fall in love with women exclusively, but I love to have sex with men occasionally. My current girlfriend not only approves, she likes to join in. We have a great kinky sex life, and at times we invite a hot bi dude to join us. You keep saying that to counter bisexual erasure, it is the duty of every bisexual to come out of the closet. If I were a “proper” bisexual, i.e., romantically interested in men also, that would be no problem — my family and work and social circles are extremely liberal. However, your advice to us kinksters and people in open relationships is that we probably shouldn’t come out to our parents or colleagues, since when it comes to sex, it’s advisable to operate on a need-to-know basis. While I agree with this completely — my mother doesn’t need to know my girlfriend pegs me — the rule keeps me in the closet as well. Since I’m only sexually interested in men, wouldn’t I be revealing facts about my sex life if I came out as bi? I also wouldn’t want to mislead gay men into thinking that I’m available for romantic relationships with them. So which rule is more important: the duty to come out as a bisexual or the advice to operate on a needto-know basis when it comes to your sex life? BISEXUAL LEANING OUT WARILY

There’s nothing improper about your bisexuality, BLOW — or Charles M. Blow’s bisexuality, or the bisexuality of other “lopsided” bisexuals. While the idea that bisexuals are equally attracted to men and women sexually and romantically used to be pushed by a lot of bi activists (“I fall in love with people, not genitals!”), it didn’t reflect the lived/f*cked/sucked experience of most bisexuals. Like you and Blow (hetero-romantic bisexuals), many bisexuals have a strong preference for either women or men as romantic partners. My recently “gay married” bisexual friend Eric, however, is one of those bi-romantic bisexuals. This popular misconception — that bisexuals are indifferent to gender (and more highly

evolved than all those genital-obsessed monosexuals) — left many people who were having sex with men and women feeling as if they didn’t have an identity. Not straight, not gay, and disqualified from bi. But thanks to bisexuals like Blow coming out and owning their bisexuality and their lopsidedness, a more nuanced and inclusive understanding of bisexuality has taken root. That nuance is reflected in bisexual activist Robyn Ochs’s definition of bisexuality: “I call myself bisexual,” Ochs says, “because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted — romantically and/ or sexually—to people of more than one sex and/ or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree.” Lopsided or not, BLOW, you’re a proper bisexual, and if you’re in a position to come out to your family and friends, you should. And rest assured, telling people you’re bi doesn’t mean you’re divulging details about your sex life. You’re disclosing your sexual orientation, not detailing your sexual practices. You can tell someone you’re attracted to men and women — at the same time, in your case, if not in the same way — without telling them about the hot bi dudes you and the girlfriend bed together. And if you and the girlfriend are perceived to be monogamous, and you want to keep it that way, you can allow people to continue to make that assumption.

person at a time, but during that short span, I was in love with both a guy who made me suffer and my best friend, a woman, who helped me with that guy. After I found a new boyfriend, I stopped thinking about anyone else because our relationship is closed. But I don’t know if that’s just because I avoid thinking about others or because I wasn’t really in love with the two people (despite my surprisingly real heartbreak). BISEXUAL IN NEED AND INQUIRING FINALLY

1. See my response to BLOW, above. 2. A person can love more than one parent, more than one child, more than one sibling, more than one set of tit clamps, and more than one romantic partner. Telling people that they can feel romantic love for only one person at a time isn’t just stupid, it’s harmful. Let’s say Bill is partnered with Ted, and Bill believes romantic attraction/love is a one-at-a-time phenomenon because that’s what he was told. Now let’s say Bill develops a crush on Sandra. If Bill doesn’t question the one-at-a-time bullsh*t he was taught to believe about romantic love, Bill is highly likely to think: “Well, I must not be in love with Ted anymore, otherwise I couldn’t feel this way about Sandra.” And then he may dump tried-and-true Ted for shiny-and-new Sandra. I’m not arguing that everyone should be poly — most people want only one partner at a time, and that’s fine. But telling people they can’t experience romantic attraction or romantic love for more than one person at a time sets long-term relationships up for failure. Because while stable, lasting love feels amazing, it’s less intoxicating than shiny, new, c*m-drunk love. And while almost all stable, lasting loves were shiny, new, c*m-drunk loves early on, very few new loves become lasting loves. If we don’t want people tossing lasting love overboard every time they develop feelings for someone new, people need to know that, yes, you can be in love with two different people at the same time.

TELLING PEOPLE YOU’RE BI DOESN’T MEAN YOU’RE DIVULGING DETAILS ABOUT YOUR SEX LIFE.

I am a 23-year-old bisexual woman and I have two questions for you: (1) Is it possible to fall in love differently with women than with men? I think I am bisexual because I have been in love with some women, despite never getting past a kiss. What I find strange is that whereas with men I feel immediate attraction, with women the attraction rises after a deep friendship is formed. (2) Is it possible that I was in love with two different people at the same time? I always thought that I could be in love with only one

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FINAL DAYS! Through Sunday, July 15 TheFrickPittsburgh.org

The exhibition is organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

The Pittsburgh presentation of this exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Richard King Mellon Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Allegheny Foundation.

Image: Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917), Little Dancer Aged Fourteen (Petite danseuse de quatorze ans), model executed ca. 1880; cast in 1922. Bronze with net tutu and hair ribbon. 38 ½"H x 14 ½"W x 14 ¼"D; base: 2 ¼"H x 19 ½"W x 12"D. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. State Operating Fund and the

ED

Art Lovers’ Society. Photo: Travis Fullerton. © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

D EM N E D

THEFRICKPITTSBURGH.ORG 412-371-0600 7227 REYNOLDS STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15208

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July 11, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 28

July 11, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 28