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EDITORIAL Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts and Entertainment Editor REBECCA ADDISON Associate Editor ALEX GORDON Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns ANNIE BREWER, ALEX MCCANN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

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MAY 16-23, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 20

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MAYA PUSKARIC, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

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News+Views 6 Food+Drink 15 Arts+Entertainment 20 A Calendar 100

Marketing Director BETHANY RUHE Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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SUMMER GUIDE PULLOUT 25 C P C OV E R IL L U ST R AT IO NS B Y ASH L E Y O L INGE R

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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NEWS +VIEWS

.MARIJUANA.

GETTING HIGHER

Despite decriminalization, Pittsburgh’s marijuana-possession arrests are on the rise BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HEN PITTSBURGH City Council passed a marijuana-decriminalization ordinance in December 2015, it was seen as a victory on many fronts. Local governments would see fiscal savings thanks to fewer resources being used to arrest and prosecute individuals. Progress was promised in reducing the disproportionate arrests of black people in the city. And, hopefully, vulnerable populations would avoid entering the criminal-justice system for marijuana possession in small amounts. “From a social perspective, it will really help a lot of young men and women’s lives from being destroyed or caught in sort of the hamster wheel of prosecution through governmental means,” Pittsburgh City Councilor Daniel Lavelle told City Paper in 2015.

But after a decrease in marijuana-possession arrests in 2016, those numbers actually jumped significantly in 2017. Chris Goldstein of marijuana-advocacy group Philly NORML compiled statistics from the Pennsylvania Crime Reporting System over the past few years. Goldstein counted the arrests filed under Pennsylvania statute 18F, which signifies misdemeanor possession of less than 30 grams of marijuana. In 2016, the first year of decriminalization in Pittsburgh, marijuana-possession arrests dropped to 494 for the year (down by 160). But in 2017, marijuana-possession arrests increased to 772. In fact, 2017 arrests for possessing less than 30 grams of marijuana even surpassed the 2015 totals by 118 arrests (before a decriminalization ordinance was in place but recognized as necessary by city officials).


800

PEOPLE

1,000 WHITE 764

THE PARTY IS 2 WEEKS AWAY!

BLACK 638

600

551 477

400

348 302 244

0

221 177

200

2013

2014

146

2015

2016

2017

PITTSBURGH’S MISDEMEANOR MARIJUANA-POSSESSION ARRESTS OVER THE YEARS Taken from Pa. Uniform Crime Reporting System — Code 18F DATA COMPILED BY CHRIS GOLDSTEIN

Without comprehensive data available, Pittsburgh marijuana-reform advocates aren’t sure exactly why the arrests rose in 2017. However, they say some actions left the door open for officers to ignore the ordinance, which could be a factor, along with others, in the rise of arrests. Advocates are also upset that the ordinance has had virtually no effect on shrinking the disproportionate gap in which black and white people are arrested for marijuana possession. Pittsburgh officials say they’re aware of the increase and are looking at steps to meet their commitments to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana. But advocates say arrests will only drop again if changes are made to the ordinance and attitudes are altered among Pittsburgh police officers. And in an age of conflicting law-enforcement priorities handed down from federal, state and local officials, that may be a difficult feat. PATRICK NIGHTINGALE, of marijuanaadvocacy group Pittsburgh NORML, isn’t happy about the increase in arrests. He says the decriminalization ordinance, which essentially issues tickets and a small fine to violators, was used about 200 times in 2017. But Nightingale says that number should be higher, considering most of the misdemeanor marijuanapossession charges end up being withdrawn anyway. “You are still bringing 700 people into the court and fingerprinting them, and that is 700 people that still need their records expunged,” says Nightingale.

“All of these cases are still being withdrawn. Why are these people getting fingerprinted?” Nightingale is also upset that possession arrests are still overwhelmingly affecting African Americans in Pittsburgh. Out of the 772 people arrested on misdemeanor marijuana-possession charges in 2017, 551 of them were black. That means in a city where African Americans make up just 24 percent of the population, black residents made up 71 percent of these marijuana arrests. That percentage has seen virtually no annual change since 2013. In February, Nightingale met with Pittsburgh officials and high-ranking police officers to discuss the increase in arrests. He says officers complained some marijuana consumption in public has increased due to a presumption marijuana is quasi-legal now. Nightingale says this claim may have some merit, given some might not fully understand the decriminalization ordinance, as well as the proliferation of headlines about the start of Pennsylvania’s medical-marijuana program and California’s new legal recreational cannabis status. But Nightingale thinks the increase in arrests has more to do with a flaw in the ordinance and a memo sent to Pittsburgh police officers. Nightingale says Pittsburgh Deputy Chief Thomas Stangrecki issued a memo advising officers that they had the discretion to use the decriminalization ordinance. However, the memo told officers they “may” follow the ordinance but stopped short of telling CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

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JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER IN MAY. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NONMEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR CALL 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

GETTING HIGHER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

them that they “shall” use the ordinance. The ordinance also states: “This Chapter shall not be construed to supersede any existing Pennsylvania or Federal law.” State and federal law classify marijuana possession as a misdemeanor. “It is a policy, it is not a law, and the policy is weakly worded,” says Nightingale. “All I want to do is change the word from ‘may’ to ‘shall.’” Nightingale says the Pittsburgh ordinance was modeled after Philadelphia’s decriminalization ordinance, except for some minor changes, like using the word “may” instead of “shall.” But he says that makes big difference. Philadelphia’s marijuana-possession arrests have dramatically dropped since the city passed its decriminalization ordinance in 2014. Dan Gilman, chief of staff for Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, says Peduto still deeply believes in the decriminalization of small amounts of marijuana. In fact, Peduto announced in a tweet on May 11 that he supports Pennsylvania legalizing and taxing recreational marijuana. Gilman doesn’t downplay the marijuana-arrest numbers, but he says those figures could be a bit misleading since some marijuana-possession arrests could be tied to more serious crimes. However, Gilman says officials are working closely with the law department to make possible adjustments to the policy and should be meeting this week.

“IT IS A POLICY, IT IS NOT A LAW, AND THE POLICY IS WEAKLY WORDED.” “It is something very much on the front burner and once we get through that, then training will reflect the new policy,” says Gilman. Gilman says he “would have hoped to see the numbers drop by now” but notes the decriminalization ordinance is not a “silver bullet” solution for fixing the issues surrounding marijuana, including the racial gap in those arrests. Gilman says he has faith in the ability of Pittsburgh Police officers to adjust to these figures. Gilman also says the police department’s ongoing implicit bias training should continue to tackle the racialdisparity gap in all arrests. JESSE WOZNIAK is a West Virginia Uni-

412-471-5808

versity criminology professor who advocated for Pittsburgh’s decriminalization

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Patrick Nightingale

ordinance as part of the local Alliance for Police Accountability. He’s not surprised that marijuana-possession arrests grew last year because he says the ordinance’s language isn’t strong enough. “Without some teeth in the ordinance, it probably won’t make a difference,” says Wozniak. And without a mandate in the policy, Wozniak says Pittsburgh is reliant on officers to choose to enforce the ordinance when confronting people possessing marijuana. He says some city officers have embraced the ordinance, but understands conflicting law-enforcement priorities are sending mixed messages. “There are some officers that have really taken [the decriminalization ordinance] to heart,” says Wozniak. “But, in the current political environment, you also have rhetoric and policies of [U.S. Attorney General] Jeff Sessions.” Sessions is a well-known opponent to all things marijuana. In January, Sessions announced that federal prosecutors can decide for themselves whether to press cases against growers, sellers or users for violating federal law, including in states where the drug is legal. Wozniak says it’s not too farfetched to believe Pittsburgh police officers could be following Sessions’ lead. Either way, Wozniak says police culture doesn’t change quickly and Pittsburgh officers still have the ability to issue misdemeanor marijuana-possession arrests without breaking city rules. He says stricter local policies are needed to combat the culture of police officers and priorities laid out by people like Sessions. “Without strict language,” says Wozniak, “then it just goes back to the way it was before.”


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.NEWS .

GOT GAME? BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

WOMAN WALKS into a crowded bar in Los Angeles. She’s there to meet her best friend but can’t find her anywhere. Killing time until her friend shows, the woman steps up to the bar and orders a drink. As she stands there she feels the weighty gaze of several men fall on her. She realizes that the bar is mostly filled with men and soon one from the crowd steps toward her. He reaches for her arm and commands her to spin. This is one of the many scenarios that can be played in “The Game: The Game,” an immersive installation artwork and simulator created by Carnegie Mellon University School of Art professor Angela Washko. Washko created The Game: The Game as an interactive exploration of the world of seduction coaching, a.k.a. pick-up artists (PUAs), and the tactics they use in their efforts to bed as many women as possible. Neil Strauss’ 2005 book The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists introduced the subculture to mainstream American culture and shined a light on the massive amount of money these men were making selling their tactics to sexually frustrated men in seminars, online videos and written guides. Some of these PUAs are self-professed chauvinists, insisting that hypermasculine, aggressive and leading behaviors are the way to a fulfilling (read: prodigious) sex life. Washko, a feminist artist, became aware and interested in learning about pick-up artistry through gaming, particularly inside World of Warcraft. As a participant in the gaming space, she started a four-year project called “The Counsel on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness” where she facilitated conversations with other players about some of the exclusionary social dynamics in the game. “We had a lot of conversations about why the player base was so aggressive toward women, people of color and the queer community in this fantasy game environment,” Washko says. During the project, she talked with a lot of people who identified as men’s rights activists and “members of the manosphere.” This led her to Roosh V, an American pick-up artist, blogger and author of a series of books called Bang, which are manuals filled with advice and tips about how to pick up women in different countries. Washko went on a search for

IMAGE COURTESY OF ANGELA WASHKO

Pick-up artists in “The Game: The Game”

the women Roosh V claimed he had slept with and Roosh V became aware of the project over Twitter. After much back and forth, he agreed to an interview via Skype with Washko. Through that interview and an intensive study of the tactics and perspective of four other PUAs, Washko began developing The Game: The Game.

“I THOUGHT THAT CREATING A GAME EXPERIENCE WAS A WAY THAT PEOPLE COULD EXPERIENCE THOSE PRACTICES WITHOUT THE DISTANCE THAT READING ABOUT THEM CREATES.” Three years and over the equivalent of a 400-page novel in self-written code later, “The Game: The Game” is showing in galleries in select cities and ready to play. Washko didn’t pull any punches in development. All of the pick-up artists encountered in the game are based on six real PUAs and their published materials. She names them, uses their images (illustrated cyanotypes created by Washko) and has programmed each to use the tactics that they discuss in their books and seminars. Washko says she wanted participants to be able to “play through some of the most visible and successful pick-up artist practices and see what it would be like to encounter them.”

“I thought that creating a game experience was a way that people could experience those practices without the distance that reading about them creates, and put them in the position of making decisions,” says Washko. The platform has over 50 different endings that a player can reach. One can play through and go home with a PUA, immediately try to get away from the situation or choose other options in between. The soundtrack, written and performed by the band Xiu Xiu, is dark and complex and, in combination with Washko’s cyanotypes, helps to create a feeling of claustrophobia and urgency during game play. Men approach the player one after another. When I was playing, I felt myself experiencing a stress response: sweaty palms, quickened pulse and a desire to turn it off. I recorded audio as I played and listening back to it, I hear myself sighing frequently and laughing nervously. As a young woman, I immediately recognized many of the tactics that were being used from personal experience. Washko confirmed that many women players had felt similarly. “One of the things that’s really important to me is making sure that people know what they’re getting before they go into the experience,” says Washko. She makes sure to contextualize the work with warnings that some of the scenarios resemble sexual assault and confirms that people know where the material is coming from. The game is not currently available for the public to play, but Washko plans to eventually release it online. To keep up with what Washko is working on and to learn more about this project, visit angelawashko.com.


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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STADIUM SUMMER EVENTS MAY May 11

Riverhounds SC vs Indy Eleven

May 19

Pittsburgh Taco Festival

May 20

Punk In Drublic Beer & Music Festival

May 26

Riverhounds SC vs Penn FC

May 30

Riverhounds SC vs Nashville

.LGBTQ.

PRIME PROTECTION BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JUNE June 5

Dirty Heads w/Iration, The Movement, Pacific Dub

June 7

Alzheimer’s Association RivALZ Football Game

June 16

Riverhounds SC vs New York Red Bulls II

June 17

International Champions Cup U16 Skills Contest

June 21 -22

Nitro Circus presents The NEXT LEVEL Tour

JULY July 4

Riverhounds SC vs North Carolina FC

July 21

Riverhounds SC vs Charleston

AUGUST August 1

Riverhounds SC vs Richmond

August 4

Riverhounds SC vs Toronto FC II

August 5

Kick IT 3v3 Soccer

August 18

Riverhounds SC vs Charlotte Independence

August 22

Riverhounds SC vs Tampa Bay Rowdies

HOME OF THE

FOR MORE INFO GO TO HIGHMARKSTADIUM.COM 12

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S

OME OF THE fastest growing

towns in the Pittsburgh area lie just across the Allegheny County border in counties like Butler and Washington. Townships like Cranberry and Peters have enjoyed influxes of several thousand new residents over the years. These areas are very attractive to new residents thanks to their modern amenities, newly constructed homes, low taxes and good school districts. But towns outside of Allegheny County also lack something important to LGBTQ residents: civil-rights protections that prevent people from being evicted or fired merely for identifying as LGBTQ. And the “No Way No Gay” campaign believes this lack of protections could seriously hurt Pittsburgh’s chances of landing Amazon’s second headquarters, also called HQ2. The campaign was established in February to encourage Amazon to choose a region with robust LGBTQ protections. Pittsburgh and Allegheny County have passed non-discrimination laws for LGBTQ residents, but no community outside of Allegheny County in the greater Pittsburgh area offers such protections. Amazon employees have pressured the tech giant to consider LGBTQ protections when selecting the HQ2 location. The Seattle Times reports that Amazon vice president of public policy Brian Huseman issued a memo assuaging employees’ concerns that Amazon is committed to LGBTQ rights. “[We’ll] continue to join the business community in efforts to oppose laws that discriminate or encourage discrimination, no matter where HQ2 lands,” wrote Huseman in the memo.

No Way No Gay spokesperson Conor Gaughan believes this is a bad sign for Pittsburgh’s HQ2 bid, since communities like Cranberry and Peters, popular suburbs for people who work in the city but choose to live elsewhere, don’t have LGBTQ protections. “Amazon employees shouldn’t have to sacrifice their civil liberties on their daily commute to and from work or send their kids to schools where they aren’t protected from bullying based on their sexual orientation or gender identity,” wrote Gaughan. “When it comes to big and innovative companies looking to make major investments, this presents a competitive disadvantage to those cities in states without protections.” The past several years, Pennsylvania state Rep. Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill) has introduced a bill in Harrisburg that would provide all LGBTQ Pennsylvanians non-discrimination protections. However, that bill has been held up in state Rep. Daryl Metcalfe’s (R-Cranberry) committee. Metcalfe, who consistently expresses anti-LGBTQ views, wrote on Facebook in April that he blocks “all substantive Democrat legislation.” Gaughan acknowledges that both cities of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia are very LGBTQ friendly, but he writes that without a statewide LGBTQ non-discrimination law, any city in Pennsylvania has a slim chance to land HQ2. “It is clear that the failure of state lawmakers to protect LGBTQ citizens is jeopardizing the chances that either Philadelphia or Pittsburgh will land the bid and the estimated 50,000 new jobs that come with it,” wrote Gaughan.


LOVE US? HATE US? + RANTS RAVES EMAIL US AT INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM COMMENTS OF THE WEEK

.PITTSBURGH LEFT.

RISKY WAGER?

“My ‘user name’ is Alan, as noted. Should it interest anyone, my real first name is exactly the same, Alan. I am not a devotee of ‘social media.’”

