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PITTSBURGH’S LEADING ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT NEWSWEEKLY

JUNE 20-27, 2018

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EVENTS Every Saturday & Sunday in June – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY In celebration of LGBTQ+ Pride Month, join artist educators for Dandy Andy tour. Free with museum admission

6.29 – 7pm ART IN CONTEXT: THE HUSTLE The Warhol theater Free; Registration is suggested

6.30 – 2pm MEMBER TOUR: ADMAN: WARHOL BEFORE POP Free for members; registration is suggested

7.13 - 7pm WINDOW DRESSING: AN EVENING OF FASHION FROM THE EONS ARCHIVES The Warhol entrance space Free; Registration is suggested

Andy was always one step ahead.

7.20 – 10am TEACHER WORKSHOP: ADMAN: WARHOL BEFORE POP Tickets $30 (includes museum admission, materials, private tour of exhibition); Registration required.

: April 27 - September 2 This exhibition was developed collaboratively by The Andy Warhol Museum and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

Image: Getty Images, Women trying on shoes for a wedding.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor ROB ROSSI Managing Editor LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Arts Writer HANNAH LYNN Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX MCCANN, LAUREN ORTEGO

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PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

JUNE 20-27, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 25

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

ADMINISTRATION Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

PUBLISHER EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

ON THE COVER: 2018 MUSIC ISSUE C OV E R PH OTO B Y ANNIE B R E WE R

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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NEWS +VIEWS

CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

.MUSIC ISSUE.

SOUND ADVICE Checking up on the Pittsburgh Music Ecosystem Project eight months after its launch BY MIKE SHANLEY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ALK DOWN THE STREETS of a city like New

Orleans, Austin or Nashville at night, and you’ll hear the sounds of music emanating from venues. Here in Pittsburgh, though, the sounds of live music can get a club’s management in trouble. Under current regulations, a venue’s liquor license can be called into question if music can be heard from the curb outside. Over the past seven months, a myriad of topics has been discussed, from antiquated legal issues — like the one above — to the need to grow the Pittsburgh audience and, most importantly, the diverse cast of musicians who could achieve more success if they had more support. That discussion was kickstarted by the creation of the Pittsburgh Music Ecosystem Project, which aims to find ways to boost the

Steel City’s local music scene. A couple years ago, it seemed that Pittsburgh was “getting a lot of love in the national media for our affordability and the tech boom that was going on,” says Abby Goldstein, the general manager of 91.3 WYEP. “The city was written up in for the food scene in The New York Times. And there was no love for music. What I was seeing from my vantage point was great talent here without the civic level of support that would help it shine on a national stage.” People had started to wonder aloud how, and if, the city government could help the music scene. At the same time, Russell Howard, vice president of special events and development at the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, was trying to launch a program to improve CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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SOUND ADVICE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 6

SMOKEY ROBINSON

Aug 11 • 7:30 PM

SESAME STREET LIVE! C IS FOR CELEBRATION

Sept 9 • 1 PM & 3:30 PM

LITTLE ANTHONY & THE IMPERIALS & THE FLAMINGOS

TOP 5 PITTSBURGH SONGS “A Good Man is Hard to Find (Pittsburgh)” After an opening that notes “it’s cloudy out in Pittsburgh, raining in Saigon,” Bruce Springsteen spins a yarn about broken hearts and promises. You know … new territory for The Boss.

Sept 15 • 7 PM

DENNIS DEYOUNG

Oct 19 • 8 PM

THE TEMPTATIONS Oct 25 • 7:30 PM

CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

“The Range War” There are thirsty cows awaiting their maker on a farm near Pittsburgh, which is “the only town east of the river” that Todd Rundgren knows. Yeah, we’re confused, too.

“On the Streets I Ran”

KOOL & THE GANG Nov 1 • 8 PM BRET MICHAELS Nov 9 • 8 PM

Morrisey, who isn’t exactly our city’s biggest fan, begs God to spare him at the expense of (ahem): “him, them, anyone, the stillborn, the newborn” and … “people from Pittsburgh.” To which we say: Johnny Marr forever!

“Life During Wartime”

KENNY G HOLIDAY & HITS TOUR Dec 10 • 8 PM

FOR TICKETS:

724.836.8000 Online at www.thepalacetheatre.org

ThePalaceTheatre GREENSBURG, PA

Dangerous is trying to claim confident interpretation of any phrase turned for the Talking Heads by lyrical genius David Byrne. Can we just be glad he had “heard of Pittsburgh, Pa.?”

“Living in America” Why pick from seemingly a hundred Wiz Khalifa songs that mention our city when James Brown’s preceded the plot twist in an increasingly relevant (again) Rocky IV? Exactly. Or something.

The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival held free concerts in Downtown Pittsburgh on June 15-17.

the live music scene Downtown. After speaking with Allison Harnden, the city’s nighttime economy manager, Goldstein and Howard joined 17 other Pittsburghers at a 2017 Austin conference hosted by the Responsible Hospitality Institute. There, they heard reports on how cities like San Francisco and Seattle helped to strengthen support for music ightening there. One of the more enlightening moments came from San Francisco’s er, entertainment commissioner, who insisted “noise” issues be considered “sound” issues, helping break down resistance there. “If you go to cities that have thriving music scenes, you can walk ear down the street and hear music wafting from here, from ing “It there,” Howard says, gesturing. gives the neighborhood texture.” During the conference, a mutual friend introduced Howard to Don Pitts. While working for Austin’s Economic Development Department’s music and entertainment division, Pitts helped reduce sound complaints by 70 percent. He also persuaded club owners to adopt unorthodox practices, like sharing their booking calendars with one another to ensure that bands of similar styles were not competing against one another. He was about to launch consulting firm Sound Music Cities LLC. Motivated by what they heard, Howard and Goldstein received a proposal from Pitts and, with the support

of a grant from the Heinz Endowment, the Pittsburgh Music Ecosystem Project was officially launched in October. From the beginning, the Ecosystem Project was met with skepticism. The project’s creation came hot on the heels of a Visit Pittsburgh survey that gave low marks to the city’s nightlife, which led people to suspect that the project’s main goal was to develop a scene for Downtown exclusively, focusing on tourism. Pittsburghers be became quite territorial upon h hearing that an outsider was coming to our fair city to offer his two cents worth on what we have. Things came to boil in February when the Ecosystem Project hosted a town hall meeting at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. Despite the fact that Goldstein opened the event by explaining that it was geared towards gathering information and input, many people came expecting to hear answers, not give them. One audience member repeatedly demanded to hear what Pitts was going to do for the city. The Ecosystem Project was never intended to be an action plan that its backers would implement. Nor did anyone want to dress Pittsburgh up in some other city’s clothes. Those messages have been muddled among the suspicion and cynicism. “The idea was not taking what’s worked in other places and dropping it into Pittsburgh,” Howard explains. CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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t c e f r e p e h t k Pic . s s a p y t i r o h t u A Port

What pass is best for you? In for the long run. Annual Pass- Best value if you ride frequently all year long. Price includes a full year of unlimited rides. Pay for the first 11 months– the 12th month is free. Cost: $1,072.50

Take 10. Ten-Trip Pass*- So, you plan to ride but don’t know exactly when. No problem. The ten-trip pass gives you the flexibility to use according to your unpredictable schedule. Cost: $25.00

Everyday commuter? Monthly Pass- The next best option, if you prefer to pay each month instead. Receive unlimited rides, just not the free month. Valid for a calendar month beginning with the first day and ending on the last. Well worth it if you intend to ride at least 20 days per month. Cost: $97.50

Forget Cash. Stored Cash Value- Provides the same flexibility as a ten-trip pass and will save you from paying an extra $.25 if you use cash. Stored cash value is required in order to purchase a $1 electronic transfer. Cost: Load any value up to $200

Taking it one week at a time. Weekly PassA good short-term option if you plan to ride often throughout a specific week. Receive unlimited rides for a calendar week Sunday through Saturday. Cost: $25.00

Taking it day by day. Day Pass*- Your best option for unlimited rides for one service day. The pass is valid from first tap on a farebox to the end of Port Authority service that same day. Cost: $7.00 Passes are available on a Connectix, the paper version of an electronic smart card, and can be purchased at any ConnectCard Vending Machine.

One day at a time. Single Trip Pass/Single Trip Pass with Transfer- A great option for occasional riders and visitors. Perfect if you just need a one-way ride to or from an event or want to see Downtown Pittsburgh at night from the Monongahela Incline. Cost: $2.50/$3.50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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SOUND ADVICE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

TOP 5 PITTSBURGH JINGLES “Century III Chevrolet” The granddaddy of Pittsburgh jingles. Random shouts of “minutes from the mall!” can be heard at many a Pittsburgh gathering. It’s cheesy, but Lebanon Church Road will live in our collective memory forever thanks to it. CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

“Molyneux Tile Carpet Wood”

St. Paul Cathedral 2018 Organ Concerts Sunday, July 15 – 4:00pm Douglas Starr – Mt. Lebanon Sunday, July 22 – 4:00pm Mark Pacoe – New York City Sunday, August 5 – 4:00pm Joe Balistreri - Detroit Sunday, August 12 – 4:00pm Peter Gonciarz - Buffalo Sunday, August 19 – 4:00pm Benjamin Cornelius Bates – Pittsburgh Sunday, September 9 – 4:00pm Don Fellows - Pittsburgh Friday, September 28 – 7:30pm Nicole Keller – Berea, Ohio Friday, October 19 – 7:30pm Virginius Barkauskas & oboist Robertas Beinaris - Lithuania Friday, November 16 – 7:30pm Kimberly Marshall – Scottsdale Cathedral is located at the corner of Craig Street & Fifth Avenue/Oakland. Admission is free, and a freewill offering will be received. For details, please call the Cathedral Music Office: 412-621-6082

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The entire jingle is “feel the comfort of home, get to know Molyneux” (pronounced mol-ih-know). It’s over within seconds, but even so, it’s elevator music-sound puts you in a relaxed mood. Repeated three times in succession next to images of puppies on carpets. Awww.

“California University of Pennsylvania” This old tune is the kind of jingle that goes perfect with college kids jumping in the air into a freeze frame. Grab your trapper keeper, your JanSport backpack, rock out to this 1990s rock-like jingle and head to California University of Pennsylvania, where it’s all about you.

“Day Automotive” It will make your day! Snappy and a little beach rock-y. It’ll put a smile on your face, but not really sure you’ll want to buy a car.

“Beaver County Auto” Less a jingle and more the catchy repetition of the “buh, buh, buh” sound. It does, however, make you want to buy a car. Also, famous Pittsburgh athletes like Hines Ward and Neil Walker greet us with some “buh-buh-buhs.” Muh-muh-miss you Neil.

Music fans gathered Downtown for the free jazz festival over the weekend.

Goldstein agrees. “Something that Russell has said throughout this project, and what has been misunderstood, is bringing somebody like Don in from Austin doesn’t mean that we want to become Austin. That’s one of the key pieces of misinformation: that we want to become something else. There’s greatness here,” she says. “We can take the best of what’s happening here, enhance it and remove barriers, and allow Pittsburgh’s music to be exported elsewhere so that it becomes as much a point of pride as our symphony or our sports teams. That’s the goal right there.” But before that goal can be reached, things need to change in a positive direction. “I do things differently now as a result of the conversations that we’ve had on this project,” Goldstein says. “[WYEP’s] summer music series is all Pennsylvania bands this year, and most of them are local.” Later this summer, Pitts will release a report based on input from focus groups, the February town hall meeting and surveys distributed earlier this year that will include recommendations on what steps should be taken next. One thing the report won’t do is grade Pittsburgh’s music scene, another misconception that Pitts heard as he met with people. “What we really want to do in the report is share the comments from the last seven months, to give the reader a peek into what we were told,” Pitts says. “When you read it, hopefully it will resonate that it’s not just our opin-

ion. This is what you told us.” After the report is issued, the real work starts, the three say. It’s up to the community, not them, to figure out the next step. “I think it’s fair to say that the three of us are not looking to take this and run it all the way to the end zone,” Howard says. “That’s not the intention. There needs to be some leadership that comes out of the fabric.”

“IF YOU GO TO CITIES THAT HAVE THRIVING MUSIC SCENES, YOU CAN WALK DOWN THE STREET AND HEAR MUSIC ... IT GIVES THE NEIGHBORHOOD TEXTURE.” Other people have started showing motivation as well. “I’ve seen things bubble up in a bunch of different places since we’ve started this conversation — even without a report — of folks saying, ‘We could do things better,’” Goldstein says. “I think that gives me a great sense of hope and enthuse for what might come next.”


