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PITTSBURGH’S LEADING ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT NEWSWEEKLY

MAY 30JUNE 6, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor ROB ROSSI Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Arts Writer HANNAH LYNN Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX MCCANN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

pghcitypaper.com PGHCITYPAPER

MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 22

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

News+Views 6 Food+Drink 16 Arts+Entertainment 21 Calendar 36

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

WEEKLY FEATURES

ON THE COVER — PAGE 14: Marc-Andre Fleury doesn’t belong to Pittsburgh anymore

ADMINISTRATION Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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NEWS +VIEWS

CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Emerging Artist Carina Kooiman

.ARTS FEST.

CULTURE SHARE

Three Rivers Arts Festival’s Emerging Artist Program provides mentorship and assistance to new artists

BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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T

HE DOWNTOWN AIR is filled with carnival

food; sounds of laughter and chatter dance across the pavement. Around the corner, a corridor of hundreds of tents appears, each one holding a unique set of artistic treasures to behold or maybe take home. This is the Three Rivers Arts Festival Arts Market, a perennial staple of summer in the city of Pittsburgh. This year’s visual arts market features 362 artists in 368 booths. As people explore the market Downtown, they may notice booths featuring signs that say “Emerging Artist,” or “Emerging Artist Alumni.” The Emerging Artist program was started in 2003 as a way to encourage artists to get their foot in the door at a large outdoor market without the stress of paying for a

10-by-10 booth space, a tent, lights and all the other outdoor-vending necessities. There were more than 70 applicants for the program this year, and nine new Emerging Artists were selected. Those artists: Brian Peters, who creates 3D printed ceramics; Brett Kern, who works with slip-cast clay sculptures and makes functional clay pottery; Lauren Braun, who works with graphite, pastels, charcoal, Xerox transfers, metallic wax crayons and acrylic paint; oil-painter David Wadsworth, who creates city scenes, abstracts and landscapes; Darrin Milliner, whose art is a combination of drawing, painting and computeraided design; Stacy Rodgers, a jewelry artist who creates organic, hand-pierced pieces from sterling silver; oil painter Annie Heisey, who works on cradled panel;


and Keith Loughrey and Nancy Murray (known as Burghwood), who make hand-crafted wooden furniture. Two prior Emerging Artists have been granted scholarships to return for another year: Nathan Doverspike (drawing) and Corina Kooiman (ceramics). These artists were selected after three rounds of jurying, based on their scores. With a wide variety of applicants, this class represents what’s going on in Pittsburgh and the greater art community. Starting an art career can be daunting, and making it financially viable is even more difficult. Melissa Franko, coordinator of the artist market, says the Emerging Artist program is necessary to give young artists a boost, so they receive the attention they deserve. “We don’t like to just have one school of thought on display, because we want to be representative of Pittsburgh and of the arts,” explains Franko. “It’s mainly about their talent, but we end up getting a good crosssection of Pittsburgh, too.” Franko works closely with each class of Emerging Artists, meeting one-on-one to prepare for the event. She also started a private Facebook group to connect all prior Emerging Artists with those new, giving them a community to reach out for questions. This fosters a collaborative spirit that only improves Pittsburgh’s already strong arts community. “I’m really proud when previous Emerging Artists stay in touch on that Facebook group and are welcoming to new artists,” says Franko.

Emerging Artist Darrin Milliner

ANNIE HEISEY’S work is bright and

colorful and in the figurative realm. “I grew up in Pittsburgh and have been going to the Three Rivers Arts Festival since I was kid,” says Heisey. “I thought it would be a really great thing to be a part of, but I couldn’t afford it.” Being selected as an Emerging Artist

gave Heisey the opportunity to have a free space in which to sell, but equally

THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL Fri., June 1 through Sat., June 10. Downtown. traf.trustarts.org

valuable to her is the information and network the program offers. “It would have been so much more complicated if I was just going for it on my own. I had my first meeting with Melissa, and she was going through lists of things I hadn’t even thought about. I was like, ‘Wait! Let me write CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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CULTURE SHARE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

Emerging Artist Brett Kern

this down!’” laughs Heisey. Heisey describes Pittsburgh’s art community as robust and inclusive, a sentiment echoed by Franko. This upcoming market will provide an opportunity for Heisey to meet even more artists and grow her network. Heisey earned an MFA in art and has taught grad classes but felt she hadn’t learned much on the business end of things. “It wasn’t something we talked about at all,” she explains. “You have to then put it all together on your own. But the business know-how this program offers and tiny logistical things that Melissa gives us are hugely benefi-

“FOR A YOUNG ARTIST OR SOMEONE NEW TRYING TO BREAK IN, THE EMERGING ARTIST PROGRAM WIPES OUT THAT FINANCIAL RISK.” cial. As an artist, you really have to be an entrepreneur, and that’s not natural to a lot of artists.” Darrin Milliner echoes Heisey’s sentiments as he talks about being a part of the arts market. “I don’t think I would have the right

resources to actually display at the festival without it,” Milliner explains. “I’ve learned a lot from everyone in the program now and previous years that will help me in submitting and displaying my work in similar events in the future. I think the community

aspect of the program is amazing, and with all the help, I’m able to focus on creating more art.” Milliner’s art is reflective of a shift in the interests of younger artists that Franko pointed out. His pieces play with perspectives and simple geometric shapes, using digital illustration with printed collages. “You can see in the last few years that younger artists are going towards 3D technology art, screen printing and graphic design,” says Franko. Another Emerging Artist making outof-the-box pieces is Brett Kern. His work on display will include signature dinosaur sculptures, in addition to mugs and CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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CULTURE SHARE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

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Emerging Artist Annie Heisey

planters and other functional ceramics. He’s even selling a crock pot in the mold of an actual crock shoe. “I usually don’t make this much stuff,” explains Kern. “I work with a few galleries, so I don’t have a lot of inventory laying around. People don’t want to come and see a bunch of bare shelves, so I’ve been doing 15-hour days in the studio to prepare.” Other artist friends of Kern’s spoke on the benefits of participating in the festival, but Kern is still concerned about finances. “You worry about spending the money and not selling that much, so for a young artist or someone new trying to break in, the Emerging Artist program wipes out that financial risk,” says Kern. Returning Emerging Artist Carina Kooiman agrees. “It’s a big investment if you don’t know how much money you’ll make,” says Kooiman. “But the logistical and moral support put me at ease, and it helped me figure out if I’m able to do this in a yearly way.” Kooiman will be selling porcelain in her own tent, one she invested in with the advice and guidance of other artists in the Facebook group. In a few days, this year’s Emerging Artists will set up shop and dive into the waters of a large outdoor market, which averages about three million attendees each year. “Some of these artists may find that outdoor shows aren’t their thing right

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now, and that’s the beauty of this,” says Franko. “If you come and discover you’re not quite ready to do this on

your own yet, you can find other outlets, because you’re part of the Trust Arts family now.”

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.ARTS FEST.

ARTS CROWD Is the Three Rivers Arts Festival becoming a national draw? BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE PITTSBURGH diaspora is powerful. It’s why the airport is crowded on certain Sundays in the fall; Pittsburghers come back home to watch the Steelers. But a beloved football team isn’t the only national draw anymore. Pittsburgh has been attracting more conventions in recent years and has been featured as a visit-worthy destination in many travel publications. Pittsburgh is having a bit of a travel moment. Taking advantage of and contributing to that moment is the Three Rivers Arts Festival. Sarah Aziz of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, which is running the festival, says 15 percent of last year’s attendees came from outside of the region. She also says that percentage has been growing for the last several years. “It has become part of the culture and part of the summer here in Pittsburgh,” says Aziz. “It is a combination of tradition and programming that is leading to our growth.” Aziz says more than 500,000 people attended last year’s Three Rivers Arts Festival, and she expects more this year both from in and outside Pittsburgh. She notes that Pittsburgh’s focus on revitalizing downtown and its riverfront has helped. Aziz also says the national headliners, such as Mavis Staples (performing this year), has been integral to attracting festival-goers from places like Columbus, Buffalo and Washington, D.C.

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CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON

Three Rivers Arts Festival at Point State Park

“IT IS A GOOD ENOUGH SHOW TO MAKE THE DRIVE FROM TEXAS.” “Mavis Staples playing for free in Pittsburgh, people will drive at least a couple hours to see that,” says Aziz. She believes a diverse set of entertainers has also contributed to Arts Festival’s growth. The festival attracts

country acts, rock ‘n’ roll, as well as a breakdance troupe. “We have definitely seen growth, especially since we started focusing on curating the music scene a bit more,” says Aziz. “National acts and diversifying the genres played.” One longtime artist/vendor agrees Arts Festival has excelled at growing not just its regional fanbase, but groups of fans from all over. “It is a good enough show to make the drive from Texas,” says photographer Dan Westfall, who lives in the Lone Star State.

Westfall specializes in photographs of art and architecture in Europe and he says of the 25 shows he does every year, Pittsburgh’s Arts Festival is consistently his best seller. Aziz is happy to see more non-regional attendees at Arts Festival. But she also points out it’s still about the Pittsburgh region first and foremost. Though 75,000 people attended last year from outside the region, a vast majority still visited from within the Pittsburgh area. “The name is the Three Rivers Arts Festival, everyone in the region identifies with the rivers,” says Aziz.


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.SPORTS.

DESERT BLOOM BY ROB ROSSI // ROBROSSI@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

ARC-ANDRE FLEURY doesn’t belong to us anymore. He knows it. His family knows it. His friends know it. Pittsburghers need to know it, too. This is no way a suggestion to avoid watching the Stanley Cup Final. If any citizenry is familiar with how the NHL’s championship series will likely play out, it’s the seen-it/lived-it people of Pittsburgh. The only thing standing between the greatest goal-scorer of his generation and Lord Stanley’s cherished silver chalice is the one guy who keeps breaking the heart of Alex Ovechkin. Sidney Crosby has never been that guy. Fleury has — and as he did while protecting the Penguins’ crease in a couple of victorious Game 7s, “The Flower” will not wilt when attempting to again deny Ovechkin the only hockey goal that matters. But before he grips that Cup for a fourth time (leaving old friends Crosby and Evgeni Makin to catch up with him), Fleury will get his hands on the Conn Smythe Trophy that is awarded to the most valuable player of a Stanley Cup postseason. And when those scenes are playing out in Sin City and on screens throughout the True North Strong and Free, the loudest cheers might be heard from our City of Champions, where Fleury’s silvery

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JEFF BOTTARI/VEGAS GOLDEN KNIGHTS

No longer a Penguin: Marc-Andre Fleury

run with the Golden Knights has replaced the Penguins’ regular Cup chase as a late-spring fling for Pittsburgh’s devout sporting populace. “One person sent me a message and asked, ‘Why don’t you make a ‘Kunitz Backers’ shirt?’” says Zack D’Ulisse, owner of Pittsburgh Clothing Co., which has offered customers a “Pittsburgh Vegas Backers” t-shirt since the Penguins were eliminated from these hockey playoffs by Ovechkin’s Capitals. “I told the guy, ‘Uh, nothing against Chris Kunitz, but Fleury is a little different.”