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Free Will Astrology BY ROB BREZSNY

LOVE LAS VEGAS and it’s not just because of the gambling. It is the gambling, of course — sports gambling being a big part of that — but it’s also the vibe, the atmosphere, the lights, the drinks, the food, the shows and the ability to experience the unexpected. It’s also because I can come home and leave it all there until the next trip. But the proliferation of gambling across the country makes it easy for just about anyone to be at a casino in a few hours (at the most). Then last year, Pennsylvania legalized online gambling from poker and slot machines to lottery scratchers and Keno. So, when the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling on May 14 clearing the way for legal sports gambling across the country, it didn’t take long to realize that Pennsylvania was soon going to be in this racket too. It’s already legal. When the legislature decided last year that it was a good idea to let people play slot machines from their iPhones, they also legalized sports gambling, when and if the federal prohibition was lifted. And, so, here we are. Don’t look for this to be a “someday” kind of thing. J.J. Abbott, spokesperson for Gov. Tom Wolf told the Allentown Morning Call on Monday morning that getting betting windows open “should be pretty quick,” adding that it “has the potential to be good for the budget.” That’s what we’ve heard from the time that gambling was expanded nearly a decade ago. But at the beginning of this process, way back when slots were legalized to help save the state’s horse-racing industry, legislators weren’t just asking if it was good for the budget, they were asking if it was good for the citizenry. But once those first casinos opened and

governments could see how easily the money came in, that concern for “the t. people” has taken a backseat. opic I’ve written about this topic a lot over the years and I’ve alm ways pointed out that I am ng not a prohibitionist. Gambling its done safely and within limits ne is a hell of a lot of fun. Anyone who has ever played craps at 2 a.m. with a hot shooter knows that. But we’ve made it too easy ord for people who can least afford sks these losses to take these risks. Up until 48 hours ago, sports gambling was an unobtainable unicorn for states

— tens of billions of dollars are wagered p on sports every year. It’s part of Americu can culture and it’s about to get really ea to do. The revenue ceiling is easy a unknown because more than an 95 percent of sports gambling is done illegally and untaxed. This is pretty much the last available gambling market for st states like Pennsylvania to enter th and they’re hoping the payoff is massive Pretty much the only place left sive. to take state-sanctioned gambling l is legalized cockfighting. Sadly, I don’t find that statement as absurd today as I did a few years ago.

JENSORENSEN

NOT YOUR SIGN? VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM FOR OUR FULL ASTROLOGICAL FORECAST

(April 20-May 20): TAURUS Born under the sign of Taurus, Edmund Wilson was a renowned 20th century author and critic who wrote more than 30 books. He also served as editor for Vanity Fair and The New Republic, and influenced the work of at least seven major American novelists. When he was growing up, he spent most of his free time reading books: 16 hours a day during summer vacations. His parents, worried about his obsessive passion, bought him a baseball uniform, hoping to encourage him to diversify his interests. His response was to wear the uniform while reading books 16 hours a day. I trust you will be equally dedicated to your own holy cause or noble pursuit in the coming weeks, Taurus. You have cosmic clearance to be single-minded about doing what you love.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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.GUEST OPINION.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT BY JACKIE CULLEN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG

Inside Ferment Pittsburgh’s Culture Library

.FOOD.

EXCHANGING CULTURES “Why not go home, reawaken some of those traditions and feed your family? Invite your neighbors over.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

OOD IS ONE of the primary channels for passing on and enlivening cultural heritage. Taste can be the key that unlocks powerful family memories or fosters connections between family members and friends when they are apart. Ferment Pittsburgh and Chatham University’s Center for Agriculture, Food and Transformation (CRAFT) are both interested in fostering these connections using a library system for fermentation cultures. Ferment Pittsburgh is a project designed to influence the growth of fermentation cultures in the area. For the past few years, the organization has been running an informal library for cultures (living organisms that propagate foods like yogurt, kombucha and sourdough bread). Now Ferment Pittsburgh wants to invite the wider public to be more involved in the project. “It’s a natural evolution because people ask me for cultures or

where they can get them. I wanted to make that a little more formal,” says Justin Lubecki, a farmer, educator and one of the core members of Ferment Pittsburgh. (City Paper covered one of his projects in our food podcast, Sound Bite.) Lubecki also wants people to be able to get local cultures instead of ordering them online. “Right now we [Lubecki and his brother Nick] have this very involved and specific farming project that’s involved with saving and perpetuating [local] seed strains. We see their adaptation. Seeds we’ve gotten from this region are totally outperforming seeds from other areas,” he says. When he was first getting interested in fermentation, Lubecki’s friend, David Asher, author of The Art of Natural Cheesemaking, was making kefir and inspired Lubecki to think of cultures as heritage. CONTINUES ON PG. 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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EXCHANGING CULTURES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 15

MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

WW WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM WWW W W SENY S NY Y AIPG A PGH G H CO M

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Trevor Ring, president of Chatham’s Fermentation Club with Sally Frey, assistant professor in sustainable gastronomy in food studies

Expires 5-30-18

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“I remember him introducing me to the history of it and saying, ‘This is one thing that we don’t have any idea of the origins of, how it was created and where it came from. We know more about the beginning of the universe than the beginning of kefir,’” says Lubecki. As a result, kefir has to be kept and passed on; to Lubecki and many others through history, the culture has taken on a sort of sacredness. “It’s an important cultural relic,” he says. Ferment Pittsburgh asks that people who want cultures to exchange something that is representative of themselves whether that’s a piece of art, a service or, most commonly, a favorite homemade dish. “It never made sense to me to sell them. The way we’ve done this all along is through exchange and bartering. The point is never to deny anyone this thing because it’s not ours to own. We care for it,” says Lubecki. Lubecki wants to harness the excitement and energy people feel about outside culinary experiences and going out to eat and transfer it back to the community level. “I want to take that inspiration and excitement and bring it home. It’s better for sourcing and investing into local agriculture,” says Lubecki. He wants to help families start new traditions and hold onto old ones through food. “Why not go home, reawaken some of those traditions and feed your family? Invite your neighbors over,” Lubecki says. CRAFT is in the nascent stages of launching its own culture library at Chatham. “The idea is an interdisciplinary proj-

ect that uses oral history and microbiology to collect cultures and document the genetic and personal histories of them,” says CRAFT project manager Cassandra Malis. When collecting cultures from community members, CRAFT will collect any historical information including recipes and pictures and add them to its collection of oral histories. To find out what cultures are currently available, visit fermentpittsburgh.com

“One of the things that projects like this do is maintain diversity. But to actually provide evidence that that’s what they’re doing, that’s what I can do,” says Sherie Edenborn, an associate professor of biology at Chatham. By testing the incoming cultures, Edenborn plans to chart “family trees” that show the relationships between different strains of fungi. Pairing biology with oral histories can help give a fuller history of cultures and serve to legitimize their roots. CRAFT’s existing oral history projects seek to preserve the knowledge and the history that accompanies the food of this region and the culture library fits into this niche. CRAFT is also interested in preserving the diversity of cultures in foods, which is part of the reason testing is an important tenet of its future culture library. Says Edenborn, “Biological diversity is hugely important because it builds stability in systems whether it’s an epicurean thing or a need to maintain stable food sources.”


.FOOD.

DUALSTRANDS

EAT ME

SUNDAYS

BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5PM - MIDNIGHT

May 20 | Chartreuse Chartreuse Yellow VEP

French Crooner

VS

Chartreuse Green VEP

Canadian Crooner

May 27 | mexican bitters Fernet-Vallet

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

DeeDee, a bartender at Howard’s for 15 years, shares a laugh with a customer CP PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS

.ON THE ROCKS .

HIDDEN GEMS BY CRAIG MRUSEK // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

LOCATION:

Mexican Rock

VS

Amargo-Vallet

MexicanAmerican Rock

21st Street Coffee and Tea, Downtown

OME BARS ARE liminal spaces. They appear mundane but give off extraordinary

energy. Everything about them seems unremarkable except for some curious aspect that can’t quite be identified. They’re simultaneously common and unexpected. And they’re the type of environment that shifts your perception. Howard’s Park Place Pub is one of those bars. Surrounded by a swath of well-kept grass and flower beds your grandmother would envy, it doesn’t resemble a bar so much as a building from a model train set made life-size. Standing slightly apart from the neighborhood’s houses and apartments, it radiates an odd, enticing charm. The colorful stripes painted on the exterior suggest an ice cream stand, but the smattering of beer signs indicates the grownupsonly nature of the place. The make-believe clock above the door always reads 5 (p.m.). If Tim Burton and Wes Anderson opened a bar together, this would be it.

HOWARD’S PARK PLACE PUB 534 Peebles St., Point Breeze. 412-247-9250

Entering Howard’s, you’re undeniably crossing a threshold. The metal-gated door is a bit imposing, and remains locked until the bartender buzzes you in. At that point, you’ve made the transition and entered a new realm. Initially, it appears to be an average neighborhood joint, but there’s a layer of uniqueness that pulls it pleasantly off-center. Small details slowly reveal themselves. If draft beer is your thing, you can’t be choosy. There’s only one on offer, and the solitary tap stands proudly like the sword in the stone. A high-mileage toaster oven hints that food is available but will be a strictly no-frills affair. Sharing shelf space with an assortment of hot sauce bottles is a handful of obscure reference books (presumably used to settle the occasional dispute). Christmas lights drape the ceiling in a cheery aura, regardless of the season. The overall atmosphere is a seamless balance of old and new, never tipping completely into nostalgia or trendiness. The bar’s age and history are evident, but so is its vibrancy. However, the one thing you notice above all is that everyone here is just so unfailingly nice. These and dozens of other things combine to make you immediately feel comfortable and welcome. This is the spot where you go for one drink but end up happily sticking around longer. Quirky warmth seems to seep from every surface and hold you in place. Even if it’s your first visit, you somehow feel as though you’ve been coming here for years. And of course, in true old Pittsburgh style, it’s cash only.

AMBIANCE: This quick in-and-out cafe is a nice relaxing spot to spend a few minutes in before heading back to the office.

WHAT WE ATE: Chocolate glazed donut from Relish Co.

COST: $3.50

HOT TAKE: A friend called this donut a “fistful of gluten” and they were right in the best way. This dense donut is a perfect snack to help settle your coffee jitters. The chocolate glaze was a sweet touch without being gloppy or overwhelming. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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O

N MAY 20, a craft beer and punk

festival named for NOFX’s 1994 album Punk in Drublic will come to Pittsburgh. The festival was born when Cameron Collins, a punk rock fan and co-founder of Brew Ha Ha Productions made a call to Fat Mike, the lead vocalist and bassist of NOFX, and suggested a collaboration. “I didn’t choose craft beer, it chose me,” says Fat Mike, who only goes by his stage name. “He wanted me to come on board and make it as fun as possible.” The festival will feature five major bands: NOFX, Bad Religion, Mad Caddies, The Interrupters, Bad Cop/Bad Cop and more than 100 different beers. Bands will play all day and beer will be tapped and poured from 1 to 4 p.m. After 4 p.m., cocktails, beer and non-alcoholic drinks will be available for purchase. Fat Mike and Stone Brewing collaborated to create a special beer for the festival: Stone & NOFX Punk in Drublic Hoppy Lager. This is Stone’s first collaborative an. can release with a musician. ed Other breweries represented e will include locals like Arsenal Cider House, Couch Brewery, North Country Brewing Co. and Hop Farm Brewing Co. Originally Collins wanted to theme it as a 21 and over event with 21 bands, but Fat Mike wanted a more low-key affair after years of doing shows with huge bills like Warped Tour. The event is still 21-and-over but the musical

focus is more defined. So far, the tour has stopped in Fort Worth, Texas, Richmond, Va., Philadelphia, Pa., and Brockton, Ma. and will wrap with “Camp Punk in Drublic” in Thornville, Ohio in the first weekend of June. “From what we’ve seen it’s just been super mellow and a really good time. Not having kids around sounds kind of elitist but it’s kinda nice. You don’t feel like you’re the oldest person at the show,” Fat Mike says laughing.

PUNK IN DRUBLIC 1-9 p.m. Sun., May 20. Highmark Stadium, 510 W. Station Square Dr., Southside. $49.5099.50. punkindrublicfest.com/pittsburgh

NOFX has been playing Pittsburgh for a long time, starting in the late ’80s at the former Electric Banana space in Oakland. Fat Mike is looking forward to playing classics from Punk in Drublic, the band’s fifth album, which sold more tha than a million copies and was na named the 11th best pop-punk album by Rolling Stone in 2017. But he’s more excited to play new material. “People wantto hear new songs,” he says. “Our newest record has gotten better reviews than we’ve gotten in over 10 years.” As for Fat Mike’s brew of choice, he says he’ll be sticking to vodka. “You can’t drink a case of beer every day,” he says. “I’d really be bigger than fat Mike. I’d be g gigantic Mike.”


DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

BAR LOUIE 330 N. SHORE DRIVE, NORTH SIDE (412-500-7530) AND 244 W BRIDGE ST., HOMESTEAD (412-462-6400) BARLOUIE.COM We’re your neighborhood bar, where you can kick back and be the real you, with the help of an amazing staff, great music, handcrafted martinis and cocktails, local and regional drafts, incredible wines and a huge selection of bar bites, snacks, burgers, flatbreads and sandwiches. Come in after work, before the game, late night at night, or any time you need a quick bite or a night out with friends. Bar Louie. Less obligations. More libations.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 / ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-to-table products.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

LEGACY CAFE CATERING 412-218-7216 LEGACYCAFEPITTSBURGH.COM Legacy Cafe catering means fresh quality food. Located in the Historic Hill District we are a premier Business to Business company committed to locally sourced produce.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SENTI RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 3473 BUTLER ST, LAWRENCEVILLE 412-586-4347 / SENTIRESTAURANT.COM Senti is a modern Italian Restaurant combining the tradition of Italian home cooking with European fine-dining. Taste different fine wines from the self-serve wine dispenser.

SENYAI THAI KITCHEN 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE., SHADYSIDE 412-441-4141 / SENYAIPGH.COM Immersed in authenticity, Senyai Thai Kitchen creates an intricate fusion of food and design, where every detail transports you to a faraway place. Traditional favorites and new creations like jumbo lump crab curry make Senyai a destination.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE, BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. We also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

Starship Mantis

.MUSIC.

COSMIC TRAP It’s a voyage through time and space on a wacky spaceship piloted by some of the most colorful characters you’ve met. BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

MAGINE FINDING your human form suddenly trans-

formed into that of an alien and being trapped in the ninth dimension, all while heartsick and hungry for some sense of affection and normalcy. That’s precisely where debut album Trapped in the 9th Dimension finds the members of Starship Mantis, entwined in a sonic drama. The album is full of romance (“Diamond Girl”), groovy energy (“27 Years”), calls for equality and unity (“Drop Your Color”) and danceable tunes with incredibly technical roots (“Space Citizen”). It’s a voyage through time and space on a wacky spaceship piloted by some of the most colorful characters you’ve met. Starship Mantis is a pop-soaked funk band with jazzfusion elements that induce hip shaking and feet moving.

The sextet wears fun, outlandish costumes and radiates an energy of excitement and carefree pleasure. The band has only been together for about a year and a half, but in that time, it has created 19 songs, a dozen of which found their way on to the forthcoming record. They craft the kind of music that musicians can nerd out over and casual fans can shake their booties to. After all, Starship Mantis is a firm believer that “your brain is in your butt.” “We try to incorporate pop aspects into it because of the whole idea that your brain is in your butt,” explains band member Beni Rossman. “We try to incorporate the idea that music can be enjoyable to musicians who are listening for cool little things, but it’s also for people who just want to dance. The pop aspect and


easy listening elements paired with the more mathematical music helps make it accessible.” The band is Rossman (bass), Langston Kelly (vocals/saxophone/flute), Julz Powell (drums), Spencer Geer (guitar), Chris Potter (keys) and Ross Antonich (percussion). Rossman and Geer have been performing music together since they were 19, and the two had previously played with Kelly in a house band. After one particular instance of a night of improvised funk and pop music together, Rossman went home and wrote down a bunch of bass licks. When he was done, he called up Kelly. “I told him, ‘I want to start this band, come over to my house,’” says Rossman. “We wrote these tunes and then everyone else came over the next day to work on them.” Two of the songs from the initial jam session can be found on Trapped: “27 Years” and “Space Citizen (Cosmic Man).” With Trapped, the band made an effort to take the songs it had written and form them into a cohesive storyline once all the parts had been assembled, essentially working backwards. “The very last song is actually part of the first song, so by the end of the record we get stuck in the ninth dimension and it cycles right back to the beginning again,” explains Rossman. “It was a whole process putting it together. We spent a lot of time figuring outthe order.” “We had the songs first, so we would then figure out what fits and made the storyline after the songs were together,” adds Geer. “Some of them fit together perfectly!” According to the band members,

none of the tracks are supposed to be standalones — rather the album is a unit. With the storyline, cyclical music style and its noisy, atmospheric transitions between songs, Trapped really is an album that deserves a full listen through — maybe even several. It contains all sorts of audio Easter eggs in the form of riffs, sampled sounds and beyond, little details that the band spent a great deal of time putting into place, little references to other tracks on the album and audio samples from the band’s travels. The band hopes that the mystique and details will lead people to do some fun dissecting in addition to the inevitable booty shaking.

