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PITTSBURGH’S LEADING ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT NEWSWEEKLY

JUNE 13-20, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor ROB ROSSI Managing Editor LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Arts Writer HANNAH LYNN Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX MCCANN, LAUREN ORTEGO

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JUNE 13-20, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 24

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

News+Views 6 Food+Drink 14 Arts+Entertainment 19 Calendar 31

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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WEEKLY FEATURES

ON THE COVER: For his spring semester with City Paper, photo intern Jake Mysliwczyk explored Pittsburgh’s skyline from a new vantage point each week. View his completed collection at pghcitypaper.com/PGH360.

Jen Sorensen 10 Free Will Astrology 28 Crossword 37 Savage Love 38

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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NEWS +VIEWS

.BUSINESS.

NOT DELIVERED Allegheny County libraries likely out $1.49 million a year because of Amazon BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ENDY OUEDRAOGO visits Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s main branch in Oakland regularly to access its free internet. She is not alone. For many in Pittsburgh, the library is a reliable resource for services they can’t afford at home. Almost everybody can get to the library. In fact, Allegheny County’s public libraries offer more than books. They are where people rent DVDs, receive tutoring on foreign languages or assistance with job applications, and, as is the case with Ouedraogo, use the internet. All for free. Those services and other public resources in Allegheny County are in large part funded from an extra 1-percent sales tax made in Pittsburgh. Which Ouedraogo is happy to pay. When somebody such as Ouedraogo, a Pittsburgh resident,

makes a purchase within the county, an extra 1-percent tax benefits libraries and other institutions, which is fine by her. “Absolutely it would be helpful to see the library get more funds,” says Ouedraogo. “Especially for the elderly and for the kids. Not everyone can afford to have everything available at home.” A certain online goliath that city and county officials hope will make Pittsburgh home to its second headquarters can afford everything. But Amazon, the largest online retailer in the U.S., isn’t collecting a local sales tax — and the result is Allegheny County libraries missing out on $1.49 million annually, a City Paper analysis shows. A study by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy concludes Amazon isn’t collecting the 1-percent sales CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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NOT DELIVERED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 6

tax Allegheny County levies on local purchases. The Regional Asset District (RAD) tax contributes to public parks, museums and distressed municipalities in addition to generating more than $31 million yearly to public libraries. Amazon officials did not respond to City Paper’s request for comment. Not only Pittsburgh and Allegheny County are being left out. Amazon also isn’t collecting a 2-percent sale tax in Philadelphia, and it isn’t contributing extra sales-tax revenues to counties in Alabama, Iowa and New Mexico. Walmart and Target each collect extra sales tax, even on their online purchases, that contribute to public services in Allegheny County. The revelation that Amazon is avoiding collecting taxes comes at a time when it has chosen Pittsburgh as one of 20 possible placements of its second headquarters, HQ2. County officials reportedly have offered many tax incentives to Amazon, which has promised 50,000 jobs to the region. Details, though, have not been made public. The public was on Rick Stafford’s mind in 1994, when the RAD tax (in which he played an integral role) was instituted. Then with the Allegheny Conference and now a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, Stafford believes the RAD tax is a resounding success, saying it has greatly improved quality of life for residents in Allegheny County. “I think it is fair to say the parks and the cultural assets contribute to the fact that this is a place that’s interesting, that has a cultural vibrancy to it,” says Stafford. “We have one of the richest park systems imaginable. The library system is

CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO

Pittsburghers calling on Amazon to partner more with local government officials

far superior than what is was before.” Stafford says Amazon should be collecting the extra local tax. “If they are collecting the 6 percent [state sales tax], it is totally hypocritical for them not to collect the 7 percent here or 8 percent in Philadelphia,” he says. The RAD tax fund would be boosted annually by about $9.6 million if Amazon collected the extra 1-percent sales tax. (CP calculated the average Americans spend yearly at Amazon’s website and multi-

plied that total by how many people in Allegheny County likely make purchases through Amazon.) In 2016, Allegheny County distributed $189.7 million to cultural assets and municipalities through the RAD tax. The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh system relies on the tax for the majority of its budget. The more money the RAD tax collects, the more money the library has to improve and expand services. State officials said Amazon would

start collecting a 6-percent sales tax on purchases and the extra taxes in Allegheny County and Philadelphia, the Tribune-Review reported in 2012. Graham Martin, a tax law expert at website TaxJar, says Amazon is not required to collect the extra tax because it lacks a retail presence in Allegheny County. Crafton is home to an Amazon sorting center since 2014, but Martin says Amazon can claim all purchases are originated in Virginia — home to the company’s East CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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Coast Web Services campus. Pennsylvania’s use of an “originbased” tax law does not compel Amazon to collect the extra tax because Martin says a sorting center, such as the one in Crafton, “is not the place where the order was received.” “They are not considering that the seller location,” he says. State officials need to create or amend legislation to specifically include rules about collecting local sales taxes to force Amazon (or similar online retailers) to collect in Allegheny County and Philadelphia, Martin says. Allegheny County state Rep. Dom Costa and Philadelphia state Rep. Curtis Thomas co-sponsored a bill that forces Amazon to collect 6-percent sales tax on all purchases shipped to the state, including through Amazon’s third-party marketplace. The bill was signed into law this past March, but it does not contain language pertaining to local sales taxes of Allegheny County or Philadelphia. The Institute of Taxation and Economic Policy’s Carl Davis believes local retailers are at a disadvantage because Amazon is not paying the extra taxes. He sees little

logic in asking consumers that shop at local retailers — with owners who pay property taxes and employ thousands of taxpayers — to pay more to fund public services such as libraries than consumers that shop through Amazon. “It is exactly the opposite thing to do from the place of local economic development,” says Davis. “We need a level playing field for local business.” There is also the part about maintaining free services that many people have come to rely on. Consider Marc Patti, a Duquesne University grad student who had 20 books checked out from the public library when he spoke to CP last week in Oakland. He cannot afford to buy all the books he needs to continue his higher education. What hurts the libraries hurts Patti where he lives, so it is not surprising he favors Amazon collecting the extra sales tax — especially considering Allegheny County is a place Amazon might consider its second home. “If you want to operate here, you have to play by the rules,” says Patti. “No matter how big of a corporation you are going to build here.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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.SPORTS.

WORLD WATCHING BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HERE WASN’T anything particularly

malevolent about Sergio Ramos’ challenge. It wasn’t a foul, and it didn’t appear to be more vicious than most other tackles. But Mohamed Salah landed hard on his left shoulder and stayed on the ground. When he did, it wasn’t only Liverpool fans holding their collective breath. An entire nation was urging its star forward to get up, fearful that dreams 28 years in the making were shattered. “It was a very bad feeling,” Yassin Khalifa says. “I was so frustrated, especially because it wasn’t that hard a fall.” That fall dislocated Salah’s left shoulder just under 25 minutes into the Champions League final May 26, only 20 days prior to Egypt’s opening match in the World Cup. The last time Egypt was in the World Cup, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union competed, and West Germany took home the title. Egypt scored just once in that tournament, drawing twice and losing, 1-0, to England, crashing out in the group stage. With Egypt back in the biggest spectacle in world sports, its local expatriates are ready to cheer on Salah and his teammates. “This is special for all Egyptians to watch,” says Khalifa, the communication director for the Egyptian Student Association at University of Pittsburgh. Egypt will be hard-pressed to play any more than those three matches, having drawn a strong group that also contains host Russia, Saudi Arabia and two-time World Cup winner Uruguay. Most of the members of the Egyptian Student Association (primarily graduate students) weren’t alive to see the 1990 World Cup,

CP PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON

Members of the University of Pittsburgh’s Egyptian Student Association

so the group is planning to go all-out for Egypt’s three group stage matches. It will play host to watch parties on June 15, 19 and 25 at Benedum Hall on campus. A handful of other watch parties will take place around town. Similar to the Egyptian Student Association, Carnegie

EGYPT WORLD CUP WATCH PARTIES 8 a.m. Fri., June 15. Benedum Hall, Room 1145, 3700 O’Hara St., Oakland. 2 p.m., Tue., June 19. Benedum Hall, Room 1145, 3700 O’Hara St., Oakland. 10 a.m. Mon., June 25. Benedum Hall, Room 102, 3700 O’Hara St., Oakland.

IRAN WORLD CUP WATCH PARTIES 11 a.m. Fri., June 15. Hamerschlag Hall, Room B131, Hamerschlag Dr., Oakland. 2 p.m. Wed., June 20. Doherty Hall, Room 2315, Hamerschlag Dr., Oakland. 2 p.m. Mon., June 25. Scaife Hall, Room 219, 4805 Frew St., Oakland.

PIPER’S PUB WATCH PARTIES Daily, June 14-July 25. 1828 E. Carson St., South Side. piperspub.com

THE PITTSBURGH BOTTLESHOP CAFE WATCH PARTIES Daily, June 14-July 25. 1597 Washington Pike, Bridgeville. bottleshopcafe.com

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Mellon University’s Iranian Student Association will gather for campus watch parties for all three of Iran’s group stage matches. For those who don’t have a vested rooting interest — the United States missed this year’s cut, as did Italy, Ireland and Netherlands — Piper’s Pub in the South Side will open its doors as early as 6 a.m., and show every match of the tournament. The Pittsburgh Bottleshop Cafe in Bridgeville will also have the matches on, with beer flowing. Even without the U.S. in the World Cup, there’s nothing that truly compares to the worldwide spectacle that pits underdogs, such as Egypt and Iran, against giants Germany, Argentina and (usually) Italy. “Football is already a very huge thing, but the World Cup is different,” Khalifa says.


.OPINION.