REAL DEAL

James Neal on what makes this hockey season special in Las Vegas “Honestly, what happened [last October’s mass shooting] ng] … you see ace you’re terrible things throughout America, but when it’s a place ook it on trying to make your home, it’s different. We kind of took ourselves to play for this city. You can’t go anywhere here without re at that knowing somebody who was affected. A lot of us were t’s a small, tight concert. Out here, the people who live in Las Vegas, it’s appened, and community. There was this unbelievable thing that happened, ckey game, then we’re playing a hockey game — the first real hockey d. and it’s the first big professional game this city has had. d People were crying during the opening ceremony, and ly then we scored a goal a few minutes later, and I’m literally telling guys on the bench to look around because h people had tears of joy. Out here, there is still so much pain. But when it comes to us, there’s just this universal d happiness. These people needed us. We actually talked about that responsibility. It’s a real thing.”

More than a little, Zack. He is the most genuine professional athlete in our city’s history. My favorite encounter with this great goalie for whom I have sacrificed journalistic objectivity remains one of our very first. It happened in October 2003, during his first weeks in Pittsburgh, and it says everything about Fleury. At a rink in Castle Shannon, a Penguins employee handed him a black Pirates cap, the one with that familiar yellow (sorry … gold) “P.” Fleury turned to me and asked, “Penguins?” “Pirates,” I said. “Baseball?” he continued. “Yeah,” I offered. “But that’s, like, Pittsburgh’s unofficial hat. The ‘P’ basically means ‘Pittsburgh.’” Without hesitation, he lifted that cap, pulled it onto his head (stray black hairs creeping out of the sides), rolled back his shoulders and smiled the smile we would all come to love. “Pittsburgh,” Fleury said. He wore that cap basically that way, and somehow maintained that smile in what became hockey’s ultimate pressure-cooking environment, for the next 15 years. Then, about a year ago, the

— JAMES NEAL, VEGAS GOLDEN KNIGHTS S ^ Pittsburgh Clothing Co.’s T-shirt design

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Penguins moved on. Thing is, Pittsburghers haven’t moved on as quickly. We need to. All of us. Moving on is a part of life. Can’t really live one if you don’t. “I’ve seen him maybe at his worst and his best,” says James Neal, a teammate of Fleury’s with the Penguins and now the Golden Knights. “But I’ve never seen ‘Flower’ like this. “No matter what an athlete says, it’s hard to leave a team. I don’t think you ever want to say it’s easy to walk away. It’s always hard. But for a guy who’s been so much to a city and a team, you want your reality to be that you’re wanted. And the last couple of years, can you really say the Penguins wanted him?” No, James. Nobody speaking truthfully about Fleury’s long endgame with the Penguins can say that. “Exactly,” says Neal. “So, when you tell me ‘Marc came to Vegas to prove that he is still a great hockey player, not just a good guy that people love’… well, you’re right, Rob. He’s told me that. And he’s doing that.” “I think ‘Flower’ will always think of Pittsburgh. But I’m telling you, he’s moved on.” As he should. As we all should. As I told him in a text message a few hours after he won the Clarence S. Campbell Bowl for his Golden Knights: “Four more, Marc. Go get Stanley.” His response: “Thx robrossi, will try my best.” Didn’t have the heart to tell him that while he authored the last chapter to a storybook season, I will be focusing on City Paper’s coverage of Three Rivers Arts Festival and plans for our upcoming Pride issue. Life happens. Stories change. Marc-Andre Fleury doesn’t belong to Pittsburgh anymore — and deep down, Pittsburghers know this to be true. It’s why since the Penguins’ championship run ended, a flowery love for Vegas’ hockey club has blossomed in Pittsburgh. We know that guy. We. Know. Him. Maybe by following his Final hour, we’re all getting ready to really, truly, finally move on.


CP FILE PHOTO

.OPINION.

DAHNTAHN FOR YOU BY TERENEH IDIA // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“DEARLY BELOVED, we are gathered here

today to get through this thing called life.” Dun dun dududu dun dududu... You probably know those opening lines to Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy” and the first scene in his landmark film Purple Rain. What you probably don’t know is that in 1984, when the song and film were released, I was far from 18 years old. Really. But this did not stop me from sneaking into my first R-rated movie. Then, the old Fulton Theater on Sixth Street was just one of the many movie theaters easily accessible to the North Side. You could walk. Or you could take one bus. Now, taking one bus to and from a location is an ever more elusive, almost magical occurrence. However, Pittsburgh’s ailing public transportation system is a topic for another column. This one is about Downtown, and for whom it is being renovated/innovated. Someone recently told me Downtown is “so much better now than before.” Before what? Before there were no good restaurants? I am left to wonder if good restaurants are what a “so much better” Downtown is to other people. The number of restaurants has increased, but the cultural culinary representation has hardly expanded to include everybody. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows Pittsburgh is 65 percent white, 25 percent black, 4 percent Asian, and 2 percent each of two or more races and Latinx. So, again, allow me to ask a question. Do the entertainment, cultural and culinary options in Downtown adequately reflect this multicultural population?

No. Downtown is moving away from being a centrally located mix of sociocultural economic activities for the many and into narrowly defined experiences for the few. When someone says, “Oh you can just shop online,” I reminisce about buying a pair of shoes for that evening’s event at Saks Fifth Avenue, getting new lipstick at Kauffman’s or — most especially — being inspired by amazing designers at Emphatics. Imagine a younger me flipping the pages of Vogue magazine, seeing Naomi Campbell wearing a Gaultier, reading “Jean Paul Gaultier, Emphatics, Pittsburgh, Pa.” and then being able to walk (run!) Downtown to see the actual garment in real life. These experiences changed my life and inspired what I do. They would not and could not happen today. But I can buy a taco from a few different places — and, to be fair, I do like tacos. We must not dismiss the socioeconomic realities of our city. Reality is, not every Pittsburgher has a bank account, a credit card and/or a secure address to which items can be delivered. Growing children need to try on garments. (Heck, growing or shrinking adults need to try on garments.) Brick and mortar stores serve a purpose. When did it become a rule for central locations to have only one retail option based on income? What happens if all these great, new restaurants do not reflect the true cultural diversity of the city? What is Dahntahn? Who is it for?

Tereneh Idia is a contributing columnist. Follow her on Twitter @Tereneh152xx PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Joseph Grasso behind his counter at Henry Grasso Co., Inc.

.FOOD.

COMMUNITY STAPLE “This is my passion. I enjoy preparing foods and teaching people what to do.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HE PITTSBURGH dining scene is increasingly embracing the old school. Specialty shops such as Chantal’s Cheese Shop or Gryphon Tea Company function much like grocers did before the advent of large supermarkets and big box stores. They offer a limited number of products and count on expertise and customer service to make up for a breadth of choice. Henry Grasso, Co. Inc., a sausage and butcher shop in Larimer, follows this business model, but not because it is looking to hone in on a hip market. This model has been business-as-usual for the last 80 years. Joseph Grasso, 65, is proprietor of the shop. It was passed to him by his father, the shop’s namesake. Henry Grasso was a first-generation Italian immigrant in his 20s when

he opened the butchery. He moved the business to its current location in Larimer in 1938. Grasso picked up a love for butchery from his father, who had made sausage back in Italy. At the end of the Great Depression, Larimer was a bustling community with rows of commercial shops. Until the 1960s, Larimer served as Pittsburgh’s Little Italy and the Grassos made a living selling Italian sweet and hot sausage and other small grocery goods. Walking into the shop now is like traveling to a bygone era. It stands alone on Larimer Avenue, with the same hand-lettered sign it’s had since the beginning. The motifs are all in the colors of the Italian flag, and inside white countertops and stainless-steel butcher’s


tables gleam with the antiseptic cleanliness of a surgery theater. Men of all ages — clad in white aprons, shirts and hair nets — bustle around, grinding meat and filling casings, stopping to clean as they go. In contrast to the business-like affect and cleanliness, the space is warm and peppered with decorative pigs (an homage to the animal that enables their livelihood) given over the years by wives and customers. On the spare shelves are makings of a full, simple dinner: olive oil, pasta, red sauce, broth, olives; and in the coolers, meats of all kinds. Grasso estimates that around 80 percent of business is wholesale. The rest is sold retail to families coming by to get a few specialty items. He says a number of his returning customers are second and third generation. They come by often on Saturdays to chat with him and his employees. This shop, which used to do significantly more retail business, has had to adjust as the neighborhood has seen

changes because of rising prices and the start of a new wave of gentrification in East Liberty. Grasso is a staunch supporter of small businesses, speaking fondly of when families and neighbors would order in bulk from Larimer’s mom-and-pop establishments. He’s also proud of the work he’s been able to do as a mentor to other young professionals in his field.

HENRY GRASSO, CO. INC. 716 Larimer Ave., Larimer 412-441-8126

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WW WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM WWW W W SE SENY NYAI AIPG PGH H CO COM M

Grasso, who has worked at the shop since he was a teenager, says he’s never doubted his commitment to the business, his vendors, and his community of customers. “This is my passion,” he says. “I enjoy preparing foods and teaching people what to do. When I was starting out, I had a lot of people mentor me. Now I feel like I’m returning the favor.”

blogh.pghcitypaper.com CELINE ROBERTS ON BUTCHERY When I started writing about food, I gravitated toward something very unfamiliar: meat production and butchery. As a vegetarian of 13 years who had somewhat recently started eating meat again, I was driven to understand what I was eating and where it was coming from. I’ve now interviewed several butchers and chefs in Pittsburgh and even gotten my hands on some butcher’s knives. What I’ve walked away with is an immense sense of respect for this work and the people who are working to make raising animals ethical and sustainable. Butchery isn’t something that my interviewees have taken lightly. All have taken years to hone their craft. This is a profession making a resurgence as a valuable expertise in the restaurant industry, and I’m excited to see these skills being transferred generationally from experts to young people. •

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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.ON THE ROCKS.

BBQ SPIRITS

BY CRAIG MRUSEK // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM BEER AND BARBECUE are a natural match. However, there are plenty of other adult

beverages that complement meat cooked in the beloved low-and-slow style. Three local barbecue gurus share which non-beer options they enjoy. Richard Coursey, owner and pit master of YinzBurgh BBQ, says his priority is finding a drink that won’t clash with the food. “I prefer to not drink something that’s going to step on the taste of the meat,” says Coursey, who keeps it very simple when it comes to wine. “I like a medium red wine. Spanish styles like tempranillo and Rioja. Nothing too complex or oaky that’s going to compete with the smoke.” Cocktail-wise, Coursey’s favorites include margaritas and mojitos. “Margaritas have that balance of tang and sweetness,” he says. “The mojito is a nice drink if you’re outside. And if I’m just going to go with a straight spirit, I like a good single-barrel bourbon.” Although Coursey is a fan of scotch, he tends to save it for non-barbecue occasions. “I avoid drinking scotch with barbecue because my favorites are the heavily peated ones, and it ends up being too much smoke,” he says. Black Sheep BBQ’s Tony Guglielme (known to his customers as “Tony G.”) makes his beverage choices based largely on the time of year. “For me, it’s seasonal,” he says. “I make barbecue year-round, and always outside. So, when it’s hot, I drink one of two things: white sangria, or a gin and tonic with an orange and cucumber slice. “In winter, I’ll do [a pour of] tequila or mezcal neat. Also, bourbon — neat or a on a big rock. Sometimes a Manhattan.” When it comes to pairing a drink with his barbecue, Guglieme is fairly straightforward. “My go-to is rum,” he says. “A lot of my barbecue is non-traditional and has Middle Eastern, South American and Asian flavors, and the flavors in rum go perfectly with those.” Keith Fuller, owner and executive chef at Pork & Beans, also tends to let the weather steer his drink choices. “If it’s a hot summer day, I’ll do a crisp white wine like a pinot gris or a buttery chardonnay … something that cuts through the smoke,” he says. “There’s also a cocktail I really like called the Blackthorne, which is made with Irish whiskey, sweet vermouth, absinthe and bitters.” Given that Pittsburgh also gets its share of winter weather, what does Fuller opt for when during a cold front? “If I’m cooking in a foot of snow, I’ll just have a nice glass of rye,” he says.