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Lily Hiatt Americana

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Butcher Brown Jazz/funk Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters country

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ONA rock

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Christian Lopez roots/pop

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Donna The Buffalo jam rock TThe English Channel British invasion tribute

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Dancing Dream ABBA tribute Kwame Binea Shakedown roots rock r

S Swift Technique Party/Funk JJocelyn & Chris Arndt Pop/rock/Blues P

VVanessa Collier blues/jazz/rock

Selwyn Birchwood Band blues Sponsored in part by the generosity of the following:

HEAR TH E M U S I C A T S U M ME R SOUNDS. COM ©FRIENDS OF SUMMERSOUNDS, INC.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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.MUSIC ISSUE.

SEE, HEAR, SUPPORT BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SOME GOOD MUSIC VIDEOS BY PITTSBURGH ARTISTS 1,2,3: “Scared But Not That Scared” (2012) directed by Sue-Ling Braun

In typical fashion for this crew, this song and video are both charming and unsettling. It covers a cult, poisonous pudding and a cute ass animated asteroid headed for earth.

Badboxes: “The Mystery” (2014) directed by Thom Glunt

This video is about as ambitious as you can get, and the concept is pulled off impeccably. Robots and saxophones, enough said.

Code Orange: “I Am King” (2014) directed by Max Moore

2017’s Forever was the breakout record for Code Orange, but this video and song from I Am King still felt like a huge step forward and re-introduction for the band. The opening seconds still give us the willies. Shout out to Carrie Furnace for one of its many cameos in Pittsburgh video history.

Girl Talk and Freeway: “Tolerated” (2014) directed by Allen Cordell

Gregg Gillis may no longer call Pittsburgh home, but he wears a Pirates hat once in a while, so that’s something. Any video in which people walk down the street getting in fights (“Bittersweet Symphony,” etc. …), is a winner. 12

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T

H ERE ARE TONS of venues in Pittsburgh, each with their own quirks and strengths and communities. In honor of City Paper’s Music Issue, here are just a few venues of interest to get you hungry to do some exploring yourself.

Smiling Moose 1306 E. CARSON ST., SOUTH SIDE SMILING-MOOSE.COM This venue is one of the few all-ages capable spots in the city, and it plays host to a super wide variety of music. I’ve seen everything from pop punk to hardcore to indie rock to hip hop in its second-floor room, and each time it was an intimate experience. Bonus: It also has the best food of any venue in the city.

Cattivo 146 44TH ST., LAWRENCEVILLE CATTIVOPGH.COM The downstairs room at Cattivo and its smaller room upstairs offer two different experiences, making it a great place to show-hop if you’re in that kind of mood when there are two gigs going at once. Cattivo is another venue that keeps an eclectic calendar, so look out for everything from black metal to power pop.

The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls 400 LINCOLN AVE., MILLVALE MRSMALLS.COM If you’re a big fan of saying, “I saw this band back when …,” get acquainted with the Funhouse at Mr. Smalls. Mr. Smalls’ large room has long been regarded as a crucial space for touring acts from Run the Jewels to Hatebreed to of Montreal and beyond, but its smaller upstairs room frequently hosts mid–level acts that are on the come up.

The Mr. Roboto Project 5106 PENN AVE., BLOOMFIELD THEROBOTOPROJECT.COM This board-operated and member-run space is dry and all-ages, making it a unicorn in a sea of boozy, 21+ restricted venues. It’s an excellent place to see bands before they make it big, and it’s also been host to some incredibly intimate shows with big bands (e.g. a VERY sold out Andrew W.K. solo show). It’s a great place to hang out if you’re looking to be a part of the DIY community, and a good way to get your foot in the door if you’re a youngster and don’t know where to start.

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

The Childlike Empress performing at The Glitter Box Theater

Babyland +The Glitter Box Theater

Rex Theater

460 MELWOOD AVE., OAKLAND BLOOMCRAFT.SPACE The Bloomcraft building in Oakland is a magical land of artistic and community collaboration, and its two venues are great examples of that. The Glitter Box Theater inside and the Babyland Garage around back are places to see shows that center community issues or groups in the community that can be neglected or underrepresented elsewhere

1602 E. CARSON ST., SOUTH SIDE REXTHEATER.NET Rex Theater’s cavernous room and smart booking make it a great place to experience shows. From Code Orange’s Forever release show, to the wild energy of Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, to Moth story slams, it’s a room for making memories. The theater also commits to showcasing local artists, a major plus for such a large room.

Club Cafe 56-58 E. CARSON ST., SOUTH SIDE CLUBCAFELIVE.COM If you’re looking for a speakeasy feel and a personal connection with your musicians, Club Cafe is a nice choice. It’s an escape from the general trash fire that is East Carson Street and feels comfortable and intimate whether you’re seeing alt-country or folk or math rock.

Rock Room 1054 HERRON AVE., POLISH HILL 412-683-4418 This is the place to see the grimy, gritty, freak-oriented punk rock, noise, post-punk, etc. It’s not a space for the faint of heart, but it’s also always full of energy, and the shows are often booked by active members of the punk community. And while you’re there, get yourself a pizza boat for 50 cents.

A LIST OF LOCAL RECORD SHOPS

JERRY’S RECORDS RDS 2136 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill

ATTIC RECORD STORE 513 Grant Ave., Millvale

JUKE RECORDS 4526 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield

CRUEL NOISE RECORDS 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill

RATHER RIPPED RECORDS 754 Brookline Blvd., Brookline

DAVE’S MUSIC MINE 1210 E. Carson St., South Side

SKULL RECORDS 635 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown

DORSEY’S RECORD SHOP 7614 Frankstown Ave., Homewood

UP BEAT RECORDS 801 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg

GET HIP RECORDINGS 1800 Columbus Ave., North Side

VINYL REMAINS 2911 Glenmore Ave., Dormont


Dave Hillis | Music Production

[ Producer • Mixer • Engineer • Composer ]

Seattle’s finest is bringing a whole new sound to Pittsburgh Worked on albums with Pearl Jam, Alice In Chains, Chris Cornell, James Blunt, Twilight Singers, Afghan Whigs

412 • 607 • 4594 | www.davehillismusic.com

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$24 in advance at CarnegieScienceCenter.org $29 at the door

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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CP PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON

Anna Azizzy (top) and SPISH (bottom)

.MUSIC ISSUE.

PROMOTE THYSELF BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

ODERN ARTISTS face unique challenges in self-promotion, given the sheer quantity of artists and the ubiquity of internet access. With so many artists having so much reach, putting on unique events and choosing what to post on the Internet has never been trickier. ve Some Pittsburgh artists have ive figured it out. Redfishbowl is a collective of creatives that collaborate to put on re. paint jams, music festivals and more. Each event feels like more than just a concert. Its mission statement reads:: “Through curating showcases and events in different boroughs of our city, we

create a platform for any artist of any medium to gain exposure, opportunity, and connect with the artistic community.” One musician Redfishbowl works closely with is SPISH, an indie pop rock outfit. “SPISH’s Love Dungeon,” at Spirit around Valentine’s Day, w was a night complete with kink, g gender-defying entertainment and f free condoms. On the band’s w website, people can sign up to become members of SPISH cult o send friends one-of-a-kind or death certificate. Bizarre and spicy details are part of what keeps a band like SPISH from getting lost in a sea of competitors. CONTINUES ON PG. 16

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Outdoor B a n ds a l l g Summer Lon Ju 222 No Bad JuJu Band (8pm) June June 23 InTransit Band (8pm) June 24 Nieds Hotel Band (2 - 6 pm) June 29 Steeltown Band (8pm) June 30 Dancing Queen Band (8pm) July 01 Second Shift Band (2 - 6 pm) *FREE Sunday Summer Concert Series!

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$25 Concert (8PM) w/cash bar $75 Concert & Dinner (6:30PM)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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PROMOTE THYSELF, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

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Anna Hale of Swampwalk (top) and Chris Boles, founder and manager of Redfishbowl (bottom)

Another Pittsburgh artist with a magical online presence is Anna Azizzy, a performer, experimental musician and video artist. Booking DIY art and music shows for five years, Azizzy’s works include a current series called “Side Split Variety Show” that features short performances of people performing something they’ve never done before. “[Instagram] is like a free artist website that everyone is addicted to,” says Azizzy. “I post a mix of things: works-inprogress to promote upcoming projects and events, documentation of performances or videos, and more impulsive moments of ‘feeling myself.’” Those moments are often Azizzy trying on costumes, lip syncing or testing new instruments. Lucky fans might catch a day on which Azizzy’s story features recreations of numbers from Jesus Christ Superstar.

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For Azizzy, social media can put agency in the hands of the underrepresented. “Especially when you are not an over-represented white dude, it’s important to have platforms where you can connect and grow your community,” says Azizzy. Anna Hale of Swampwalk is an electronic alt-pop musician who uses creative tools (a Gameboy) to produce addicting tracks. Hale has posted self-produced animated videos to promote shows, videos of her playing around musically and a plethora of delightful selfies entwined with humor and wit. “I think Instagram feels a lot more intuitive for audio visual and visual stuff,” says Hale. “But even with Facebook, it’s just kind of fun to have your own voice, like it’s a blog in a way. Sort of treating it like a piece of art in itself, like this is my canvas and here’s what I can do.”


.MUSIC MUS ISSUE.

PITCH IT (GOOD) BY MEG FAIRMEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Self-promotion is essential for musicians. When pitching to music journalists around town, heed these helpful tips:

Find a form Send music in an easily accessible listening format. Bandcamp and Soundcloud links work great, but if you’re sending your songs via Google Drive, be sure to put them in a folder. Nobody has time to download each song from individual G Drive links.

Do digital Put together an electronic press kit (EPK). It should include: your music, a bio detailing your distinguishing qualities and your latest work, and downloadable images and/or videos (with credits!).

Say cheese Have promotional photos taken. Hi-res images are crucial for print and online media. Be sure a photographer has provided explicit permission for images before sending them to a reporter or editor.

Try sugar Polite and understanding approaches never hurt an artist. Journalists are bombarded with emails; don’t expect a response within minutes or even a day. Avoid lashing out at writers, by way of email or on social media, for “ignoring.” They’re busy, too.

Sell yourself Your art is valuable. Your time is worth something. Don’t waste it by failing to convey what makes you and your music compelling. Don’t worry about coming off too confident.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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Open Sessions 12 & Under Sessions

.MUSIC ISSUE.

TALE OF TWO PROMOTERS

Womxn & Grrrls Only Sessions Private Lessons & Park Rentals Available

BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JOSHUA BAKAITUS

7518 Dickson Street | Swissvale, PA 15218 | (412) 871-0023 www.switchandsignalskatepark.com

COMPANY: Mr. Smalls Presents TITLE: Partner/Talent Buyer BIO: Began booking shows at 13. Started Bridgeport Promotions at 19. Former VP at Drusky Entertainment. HE SAYS: “I liked bringing people together and introducing people to something different, which I still do. That’s probably the main reason I still do what I do.” TWITTER: @joshbakaitus PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK PREZIOSO

BRETT SHUMAKER COMPANY: Don’t Let the Scene Go Down on Me! TITLE: Founder BIO: Began booking shows at 21. Booking Director/Board for Mr. Roboto Project. Barista at Crazy Mocha. HE SAID IT: “I had an urge, being in a small town to bring acts I wanted to see through my town.” TWITTER: @dltsgdomshows

T

HERE ARE MANY music promoters

in Pittsburgh. All are integral to bringing a certain type and level of music to the city. For the music issue, we’re shining a light on two promoters who are crucial to new and developing talent: Josh Bakaitus and Brett Shumaker.

DIY ROOTS Josh Bakaitus: It was right around 2000 when I started to do pittbands.com without me ever going to club shows. That was my local music website. I just was interested in it because my friends

and cousin played in a local band. I’d list Metropol shows and Club Laga shows and 31st St. Pub shows and I’d list those on the site. And I had never been to any of those places. I just thought it was awesome. Brett Shumaker: I went to high school in West Virginia. It was a much smaller scene. Some friends told me about a show that was happening in a fire hall, and I loved it. I still have a scar on my hands from my first mosh pit at that show. That was it for me, I was like, “This is where I want to be.” JB: I had the idea to do a local music CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


LIVE MUSIC

TOP 5 PITTSBURGH CONCERTS

JUNE 21

Juan & Co. (starting 8-9 pm)

JUNE 28

Open Mic w/ Jay Constable (starting 8-9 pm)

(since moving here in August 2005) BY ALEX GORDON

The Roots at Carnegie Mellon University (free!)