BEAUTIFUL MEN BY TERENEH IDIA // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ALKING OUTSIDE an astonish-

ing palace in India, a group of colorfully attired men captured my attention. I quickly grabbed my camera as they walked closer. A tall gentleman in green stopped in his tracks and pointed. In unison, the men slowly turned their heads, looked at me and then at my camera. I hesitated, thinking they would tell me to stop. Instead, as if silently choreographed, they posed. One click. Perfection. They understood their beauty. Men are beautiful. I love their voices; the way their arms and hands move, balletic or trained like an artisan smith; the place where the neck meets their shoulders; the way clothes drape on the male form, a perfect white shirt cascading over the back, biceps, triceps ‌ stunning. Most male species understand this beauty birthright. If you look at the male lion’s mane or the blue-green, gem-like plumes of the peacock, it’s evidence that Mother Nature made an extra effort on male allure. But somehow the American man and many Pittsburgh men don’t seem to get this point. You have a gorgeous canvas, why not work it?! In part it has to do with the white European patriarchy and some religions. Men’s attire was more colorful throughout human history and remains so in many parts of the present-day world. In the 1800s-Europe, men wore plumes, not women. When women started wearing feathers in their hats and hair — they were a phallic symbol and sign of male power — surprise! Men stopped wearing the feathers. Thus, began the slow decline in Western male fashion. Caring about how you look is equated with being feminine. The

austere lifestyle of many Protestant immigrants to what became the U.S. fueled a desire to refrain from embellishing the body. Cleanliness meant you had to strip away the bling, baby. This process of austerity continued with Colonization. It stripped away language, customs, built environment, spirituality, material culture and clothing styles from peoples all over Africa, Asia and the Americas. Where I design with the Maasai in Kenya, traditional leather clothing has disappeared. Here in the U.S., there is a history of Native Americans being forced to cut their hair, not speak their language or practice their traditional spirituality. All of this is formed by clothing; what you admire, what you value, is reected in how you dress. In a sports-crazed town such as Pittsburgh, wearing a team jersey is almost considered formal attire. I offer an alternative view, a more nuanced version of the Black & Gold. Black is universally attering and it comes in many shades — seriously. Replace a team jersey with a ďŹ ne-ďŹ tting (for whatever body you possess), quality, jerseyfabric collarless shirt. Option: black linen or cotton, with a collar. No logos, please iron. Grab a nice pair of black trousers, tailored shorts (LeBron James looked sexy AF before Game 1 of the NBA Finals) or wellďŹ tting black jeans. For the gold, a nice belt buckle or, dare I suggest, some jewelry — a bracelet, watch chain fob, earring, or vintage signet ring. Simple, elegant. You can jazz up the same outďŹ t by putting on a black linen blazer with a pocket square or gold pin. Option: a nice three-season cotton or wool blazer. Just thinking about it makes me smile. Sexy, yes. Make an effort. Consider the space. Occupy the eyes that gaze upon you. You’re beautiful, show us how much.

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Tereneh Idia is a contributing columnist. Follow her on Twitter @Tereneh152xx PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO

Elsa Santos in Azorean Cafe

.FOOD.

AZOREAN APPETITE “There is no such thing there as processed food.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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O

VER THE YEARS away from the islands, Elsa Santos

nurtured the dream of owning her own cafe and restaurant that would bring a piece of her home to Pittsburgh. Now, Santos is making that dream a reality with her newly opened Azorean Cafe in Bloomfield. Santos, the chef/owner, hails from the Azores, a Portuguese archipelago in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Stepping into the cafe, you’re transported to the home of Santos’ youth, surrounded by blue hydrangeas and the smell of freshly brewed Portuguese coffee that’s served with a twist of lemon. Santos arrived in the U.S. 17 years ago and made her living in the coffee industry with her cousins. She characterizes Azorean cuisine as relying on the land and seasonal harvest with lots of seafood, homemade breads

and organic vegetables. “I grew up with that all in the backyard. There is no such thing there as processed food,” says Santos. In order to keep her flavors and foods as authentic as possible, Santos orders most everything from a Portuguese grocer. Her dedication to her homeland is epitomized in a dense pastry called queijada that she imports directly from her village on the island of São Miguel. The same family has made this secret recipe for 100 years. “It started with a couple of nuns who raised a little girl and she kept the recipe in her family. Now her great granddaughter has the company that produces them,” says Santos. Pastries and breads are an important part of the Azorean breakfast. The fluffy yet crusty white roll served with butter and cheese is a staple, especially


Bifana: pork loin with sautéed onions, lettuce and tomato in a garlic sauce on a Portuguese roll; served with imported peppers, Portuguese salad and home fries

when paired with a clean-tasting and slightly sweet cup of Portuguese coffee. Santos serves rolls with eggs and chourico to fill out a slightly more American-style breakfast sandwich. Santos notes that the chourico is different from Mexican chorizo in both spelling and taste. Chourico is less fatty and meaty than its cousin. She carries both smoked and regular. Her cheeses, all made from cow’s milk, are also imported from the Azores. São Jorgea, a semi-hard cheese with a spicy bite, is the cheese she grew up on along with topo, a buttery cheese good for melting. A dense cheese from Faial Island (also known as the Blue Island) rounds out the offerings. Although the cafe’s hours start bright and early at 6:30 a.m., there is a robust lunch menu to feast upon too. Casseroles are a popular dish in the Azores, and Santos credits her mother for many of the recipes, including the octopus casserole. Currently one of the biggest sellers, this casserole offers tender

morsels of baked octopus with potatoes and onions in a red wine sauce. It’s a different way to experience this seafood which is typically served grilled. Feijoada, chunks of pork and chourico stewed with carrots and sweet potatoes is a classic Portuguese dish. For those feeling slightly less adventurous, familiar riffs on classic sandwiches done Azorean style fill out the lunch offerings.

AZOREAN CAFE 4715 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. azoreancafe.com.

Although the Azores — and certainly Portugal — have some truly delicious wines, the cafe doesn’t import bottles. Instead Santos, whose father owned a vineyard, encourages customers to bring their own to share over an afternoon meal. Finishing a bottle off with a coffee while gazing upon the paintings of blue hydrangeas and chatting with a friend will give you a moment of island respite for the day.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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2018 PHOTOS COURTESY OF HAYRULLO UMARALIEV

Lagman, a traditional Uzbek dish available at Kavsar

.FOOD.

TIES TO RUSSIA BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HAVE YOU VOTED? W The voting session for BEST OF PGH 2018 is almost over! Let your voice be heard and vote for your local favorites before time runs out.

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HEN IT COMES to Russia,

Pittsburgh’s population comes from former Soviet satellites, a small enclave of immigrants and, of course, the Penguins’ Evgeni Malkin. What our city lacks is a plethora of Russian restaurants to offer Pittsburghers a taste of that country’s cuisine. Mount Washington is home to one such place. Kavsar, an Uzbek and Russian restaurant, provides a small window into those flavors for folks intrigued by dishes likely available to soccer fans in Russia for the World Cup. Owners Hayrullo Umaraliev and Tahmina Umaralieva hail from Uzbekistan, although Umaralieva is also half-Russian. Around four years ago, Umaraliev opened Kavsar as a gift to his wife, who is the restaurant’s chef. Even through a translator, his affection for her and belief in her talent are clear — and it all plays a significant role in this restaurant’s culture. In Uzbekistan, a country of about 32 million people, culture and food remain closely tied with Russia. A major difference is that much of Uzbekistan’s population is Muslim and so the food is often halal and does not include pork. Kavsar’s menu is entirely halal, although dishes are very meat-forward. Beef, lamb and chicken are in most menu items, which span from simple salads and soups to large portions of homemade dumplings, rice and pasta dishes.

Plov, a traditional Uzbek rice dish with lamb, carrot, chickpeas and spices, is a popular dish among customers seeking authenticity. Venera, a server at the restaurant, insists the manti (a kind of savory beef dumpling) reminds her of being home in Uzbekistan. Lagman, a homemade and brothy noodle dish with beef, red and green peppers and topped with dill, shines as a convergence of cultures and trade in Tashket, the capital city of Uzbekistan that was once along the Silk Road.

Manti beef dumplings

The Umaralievs hold that Uzbek cuisine is very popular in Russia, with a few of the most expensive restaurants in Moscow serving Uzbek cuisine. Umaraliev acknowledges each culture thinks of the other’s as its own, but with a few discernible differences. “No one can cook rice like the Uzbeks,” says Umaraliev with a smile.


DINING OUT

CP PHOTO BY KATE HAGERTY

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MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

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SENTI RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 3473 BUTLER ST, LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4347 / SENTIRESTAURANT.COM Senti is a modern Italian Restaurant combining the tradition of Italian home cooking with European fine-dining. Taste different fine wines from the selfserve wine dispenser.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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.DRINKS.

DRINK ME BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Wendy Yurok shares a laugh with customers at Kelly’s Korner Bar.

LOCATION:

.ON THE ROCKS.

Mazza Wine Shop at Baldinger’s Candy Store

HIDDEN GEMS BY CRAIG MRUSEK // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AMBIANCE: This little wine shop is the candy store for adults — within an actual candy store. Pick up rare and old-fashioned candies in bulk, and a bottle for yourself.