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.FOOD.

EAT ME BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS

Dining on the grass at Point State Park during Three Rivers Arts Festival

.ARTS FEST.

CP PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS

FESTIVE FOODS

LOCATION:

BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE THREE RIVERS Arts Festival’s

schedule is packed with performances, gallery exhibits and activities to keep you Downtown for its 10 days and nights. That’s long enough to drive up anyone’s appetite. So, when preparing to spend days absorbing as much culture as possible, make sure your blood sugar doesn’t suffer, and plan your meals, too. Here are a few ways to ensure the hanger is kept at bay.

Downtown’s culinary scene While you’re planning which events to attend, Google dining spots near Downtown. The Golden Triangle’s restaurant scene is booming and likely offers worthy options. Whether you’re looking for something quick (a slice of pizza) or ready to drop serious cash (on a fancy steak), Downtown’s culinary landscape provides several options. Make a list of dishes you’d like to try and go on a restaurant crawl or stop into a bar to cool off with a midday sip. Pro tip: plan ahead and make reservations if possible. A lot of other people will be dining out and slogging from restaurant to restaurant on an empty stomach — a sure way to bring down your mood.

Food trucks and carnival foods City Paper hit the presses before the release of this Arts Festival’s food-trucks list, but considering the 2017 lineup, the organizers know what’s what when it comes to Pittsburgh’s food-truck scene.

Check out a mobile restaurant that’s new to you for a quick bite. A gathered corral of food trucks usually offers a lot of culinary diversity, from chili to vegan specialties. Nothing catching your eye? Head to the food court filled with carnival snacks and grab a funnel cake, which is beloved and made by Pennsylvania Dutch communities from our commonwealth. As is obvious from some of their other culinary contributions (shoofly pie, whoopie pies, apple dumpling … and the list goes on), the Pennsylvania Dutch love desserts. They call funnel cakes “drechter kucha.”

YOU CAN BYOF TO THE THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL, BUT BYOB IS OFF LIMITS. Pack for a picnic If the forecast isn’t promising rain, picnic-style meals are a great way to save some money. A lightweight cooler that you don’t mind carrying should allow you to get creative. Everything from a simple PB&J and carrot sticks to an onthe-fly cheese and charcuterie snack plate will add to the enjoyment of time spent at Arts Festival. Also, a meal al fresco is a fun treat. Top it off with a drink at a nearby bar when you need a break. You can BYOF to the Arts Festival, but BYOB is off limits.

Soju, 4923 Penn Ave., Garfield

AMBIANCE: Soju is a new addition to Garfield. It’s warm and inviting with modern wood finishes and a garage door to let in the warmer weather. A couple seats at the bar accommodate friends for drinks or solo diners.

WHAT WE ATE: Dwaejibulgogi (spicy Korean barbecue pork)

COST: $14

HOT TAKE: I’ve been thinking about this dish since I ordered it. The smoky flavors of the pork barbecue with the sweet and spicy flavors of the banchan (pickled vegetables) make for a perfectly balanced dish that you want to come back to for seconds (or thirds). PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BAR LOUIE 330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) / BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

BURGH’ERS 3601 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE AND 100 PERRY HIGHWAY, HARMONY 724-473-0710 / BURGHERSPGH.COM From top to bottom, Burgh’ers is a true farm-to-table restaurant serving food grown in Pennsylvania and the tri-state area.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

LEGACY CAFE CATERING 412-218-7216 LEGACYCAFEPITTSBURGH.COM Legacy Cafe catering means fresh quality food. Located in the Historic Hill District we are a premier Business to Business company committed to locally sourced produce.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE 2128 MURRAY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL 412-521-2053 / MINEOSPIZZA.COM Mineo’s Pizza House is celebrating 60 years! Since 1958 when John Mineo opened in Squirrel Hill, we continue the family tradition of hand-grating cheese, slow simmering our sauce and making everything fresh daily.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SENTI RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 3473 BUTLER ST, LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4347 / SENTIRESTAURANT.COM Senti is a modern Italian Restaurant combining the tradition of Italian home cooking with European fine-dining. Taste different fine wines from the self-serve wine dispenser.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

TUPELO HONEY TEAS 211 GRANT AVE., MILLVALE 412-821-0832 WWW.TUPELOHONEYTEAS.COM Charming and intimate tea cafe in Millvale, featuring delicious vegetarian and vegan fare. Plus: Tea Blending Classes and Special Events!

V3 PIZZA 11 FIFTH AVE., DOWNTOWN AND 4500 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-456-0500 / V3FLATBREADPIZZA.COM Fast casual pizza concept. Guest can make their own pizza or choose from eight signature pizzas. V3 Pizza offers a variety of toppings.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

CP PHOTO BY ANNIE BREWER

Curator Christina Lee at Future Tenant

.ART.

I’M NOT WITH HIM “These works subvert the male gaze by re-appropriating these socalled feminine mediums and doing something unexpected with them.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE MODERN CULTURAL lexicon has embraced the

concept of the “clap back,” an acute and (sometimes withering) response to criticism or oppression. This phrase, utilized and popularized by women of color, has taken its place in headlines, spoken word and internet memedom. I’M NOT WITH HIM, a new exhibit at Future Tenant, is curated by Christina Lee. An artist, illustrator, designer and co-founder of PULLPROOF studio, her exhibit embodies the spirit of the clap back through works of five artists whose creations embrace feminist narratives through nontraditional mediums. “I wanted to capture one specific definition of feminism which was saying, ‘f**k you’ back to the catcaller, which I think this work encapsulates,” says Lee. “But it also repre-

sents other aspects of feminism as well.” This exhibit was initially meant as a solo show for Katrina Majkut. A visual artist and writer, Majkut’s offerings are taken from her cross-stitching series (“In Control”), in which she uses the traditionally feminine medium of cross stitch to meditate on modern products for women’s bodies, health and family planning. Her six pieces feature realistic depictions of items such as oral contraceptive blister packs, condom wrappers and a package of Midol. “In colonial times, girls would make cross-stitch samplers to showcase their skills to prospective husbands. The motifs represented their values, religion, etc. ... It was like a calling card,” says Majkut. She appropriated the medium to focus on the CONTINUES ON PG. 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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I’M NOT WITH HIM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

physicality of wifehood, ifehood, motherhood, and femininity, which she identifies as missing in women’s es. historical narratives. rrect that “I set out to correct omission and modernize ople would the practice, so people out physical start to think about cal means,” identity in physical says Majkut. nt saw an Future Tenant opportunity to complement nging in Lee, this work by bringing rator, to dea first-time curator, themed show sign a feminist-themed around Majkut’ss work. Lee wanted to make sure the exhibit was diverse in medium and dimension while honoring the growing narrative.. “What I like about [Majkut’s] ery loud. It’s not work is that it’s very e something like every day you’d see dery,” says Lee. “I Vagisil in embroidery,” really wanted to play up the sense of humor and DIY sensibility.” her artists equally Lee sought other orks. bold with their works. Featured artistss Hannah Epstein, enna Houston and Lizzee Solomon, Jenna Njaimeh Njie all have ties to Pittshat focuses sharply burgh and work that on identity. “These works subvert the male opriating these sogaze by re-appropriating called feminine mediums and doing something unexpected with them,” says Lee.

I’M NOT WITH HIM Runs Fri., June 1 to Sun., July 22. Opening reception 5:30 p.m., Fri., June 1. Future Tenant, 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. futuretenant.org

The works encompass many angles of the feminine experience. Houston, a multimedia artist and writer, is presenting their work on silk curtains that will be hung from the gallery ceiling. Their work, which deals with the intersections of medicine, gender, and queerness in the everyday, seeks to bring attention to lost physical spaces for the queer community. Epstein uses rug hooking to highlight the way beauty and youth are linked to success in the art world in her piece, a hot girl made an art. Njie focuses on the everyday experiences of black women in Pittsburgh, giving voice to their narratives in an intimate way. Solomon mixes folk art and technology in acrylic portraits that examine her work as a woman artist.

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTINA LEE

Hannah Epstein’s a hot girl made an art

Lee rounds out the exhibit with a curated library of feminist zines. Lee, who also helps organize the Pittsburgh Zine Fair, hopes to give more outlets to those who want to publish independent work and sell it. Subjects of the zines span sexual assault, feminist comics and Madeleine Campbell’s popular Women in Sound series. “I wanted to amplify the voices of these female zine creators by having a zine library in the show,” Lee says. Lee’s touches can be seen throughout the curation. In preparation for arranging the show, she read authors like Alison Bechdel and Roxane Gay and hired an all-woman staff for the opening. The title I’M NOT WITH HIM pays homage to the #MeToo moment and riffs off the recent feminist rallying cry of “I’m with her.” After receiving feedback from the artists, Lee designed promotional materials to center the artists names. “In order to subvert the male gaze, I branded it so the female exhibitors names are front and center, so you don’t see the title first which centers on men,” says Lee.


Even “The Boy Who Lived” should be mocked sometimes.

.COMEDY.

MAGIC MOCKERY BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

H

ARRY POTTER IS an amazing, magical, world-changing series of books and movies, but some of its stuff really just doesn’t make sense. The Weasley family, for example, lives in poverty in a world where wizards can literally create just about anything with magic. Conjure up some cash, Weasleys! John Dick Winters, founder of Pittsburgh-based Race to the Coffin comedy group, says Harry Potter plot holes like these need to be ridiculed. That’s why a group of comedians and improv actors are hosting a Harry Potter roast at Club Cafe on June 2. Winters says the roast is mostly scripted and will be hosted by an actor portraying Hogwarts headmaster Albus Dumbledore. (A reminder that Dumbledore dies in the Potter world, so no promises on him making it through 90 minutes of roasting.) Winters says the Harry Potter world is ripe for parody. “You will see jokes that make fun of all the clichés and also, like, just making stuff up about the characters,” says Winters. “The more abstract and the more from the universe that exists, the better the roast can be.”

Snackable content to read on the go.

HARRY POTTER ROAST 10:30 p.m. Sat., June 2. Club Cafe, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. clubcafelive.com.