STARSHIP MANTIS RELEASE PARTY AND PAINT JAM 9 p.m. Sat., May 19. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10-20. spiritpgh.com

“To give the album its full credit is to listen to it front to back and let it cycle through,” says Rossman. “It’s kind of like Arrested Development in that you’ll notice a bunch of stuff in the third or fourth time of listening that you didn’t notice before.” “And the storyline itself is a little ambiguous, we left it up a little to see what people can form in their mind. I think if people open their minds, the album can lead them to some pretty cool conclusions,” adds Rossman. One conclusion is clear: Starship Mantis has as bright a future as the stars its spaceship is zipping past on Trapped in the 9th Dimension.

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.MUSIC.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHRYN STABILE

MP 3 MONDAY >>ANDRÉ COSTELLO Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free, and this week it’s “Kinda (Makes You Feel Good)” by André Costello and the Cool Minors. The grooving indie rock track is the perfect soundtrack to the birth of summer. Stream or download “Kinda (Makes You Feel Good)” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com, and blast it as you bike alongside the river and let the sunshine wash over you.

CIGARETTES ©2018 SFNTC (2)

*Website restricted to age 21+ smokers

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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2018 PHOTO COURTESY OF IMAGE42

Kristin Welch and Adam Speers in Dogfight

.STAGE.

PRIZE FIGHT

BY TED HOOVER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VOTING BEGINS MAY 21ST Mark your calendars! The voting phase for Best of PGH 2018 is just around the corner. Let your voice be heard on May 21st and vote for your local favorites. Winners will be celebrated at the BEST OF PGH 2018 PARTY on August 9th!

VOTING ENDS

SUNDAY, JUNE 17th at 11:59 PM pghcitypaper.com/bestofpgh #CPBESTOFPGH

I

N 1991, the independent film Dogfight, starring River Phoenix, was released. Over

the years it’s become something of a cult favorite. Set in San Francisco in 1961, it tells the story of three soldiers — the night before their posting to Vietnam — who’ve agreed to be part of a “dogfight.” This charming, and misogynistic, little Marine custom involves going out into the city, tracking down the ugliest women and bringing them to a dance where, without their knowing, the women are competing to be named most repellent. The man what brung her wins a cash prize. Who in the world would see that movie and think, “This oughta be a musical!!!”? Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, that’s who. You might recognize them as the songwriting team behind the films La La Land (lyrics) and The Greatest Showman, as well as the current Broadway smash, Dear Evan Hansen. Pasek and Paul, along with bookwriter Peter Duchan, turned the movie into an off-Broadway musical in 2013 which garnered rave reviews and put the duo on the theatrical map.

DOGFIGHT Continues through May 20. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. 412-429-6262 or stage62.com

And now Stage 62 presents the Pittsburgh premiere of this decidedly off-beat musical. The dogfight of the title is just the beginning of the story, of course; both the film and musical are, in fact, romances. The hero Eddie Birdlace, after tricking Rose Fenny to the dance and the attending humiliation, tries to make amends; in the process the two fall in love. I can’t say I’d ever put this on a list of favorite musicals, but I do salute Stage 62 for making such a bold artistic choice. Pasek & Paul’s score is played with impressive musicality by the six-piece band, thanks to music director Andrew Peters. The songs are sung with uniformly powerful and expressive voices; this production is really about the music … which is very smart since it’s mostly sung-thru. Adam Speers sings Birdlace’s numbers with a strong set of pipes; Ryan Hadbavny and Michael Tarasovich provide extraordinary vocal support as his fellow Marines. Ashley Harmon plays the dogfight “winner” with blistering contempt and aching self-loathing. And Kristin Welch brings to Rose a beautiful, soaring voice filled with need; this production is never more moving than during her two solo numbers. Director Rob James gets credit for propelling the show through some of its more hazardous pitfalls and, especially, for rounding up and guiding this cast of amazing singers.

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Special offer for Port Authority ConnectCard customers only. • All Grandstand seats are just $10. (Wednesdays only) Simply show your ConnectCard at the Pirates box office the day of the game or purchase in advance by going online to Pirates.com/ConnectCard. Connect and Save with this special offer today.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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PITTSBURGH PIRATES

AND DOLLAR DOG NIGHTS P

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MAY 25

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JUNE 13

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3


COVER ILLUSTRATIONS BY ASHLEY OLINGER

MUSIC 8 • FILM 22 • ARTS 24 • STAGE 34 • KIDS 44 • OUTDOORS 48 • FAIRS AND FESTS 54

COMFORT • QUALITY • COMMUNITY

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EVENTS 5.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: FLEET FOXES WITH SPECIAL GUEST AMEN DUNES Benedum Center for the Performing Arts (Downtown) Co-presented with Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and Opus One Tickets $34.50 - $79.50

5.18 – 6pm COLORFUL HOROSCOPES AND COCKTAILS The Warhol entrance space This program is presented as part of Art Museum Day 2018. Free; Registration is suggested

5.23 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS The Factory Families work with artist educators to create silkscreen prints for children ages 1 to 4 years old. Free with museum admission

5.27 – 6-10pm LGBTQ+ YOUTH PROM: ONCE UPON A MIDNIGHT The Warhol entrance space FREE; Registration suggested

Andy always saw things differently.

6.1 - 6pm TEEN TOWN HALL The Warhol theater Free; Registration required

: April 27 - September 2 This exhibition was developed collaboratively by The Andy Warhol Museum and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

Image: Alamy Images, New York City street view, circa 1950.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

5


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

The Flotation Suite is used for glorious individual or couples’ sessions in our 7’ x 6’ tank, the largest in the area. It provides relaxation, soothes sore joints and muscles, reduces symptoms from jet lag, headaches and migraines and promotes a more restful sleep. The Flotation Suite helps to calm our overly stimulated system and restores the body’s chemical and metabolic balance. And if you meditate, you will not find a more relaxing, peaceful and productive environment. Our LED Light Stimulation Bed is FDA-cleared and provides warm, soothing, natural, non-invasive relief from muscle, joint and arthritic pain. It helps reduce inflammation so the body can naturally relieve pain, speed healing and promote total body wellness. The bed increases production of ATP and NO to ease muscle fatigue and improve post-exercise and muscle recovery. It protects against cardiovascular disease, heart attack and stroke, and protects the skin from harmful UV rays. Revitalized is proud to provide the only commercial LED Bed in the region. We at Revitalize go to extreme lengths to provide our clients with a calm, relaxing environment which provides temporary body relief while encouraging a restful, meditative mindful setting. We are the only local facility to offer all three of these unique services. Come, relax and experience the Revitalize MINDANDBODY approach to wellness.


STORED CASH VALUE JUST LIKE CASH Load any amount on the ConnectCard up to $200. Use it anytime even if you don’t ride every day, it doesn’t expire like a weekly or monthly. Forget about exact change.

ConnectCard.org

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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Bad Cop, Bad Cop at Punk in Drublic, May 20 PHOTO COURTESY OF JEREMY VENAAS

SUMMER MUSIC COMPILED BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MAY 17 Basement, Citizen. Rex Theater Typesetter. The Mr. Roboto Project Fleet Foxes, Amen Dunes. Benedum Center Blue October. Mr. Smalls Lou Barlow. Get Hip Ana Popovic. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Marmalakes. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Kash’d Out. The Stage at Karma Cycles. Cattivo Whitney Peyton. The Smiling Moose Drift Mouth. Howlers

MAY 18 The Hills & the Rivers. Cattivo Ghost. Benedum Center Bambara. Rock Room Lee Robinson. Club Café (Early) Bait & Switch. Club Café (Late)

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Vance Joy. Stage AE Jukebox the Ghost. Mr. Smalls Handsome Ghost. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Bodega Bamz. Spirit Y La Bamba. Howlers

Paddy the Wanderer. Brillobox Justin Charles. The Smiling Moose West End Blend. Cattivo Ugly Blondes. The Smiling Moose Trapline. Mr. Smalls

Attic Salt. Howlers Petrification. Gooski’s

MAY 22 Portugal. The Man. Stage AE Andrew W.K. Mr. Smalls Rhiannon Giddens. Byham Theater Kiefer Sutherland. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Order of Elijah. Black Forge Coffee House Western Centuries. Club Café Them Evils. The Smiling Moose Jenny Don’t. Howlers Eric Johnson and The Fabulous A-Team. The Backstage Bar

Andre Costello and the Cool Minors.

MAY 20

The Stage at Karma Bryan Mcquaid. Hambone’s Rod Clemmons. Rex Theater Nowadays. Black Forge Coffee House Dauzat St. Marie. Palace Theatre

Punk in Drublic. Highmark Stadium Concealed Blade. Rock Room Slaughter. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille From Ashes to New. Cattivo Lissie, Van William. Mr. Smalls The Tillers. Club Café After Funk. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Starbenders. The Smiling Moose

at Theater Square

MAY 21

MAY 23

68. Cattivo Tool. Stage AE Matthew Logan Vasquez. Club Café

Kali Masi. Howlers Shaman’s Harvest. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille St. Dude. Club Café

MAY 19 Melvins. Rex Theater Starship Mantis. Spirit PSO360: Augustin Hadelich. Heinz Hall Shane Smith and the Saints. Wild Things Park Laxx. Cruze


PHOTO COURTESY OF RCA RECORDS

MUSIC VENUES THE ABBEY ON BUTLER STREET. 4635 Butler St., Lawrenceville. theabbeyonbutler.com ACE HOTEL. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. acehotel.com/pittsburgh ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. warhol.org AUGUST WILSON CENTER. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. trustarts.org BABYLAND. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. facebook.com (“Babyland”)

MELLON PARK, CITIPARKS BACH, BEETHOVEN AND BRUNCH SERIES.

trustarts.org

citiparks.net

BELVEDERE’S. 4016 Butler St.,

MOONDOGS. 378 Freeport Road,

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. librarymusichall.com

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL.

MAY 24 Dead to Me. The Smiling Moose Johnny A. Club Café Mitchell Tenpenny. Rivers Casino

MAY 25 HIRS. Babyland The Suicide Machines. Spirit New Found Glory, Bayside. Stage AE Jawga Boyz. Foxtail Caitlin Canty. Club Café (Early) Danielle Nicole. Club Café (Late) Badluxe. The Stage at Karma Billy Price. Rex Theater Kahone Concept. Mr. Smalls Daryl Shawn. The Backstage Bar

Chrome. Spirit Snowdonia. Rex Theater Thieves & Lovers. The Stage at Karma Apathy Angel. Mr. Smalls Moonlight Bloom. Howlers

MAY 27 The Sidekicks. The Smiling Moose Rick Maguire. Mr. Smalls

Blawnox. moondogs.us

THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. therobotoproject.com MR. SMALLS THEATRE. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. mrsmalls.com THE STAGE AT KARMA. 1713 E. Carson St., South Side. thestageatkarma.com PALACE THEATRE. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. thepalacetheatre.org PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. peterseneventscenter.com

PITTSBURGH JAZZLIVE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL. pittsburghjazzlive.com PPG PAINTS ARENA. 1001 Fifth Ave.,

4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. trustarts.org CATTIVO. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. cattivopgh.com CLUB CAFÉ. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. clubcafelive.com CRUZE BAR. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. cruzebar.com DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL. North Side. deutschtownmusicfestival.org FOXTAIL. 1601 E. Carson St., South Side.

Uptown. ppgpaintsarena.com REVEL + ROOST. 242 Forbes Ave., Downtown. revelandroost.com REX THEATER. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. rextheater.net RIVERS CASINO. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. riverscasino.com

THE FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze.

412-683-4418

thefrickpittsburgh.org GET HIP HQ. 1800 Columbus Ave., North Side. gethip.com THE GLITTER BOX THEATER. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. theglitterboxtheater.com GOOSKI’S. 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. 412-681-1658 HAMBONE’S. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. hambonespittsburgh.com HARD ROCK CAFÉ. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. hardrock.com HARTWOOD ACRES. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. 412-351-2528 HEINZ FIELD. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. heinzfield.com HEINZ HALL. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. pittsburghsymphony.org

HIGHLAND PARK, CITIPARKS RESERVOIR OF JAZZ SERIES. citiparks.net HIGHMARK STADIUM. 510 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. highmarkstadium.com

RIVERVIEW PARK, CITIPARKS STARS AT RIVERVIEW JAZZ SERIES. citiparks.net ROCK ROOM. 1054 Herron Ave., Polish Hill. SKULL FEST. skullfestpgh.com ST. CLAIR PARK. 135 N. Maple Ave., Greensburg. summersounds.com

SCHENLEY PARK, CITIPARKS WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES. citiparks.net SCHENLEY PLAZA. 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. pittsburghparks.org/schenley-plaza THE SHOP. 3520 Charlotte St., Lawrenceville. 412-951-0622 THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. smiling-moose.com SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. 100 Farmshow Drive, South Park. 412-835-4810 SPIRIT. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. spiritpgh.com STAGE AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. promowestlive.com THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Point State Park, Downtown. 3riversartsfest.org

WIGLE WHISKEY’S BARRELHOUSE AND WHISKEY GARDEN. 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side. wiglewhiskey.com/barrelhouse

WILD THINGS PARK. 1 Washington Federal Way, Washington. washingtonwildthings.com

MAY 28 Sworn Enemy. Cattivo Suffering Hour. The Shop

MAY 29

MAY 26

Spirit Animal. Stage AE Wormrot. Black Forge Coffee House Brandon Bonine. The Smiling Moose Jevon Rushton Group.

Suuns. Club Café Ufomammut. Cattivo

The Backstage Bar at Theater Square Dirty Projectors. Mr. Smalls

at Theater Square

MEADOWS RACETRACK AND CASINO. 210 Racetrack Road, Washington. meadowsgaming.com

THE BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. Lawrenceville. belvederesultradrive.com BENEDUM CENTER. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. trustarts.org BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. blackforgecoffee.com BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. brilloboxpgh.com BYHAM THEATER. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. trustarts.org

SZA, June 16

HOWLERS. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. howlerspittsburgh.com JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. jergels.com KEYBANK PAVILION. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. livenation.com LADYFEST 2018. facebook.com/ LadyfestPittsburgh

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTINE MITCHELL

SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 9

Thunderpussy, June 20

MAY 30 Bone Thugs-n-Harmony. Mr. Smalls Brockhampton. Stage AE Chaos Chaos. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls

Diamond Head. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Lillie Mae. Club Café Mary Lattimore. Spirit

MAY 31 Lola Tried. The Mr. Roboto Project The Decemberists. Benedum Center Royal Blood. Stage AE HammerFall. Rex Theater Suicide Commando. Cattivo Red Elvises. Hard Rock Café Raven Black. The Smiling Moose The Weekend Classic.

Shortly and Many Rooms.

Tommy James and the Shondells.

Black Forge Coffee House

The Meadows

A-Money & the Downtown City. Club Café (Early) Garage Space. Club Café (Late) Dave Matthews Band. KeyBank Pavilion.

Darren Criss, Lea Michele.

JUNE 5

Benedum Center Wrecks. Rex Theater Cruces. The Shop Heather Kropf. The Backstage Bar at Theater Square Parker McKay. Club Café

Real Estate. Mr. Smalls Tech N9ne. Stage AE Dirty Heads. Highmark Stadium Inter Arma. Brillobox Trombone Shorty, Orleans Avenue. Carnegie

Frank Turner, Homeless Gospel Choir, Mavis Staples. Three Rivers Arts Festival Menzingers. Stage AE Lorrie Morgan. The Meadows Jungle Rot. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Codes. Cattivo

JUNE 2 Go Go Gidget. Howlers Cold War Kids, Jack White. KeyBank Pavilion

Everything Everything.