WHAT WE DRANK: Sparkling Pinot Noir, South Shore Wine Company

COST: $19.95/750ml

HOT TAKE: Pennsylvania is starting to get serious about its wine region, dubbed “Pennsylvania Wine Land.” This is a bottle that deserves a second or third pour. A light-bodied pinot noir, this sparkler is slightly sweet while still maintaining subtlety. 18

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

EPENDING ON your outlook, Lawrenceville is either a paradise or a punchline. Arguably Pittsburgh’s hipster headquarters, it is saddled with all the baggage that kind of designation entails. For devotees and detractors, the main commercial strip of Butler Street is a focus of Lawrenceville’s identity — embodying a relentless dynamic of new supplanting old. Kelly’s Korner is the antidote to Butler Street. Occupying a corner spot (naturally) among the slope-side homes of 45th Street, Kelly’s announces itself as a basic bar in the best possible ways. Like all good neighborhood spots, it’s not big. With a bar that seats less than 10, it’s a given you’ll be involved in multiple conversations … even as a bystander. If spooked by the idea of a stranger suddenly chatting up and welcoming a newcomer, just remember it’s Pittsburgh. We do that here. Kelly’s also quietly and unrepentantly maintains ties to an older era. The wooden bar’s top, freckled with cigarette burns, is a tangible reminder everyone is free to light up. Sales are cash-only. Even the jukebox skews retro. It’s not uncommon to hear Neil Diamond, Paul McCartney and Wings, and The Knack played in quick succession. Jumbo-size bags of chips and pretzels hang abundantly from the vintage back bar. A pinball machine patiently waits for

the next person with a few quarters to spare. Drink-wise, an occasional unfussy cocktail can be found, but beer is clearly the beverage of choice for regulars. A respectable row of taps has a prominent position up front, while a nearby cooler stands at the ready with an array of choices for the bottle-and-can brigade. And with certain brands coming in around $2, it’s a bargain that’s hard to ignore.

KELLY’S KORNER BAR 285 45th St., Lawrenceville. 412-773-4145

The other thing that’s hard to ignore is Irish pride evident everywhere. There’s a liberal use of green, and even the wallpaper bears a subtle shamrock pattern. Leprechaun figurines coyly peek out from clusters of assorted knick-knacks, but it’s not a display of manufactured cuteness. Periodically playful moments don’t obscure the no-nonsense nature of this place. Trends obviously come and go, and neighborhoods change. The cycles of fashion can erode the personality of even the most established businesses. But unassuming bars such as Kelly’s have a stamina that provide deeper character coupled with greater longevity. We should all raise a glass to that.


ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

Pittsburgh Jazz international Festival performers Gregory Porter, Marcus Miller and Shemekia Copeland

.MUSIC.

(MOSTLY)

FREE JAZZ With some programming changes and varied voices, the Jazz Festival keeps it fresh BY MIKE SHANLEY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE EIGHTH Annual Pittsburgh Jazz International

Festival kicks off this weekend using the same model since the early days. With the exception of a few ticketed items, this festival predominantly features free outdoor concerts, with sets by renowned jazz artists. Following the main events, a free jam session offers the chance for these musicians to combine forces with local players. Some minor changes are taking place this year. Janis Burley-Wilson, who launched this festival while working at Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, now serves as president and CEO of the African American Cultural Center, located at the August Wilson Center. The festival has moved along with her, from Penn Avenue up around the corner to Liberty

Avenue, taking advantage of wider streets and closer proximity to the August Wilson Center. Programming this year also includes master classes and artist talks. Among the roster of performers is drummer Terri Lyne Carrington, who is no stranger to Pittsburgh. She has played numerous times at the Pitt Jazz Seminar. The late Geri Allen, who directed the seminar most recently, will be the subject of her festival appearance in a group that includes Orrin Evans (piano), Tia Fuller (saxophone), Kenny Davis (bass), and Val Jeanty (turntables). Carrington, who performs Saturday evening on Liberty Avenue Stage II, worked with Allen, and the late pianist’s inuence runs deep. CONTINUES ON PG. 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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(MOSTLY) FREE JAZZ, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

“Geri was in some ways like a big sister because she was a little bit older than me,” Carrington says. “She had a very quiet strength, a real quiet fire which came through in her playing as well. She kept pushing whoever she was playing with, or whoever she was working with. She made me see our value even more — our value as jazz artists, our value as women.” With her Mosaic Project albums, Carrington saluted and worked with numerous female jazz musicians. Her new Social Science project features music driven by the current political and social landscape. In the wake of the #MeToo movement, Carrington has also become busy, speaking off the bandstand as well. While it sometimes cuts into her creative work, she sees the importance of it. “For me, the #MeToo movement moves into gender equity, which I actually call gender justice,” Carrington says. “Because … justice implies transformation.” Tenor saxophonist Donny McCaslin

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— who appears on Sunday afternoon at the Smithfield Street Stage — was already firmly established as a performer, with 10 albums as a leader, in addition to work with composer/bandleader Maria Schneider. Then his career took a turn in 2016 when his quartet collaborated with David Bowie on Blackstar, which would be the Thin White Duke’s final album. If it means his name is constantly linked to Bowie, McCaslin has no qualms.

PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL Fri., June 15 - Sun., June 17 Various stages, Downtown Pittsburgh. For dates and locations, go to pittsburghjazzfest.org

“It has brought more attention to my individual work, but it was such a special experience working with him, something that felt transformative and affirming in such a deep way. Being associated with that is nothing but

positive,” he says. “It couldn’t have been more of a creative environment to work in. He was open to everything that we wanted to try.” Even before working with Bowie, McCaslin had been combining his muscular tenor saxophone voice with electronic music and drum and bass grooves. This quartet also includes bassist Tim Lefebvre, of TedeschiTrucks Band, and drummer Zach Dansinger, whose soundtrack work brings a producer’s mindset to the table. Jason Lindner combines an acoustic jazz background with the skill at creating rich soundscapes on electronic keyboards. “He’s really able to manipulate sounds in the moment as we’re playing, and he’s able to have the aesthetic of an improviser and composer [who] has this really organic relationship with the sounds that’s really unique,” McCaslin says. The result is a group that can set a mood without sacrificing the bite of intense solos.

AS THE PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL winds down with a set by velvet-voiced Gregory Porter, one of Pittsburgh’s jazz expatriates makes his return, just across the river and up the street. Bassist Matt Booth was one of the musicians that helped launch Space Exchange, a Tuesday-night event at Thunderbird Café that presented different strains of new music each week. The offerings included traditional jazz, world music, free improvisation or some combination thereof. Booth could often be found behind the upright bass in many of these projects. He also played EXTENDED with City Dwelling Nature Seekers, Sun., June 17. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Avenue, North Side. who played modern folk music, taking 6 p.m. Free, but reservations are required. cityofasylum.org. it in more exploratory directions. Since relocating to New Orleans, Booth has continued to spread himself around with a number of different projects. On Sunday, he comes to Alphabet City with Extended, a lively piano trio. Drummer Brad Webb and pianist Oscar Rossignolli complete this group, which covers a wide range of moods with a playful enthusiasm that recalls the work of the Bad Plus. However, Extended avoids the mischievous tendencies of that more notorious trio, while maintaining an animated delivery. Sometimes Rossignolli plays something that wouldn’t sound out of place in a piano concerto. Other times, he muffles the strings inside the piano, getting a percussive clank out of it, while his partners lay on a groove that sounds just a few steps away from funk riff. The trio’s self-titled CD features several pieces like this, switching moods with nearly every track. In person, this kind of diversity can win over a crowd. •


.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

STEIM III >> BY BRIAN RIORDAN SELF-RELEASED BRIANRIORDAN.BANDCAMP.COM

Mat Bocian

.LITERATURE.

SOLDIER STORY BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

TORIES OF veterans and armedservice members are typically portrayed in TV shows and movies, but one local Iraq War veteran wants to share his firsthand. Mat Bocian will speak at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall on June 14. He will address time served in the Army during Middle East conflicts and dealing with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “It is preserving veterans’ legacies, I find that appreciative,” Bocian says of Soldiers & Sailors. “They’re providing a venue for so many other soldiers’ stories to be told.”

MAT BOCIAN 6:30 p.m. Thu., June 14. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum, 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. soldiersandsailorshall.org

Inspired by the Greatest Generation’s fight in World War II, Bocian joined the Army for combat. After multiple deployments during which his unit experienced casualties, Bocian started seeing combat differently. “I didn’t really understand, it was difficult to process,” says Bocian, who began writing as a coping method for dealing with complex emotions and PTSD. He wrote a blog. He wrote vignettes.

He even wrote poetry. Bocian says writing a book was integral to his emotional recovery. “First book I wrote was about living with PTSD, the progress, the transition,” says Bocian. “It was easier to write than to talk about it.” His books include The Ghosts of Tal’Afar, Living in the Shadow and Operation Erdanus. Bocian says getting thoughts on paper helped him reflect on who he was and who he was becoming. He knows seeing combat has powerful effects on everyone. “Combat changes you,” says Bocian. “Anyone who is going to be a combatant, it is going to change you.” He says the Middle East conflicts changed his outlook, because it was “soul crushing” to fight for so long and then see the Islamic State take over. He says it felt like the U.S. wasted time and money. Bocian hopes his event at Soldiers & Sailors will encourage other veterans to publicly share their stories. He encourages veterans to tell their stories, no matter what their experience might be. “I want to help veterans,” says Bocian. “I want to tell the ones in the audience that we need to tell our stories. The only people who will do this is us. Even if you are cook, someone is going to want to know about that experience.”

Pittsburgh-based performer, composer and improviser Brian Riordan’s latest release from his residency at the STudio for Electro-Instrumental Music in Amsterdam (STEIM) is an immersive journey worth a headphones-on listen. STEIM III, the third of his releases from time in the Netherlands, plays with electronic sounds and manipulation as it interacts with viola, cello, the traverso (Western concert flute) and double bass. Across the six tracks, Riordan and collaborators at STEIM give the audio texture and movement, the kind nearly felt under your fingertips or sensed around your neck with eyes closed and immersed in the soundscape. These soundscapes, while wholly captive, are fairly minimalist, leaving little details, glittering blips and abrupt electronic uprisings to be heard and not lost in a sea of overwhelming sound. STEIM III is at moments bright and spritely, and at others deeply unnerving and suspenseful. The concept of these six songs scoring various tense short films, especially closer “Ships Hell,” is fully believable. • FOR FANS OF: Multimedia art installations, brain massages, horror scores

BEFORE 3603 BUTLER ST

AFTER 2 TREATMENTS

PITTSBURGH, PA 15201

DISAPPEARINGINK.NET

AFTER 5 TREATMENTS 724-972-7734

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

21


Outdoor B a n ds a l l g Summer Lon June 15 June 16 June 17 June 22 June 23 June 24

DJ Grover (7 pm) Walk of Shame Band (8pm) Ras Prophet (2 - 6 pm) No Bad JuJu Band (8pm) InTransit Band (8pm) Nieds Hotel Band (2 - 6 pm)

*FREE Sunday Summer Concert Series!

Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM Best Live Bands Every Weekend!

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant... PHOTO COURTESY OF EBRU YILD

Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast

it’s a destination!

.MUSIC.

IN HEAVEN

1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com

BY ELI ENIS // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

ICHELLE ZAUNER, songwriter behind sonically limitless dream-pop band Japanese Breakfast, is living beyond her greatest expectations. “I’m at the point where the shows we’re playing and the response we’ve received is just so far from what I could’ve imagined from myself,” she says. It’s been nearly a year since Zauner quickly followed her 2016 debut, Psychopomp, with the brilliant Soft Sounds From Another Planet. It was Planet songs furthest from Pscyhopomp’s hit (pearly rocker “Everybody Wants To Love You”) that caught the most wind. Lead single “Machinist” is a synth-based space odyssey that features robotic auto-tuning and a throbbing dance rhythm. Trip-hoppy “Road Head” is both the record’s poppiest track and the second-most outlier in the discography of J Brekkie — this project’s colloquial name. Having amassed millions of Spotify streams, J Brekkie is in a tier similar to current indie stars Car Seat Headrest and Mitski.

JAPANESE BREAKFAST, HALF WAIF 8 p.m. Thu., June 14. Spirit Hall. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15. spiritpgh.com

Its gigs are proof that popularity is measured in more than just streaming numbers. “We played Union Transfer last night, which is this 1,200-[capacity] venue in [Philadelphia],” Zauner says. “And the biggest kicker is, four years ago I worked the coat check there. So, it’s really this full-circle thing. “We also played a show at the Crystal Ballroom in Portland, which is where I used to see shows as a kid. Built to Spill was one of my first shows there. Death Cab For Cutie [too]. So, to play that stage was a huge deal to me.” Few artists blend styles as seamlessly and effectively as Zauner, which makes constructing a setlist as painstaking as it is exciting for her. “The first act is the really synthy, bass-in-your-face type stuff. The second act is the straightforward rockers. Then the quiet songs, the heart rippers … It’s tricky, I’m really fussy about the setlist. It’s a very careful kind of equation. “I hate it when songs all sound the same. I’m glad we get to experiment with something different.”

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.PODCAST.

STUFF WE LIKE

BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MULTIPLE >> DISRUPTIONS BY HOON PARADISE

CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

Jeremy Raymer in front of his Roberto Clemente mural

.ART.

BEHIND THE WALL BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

RIVERS HEADED northbound from

Downtown by way of Interstate 279 probably have noticed a massive mural of a familiar face. Late Pirates legend Roberto Clemente’s likeness covers a side of Verdetto’s Bar & Restaurant on Madison Avenue. This mural is the work of local artist Jeremy Raymer, who chatted about his rendering of a Pittsburgh icon. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR ART? One of my goals as an artist is to be able to paint anything. So, I think it’s hard to lump it into saying I just do one thing or it’s easily described in a short statement. [I paint in] an Impressionistic style, definitely roots in photorealism as well, but with some cross-hatching. And my technique has developed into itself over the past few years since I’ve been doing murals. This is close to my 60th one or so. WHEN AND HOW DID YOU GET INTO PAINTING MURALS? Late 2013 is when I really first started scaling up — I had traditionally just done portraits and oil paints on my canvas. And then in 2013, I visited Wynwood Walls outside of Miami, and that’s like the street art capital of the U.S. In probably a 20- to 30-block radius, literally every single thing is covered in murals. I saw it, I was intrigued, I came home and

There are innumerable podcasts about current events, each putting their own spin on a global or national issue. Less common are podcasts that address the culture of specific cities and communities. Multiple Disruptions, a podcast by local teacher Hoon Paradise, launched in April with an aim to interview “disruptors.” A recent episode features Justin Strong, former owner of Shadow Lounge and AVA in East Liberty, current manager at Spirit Lodge. In the interview, they discuss controversy over the “There are Black People in the Future” sign (which sat on the former Shadow Lounge building), the different angles of gentrification and Strong’s investment in the community. Paradise has a made-for-podcasting voice and dives into locally-grounded issues with people who have actually experienced them. Other guests include Leah Lizarondo, founder of 412 Food Rescue, Melissa McCart, the head food critic at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and Jiu Jitsu instructor Rocky Long. The podcast currently has 10 episodes available on SoundCloud and a Patreon site to help support it. •

bought my first cans of spray paint and started scaling up from there, and it just keeps getting bigger and bigger. I had one painting class in college, but other than that, it’s been trial and error and practice. WHERE DID THE INSPIRATION FOR THIS ROBERTO CLEMENTE MURAL COME FROM? Another potential client had reached out about doing some artwork on his warehouse in the South Side. For some reason, Pittsburgh sports came up, and I came up with this Clemente concept. That project ended up falling through. This wall and Verdetto’s being a sports bar — it kinda all just fell in place. When the other location in the South Side fell through, I was driving up to my friend’s [place] in Wexford and realized that this is literally one of the best walls in the city in terms of visibility and daily views, weekly views. I reached out [to Verdetto’s], and we were able to put it together on short notice. ARE SPORTS MURALS SOMETHING YOU MIGHT LOOK TO DO MORE OF DOWN THE ROAD? Yeah, certainly, with such a recognizable face and such a high-visibility location, I would say my longshot hope is maybe that the Pirates or Steelers or Penguins would reach out and have me do something for them somewhere.

JUNE 15-17 AND 22-24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG

Kickback Pinball Cafe

.GAMES.

MAN VS. (PINBALL) MACHINE BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

42_4.75_x_4.75.indd 1

$88

+tax

er us tom c w e -n al* -

i - spec

The machines are a bright and fun adult toy whose biggest appeal comes from whatever movie, TV show or cartoon the design is referencing. And Pittsburgh in particular has an affinity for the game, with the Professional & Amateur Pinball Association 6/7/18 10:56 AM located just outside the city. Pinburgh, history’s largest pinball competition in history, is an annual summer attraction at the David Lawrence Convention Center. It welcomes 800 players to play on 300 machines. If this many blinking lights and pinging balls is intimidating, try starting small. Kickback Pinball Cafe (Lawrenceville) will host the Pittsburgh City Pinball Championships on Saturday. The event features a more manageable 24 competitors to duke it out for the title of champion, a banner and a $200 prize. Not bad for a game that costs a couple quarters. Kickback originally opened in spring 2013 as a coffee shop equipped with pinball machines and a floor painted to look like one. After the original owners decided to move on, new owners stepped in and launched an IndieGoGo campaign to raise money for repairs and improvements. They quickly met their goal of $5,000, ultimately raising over $12,000 by the end of the campaign. The cafe reopened last July and is one of the only non-bars in the city with multiple * Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more pinball machines. involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours. If you can’t make Pittsburgh City

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available

phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INBALL IS universally loved.

Pinball Championships — or don’t want to embarrass yourself in front of the professionals — Kickback hosts a weekly pinball tournament (Wednesdays at 7 p.m.) The all-skill level tournaments offer cash prizes and is BYOB. Pinball might seem like a fun and quirky game for nerds, but it actually has a pretty wild history. In the 1940s, these machines were seen as a means of gambling because they accepted coins. They were considered a menace to society and a waste of resources during war-time. Former New York mayor Fiorello LaGuardia called them “insidious nickel-stealers.” He even instituted a ban on pinball machines in the city, so policemen raided candy stores and bowling alleys to confiscate these big toys.

PITTSBURGH CITY PINBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat., June 16. Kickback Pinball Cafe, 4326 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15 to enter.

Kind of seems like there were way more important things the cops could’ve been worried about in the 1940s, no? Anyway, a web-image search of “Pinball prohibition” reveals a gang of men in suits destroying pinball machines with large mallets. Thankfully, pinball is now not only legal, but alive and thriving. However, if anyone has one and a mallet… well, that sounds pretty fun.


blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.

CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

Office of Public Art staff: Sallyann Kluz, director; Rachel Klipa, manager of community engagement; Kahmeela Friedson, project assistant

.ART.

M

ARY TREMONTE IS looking forward to kickstarting a new art-education curriculum — one focused on showcasing the stories of immigrants and refugees. Tremonte, who started a two-year residency at the Office of Public Art last year, will be guiding participating artists in a new program through two stages. The first is getting to know immigrants and refugee communities at respective organizations. The second is facilitating art by those communities. Four artists chosen for the project were placed within four different organizations that have active relationships with immigrants and refugees. While some art was created during the first year, the second is when the four pairings gear up for a big project. “At this point, a year into it, the project managers and the artist and the organizations have built a very good working relationship,” says OPA Director Sallyann Kluz. “I feel like some of the initial rounds of handholding and getting-to-know-you phases happened so long ago now that the trust level that’s been built up is really strong.” Molly Rice, matched with Northern Area Multi-Services Center, plans to lead a series of “dinner events” with narrative theatrical experiences. Christine Bethea will facilitate art-focused field trips for the Bhutanese Community Association of Pittsburgh. She will also guide a youth group in gaining media skills, in partnership with Pittsburgh Public Community Television. Lindsey Scherloum, with the United Somali Bantu of Greater Pittsburgh, is putting together a book and website documenting the Somali Bantu community in the Pittsburgh Area. “What’s really interesting with having four residencies simultaneously is that you can see where there [are] similarities … and then where those similarities change and morph based on not just the personalities, but the difference within the cultures and the different stage of where the communities are as well,” says Kluz. Tremonte, 39, from the North Side, says she has been spending about 20-25 hours a week on the residency program. She has tutored immigrants learning English, put together a zine with interviews and art from students, and spearheaded weekly sewing and crocheting programs. Students of Literacy Pittsburgh originate from Bhutan, Syria, Morocco, Russia, China and more. Throughout her year with Literacy Pittsburgh, Tremonte experienced a wide range of challenges. “I’ve learned a lot more about organizations that are supporting newcomers,” says Tremonte “What their actual work is and some of the systemic and social barriers and challenges that people are facing here.”