Race to the Coffin has been putting on roasts of fictional characters for a few years now, including Batman and his nemesis, the Riddler. Winters says fictional characters can be a good introduction to roasting culture, since the person being mocked isn’t actually real. Even so, Winters feels shows are best when things get personal. He expects actors to get rude even when roasting the generally upstanding Harry Potter characters. “One of the best things is when [actors] cross the lines of reality and roast the person playing the character,” says Winters. The show isn’t just for Harry Potter superfans who know every inside joke. Winters believes the roast will appeal to people who know very little about the series’ universe, so no need to read thousands of pages of wizard prose before attending. “Even if you are not a huge Harry Potter fan, I think you will really enjoy it,” says Winters. “This is not inside baseball.” One thing Winters can’t predict is how the truly die-hard Harry Potter fans will react to their favorite wizard being mocked. (Any trip to online Harry Potter forums will show you a brutal world more terrifying than Azkaban.) But Winters thinks that will make the roast even funnier. “We haven’t had a roast for a character that has quite [this] much devotion before,” says Winters. “I don’t think someone would get upset, but to me that would be hilarious.”

Served fresh from CP Marketing

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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Join us in congratulating staff writer Celine Roberts on her victory at the 54th annual Golden Quill Awards. Celine’s story (“Judge Lester Nauhaus Has a History of Making Questionable Comments in the Courtroom, but Has He Gone Too Far?”) won in the Enterprise/Investigative category for nondaily newspapers. Former City Paper editor Charlie Deitch co-reported the winning entry. In all, City Paper won Golden Quills in five categories, including contributor Kim Lyons’ Best-In-Show piece (“Pittsburgh’s Center for Women’s Behavioral Health at West Penn Helps Women with Postpartum Depression”), and placed finalists in four others. The Golden Quill Awards were presented by Press Club of Western Pennsylvania in a ceremony at Rivers Casino on Thursday, May 24. More than 700 entries were judged for the annual event that recognizes excellences in print, broadcast, photography, illustration and online journalism in Western Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia.

BEST IN SHOW

RAY SPRIGLE MEMORIAL AWARD (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS)

Kim Lyons | “Pittsburgh’s Center for Women’s Behavioral Health at West Penn Helps Women with Postpartum Depression”

WINNERS

COLUMNS (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Charlie Deitch | “Pittsburgh Left”

EDUCATION (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Kim Lyons | “Girls Write Pittsburgh is Helping Local Girls Explore Their Creativity and Themselves”

ENTERPRISE/INVESTIGATIVE (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Celine Roberts and Charlie Deitch | “Judge Lester Nauhaus Has a History of Making Questionable Comments in the Courtroom, but Has He Gone Too Far?”

HEALTH/SCIENCE (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Kim Lyons | “Pittsburgh’s Center for Women’s Behavioral Health at West Penn Helps Women With Postpartum Depression”

FINALISTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Meg Fair | “Julien Baker on DIY, Faith and Where to Get Good Coffee” Alex Gordon | “At Pittsburgh’s Accessible Recording in Oakland, Owner Madeleine Campbell Takes the Name to Heart”

BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY/CONSUMER (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Ryan Deto | “Effects of Property Speculation on Pittsburgh’s Housing Market”

CONTINUING BLOG Ryan Deto and Staff | “PolitiCrap”

GENERAL FEATURE (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Meg Fair | “12-year-old Drag Artist E! The Dragnificient Wants People to Change the Way They View Gender”

HEALTH/SCIENCE (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Rebecca Addison | “While Pittsburgh Has Seen Recent Victories on Abortion Causes, Activists Say a Persistent Piece of Legislation Could Roll Back a Woman’s Right to Choose”

LIFESTYLE (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Celine Roberts | “Pittsburgh City Paper Bar Crawl: You Can’t Drink All Day if You Don’t Start in the Morning”

SPORTS (NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS) Charlie Deitch | “Pittsburgh Pirates Preview”

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF PAAYA

Cousin Boneless

.MUSIC.

POSSESSED

BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE MEMBERS of Cousin Boneless

never fit in. That’s exactly how they like it. “We can play a set that’s accessible to families having a picnic, or we can also play a super dingy basement show with a bunch of punks and get them riled up as well,” vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Joey Schuller says. “It’s hard to pigeonhole us.” He’s right. Cousin Boneless’ music gives punk a folk spin, jumping from light acoustic sounds to thrashing guitars and guttural screams with ease. The band’s lyrics touch on everything from dysphoria with technology to critiques of society and general disillusion, but there’s always an air of goofy fun involved. And while its music almost always has political meanings behind it, the group (by its own admission) isn’t Anti-Flag — all of its messages come in the form of narratives or imagery that play out in the songs. Vocalist, guitarist and accordion player Chris Blake compares the band to the Halloween tradition of telling blindfolded children that peeled grapes and cold spaghetti are actually eyeballs and intestines. “We try to trick you into thinking we’re more profound than we are just ’cause we’re weird,” Blake says. “But really, we’re just weird.” Cousin Boneless’ upcoming fourth album, Possession, marks the band’s leap from acoustic roots to a fully electric sound. Almost completely recorded in two, 12-hour days in the studio, Possession adds electric guitar, giving the music a firmer base. This band’s signature weirdness doesn’t go away on Possession, though. The album’s

name even has a double meaning, representing both the band’s lyrical content and its love of irreverent horror. For “Null Set,” the second of the two singles released ahead of Possession, the band filmed a music video that captures much of its essence. “It’s, like, weird and goofy and also a little disturbing and vaguely sexual and, like, a little political, too,” Schuller says, joking that it influenced Childish Gambino’s viral “This Is America” video.

COUSIN BONELESS POSSESSION RELEASE PARTY with CESCHI and MAY DAY MARCHING BAND 7 p.m., Thu., June 7. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $8. spiritpgh.com

Possession will be unveiled at Cousin Boneless’ show June 7 at Spirit in Lawrenceville — the first stop on the group’s June tour. Hip-hop artist Ceschi and local marching band May Day Marching Band will open, and Sikes will close the show out with a DJ set. Vinyl copies of Possession will be available for $20. Before Possession, physical copies of Cousin Boneless’ music were limited to CDs that Blake and Schuller burned and for which they provided hand-drew artwork. Thanks to Canada-based independent label All We’ve Got Records, that’s in the past. “There’s only so many times you can go to Thanksgiving and tell your grandma that the band’s going OK and that’s the report,” Blake says. “You gotta take that record home to Grandma,” Schuller adds.


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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WE BUY RECORDS & CDS

.CD REVIEWS.

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BY THE LONG HUNT

.ARTS FEST.

SELF-RELEASED LISTENTOTHELONGHUNT.COM

PUBLIC PAINTING

The Long Hunt makes wandering music, so it’s only fitting that its latest release is titled All Paths Lead to Here. The heavy psych, minimalist post-rock moves through valleys of sludgy riffs, ascends into peaks of slithering bass licks and rolls across ambient fields of rock. There are only three members (drums, guitar, bass), but it sounds like many more. The band is entirely instrumental, and it doesn’t need lyrics to weave a tale. All it has to say is delivered through the feeling of each epic track.

<< S/T BY JIMMY MAYO SELF-RELEASED JIMMYPLAYSMUSIC.BANDCAMP.COM

In three songs, Jimmy Mayo makes its sharp emo debut. The gruff vocals over poppy punk give life to the angsty lyrics. Jimmy Mayo describes itself as “a group of sad kids writing sad music,” and on S/T it uses its musical vehicle to reflect upon themes like addiction, mental illness, failed romance and nostalgia. It all culminates with the intense EP closer “Will’s Garage,” as the vocalist desperately shouts, “I’m struggling with things I’ve known about myself since I was thirteen.”

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Pittsburgh artist Ashley Olinger

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

OCAL ILLUSTRATOR and artist Ashley Olinger created a vibrant cover for City Paper’s Summer Guide issue. She is back in the fold to participate in a live painting of newspaper boxes — we’re calling it an “Artbox” — as part of Three Rivers Arts Festival. We talked to Olinger about her career, painting live, and the state of Etsy shops.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO ILLUSTRATING? I went to school for design and I took an illustration class my very last semester and ended up loving it. Whenever I graduated, I realized I wanted to do this. YOUR ART FEATURES FRUIT AND PLANTS AS WELL AS POP CULTURE REFERENCES. WHERE DOES YOUR INSPIRATION COME FROM? I grew up watching a lot of comedy, so that’s always been a big inspiration to me. I try to put that humor into my work because I feel like it makes it more relatable. I really like illustrating everyday things and injecting them with color to make them more interesting. DO YOU FEEL LIKE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO BE SELLING EASILY PURCHASABLE AND ACCESSIBLE ART ON ETSY? I think we’re in a weird place. I see a lot of people that capitalize on this renewed feminist movement and the political climate and I don’t judge anyone for that

— but it already takes over so much of our life. DO YOU FEEL LIKE THERE ARE ARTISTS CAPITALIZING ON THE POLITICAL CLIMATE? I do feel like there are a lot of people that are making it based on their own experiences. But there are a lot of shops that sell things that just say “depression” and “anxiety” and that starts to bug me. HAVE YOU EVER PAI PAINTED LIVE IN FRONT OF PEOPLE BEFORE? No No. I was a little appr prehensive at first, but I’m trying to do new th things. D YOU HAVE ANY DO P PLANS FOR HOW Y YOU’LL PAINT T THE BOX? I think the Pittsburgh theme always wi people over, but I wins think something super bright and colorful — probably some fruit. IS ART YOUR FULL-TIME JOB? I went full-time about a year ago. I ended up quitting my last design job and I got a job as a barista part-time. I started building up a client base while I was there and quit after a few months. WHAT KIND OF CLIENTS DO YOU HAVE? I’ve been getting a lot of people that are local bloggers. Those have been my favorite because I like working with creative people. They always have the best ideas.


PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER

Katie Lynn Esswein and Christopher Larkin in Nomad Motel

.STAGE.

(NOT) KIDS STUFF BY TED HOOVER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

R

IPPED FROM today’s headlines! (I always wanted to start a review like that …)

Playwright Carla Ching’s Nomad Hotel is a mashup of two unsavory current cultural trends: “motel kids” and “parachute kids.” The first are working poor families that, because of rising house prices and stagnated wages, are forced to live in motels. The latter are children from foreign parts (mostly Pacific Rim countries) sent to America, alone, by their parents; they’re enrolled in a high school as the first step in ensuring their acceptance at a firstclass university. In a “you got peanut butter in my chocolate” moment, Ching wondered what would happen if such young people became friends. Nomad Hotel, now receiving its local premiere at City Theatre, is her answer. Alix is a high schooler whose mother has made some bad relationship and financial choices. Her two brothers and mom are making barely enough to live in a motel, and, not surprisingly, Alix’s schoolwork has crashed through the floor, along with her dream of attending college.