EatShady.com

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April 2008 I have seen some good free shows, but nothing will ever compare to this one. There were extended drum solos (Questlove’s sticks lit up!), extended un-boring jam sessions and of course, Tuba Gooding Jr.

Delicate Steve at Thunderbird Cafe April 2015 This one was so good that my friend and I went home and listened to his live album (Live in Las Vegas), which had the same exact setlist, immediately after. Also, Steve wore a Waldo hat.

Pixies at Carnegie Music Hall January 2014 My friends and I trekked through a hell of a snowstorm in an ill-equipped rental car to get to this one. We got in zero car crashes, sustained zero injuries and witnessed one of the best sets any of us had seen. (Having seen Pixies again in 2017, I can now underline just how good this 2014 show was.)

Outdoor seating, food and drink ŸŞåÎĜ°ĬŸƉŅýåųåÚƉ°ƋƉÅŅƋĘƉĬŅΰƋĜŅĹŸ

Blackalicious at Mr. Smalls March 2006 Blackalicious’ MC, Gift of Gab, is a big fella. He remained seated on a stool for much of the show, but stood up slowly during the “Alphabet Aerobics” encore, and you know what? It was riveting.

Deerhoof at Rex Theater April 2014 This one had all the earmarks fans come to expect from a Deerhoof show: Greg and Satomi switching instruments, a “Come See The Duck” singalong, Ed’s fabulous clothing. Fun bonus: the opener was future Ocean’s 8-er Awkwafina.

LIVE MUSIC JUNE 23

JUNE 30

Chase Baron

Right Turn Clyde

(12-4 pm)

(12-4 pm)

BakerySocial.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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TWO PROMOTERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

festival … it was at the American Music Cafe in Murrysville. I did that, and I realized after it was booked I’d never booked a show before and I should probably book a practice show before it. So, I did that. Like two weeks before that show, I booked a show in Charleroi at the VFW hall, which became a thing after that. I liked doing something in my school that was off the wall, that wasn’t sports or the norm. I would flyer in my high school at lunch time, and it worked.

ALL-AGES SHOWS ARE THE BACKBONE OF THE CULTURE OF WHAT WE DO. BS: I was in and out of bands for a while. And then I was in one particular band for two years and I was booking our shows, and the band broke up. So, I just kept booking shows. I also had an urge, being in a small town to bring acts I wanted to see through my town. JB: I did a couple local shows at American Music Cafe — and I liked bringing people together and introducing people to something different, which I still do. That’s probably the main reason I still do what I do.

GETTING REAL

KICK OFF TO SUMMER FREE DAY SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2018

Enjoy FREE admission to:

For more details about Kick Off to Summer Free Day visit pittsburghkids.org

• Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh 10am–5pm • Allegheny SolarFest in Buhl Community Park 10am–3pm Kick Off To Summer Free Day is underwritten by The Buncher Foundation and sponsored in part by Pa Cyber.

BS: [First booking] was Dan Potthast, the singer of MU330 and Dan P and the Bricks, he plays keyboards for Jeff Rosenstock right now; and Rick Johnson from Mustard Plug — that was my first show. They were heroes of mine. Growing up a ska fan, that was a big deal for me. They stayed at my house and we played Mario Kart and ate fish sticks — it was great. And that was like, “I can do this.” JB: The first national band I booked was at the American Music Cafe, too. It was this band that was coming up, a punk band — Rise Against. That was the first national band I ever booked, but they were really small and there were, like, 20 people there. BS: I think it was Frankie Cosmos. That was the first time I was talking to a real agent and they sent me a contract and all that. I was like, “This is getting serious CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TOP 5

UNFORGETTABLE PITTSBURGH SPORTS SONGS “Here We Go” A regularly-updated, migraine-inducing ditty that proves Pittsburgh is a Steelers town with a cheesy theme problem.

“Beat ’Em Bucs (the Bucs Are Going All the Way)” Harsh truth, Steelers Nation: songs about the Pirates have always been superior. We offer as evidence, from 1960, the Coca-Cola Classic of Pittsburgh sports tunes. Or …

“We Are Family” Picture it: 1979 — Stargell stars, a skinny Pirate Parrot, 7 million uniform combinations, and one glorious disco masterpiece forever tied to probably the last World Series championship club Pittsburghers will ever know.

“Boys of Winter” A wordless wonder that is as much a part of the Penguins experience as Mario Lemieux, Mike Lange’s goal calls and springtime hockey.

“Puhlahmahlu” Bless yinz, Mr. Devious. We didn’t deserve this Muppets parody honoring Troy Polamalu then or now.


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412.431.0700 • PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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TWO PROMOTERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

LESSONS, BAND EQUIPMENT, INSTRUMENT REPAIR & MORE!

now.” I wasn’t always good about it in the beginning. I’d forget to send the contract back [laughs]. I’m a little bit better about being professional now.

HEAR & NOW 11AM-8PM Mon-Thurs • 9AM-5PM Fri- Sat • Closed Sunday

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BEST! Pittsburgh:412-821-5908 • New Brighton:724-843-9380

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JB: All-ages shows are the backbone of the culture of what we do. We’re in a weird period right now where a lot of venues don’t want them, but my argument is that all-ages shows are our future. Our future is not the 21-plus crowd now. The youth that will continue to grow and want to come back when they’re 21. BS: I’m trying to collaborate more. I have been talking to a lot of other independent promoters about starting a new thing, which would be called At the Gig Promotions. A lot of us are tired of doing it all on our own, and it’d be nice to have some help. So, we were like, “We’re all doing it already, why not just do it together?” So hopefully we’ll be rolling that out in the next few months. JB: I’m learning to be more patient. When we started Mr. Smalls Presents, I wanted to continue to go at the pace that I was going at. So, we went re-

ally hard really fast; in the first year and four months, we’ve done 400 shows, which I think is pretty incredible. But now I’m, like, “Let’s slow down for a second, regroup and refocus.” What I’m seeing now is I want to focus a little closer to every show, so if that means booking less shows, I’d rather do that and make each show better. BS: I want to make shows more of an experience. I want to bring in vendors and food if I can. I want people to want to come to shows. I want more of a community.

EXPERT ADVICE JB: Stay in touch with promoters you want to work with and booking agents and bands you’d like to work with. Eventually, you will get a cool show, and when that show goes well you’ll get more opportunities. BS: Promote! I feel like a lot of people who start off book the show, make the Facebook event and that’s it. But you really need to grind, especially these days. Diversify your lineups, and don’t feel pressured to put a million bands on one show.

Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

JENSORENSEN

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COME SEE WHAT’S

BREWING BUFFALO

IN

With 30+ craft breweries, locally grown hops and a Great Lake in our backyard, it’s a wonder you didn’t stop by to wet your whistle sooner. Come see what’s on tap.

BREWCATION

And while you’re here, check out beer’s best friend on the Buffalo Wing Trail!

BEERINBUFFALO.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Opera singer, and Mad Mex server, Devan Mercurio

.FOOD.

RHYTHM WORK “If you can cook, then it’s usually the one thing you can go and get a job anywhere.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE LATE, GREAT Anthony Bourdain compared kitchen life to a pirate ship: employees are the crew, bonded by companionship born of a nightly trial-by-fire nature. Yet there’s also a meticulously choreographed dance that makes up the workings of meal service. Restaurant work is a fast-paced, on-the-go profession that requires creativity, flexibility and constant adaptation in order to succeed. Creative people of all types are drawn to work in restaurants, sometimes for the hours or the pay. Regardless of the reason, it’s likely many of the people in the industry have some sort of creative venture they are supporting through restaurant work. For the music issue, CP examines the intersections of being a musician and working in the restaurant industry.

Jonathan Ahn, 34, has been playing bass and singing for his band, edhochuli, for the last 10 years. Around four years ago, he joined CALYX (which joyfully refer to itself as a “hard pop pizza punk band” on social media). Both bands tour fairly frequently and much of Ahn’s time is dedicated to making music and being on the road. That’s part of the reason he works at Spak Brothers Pizza in Garfield. “It’s perfect. It pays really well, and I can pretty much go on tour whenever I want to,” says Ahn. When he first interviewed with the owner, Ahn’s only condition was that he needed time off to tour. “The first year I worked at Spak, I probably worked altogether four months because I was on tour so much,” he says. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


2018

SAVE THE DATE! Don’t miss our celebration of the year when we award the winners of BEST OF PGH 2018!

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9TH, 7-10 PM NOVA PLACE, NORTH SIDE cpbestofparty.com || #CPBESTOFPGH

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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RHYTHM WORK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

The best wines, the best tunes, the best friends.

Class Out The Glass!

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PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK SZILÁGIY

Jonathan Ahn playing with edhochuli

Other than occasionally feeling a little guilty for taking off for a few weeks or months, he says Spak Brothers has wholly supported his pursuit of music. “If you can cook, then it’s usually the one thing you can go and get a job anywhere,” says Ahn. Because Spak is his main source of income, when Ahn is home in Pittsburgh, he feels it’s important to be a reliable part of the team that runs the restaurant. He’s transferred a lot of that camaraderie and work ethic from his music career. “Doing music has allowed me and my bandmates to meet all these amazing people and see the world because I picked up a guitar,” says Ahn. Devan Mercurio, 25, has been studying opera since she was 18. She’s been using her job as a server at Mad Mex to support herself all along. Although she interns at Quantum Theater and teaches voice lessons, she says Mad Mex is her main source of income. Mercurio credits her job at Mad Mex with allowing her the flexibility in her schedule to perform and travel to study opera. Last year she spent three months in Paris studying and said that she received support not only from her bosses who held her job, but also from her regulars, who often show up to performances or tip her a little extra when they know she’s planning to travel. “You have security, even though the creative path you’ve chosen doesn’t have a lot of security,” she says. Working in the service industry has also helped Mercurio become less shy, sneak in vocal practice while she waits tables and gives her the time for meetings and practice in the mornings.

However, she also tries to maintain a balance. “Your body is your instrument,” she says. To keep hers working, Mercurio avoids alcohol before performances and schedules her sleep so she can be fully rested.

“YOU HAVE SECURITY, EVEN THOUGH THE CREATIVE PATH YOU’VE CHOSEN DOESN’T HAVE A LOT OF SECURITY.” Mercurio is also trying to make opportunities for young singers in her field. “With [people in the field of] opera, they say ‘You have to age [your voice] like a cheese or a wine and then we’ll let you perform,’” she says. She’s currently involved in Opera on Tap, a group that performs at Allegheny Wine Mixer every third Tuesday of the month. Even though they come from two radically different music backgrounds, Mercurio and Ahn agree that part of balancing their jobs and musical lives, it’s something they take very seriously. Both practice and tour but try to maintain a manageable balance that allows them to do what they love. “I gotta make a paycheck, so I can buy a van and hit the road,” says Ahn.


.ON THE ROCKS.

SPIKED SUMMER READING

.FOOD.

EAT ME

BY LISA CUNNINGHAM LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BY DREW CRANISKY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HETHER LOUNGING by the pool or killing time at the airport, summer offers a chance to kick back and catch up on reading. Here are a few new boozy books to consider.

Drinking Distilled: A User’s Manual by Jeffrey Morgenthaler For years, Jeffrey Morgenthaler has run an excellent website for bartenders, where he sporadically posts about everything from barrel-aged cocktails to the best shoes for behind the bar. In 2014, he condensed all of that knowledge into The Bar Book, a handy overview of key techniques for successful cocktailing. His latest book, Drinking Distilled: A User’s Manual, comes at alcohol from the other side. As the name suggests, Drinking Distilled focuses less on making drinks and more on consuming them, covering topics such as bar etiquette, the perfect drink for any occasion, and what drinking “rules” ought to be broken. Morgenthaler’s style is light and breezy, great for the campground or the beach. And don’t worry — he writes of the perfect drinks for both.

Session Cocktails: Low-Alcohol Drinks for Any Occasion by Drew Lazor and the editors of PUNCH You’ve likely heard “session” applied to beer, perhaps used to describe a low-alcohol IPA that can be glugged backto-back in a single session. According to Drew Lazor and the crew at PUNCH (a top-notch online drinks magazine), the term also extends to cocktails. Unlike many classic concoctions, which often contain several ounces of full-strength spirits, drinks in Session Cocktails dial back the booze without sacrificing taste. Leaning on flavorful but lower-proof ingredients like sherry, vermouth, sparkling wine and herbal liqueurs, some of the world’s best bartenders offer refreshing recipes that will keep you upright through the long summer days.