“THE TRUST LEVEL THAT’S BEEN BUILT UP IS REALLY STRONG.”

TH E T H M R H Y N NA IS GOYOU! GET Photos: Matthew Murphy

ART START

BY MATT PETRAS // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Now - June 17

1 WEEK ONLY!

For Placement Only

pittsburghCLO.org i b hCLO 412-456-6666

Localization info will go here

At the Benedum Center

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

25


.STAGE.

A LITTLE MUCH

BY TED HOOVER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

B

ACK WHEN my adorable son was a

child, he got his hands on a book — 101 Jokes for Every Occasion or something like that. Most of that year was filled with: “If athletes get athlete’s foot, what do astronauts get? Missile toe.” “Why did the lion spit out the clown? He tasted funny.” It was cute at first, but it got old quick. I was thinking about this at Pittsburgh Public Theater’s production of William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (Abridged) from the Reduced Shakespeare Company. This three-man comedy starts enjoyably but … I was happy when the lights came down. The RSC (which began life as an offshoot of Renaissance Fairs) is a theatrical company specializing in wacky comedies on “important” subjects. Its breakout hit was the enormously popular The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged), which spoofed all 36 of the

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER

The Reduced Shakespeare Company in William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (abridged)

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S LONG LOST FIRST PLAY (ABRIDGED) runs through July 1. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600 or ppt.org

plays written by The Immortal Bard (as his wife used to call him.) They went on to “reduce” the Bible, Hollywood, Great Books and Western Civilization, and lately have been touring Long Lost First Play, which, while new, is cut from the same cloth as Complete

Works. There’s a plot (a recently discovered manuscript of 17-year-old Bill’s first play) but it’s only an excuse to run through a two-act, goofy lampoon of those 36. You don’t need to be a Shakespearean scholar to get the laughs at an RSC “reduction” … which might be part of the trouble. My memory of past RSC shows is a mixture of high- and low-brow humor; spit takes jostling with genuine wit. This script skips the high toned entirely, and the evening is a numbingly rapid series of schticky bits and gags, few lasting more than 10 seconds. It begins well enough, but soon the repetitive (and relentless) nature of the material starts to feel strained. It’s as though someone created #ShakespeareGags and this show is the responding tweets read in real time. The performers are Reed Martin, Austin Tichenor (who also co-wrote and co-directed) and Teddy Spencer. They are nimble actors and gifted clowns easily inhabiting the hundreds of characters they slip in and out of with precision and definition. But they just can’t build a solid structure out of these disjointed spurts. It’s not an evening without entertainment, but a little goes a very long way.


TOP 5

PLACES TO TAKE DAD FOR FATHER’S DAY BY ALEX GORDON ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LIVE MUSIC JUNE 14

Eden Sparks Trio

JUNE 21

Juan & Co.

(starting 8-9 pm)

(starting 8-9 pm)

EatShady.com

ȏȦȶȰȟȮȉȟȉȟ

ȍȍȉȉ;EPRYXXVIIXLEH]WMHI

THE BIG LEBOWSKI AT ROW HOUSE PHOTO COURTESY OF CORBIN SMITH

Sloan

.MUSIC.

QUESTION OF BALANCE BY BILL KOPP // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

ANADIAN ROCK foursome Sloan

is unusual in the context of popular music: the band has been together for more than 25 years without a single change in its lineup. Even more remarkably, all four members of this Toronto-based group sing, play multiple instruments and compose songs. And it’s no leap of logic to observe those things as related. “Everybody has the same amount of real estate,” quips the band’s Jay Ferguson. “The four of us usually each get three songs per record.” That’s true on 12, this band’s latest release — though for publishing purposes, all the songs are group-credited.

SLOAN 8 p.m. Sun., June 17. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20. mrsmalls.com

Ferguson says records are a way for each band member — himself, Chris Murphy, Patrick Pentland and Andrew Scott — to express his own songwriting. “We share the songwriting royalties as well, and I think that’s another ingredient that helps keep our band together,” Ferguson says. “So it’s a combination of the financial and artistic.” Sloan has enjoyed consistent acclaim for most of its efforts since the band’s debut, 1993’s Smeared. The band’s sound – sometimes classified as power pop, but just as easily described as melodic

indie/alternative rock – has won it a dedicated fan base. But outside of Canada, commercial success on a grand scale hasn’t really materialized. “I don’t really know if that’s a goal at this point,” Ferguson says. “Our goal is to make music that we enjoy, and that is good quality. You always hope that there are some new people who may join along, but also you hope that your fan base still comes along with you.” He describes Sloan’s collective mindset as “maintaining a career, as opposed to ‘fingers crossed we’re gonna break through.’” “But if it happens, that would be great,” he says. “We would probably be more prepared to deal with it now than we would have 25 years ago.” Sloan continues to make highlyregarded music. Its 2014 double album Commonwealth earned some of the group’s best reviews to date, and 12 is another consistently appealing set of memorable songs. Through decades of making albums, the band has long since figured out which creative methods work best. “We don’t really use outside producers,” Ferguson says. “We have our own studio; the scope of our world is sort of small.” Instead of looking for inspiration by recording at a different studio, he and his band look closer to home for new ideas. “You could be reading a book or an article in a magazine and find a turn of phrase you like,” he says. “It’s always the little things that spark a new idea.”

It’s not specifically about fatherhood, unless you count the Big Lebowski/Brandt theory, but any dad worth a dime would be thrilled to spend the holiday bowling vicariously in an air-conditioned theater.

LADYFEST AT HAMBONES AND BABYLAND This three-day, female-centric music festival rules, and if your dad does too, he’ll dig it.

DINOS, DONUTS AND DADS AT PITTSBURGH ZOO This one is pretty selfexplanatory. Entertainment provided by DJ Disturbing the Peace.

CRABFEST AT LUKE

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WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE Nothing strengthens paternal bonds like shellfish, tiny forks and dope bibs.

PLATINUM POLE AWARDS AT CHEERLEADERS

LIVE MUSIC

Not all father-child relationships are built for attending pole-dancing competitions at gentlemen’s clubs. But if you have one, by all means take advantage here (Thu., June 14). It’s the “world’s most pulsating” pole-dancing competition, according to the website, so expect a lot of pulsating.

JUNE 16

JUNE 23

Samantha Sears

Chase Baron (12-4 pm)

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BakerySocial.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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.FOR THE WEEK OF JUNE 14.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFOF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Congratulations on the work you’ve done to cleanse the psychic toxins from your soul, Cancerian. I love how brave you’ve been as you’ve jettisoned outworn shticks, inadequate theories, and irrelevant worries. It makes my heart sing to have seen you summon the selfrespect necessary to stick up for your dreams in the face of so many confusing signals. I do feel a tinge of sadness that your heroism hasn’t been better appreciated by those around you. Is there anything you can do to compensate? Like maybe intensify the appreciation you give yourself?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I hope you’re reaching the final stages of your year-long project to make yourself as solid and steady as possible. I trust you have been building a stable foundation that will serve you well for at least the next five years. I pray you have been creating a rich sense of community and establishing vital new traditions and surrounding yourself with environments that bring out the best in you. If there’s any more work to be done in these sacred tasks, intensify your efforts in the coming weeks. If you’re behind schedule, please make up for lost time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Necessity is the mother of invention,” says an old proverb. In other words, when your need for some correction or improvement becomes overwhelming, you may be driven to get creative. Engineer Allen Dale put a different spin on the issue. He said that “if necessity is the mother of invention, then laziness is the father.” Sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein agreed, asserting that “progress is made by lazy men looking for easier ways to do things.” I’m not sure if necessity or laziness will be your motivation, Virgo, but I suspect that the coming weeks could be a golden age of invention for you. What practical innovations might you launch? What useful improvements can you finagle? (P.S. Philosopher Alfred North Whitehead attributed the primary drive for innovative ideas and gizmos to “pleasurable intellectual curiosity.”)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Would you have turned out wiser and wealthier if you had dropped out of school in third grade? Would it have been better to apprentice

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Whether you love what you love or live in divided ceaseless revolt against it, what you love is your fate.” Gemini poet Frank Bidart wrote that in his poem “Guilty of Dust,” and now I offer it to you. Why? Because it’s an excellent time to be honest with yourself as you identify whom and what you love. It’s also a favorable phase to assess whether you are in any sense at odds with whom and what you love; and if you find you are, to figure out how to be in more harmonic alignment with whom and what you love. Finally, dear Gemini, now is a key moment to vividly register the fact that the story of your life in the coming years will pivot around your relationship with whom and what you love.