JUNE 3 World’s Greatest Dad. The Glitter Box Theater Rozwell Kid. Mr. Smalls Combichrist. Rex Theater Jill Sobule. Club Café River City Brass Band. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater Stuyedeyed. Spirit

Black Forge Coffee House

Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 1

Heinz Field

JUNE 4

Code Orange. Mr. Smalls Calvin Brown. August Wilson Center

Def Leppard. PPG Paints Arena Hayley Kiyoko. Mr. Smalls

Banda Magda. Three Rivers Arts Festival Men I Trust. Cattivo

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Thomas Rhett, Kenny Chesney.

Bruno Major. Club Café

of Homestead Music Hall

Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 6 Hop Along. Spirit Everclear. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Kali Uchis. Stage AE Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real. Three Rivers Arts Festival Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks. Rex Theater Typhoon. Mr. Smalls Bombadil. Club Café


Scott Helman. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Jonathan Scales Fourchestra. Cattivo

JUNE 7 LANY. Stage AE PSO feat. Reza Vali. City of Asylum Richard Buckner. Club Café Red Wanting Blue. Spirithow Infernal Coil. Howlers Fortune Teller. Black Forge Coffee House Sidewalk Chalk. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 8 Alison Krauss. Benedum Center Mastodon, Primus. Stage AE Exmags. Spirit American Aquarium. Mr. Smalls Jeff Austin Band. Rex Theater Eliot Lewis. Club Café Destination Dimension. The Smiling Moose Daryl Shawn. The Backstage Bar at Theater Square

Valerie June. Three Rivers Arts Festival Samantha Fish. South Park Amphitheater

Valerie June, June 8 PHOTO COURTESY OF JACOB BLICKENSTAFF

JUNE 8-10 PSO: Beethoven Concerto Cycle: No. 4. Heinz Hall

Tickets: 412-624-4129 or chambermusicpittsburgh.org

JUNE 9 Slayer, Anthrax. KeyBank Pavilion Yo-Yo Ma with the PSO. Heinz Hall Daryl Hall & John Oates, Train. PPG Paints Arena The Litz. Cattivo Daisy Chain. The Mr. Roboto Project

Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 10 Shilpa Ray. Howlers Young Widows. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Tigue. Spirit

The Mavericks. Three Rivers Arts Festival Noah Gunderson. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater

JUNE 11 Horse Feathers, Twain. Club Café Fleshgod Apocalypse. Cattivo

Concert ticket prices are; $25 (cash bar available); $75, which includes a pre-concert, prix fixe family style dinner. Media Sponsors:

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GABE SHADDOW

SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 11

JUNE 12 Jenny Lewis. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall alt-J. Stage AE The Toasters. Club Café Skating Polly, Potty Mouth. Mr. Smalls

JUNE 13 Snail Mail. Cattivo Thirty Seconds to Mars. KeyBank Pavilion Jungle. Mr. Smalls Street Dogs. Rex Theater Russ Liquid Test. Spirit Ben Caplan. Club Café Cherry Pools. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Immortal Bird. Howlers

JUNE 14 Japanese Breakfast. Spirit Dwarves, Murder Junkies. Cattivo Animal Years. Club Café Lee Bains III. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Freak Mythology. Spirit Jay Parade. Howlers Cristina Pato Quartet. Ace Hotel

JUNE 15 LANco, Dierks Bentley. KeyBank Pavilion Gordon Lightfoot. Palace Theatre Warren G. Spirit Bruce Hornsby. The Meadows The New Mastersounds. Rex Theater Chris Knight. Hard Rock Café Byzantine. Club Café Sam Evian. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Marcus Miller. August Wilson Center

JUNE 15-17 Ladyfest 2018. Multiple venues Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Multiple venues Ax plays Beethoven’s “Emperor.” Heinz Hall

JUNE 16 Jay Rock, AB-Soul, SZA, Kendrick Lamar. KeyBank Pavilion The Regrettes. Mr. Smalls

Ty Dolla $ign, Aug. 29

The Clarks. Stage AE Dalton Domino. Wild Things Park David Ramirez. Club Café Herman’s Hermits. The Meadows

JUNE 17 Dr. Dog, Alex G. Stage AE ONR. Club Café Trevor Hall. Rex Theater Mary Chapin Carpenter. Byham Theater The Queers. Cattivo Sloan. Mr. Smalls

The Reptilian. Gooski’s Iris Creamer. Babyland

JUNE 18 Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphys. Stage AE Geoff Tate. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Suzanne Santo. Club Café

JUNE 19 Dollar Signs. The Mr. Roboto Project The Posies. Club Café

The Magnetic Fields. Carnegie Music Hall Houndmouth. Mr. Smalls We Are Scientists. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls The Funky Knuckles. Cattivo Sir The Baptist. Club AE Chris Rattie. The Smiling Moose Castle. Howlers

JUNE 20 Ben Folds with PSO. Heinz Hall CONTINUES ON PG. 14

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


FEATURED MUSIC 6/1 6/2 6/3 6/4 6/5

Mavis Staples + AHI Everything Everything Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Banda Magda + Water Seed The Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh The Times They Are A-Changin’: Words and Music of Bob Dylan

6/6 Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real + Rachel Lynne

6/7 Sidewalk Chalk + The Rubix and C. Brown

6/8 Valerie June + Brooke Annibale

6/9 Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder + Lindsay Lou

6/10 The Mavericks + The Sadies

ADVANCING BLACK ARTS IN PITTSBURGH FEATURING 7 ARTISTS

WITH SUPPORT FROM THE HEINZ ENDOWMENTS AND THE PITTSBURGH FOUNDATION

VISUAL ARTS DEE BRIGGS SIX PLATES FOR ANNABELLE AND MAGGIE FACES OF PITTSBURGH BY JANETTE BECKMAN JURIED VISUAL ART EXHIBITION ARTIST MARKET FEATURING 350+ ARTISTS THREE RIVERS FILM FESTIVAL CULTURAL DISTRICT GALLERIES

CREATIVITY ZONE HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES ARTIST DEMONSTRATIONS

ART + TECH CREATE FESTIVAL

THEATER + DANCE INDOOR + OUTDOOR SPACES

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

PHOTO COURTESY OF FATHER/DAUGHTER RECORDS

Peter Frampton, Steve Miller Band. KeyBank Pavilion Lee Brice. Palace Theatre The Magnetic Fields. Carnegie Music Hall Todd Snider. Rex Theater The Iguanas. Club Café Super Suckers. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Yeek. The Smiling Moose Jauntee. Cattivo Thunderpussy. Spirit

JUNE 21 Ellen Siberian Tiger. Howlers Priests. Mr. Smalls Glitch Mob. Stage AE Motherfolk. Club Café

JUNE 22 Spoon, Grizzly Bear. Stage AE Jaira Burns. Club Café Plain White T’s. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Sword. Mr. Smalls Al Di Meola. Palace Theatre The Blasters. Hard Rock Café Parker Millsap. Rex Theater ASG. Cattivo FBGM. The Smiling Moose Justin Fabus. South Park Amphitheater

JUNE 22-24 PSO: Broadway Divas. Heinz Hall

JUNE 23

Remember Sports, July 2

Jay and the Americans. Palace Theatre Maps & Atlases. Cattivo Too Many Zooz. Mr. Smalls Venom Prison. Rex Theater The Lagoons. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Jam on Walnut. Walnut Street, Shadyside

Big Sam’s Funky Nation. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Kevin Krater. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Lera Lynn. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater Peter Bradley Adams. Hartwood Acres

Tracyanne & Danny. Club Café

JUNE 26 Cut Copy. Mr. Smalls Bad Bad Hats. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls

Kelsea Ballerini, Keith Urban.

JUNE 24

JUNE 25

Alvarez Kings. Cattivo Davina and the Vagabonds.

KeyBank Pavilion

Bishop Briggs. Mr. Smalls

Magic Sword. Cattivo

Club Café CONTINUES ON PG. 16

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


SUMMER GUIDE 2018

15


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14 PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHLAN GREY

Brockhampton, May 30

Ruggers Pub

World’s Scariest Police Chases.

Snarky Puppy. Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall

JUNE 27

JULY 2

Soccer Mommy. Cattivo Foreigner, Whitesnake. KeyBank Pavilion The Iron Maidens. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Jeremy Enigk. Mr. Smalls The Caribbean. Howlers Seth Tiven. Club Café

Remember Sports. The Mr. Roboto Project Tarah Who? Howlers

JUNE 28

Carter Winter. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Dan Baird. Club Café

Dangermuffin. Mr. Smalls Moonshine Bandits. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Consider the Source. Rex Theater Kuinka. Club Café

JUNE 29 Sawyer Brown. The Meadows Delta Rae. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille XEB. Hard Rock Café Lumariia. Mr. Smalls Vista. The Smiling Moose Void Omnia. Brillobox The Rainbow Ends. Club Café Zach Nugent. Rex Theater

JUNE 30 Pittsburgh Symphony. South Park Amphitheater Remission. The Mr. Roboto Project Luke Bryan. Heinz Field Candlebox. The Meadows Secrets. The Smiling Moose The Trainjumpers. Cattivo Nick Barilla. Club Café (Early) Antz Marching. Club Café (Late) Yinzfest 2018. Mr. Smalls

JULY 1 Pittsburgh Symphony. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater Dead Boys. Mr. Smalls Mokoomba. Shadyside Nursery Kinky Friedman. Club Café Sheck Wes & Valee. Foxtail The Body. Spirit

JULY 3 Ray LaMontagne, Neko Case. Heinz Hall

JULY 5 JULY 6 Bell Witch, Yob. Rex Theater Vince Neil. The Meadows Chris Jamison. South Park Amphitheater Ugly Blondes, Fortune Teller. The Stage at Karma

Mindmaze, Lady Beast. Howlers Kevin Miller’s Smashed. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

JULY 7 Jimmy Buffett. KeyBank Pavilion Amtrac. Brillobox Billy Price. The Meadows O-Town, ALBVS. Hard Rock Café Neverweres. Club Café

JULY 8 The Felice Brothers, Twain. Club Café Act of Defiance, East End. Hard Rock Café

The Original Lakeside. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater

JULY 9 Ted Nugent. Palace Theatre Anthony Picone. Club Café Remember Jones. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

JULY 10 Arcade Fire. Stage AE Weezer, Pixies. KeyBank Pavilion Steel City Ruins. Mr. Smalls Lit. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille CONTINUES ON PG. 18

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


EDEN HALL CAMPUS

v e E n r t S e m e ries m u S KIDS CAN FESTIVAL

SUNDAY, JUNE 17 • 1:00-4:00 P.M.

CLASSICAL NIGHT featuring PITTSBURGH FESTIVAL OPERA SATURDAY, JUNE 23 • 7:00 P.M.

JAZZ NIGHT featuring FUNKY FLY PROJECT and THE POOGIE BELL BAND SATURDAY, JULY 14 • 7:00 P.M.

BLUEGRASS NIGHT featuring SHAMELESS HEX, THE TURPENTINERS and LONESOME, LOST & FOGGY SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 • 6:00 P.M. Throughout the summer, Eden Hall will also offer a number of farm-to-table events and workshops on topics from bread baking to creative writing for the public.

Learn more about all the events at

chatham.edu/summerseries SUMMER GUIDE 2018

17


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

Snail Mail, June 13

JULY 11

JULY 17

Theory of a Deadman. Stage AE Asleep At the Wheel.

Shania Twain. PPG Paints Arena Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Beth Hart Band. Palace Theatre Rivers of Nihil. Cattivo

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Banditos. Club Café Artificial Brain. Brillobox

JULY 12 Strawberry Girls. Mr. Smalls Unsane, Child Bite. Club Café

JULY 12-13 PSO: Star Wars: A New Hope. Heinz Hall

JULY 13 The Lone Bellow. Mr. Smalls Bombino. Cattivo Christian Lopez. St. Clair Park Jim Donovan and the Sun King Warriors. South Park Amphitheater

JULY 13-14 Deutschtown Music Festival 2018. Multiple venues.

JULY 14 Styx, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts. KeyBank Pavilion

Dave Mason & Steve Cropper. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

JULY 15 Phillip Phillips. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater

States & Capitals.

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

JULY 18 PSO: An Evening of Brahms. Heinz Hall Typecaste. The Mr. Roboto Project Panic! At the Disco. PPG Paints Arena Marcus King Band. KeyBank Pavilion Joe Jackson. Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead Homesafe. Mr. Smalls Mobley. Club Café

JULY 19 Foo Fighters. PPG Paints Arena Heresiarch. Brillobox Paula Cole. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Murphy’s Law. Mr. Smalls Dom Flemons. Ace Hotel

JULY 20 John Prine. Heinz Hall Gin Blossoms. Stage AE Tone Loc. The Meadows L.A. Guns. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Eilen Jewell. Club Café (Early) Turnpike Gardens. Club Café (Late) Neil Hamburger. Rex Theater Travis Larson Band. The Smiling Moose Thompson Square. South Park Amphitheater

JULY 21

Black Forge Coffee House

Bush, Stone Temple Pilots, The Cult.

JULY 16

KeyBank Pavilion Tory Lanez. Mr. Smalls

Kingdom Hearts Orchestra. Heinz Hall Mike Vial and Mike Gentry. Mr. Smalls Vans Warped Tour 2018. KeyBank Pavilion

The Meadows

Starship featuring Mickey Thomas. Jam on Walnut. Walnut Street, Shadyside


Coheed and Cambria, July 22

JULY 22 Coheed and Cambria, Taking Back Sunday. Stage AE Erasure. Byham Theater Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. South Park Amphitheater 6LACK. KeyBank Pavilion Ty Sciullo. The Smiling Moose

Koe Wetzel, Jack Ingram. Wild Things Park Old Game. Club Café (Early) Jordan DePaul. Club Café (Late) Muscle Tough. Rex Theater

JULY 29 Culture Club. Stage AE CKY. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Lucius, Brooke Annibale.

JULY 23

South Park Amphitheater

Otep. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

JULY 31

JULY 24

Arctic Monkeys. Petersen Events Center

Eagles. PPG Paints Arena Amanda Shires. Rex Theater

AUG. 1

JULY 25 Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson. KeyBank Pavilion Slaid Cleaves. Club Café Live at the Fillmore. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

JULY 26

Hot Flash Heat Wave. Mr. Smalls PSO: Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons.

Billy Price. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille HANSON String Theory w/ PSO. Heinz Hall

JULY 27

AUG. 4

JULY 27-29 Migration Fest 2018. Mr. Smalls

JULY 28 REO Speedwagon. KeyBank Pavilion Jeff Daniels. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Sworn Enemy. Cattivo

June 23 The Hobbs Sisters + No BAD JUJU

July 21

AUG. 2

AUG. 3

Amphitheater

Join us on these saturdays along walnut Street in shadyside:

Heinz Hall

Radiohead. PPG Paints Arena PSO: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Heinz Hall Lord Huron. Stage AE He Is We. Mr. Smalls Rascal Flatts, Dan + Shay. KeyBank Pavilion Ween. Stage AE Mike Dillon Band. Cattivo The Caribbean. Spirit Lucy Dacus. Club Café Jefferson Starship. South Park

ENJOY DRINKS, FOOD & LIVE MUSIC!

Avenged Sevenfold. KeyBank Pavilion Better than Ezra. South Park Amphitheater Father John Misty, Bully. Stage AE Good Old War. Mr. Smalls Smashing Pumpkins. PPG Paints Arena Highly Suspect. Stage AE J.D. Wilkes. Club Café The Devon Allman Project. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

AUG. 5

Brighton Boys + The Delaneys

August 18 Lucky Me + Byron Nash and PlanB mane Hu

Animal

All proceeds benefit the animals at Humane Animal Rescue!