NOMAD MOTEL Continues through June 3. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. 412-431-2489 or citytheatrecompany.org

Mason (he’s been assigned to work on a school project with Alix) is alone in a suburban house. His father lives in Hong Kong working for what would appear to be the Asian mafia, but still takes time, via phone, to relentlessly push Mason on academic achievement and hammer the absolute necessity of getting into Harvard’s School of Business. For various reasons, Alix’s mother and Mason’s father suddenly disappear. These two kids, even more than before, are forced to grow up and begin to chart their own lives away from such toxic adults. As bleak as this all sounds, Ching soft pedals most of the desperation and danger; catastrophe seems always to be lapping at the shore, but Ching never lets it get any further up the dramatic beach. This isn’t exactly a “feel good” play, but she obviously cares too much about these characters to actually jeopardize them. Bart DeLorenzo takes a similar light touch approach with his direction, emphasizing the pluckiness of Alix and the endearing resolution of Mason. Nelson Lee and Lisa Velten Smith play the spectacularly bad parents with fierce intelligence, and Shanine Ezell brings much needed dangerous energy as Alix’s ex-boyfriend. Katie Lynn Esswein and Christopher Larkin do a terrific job showing us the enormous emotional cost of children forced to raise themselves and, most exceptionally, they avoid the trap of self-pity, the temptation of which would have sunk lesser actors.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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LIVE MUSIC MAY 31

JUNE 7

(starting 8-9 pm)

(starting 8-9 pm)

Acoustic Open Mic with Jay Constable

Ridgemont High (80’s Cover Band)

EatShady.com

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Billie Nardozzi

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OPEN BOOK

BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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LIVE MUSIC JUNE 2

JUNE 9

Samantha Sears

Acoustical Bruce

(12-4 pm)

BakerySocial.com

(12-4 pm)

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P

ITTSBURGH IS lucky to have

Billie Nardozzi. He’s been publishing short, memorable poems in the Post-Gazette (at his own expense), writing and performing fight songs for the local sports teams and making regular appearances on 93.7fm The Fan for more than a decade. The songs and the poems are simple, but undeniably charming (he’s written heartfelt odes to Kinko’s and the Hyundai dealership in Dormont). In a time when negativity, sarcasm and de facto derision seem to permeate every interaction both on and off the internet, it’s refreshing to see somebody so candid and unabashedly sincere. When he changed his byline from “Billy” to “Billie” and began favoring

women’s clothing last year, the switch was announced in a series of poems and two billboards certifying his status as “Pittsburgh’s premier poet.” In a fittingly unguarded move, he included his home phone number on the billboards. While there have been a few cruel messages, he says the response has been overwhelmingly kind. His attitude is contagious. On Friday, Pittsburghers have a chance to witness the full breadth of Nardozzi’s talents with a one-person variety show at Glitter Box Theater. The night will include poem readings, music, pantomime, storytelling and a Q&A session. City Paper caught up with Nardozzi to discuss the show, the billboards, the clothes and his favorite poem.

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH BILLIE NARDOZZI 8 p.m., Fri., June 1. The Glitter Box Theater, 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5-10. theglitterboxtheater.com

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST TIME ON STAGE? Oh jeez. I was 7 years old, I had dressed up as a Beatle. It was in St. Cyril Methodius [church] and I sang “I Saw Her Standing There.” WHICH BEATLE? Oh, I don’t know, I guess Paul? SO JUST A BOWL CUT? Yeah. That would have to be my very first time standing in front of an audience. DID YOU LIKE IT IMMEDIATELY? It started the ball rolling. I got a nice response. It was always in me, the music. WHAT WOULD YOU WANT THE AUDIENCE TO TAKE AWAY FROM YOUR UPCOMING VARIETY SHOW AT GLITTER BOX? [I want them] to say, “We saw a performance and it was a joyful thing. We walked away smiling.”


WOULD YOU WANT TO DO MORE SHOWS LIKE THIS? Absolutely! All my life. It’s my complete happiness. WHAT ARE SOME MISCONCEPTIONS YOU THINK PEOPLE HAVE ABOUT POETRY? Most of those great poets, I don’t think you can understand the way they write, that’s it. You don’t understand, neither do I. Mine [are] very simple, not hard to understand. I think they’ll be surprised [at the show] if they don’t know my poetry, how simple and down to earth it is. ARE THERE ONES YOU LIKE TO GO BACK TO AND RE-READ? I always bring the same three or four to every reading. Of course, the one about — God rest his soul — my father. And the early one, “If I Met Jesus.” It wasn’t meant to be funny but they laugh at it. You know, I take him to McDonald’s. “Couldn’t you take him to somewhere more expensive? Jeez!” [Laughs] DO YOU STILL GET NERVOUS AT READINGS? I think anybody human with all those people there [would]. I’ve been in front of an audience since I was 7. … There’s always that chance that somebody might not like you, and that’s inside you, “I hope they like me.” That’s the kind of feeling I get, anyway. But I love doing it. I love making people happy, that’s why I do it! YOU WERE QUOTED RECENTLY SAYING, “I LET THEM [THE AUDIENCE] SAY WHO THEY THINK I AM.” WHY IS THAT IMPORTANT TO YOU? Basically, I let them say who they think

I am, [as a poet]. If I’m good. In the way that I dress. “What is he?” [Laughs] But whatever they say I am, I go with it. The audience, they’ll make you or break you. They’re the ones that make it happen. If somebody thinks you’re someone and it makes them happy and they get a kick out of it, leave it alone. Let ’em! Go ahead. On the other hand too, maybe derogatory things ... I get phone calls, not many are bad, but you gotta take it with a grain of salt. But if you’re in the spotlight, if you can’t take that, you have to get out of the game. WHAT’S IT LIKE PASSING BY YOUR BILLBOARDS? DO YOU TRY TO GAUGE IF PEOPLE ARE RESPONDING TO THEM? I’ve gone by once, maybe twice. [PostGazette reporter] Brian O’Neill, when he interviewed me, [we drove] past it and it was the first time I’d seen myself. It was kinda crazy. I looked at it and said, “I wonder what people really think. Who is this goof? What is he doing?” That was my reaction when I first saw it. But on the other hand, it was very nice. It’s like, “Jeez! Up in the lights, not bad.”

’ LET S

GET S CIAL

WHAT’S A QUESTION YOU GET MOST OFTEN? Usually everybody asks me about the way I dress. … They always ask me that. “Why do you dress like that? What is your reason?” My answer is that I love it. I feel comfortable. It’s me. It makes me happy. I’m very happy. It’s just me. I found me. [Laughs] You get crazy looks at stores, but I don’t care. I’m happy with the way I look and that’s it. The metamorphosis occurred and I’m sticking with it.

.MUSIC.

MP 3 MONDAY >> CALEB KOPTA Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free, and this week it’s “Burning House” by Caleb Kopta. This danceable indie rock track has some serious Sam’s Town-era Killers vibes with a dose of ’80s nostalgia. Blast the chorus with your windows down for full effect. Stream or download “Burning House” for free on FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF TONJE THILESEN

Hop Along

.MUSIC.

BARK AND BITE BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

H

OP ALONG’S music has the ability to freeze time.

The first time you hear vocalist and guitarist Frances Quinlan’s distinct voice over the subtle, smart-moving guitar parts, your breath may get caught in your throat. With careful ingredients, Hop Along captures the sublime, confusing, warm and existential in a way that evades easy description. Its latest release, Bark Your Head Off, Dog is no exception. Its nine eclecticbut-cohesive songs range from bouncy to tender and contemplative. “I’m really proud of the record, it’s the proudest I’ve ever been of something I’ve been a part of,” says Quinlan. “Now the anxiety is attached to best representing it live.” While writing the record, band members exercised restraint and focused on starting the songwriting process with an idea of feeling for each song. As a result, Hop Along left space for strings and piano on tracks such as “Not Abel,” “Prior Things” and “One That Suits Me.”

Outdoor B a n ds a l l g Summer Lon J 1 Ridgemont High (8pm) June June 2 Mercedez (8pm) June 3 The Shiners Band (2-6pm) June 8 Tony Janflone, Jr. (8pm) June 9 Bon Journey Band (8pm) June 10 Vagrants (12-4pm) Buffetman (5-8pm) *FREE Sunday Summer Concert Series!

HOP ALONG, BAT FANGS AND CALYX 7 p.m. Wed., June 6. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15-18. spiritpgh.com

Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM Best Live Bands Every Weekend!

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

it’s a destination!

1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com

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“Knowing each other so well made us better able and equipped to communicate needs and the moods of those songs, and the concept of mood came up earlier than it ever has in the process before,” says Quinlan. “Once you have that [mood], you can shape the song into something, and it’s easier to shape than a jumble of verses and choruses.” Hop Along has long been known for its prolific, literary lyrics. They come from journal entries and writings that Quinlan works on over time, the words pulled from various entries over a longer span of time — or sometimes from just a few days in a row. And although her songs are personal to an extent, Quinlan happily leaves them open-ended for the listener. “I’ve been really excited to have conversations about people’s interpretations of songs,” says Quinlan. “I’m really excited about how people are interpreting this album in general.” As Hop Along embarks on its headlining tour in support of Bark Your Head Off, Dog, Quinlan admits the hardest part is figuring out what new songs to cut to leave space for old favorites. One of those old favorites, “Tibetan Pop Stars,” is a fervent singalong. It still affects Quinlan even after years of performing it. “That song blows my mind on this tour,” Quinlan explains. “It’s one thing to be in smaller spaces and having people singing those words, but in larger spaces and headlining, hearing people sing [along] is humbling.”


TOP 5

KENNY CHESNEY SONGS (FOR PITTSBURGHERS) BY ROB ROSSI ROBROSSI@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A STILL FROM THE PROMO BLACK CREATED FOR ROW HOUSE CINEMA

Jack Black wants you to be kind and rewind.

.FILM.

AMATEUR HOUR BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

OST PEOPLE will never see their movie played in an actual movie theater, but the Sweded Film Festival at Row House Cinema offers anyone with a camera and a sense of humor that chance. The concept of a sweded film — purposely short and low-budget recreations of popular movies — comes from the 2008 Michel Gondry comedy, Be Kind Rewind. In that movie, two friends accidentally erase all the VHS tapes in the video store where they work and then recreate bootleg versions of popular movies as replacements. Their explanation? The replacement films are Swedish versions, hence “sweded.”

SWEDED FILM FESTIVAL Fri., Jun 15 - Thu., June 21. Winner announced on Thu., June 21. Row House Cinema, 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. rowhousecinema.com

“This idea kind of took off on its own and people started making their own sweded films,” explains Molly Ebert, director of events and membership at Row House. “The more low-budget, the better. It’s just a good way for people to be creative.” Row House first embraced the idea of sweded films by shooting staffmade bootleg trailers for movies such as Fight Club and The Godfather. Last year, its festival took place on a single day. Due to popularity, it has been ex-

panded to a full week (June 15-21) that also coincides with this theater’s fourth anniversary. Registration occurred from April 16May 15. Requirement for submissions included films being three to five minutes in length with relatively familyfriendly context and no repeats. There will be voting throughout the week and a cash prize for the winning film. This festival gives people an easy and accessible way to play with filmmaking without having to be a professional filmmaker. “People just make something for the heck of it,” says Ebert. “And it’s pretty rare you get to see something you made on movie screens and have an audience.” This year, the film festival also received a little help from Jack Black, a star of Be Kind, Rewind. Black sent a short video to the theater, encouraging people to come out for the festival, and of course, to be kind and rewind. “It’s been the craziest week because we can’t believe that happened,” says Ebert. “Fifteen minutes after him and his manager said he’d give us a video, we got a video. We just can’t believe it.” Ebert says “Is it fun?” is the guiding principle for Row House when coming up with new ideas; a sweded film fest was the perfect fit. “It’s local and it’s kind of what independent local movie theaters are made for,” he says.

“NEVER WANTED NOTHING MORE” ... Than Amazon to pick Pittsburgh. Pretty please, Amazon. We’ll, like, convert the Mon into a bike lane only accessible to your people. And how does “Mount Amazon” sound? Or “Primeburgh”? — Sincerely, our elected officials

“WHEN I THINK ABOUT LEAVING” An ode to the couple of great, few good and all of even those sorta-kinda decent Pirates players who have come and gone (too soon) for 30 years and counting.