yourself to a family of wolves or coyotes rather than trusting your educational fate to institutions whose job it was to acclimate you to society’s madness? I’m happy to let you know that you’re entering a phase when you’ll find it easier than usual to unlearn any old conditioning that might be suppressing your ability to fulfill your rich potentials. I urge you to seek out opportunities to unleash your skills and enhance your intelligence.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The temptation to overdramatize is strong. Going through with a splashy but messy conclusion may have a perverse appeal. But why not wrap things up with an elegant whisper instead of a garish bang? Rather than impressing everyone with how amazingly complicated your crazy life is, why not quietly lay the foundations for a lowkey resolution that will set the stage for a productive sequel? Taking the latter route will be much easier on your karma, and in my opinion will make for just as interesting a story.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Each of us harbors rough, vulnerable, controversial, or unhoned facets of our identity. And every one of us periodically reaches turning points when it becomes problematic to keep those qualities buried or immature. We need to make them more visible and develop their potential. I

suspect you have arrived at such a turning point. So on behalf of the cosmos, I hereby invite you to enjoy a period of ripening and self-revelation. And I do mean “enjoy.” Find a way to have fun.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For the next two-plus weeks, an unusual rule will be in effect: The more you lose, the more you gain. That means you will have an aptitude for eliminating hassles, banishing stress, and shedding defense mechanisms. You’ll be able to purge emotional congestion that has been preventing clarity. You’ll have good intuitions about how to separate yourself from influences that have made you weak or angry. I’m excited for you, Capricorn! A load of old, moldy karma could dissolve and disperse in what seems like a twinkling. If all goes well, you’ll be traveling much lighter by July 1.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I suggest you avoid starting a flirtatious correspondence with a convict who’ll be in jail for another 28 years. OK? And don’t snack on fugu, the Japanese delicacy that can poison you if the cook isn’t careful about preparing it. Please? And don’t participate in a séance where the medium summons the spirits of psychotic ancestors or diabolical celebrities with whom you imagine it might be interesting to converse. Got that? I understand you might be in the mood for high adventure and

out-of-the-ordinary escapades. And that will be fine and healthy as long as you also exert a modicum of caution and discernment.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I suggest that you pat yourself on the back with both hands as you sing your own praises and admire your own willful beauty in three mirrors simultaneously. You have won stirring victories over not just your own personal version of the devil, but also over your own inertia and sadness. From what I can determine, you have corralled what remains of the forces of darkness into a comfy holding cell, sealing off those forces from your future. They won’t bother you for a very long time, maybe never again. Right now you would benefit from a sabbatical -- a vacation from all this high-powered character-building. May I suggest you pay a restorative visit to the Land of Sweet Nonsense?

ARIES (March 21-April 19): My Aries acquaintance Tatiana decided to eliminate sugar from her diet. She drew up a plan to avoid it completely for 30 days, hoping to permanently break its hold over her. I was surprised to learn that she began the project by making a Dessert Altar in her bedroom, where she placed a chocolate cake and five kinds of candy. She testified that it compelled her willpower to work even harder and become even stronger than if she had excluded all sweet treats from her sight. Do you think this strenuous trick might work for you as you battle your own personal equivalent of a sugar addiction? If not, devise an equally potent strategy. You’re on the verge of forever escaping a temptation that’s no good for you. Or you’re close to vanquishing an influence that has undermined you. Or both.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have caressed and finessed The Problem. You have tickled and teased and tinkered with it. Now I suggest you let it alone for a while. Give it breathing room. Allow it to evolve under the influence of the tweaks you have instigated. Although you may need to return and do further work in a few weeks, my guess is that The Problem’s knots are now destined to metamorphose into seeds. The awkwardness you massaged with your love and care will eventually yield a useful magic.

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WED., JUNE 27 THE IRON MAIDENS 8 P.M. JERGELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $16-30. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Dying Breed.

THU., JUNE 28 DANGERMUFFIN 7:30 P.M. MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE MILLVALE. Over-18 event. $10. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

THU., JUNE 28 MOONSHINE BANDITS 7:30 P.M. JERGELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $15-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Sourmash.

FRI., JUNE 29 VISTA 6:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE SOUTH SIDE. 412-431-4668. All-ages event. $10-12. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com.

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ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US/SUMMER FRI., JUNE 29 FLUID MOTION FULL MOON FLOATING YOGA 8 P.M. NORTH PARK SWIMMING POOL NORTH PARK. $50. Fluidmotionpgh.com/schedule/classes.

FRI., JUNE 29 XEB 9:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $15-65. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guests Le Wow & Pixelated.

SAT., JUNE 30 LUKE BRYAN 5:30 P.M. HEINZ FIELD NORTH SIDE. $24-142. 412-323-1200 or ticketmaster.com.

SAT., JUNE 30 CANDLEBOX

SUN., JULY 1 DEAD BOYS 8 P.M. MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE MILLVALE. Over-21 event. $15-18. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

SUN., JULY 1 SNARKY PUPPY 8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $41.75-61.75. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

SUN., JULY 1 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 8:15 P.M. HARTWOOD ACRES PARK HARTWOOD ACRES. Free event. 412-767-9200 or alleghenycounty.us/parks/ hartwood.

MON., JULY 2 REMEMBER SPORTS

8 P.M. THE MEADOWS CASINO WASHINGTON. All-ages event. $19-59. 724-503-1200 or ticketmaster.com.

8 P.M. THE MEADOWS CASINO WASHINGTON. All-ages event. $30. 724-503-1200 or ticketmaster.com.

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8 P.M. JERGELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $20-35. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

9 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $12. 412-687-2157 or ticketmaster.com.

8 P.M. HEINZ HALL DOWNTOWN. $79-381. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsym phony.org. With special guest Neko Case.

7 P.M. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT BLOOMFIELD. All-ages event. $10. Therobotoproject.com.

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CALENDAR JUNE 13-20

PHOTO COURTESY OF JAN-TOSH GERLING

^ Fri., June 15: Jellyfish queer dance night

WEDNESDAY JUNE 13

FOOD FESTIVAL Looking to shake up dinner plans this week? Head to Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church for its Greek Food Festival. Dine on delicacies such as moussaka, dolmathes and lamb chops, prepared by the congregation. Make sure to check out the dessert table for karidopita, baklava and more. Enjoy live Greek music and nightly folk dancing in traditional dress or take a tour of the church. If you don’t have time to stay for dinner, call ahead and order to-go. Celine Roberts 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Runs through June 15.

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Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church, 123 Gilkeson Rd., Mount Lebanon. Free. pittsburghgreekfestival.com

THURSDAY JUNE 14 COMEDY Most of us were introduced to Nick Swardson as Terry, the rollerskating prostitute on Reno 911!. His semi-regular character stole nearly every scene, always caught red-handed but perpetually equipped with a far-fetched alibi (“a hand job is still a job”). In the years since, Swardson’s accumulated a solid comedy resume split between standup specials and film (mostly Adam Sandler movies).

Like many Happy Madison regulars, Swardon’s style can register as either charmingly low-brow bro-y, mingly low brow and bro y, or grating ng and broad. If your taste is more the former, mer, don’t miss Swardson’s appearance earance at Carnegie of Homestead mestead Music Hall. Alex x Gordon 6:30 p.m. Carnegie egie of Homestead Music ic Hall, 510 E. 10th Ave., Homestead. mestead. $42.50-$92.50. librarymusichall.com rymusichall.com

EXHIBIT HIBIT Beauty uty in art is ective — that’s subjective > Thu., June 14: Nick Swardson PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN GREEN

what FCKART (a.k.a. Kevin Jacob) conveys in his exhibit being displayed at BOOM Concepts this month. The Beautiful Ugly exhibit-goers have a chance to participate in a Q&A with the artist, to discuss his methods and inspirations for the pieces. Using a variety of tools from cotton to cardboard to his own hands, Jacob has created a series of works that display beautiful figures in unflattering and ugly forms, forcing those who view it to question and explore their own understanding of what is beautiful and what is ugly. Lauren Ortego 7 p.m. Continues through June 30. 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. (Facebook search “BOOM Concepts”)

MUSIC Blag Dahlia, Rex Everything, Hunter Down, the Fresh Prince of Darkness and CONTINUES ON PG. 32


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PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ALTDORFER

^ Fri., June 15: Urban Garden Party

HeWhoCannotBeNamed (who tends to perform wearing nothing but a Rey Mysterio wrestling mask) are the maniacs behind the Dwarves, whose on-stage antics and lyrics have led to its music being characterized as “scum punk.” Anything from a re-enactment of Jesus’ crucifixion to on-stage fist fights could ensue. The nudity will continue when the Murder Junkies take the stage — though only drummer Dino Sex plays in his birthday suit. Don’t expect politeness from either group. Detroitbased punk four-piece Busby Death Chair (named for a cursed chair) and local scum punks Grizzled Yinzzers will get the madness started at Cattivo. Alex McCann 8 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $16 in advance, $20 day of. cattivopgh.com

FRIDAY JUNE 15

DANCE PARTY If you’re looking for a way to celebrate Pride and help kids with arthritis, look no further. The Getaway Cafe is hosting a Pride-themed Karaoke Contest and Dance Party, a fundraiser to support the Juvenile Arthritis Foundation. All you need is a dollar and an entry form to be judged on your

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vocal skills and audience favoritism. Don’t like someone’s singing? Two dollars gets them to stop. Don’t like someone telling you to stop? One more dollar lets you keep singing and two more dollars makes the person who stopped you finish the song. LO 7 p.m. 3049 Sussex Ave., Brookline. $1. Facebook search “ISING Karaoke”

PAINTING Celebrate the life, work (and face) of the Thin White Duke with a painting class at Paint Monkey, a night dedicated to recreating the cover for David Bowie’s 1973 album Aladdin Sane (it’s the one with his lightning face paint and glamorous red mullet). Bring a friend and step up your painting game while paying homage to the great Goblin King. The ^ Fri., June 15: Dat Garcia PHOTO COURTESY OF ZZK RECORDS

soundtrack is sure to be killer. AG 7 p.m. Paint Monkey, 4020 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $40. beapaintmonkey.com

PARTY Each year The Mattress Factory brings a new theme to its Urban Garden Party, and this year’s will have you seeing stars. Get in your spaceships and be transported to 2058 at the Galactic Get Down. There will be food and drink provided by some of Pittsburgh’s local eateries and music from Mars Jackson. Dance, snap a photo and watch a laser show put on by Lightwave International. Not feeling the upstairs? Go to the lower-level intergalactic space station with synth-pop music performed Jack Stauber. LO 7:30 p.m. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. $95. Mattress.org