Re s u e c

www.humaneanimalrescue.org

Toots & the Maytals. Hartwood Acres

AUG. 7 Taylor Swift. Heinz Field

AUG. 9 Jim Avett. Club Café Safety Last. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille CONTINUES ON PG. 20

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

19


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Lucy Dacus, July 27

AUG. 10

AUG. 23

Black Moth Super Rainbow. Mr. Smalls Within the Ruins. Cattivo Sweet Crude. South Park Amphitheater

Heinz Hall

AUG. 11 Jeff Beck with Ann Wilson. Heinz Hall Cyndi Lauper, Rod Stewart. PPG Paints Arena The Suitcase Junket. Club Café

AUG. 12

Agent Orange. Mr. Smalls The Flaming Lips. Stage AE Jason Aldean. KeyBank Pavilion Shawn Mullins. South Park Amphitheater

AUG. 25

AUG. 14 Five Finger Death Punch. KeyBank Pavilion

Lynyrd Skynyrd. KeyBank Pavilion Nathan Gray. Mr. Smalls Davisson Brothers Band.

AUG. 15

Rock, Reggae and Relief Festival.

Joan of Arc. Club Café

Forbes Avenue, Downtown

AUG. 16

AUG. 26

Pedro the Lion. Mr. Smalls Mike Tomaro and Friends. Ace Hotel

Efrim Manuel Menuck. Club Café Sinkane. South Park Amphitheater

AUG. 16-19

AUG. 27

SKULL FEST 10. Multiple venues.

A Wilhelm Scream. Cattivo

AUG. 17

AUG. 28

AUG. 18

The Meadows

Shinedown, Godsmack. KeyBank Pavilion

AUG. 29 G-Eazy, Ty Dolla $ign. Wild Things Park

The Dead Daisies. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Wade Bowen. Wild Things Park Muscle of Love. Hard Rock Café Jam on Walnut. Walnut Street, Shadyside

AUG. 30

AUG. 20

AUG. 31

Fireside Collective. Club Café

AUG. 21 Wolf Parade. Mr. Smalls

AUG. 22 Marty Stuart, Lee Ann Womack. Palace Theatre

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

AUG. 24

Larry Carlton. South Park Amphitheater

Miranda Lambert. KeyBank Pavilion Nicole Atkins. Club Café Jean Luc Ponty. South Park Amphitheater The Four Horsemen. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Smokey Bellows. Mr. Smalls

20

Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons.

Counting Crows. KeyBank Pavilion Paul Luc & Kayla Schureman. South Park Amphitheater

SEPT. 1 Pentatonix. KeyBank Pavilion

SEPT. 2

Great White. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille •


SUMMER GUIDE 2018

21


Sorry to Bother You, July 6

SUMMER FILMS BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

F YOU’RE FED up with the endless cycle of movie sequels, universe building and rebootery, this summer is, well ... kind of a mixed bag. There’s the predictable lot of hotly anticipated sequels and franchise add-ons, but also a cache of promising low(er) budget indies, riskier festival fare, experimental local programming and, of course, new shows to stream when you’re in no mood for sunshine and fresh air. Let’s start with the heavy-hitters. Fresh off an unforgettable Celine Dion collab, Ryan Reynolds’ quick-quipping superhero returns with Deadpool 2 on May 18. Solo: A Star Wars Story (May 25) sub-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

mits another chapter to the intergalactic saga, flashing back to the origins of Han and Chewbacca, as well as Lando Calrissian and his killer facial hair. Ocean’s 8 flips the heist franchise to an all-female crew on June 8 and on June 22, treat yourself to a long overdue family reunion with The Incredibles 2. Despite hundreds of deaths and millions of dollars lost in previous attempts, they’re giving the dinosaur theme-park idea another go with Jurassic Park: Fallen Kingdom on June 22. And finally, the unkillable Ethan Hunt is back on July 27 in Mission: Impossible — Fallout. Tom Cruise (Valkyrie, The Mummy) stars. Fans of sci-fi and punk rock can look forward

to How to Talk to Girls at Parties from writer Neil Gaiman and director John Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig and the Angry Inch); the alien-love story lands on May 11. The Sundance sweetheart Sorry to Bother You (July 6) is a surreal comedy in which a black telemarketer (Lakeith Stanfield, of Get Out) adopts a white-guy speaking voice (provided by comedian David Cross) to make sales — and it works. Bo Burnham’s Eighth Grade transports audiences back to the awkward horrors of pubescence on July 13. The romantic comedy Crazy Rich Asians (Aug. 17) tackles class and Eastern/Western cultural barriers as a New York woman meets her boyfriend’s super-wealthy family during a


Ocean’s 8, June 8

Crazy Rich Asians, Aug. 17

trip to Singapore. Horror fans won’t have to wait for Halloween for 2018’s most anticipated spookers, chief among them A24’s Hereditary — out on June 8 — which involves grief, family and a decapitated pigeon. From director David Robert Mitchell (It Follows), Under the Silver Lake looks to be a sardonic, trippy, can’t-trust-the-floor-under-your-feet thriller starring Andrew Garfield and arrives June 22. On Aug. 24, the disturbing true story of teens turning memes to murder arrives in Slender Man, and on Sept. 7, we finally get the backstory behind The Conjuring’s spooky-ass MVP in The Nun. If that all sounds too heavy, check out a more mainstream entry with the Jason Statham monster flick The Meg (Aug. 10). On Netflix, spend a night with your two favorite amigos in Steve Martin and Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget for the Rest of Your Life, starting May 25; on May 27, liberal,

elitist bully Michelle Wolf debuts her new show The Break. Plus, two fanfavorite originals, Marvel’s Luke Cage and the women’s wrestling series Glow, return for sophomore seasons on June 22 and 29, respectively. Locally, you can check out the new documentary Won’t You Be My Neighbor? on June 8, which — do I really need to explain? — celebrates the life, work and enduring influence of Latrobe-born Pittsburgh icon Fred Rogers. Mid-June kicks off a number of well-worth-it local film programs, including a live Mystery Science Theater 3000 event at Regent Square Theater on June 15 and 16; a “sweded” film festival (brazenly amateurish recreations of popular films) at Row House Cinema June 15-21; and the highly-anticipated Japanese-American film Oh Lucy! playing at Harris and Regent Square from June 15 to July 5. If you’ve been missing Josh Hartnett from the big screen, Oh Lucy! offers a chance for a tearful reunion (just like Pearl Harbor!).

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

23


Raoul Dufy’s L’Atelier au bouquet (detail) at Frick Art Museum’s Van Gogh, Monet, Degas, through July 8

SUMMER ARTS COMPILED BY REBECCA ADDISON // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CURRENT 707 and 709 Penn Galleries. You Will Arrive (work by Kara Skylling), through June 17. 937 Gallery. Terracotta CoLab (explores the intersection of historical architectural terracotta and digital fabrication), through May 26. The Andy Warhol Museum. Adman: Warhol Before Pop (300 objects on display — from rare drawings and photographs to vintage advertisements, artist books and

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

recreated department store window displays), through Sept. 2. Also: permanent exhibits. August Wilson Center. Abstract Minded (works by six contemporary African artists), BNY Mellon Gallery. Lest We Forget: Black Americana and Cultural Memory in the Age of the Hyperreal, 1839 Gallery. Naomi Chambers: Communal Future; Darkness Giving Life (various works from the Art Lending Collection at the Braddock Carnegie Library), Claude Worthington Benedum Gallery. All exhibits continue through July 22.

be Galleries. Mary M. Mazziotti: All the Paintings, through June 30.

Carnegie Museum of Art. Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye (combines new acquisitions and longtime gallery favorites from CMOA’s 1750-1850 collection), through June 24. Teenie Harris Photographs: Service and Sacrifice, through May 28. Hiroshige’s Tōkaidō Road (55 prints from the first [Hōeidō] edition of Hiroshige’s Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō.), through July 22. Deana Lawson (a combination of photographs and appropriated-image

installations by the Brooklyn-based artist), through July 22. Contemporary Craft. Quadrennial: Four Years of Spectacular Buckles from the U.S. and Abroad (a selection of work from the past four World Champion Belt Buckle competitions), through August 25, Studio Gallery. Visual Voices: Truth Narratives (work from 35 selected ceramic artists), through Aug. 18, Main Gallery. Frick Art & Historical Center. Revive, Remix, Respond: Contemporary Ceramic Artists and The Frick Pittsburgh, through


MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES 707 AND 709 PENN GALLERIES. Downtown, trustarts.org 937 GALLERY. Downtown, trustarts.org THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. North Side, warhol.org AUGUST WILSON CENTER. Downtown, culturaldistrict.org/awc BE GALLERIES. Lawrenceville, begalleries.com BOXHEART GALLERY. Bloomfield, boxheartgallery.com CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Oakland, cmoa.org CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Strip District, contemporarycraft.org FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Point Breeze, thefrickpittsburgh.org FUTURE TENANT. Downtown, futuretenant.org GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Lawrenceville, galleryon43rdstreet.com HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS. New Castle, hoytartcenter.org HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Oakland, huntbotanical.org

LAWRENCE HALL. Downtown, pointpark.edu

MATTRESS FACTORY. North Side, mattress.org

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Shadyside, morganglassgallery.com

NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Ross, northhillsartcenter.com

July 5,6,7,& 8

FREE ADMISSION

PANZA GALLERY. Millvale, panzagallery.com

PERCOLATE ART SPACE. Wilkinsburg, facebook.com/PercolateArt

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Shadyside, center.pfpca.org

PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Downtown. trustarts.org

PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Friendship, pittsburghglasscenter.org

Thursday-Saturday 11:00 to 8:00 and Sunday, 11:00 to 6:00

TWIN LAKES PARK www.artsandheritage.com

• 4 Stages of LIVE Entertainment • Over 40 Ethnic Food Booths • Over 175 Artist Market Booths • Fine Art & Photography Exhibit • Children’s Activities • Book Signings • FestivalCon

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Bloomfield, silvereye.org

SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT JOHNSTOWN. sama-art.org

SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT LIGONIER VALLEY. sama-art.org SPACE GALLERY. Downtown, spacepittsburgh.org

SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Friendship, facebook.com/ SpinningPlateGallery

SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sewickley, sweetwaterartcenter.org

THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Downtown, 3riversartsfest.org UNSMOKE ARTSPACE. Braddock, unsmokeartspace.com WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Greensburg, thewestmoreland.org

Featuring all handmade vendors!

WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Downtown, woodstreetgalleries.org

Shop local, shop handmade!

Spring May 27. Van Gogh, Monet, Degas: The Mellon Collection of French Art from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, through July 8. Gallery on 43rd Street. Bright Blessed Day/Dark Sacred Night (pastels by Diane Grguras), through June 30. Hoyt Center for the Arts. I Am. We Are. (A photographic journal of Lawrence County’s Diamond Girl program), through June 12.

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora, through June 29. Lawrence Hall. Paintings by Lisa Bergant Koi, an Associated Artists of Pittsburgh show, through June 3. Mattress Factory. Rhizome: Intrastructure

(Alex Hibbitt); Stations (Ezra Masch), through June 3. Solar Grow Room (Meg Webster); Sculpting Gravity (Allan Wexler), through July 29. A Selection from the Greer Lankton Archive, ongoing.

Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. Teapots! (12th annual invitational), through May 26.

North Hills Art Center. Regional show, through June 8.

Panza Gallery. “Human Plus” (drawings and sculpture by Richard Claraval), through May 31.

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Under the Blankets - Printmakers Together; Imin Yeh & Paul Mullins: Here is Something You Might Like to Have; Family Meeting, through July 8. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

SaturDAY 5/19 10AM-5PM

216-372-8655 avantgardeshows.com

Teamsters Local 249 Banquet Hall 4701 Butler St., 15201 Admission is $3, children under 12 are free. A portion of proceeds wilL benefit Senior Pet Animal Rescue

Present this ad for $1 off admission SUMMER GUIDE 2018

25


PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES KIDD

SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

833-744-8454 @TikisPittsburgh @TikisPittsburgh cruisintikispittsburgh.com

Bringing an island experience to the city of champions!

“Lest We Forget” at August Wilson Center, through July 22

A Student Art Exhibition, through June 1.

(four room-sized kinetic light installations, including three world premieres), through June 17.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier. Ritual

MAY

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. Pictures:

Abstractions: Australian Aboriginal Art from the Collection of Anne M. MacDougall, through Aug. 5. SPACE Gallery. Marx@200 (marking Karl Marx’s 200th birthday with more than 25 works by artists from around the world), through June 10. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. site/sight (photographic works from artists who are concerned with humanity’s complex relationship to place), through June 8. UnSmoke Artspace. Unfolding (Sarika Goulatia and Mia Tarducci), through May 27.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Tell Us Your Immigration Story (highlighting stories through writing, audio and photographs), through June 3. The Art of Giving: Selections from the Richard M. Scaife Bequest, through Aug. 5. Wood Street Galleries. Macular - Cycles

BoxHeart Gallery. Discovery: Sonja Sweterlitsch, Premonition: Juliet Pusateri, May 29-June 29. Hoyt Center for the Arts. What You See: June Edwards, Susan Krause & Barbara Westman (three bodies of work exploring materials, textures and structures), May 29 to Aug. 2.

JUNE Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, June 1.

Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. With performances, public art, a juried visual-art exhibition and more, June 1-10. 937 Gallery. Camouflage (artists use a variety of materials to address the idea of concealment and disguise in a physical, digital or sometimes cultural form), June 1-10. CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


2 018 Outside E n t e r t ain m e n t SUNDAY SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Free concerts every Sunday beginning May 27th 2-6PM

OPEN ALL YEAR!

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! Outside bar and deck opens Memorial Weekend with live entertainment every Friday and Saturday evening each weekend- ALL SUMMER LONG!

Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM Best Live Bands Every Weekend! The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

it’s a destination! 1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com

May 25 May 26 May 27 May 28 June 1 June 2 June 3 June 8 June 9 June 10 June 15 June 16 June 17 June 22 June 23 June 24 June 29 June 30 July 1 July 4 July 6 July 7 July 8 July 13 July 14 July 15 July 20 July 21 July 22 July 27 July 28 July 29 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26 Aug 31 Sept 1 Sept 2 Sept 3

8:00 PM – Midnight unless noted otherwise. Schedule and time subject to change.

DJ Grover (7 pm) Dancing Queen Band Flow Band (2 - 6 pm) / DJ Grover (7 - 11 pm) Told Ya SO! Band (2 - 6 pm) Ridgemont High Band Mercedez Band The Shiners Band (2 - 6 pm) Tony Janflone, Jr. Band Bon Journey Band Vagrants (12 – 4 pm) / Buffettman (5 - 8 pm) DJ Grover (7 pm) Walk of Shame Band Ras Prophet (2 - 6 pm) No Bad JuJu Band InTransit Band Nieds Hotel Band (2 - 6 pm) Steeltown Band Dancing Queen Band Second Shift Band (2 - 6 pm) Flow Band (2 - 6 pm) / DJ Grover (7 - 11 pm) Ridgemont High Band Bon Journey Band House Band (2 - 6 pm) Tony Janflone, Jr. Band Move Makers Band Vagrants Band (12 - 4 pm) / Buffettman (5 - 8 pm) DJ Grover (7 pm) Ferris Bueller’s Revenge Band TBA InTransit Band Dancing Queen Band Ras Prophet (2- 6 pm) Totally 80’s Band Mercedez Band House Band (2- 6 pm) Tony Janflone, Jr. Band Walk of Shame Band Vagrants Band (12 - 4 pm) / Buffettman (5 - 8 pm) No Bad JuJu Band In Transit Band Nieds Hotel Band (2 - 6 pm) Ferris Bueller’s Revenge Band d Dancing Queen Band Ras Prophet (2 - 6 pm) The Shiners Band Ridgemont High Band Jill West (2 - 6 pm) / DJ Grover (7 - 11 pm) Flow Band (2 - 6 pm) SUMMER GUIDE 2018

27


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

Future Tenant. I’m Not With Him (visual exhibition curated by Christina Lee.), June 1 to July 22. Pittsburgh Glass Center. Making the Ordinary Extraordinary, June 1 to July 29. Silver Eye Center for Photography. Fellowship 18: Soohyun Kim, Tamsen Wojtanowski, Anastasia Davis, June 1 to Aug. 11. Carnegie Museum of Art. Teenie Harris Photographs: Around the Clock, June 2 to Sept. 3. Spinning Plate Gallery. Ancestry.art, June 8-24. Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. Seeing Our Scene: Artists and the Pennsylvania Landscape, June 8 to Aug.17. Mattress Factory. Urban Garden Party, June 15. Panza Gallery. Physique: Construction of the Human Form (Pittsburgh Society of Artists), June 9-29. Percolate. Creating Space for Joy, created and curated by Julie Malis. June 22 to Aug. 31. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Mountain Muse (contemporary works in traditional media by artists who reside in the Appalachian Mountain Region), June 23 to July 30.