Godforsaken Grapes: A Slightly Tipsy Journey through the World of Strange, Obscure, and Underappreciated Wine by Jason Wilson For his 2010 book Boozehound, Jason Wilson told stories of rare treasures of the spirits world and penned one of the most entertaining travelogues I’ve ever read. Now, the selfdescribed “booze columnist” is back at it with Godforsaken Grapes, which applies the same concept to the world of wine. With his delightfully irreverent style, Wilson champions “weird wines” — obscure varietals that, though less familiar than cabernet and pinot grigio, still deserve our attention. And while you might struggle to find a bottle of Alpine himbertscha in your local liquor store, the book is an entertaining, eye-opening nudge to stray off the beaten path the next time you pop a bottle. •

CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

LOCATION: Doce Taqueria, 1220 E. Carson St., South Side

WE WANT TO FEATURE YOUR PHOTOS ON INSTAGRAM! Tag your Pittsburgh photos with #CPReaderArt for your chance to be featured next!

AMBIANCE: Steady stream of customers. Pop-punk blasting from the speakers. Lots of sugar-skull artwork. Everyone in the place, both customers and staff, is in good spirits.

WHAT WE ATE: Cajun Remy Chicken taco

COST: $3

HOT TAKE: I got the special of the day, a taco with shredded chicken, farmer’s cheese and fried jalapeno. The meat was moist and well-seasoned, and the fried jalapeno had a great kick. Mid-bite, my dining partner yelled out to our waiter, “Best tacos in the city!”

Thanks for sharing, @hanleyphotography76 and @four_one_two!

@pghcitypaper

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

27


JUNE 20

SATURDAY, JUNE 23

JUNE 27

SATURDAY, JULY 7

JULY 25

FRIDAY, JULY 27

SATURDAY, JULY 28

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3

TAG US! KEYBANK PAVILION KEY_BANK @KEYBANKPAVILION AUGUST 28

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AUGUST 30

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

LIVENATION_PGH


JULY 16

JULY 18

SATURDAY, JULY 21

JULY 22

AUGUST 14

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17

FRIDAY, AUGUST 24

SATURDAY, AUGUST 25

SEPTEMBER 7

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETMASTER LOCATIONS, AT LIVENATION.COM OR 800-745-3000 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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.DRINK.

LEMON LIFT

BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

I T H L O N G s u m m e r d ay s stretching into hazy evenings, the idea of getting away from the city may be fresh on the mind. While a summer vacation may or may not be in the cards, a sip of limoncello can temporarily transport the imbiber to the beaches and lemon trees of the Amalfi Coast. Limoncello is an Italian liqueur made by soaking lemon peels (with all of the pith removed) in a base spirit, usually grappa or vodka, until the fruit releases its essential oils. Then it’s sweetened and traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner drink. The alcohol by volume can vary, but it’s typically lower in alcohol than other spirits, somewhere between 25 and 30 percent. Crema di Limoncello, a limoncello that adds milk instead of sugar, is typically even lower, often hovering around 16 percent alcohol by volume. But whichever version of this drink one sips, it’s sure to give a small, sunshineyellow lift. Italians have been making limoncello at home for generations and a quick Google search will yield dozens of recipes for this relatively-easy-tocreate liqueur for those with curious taste buds. However, for the discerning drinker who isn’t a do-it-yourselfer, there are a few ways to work limoncello into this summer’s sipping schedule. Valozzi’s, an Italian restaurant Downtown, plays host to a second annual Festa di Limoncello on Saturday. The bar

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staff crafts house-made limoncello for the event and transforms the lounge, sidewalk and adjoining alleyway into a slice of Italian life, and features Limoncello tastings, pizzas and a DJ.

FESTA DI LIMONCELLO 1-4 p.m. Sat., June 30. Valozzi’s, 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. valozzis.com

BELLA BAMBINI CELLO 1042 Fifth Ave., Coraopolis. bbcello.com

If street parties aren’t your thing, head to Coraopolis and visit Bella Bambini Cello distillery (aka BB Cello) to pick up a bottle or two. This distillery opened in September 2017 by a grandfather and granddaughter, Jim and Brittany Breen, who had been making limoncello together for years. Each batch of fruit is peeled by hand, distilled in grain alcohol for 30 days and then carefully strained. Along with limoncello, they also create blueberry, pineapple and orange cellos. BB Cello is partnered with Pennsylvania Libations, so its products are also available at its Strip District locations. Limoncello may be the best known, but there are other varieties of cello for the tasting. Meloncello, pistachiocello and fragoncello (made with strawberries) find their ways into the starring role of this liqueur. These varieties are harder to find in the U.S. though, so kitchen experiments may be in order.


DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

LEGENDS EATERY 500 EAST NORTH AVE., NORTH SIDE 412-321-8000 / LEGENDSEATERY.US Legends Eatery is a family owned, BYOB Italian restaurant located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s North Side. Get your family and friends together and make reservations today!

LEONA’S ICE CREAM

BAR LOUIE 330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon–midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

412-709-5275 LEONASPGH.COM Small batch ice cream sandwiches and pints made with local dairy and ingredients whenever possible. Available at 60 retail, restaurant and brewery locations.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE 2128 MURRAY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL 412-521-2053 / MINEOSPIZZA.COM Mineo’s Pizza House is celebrating 60 years! Since 1958 when John Mineo opened in Squirrel Hill, we continue the family tradition of hand-grating cheese, slow simmering our sauce and making everything fresh daily.

OR, THE WHALE 463 BLVD. OF THE ALLIES, DOWNTOWN 412-632-0002 / ORTHEWHALEPGH.COM Seafood and chophouse with a woodfired grill and curated wine selections. Partnering with local sustainable farms to provide dry-aged beef, Maine Lobster and seasonal produce.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar

is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

PARIS 66 6018 CENTRE AVE., EAST LIBERTY 412-404-8166 / PARIS66BISTRO.COM Voted “Best French Restaurant,” Paris 66 is an authentic, cozy and intimate French bistro, serving everyday French cuisine prepared with local, fresh ingredients.

SENTI RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 3473 BUTLER ST, LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4347 / SENTIRESTAURANT.COM Senti is a modern Italian Restaurant combining the tradition of Italian home cooking with European fine-dining. Taste different fine wines from the selfserve wine dispenser.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

.ART.

ZINE INTO IT “One way that we can hear each other and be heard” BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

“ZINE” IS A foreshortening of magazine, and a cultural phenomenon of non-commercially published material that usually includes artwork, often devoted to specialized and unconventional subjects. Also see definition for rad. Pittsburgh has been a hotbed for zine culture over the decades, stemming from its do-it-yourself culture and small artists communities. In 2011, the Pittsburgh Zine Fair made its debut and in 2015, the Feminist Zine Fest Pittsburgh (FZF) was born out of to focus on equality and social justice. Zine contributors mostly come from Pittsburgh, but some visit from Wilkes-Barre, New York, Saint Clairsville, Ohio and Falls Church, Va. Three years later, organizers Jayla Patton, Anne Schwann and Jude Vachon are excited to keep the event available and welcoming to everyone.

HOW HAS THE FZF GROWN OVER THE LAST THREE YEARS? Jude Vachon: I wouldn’t say it’s grown in terms of having more feminist zinesters table, or that that’s actually an important

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goal. I would say that for me, I’ve learned a lot from the experience each time and have a deeper connection to what we’re all doing together — organizers, tablers, visitors — each time we do it. And that’s really meaningful to me. Anne Schwann: Each year we’re seeing familiar faces, but lots of new ones, too. I really love when we get tablers who’ve never made a zine before FZF. We’ve also been exploring ways to connect with folks outside the zine community, like a teen girls group that’s part of ARYSE PGH [Alliance for Refugee Youth Support and Education]. Jayla Patton: This is my second year assisting with organizing FZF. It’s fun to see new faces and new zines coming out! The event itself is always changing due to the attendees and the artists changing. ARE THERE ANY TRENDS YOU SEE IN TOPIC FOR THIS FEST? JV: Gender, women’s bodies, Black identity and mental health. WHAT CHANGES HAVE BEEN MADE? JV: Well, we had [four] days of events the first time. But we


also had a lot more people on the organizing team. We’ve pared it down some over time to have a smaller organizing team. It was super fun and energizing the first year with a film screening, a discussion and zine-making session, a dance party and the fest. It’s also great to do things on a smaller, more focused scale. Also, we had the first [FZF] event with tabling at Pitt. Last year and this year, it’s at the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. We decided we really prefer the community feel to an academic space. AS: This year we’re having a zine reading the night before FZF. We’re really excited for the chance for tablers to connect and get to know each other’s work prior to the fest. WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE POWER OF ZINES? JV: Zines are a way for anyone at all to express themselves without anyone’s permission. This means pretty much regardless of financial status (they’re cheap), regardless of the maker’s race, gender, sexual identity, age … Have you seen statistics on who gets published? Zines are one way that we can hear each other and be heard. This is radically powerful both for zine makers and zine readers. AS: Yes! I think zines are a powerful way to say “hell no” to everything in our culture that says marginalized people shouldn’t use their voices or be seen. Share your experiences, knowledge, silliness, rage … through this we empower each other to take up space.

zine ever before the fest, but makes one to table, I think that’s really exciting. JP: Some zine makers have only created one zine, while others have 20. Getting your thoughts out and onto paper and sharing it is pretty amazing, I think. The project can always be taken further, but that’s up to the creator. Sometimes it’s cathartic, sometimes it’s chaotic, but it’s always necessary.

even more appreciation and warmth at feminist zine fests and less focus on sales.

HOW DOES COLLABORATION FOSTER ZINE CULTURE? JV: Comp zines, split zines or zines that are some other form of collaboration result in really interesting zines that are more than the sum of their parts. AS: I think zines are conversations. You read something that really rings your bell, and you want to share: “I feel that way too!”, or “holy shit, I’ve never thought about that before.” And you can actually talk to the author. Collaboration can come out of that.

HAS ANYONE SEEN PARTICULAR SUCCESS OR SIGNIFICANTLY FURTHERED PERSONAL PROJECTS BECAUSE OF THE FEST? AS: Whenever someone hasn’t made a

DO YOU THINK ZINE CULTURE IS INHERENTLY FEMINIST? JV: No. I think zine culture is inherently DIY and anti-establishment, but it can still be misogynist.

Feminist Zine Fest Pittsburgh organizers Jayla Patton, Anne Schwann and Jude Vachon

FEMINIST ZINE FEST PGH 12-5 p.m., Sun., June 24. Irma Freeman Center, 5006 Penn Ave., Garfield. feministzinepgh.tumblr.com.

HOW DO PEOPLE IN THIS COMMUNITY SUPPORT EACH OTHER? JV: Zine communities are generally supportive — people become friends, write to each other expressing thoughts and feelings about each other’s zines, show up at zine fests and are reunited. … For me, feminist zine fests are even more connected and supportive. I experience

GALLERY WALK

Three artists of note at Pittsburgh’s Feminist Zine Fest BY CELINE ROBERTS

“Learning Good Consent,” Fair Moans This self-described, sex-positive collective is a great source of information for those who are looking to get down while gettin’ down with safety, consent and a little bit of kink. Tabling at FZF with a welcoming attitude, body-safe products and informative and sexy zines, like “Learning Good Consent,” this zine offers helpful tips on dating, negotiating boundaries and improving your sex life. Free. fairmoanspgh.wordpress.com

“Other Worlds 2,” V. Adams V. Adams is an artist I’ve been following for a few years. I found them at the first Feminist Zine Fest and have been entranced by their work ever since. Much of their work revolves around queerness and the natural world. The signature black and white style with gold accents is eye-catching, as is the juxtaposition between the hyper realistic and whimsical elements. Their “Other Worlds” focuses on queer visions of the future and features work from a variety of other artists. $8. vanessadams.bigcartel.com

“Nsai Temko” I’m not sure what this bright young person is going to be offering at FZF. Whatever it is, I’m very excited to see it. Nsai Temko is a poet, writer and journalist who’s going to be a senior at Propel Braddock Hills High School. Her work has been featured in PublicSource and she’s performed at The Andy Warhol Museum and Chatham University. Check out her poetry on her YouTube channel. I particularly love, “The Unmarried Weeping.” youtube.com search “Nsai Temko”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FORTUNE TELLER >> BY FORTUNE TELLER SELF-RELEASED FORTUNETELLERPGH. BANDCAMP.COM

Fortune Teller’s fuzzy stoner rock and its garage-y roots come to life on a full-length, self-titled debut. The record clocks in at a little under 50 minutes, but if you’re accustomed to the patient, meandering stoner rock genre it’ll be nothing new. Fortune Teller is strong and cohesive with limitless live potential in its pounding energy. Each song furthers the story the album tells; the journey of a protagonist who is at the mercy of an all-knowing, all-seeing entity hell-bent on destruction. As a result, the album has moments of sinister psychedelic vibes, songs bleeding into the next in an eerie haze. For being the effort of a two-piece, Fortune Teller has a sonic oomph to it that feels much bigger and vaster. Members J.J. Young and Giovanni Orsini pump out blues-tinged rockers like “Red Eye,” but also use the album to show off long, wandering numbers with multiple movements and instrumental explorations, such as “Face,” which has a run time of 12:33. • FOR FANS OF: Early Black Sabbath, Sleep but faster, ‘90s rock riffage

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Friday July 20 • 5PM-11PM Dearest Home, Echo Valley, Scott & Rosanna Spindler, Allegheny Drifters

Saturday July 21 • 10:30AM-10:30PM Jay Smar, Old Song Rescue Society, Buffalo Rose, The Early Mays, MillBillys, Snappin’ Bug String Band, South Wind, Pittsburgh Banjo Club, The Wayward Companions, Sarah Steranka and Devin Sherman, Pittsburgh Historical Music Society Orchestra, Well Strung, Cello Fury Sponsors:

Tickets & more info at InHarmonyFestival.com 34

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GUNPOWDER AND SKY

Hearts Beat Loud, starring Nick Offerman and Kiersey Clemons

.FILM.