“SOMEWHERE IN THE SUN” ... There is a street closed off to traffic because all those repairs that never quite get done are re-routing cars to the city’s four functioningas-normal roads this and every summer.

“IF THIS BUS COULD TALK”

june 2 | LoFi Delphi,

Andre Costello and the Cool Minors, Grand Piano, DJ - The Lopez in collaboration with Deutschtown Music Festival and Northside Leadership Conference

June 9 | BB Guns, Clara Kent, DJ - Kanti Kasa

in collaboration with Deutschtown Music Festival and Northside Leadership Conference

... Ours would surely say, “Spare your horns, jagoffs; I’ll turn wherever, whenever I want.”

“SOME TOWN SOMEWHERE” As in: some town somewhere is about to get trashed. (Don’t say we didn’t warn you.) PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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.FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 31.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFOF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Ninety-five percent of your fears have little or no objective validity. Some are delusions generated by the neurotic parts of your imagination. Others are delusions you’ve absorbed from the neurotic spew of other people’s imaginations. What I’ve just told you is both bad news and good news. On the one hand, it’s a damn shame you feel so much irrational and unfounded anxiety. On the other hand, hearing my assertion that so much of it is irrational and unfounded might mobilize you to free yourself from its grip. I’m pleased to inform you that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to wage a campaign to do just that. June can and should be Fighting for Your Freedom from Fear Month.

For many years, actor Mel Blanc provided the voice for Bugs Bunny, a cartoon character who regularly chowed down on raw carrots. But Blanc himself did not like raw carrots. In a related matter, actor John Wayne, who pretended to be a cowboy and horseman in many movies, did not like horses. And according to his leading ladies, charismatic macho film hunk Harrison Ford is not even close to being an expert kisser. What about you, Pisces? Is your public image in alignment with your true self? If there are discrepancies, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make corrections.

(May 21-June 20): GEMINI On Feb. 17, 1869, Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleyev had an appointment with a local cheese-making company to provide his expert consultation. But he never made it. A blast of inspiration overtook him soon after he awoke, and he stayed home to tend to the blessed intrusion. He spent that day as well as the next two perfecting his vision of the periodic table of the elements, which he had researched and thought about for a long time. Science was forever transformed by Mendeleyev’s breakthrough. I doubt your epiphanies in the coming weeks will have a similar power to remake the whole world, Gemini. But they could very well remake your world. When they arrive, honor them. Feed them. Give them enough room to show you everything they’ve got.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During the next four weeks, I’ll celebrate if you search for and locate experiences that will heal the part of your heart that’s still a bit broken. My sleep at night will be extra deep and my dreams extra sweet if I know you’re drumming up practical support for your feisty ideals. I’ll literally jump for joy if you hunt down new teachings that will ultimately ensure you start making a daring dream come true in 2019. And my soul will soar if you gravitate toward the mind-expanding kind of hedonism rather than the mind-shrinking variety.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Everyone has a unique fate that’s interesting enough to write a book about. Each of us has at least one epic story to tell that would make people cry and laugh and adjust their thoughts about the meaning of life. What would your saga be like? Think about what’s unfolding right now, because I bet that would be a ripe place to start your meditations. The core themes of your destiny are currently on vivid display, with new plot twists taking your drama in novel directions. Want to get started? Compose the first two sentences of your memoir.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Dear Oracle: I find myself in the weird position of trying to decide between doing the good thing and doing the right thing. If I opt to emphasize sympathy and kindness, I may look like an eagerto-please wimp with shaky principles. But if I push hard for justice and truth, I may seem rude and

insensitive. Why is it so challenging to have integrity? - Vexed Libra.” Dear Libra: My advice is to avoid the all-or-nothing approach. Be willing to be half-good and half-right. Sometimes the highest forms of integrity require you to accept imperfect solutions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You have waited long enough to retaliate against your adversaries. It’s high time to stop simmering with frustration and resentment. Take direct action! I suggest you arrange to have a box of elephant poop shipped to their addresses. You can order it here: tinyurl.com/ ElephantManure. JUST KIDDING! I misled you with the preceding statements. It would in fact be a mistake for you to express such vulgar revenge. Here’s the truth: Now is an excellent time to seek retribution against those who have opposed you, but the best ways to do that would be by proving them wrong, surpassing their accomplishments, and totally forgiving them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Marketing experts say that motivating a person to say yes to a big question is more likely if you first build momentum by asking them smaller questions to which it’s easy to say yes. I encourage you to adopt this slant for your own purposes in the coming weeks. It’s prime time to extend invitations and make requests that you’ve been waiting for the right moment to risk. People whom you need on your side will, I suspect, be more

receptive than usual – and with good reasons – but you may still have to be smoothly strategic in your approach.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I bet you’ll be offered at least one valuable gift, and possibly more. But I’m concerned that you may not recognize them for their true nature. So, I’ve created an exercise to enhance your ability to identify and claim these gifts-in-disguise. Please ruminate on the following concepts: 1. a pain that can heal; 2. a shadow that illuminates; 3. an unknown or anonymous ally; 4. a secret that nurtures intimacy; 5. a power akin to underground lightning; 6. an invigorating boost disguised as tough love.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When I was a kid attending elementary schools in the American Midwest, recess was a core part of my educational experience. For 45 minutes each day, we were excused from our studies so we could indulge in free-form play – outdoors, if the weather was nice, or else in the gymnasium. But in recent years, schools in the U.S. have shrunk the time allotted for recess. Many schools have eliminated it altogether. Don’t they understand this is harmful to the social, emotional and physical health of their students? In any case, Aquarius, I hope you move in the opposite direction during the coming weeks. You need more than your usual quota of time away from the grind. More fun and games, please! More messing around and merriment! More recess!

ARIES (March 21-April 19): A critic described Leonardo da Vinci’s painting the Mona Lisa as “the most visited, most written about, most sung about, most parodied work of art in the world.” It hasn’t been sold recently but is estimated to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Today it’s kept in the world-renowned Louvre museum in Paris, where it’s viewed by millions of art-lovers. But for years after its creator’s death, it enjoyed little fanfare while hanging in the bathroom of the French King Francois. I’d love to see a similar evolution in your own efforts, Aries: a rise from humble placement and modest appreciation to a more interesting fate and greater approval. The astrological omens suggest that you have more power than usual to make this happen in the coming weeks and months.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): These days, many films use CGI, computer generated imagery. The technology is sophisticated and efficient. But in the early days of its use, producing such realistic fantasies was painstaking and time-intensive. For example, Steven Spielberg’s 1993 film Jurassic Park featured four minutes of CGI that required a year to create. I hope that in the coming weeks, you will summon equivalent levels of old-school tenacity and persistence and attention to detail as you devote yourself to a valuable task that you love. Your passion needs an infusion of discipline. Don’t be shy about grunting. Homework: Each of us has a secret ignorance. Can you guess what yours is? What could you do about it? freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER

WED., JUNE 13 THIRTY SECONDS TO MARS

PITTSBURGH OPERA

6 P.M. KEYBANK PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN. $15-99. 724-947-7400 or livenation.com. With special guests Walk the Moon, MisterWives & Joywave.

JUNE 1 | 7:30 PM

WED., JUNE 13 NICK SWARDSON

HARTWOOD ACRES AMPHITHEATER

RIVER CITY BRASS BAND

7:30 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $42.50-92.50. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

THU., JUNE 14 JAPANESE BREAKFAST

JUNE 3 | 7:30 PM

8 P.M. SPIRIT LAWRENCEVILLE. All-ages event. $15-17. 412-586-4441 or ticketfly.com.

ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US/SUMMER SUN., JUNE 17 TREVOR HALL

FRI., JUNE 15 PITTSBURGH JAZZ ORCHESTRA 5:30 P.M. SMITHFIELD STREET STAGE DOWNTOWN. Free event. Pittsburghjazzfest.org.

FRI., JUNE 15 BRUCE HORNSBY & THE NOISEMAKERS 8 P.M. THE MEADOWS CASINO WASHINGTON. $29-64. 724-503-1200 or ticketmaster.com.

REX THEATER

SAT., JUNE 16 CORY HENRY & FUNK APOSTLES 6:15 P.M. LIBERTY AVENUE STAGE DOWNTOWN. Free event. Pittsburghjazzfest.org.

SAT., JUNE 16 STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY

FRI., JUNE 15 GORDON LIGHTFOOT

6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Indoor Sports Arena. $15-20. Steelcityrollerderby.org.

8 P.M. THE PALACE THEATRE GREENSBURG. $49-62. 724-836-8000 or thepalacetheatre.org

SAT., JUNE 16 JAY ROCK, AB-SOUL, SZA & KENDRICK LAMAR

FRI., JUNE 15 THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS

7:30 P.M. KEYBANK PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN. $35-187. 724-947-7400 or livenation.com.

9 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $20. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

FRI., JUNE 15 CHRIS KNIGHT 9:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $20-25. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guests Northern Comfort & Tom Breiding.

SAT., JUNE 16 THE SWEET SPOT BURLESQUE 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $20-60. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

SUN., JUNE 17 JOSE ALBERTO SALSA

ORCHESTRA 2:30 P.M. LIBERTY AVENUE STAGE DOWNTOWN. Free event. Pittsburghjazzfest.org.

SUN., JUNE 17 SLOAN 8 P.M. MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE MILLVALE. Over-18 event. $20-24. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

SUN., JUNE 17 TREVOR HALL 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $25-28. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

NORTH PARK PRENATAL YOGA Mondays: June 4-25, 6-7 pm NORTH PARK OUTDOOR VINYASA YOGA Mondays: June 4-25, 7-8 pm HARTWOOD ACRES MANSION YOGA ON THE LAWN Wednesdays: June 6-27, 7-8pm ROUND HILL PARK PIYO LIVE Thursdays: June 7-28, 6:30-7:30pm SOUTH PARK BASIC YOGA FLOW Thursdays: June 7-28, 7-8 pm

MON., JUNE 18 KID BOOT CAMP 12 P.M. BOYCE PARK WAVE POOL BOYCE PARK. Ages 7-12. $25-31 (online registration required). Alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms.