JULY Cultural District Gallery Crawl. Downtown, July 6 (Pittsburgh Cultural Trust). Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, July 6. BoxHeart Gallery. John Shook, July 10 to Aug. 10 Hoyt Center for the Arts. Rebecca & Nancy Hawkins: Quaker Sisters (paintings from everyday life), July 19 to Aug. 30.

Droze, Aug. 16 to Sept. 21.

AUGUST

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier.

Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, Aug. 3. BoxHeart Gallery. In the In-Between: Nicole Renee Ryan; Puja: Augustina

Janette Beckman’s “Faces of Pittsburgh” at Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival, June 1-10

Doreen Currie: Plein-Air Paradigm, Aug. 17 to Nov. 4.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier Valley. Two Decades’ Delights: Highlights from

20 Years of Exhibitions at SAMA-Ligonier Valley; Art from the Heart: A Celebration of SAMA Ligonier Valley’s Founders, Aug. 18-Nov. 5.

University, Chatham University, St. Vincent College, Seton Hill University, Westmoreland County Community College and the University of Pittsburgh), Aug. 25 to Nov. 25.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Artists Who Teach (highlighting

SEPTEMBER

the work of more than 50 contemporary artists who teach at Carnegie Mellon

Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, Sept. 7. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

FEATURING THE COMMONHEART DARMON MEADER OF NEW YORK VOICES TUBBY DANIELS BAND SHAWN MAXWELL’S NEW TOMORROW

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SATURDAY, MAY 26 10:00 A.M. – LATE

INDIANA, PA FREE ADMISSION 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

FUNKY FLY PROJECT WESTSYLVANIAJAZZANDBLUES.ORG

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SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

It’s kit-tea time! A handcrafted mug to delight cat

OTHER EXHIBITS

enthusiasts and loose-leaf connoisseurs. Steeped in tradition, ceramics provide sustainable livelihoods for makers in Nepal.

Flight simulation: Birdly in use at the National Aviary

5820 Forbes Avenue . Pgh, PA 15217 Mon, Wed, Fri-Sat: 10 AM - 6 PM . Tue, Thur: 10 AM - 8 PM

Offer valid at participating stores until 7/31/18. Not valid with other offers or discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs, Traveler’s Finds or consumables. One coupon per store per customer.

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Carnegie Museum of Natural History. We Are Nature: Living in Anthropocene, through Sept. 3. Carnegie Science Center. Permanent exhibits including Highmark SportsWorks, roboworld and Rangos Omnimax Theater. Also: BodyWorks (about the human body), H2Oh! Why Our Rivers Matter, SpacePlace, Exploration Station and more. Center for Postnatural History. Exhibits about genetic engineering and the like, ongoing. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Permanent exhibits plus attractions and activities including: The Pigeon Comes to Pittsburgh: A Mo Willems Exhibit, through Sept. 2; Tough Art (original interactive artworks), ongoing; and Thomas & Friends: Explore the Rails, through Sept. 9. Fort Pitt Museum. Permanent exhibits on the French and Indian War and more. Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Permanent exhibits include archaeological site with 16,000 years of human habitation and recreations

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Oakland, carnegiemnh.org CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Garfield, postnatural.org

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH.

@NeishlossandFleming

2275 Swallow Hill Rd Building 300 Pittsburgh, PA 15220 30

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PITTSBURGH CITY TY PAPER

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden. BioBlitz (annual scientist-led biological survey), June 10. Butterfly Forest, through Sept. 3. Tropical Forest Congo, ongoing.

Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area. Saturday and Sunday tours of historical Carrie Blast Furnace continue weekly through October. Friday tours of Carrie continue weekly through August. See website for other tours and events. Sen. John Heinz History Center. Visible Storage (artifacts from the museum’s collection), ongoing. Also: Heinz, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, Pittsburgh: A Tradition of Innovation, From Slavery to Freedom and other ongoing exhibits. Also houses the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum. •

OTHER VENUES North Side, carnegiesciencecenter.org

800.562.7733 |

of a Native American village and 19th-century settlers’ village. National Aviary. Birdly (virtual-reality flight-simulator), ongoing. Plus Penguin Point, Tropical Rainforest, Wetland and other permanent exhibits.

North Side, pittsburghkids.org FORT PITT MUSEUM. Downtown, heinzhistorycenter/fort-pitt

MEADOWCROFT ROCKSHELTER AND HISTORIC VILLAGE. Avella, heinzhistorycenter. org/meadowcroft

NATIONAL AVIARY. North Side, aviary.org PHIPPS CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS. Oakland, phipps.conservatory.org RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Swissvale, riversofsteel.com SEN. JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Strip District, heinzhistorycenter.org


MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

The

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Thursday performances at 8:00p.m. Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15, $10 ON THURSDAYS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

Join us for the GRAND OPENING saturday, June 2 (11AM-4PM)

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12 McCandless Ave. Pittsburgh, Pa. 15201

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SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


SUMMER GUIDE 2018

33


JAY & THE AMERICANS, THE DUPREES, LATSHAW POPS & MARK MILOVATS

Titanic, June 22-July 1

SMOKEY ROBINSON Aug 11 • 7:30 PM

MARTY STUART & HIS FABULOUS SUPERLATIVES & LEE ANN WOMACK Aug 22 • 7:30 PM

PHOTO COURTESY OF CYLLA VON TIEDE

June 23 • 7 PM

SESAME STREET LIVE! C IS FOR CELEBRATION

Sept 9 • 1 PM & 3:30 PM

LITTLE ANTHONY & THE IMPERIALS & THE FLAMINGOS Sept 15 • 7 PM

VICKI LAWRENCE & MAMA - A TWO WOMAN SHOW Sept 30 • 3 PM

S U M M E R STAG E

THE TEMPTATIONS

COMPILED BY REBECCA ADDISON // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Oct 25 • 7:30 PM

NOW ON STAGE

KOOL & THE GANG Nov 1 • 8 PM BRET MICHAELS Nov 9 • 8 PM

CAROL OF THE KING - IRISH DANCE CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR Dec 2 • 4 PM

LATSHAW POPS SPECTACULAR CHRISTMAS SHOW

Dec 14 • 7:30 PM

FOR TICKETS:

724.836.8000 Online at www.thepalacetheatre.org 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Dogfight. Set in 1963, the show centers on three young Marines setting out for a night of debauchery on the eve of their deployment to Vietnam, through Sun., May 20 (Stage 62). A Flea in Her Ear. Laura Chandler believes her husband Victor is having an affair with another woman and tricks him into meeting her at a motel to catch him in the act, through Sat., May 26 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). The Great Gatsby. In this classic, a young newcomer to Long Island is drawn into a world of obsession, greed and danger, through Sun., May 20 (Heritage Players). Hamlet. A young man encounters the ghost of his slain father in this epic drama., through Sun., May 20 (Pittsburgh Public Theater). HIR. The classic dysfunctional family drama has just crashed into a wholly original place, through May 26 (barebones productions). King Hedley II. Peddling stolen refrigerators in the feeble hope of making enough money to open a video store, King Hedley, is scraping in the dirt of an urban backyard trying to plant seeds where nothing will grow, through Sun., June 3 (Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.). The Nerd. Set in late 1979, the show centers on the hilarious dilemma of a young architect

who is visited by a fellow ex-GI he has never met but who saved has life after being seriously wounded in Vietnam, through Sun., May 20 (McKeesport Little Theatre). Nomad Motel. Alix bounces between motel rooms, taking care of her twin brothers for her mostly MIA mother, through Sun., June 3 (City Theatre). Sea Turtle in Space. Turtle is lost in Space and has to make a tough decision. Octopus teaches us about the journey to self-love and how to release the ego, through Sun., May 20 (The Glitter Box Theater). Social Security. This Broadway comedy focuses on a married couple who are art dealers, through Sat., May 26 (Apple Hill Playhouse). Perfect Wedding. Bill is hours away from his wedding to Rachel when he wakes up with another woman in his bed, unsure how she got there. Through Aug. 12 (CLO Cabaret)

MAY

Hammerstein’s most beloved songs: “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago,” May 22-27 (PNC Broadway). Pigeon. This play by Jeremy Lesifko-Bremer, takes the characters of Chekhov’s tragicomedy The Seagull to the contemporary big city, May 24-26 (Steel City Improv). The Cemetery Club. Three widows meet once a month for tea before going to visit their husbands’ graves, May 24 to June 9 (South Park Theatre Co.). Building the Wall. Rick finds himself caught up as the frontman of the Trump administration’s edicts and loses his humanity, May 24 to June 10 (Twelve Peers). Escape Velocity. This interactive play about a soul trapped in limbo is controlled by the audience randomly pulling tarot cards. No two performances of this show are ever the same. May 31 (CSA Performance Series, New Hazlett Theater)

A New Brain. This musical from Tony

Momentum Festival: New Plays at Different Stages. Playwrights from

Award-winning composer William Finn is a semi-autobiographical creation about a composer who copes with a life-threatening disease the only way he knows how, through music. May 18-27 (Front Porch Theatricals at New Hazlett Theater) Cinderella. A contemporary take on the classic tale including some of Rodgers &

around the country will visit for a weekend of workshops, readings and artist panels, May 31 to June 3 (City Theatre). Arcadia. Set in both 1809 and the present day, Tom Stoppard playfully zigs and zags through many realms, including mathematics, poetry, sex and gardening, May 31 to June 16 (Little Lake Theatre Co.).


T H E AT E R C O M PA N I E S AND VENUES ALPHABET CITY. North Side,

NEW HORIZON THEATER. Homewood,

alphabetcity.org

newhorizontheater.org

APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Delmont,

NEW HAZLETT THEATER. North Side,

applehillplayhouse.org

newhazletttheater.org

ARCADE COMEDY THEATER. Downtown, arcadecomedytheater.com BENEDUM CENTER. Downtown, trustarts.org BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. Allentown, blackforgecoffee.com BRICOLAGE THEATRE. Downtown, bricolagepgh.org BYHAM PRODUCTIONS. Downtown, trustarts.org

OFF THE WALL PRODUCTIONS. Carnegie, insideoffthewall.com PICT CLASSIC. Oakland, picttheatre.org PITTSBURGH CLO. Downtown, pittsburghclo.org PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Downtown, trustarts.org PITTSBURGH FESTIVAL OPERA. pittsburghfestivalopera.org

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Munhall, librarymusichall.com CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Carnegie,

Downtown, pghplaywrights.com

carnegieperformingartscenter.com CARNEGIE STAGE. Carnegie, carnegiestage.com CITY THEATRE. South Side, citytheatrecompany.org CLUB CAFÉ. South Side, clubcafelive.com CLO CABARET. Downtown, pittsburghclo.org/cabaret FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS. North Side, frontporchpgh.com GEMINI THEATER. McKees Rocks, geminitheater.org HEINZ HALL. Downtown, pittsburghsympony.org HERITAGE PLAYERS. South Hills, heritageplayers.org

Strip District, pbt.org

PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATER CO. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER. Downtown, ppt.org

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATER. PITTSBURGH IMPROV. Homestead, pittsburgh.improv.com PLAYHOUSE JR. Oakland, pittsburghplayhouse.com PNC BROADWAY IN PITTSBURGH. Downtown, trustarts.org primestage.com

QUANTUM THEATRE. Various venues, quantumtheatre.com

East Liberty, kelly-strayhorn.org

KEYSTONE STATE MUSIC THEATER. Cranberry Township,

Lawrenceville, throughlinetheatre.org

keystonestatemusictheater.org LITTLE LAKE THEATRE. Canonsburg, littlelake.org MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. McKeesport, mckeesportlittletheater.com

Peoples Oakland 11 Annual Gala Benefit th

Thursday, May 31st, 2018 Under the big tent • Schenley Plaza, Oakland

6:00PM Reception Live Music • Heavy Hors d’ouvres • Open Bar 6:45PM Program - Celebrate recovery with members as they tell their stories of recovery.

PRIME STAGE THEATRE. North Side,

SOUTH PARK THEATRE. South Park, southparktheatre.com STAGE 62. Carnegie, stage62.com STEEL CITY IMPROV, Shadyside, steelcityimprov.com THE SUMMER COMPANY. Uptown, thesummercompany.com THE THEATRE FACTORY. Trafford, thetheatrefactory.org

JOHNNY APPLESEED CHILDREN’S THEATER. Delmont, applehillplayhouse.org KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER.

Celebrate Recovery

THROUGHLINE THEATRE COMPANY.

- Honorees, The University of Pittsburgh:

Paul A. Supowitz

Vice Chancellor for Community and Government Relations

John M. Wilds, PhD, SPHR

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Community Relations

7:15-9:00PM

The Legendary Soul Man Billy Price

TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Downtown, trustarts.org TWELVE PEERS. Lawrenceville, 12peerstheater.org UNPLANNED COMEDY. Lawrenceville, unplannedcomedy.com

Tickets $75 Donation • Each additional ticket: $40

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Peoples Oakland

3433 Bates Street • Pittsburgh, PA • 15213 William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play. The Bard’s most famous characters, greatest lines, and magnificent speeches are lampooned in a comic smorgasbord, May 31 to July 1 (Pittsburgh Public Theater).

JUNE Sassy Mamas. Three women find themselves single and developing a new strategy to find love — pursuing younger men. June 1-17 (New Horizon Theater) On Your Feet. From their humble

beginnings in Cuba, Emilio and Gloria Estefan came to America and broke through all barriers to become a crossover sensation at the very top of the pop-music world, June 12-17 (Pittsburgh CLO). Hay Fever. Novelist David Bliss and his wife Judith, a retired actress, are hoping for a quiet weekend in the country with their guests, June 21 to July 7 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). Broadway Divas. Performances of hits from Les Misérables, Dreamgirls, My Fair Lady, Funny Girl, Mame, Cabaret, Chicago, Wicked and many more, June 22-24 (Heinz Hall).

Parking Street parking, Soldiers & Sailors Garage and Carnegie Museum Garage

For more information call: 412.683.7140 ext. 234

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

10TH ANNUAL

S U M M E R

D A N C E

P A R T Y

A BENEFIT FOR THE KELLY STRAYHORN T HEATER 2018 Please join us for the Tenth Annual Full Bloom Summer Dance Party Benefit, an East Liberty staple and signature Pittsburgh event. This year we celebrate a decade of fantastic programming with a benefit bash that will undoubtedly be the best Full Bloom yet. Full Bloom 2018 and all proceeds support this summer’s programming — East Liberty LIVE!

S AT U R DAY, J U N E 2 , 2 0 1 8

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Rated one of Pittsburgh’s Top-10 Summer Parties — come enjoy the LIVELIEST dance party of the summer! DANCE PARTY TICKETS: $50 - $100

William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play at Pittsburgh Public Theater, May 31-July 1

Ubu Roi. King Ubu and his family have a variety of ideas on the best ways to be greedy, corrupt and stupid while running the country, June 22-30 (Throughline Theater Co. at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre). Titanic. In the final hour of April 14, 1912 the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg, and tragic history was made, June 22 to July 1 (Pittsburgh CLO). The Bridges of Madison County. Carnivale Theatrics will stage the Pittsburgh premiere of this Tony Award-winning play about love, choices and what ifs? June 29 to July 7 (New Hazlett Theater)

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The Full Monty. Six unemployed steel workers from Buffalo decide to go buff to pay their bills and get much more than they bargained for, July 6-15 (Pittsburgh CLO). La Bohème Warhola. This version of Puccini’s La Boheme isn’t set in 19th-century Paris, but rather the loft of Pittsburgh’s own Andy Warhol in the 1960s. July 6, 8, 12, 14, 19 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera) Kaiju Big Battel: Multiple Choice Beasts. In this live monster-fighting spectacle, Planet Earth is under threat. July 7 (Multiple Choice Events) A Streetcar Named Desire. Fading southern belle Blanche DuBois arrives unexpectedly on her sister’s doorstep, searching for an escape from the realities of her life, July 12-28 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). Why Do Fools Fall in Love. At her impromptu bachelorette party, Millie and her best friend dive into age-old questions about love, marriage and dating, July 12-28 (South Park Theatre Co.). Rhinegold. Wagner’s opera about one ring to rule them all was written more than 20 years before J.R.R. Tolkien was even born and is the first installment of his own ring series. July 13, 15, 21 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera) The Complete Works of Shakespeare. All 37 of Shakespeare’s plays performed in a single evening by only three actors, July 15-21 (The Glitter Box Theater).