FAMILY BAND

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE TRAILER FOR indie dramedy Hearts Beat Loud, out Friday, has everything a good trailer should: catchy song, lively montages and enough to pique your interest into watching the full-length feature. But watching the movie feels too much like watching an extended version of the trailer. The entire time, it seems like the real movie is about to start, setting parts in motion for a story that never comes. It’s a movie that likes the idea of itself — the aesthetics, the description — but doesn’t go deeper than that. Also, I have a conspiracy theory that it’s sponsored by Spotify™. Frank (Nick Offerman, as the hot dad he was born to play) owns a cool record store in Brooklyn that’s going out of business, which makes little sense because record stores are probably thriving more now than when he opened it 17 years ago. His daughter, Sam (Kiersey Clemons), is spending her summer taking pre-med classes before going off to college. But Frank, a former musician, begs Sam to jam with him, like they apparently used to in the old days. She reluctantly gives in, and in one night they end up writing and recording a perfect song. Without telling Sam, Frank uploads it to Spotify™ (a scene that conveniently shows how you, too, can upload music to Spotify™). Soon after, Frank hears “Hearts Beat Loud” at a coffee shop on a Spotify™ indie mix playlist and freaks out, but Sam is less than excited. She wants to focus on school and her new girlfriend, but Frank wants her to postpone her future to be in a band. The songs they write are genuinely

good, and there are a few funny lines that come from Offerman as a doofy dad, but the lukewarm script mostly falls flat, despite the stacked supporting casted. Ted Danson plays a bartender in yet another Cheers callback. Toni Collette’s talent is wasted as Frank’s cool landlord who kisses him once and then has to accept an Animal Collective vinyl as a gift. Frank’s mother, played by Blythe Danner, gets arrested for shoplifting, but that subplot never becomes relevant. It’s refreshing for Sam and her girlfriend to depict a sweet black lesbian couple, but that too feels surface-level and incomplete.

HEARTS BEAT LOUD DIRECTED BY: Brett Haley STARRING: Nick Offerman, Kiersey Clemons Opens Fri., June 22

The whole movie looks too polished, like you asked suburban parents to describe what Brooklyn looks like. Frank and Sam live in a beautiful, airy apartment with exposed brick, despite their only income being a failing record store. The store is cool, inviting and looks like it could’ve opened last year. When Frank and Sam play their songs on the store’s last day, they do so perfectly despite having never played live before. Hearts is a little more than an hour and a half, and 10 minutes of that is taken up by them performing three songs all the way through. It’s a nice idea of a movie but doesn’t use its time or cast wisely. Plus, do we really wanna trust a movie that is probably sponsored by Spotify™?


.APP.

SAFETY NET BY LAUREN ORTEGO INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

OMESTIC ABUSE affects people e s. of all ages, genders and races. h Aspirant, in partnership with the Women’s Center and Shelter of ks Greater Pittsburgh (WC&S), looks lp to make finding resources and help ed easier for victims through an updated version of its app, RUSafe. nd “[Abuse] is a real problem, and you’re just seeing the beginning of it ys coming out of the woodwork,” says nt. Mike McClaine, president of Aspirant. gy “I think our ability to use technology al and mobile app capabilities is a real way to impact this problem.”

RUSAFE UPDATE LAUNCH 5 p.m., and 7 p.m. June 27. Alloy 26, 100 S. Commons Suite 102, North Side. Free. aspirant.com/launchRUSafe

ur One in three women and one in four d men experience physical violence and e abuse from a partner or someone close

to them, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Since RUSafe launched in 2014, the app has helped 1,954 women contact a shelter, according to Aspirant. RUSafe has been used in all 50 states and is connected to 685 shelters across the country. “It started in Pittsburgh, but we have the whole network, nationally, of women’s shelters [available] in the app,” says McClaine. “So, no matter where [the victim] is, it’ll use GPS functionality to show [them] who is close by.” The first iteration of the app acted more as a resource tool. Victims filled out a questionnaire to gauge the severity of the situation and the app listed resources where they could find help. Improvements to the new version include: a journal tool that will allow users to record audio and upload pictures along with text to the app; questionnaires for family and friends who believe their loved ones may be victims of abuse; GPS capabilities for more accurate location services; additional links to resources; and the ability to directly dial 911 within the app. RUSafe is available in English, Spanish and Nepali.

The update launches on June 27 at a free and public event, where Aspirant and the WC&S of Greater Pittsburgh will recruit “champions” to spread awareness of the app and of abuse in their communities. Sally Wiggin will emcee.

“IT STARTED IN PITTSBURGH, BUT WE HAVE THE WHOLE NETWORK, NATIONALLY, OF WOMEN’S SHELTERS.” Volunteers will receive toolkits to get the word out, resources on abuse and more information on the WC&S, plus two lawn tickets from Live Nation to select shows at KeyBank Pavilion. “[Victims] are always given the advice, ‘Well, why don’t you just leave?’ and it’s just not that simple,” says McClaine. “As a community, whether it’s through apps or business support, it’s really important for us all to play our part [in helping them].”

iday at Frid s i h t g in O p en

See See the the blockbuster blockbuster of of the the summer summer on on Pittsburgh’s Pittsburgh’s LARGEST LARGEST SCREEN! SCREEN! For tickets and show times, visit CarnegieScienceCenter.Org. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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.PODCAST REVIEW.

STUFF WE LIKE

BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PEOPLE BEHIND >> THE PLANS AVAILABLE ON ITUNES, STITCHER AND PLANNING.ORG/ CAREERCENTER/PODCAST

If I told you to listen to a podcast from the American Planning Association, you’d probably say “what?” or “no.” But what if I told you they had a Pittsburgh-centered episode? A-ha, your interest piqued now that it’s about you. People Behind the Plans, a series from the APA podcast hosted by Courtney Kashima in Chicago, talks to planners about working and problemsolving in their communities. In a recent episode, she talks with Kristin Saunders (pictured), the principal transportation planner for Pittsburgh’s relatively new Department of Mobility and Infrastructure. In the interview, they discuss the key tenets from which the department operates, which includes the ability to live accessibly without a car and pedestrian safety. You don’t have to know anything about urban planning to enjoy the episode, and it’s an interesting and detailed look at the importance of infrastructure and what’s being worked on in Pittsburgh. Saunders discusses the importance of accessibility, an interactive project to track the city’s more than 800 public staircases and, of course, the biking of Steelers wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster. •

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PHOTO COURTESY OF UNITED WAY OF SOUTHWESTERN PA

A volunteer helps construct a bicycle at a past Build-a-Bike event.

.EVENT.

BIKE TIME

BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

R

IDING AND OWNING a bike is a rite of passage for most people. But just because everyone should be able to ride their own bike, doesn’t mean that everyone gets to. The United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania is intent on giving hundreds of kids that chance. For the fifth consecutive year, the organization is staging a Build-A-Bike event in which volunteers team up with disadvantaged youth to construct a bicycle together. “We are passionate about and dedicated to helping local youth succeed and have a healthy lifestyle,” says Linda Jones of the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania. “Riding a bike is certainly part of that.”

BUILD-A-BIKE 2-5 p.m. Thu., June 21. Heinz Field, 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. uwswpa.org

This year’s event is being held June 21 at Heinz Field and will feature 400 volunteers and 150 kids. Hearing kids say “Wow this is mine. I have never had a bike before,” is one of the most fulfilling parts of the event, Jones says. “Even a bigger joy is watching them get on the bike for the first time and seeing the joy on their face when riding,” says Jones. Overall, it’s about more than giving bikes away. It’s also about volunteers working with kids to build the bikes and showcasing teamwork. Jones says

some of the kids don’t have a positive role model in their home life, and having thoughtful volunteers work with them has a powerful impact. “We have the kids work together with the volunteers,” says Jones. “They are working alongside a positive role model. Showcasing a relationship with a caring adult is important.” A bike can also encourage living healthy. In low-income communities, it’s not always easy to maintain a healthy lifestyle, since fresh-food options are scarce. “Many kids in our community are in need of guidance and part of that means encouraging healthy habits,” says Jones. “[T]his bike might be one of the first times they are exposed to a healthy habit.” The event is also a reminder for volunteers and other privileged people that owning your first bike is not a guarantee. Jones hopes the event reminds Pittsburghers to give back and help the less fortunate. “Many of us take for granted what we have,” says Jones. “We want as many children as possible to have those same types of opportunities.” Volunteer registration is full, but the United Way is still accepting donations. Jones says the Build-A-Bike program is backed by several corporations (including energy giant Williams) that have helped to expand the program over the years. She hopes it will continue to grow.


PHOTO COURTESY OF INTERESTING HUMAN

Weird Paul (center)

.FILM.

WORKING WEIRD BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN JOE LITZINGER first discovered Weird Paul, he assumed the YouTuber was an actor. It was summer 2016 and the Los Angeles-based filmmaker was researching potential subjects for an upcoming documentary series on interesting humans for his production company, Interesting Human. He stumbled on Weird Paul’s page and fell down a YouTube wormhole of homemade videos. They ranged from original music videos to food reviews, Q&As and unpacking videos and tutorials on subjects such as “how to punch food.” Most of the videos had more than 5,000 views. Some had a whole lot more. All had charming lo-fi production, a complete lack of pretense and, of course, Weird Paul’s fabulous bowl cut front-and-center. “My first thought was, whoever this actor is, he’s doing a great job,” says Litzinger. But after some digging, Litzinger realized that Paul was the real deal. Weird Paul (Paul Petroskey) wasn’t an act, but a deeply committed Pittsburgh musician and artist who’d been making these videos with remarkable dedication since the early 1980s, landing him the unofficial title of “the original vlogger.” Litzinger found his interesting human.

WILL WORK FOR VIEWS 7 p.m., Sat., June 23. Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15. Cinema.pfpca.org

Over the next year or so, Litzinger and co-director/editor Eric Schrader traveled from Los Angeles to Pittsburgh to follow the day-to-day life of Weird Paul. They spent time in his home with his parents and girlfriend, followed him at his day job, and chronicled the writing, shooting and editing process behind his filmmaking. The final product is a 90-minute documentary called Will Work For Views: The Lo-Fi Life of Weird Paul. Will Work For Views isn’t the first attempt to tell the story of Weird Paul – he’s been featured locally, as well as in Vice and AV Club – but it’s likely the most in-depth. Other profiles simply share the fact Weird Paul and his videos exist, often with a tone of detached amusement. Litzinger and Schrader were more interested in what it takes to make the videos, how he supports himself, and what his daily life is actually like. For example, while the YouTube videos appear modest, Litzinger discovered that Petroskey goes through a rigorous process to make each one, re-writing scripts, taping multiple takes, editing until everything fits just right. Between his job and family life, some videos can take up to three days to complete. There’s more to Weird Paul than meets the eye. “[Paul] can come across as weird or goofy, but there’s a really deep person in there,” says Litzinger. “A person who has similar struggles with things we all go through. Particularly as an artist who’s trying to make it, after 30 years of doing this.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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BRIDGEVILLE, PA

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

G

OING ON FACEBOOK has started

to feel like being stuck in a joyless marriage, only instead of silence, the torture comes in form of despair-inducing articles, updates from high school enemies and notifications for events you would never attend. I can pinpoint when Facebook, against all odds, recently started to feel fun. When I discovered the celebrity gossip podcast Who? Weekly, it felt like finding a soulmate I didn’t know I was missing. It’s perfect fodder for the permanently deranged brains of anyone

Looking for a new best friend? Don’t miss #CPPetProject, photo intern Annie Brewer’s weekly Instagram feature, highlighting adoptable animals around Pittsburgh.