TUE., JUNE 19 FUNKY KNUCKLES 8 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. Over-21 event. $10-12. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US

ΨϯϬ&KZZ^/Ed^ΘΨϰϬ&KZEKEͳZ^/Ed^ &KZ,&KhZͳ^^^/KE>^^

Register at alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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CALENDAR MAY 31-JUNE 6

CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS

^ Thu., May 31: Underwear Bike Ride

THURSDAY MAY 31

PRINTMAKING Join activists and artists Alisha Wormsley and Robert Hodge tonight for the Artist Meet, Greet and Make! event hosted by AIR: Artists Image Resource. You’ll have a chance to meet with two influential artists who have worked not only in Pittsburgh, but across the nation. Attendees will be able to print the artists’ work on a variety of canvases such as t-shirts, tote bags or plain old paper. Included in the images will be Wormsley’s now famous “There

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a world ...). Francisco’s re-imagining of Are Black People In The Future” text from fictional movie trailers with an assortment the art installment, The Last Billboard, of celebrity impersonations is not to be in East Liberty. Lauren Ortego 6 p.m. missed. Get a taste for yourself with 518 Foreland St., North Side. Free. six appearances at the Improv Facebook search “Artist Meet, this weekend. Alex Gordon Greet and Make” THREE TS 8 p.m., Thu., May 31; 7:30 p.m. AR S R E IV R L A and 9 p.m., Fri., June 1; 7 p.m. IV T S E F and 9:30 p.m., Sat., June 2; Pablo Francisco broke onto STARTS 1 E and 7 p.m., Sun., June 3. 166 the comedy scene with FRI., JUNories E. Bridge St., Homestead. $22. a well-received Comedy See our st6, 12, s e on pag pittsburgh.improv.com Central special in 2000, when 1 19 and 2 he showed off an impression of Don LaFontaine — the Strip down to your skivvies for a prolific voice actor behind nearly night of biking and body positivity. Meet every action blockbuster movie trailer in Lawrenceville with your wheels, helmets from the mid 1980s to the early 2000s (“In

COMEDY

OUTDOORS

and lights for a leisurely and safe Underwear Bike Ride. Check out the website for a few pointers on bike safety and laws. An afterparty will be hosted at Harris Grill. Celine Roberts 8-11 p.m. Thu., May 31. 46th and Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. facebook.com/ PghUnderwearBikeRide

FRIDAY JUNE 1 MUSIC Local rock band A-Money and the Downtown City will unveil its debut EP,


Celebrate Recovery Peoples Oakland 11 Annual Gala Benefit th

Thursday, May 31st, 2018 Under the big tent • Schenley Plaza, Oakland

6:00PM Reception Live Music • Heavy Hors d’ouvres • Open Bar 6:45PM Program - Celebrate recovery with members as they tell their stories of recovery. - Honorees, The University of Pittsburgh:

Paul A. Supowitz

Vice Chancellor for Community and Government Relations

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALISHA WORMSLEY

^ Thu., May 31: Artist Meet, Greet and Make!

John M. Wilds, PhD, SPHR

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Community Relations Night/Vision, at tonight’s show at Club Cafe. The group combines rock with reggae, soul and hip hop, often jumping from one sound to another within the same song. Night/Vision is a five-song EP that was partially crowdfunded via a GoFundMe. Clara Kent, a local musician whose songs blend hip hop, soul and R&B, will open the show. Her full-length debut album, AURA, was released in February and includes features by local hip hop artists like Bilal Abbey and Pharaoh Lum. Alex McCann 6 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. clubcafelive.com

MALLS The heyday for massive shopping centers of air-conditioned consumerism is long gone, but it’s primetime for fondly remembering days of soft pretzels, ear piercings and indoor fountains. Enter the Century III Mall Final Meet and Walkthrough, a farewell to the West Mifflin mall, which first opened in 1979 and will go up for auction at a sheriff’s sale on June 4. Anyone is

^ Thu., May 31: Pablo Francisco PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS WHITEHOUSE

welcome at the walkthrough, but it’s aimed at fans of the Facebook page “Century III Mall Memories,” which boasts over 11,000 members. The meetup includes a tour of the mall and reminiscing with other mall-minded people. Hannah Lynn 6 p.m. 3075 Clairton Road, West Mifflin.

OUTDOORS The Pittsburgh region is teeming with outdoor recreational opportunity — rivers for kayaking, trails for hiking, ponds for swimming. To maximize your outdoor output, some specialized gear can help, and that’s where 3 Rivers Outdoor Co. comes in. This new company now setting up shop in the Regent Square part of Swissvale is focused on being the locally owned source for everything outdoors. National chains such as REI can be great, but why not get the same results and support your neighbors? To commemorate their arrival in the Pittsburgh scene, 3 Rivers is throwing a Grand Opening celebration, complete with live music, tasty food and local beers. Ribbon-cutting is on June 1, but events last

7:15-9:00PM

The Legendary Soul Man Billy Price Tickets $75 Donation • Each additional ticket: $40

Donate www.peoplesoakland.org VIA PayPal or check to:

Peoples Oakland

3433 Bates Street • Pittsburgh, PA • 15213

Parking Street parking, Soldiers & Sailors Garage and Carnegie Museum Garage

For more information call: 412.683.7140 ext. 234

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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CP PHOTO BY JORDAN MILLER

^ Sat., June 2: First Caturday Pittsburgh!

PARTY

all weekend. Ryan Deto June 1, 4 p.m. 1130 S. Braddock Ave., Swissvale; free. 3riversoutdoor.com

If you didn’t get to Coachella this year, you missed Beyoncé’s much talked about “Beychella” performance. But don’t worry, SisTers PGH is giving you a second chance. Grab your friends, put on your finest and head to Ace Hotel for Beychella 412 dance party. Dance to the footage from Beyoncé’s Coachella performance and join friends from the Beyhive. Getting your dance on tonight will benefit Peoples Pride, an LGBTQ group in Pittsburgh focused on championing the overlooked and ignored influence of black, brown and trans people in the community’s history and present. CR 8:30-11:30 p.m. Fri., June 1. Ace Hotel., 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. $5 or pay what you can. queerpgh.com

MUSIC Local Grammy-nominated metalcore band Code Orange is heading to Mr. Smalls Theatre tonight for a well-deserved homecoming performance. The band spent a year filled with festivals, being the first band to ever perform live at WWE’s NXT TakeOver: Brooklyn III, opening for a plethora of major influencers in the metalcore and hardcore punk scene, going to the Grammys and signing to major record label Roadrunner Records. Now, these Pittsburgh natives are coming back to the Pittsburgh stage after performing at Rock on the Range in Columbus two weeks ago and before heading off on a U.S. tour this summer. LO 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20-22. mrsmalls.com

BROS CrossFit invites you to bro-down tonight with some likeminded ... bros. Pick up your favorite six pack and prepare for

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CP PHOTO BY MEG FAIR

^ Fri., June 1: Code Orange

some male bonding at Bro Night at CrossFit Mt. Lebanon. Bring a friend to check out the gym, lift a few heavy things up (and then put them down) and

see what CrossFit is all about. P.S.: no girls allowed. CR 7:30-11 p.m. Fri., June 1. 427 Washington Rd., Mt. Lebanon. crossfitmtlebanon.com

OUTDOORS Springtime means more cyclists on Pittsburgh streets; it’s a fact. And for those bringing their bikes out of winter hibernation, making sure bikes are ready and safe to ride is essential. Today, pedal down to Strawberry Way just outside the


Hotel Monaco for a Free Bike Checkup. Pittsburgh’s bikeshare nonprofit, Healthy Ride, will be on the scene with its mechanics to administer some tune ups, on the house. Enjoy one of Pittsburgh’s car-free alleys while your bike gets the TLC it deserves. People who participate in a check up are registered to win a one-night stay at Hotel Monaco. RD June 1, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Strawberry Way, Downtown (near the intersection with William Penn Place; free. healthyridepgh.com

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF FELIPE Q. NOGUEIRA

Kali Uchis

THURSDAY Lola Tried 7 p.m. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. therobotoproject.com

FRIDAY PHOTO COURTESY OF SEBASTIAN FOLTZ

^ Fri., June 1: 3 Rivers Outdoor Co. Grand Opening

SATURDAY JUNE 2

Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls 6 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. promowestlive.com

SATURDAY California Cousins

FAIR The general vibe of the Pittsburgh Freaky Fair is the “we are the weirdos, mister” from The Craft. A bi-annual market, found at the former location of Joseph Beth Booksellers at SouthSide Works, features vendors selling vintage and handmade goods, such as haunted artwork, taxidermy, cannibalized books, lamps made from MRI scans, and so much more (if you can believe it). There will also be live entertainment, street performers and DJs. The event is all ages, but as the event’s website notes: they don’t censor vendors, so keep in mind your kid might turn goth if exposed to spooky kitsch. HL 11 a.m-6 p.m. 424 S. 27th St., South Side. pittsburghfreakyfair.com

CATS Tired of dog lovers getting to take their pets everywhere? Here’s the purr-fect event. First Caturday Pittsburgh!, part of a nationwide event held on the first Saturday of each month, invites cat owners to bring their fluffs to Schenley Park today for an afternoon of meowing, purring and — let’s be honest — probably some hissing. Cats comfortable on leashes or in strollers are best; or, keep them in their carrier if they’re not used to being outside. (Fur real.) Can’t have pets? Stop by to pet

7 p.m. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. therobotoproject.com

SUNDAY World’s Greatest Dad 7 p.m. Glitter Box Theater, Oakland. theglitterboxtheater.com

MONDAY Bruno Major 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. clubcafelive.com

TUESDAY Real Estate 7 p.m. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. mrsmalls.com

WEDNESDAY Kali Uchis 7 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. promowestlive.com

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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some kitties. We’re paws-itive it’ll be meow-velous. Lisa Cunningham 1:30-4:30 p.m. Mary Schenley Memorial Fountain, Schenley Park, Oakland. Weather purr-mitting. Facebook search “First Caturday Pittsburgh!”

FEST Taste your way through more than 50 Western Pennsylvania breweries at this year’s Beers of the Burgh Festival. A ticket gets you a keepsake glass and access to some of the finest beer brewed in our commonwealth. Music and live entertainment will keep you dancing through the day and into the evening. CR 3-7 p.m., Sat., June 2. Carrie Furnace, Carrie Furnace Blvd., Swissvale. $49 (no door sales). 21 and over. beersoftheburgh.com

MUSIC Ahead of the Deutschtown Music Festival (June 13-14), check out several musicians on the first night of Deutschtown Goes Downtown in Market Square. All three artists performing are also on the schedule for the main festival. They are: LoFi Delphi, an energetic, lively rock group; indie rock band André Costello and the Cool Minors, fresh off the May 11 release of its second album, Resident Frequencies; and Grand Piano, a rock group that incorporates folk, jazz, honky-tonk and an occasional pedal steel guitar. Synth-punk duo The Lopez will play a DJ set. Local music blogger Hugh Twyman, known for his site HughShows, will host the show. AM. 5 p.m. 210 Forbes Ave., Downtown. Free. facebook.com/ deutschtownmusicfestival

MUSIC Though the riot grrrl movement mostly fractured at the close of the 1990s, its message of give-you-hell feminism still holds up. Go Go Gidget hasn’t forgotten that message. A four-piece band, which describes its surf-punk style as “riot srrrf,”

PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE RUBINO

^ Mon., June 4: Golden Girls LIVE

Go Go Gidget will perform its first show as a group at Howlers. The band will be joined by Lorenzo’s Oil, a “fairly quiet” duo that combines two bass guitars, matching outfits and lots of laughter. Metal-influenced punk group The F**kies will bring its sometimes-spooky, cellofilled sound along for the ride. Michiganborn acoustic folk-rock singer-songwriter Jess Klein will also perform. AM 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $8. howlerspittsburgh.com

SUNDAY JUNE 3 MUSIC More than a decade before Katy Perry became a star with a song of the same name, singer-songwriter Jill Sobule was singing about bi-curiosity on a song titled “I Kissed A Girl.” When Perry’s song of the same name became a hit, Sobule made

waves when she sarcastically called Perry a “f*cking little slut.” (She later penned a HuffPost article calling that a “goof on what many of my fans were hoping to hear.”) Back in 1995, Sobule’s “I Kissed A Girl” reached several charts, and its music video — featuring Fabio, of romance novel cover fame — became a hit on MTV. Much of Sobule’s music, which she’ll bring to Club Cafe, features folksy guitar and impassioned singing; her lyrics range from deep