Brigadoon. When New Yorkers Tommy Albright and Jeff Douglas lose their way during a vacation to the Scottish Highlands, they stumble into the mythical village of Brigadoon on the one day it appears every hundred years, July 17-22 (Pittsburgh CLO). Fight for the Right. The latest work in Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s “Music that Matters” series asked female composer and librettist teams to create original music dramas inspired by themes of women and girls around the world improving their lives through education. July 18 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera) Arabella. This is the Pittsburgh premiere of Richard Strauss’ opera about an aging count’s attempt to launch one of his two daughters into society while forcing the other to act like his son to save money. July 20, 22 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera) Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Two con men enter into a challenge to see who can seduce and then fleece a wealthy target to prove who is the biggest scoundrel in town. July 19-22 and 26-29 (Stage 62) Stupid Fucking Bird. An aspiring but cynical young playwright rampages against the art created by his mother’s generation, July 26 to Aug. 12 (Twelve Peers). Beauty and the Beast. Step into the enchanted world of Broadway’s modern classic, based on the treasured Disney film, July 27 to Aug. 5 (Pittsburgh CLO).

AUGUST Steel Magnolias. Anyone who is anybody comes to Truvy’s salon to have their hair done, Aug. 2-18 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). Catch Me if You Can. An advertising man who has brought his bride to the boss’ mountain lodge for a honeymoon calls in the local police to investigate her disappearance, Aug. 2-18 (South Park Theatre Co.). Twelfth Night. The Urban Impact Performing Arts Program offers a modern twist to Shakespeare’s classic comedy about mistaken identity. Aug. 3-12 (New Hazlett Theater) Thoroughly Modern Millie. Flapper Millie Dillmount is on the hunt for a rich husband but falls for a penniless paperclip salesman CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

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instead, Aug. 7-12 (Pittsburgh CLO). Footloose the Musical. No Kevin Bacon, but it’s the same great story of the new kid in town who helps reopen the minds and heal the hearts of a small town. Aug. 10-12, 16-18 (Keystone State Music Theater) The Inspector General. A corrupt town expecting a visit from a government official is turned on its head when they try to bribe the wrong man, Aug. 10-19 (Throughline Theater Co. at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre). Pittsburgh New Works Festival. This annual program fosters the work of playwrights via the creation of original one-act plays presented over six weeks.

Aug. 19 to Sept. 23 (Carnegie Stage) Disney’s Aladdin. All your favorite songs from the film as well as new music written by Tony- and Academy-Award winner Alan Menken, Aug. 21 to Sept. 9 (PNC Broadway). Funny Money. When Harry mistakenly picks up the wrong briefcase, one filled with cash, he decides to keep it, Aug. 23 to Sept. 8 (South Park Theatre Co.). Little Miss Sunshine. The Hoover family has seen better days, but when the youngest Hoover enters a regional children’s beauty pageant, the family thinks that their luck could change, Aug. 30 to Sept. 15 (Little Lake Theatre Co.).

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EQT Children’s Theater Festival, through May 20

ONGOING

JULY

EQT Children’s Theater Festival.

The Jungle Book. A young boy abandoned

Four-day Downtown festival, including hands-on activities and troupes from around the world, through Sun., May 20 (Pittsburgh Cultural Trust). The Forest of Everywhere. A colossal storm has rearranged the entire globe, causing whole cities to change locations. Swept up from all across the world, our furry and feathered animal friends have found refuge in a beautiful enchanted forest, through Fri., June 8 (Bricolage Theater).

to the jungle must learn to find his place within the community of animals, July 6-21 (Little Lake Theatre Co.).

MAY Fancy Nancy. Based on the popular Fancy Nancy book series, the titular character bemoans that her family is too plain, and gives them a master class in poshness, through Sun., May 20 (Pittsburgh Playhouse).

JUNE The Little Mermaid Jr. In a magical underwater kingdom, the beautiful young mermaid, Ariel, longs to leave her ocean home — and her fins — behind and live in the world above, June 13-30 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). Peter Rabbit. Based on the beloved children’s book character, June 25 to July 3 (South Park Theatre Co.).

Goldie B. Locks and the Three Singing Bears. This family-friendly opera is a nice introduction into the genre for little ones and is a retelling of the classic fairytale. July 6,14, 21 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera) The Little Mermaid. Another adaptation of the tragic tale of a mermaid who wanted to be human, July 9-18 (South Park Theatre Co.). The Elves and the Shoemaker. The story of a poor shoemaker who receives much-needed help from elves, July 23 to Aug. 1 (South Park Theatre Co.).

The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley Jr. Stanley Lambchop is your ordinary, everyday 10-year-old until the bulletin board on the wall above his bed comes loose and falls on top of him, July 25 to Aug. 11 (Little Lake Theatre Co.).

AUGUST The Wizard of Oz Jr. A children’s version of the classic story of Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion, Aug. 3-12 (Heritage Players). Thwacked. Delightful characters attempt to unravel a mystery in a fairytale world, Aug. 6-15 (South Park Theatre Co.). CONTINUES ON PG. 40


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Nature Art & Photography [ August 8 - 10 ] Suitable for children going into 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 38

CO M E DY

Eddie Griffin, June 8

Arcade Comedy Theater. The Playlist: Music-Inspired Improv, May 17. Improv Pop-Up Night, May 17, June 21, July 19 and Aug. 16. Comedy Royale (short-form improv competition), May 18, June 15 and July 20. Beta Stage (improv), May 19, and May 26. Drinking Partners Present: A Night of EPIC Comedy, May 19. Bonus Stage (improv), May 20, May 24 and May 27. Penny Arcade (kid-friendly comedy), May 26, June 9 and 23. Knights of the Arcade: Epic D&D Comedy, May 25, June 30. Byham Theater. DVE Comedy Festival, June 29; Miranda Sings Live, July 25. Black Forge Coffee House. Alonna And Friends, July 13. Brillobox. Gab Bonesso’s Comedy Showcase, June 12, July 10, Aug. 14.

Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall. Eddie Griffin, June 8; Nick Swardson, June 14; Louie Anderson, July 21; David Cross, July 31. Club Café. Standup for CF, May 31; The Roast of Harry Potter, June 2; Zach Miller and the Pump Slam Mafia Featuring Karl Prohaska, Terry Jones, Matt Light,

and guests, June 8-9. Gemini Theater. Amish Monkeys Improv Comedy, “Tabloid Headlines Show!”, June 9 Hambone’s. Sit Down and Laugh, June 9; Dave Stone, June 25. Heinz Hall. Bill Maher, July 15; Dan & Phil World Tour 2018, July 22. Pittsburgh Improv. Bruce Bruce, May 18-20; Ali Siddiq, May 24-27; Pablo Francisco, May 31 to June 3; John Witherspoon, June 7-9; TK Kirkland, June 14-17; Adam Ferrara, June 21-24; Jeff Dye, July 5-8; Guy Torry, July 26-29; Yannis Pappas. Aug. 17-19; Tony Rock, Aug. 23-26; Eddie Ifft, Aug. 30-31. Pittsburgh Improv Jam. Thursdays at Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. Rex Theater. Neil Hamburger with JP Inc & John Dick Winters, July 20. Pittsburgh Public Theater. Made in America: Some Assembly Required, Aug. 24-25. Unplanned Comedy. The Collective Presents, May 19; The Unplanned Comedy Players, May 25; The Great Unwashed, May 26.

DA N C E Bodiography Center for Movement. Spring Concert (Bodiography dance students), June 2. Byham Theater

Carnegie Performing Arts Center. Annual student recital, June 2 and 3. Intensity Dance Academy. 2018 showcase featuring students from level one to

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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pre-professional level, June 9. Byham Theater Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival, May 18-19. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. The troupe’s annual Ballet Under the Stars performance at Hartwood Acres, Aug. 19. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. The spring dance performance including classical and contemporary works performed by students from both student and pre-professional divisions, May 25 and 26. Byham Theater Texture Contemporary Ballet. The local company opens its 2018-1019 season with “Unmeasured Rhythm.” July 19-22 (New Hazlett Theater)


PHOTO COURTESY OF DENNIS J PHOTOGRAPHY

L I T E R A R Y A N D TA L K

Eisa Davis will be part of Because Blackness Like Poetry Means Many Things: Celebrating Cave Canem, June 16

3 Rivers Comicon. Comics convention hosted by New Dimension Comics, May 19 and 20, Century III Mall, West Mifflin. 3riverscomicon.com Alphabet City. Storytelling with Dovie Thomason, May 19; Free Association Reading Series, May 20, June 10, July 22; Stories That Heal: K. Rose Quayle, May 23; Chuck Kinder, May 31; Cave Canem Poets, June 14; Displacement & Belonging: Ali Asgar and Tuhin Das, June 28; Storytelling with Eshu Bumpus, July 21; Stories That Heal: Abeer Y. Hoque, July 25; Ceinwen King-Smith, Aug. 25. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 18th Annual Summer Reading Extravaganza (free family activities and entertainment), June 10. Oakland. carnegielibrary.org Confluence-SFF. Literary conference with a focus on science fiction, fantasy and horrors, July 27-29 (Sheraton Pittsburgh Airport Hotel). parsec-sff.org Creative Nonfiction. Creative Nonfiction Writers Conference (workshops and discussions), May 24-26. creativenonfiction.org Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series. Tuesdays May-July. Hemingway’s Café, Oakland. hemingwayspoetryseries.blogspot.com Irma Freeman Center. Launch Party: Leaving the Burdened Ground by Ava C. Cipri, featuring Angele Ellis, Jill Khoury, and art by Jessi Cramer of Curiosity Shop Tattoo May 19. irmafreeman.org The Moth StorySLAM. Themed storytelling night: “Endings,” June 5. Rex Theater, South Side. themoth.org

Mystery Lovers Bookshop. Coffee & Crime: Mary Kay Andrews, May 20. Oakmont. mystery.lovers.com Nasty Slam. Head-to-head poetry slam, June 6. Spirit, Lawrenceville. nastyslam.com Because Blackness Like Poetry Means Many Things: Celebrating Cave Canem. Samiya Bashir, Eisa Davis, Ruth Ellen Kocher, and avery r. young. June 16. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater Penguin Bookshop. Sewickley. Amy Reichert with Nancy Martin, May 23; Kathleen George, June 5; Dale Richard Perelman, June 16; John Fea, July 10; Zoje Stage, July 17; Rob Ruck, July 28. Sewickley, penguinbookshop.com Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Elizabeth Rosner, May 17; Daniel Borzutzky, May 21; Sarah Menkedick, May 24; Tom Peters, May 31; Fredrik Backman, June 7; Pete Souza, June 11; Eliza Griswold, June 21. pittsburghlectures.org Sen. John Heinz History Center. A Crisis of Criminality and Policing, May 24; Let’s Not Repeat the Past: History Meets Disability Advocacy 2018, May 31; heinzhistorycenter.org TEDx Pittsburgh. Local speakers and performers tackle technology, entertainment and design issues, June 16. Byham Theater. tedxpittsburgh.org WordPlay. Quarterly Bricolage Productions series blending true stories with live DJ, hosted by comic Alan Olifson. July 27-28. Downtown. bricolagepgh.org •

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ONGOING

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Library branches throughout the city offer daily kids’ and teens’ programs — like story time, singalongs, STEM workshops and literature discussions — all summer. Multiple locations. carnegielibrary.org

Carnegie Science Center. Most of the ongoing science exhibits are kid-centric, including SpacePlace, roboworld and the Highmark SportsWorks. The Exploration Station teaches youth about lasers, electricity and solar power. The Rangos Giant Cinema also offers educational movies. North Side. carnegiesciencecenter.org

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. This season’s exhibit, Thomas & Friends: Explore the Rails, running through Sept. 9, lets kids learn about the workings of an engine, organize a train schedule and explore the world of Thomas and his friends. North Side. pittsburghkids.org

Citiparks Dek Hockey. Dek hockey is basically ice hockey without the ice or skates. Full-size rinks are open at Banksville Park, Bloomfield Park, Brookline Memorial Park, Hazelwood’s Lewis Playground, Marmaduke Playground in Brighton Heights, and South Side’s Ormsby Playground. citiparks.net

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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Pittsburgh Pirates Kids Days, Sundays

Citiparks Recreation Centers. City rec centers offer sports and outdoor activities for all ages. Archery, table tennis, volleyball, dance and karate are just some of the options available. Most centers are open 9 a.m.-7 p.m. weekdays. Saturday hours vary by location. citiparks.net

Citiparks Swimming Pools and Spray Parks. From June 11 through Labor Day, the city offers a chance to cool off at 18 outdoor swimming pools; swim lessons (free from June 18 to July 27) are available at each. Spray parks, a beautiful combination of sprinklers and playground, open May 26 in Arlington, Beechview, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Hazelwood. citiparks.net Heinz History Center. Youth-friendly exhibits include Mister Rogers Neighborhood, the Kidsburgh playplace, and the interactive Discovery Place learning space. The museum also hosts “Living History” events at Point State Park, including a family fishing day on May 27. Strip District. heinzhistorycenter.org Pittsburgh Toy Lending Library. Children up to age 6 can improve their social and motor skills in this indoor art-and-play

space, which also features a library full of parenting books for members. Free access for kids with a Pennsylvania Access/ EBT card. Hours vary, so call or check online. Shadyside. pghtoys.org Pittsburgh Pirates Kids Days. It’s all about kids on Sundays at PNC Park. Special ticket and concessions prices are offered, as well as special events for children, like a chance to run the bases. Before the game, check out the Family Fun Zone on Federal Street. North Side. pittsburghpirates.com Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. The hands-on Kids Kingdom area is rated one of the top children’s zoos in the country. The zoo also hosts themed programs called “Wild Wednesdays” from June 13 to Aug. 8, where kids can meet the zookeepers and make crafts. Highland Park. pittsburghzoo.org Tyke Hikes. Once a week, Venture Outdoors offers weekday-morning nature hikes in area parks. Hikes are geared toward children younger than 6, and center on themes like waterways and birds. Begins June 13. Stroller-friendly. ventureoutdoors.org CONTINUES ON PG. 46

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

45


SUMMER CAMPS Assemble. The community space in Garfield offers weekday camps from June 18 to Aug. 17. Themes this year include the future of science, coding, and music making. assemblepgh.org Carnegie Museums. From June 11 through Aug. 24, ages 4-13 can participate in camps with activities including art classes, survival skills, and interactive history experiences. For kids in Westmoreland County, full-day sessions are available at Carnegie’s Powdermill Nature Reserve in Rector, Pa. Oakland. artandnaturalhistory.org/camps Carnegie Science Center. A variety of science-themed camps are available for children ages 4-18. Kids can learn about programming, engineering, insects and the human body. Camps run June 4 to Aug.17. North Side. carnegiesciencecenter.org/ programs/summer-camps Citiparks Citicamp. Pittsburgh Citiparks recreation centers host day camps for children 7-12. The program explores STEAM topics like nature, technology, media, history and more. Programs run from June 11 to Aug. 10. See individual rec centers for details. citiparks.net Citiparks Tot Camp. From June 11 to July 27, half-day camps with morning and afternoon sessions are held for ages 4-6.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MINNESOTA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

SUMMER KIDS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Thomas & Friends: Explore the Rails, through Sept. 9

A few of the themes are “all around the world,” “at the zoo,” and “little builders.” Each theme lasts one week. citiparks.net Frick Art & Historical Center. Starting July 30, the Frick offers a week-long day camp for kids starting grades 2 to 7, delving into creative art and exploring the museum. Each session accommodates a different age group. burgh g .org thefrickpittsburgh.org