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wears me down. Facebook was founded as a social network in the literal sense, a way to connect with friends, but now so much of the original intent has been corrupted by data breaches, election tampering and general hostility. In a Carrie Bradshaw way, I couldn’t help but wonder if it was ever fun in the first place. Back in the old days, circa 2008, Facebook did, in fact, have fun and interactive ways to connect, annoy, joke around, stalk and flirt with “friends.” Features that once seemed essential to

very specific feelings, such as “Flipping the Pillow to Get the Cold Side” or “Going Out of Your Way to Step on a Crunchy Leaf.” Relationship statuses could be taken seriously, or they could be a friendship stunt. I’ve been “married” to a best friend from high school since 2010. Deleting it now would feel like a real divorce. While Facebook has cut so many of its once ubiquitous features — most recently the dreaded Trending Topics section — it announced in May plans to improve the groups section and a

WHILE WE’RE ALL HERE IN A HELL OF OUR OWN MAKING, THERE ARE STILL WAYS TO FIND COMMUNITY, OR AT LEAST SOME SPICY MEMES who started reading gossip blogs at age 12. The Who? Weekly Facebook group is a private corner of the site populated by more than 11,000 of the podcast’s listeners. I suddenly found myself logging on only to look at discussions in the group, which range from Jonathan Cheban’s cursed behavior to Lea Michele conspiracy theories. It’s a virtual clubhouse — with US Weekly cutouts pasted on the walls — I can run to when the regular news cycle

site’s identity are now digital relics, lost in the ephemera of the internet. It was once mandatory for all status updates to start with “is,” like “John is ... I’m hoping for a snow day!” There was a collective format to the speech, even if it made no sense. Before Pinterest and other image-curating sites, there were Bumper Stickers on Facebook, showing off phrases and pictures that could easily be found on boardwalk Tshirts. There were fan pages to “like”

push to make them a more prominent feature of the site. Facebook groups, especially the more niche ones, are one of the last bastions of community on a website that once built itself on the idea of connection. Many Facebook groups exist for community over a shared interest. In addition to podcasts, many publications, like Eater and The New Yorker, have made groups for their readers to connect with each other and the staff.


Groups have also become an unlikely haven for weird and specific memes. Facebook has traditionally been behind on Weird Internet culture, which is typically reserved for more underground and anonymous spaces, like Tumblr and Reddit. Facebook is where your aunt posts about her pottery class, not where you find the latest nihilistic SpongeBob meme. New Urbanist Memes The group “New ted Teens” boasts over for Transit-Oriented 90,000 members,, dedicated to memes ng public transit and news involving n. (Here, “teens” and urban design. does not refer to literal teennslates agers but translates eak as from internet speak rains “people whose brains a r e wa r p e d f r o m ine.”) growing up online.”) There are various spinges for offs of these pages nd cities, citie es, inspecific regions and p “Steell City cluding the group iding Thoughts for Incline-Riding ained TOTS,” which has gained nce its nearly 600 members since formation in April. “There’s discussions of everything rite neighborfrom ‘what’s your favorite hood in Pittsburgh’ to ‘what do you think about the new Port Authority d i i t t CEO’,” says Ben Panko, administrator and creator of the “Steel City” group. You might also find pictures of Giant Eagle architecture that is hostile to birds or images of an overturned coal barge floating in the Monongahela described as a “floatyboi.” “I’m kind of an old man already, even though I’m 25. I don’t really wanna learn new platforms,” Panko says.

He started the group as a way to meet new people with common interests after moving to Pittsburgh from Washington, D.C. six months ago. A couple weeks ago, he hosted a meet-up for group members. About five people showed up, drinking cider and eating guacamole and trying to determine whether a shared love of urbanismbased content could translate to real world conne connections. There ar are other locally-focused meme groups, group like “Overpriced Apartment Meme Memes for Yuppie Teens” (Pittsburghers bon bonding over hatred of sterile new-bui new-build condos) and “Carnegie Mellon Memes for Spicy Teens” (insid (inside jokes about the Wi-Fi). Lar Large groups like these are usuall llly priv usually private and occasionally ha ave scr have screening questions. Forr Who? Weekly, W it’s a riddle easily a e answered by real listener listeners of the podcast. For “Steel “S City,” it asks poten potential members their favor favorite neighborhood in Pitt Pittsburgh. Conditional agreements agree prohibiting harassment a and/or hate speech are common, as are moderators that post rules to help maintain decorum, which is rare rarely found elsewhere t t on th the iinternet. It’s hard to know where either the internet or social media will go from here. All we know is that they’re here to stay. Facebook might not be a good or healthy or even safe place to be on the internet, but while we’re all here in a hell of our own making, there are still ways to find community, or at least bond over some spicy memes.

’ LET S

GET S CIAL

.MUSIC.

MP 3 MONDAY >> BAGGER Each week we share a free, online song from a local artist. This week it’s “Galactus (Nothing Left To Give)” by Bagger. The song is an ambient, lo-fi number that espouses a cool exhaustion and sadness with 1980s nostalgia swimming underneath. Stream or download “Galactus (Nothing Left To Give)” for free on FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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.HEALTH.

SUICIDE HELP BY RYAN DETO RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

S HAS BECOME common when

high-profile people take their own lives, the recent deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have thrust the topic of rising suicide rates back into the American spotlight. Nationally, rates have been increasing for decades; suicides in Allegheny County are higher than average. Dr. Gary Swanson, longtime psychiatrist at Allegheny General Hospital, spoke with City Paper about suicide and how to help people in need. IS THERE ANY REASON FOR THE RISING SUICIDE RATES? I am not sure if we have a good understanding or explanation for it. We see people who overdose on opiates, but it can be hard to figure out if it was suicide or an accident. But we do know that substance abuse can lead to depressed mood. That can lead them to the decision to commit suicide. In the past, some suicides may not have been reported. Sometimes, people “died of mysterious circumstances,” and that would have been it. It wouldn’t have been disclosed, I think people are a little more open to that now. We also know that there has been an increase in depression rates in the population over the last 50-60 years. We do see depression as being more common and that may be why we are seeing more suicide. ANY SPECIFIC REASON WHY THE PITTSBURGH REGION IS SEEING ABOVE AVERAGE SUICIDE RATES? Older people can become discouraged with some of their infirmities and you can see some increased suicide rates

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLEGHENY HEALTH NETWORK

Dr. Gary Swanson

there. And there are higher rates in suicide in white males. So you can look demographically and try to figure out if we are at a higher risk in that regard. One thing that’s clearly associated with completed suicide is access to firearms. And Western Pennsylvania is a hunting community and there is a lot of access to firearms. If a patient is depressed or a suicide risk, we are trying to reduce their access to firearms because that has been shown to be particularly helpful in reducing completed suicide. HOW CAN PEOPLE HELP? As far as what to say to someone who is struggling, most people will say “how are you doing?” But you have to sort of get beyond that. If you really want to ask somebody about how they are doing, if you are concerned, you need to be willing to ask them some questions, spend some time and really listen. People are often afraid to ask, “Are you so sad that you wished you weren’t alive?”. That kind of open conversation is difficult to have. They are afraid that asking the question will put the thought in people’s head, but there is no data that says that happens. Sometimes people are relieved that you asked.


PHOTO COURTESY OF SIERRA SELLERS

Sierra Sellers

.MUSIC.

COOL LIKE THEM BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

NQWENIQUE WINGFIELD is a

classically trained opera singer with a soprano voice that is powerful and impressive. But she grew up in Homewood, listening to jazz, funk and R&B, and she’s been breaking the mold. “A lot of my creative practice is trying to break down the barriers that exist between genres of music as a way to almost create a new genre itself,” Wingfield says. “Kind of finding my lane, because I love classical music, but I also love contemporary music as well, so I try to just create stuff that has those elements.”

COOL LIKE DAT WITH MUSIC FROM ANQWENIQUE, SIERRA SELLARS, BENJI AND SLIM THA DJ 5 p.m. Sat., June 23. Pittsburgh City Paper Stage, Market Square, Downtown. downtownpittsburgh.com

Wingfield, who performs mononymously as Anqwenique, is one of four musicians who will perform during Cool Like Dat, the June 23 edition of the Downtown Sound Music Series. R&B artist Sierra Sellars and rappers Benji and Slim Tha DJ will fill out the lineup on the City Paper Stage in Market Square. Cool Like Dat is a collaboration of art gallery Boom Concepts, where Wingfield is the studio manager. In 2014, Thomas Agnew and Darrell

Kinsel felt like something was missing from the Penn Avenue Corridor. There were lots of creative spaces in the 48005500 blocks, but none were owned by or tailored for people of color. To fill that hole, Agnew, the editor-in-chief of Jenesis Magazine, and Kinsel, a visual artist, created Boom Concepts. “So our studio model is really one where we want to provide space for artists, but also resources for them to access the things they need to make really quality work and also sell it and make money as an artist,” Wingfield says. With Cool Like Dat — the first of a handful of BOOM Concepts’ collaborations with the Downtown Sound Music Series — the gallery is promoting local black musicians, plus the local vendors that will be selling their goods in Market Square, and looking to bring a good time to Downtown. “Our goal is to have a little bit for everybody,” Wingfield says. “If there’s moments when folks want to get up and dance, they might want to grab their partner and just dance around and have a good time.” But don’t mistake Cool Like Dat for a miniature Coachella or Governor’s Ball. While some parts of the show will get a groove going, other segments will be introspective and profound. “That’s the vibe of the show: having good fun, but also experiencing something that feels really meaningful and touching,” Wingfield says.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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.FOR THE WEEK OF JUNE 21.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFOF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I suggest you ignore the temptation to shop around for new heroes and champions. It would only distract you from your main assignment in the coming weeks, which is to be more of a hero and champion yourself. Here are some tips to guide you as you slip beyond your overly modest self-image and explore the liberations that may be possible when you give yourself more credit. Tip No. 1: Finish outgrowing the old heroes and champions who’ve served you well. Tip No. 2: Forgive and forget the disappointing heroes and hypocritical champions who betrayed their own ideals. Tip No. 3: Exorcise your unwarranted admiration for mere celebrities who might have snookered you into thinking they’re heroes or champions.

(May 21-June 20): GEMINI Playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969. Four of his works were essential in earning that award: the play Waiting for Godot, and the novels Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable. Beckett wrote all of them in a two-year span during the late 1940s. During that time, he was virtually indigent. He and his companion Suzanne survived on the paltry wage she made as a dressmaker. We might draw the conclusion from his life story that it is at least possible for a person to accomplish great things despite having little money. I propose that we make Beckett your role model for the coming weeks, Gemini. May he inspire you to believe in your power to become the person you want to be no matter what your financial situation may be.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “A waterfall would be more impressive if it flowed the other way,” said Irish writer Oscar Wilde. Normally, I would dismiss an idea like this, even though it’s funny and I like funny ideas. Normally, I would regard such a negative assessment of the waterfall’s true nature, even in jest, to be unproductive and enfeebling. But none of my usual perspectives are in effect as I evaluate the possibility that Wilde’s declaration might be a provocative metaphor for your use in the coming weeks. For a limited time only, it might be wise to meditate on a waterfall that flows the other way.

best exemplify your Libran nature. In other words, be extreme in your moderation. Be pushy in your attempts to harmonize. Be bold and brazen as you make supple use of your famous balancing act. I’ll offer you a further piece of advice, as well. My first astrology teacher believed that when Librans operate at peak strength, their symbol of power is the iron fist in the velvet glove: power expressed gracefully, firmness rendered gently. I urge you to explore the nuances of that metaphor.