MUSIC Find yourself whisked away to Buenos Aires as the ZZK Records showcase tour takes over Salem’s Cafe and Event Center. ZZK is an independent record label born out of Zizek Club nights that prominently featured cumbia, a folkloric dance music from Columbia. Performer and ZZK artist Dat Garcia is a cumbia-meets-electronic storyteller for the new women’s movement in Argentina that questions traditional values while celebrating folklore traditions. This tour also features King Coya of the Northern Argentine Andes, an artist who blends electronic music with traditional Colombian cumbia and Argentine folklore. He’s currently performing with the dance troupe Queen Cholas. Meg Fair 9:30 p.m. 2911 Penn Ave., Strip District. salemsmarketgrill.com

DANCE PARTY Lace up those dancing shoes and prepare for a night of grooving to the sounds of new wave, Italo disco and post punk. Jellyfish takes place monthly and is a dance night designed for queer folks. Though new wave, Italo disco and post punk aren’t tearing up the radio airwaves as they were in the 1980s and ‘90s, it’s never a bad idea to go back in time. Tunes will be provided by DJs Stephanie Tsong, Ricky Moslen and Adam Shuck. Once a strip club called Anthony’s


Lounge, P Town Bar has transformed into one of the area’s top gay bars, self-described as “Pittsburgh’s destination for drinks, dancing, dudes and drag.” AM 10 p.m. 4740 Baum Blvd., Oakland. Free. ptownbar.com

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DANCE PARTY Even if you never had a MySpace, it’s easy to identify a certain kind of music that went along with a certain era of social media. Think Metro Station, 3oh!3, Paramore, early Katy Perry. It was kind of a dark time for popular music, but also a very fun and danceable time. Unleash your inner mid-aughts teen at Brillobox with MySpace Nite. The event features DJ Sikes and DJ Wyatt, with a special appearance from drag queen Bambi. Cake on eyeliner, straighten your bangs and shove your thumbs through those sleeves with the thumbholes before showing the world you do in fact still know the words to “Shake it.” Hannah Lynn 10 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. $5. 21 and over. brilloboxpgh.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF RCA RECORDS

SZA

THURSDAY The Little Mermen 9 p.m. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

FRIDAY Warren G 8:30 p.m. Spirit Hall, Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com

SATURDAY SZA, Kendrick Lamar, ScHoolboy Q 7:30 p.m. KeyBank Pavilion, Burgettstown. livenation.com

SUNDAY Dr. Dog, (Sandy) Alex G 7 p.m. KeyBank Pavilion, Burgettstown. livenation.com PHOTO COURTESY OF DEVAUGHN RODGERS

^ Thu., June 14: The Beautiful Ugly

SATURDAY JUNE 16

MONDAY Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphys 6 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. promowestlive.com

TUESDAY

COSPLAY Looking at animals is great, but doing so while dressed up like an animal is greater. Hang out with fellow cosplayers at Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium for a rollicking good time. Participants aren’t required to wear costumes, and you can dress in whatever costume you want (doesn’t have to be an animal). No weapons allowed, however. The zoo doesn’t normally allow face masks or large head pieces, but is making an exception for this event. Just make sure to purchase a discounted ticket through Western Pennsylvania Congoers Discord. Tickets must be bought

We Are Scientists 8 p.m. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

WEDNESDAY Thunderpussy 8:30 p.m. Spirit Lodge, Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL

^ Sat., June 16: Night Market and Free Concert series

in advance. Ryan Deto June 16, 12-5 p.m. 7370 Baker St., Highland Park; $15. (Facebook search “The Crimson Rose”)

BEER If you like craft beer, then maybe you should go to Craft Carnival, a craft beer festival for people like you, who enjoy craft beer. There will be other people there who like craft beer and you can bond over this shared characteristic. This second annual festival is hosted by Industry Public House (the one in North Fayette) and will feature beer, live music and food trucks as well as classic beerrelated games such as beer pong and cornhole. Regular admission includes unlimited beer tasting, while VIP admission also includes two extra hours and spirits tastings. Either way, there’s a lot of tasting. Maybe wear loose pants. HL 2-8 p.m. 140 Andrew Dr., North Fayette. $45-55. craftcarnivalpgh.com

MARKET The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership’s Night Market and Free Concert series keeps on rolling. Every Saturday night, watch Market Square light up with local vendors, diverse musicians and games the whole family can enjoy. Artists featured tonight at the City Paper stage, in collaboration with the Blues Society of Western PA, are the Aris Paul Band,

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Elias Khouri & E.K. Band, Spectrum, Pierce Dipner & the Shades of Blue, adding a blues-y feel to the area. Vendors range from BRGR to Chocolate Moonshine Co. to MW Walker Photography, providing a plethora of booths and stands to visit, with goods and services everyone can enjoy. LO 5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27. Market Square, Downtown. Free. downtown pittsburgh. com

MARKET Screen print a T-shirt, design your own graphic for a condom carrier, or just walk around and support local queer artists at the Queer Craft Market 2018. Allies for Health + Wellbeing will be on ^ Sat., June 16: Pittsburgh Cosplay Zoo Day PHOTO COURTESY OF ADORKABLY DORKY PHOTOGRAPHY

hand to help design those condomcarrier graphics. Queer PGH will have screen printing for logo T-shirts. PGH Equality Center will have a variety of cookbooks and resources available. Over 20 vendors will also be present with their art and goods for sale. The market will be hosted by Assemble, a nonprofit space for education and arts. AM 5 p.m. 4824 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. assemble pgh.org

PROM If you’re queer and missed the chance to have the prom you always dreamed of, Lazlo Productions and Steel City Sisters have your redo covered. At Cruze Bar, you’ll have the chance to experience the prom that got away with Queer Adult Prom. Not only is this event about giving the queer community a second chance, proceeds benefit the Persad Center, a nonprofit with the goal of improving well-being

of the local LGBTQ and HIV/AIDS community. Whether it’s a glamorous puffy dress or a sleek tux or even just everyday wear, come and experience an all-inclusive prom. LO 8 p.m. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $10. cruzebar.com

SUNDAY JUNE 17 EVENT Since 1935, unremarkable buildings in Oakland have been a hub of local theater. Now, the Pittsburgh Playhouse is on its way to a state-ofthe-art location Downtown. The Rauh Jewish History Program & Archives will host Curtain Call! Jews and the Pittsburgh Playhouse, a reflective on the numerous Jews who were a part of the Oakland location’s 80-plus years. The event, hosted at the Sen. John Heinz History Center, will feature photos and other behind-the-curtain looks. Longtime actor Nat Elbaum, whose decades-long stage career garnered critical praise, and actress Helen Wayne Rauh, will be two drama veterans featured. AM 10:30 a.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. heinzhistorycenter.org


TUESDAY JUNE 19 DOGS If you thought the worst part about summer is that you wouldn’t get to hang out with therapy dogs in the Cathedral of Learning then boy, have I got news for you! Therapy Dog Tuesdays will continue all the way through June and July, giving a chance to cuddle with a dog as you describe your strained relationship with dad. Just kidding. These dogs are trained and certified by Western Pennsylvania Human Society to act calm and friendly around strangers, providing relief from the stress of the summer (so much pressure to have fun!). HL 7-8 p.m. 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 20 WORLD In an era when the leaders of our country have openly condemned refugees in America, take some time out to celebrate refugees who now call Pittsburgh home. On World Refugee Day, a party will be held at Market Square with performances, speakers, food vendors, craft vendors, and children’s activities. Refugees and immigrants will be celebrated, and a U.S. Citizenship ceremony will be performed for 10 local immigrants. The First Lady of Braddock and fellow immigrant, Gisele Fetterman, will emcee the event. The party is hosted by a cavalcade of refugee and immigrant support groups, including All for All, Jewish Family & Children’s Service and

PHOTO COURTESY OF AJAPO

^ Wed., June 20: World Refugee Day

Northern Area Multi-Service Center. Most food vendors are cash only. RD 11 a.m.2 p.m. Market Square, 210 Forbes Ave., Downtown. Free. (Facebook search “NAMS Community Assistance & Refugee Resettlement”)

MUSIC “Sad clown of life” is how The Iguanas’

presented by

bassist Rene Coman once described the band’s identity. “A sense of humor, a sense of fun in spite of the danger — those are the two sides of the Iguana coin,” Coman said. This New Orleans quartet has been packaging dark, sardonic lyrics in upbeat, root Americana jazz since the early 1990s. The Iguanas may not be a household name, but the band

has a dedicated following and boasts collaborations with some of the biggest names in New Orleans music (the late Allen Toussaint among them). Check out The Iguanas at Club Cafe, with Ben Valasek and the Growlers. AG 7 p.m. Club Cafe, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. 21 and over. clubcafelive.com •

Summer Reading June 10 – August 31, 2018

SIGN UP : CARNEGIELIBRARY.ORG/SUMMER PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

DRIVERS

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Sierra Transportation LLC is Now Hiring!

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

CAREER TRAINING Massage Therapy at Career Training Academy Our accelerated Massage Therapy program teaches many different techniques of massage and bodywork. At CTA, you won’t just learn what it takes to do the job well; you’ll learn what you need to stand out from the crowd, adapt, and succeed. To plan a visit to our Pittsburgh Campus, call 412-385-7903 or visit careerta.edu.

We are looking for a FT Driver to transport clients to appointments around the city. PT also available. Must have clean drivers license.