Summer Reading

GANZA Sunday, June 10 | 12 – 5 pm

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2018 Edition

EXTRAVA

FAMILY FESTIVAL #PGHREADS

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

CONTINUES ON PG. 42

Sign Up for Summer Reading • Music & Storytelling • Games & Crafts • Food Trucks • Used Book Sale

presented by

carnegielibrary.org/extravaganza


2018

VOTE NOW! Voting for BEST OF PGH 2018 has begun! Let your voice be heard and vote for your local favorites now.

pghcitypaper.com/bestofpgh

#CPBESTOFPGH

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

^ Fri., June 1: Century III Mall Final Meet and Walkthrough

and emotional to humorous and ironic. AM 6 p.m. 56-58 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. clubcafelive.com

MONDAY JUNE 4 MUSIC There are DIY indie bands, and then there’s Men I Trust. The five-piece from Montreal doesn’t just make music — its members write, record, mix and master all the band’s songs, and they shoot their own music videos. The group’s Facebook page lists its label as “no labels and pr companies plz.” Though that might make the band sound abrasive or rude, its music is chill, smooth and relaxing, all while still maintaining a groovy undertone. The show at Cattivo will be opened by another Montrealbased group, Anemone. The dream pop fivepiece’s first album, Baby Only You & I, was released in April and features seven songs, three of them remixes. AM 6:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12. cattivopgh.com

COMEDY Have you ever watched an episode of the iconic 1980s sitcom Golden Girls and thought, “Wow, this would be so much ^ Mon., June 4: Men I Trust

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better if it was read by an all-male lineup of comedians and local actors?” Wait no more, because tonight at the Arcade Comedy Theater, all of your Golden Girls gender-swapped dreams are coming true with Golden Girls LIVE. In a special Monday night performance, there will be a staged reading of two classic episodes, directed by Pittsburgh-based talent agent Jared Pascoe. Relive the decades-old classic with a special kind of twist. LO 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. 943 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $14. arcadecomedytheater.com

WEDNESDAY JUNE 6 MUSIC If you haven’t followed Stephen Malkmus since the breakup of his seminal group Pavement in 1999, it might be time to check out Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks. In the seven albums the group has put out since 2001, Malkmus has continued to release sardonic, catchy indie rock highlighted by his inimitable, nonchalant delivery. The Jicks have changed throughout the years — The Clash’s late Joe Strummer, Sleater Kinney’s Janet Weiss, Joggers’ Jake Morris all filled in on drums at some point — but Malkmus’ idiosyncratic, accessible songwriting is as charming as ever. Check them out at Rex Theater tonight, with the Portland, Ore. band Lithics opening. AG 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20. rextheater.net •


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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east liberty squirrel hill north hills NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION TO INVOLUNTARILY TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE In Re: Adoption of Malachi Tyrone Becton, a minor. No. 85933 of 2018 in the Orphans Court of Berks County, Pennsylvania To: Tyrone Becton, Joseph Aquiline and any Unknown John Doe, or Anyone Claiming Paternity of Malachi Tyrone Becton born on December 29, 2017. The mother of said child is Christina Gima. A Petition has been filed asking the Court to put an end to all rights you have to your child, Malachi Tyrone Becton. The Court has set a hearing to consider ending your rights to your child. That hearing will be held in the Courtroom designated for Senior Judge Stephen B. Lieberman, Berks County Courthouse, 633 Court Street, Reading, PA 19601, on June 22, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. You have a right to attend the hearing. If you fail to attend the scheduled hearing, the Hearing will go on without you and the Court may end your rights to your child without your being present. You have a right to be represented at the Hearing by a lawyer. You should take this paper to your lawyer at once. If you do not have a lawyer, or cannot afford one, go to or telephone the office set forth below to find out where you can get legal help.

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CAN YOU FIELD IT?

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

’ LET S

GET S CIAL ACROSS 1 Wallflower Dylan 6 “See ya” 11 First mo. 14 “The Terminator” star, to fans 15 Hashtag movement started by Tarana Burke 16 Game with Reverse cards 17 What a wrestler or lion tamer does? 19 ___ pass 20 Two by four cutters 21 Fisherman’s gear 22 Instrument in some psychedelic bands 24 Barely make (by) 26 Nickname of Middle Eastern politics 27 Task a busy witch must do? 34 “Crazy” singer 35 Prepare for take off 36 Money-losing venture? 38 Strange 39 Amusement park ride that spins on a turntable 42 Had a date? 43 Garage job 45 Echelon 46 Wears 48 Those that smack vultures?

51 “Divergent” heroine 52 Punching tool 53 Ready to pour 55 Mix (up) 58 Mennen shaving brand 62 Making a loving sound 63 Swashbucklers that keep misplacing their rapiers? 66 Lover’s word 67 Penske rival 68 Celebrity chef Smith 69 Green lights 70 Gumby’s friend 71 Legally bar

DOWN 1 Horror film set in Amity 2 Cecilia Bartoli song 3 Had down cold 4 Engine leakage preventer 5 Dreamland? 6 “Here’s how I feel,” initially 7 Honey-flavored alcoholic beverage 8 Lift provider? 9 100% behind 10 Can you dig it? 11 “Save this as a backup” 12 “My Way” songwriter

13 Film genre with detectives 18 Indie snob’s rep 23 Egyptian bird 25 Tie part 26 Brief moment 27 Species recovery subj. 28 Give a new audio to 29 Missile launchers? 30 Runner’s spot 31 Walked back and forth 32 Soccer mom’s area 33 Swamp thing 37 ___ room 40 Scheduling nos. 41 Waffle House hero James ___ Jr.

44 Pound in English class 47 Ways to s ee the world 49 Closes, as a fly 50 Noble rank 53 Otto, in Oaxaca 54 Bit of light reading? 55 Time in the tub 56 “Big, if ___” 57 Lackadaisically 59 Pool room fabric 60 Rap’s Migos, e.g. 61 “This should take precedence,” briefly 64 “Never heard of him” 65 Writing similar to a madrigal LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 30-JUNE 6, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 38-year-old gay man with a serious problem. My boyfriend of five years has developed a strange fascination. We’ve always watched porn together, but now he has been looking at straight porn and even lesbian porn (!!!) more and more often. More than once he has expressed an interest in having a MMF threesome—and he’s a self-proclaimed gold-star gay! This week, I discovered he had hidden a Fleshlight from me. I could tell he had used it. What is going on with him? On the other hand, we still have sex pretty frequently. He really gets off when I call his ass a “pussy,” which I’ll do to turn him on, but I find it pretty weird. He also tells me he gets off on the thought of the two of us fucking a woman together. This really seems bizarre! Could my beautiful bottom boy be turning bi? If he is, I don’t know how we can handle it. GUY ALARMED, YEAH, BY YOUNGER BOYFRIEND’S INTEREST

Turning bi? Unlikely. Always was bi and only just realized it? Likelier. Always was bi but identified as gay because (1) he prefers men as romantic partners and (2) the biphobia he encountered in gay male spaces/bedrooms/buttholes convinced him to stay closeted but he doesn’t want to live a lie anymore and he’s done hiding from the man he loves but instead of using his words and coming out to you like a grown up, GAYBYBI, your boyfriend is letting you know he’s bi with his porn choices and a big push to make a MMF threesome sound like a sexy adventure you would both enjoy? Likeliest. As for how to handle it, GAYBYBI, you’ll have to use your words: Ask your boyfriend if he’s bi. (Spoiler: He’s bi, bicurious or so homoflexible he could tour with Cirque du Soleil.) If you’re not interested in having sex with women, tell him so. If being with you means he can never have sex with a woman, tell him so. And if you would never knowingly date a bi guy, tell him he deserves better. A relationship question that doesn’t involve

sex: Occasionally when two people live together, they bump into each other or one may get in the way of the other. Is it reasonable to be put off if rather than simply hearing “Excuse me” when you are inadvertently in someone’s way, the person trying to gain access says, “Do you have to stand there?” JUST SEEMS RUDE

People who are courteous to strangers (“Excuse me, can I squeeze past you?”) and contemptuous with intimate partners (“Do you have to stand there, you fucking dumbass?”) don’t value their partners and don’t deserve intimacy. People who are a**holes to everyone don’t deserve intimacy either, of course, but they get points for being consistent. I have two complaints: one with the world and one with you. My problem with the world is that it seems to think it is possible to embrace the rights of sex workers and still stigmatize the men who employ them. I am in a happy monogamish marriage, and I enjoy a very good, vanilla-but-bordering-ontantric sex life with my wife. Early on, when we discussed how open our marriage should be, we decided it would be all right for me to see escorts several times a year. This gives me some sexual variety and keeps her from feeling threatened by my becoming emotionally involved with a third party. She is very mono and has no interest in going outside the marriage for sex. My quarrel with you has to do with your oftrepeated advice that people should break things off with partners who don’t perform oral sex. My wife doesn’t like to give head — and I really don’t like getting it from her, since she doesn’t like doing it. It is, however, one of the things on my list for my quar-

terly pro session. So, I go down on her, she doesn’t go down on me, and I see escorts who do. And… IT WORKS FOR US

In regards to your first complaint, IWFU, there are sex workers out there fighting for their rights and fighting the stigma against sex work — along with fighting prohibition, the Nordic Model, and SESTA (google it) — but you don’t see the men who employ them stepping up and joining the fight. “[It’s time for] all of you clients out there [to] get off your duffs and fight,” as sex worker and sex-worker-rights advocate Maggie McNeill wrote on her blog. “Regular clients outnumber full-time whores by at least 60 to 1. Gentlemen, I suggest you rethink your current silence, unless you want to be the next one with your name and picture splashed across newspapers, TV screens, and websites.” In regards to your second complaint, IWFU, it is true that I’ve said — on one or two occasions — that oral comes standard and any model that arrives without oral should be returned to the lot. I’ve also said that you can’t be in an LTR without paying the price of admission, and I’ve said that a lot more often. If not getting oral at home is the price of admission you’re willing to pay to be with your wife, and if allowing you to get oral elsewhere is the price of admission she’s willing to pay to be with you, then Godspeed, IWFU, and tip the sex workers you patronize and speak up to fight the stigma against doing sex work and hiring sex workers.

IF YOU’RE NOT INTERESTED IN HAVING SEX WITH WOMEN, TELL HIM SO.

On the Lovecast, “Ask a Fuck-Up!”: savagelove cast.com. Send your questions to mail@savagelove.net and find the Savage Lovecast (Dan’s weekly podcast) at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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Marcus Miller

Live at the August Wilson Center June 15, 2018 7:00 PM Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Miss Grammy Award winning bassist Marcus Miller as part of the Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival Presented by Citizens Bank featuring Gregory Porter, Shemekia Copeland, Pedrito Martinez, A Jazz Crawl, Craft Beer Garden, Nightly Jam Sessions hosted by Sean Jones and More! The Jazz Fest is June 15 -17 Live in the Cultural District.

Pittsburghjazzfest.org

May 30, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 22

May 30, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 22