Everywhere they go for two weeks, students must carry around a 10-pound bag of flour. It’s a way for them to get a visceral approximation of caring for an infant. I recommend that you find or create an equivalent test or trial for yourself in the coming days. As you consider entering into a deeper collaboration or making a stronger commitment, you’ll be wise to undertake a dress rehearsal.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

If I were your mom, I’d nudge you out the door and say, “Go play outside for a while!” If I were your commanding officer, I’d award you a shiny medal for your valorous undercover work and then order you to take a frisky sabbatical. If I were your psychotherapist, I would urge you to act as if your past has no further power to weigh you down or hold you back, and then I would send you out on a vision quest to discover your best possible future. In other words, my dear Scorpio, I hope you will flee your usual haunts. Get out of the loop and into the open spaces that will refresh your eyes and heart.

Members of the Dull Men’s Club celebrate the ordinary. “Glitz and glam aren’t worth the bother,” they declare. “Slow motion gets you there faster,” they pontificate. Showing no irony, they brag that they are “born to be mild.” I wouldn’t normally recommend becoming part of a movement like theirs, but the next two weeks will be one of those rare times when aligning yourself with their principles might be healthy and smart. If you’re willing to explore the virtues of simple, plain living, make the Swedish term lagom your word of power. According to the Dull Men’s Club, it means “enough, sufficient, adequate, balanced, suitable, appropriate.”

Stage magicians may seem to make a wine glass hover in mid-air, or transform salt into diamonds, or make doves materialize and fly out of their hands. It’s all fake, of course — tricks performed by skilled illusionists. But here’s a twist on the old story: I suspect that for a few weeks, you will have the power to generate effects that may, to the uninitiated, have a resemblance to magic tricks — except that your magic will be real, not fake. And you will have worked very hard to accomplish what looks easy and natural. And the marvels you generate will, unlike the illusionists’, be authentic and useful.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The coming weeks will be a favorable time to accentuate and brandish the qualities that

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sex education classes at some high schools employ a dramatic exercise to illustrate the possible consequences of engaging in heterosexual lovemaking without using birth control.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the Georgian language, shemomechama is a word that literally means “I ate the whole thing.” It refers to what happens when you’re already full, but find the food in front of you so delicious that you can’t stop eating. I’m con-

cerned you might soon be tempted to embark on metaphorical versions of shemomechama. That’s why I’m giving you a warning to monitor any tendencies you might have to get too much of a good thing. Pleasurable and productive activities will serve you better if you stop yourself before you go too far.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Please do not send me a lock of your hair or a special piece of your jewelry or a hundred dollar bill. I will gladly cast a love spell in your behalf without draining you of your hard-earned cash. The only condition I place on my free gift is that you agree to have me cast the love spell on you and you alone. After all, your love for yourself is what needs most work. And your love for yourself is the primary magic that fuels your success in connecting with other people. (Besides, it’s bad karma to use a love spell to interfere with another person’s will.) So if you accept my conditions, Pisces, demonstrate that you’re ready to receive my telepathic love spell by sending me your telepathic authorization.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you have cosmic permission to enjoy extra helpings of waffles, crepes, pancakes and blintzes. Eating additional pastries and doughnuts is also encouraged. Why? Because it’s high time for you to acquire more ballast. You need more gravitas and greater stability. You can’t afford to be topheavy; you must be hard to knock over. If you would prefer not to accomplish this noble goal by adding girth to your butt and gut, find an alternate way. Maybe you could put weights on your shoes and think very deep thoughts.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’re slipping into the wild heart of the season of discovery. Your curiosity is mounting. Your listening skills are growing more robust. Your willingness to be taught and influenced and transformed is at a peak. And what smarter way to take advantage of this fertile moment than to decide what you most want to learn about during the next three years? For inspiration, identify a subject you’d love to study, a skill you’d eagerly stretch yourself to master and an invigorating truth that would boost your brilliance if you thoroughly embodied it.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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SAT., JULY 7 AMTRAC 9 P.M. BRILLOBOX BLOOMFIELD. Over-21 event. $14.99. 412-621-4900 or showclix.com.

SAT., JULY 7 O-TOWN 9 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $25-28. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

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MON., JULY 9 REMEMBER JONES 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $15-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., JULY 10 ARCADE FIRE 5:30 P.M. STAGE AE NORTH SIDE. $46. 412-229-5483 or ticketmaster.com.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIKA REINSEL

^ Thu., June 21: Priests

THURSDAY JUNE 21

dreamy, fuzzy, goth gaze act Plastic Idea, and brat-punk garage rock band Brazilian Wax. Meg Fair 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10-12. mrsmalls.com

MUSIC

NATURE

Priests is a rock band that grabs you by the shirt collar and yanks you off the ground, the howling vocals consuming you in one swallow. This ripping band is tinged with post punk and surf-y sounds with a heaping pile of dirt on top. Its 2017 release, Nothing Feels Natural, is absolutely gripping, full of head banging social commentary. Kicking off this show at The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls will be two Pittsburgh treats:

Space is the final frontier (or so Star Trek taught). If you’re anything like me, you probably haven’t looked up at the sky with any sincerity since last August’s solar eclipse. For the layperson and budding astronomer alike, Summer Solstice SkyWatch offers a chance at a closer look at the cosmos. The Buhl Observatory at Carnegie Science Museum will play host to SkyWatch on the longest day of the year. Start with a virtual tour

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of the night sky inside Buhl Planetarium, then (cloud cover permitting) head up to the observatory. Alex McCann 8 and 10 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $2 for Carnegie museum members, $4 for non-members. carnegiesciencecenter.org

JUNE 22

blockbuster about young love ruined by a rude iceberg. The other is Titanic, a Tony Award-winning musical by about a boat that hits a big honkin’ ice cube. The latter opens for its 10-day run at Benedum Center. Written by Maury Yeston, the play follows passengers through tragedy as they learn about adventure, love and lifeboats. Hannah Lynn 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $25.75-80.75. pittsburghclo.org

STAGE

DOGS

In 1997, two pieces of media about a famous ship sinking were released into the world. One of them, you know and love and tolerate as Titanic, the Oscar-winning

Prince Henry Charles Albert David (aka Harry ChAlDa) and Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle have had enough attention this summer. It’s time

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^ Fri., June 22: Canines & Crowns Open Photo Shoot

to appreciate the regality of our canine friends and family. Bring pups to the production house Studiome. There, they can flaunt their stuff in some seriously sassy pageant garb for this free photo shoot, to help prep for an actual upcoming pageant for charity. Crowns, sashes and trophies will be provided. You should sign up for a time slot beforehand, forehand, though walk-ins are welcome. e. Make sure your little queens ns and kings have relieved themselves beforehand. and. Alex Gordon 12 p.m. m. Studiome, 5819 Penn n Ave., East Liberty. Free. (facebook.com, search ch “Canines and Crowns ns Open Photo Shoot”)

for you to spring the $40 (it should be, though), check in with Grizzly Bear’s “Yet Again” from 2012’s Shields, or Spoon’s “Can I Sit Next To You” from 2017’s Hot Thoughts. Both bands have plenty of other amazing songs (not enough space!), but that’s a good start. AG 6 p.m. Stage AE, 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $39.50. promowestlive.com

MUSIC Every ticket sold for oon’s Grizzly Bear and Spoon’s co-headlining tour donates $1 to charity. y. g It’s a micro-financing tool from Plus1, a program started by rs Arcade Fire that pairs bands with nonprofits ts and kicks in a buck from each ticket to the chosen cause. These two chose Everytown, n, an organization thatt advocates for gun control and works to o end gun violence. If that’s not reason enough ough

June 29-July 7 at 7:30 PM New Hazlett Center for the Performing Arts Hosted by Carnivale Theatrics

> Fri., June 22: 2: ar Grizzy Bear

For tickets please visit our website www.carnivaletheatrics.org

PHOTO COURTESY Y OF TOM HINES ES

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CYLLA VON TIEDEMANN

^ Fri., June 22: Titanic

Lauren Ortego 11 a.m. 7370 Baker St., Morningside. $16 (included in admission). Pittsburghzoo.org

EVENT The kiki ballroom scene and the Garden of Peace Project are a perfect match. Both are rooted in queer culture with a focus on people of color. They’ll come together at Livin Out Loud: 50 Shades of Queer. The event, hosted by the Carnegie Museum of Art, will also feature a film screening and panel discussion and a fashion show. Aaliyah Denise Lohan will commentate, and surprise guest judges are promised. An adultsonly afterparty is also scheduled, though the location is yet to be announced. AM 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15 for adults, $5 for kids. cmoa.org

SATURDAY JUNE 23 FESTIVAL Have you ever wondered if a seal could paint? Now you don’t have to. The PPG Festival of Color at the Pittsburgh Zoo &

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BOOZE

^ Sat., June 23: Spirited Away

PPG Aquarium will answer all of your “Do animals have artistic abilities?” questions. These animals aren’t the only ones that will be delving into artsy sides. Humans will also be able to enjoy multiple crafting stations that

include sand and chalk art, coloring, face-painting, spin art and tie-dye. You can either B.Y.O.T. (that’s Bring Your Own T-shirt; white of course) or purchase one with the zoo logo. Activities will be at the PNC Pavilion.

Everyone knows Pittsburgh is better than Philadelphia, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t drink their beer. To the winner go the spoils! Spoonwood Brewing Company is presenting a day of Philly area beers for sampling from Conshohocken Brewing, Free Will, Hidden River, La Cabra, Levante, Tuned Up and 2SP. A ticket grants unlimited pours from these breweries, each of which will be bringing two beers. Tired Hands Brewing Company will on also be on hand for raffle winner to try their latest can release. Celine Roberts 12-3 p.m. Spoonwood Brewing Company, 5981 Baptist Rd., Bethel Park. $40. spoonwoodbrewing.com.

EVENT Know about Juneteenth? Well, you should. Juneteeth is celebrated to honor June 19, 1865, the day African Americans were


emancipated from slavery in Texas, and later the rest of the South. This holiday, also called Freedom Day, is celebrated with events in Pittsburgh during the weekend following June 19. But it’s not just a celebration. Issues of police brutality, domestic violence and community disorder still affect the black community. Local black leaders are holding a Juneteenth Justice Forum to discuss these serious issues. State Rep. Ed Gainey, activist Valerie Dixon and others will participate in a panel discussion at the August Wilson Center. This event will serve as a fundraiser for Clementa C. Pinckney Foundation. Ryan Deto 3-5 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. (Facebook search “Pennsylvania’s Juneteenth Celebration”)

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THURSDAY Ellen Siberian Tiger 8 p.m. Howlers, Bloomfield. howlerspittsburgh.com

FRIDAY Appalachian Terror Unit 8 p.m. Babyland, Oakland.

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Descartes a Kant 7 p.m. Get Hip Recordings, North Side.

SUNDAY Lera Lynn PHOTO COURTESY OF RALPH CREWE

^ Thu., June 21: Summer Solstice SkyWatch

GALA Join 1Hood Media with Y.B.M.K.Q. (Young Black Motivated Kings and Queens) in celebration of inspirational local and national youth for this Second Annual Black-Tie Gala. The gala will be hosted by Brian Burley. His book YNGBLKPGH is comprised of stories and how-tos from Pittsburgh’s young black success stories to help fuel a new generation of adults. Four guest speakers will speak to the audience on perseverance, motivation, self-worth and the drive it takes to become who you want to be. LO 5 p.m. Hyatt House, 5335 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. Free. 1hood.org

FILM A couple of pigs, a bathhouse, a spirit world and a character called No-Face come together in one of the most iconic and influential anime films of all time, Spirited Away. The only way Hayao Miyazaki’s artistic magnum opus could get any better would be if it were paired

7:30 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. alleghenycounty.us/parks

MONDAY Magic Sword 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. cattivopgh.com

TUESDAY Heavy Chest 8 p.m. Howlers, Bloomfield. howlerspittsburgh.com

WEDNESDAY Soccer Mommy 7 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. cattivopgh.com

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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with alcohol. Look no further than The Oaks Theater, which will play host to Spirited Away with whiskey tasting. Attendees are encouraged to cosplay as favorite characters from the film. The show is open to all ages, but (obviously) only guests over 21 can sample the bourbons and ryes. AM 7:30 p.m. 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. $11. theoakstheater.com

PARTY Belvedere’s is finally bringing us the dance night we have been begging for: Nicki Nite — a night entirely dedicated to Nicki Minaj. DJ ADMC has previously provided Drake Night, California Love (all West Coast hip hop) and Rihanna Ri-Play. Now he is living that all-Nicki/ all-night life. Belvedere’s will be transformed into a starship with beez in the trap, plenty of barbie tingz, pounding alarms and super bass. Feel yourself to her catalog of hip-hop, R&B and pop bangers, in addition to her fire features. Because let’s be real, her verse on “Monster” left Kanye and Jay-Z in the dust. MF 9 p.m. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. belvederesultradive.com

SUNDAY JUNE 24 MARKET

^ Sun., June 24: yART Sale

Putting a spin on the traditional, mundane “yard sale,” Pittsburgh Center for the Arts is playing host to the 10th Annual yART Sale. It features over 70 local vendors with affordably priced art, supplies and other crafts. Fare includes stuff from Jason Okerman, an artist and mechanical engineer who created Taiko, a card game set in 16th century Japan. Food vendors PGH Crepes, Leona’s Ice Cream Sandwiches and Edgar’s Tacos will

be available. Face-painting is another must for any art gathering. This event is rain or shine. LO 10 a.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. center.pfpca.org

JUGGALO DAY Are you a juggalo? Do you like roller coasters and Dippin’ Dots? Then boy, do I have an event specific to your interests! Juggalo Day at Kennywood

is a meet-up sponsored by Horrorcore Magazine, Majik Ninja Entertainment and other juggalo-related promoters. So, grab your face paint, cooler of Faygo and sunscreen and get ready for summer fun in the sun with your family. Regular Kennywood admission prices apply, so group-up for a discount. HL 12 p.m. 4800 Kennywood Blvd., West Mifflin. Prices vary by age.