Call 412-331-0202 HELP WANTED

APPLICATION DEVELOPER HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Application Developer to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to be responsible for analyzing, designing, coding, testing, & implementing app. enhancements w/ no supervision. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122981

HELP WANTED

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HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Application Developer to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to be responsible for analyzing, designing, coding, testing, & implementing app. enhancements w/ no supervision. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122771

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Application Developer to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to be responsible for analyzing, designing, coding, testing, & implementing app. enhancements w/ no supervision. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122776

HELP WANTED

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HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Application Developer in Pittsburgh, PA, to be responsible for analyzing, designing, coding, testing, & implementing app. enhancements w/limited supervision. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122971

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Application Developer to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to be responsible for analyzing, designing, coding, testing, & implementing app. enhancements w/ no supervision. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122892

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TEACHERS Young Scholars of McKeesport Charter School (McKeesport, PA) Comp. Sci. Teacher. Teach comp. sci. courses to middle school students. Prepare MS comp. sci. syllabus. Provide IT training/assistance to teachers. For full job desc. & to apply: http://www.ysmcs. org/job-application/ HELP WANTED

APPLICATION DEVELOPER HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Application Developer to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to be responsible for analyzing, designing, coding, testing, & implementing app. enhancements w/ no supervision. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122976

REHEARSAL

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069 ESTATE SALE Antique & newer furniture, Dining & Kitchen wares, Tools, etc. Jun.16th & 17th 8am-2pm Henrich Farm Ln, Allison Park

FICTITIOUS NAME River Dee Massage, LLC and Peace of Time Counseling, LLC are now Peace of Time Wellness located at 4810 Liberty Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15224.

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HELP WANTED SENIOR TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATOR HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Sr. Technology Administrator to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to evaluate existing Cognos environment as well as plan for enhancement of sys. to meet internal reliability & resiliency guidelines for availability, redundancy, failover, & sys. stress testing. Apply at https://careers. highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122888

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CONSULTANT

SENIOR CONSULTANT

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Consultant to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to drive customer value thru client-facing advisory & delivery services in support of HM Health Solutions’ product offerings. Will formulate long-term strategy around analytics, info. mgmt, data integration & warehousing, data governance, & Bus. Intelligence functions. Must be willing & able to travel to client locations up to 80%. Apply at https://careers. highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122886

get your yoga on!

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Sr. Consultant to work in Pittsburgh, PA to deliver value to customers thru client-facing advisory & delivery service in support of HM Health Solutions product offerings. Specific duties incl.: delivery mgmt; estimating, planning, budgeting, & owning deliverable artifacts; & leading work streams. Must be willing & able to travel to client locations up to 80%. Apply at https://careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J122884

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blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster


FINALE

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. Rex’s canful 5. Small tweet 10. Bother 14. Lunch time 15. Dance from South America 16. Residents of the Tawantinsuyu empire 17. Slick-talking 18. Nom de guerre 19. Virtual assistant who’s probably listening to us right now 20. Place to learn how to do recaps? 23. “Hotel Artemis” star Foster 24. Tear to shreds 25. Things played in Budapest? 30. “A Lesson From ___” (Fugard) 31. Directing symbol 32. Band that’s big in Japan? 35. Guns 36. Question of self-doubt 37. Often misused pronoun 38. Pop a question 39. Delta’s spots 40. Former Russian first lady 41. One who only likes red lollipops? 43. TV actor Scott

45. Mend, as a shirt or a skirt 46. Drink that might be mud, might not be? 51. “The Time Machine” extras 52. Valuable string 53. From the top 56. Unmanageable locks 57. Prepare as some eggs 58. Peacenik’s symbol 59. Baaing creatures 60. Old carrier with a globe logo 61. Alcohol ___

DOWN 1. It may be right or acute: Abbr. 2. Internet crack 3. Rash-causing bush 4. Not spending too much 5. “Mad Money” host Jim 6. Hippy dance? 7. Middle Eastern bigwig 8. Site for snipers 9. “Not for me” 10. Throws out a line, say 11. Dues collector 12. Seafood choice 13. Ship out? 21. Mil. stat

22. Posse 23. Samuel’s “Pulp Fiction” role 25. “You joker” 26. Mahmoud’s predecessor 27. Comic David Alan ___ 28. With a flair for the melodramatic 29. Melodramatic pronoun 32. Phrase said when the lights come on 33. Chest 34. Bowie’s widow 36. Mike’s partner in candies 37. Missiles

39. It’s about a foot 40. Coral design 41. Tour t-shirt listings 42. Image handlers 43. Governmental rule 44. Unified 46. Distracted Boyfriend, e.g. 47. Rough file 48. Jewish Community Center letters 49. Genesis murderer 50. Another, in Acapulco 54. Actress Amurri 55. Sign of misuse LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Without snooping, I came across texts between my wife “Mary” and a guy “Jeremy” of a very sexual nature. While I would be okay if she were doing this and I knew about it, this has been going on since before we met. (We’ve been together 10 years.) She says she has never met him in person (despite communicating with him for more than a decade!) and this was the only thing she was doing that she thought would have been out of bounds. Again, if I had known, it would have been fine. I’m not okay with her being with other guys, but I know harmless flirting can be a release. Still, I have issues with anxiety and depression, and this is definitely triggering me. I do not want to snoop and I want to trust her, but I am having a hard time with both. Prior to this, it never occurred to me that Mary would do anything that had a whiff of dishonesty about it. But her having kept this from me for as long as I have known her has made me question that. I don’t want to keep bringing this up to her, but I am struggling with it. What do you think I should do? UPSET IN THE MIDWEST

I think you should get over it, UITM. Easier said than done, I realize, particularly with the twin burdens of anxiety and depression. But if you would have been fine with this had you known — if there was no reason for Mary to hide this LTR-of-sorts from you — the best way to prove that to her is by giving it your retroactive blessing. You’re right, UITM: Mary shouldn’t have hidden this from you. But she assumed — incorrectly, as it turned out — you would have a problem with those texts. It was a reasonable assumption on her part, since swapping flirty texts with a stranger is regarded as “out of bounds” by most. While this makes Mary’s failure to disclose look a little worse, we live in a culture that defines absolutely everything as cheating and as a consequence, people not only lack perspective

(oh, to live in a world where everyone regarded harmless flirtation as no big deal!) but also the language to honesty discuss our need for a little harmless erotic affirmation from someone who isn’t obligated to find us attractive, i.e., not a spouse or partner. Put yourself in Mary’s shoes for a moment. When should she have told you about Jeremy? What would you have done if on the third or fourth date, she looked up from her menu and said, “I’ve been swapping flirty texts with this guy for, oh, the last several years. I have no interest in him in real life, we’ve actually never even met in person, but I enjoy his texts and would like to keep swapping texts with him. I hope that’s not a problem.” You would have dumped her on the spot, right? She didn’t want to stop, she didn’t know how to talk about it, she hesitated, and… a decade went by. If there’s nothing else — if no other shoes drop — give this your retroactive blessing.

a big issue.) She’s very attractive, and I’m surprised she has any interest in me at all, but it’s only when she’s drunk. Besides her looks, I’m attracted by her personality and intelligence. I don’t know what attracts her to me except maybe I’m her booty call, but recently I have been terrible at it. The last time we hooked up, she told me she’s quitting drinking. Maybe she won’t contact me anymore. My question: Is it worth pursuing this if I get my ED situation fixed? Or should I just move on and if she does contact me one night, I just say, “Sorry, not interested”? It’s obvious she’s using me. But we actually have good conversations despite us both being drunk and it kinda seems like a date of some sort. What do you think?

WE LIVE IN A CULTURE THAT DEFINES ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING AS CHEATING.

I have an unusual situation. I met a girl I am crazy about. She didn’t really have any interest in me except for the occasional drink; she just wanted to be friends. A few months later, I saw her at a bar. We drank a bit more than we could handle and slept together, and I thought we would start dating. A few weeks went by, and she always had an excuse as to why we couldn’t hang out. Then one night, she texted to say she wanted to see me, but I could tell she was tipsy. We went out for a few more drinks and then slept together again. A week later, the same thing happened. When I contact her during the day, she never seems interested. But I run over like a starved dog when she calls at night. (Sadly, due to stress and overwork, I usually can’t get hard when I go over. That’s become

SUMMONED WITH A TEXT

She’s interested in you for only one thing (sex) and at only one time (when she’s drunk, horny and out of other options) … and she can summon you with a single drunken late-night text. It’s actually not an unusual situation, SWAT — millions of people have received similar summonses. So long as the summoned person doesn’t want anything more than sex from the person issuing the summons, Yahtzee: Everybody gets laid, nobody gets hurt. But if the person being summoned wants more — if the summonee has unrequited feelings for the summoner — the summoned person is going to get hurt. Because what the summoner is essentially saying is this: “I want sex; I don’t want you.” Even if the sex is good, the rejection that comes bundled in that summons stings and the hurt grows over time. So, yeah, stop answering that drunk girl’s summonses. Let her know you want more than sex, and if she’s not interested in something more, you’re not interested in her.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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412-401-4110 HEALTH SERVICES Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? TALK TO SOMEONE WHO CARES. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-978-6674 (AAN CAN)

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You are under no obligation to be the same person you were a year, a month or even 15 minutes ago. You have the right to grow.

PITTSBURGH

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Methadone 412-255-8717 • Suboxone 412-281-1521 NOW ACCEPTING MEDICAID - info@summitmedical.biz

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BEAVER COUNTY Methadone 724-857-9640 • Suboxone 724-448-9116 • info@ptsa.biz PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER JUNE 13-20, 2018

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LIVE FROM THE

RIVERS CASINO AMPHITHEATER SHOWS START AT 7PM

JULY 20

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JULY 21

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THE BILL HENRY BAND

JULY 3

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BEATLEMANIA MAGIC JULY 4

NO BAD JUJU JULY 19

BADFISH A TRIBUTE TO SUBLIME

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EARTH, WIND & FIRE TRIBUTE AND TEMPTATIONS TRIBUTE

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June 13, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 24

June 13, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 24