OUTDOORS Local community organization Blackpacking: FUBU Hiking is collaborating with FROGANG for a celebration of natural hair and a love for the outdoors in this month’s Blackpacking event at one of Pittsburgh’s most scenic parks. Blackpacking encourages putting down the phones, going outside, learning CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.


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PHOTO COURTESY OF VERNON YOUNG

^ Sun., June 24: Blackpacking

survival skills, getting some exercise and enjoying the many views our city has to offer. Also, work on mental health and self-care. An afro is not necessary for the hike, but admiration and support of the natural hair movement is. Come through! LO 2 p.m. Olympia Park, 1001 Virginia Ave., Mount Washington. Free. (Facebook search “Blackpacking: FROGANG Edition)

FESTIVAL When I was a kid, there was a scary piece of folklore that promised if you looked in the mirror and said “bloody Mary” three times, a ghost would appear. Now that I’m an adult, I wish I could say “bloody Mary” three times and have a cold and delicious tomato cocktail appear in my hand. Bloody Marys are the perfect drink, combining tangy, briny and savory flavors with vodka and salty garnishes. The Sunday Best Bloody Mary fest, at the Heinz Lofts, will satiate all savory cocktail needs. This event features samples from local restaurants and bars, live music and food trucks. HL 300 Heinz St., Strip District. $20-60. pghsundaybest.com

TUESDAY JUNE 26 FOOD Culinary star, restaurateur and cookbook author, Lidia Bastianich is releasing her

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new memoir, My American Dream: A Life of Love, Family and Food, which is a celebration of her life as a chef. She’ll put on a three-course dinner. All dishes will be prepared from recipes in the book with preparations such as polpette in tomato sauce, pistachio crusted lamb chops, cacio e pepe and much more. Share a meal with the matriarch of the Eataly empire! CR 6-9 p.m. Lidia’s, 1400 Smallman St., Strip District. $55. lidias-pittsburgh.com

WEDNESDAY JUNE 27

STAGE Wednesday is often referred to as “hump day” because it’s the last work day before you can officially start looking forward to the weekend. But why not celebrate hump day with a bunch of naked, gyrating men? Maybe you’re lucky enough to get that at home, but if not, there’s Magic Men Live! at the Byham Theater. This interactive stage show, definitely not inspired by Magic Mike in any way, features male dancers in tiny outfits, showing off their sweets moves and bods. Having never seen the show, I can almost guarantee “It’s Raining Men” will make an appearance. HL 8 p.m. 101 6th St., Downtown. $24.24-79.24. 18 and older. Trustarts.org • ^ Wed., June 27: Magic Men Live!


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starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FILING OF ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION Notice is given that the Articles of Incorporation of Shapel General Contracting, Inc., have been filed with the Pennsylvania Department of State, and the corporation has been incorporated under the provisions of the Business Corporation Law of 1988.

SERVICE PURSUANT TO SPECIAL ORDER OF COURT Rachel Fox v. Jordan Drum This special order of court has been established by Rachel Lee Fox (mother) in her child custody mediation of Cayden Lee Drum (son) against Jordan Porter Drum (father). Jordan Porter Drum must act by the court date of July 10, 2018 to be held at Allegheny County Family Division – Suite 1030 Family Law Center at 1:00pm to ensure he is included in the proceeding. NOTICE If you wish to defend, you must enter a written appearance personally or by attorney and file your defenses or objections in writing with the court. You are warned that if you fail to do so the case may proceed without you and a judgment may be entered against you without further notice for the relief requested by the plaintiff. You may lose money or property or other rights important to you. YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR LAWYER AT ONCE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A LAWYER, GO TO OR TELEPHONE THE OFFICE SET FORTH BELOW. THIS OFFICE CAN PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION ABOUT HIRING A LAWYER. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE A LAWYER, THIS OFFICE MAY BE ABLE TO PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION ABOUT AGENCIES THAT MAY OFFER LEGAL SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT A REDUCED FEE OR NO FEE.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

51


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Contact us today for help with opioid addiction.


JOY RIDES

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1 Seaplane stop 5 It might be bulletproof 9 Give a bit more energy 14 Teleport 15 New product show 16 Candy maker H. B. ___ 17 Land with a flat top 18 Sports org. with a redshirt rule 19 Crowd, supposedly 20 Holy man of lost causes 22 Misfire 24 “Son of,” to a Saudi 25 Place with a platform: Abbr. 26 Banjo maestro Fleck 28 “Pimp Juice” rapper 30 Shot blocker 32 Guided by ___ (indie rock institution) 34 Withdrawn 35 Didn’t quit 36 Pipe part 37 Like the words that “go round” in this puzzle 38 Beret’s spot 42 Slam material

44 Large steamship 45 Bubble up? 46 Mideast VIP 47 ___ Raw (Dutch clothing company) 48 Parisian pair 50 Big club? 51 “Happy Days” dad, informally 52 [This mic on?] 54 ___ Green, Scotland 56 Ten, in Turin 58 Thornfield Hall governess 60 D&D baddie 62 ___ Park, NJ 63 Spin 64 High, in music 65 Cosmetician Elizabeth 66 “Dark Horse” singer Perry 67 Check out

10 “Color me unimpressed” 11 Landmines, e.g. 12 Words before an expiration date 13 Kind of hammer 21 eBay rival 23 Togetherness 25 Big drillers: Abbr. 27 Alleged, as fact 29 Dal pulse 31 Rock-clinging shellfish 33 “Grand Ole” place 35 Vintage toon Etta 37 Ben Stiller’s mom Anne 39 Mix things up

40 Service wheels 41 Bird of crosswords 43 Stumped words? 44 High quality 45 Go up 46 “This must be the case” 47 Pam of Blaxploitation films 49 Bird of crosswords 51 Molly, for short 53 Employee’s benefit 55 Exactamundo 57 2018 NBA Finals losers: Abbr. 59 Passing vote 61 “I slaved over a hot stove for you!” LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

DOWN 1 Watson’s creator 2 Makes certain 3 It’s often first in a bibliography 4 Mus. key with four sharps 5 Buyer 6 Really shine 7 Hot stone massage setting 8 Horny hopper 9 Style similar to Streamline Moderne

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 24-year-old straight guy who recently broke up with my girlfriend of more than four years. One of the reasons we broke up was a general lack of sexually compatibility. She had a particular aversion to oral sex — both giving and receiving. I didn’t get a blowjob the whole time we were together. Which brings me to why I am writing: One of my closest friends, “Sam,” is a gay guy. Shortly after breaking up with my girlfriend, I was discussing my lack of oral sex with Sam and he said he’d be willing to “help me out.” I agreed, and Sam gave me an earthshattering blowjob. I was glad to get some and had no hang-ups about a guy sucking me. Since then, Sam has blown me three more times. My problem is I am starting to feel guilty and worry I am using Sam. He’s a very good buddy, and I’m concerned this lopsided sexual arrangement might be bad for our friendship. Sam knows I am not into guys and I’m never going to reciprocate, and I feel like this is probably not really fair to him. But these are literally the only blowjobs I’ve received since I was a teenager. What should I do? TOTALLY HAVE RESERVATIONS OVER ADVANTAGE TAKING

I wrote you back, THROAT, and asked you for Sam’s contact information. Since you were clearly too afraid to ask Sam yourself (most likely for fear the blowjobs would stop), I offered to ask Sam on your behalf. I wasn’t serious — it was my way of saying, “You should really ask Sam.” But you sent me Sam’s contact info, and a few minutes later I was chatting with Sam. “Yes, I have been sucking my straight friend’s c*ck,” Sam said to me. “And I am flattered he told you I was good at it. That’s an ego booster!” Sam, like THROAT, is 24 years old. He grew up on the East Coast and met THROAT early in his first year at college. Sam came out at the end of his freshman year, to THROAT and his other friends, and he now lives in a big city where he works in marketing when he isn’t sucking off THROAT.

My first question for Sam: Is he one of those gay guys who get off on “servicing” straight guys? “I’ve never done anything with a straight guy before this,” said Sam. “So, no, I’m not someone who is ‘into servicing straight guys.’ I have only ever dated and hooked up with gay guys before!” So why offer to blow THROAT? “I didn’t know until after he broke up with his girlfriend that he hadn’t gotten a blowjob the whole time they were together — four years!” Sam said. “When I told him, I’d be happy to help him out, I was joking. I swear I wasn’t making a pass at my straight friend! But there was this long pause, and then he got serious and said he’d be into it. I wondered for a minute if it would be weird for me to blow my friend, and there was definitely a bit of convincing each other that we were serious. When he started taking his clothes off, I thought, ‘So this is going to happen.’ It was not awkward after. We even started joking about it right away. I have sucked him off four more times since then.” So, does this lopsided sexual arrangement — blowing a straight boy who’s never going to blow him — bother Sam? “I suppose it is a ‘lopsided sexual arrangement,” said Sam. “But I don’t mind. I really like sucking d*ck, and I’m really enjoying sucking his d*ck. He has a really nice d*ck! And from my perspective, we’re both having fun. And, yes, I’ve jacked off thinking about it after each time I sucked him. I know — now — that he thinks it is a bit unfair to me. But I don’t feel that way at all.” So, there is something in it for Sam. You get the blowjobs, THROAT, and Sam gets the spank-bankable memories. And Sam assumes that at some point, memories are all he’ll have. “He will eventually get into a relationship with a woman again, and our arrangement will end,” said Sam. “I only hope nothing is weird between us in the future because of

what has happened in the past few weeks.” I’m a straight guy in a LTR with a bi woman. We recently had a threesome with a bi male acquaintance. We made it clear that I’m not into guys and that she was going to be the center of attention. He said he was fine with this. A little bit into us hooking up, he said he wanted to suck my d*ck. I wasn’t sure about it at first, but my girlfriend encouraged it because she thought it was hot. I ended up saying yes, but I stated that I didn’t want to reciprocate. A bit later, while my girlfriend was sucking his d*ck, he said he wanted me to join her. I said no, he kept badgering me to do it, I kept saying no, and then he physically tried to shove my head down toward his crotch. My girlfriend and I both got pissed and said he had to leave. Now he’s bitching to our mutual friends about how I had an insecure straight-boy freakout, he didn’t get to come after we both got ours, we’re shitty selfish fetishists, and so on. I’m concerned about what our friends think of me, but even more so, I’m concerned that I did a sh*tty thing. I get that maybe he was hoping I’d change my mind, especially after I changed my mind about him sucking my d*ck. But I don’t think it’s fair for him to be angry that I didn’t. Is oral reciprocation so necessary that it doesn’t matter that we agreed in advance that I would not be blowing him?

WHEN HE STARTED TAKING HIS CLOTHES OFF, I THOUGHT, ‘SO THIS IS GOING TO HAPPEN.’

NOT ONE TO BE INCONSIDERATE

You did nothing wrong. And if after hearing your side of the story, NOTBI, your mutual friends side with a person who pressured you to do something you were clear about not wanting to do and then, after you restated your opposition to performing said act, pressured you to perform the act — by physically forcing your head down to his c*ck — you can solve the “mutual friends” problem by cutting these so-called friends out of your life.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 20-27, 2018

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June 20, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 25

June 20, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 25