2018 Summer Camp Calendar Ages 4-6

June 18 - 22 (Morning, Afternoon, All-Day) • July 16 - 20 (Morning only) July 30 - Aug. 3 (Morning, Afternoon, All-Day) • Aug. 13 - 17 (Morning only)

Ages 7-11

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Ages 11-14

July 9 - 13 (Morning, Afternoon, All-day)

Teen Workshop Camp: Ages 12-17 July 16- 20 & July 23 - 27

(All-Day Workshop from 9am - 4pm) - Showtime 7pm, Friday, July 28th

www.geminitheater.org | 412-243-6464 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Half-day classes run for four consecutive weeks beginning June 18. Classes include bookmaking, aerial silks fiber arts, magic and more. Camps are for ages 6-12. Bloomfield. irmafreeman.org Little Farmer’s Day Camp. Kids ages 4-13 can experience life on a 124-acre farm. Kids will learn about feeding animals, take nature walks and play games. Six three-day sessions starting June 19 until Aug. 9. Aliquippa. b blueribbonfarmsinc.com Phipps Conservatory. A series of P camps exploring ecology, botany and conservation are available from June 11 to Aug. 24. For kids ages 2-13. Oakland. phipps.conservatory.org Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Full-day and half-day camps are available from June 11 to Aug. 24 in a range of disciplines for kids ages 4-13. High school immersion camps (ages 14-18) are also offered that teach a wide array of subjects, from stained glass and metalsmithing to digital photography and video game production. Shadyside. center.pfpca.org Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. From June 11 to Aug. 17, kids ages 4-13 can attend half-day and full-day summer zoo camps that offer story time for little ones, animal study and interaction for older kids, and even the opportunity to learn what it takes to be a veterinarian. Highland Park. pittsburghzoo.org

Saltworks Theatre Company. The Young Actors Studio camp teaches kids ages 8-16 about movement, roleplaying, improv and other stage techniques at day camps held in Sewickley and Oakland. Camps run from July 9 to Aug. 10. saltworks.org Steel City Rowing Club Camp. Summer camps for experienced and novice rowers and other river activities are offered to kids ages 8-18 in half- and full-day sessions from July 17 to Aug. 13. Verona. steelcityrowing.org

OTHER EVENTS MAY 31-JUNE 2

Allegheny County Marbles Tournament. Allegheny County is home to 10 National Marbles Champions, so the county’s tourney offers the crème de la crème. Watch at the County Courthouse Courtyard, and see which winners head to the national competition, June 18-22 in New Jersey. Downtown. alleghenycounty.us/parks

JUNE 9 Penny Arcade: Kid’s Comedy Show. An improv comedy show designed for kids 5-12. Kids can draw, craft and write and then watch those ideas be brought to life on stage. arcadecomedytheater.com

JUNE 12-AUG. 3 Citiparks Roving Art Cart. Now in its 45th season of providing free multi-media art projects for kids, the Roving Art Cart travels around and sets up shop in 35 city parks in almost every neighborhood. The cart can be visited Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., for eight weeks throughout the summer. Best for children ages 5-12. citiparks.net

JUNE 18-20 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Three divisions — 16 and under, 14 and under and 12 and under — can compete in this annual tennis tournament. Both Pittsburgh and non-city residents are welcome. Regent Square. clayfricktennis.org

SEPT. 8 Alphabet Trails and Tales. Now in its 18th year, this walk through Frick Park teaches hikers 26 awesome things to do on its Alphabet Trail. The free event promotes early-elementary literacy through a day of nature, reading and hand-painted sets. citiparks.net •


ENROLL NOW

ART CAMPS & ADULT ART CLASSES Pittsburgh Filmmakers & Center for the Arts is Celebrating 40 Years of Art Camps and Classes. PF/PCA have been offering children, youth and adults hands-on experience working alongside talented teaching artist in a variety of mediums.

New This Year Youth Intensives! Two-week immersive experiences for high school students to explore their creativity and produce original work. Enroll for classes today at pfpca.org/classes.

ALL OUT ART

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF VENTURE OUTDOORS

Kayaking with Venture Outdoors

SUM MER OUTDOORS SUMMER OUT DOOR S BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ONGOING

pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/parks.html

City Pools. Citiparks pools are open June 11 through Labor Day. Programs include swimming lessons and swim teams. Purchase seasonal pool tags or pay a daily entrance fee. pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/parks.html Spray Parks. From May 26 until early fall, enjoy cooling off without having to swim. Parks in Hazelwood, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Beechview.

Disc Golf. An 18-hole disc golf course meanders through open and wooded sections of Schenley Park. There’s also a nine-hole course in Carrick. pfds.org Tennis. Courts are open in Allegheny Commons, Arsenal, Frick, Highland, Moore, Schenley and Washington’s Landing parks. Summer programs include camps and lessons, or you can join a Community Tennis Association. pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/tennis

Come check out our Summer Specials on flowers!

Cavacini

Summer Is In Garden Center Full Bloom!

ANNUAL FLOWERS • PETUNIAS • BEGONIAS • GERANIUMS

You Must See Our Variety of Trees & Shrubs, Hanging Baskets, Perennials & Vegetable Plants. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE 100 51st ST. • LAWRENCEVILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill. 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Lawn Bowling. The state’s only public bowling green is located at Frick Park. Open-lawn bowling and league play, plus free lessons. lawnbowlingpittsburgh.org Skateboarding. Go skating at city-run skate parks in Beltzhoover, Polish Hill and Sheraden. 412-255-2539 Kayak Pittsburgh. The city is known for its three rivers; Kayak Pittsburgh lets you play on them. Rentals and launch points in North Park, Aspinwall and the North Side.

Other rentals include stand-up paddleboards, rowboats, pedal boats and canoes. kayakpittsburgh.org Pittsburgh Sports League. Year-round adult co-ed sports, including basketball, kickball, volleyball, softball. Various city locations. pump.org Venture Outdoors. Venture Outdoors sponsors hundreds of outdoor events at area parks, including family-fun walks, plus beginner-to-advanced sessions in


PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS

Kids enjoying paddle tennis

hiking, backpacking, mountain-biking, rock-climbing, horseback-riding, canoeing, kayaking, yoga and much more. ventureoutdoors.org Dek Hockey. Available at outdoor rinks in Banksville Park; Marmaduke Playground, Brighton Heights; Lewis Playground, Hazelwood; Ormsby Playground, South Side; Bloomfield Park; and Brookline Memorial Park. pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/parks.html City of Play. Try a smorgasbord of games from cards to Circle Rules Football, a team sport using a fitness ball and a circular field. Various locations around the city. Full schedule at cityofplay.org Cycling. Bud Harris Cycling Track is a banked track that provides fun for expert cyclists or novices. Track sits along Washington Boulevard in Highland Park. 412-255-2539 Inline Skating. Weekly through September. Offers beginner, intermediate and advanced skates throughout the week around the city and on the Eliza Furnace Trail. skatepittsburgh.com

MAY 27

JUNE 16 Pittsburgh Melanoma Foundation 5K. South Park. melanomapgh.org

JUNE 18-20 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis tournament open to boys and girls 16 and younger. Frick Park. clayfricktennis.org

JUNE 23 Annual Rachel Carson Trail Challenge. A 35-mile endurance hike from Harrison Hills County Park to North Park. Two shorter events — the 18-mile Homestead Challenge and a 7-mile Friends and Family Challenge — also take place that day. rachelcarsontrails.org Fort Pitt Bike Ride. A 20-24 mile bike ride from Braddock to Point State Park and back, including talks about Western Pennsylvania history. Lunch included. ventureoutdoors.com CONTINUES ON PG. 50

Open Streets. The city will close down selected streets in Downtown, Uptown and South Side for a day of walking, biking and other activities. openstreetspgh.org

STUDENT/TEACHER DISCOUNTS MONTLHY SALES AND PROMOS

JUNE 2 Autism Speaks Walk Pittsburgh. Schenley Park. autismspeaks.org

JUNE 3 Kenny’s Koaster Race. 10K race or 5K run/walk at Kennywood Park. kennywood.com Greenfield Glide. 5K run and walk through a cross-country course. Schenley Park Overlook. greenfieldglide.com

JUNE 9-AUG. 11 Big Free Yoga. Second Saturday of each month, bring a mat and a friend to ASCEND climbing gym for free group yoga. South Side. ascendpgh.com

JUNE 8 Riverview 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Riverview Park. riverview5k.com

5603 Hobart Street Located in Squirrel Hill • (412) 421-3002 SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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HONEYMOON ISRAEL PITTSBURGH

CP PHOTO BY JORDAN MILLER

SUMMER OUTDOORS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

Honeymoon Israel provides trips to Israel for couples with at least one Jewish partner.

APPLICATION DEADLINE JUNE 3, 2018

Upcoming trip: November 29 - December 9, 2018 Cost: $2,200 per couple, all inclusive

Apply at www.honeymoonisrael.org

@honeymoonisrael pittsburgh@honeymoonisrael.org

Young adults 20 and under: Think you’re too old for Sunday School? Like to wrestle with questions that count?

Open Streets, May 27, June 24 and July 28

JUNE 24

AUG. 11

Open Streets. The city will close selected streets in Downtown, Strip District and Lawrenceville for a day of walking, biking and other activities. openstreetspgh.org

Night Nation Run. A running music festival complete with lights, lasers, beats and celebration. Stage AE, North Side. nightnationrun.com

JUNE 28

Brookline Breeze 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Also offers a

Fleet Feet Pittsburgh Pub Run. Join friends on a 3-5-mile jog, and then celebrate with some local craft beers after. Franktuary food truck will be onsite. Mount Lebanon. fleetfeetpittsburgh.com

JULY 9-22 Paul G. Sullivan Championship. Tennis tournament open to players 16 and older. Frick Park Red Clay Courts. clayfricktennis.org

JULY 28

christiansciencepgh.org [ for other gifts to the community [

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

sprint-distance triathlon, or the “Adventure” tri featuring a 2-mile paddle, 20K bike ride and 5K run. Keystone State Park, Derry, Westmoreland County. keystonetri.com

JULY 28

for local nonprofits. Henrietta Street and Milton Avenue, Regent Square. runaroundthesquare.com

AUG. 4 Habitat for Humanity Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-12. North Park Swimming Pool. kidstriathlon.org

AUG. 5 Steel City Roll. Group bike ride teaching people how to safely navigate Pittsburgh neighborhoods. Downtown. facebook.com/steelcityroll

AUG. 10-27 Bikefest. A celebration of life on two wheels in Pittsburgh. Various events and locations. bikepgh.org

50

Keystone Triathlon and Adventure Race. Compete in an international- or

AUG. 25

selected streets in East Liberty, Shadyside, Point Breeze, Homewood and Larimer for a day of walking, biking and other activities. openstreetspgh.org

Same time Sunday - Meetings age 20 and over, for all honest seekers for Truth

AUG. 19

Pittsburgh Pirates Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy. 5K course. PNC Park. efwp.org Open Streets. The city will close down

We offer Sunday classes up to age 20! 11:00 AM, Christian Science Church, 201 N Dithridge @ Bayard Street in Oakland

non-competitive one-mile Mini-Breeze fun run. Brookline Memorial Recreational Center. brooklinebreeze.com

Run Around the Square 5K Run/ Walk. Longstanding run to raise money

SEPT. 8 Alphabet Trail and Tails. A free early-elementary interactive literacy event incorporating children’s books. Blue Slide Playground, Frick Park. carnegielibrary.org/alphabet-trail-and-tales

SEPT. 29 Dollar Bank Junior Great Race. One-mile fun run for kids under 12. Point State Park, Downtown. rungreatrace.com

SEPT. 30 Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race. The annual 10K foot race grows every year, so register early. There’s also a 5K run/fitness walk. rungreatrace.com •


Now Open for Lunch!

Check us out for these ongoing events! • First Fridays featuring Nate Da Barber • Saturday Night Live at the PiTT with Dj G-Bo • SoulFULL Sunday Brunch at the PiTT with Dj Selecta from 1pm to 5pm with Bottomless Mimosas and Sangrias. • R n B Sunday Nights with Ed the Best Kept Secret and T Mac

burlesque + variety Poison Ivory (nyc) Mystic O’Reilly (pdx) Mika Romantic (phl) Dancakes (stl)

| | | |

Tues-Sun: 12pm-2am Mondays: Closed

For information on more events check us out on social media

Apathy Angel (nyc) MayMay Graves (Dallas) Deven Green (lax) Foxy Moxy (Reidsville)

+ The Steel City Kitty Stars!

@Mr Smalls Theatre

Hours

@preetispittllc

@preetispittllc

2701 PENN AVE. PGH, PA 15222 • 412-904-2585

Doors @7 | Show @8

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Pittsburgh PrideFest, June 9-10

SUMMER FAIRS AND FESTS COMPILED BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ONGOING

JUNE 1-10

Pittsburgh Neighborhood Festivals. citiparks.net

3riversartsfest.org

MAY 27

JUNE 9

Big Gay Picnic. Spend an afternoon outside and enjoy food, drinks, DJs and dancing. North Park Lodge, Allison Park. pittsburghpride.org

Harmony Herb & Garden Show & Sale. Harmony Museum, Harmony.

MAY 28

with music from Five Guys Named Moe (none of whom are really named Moe). Saxonburg. winetimeatthecolony.com

Jam on Walnut. Live local and regional musicians. Shadyside. thinkshadyside.com

18th-century military music, scavenger hunt and crafts. Fort Pitt Museum, Downtown. heinzhistorycenter.org Independence Day Celebration. 18th- and 19th-century historical games and demonstrations. Meadowcroft, Avella. heinzhistorycenter.org

harmonymuseum.org

JUNE 23-24

JULY 5-8

JUNE 9-10

Trolley Fair. Pennsylvania Trolley Museum,

Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival. Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg.

Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown.

Pittsburgh PrideFest. Downtown.

JUNE 23

Washington. pa-trolley.org

Memorial Day Celebration.

pittsburghpride.org

Soldiers & Sailors Hall, Oakland. soldiersandsailorshall.org

JUNE 29-JULY 7

JUNE 10

Big Butler Fair. Butler County Fairgrounds. bigbutlerfair.com

EQT Equality March. Downtown.

JUNE 1-2

pittsburghpride.org

Western Pennsylvania Trolley Meet. Model railroad and

JULY 1-15

JUNE 16

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Vintage car races, parties and shows. Various locations. pvgp.org

memorabilia vendors, presentations, and model train contest. Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Washington. pa-trolley.org

Atlatl Competition. Test your skill with a prehistoric hunting spear-thrower. Meadowcroft, Avella. heinzhistorycenter.org Wine Time at the Colony. Wine tasting

JULY 4 Fourth of July at Fort Pitt. Re-enactments,

artsandheritage.com

JULY 9 Vintage Grand Prix Car Show. More than 100 classic and exotic cars on display. Walnut Street, Shadyside. thinkshadyside.com

JULY 15 Polish Hill Arts Festival. Intersection of Brereton and Dobson streets, Polish Hill. phcapgh.org CONTINUES ON PG. 56

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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SUMMER FAIRS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 54

JULY 20-21 CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON

In Harmony Heritage Music Festival. Harmony. inharmonyfestival.com

JULY 20-22 Picklesburgh. A bash recognizing pickles, canning and farm-to-table foods. Sixth Street Bridge, Downtown. picklesburgh.com

JULY 21 Jam on Walnut. Live local and regional musicians. Shadyside. thinkshadyside.com

JULY 22-28 Bedford County Fair. Bedford County Fairgrounds, Bedford. bedford-fair.com

JULY 26-AUG. 4 Fayette County Fair. Fayette County Fairgrounds, Dunbar. fayettefair.com

JULY 29 145th Annual Rain Day. It always rains in Waynesburg on July 29 — or so the story goes. Celebrate “Rain Day” with entertainment, arts and crafts, and the Miss Rain Day pageant. Waynesburg. raindayfestival.com

AUG. 2-5 Fort Armstrong Folk Festival. Riverfront Park, Kittanning. armstrongfestival.com

AUG. 3-4

Picklesburgh, July 20-22

AUG. 6-11

AUG. 17-26

Butler Farm Show. Butler.

Westmoreland Fair. Westmoreland

Indiana County Fair. Indiana.

butlerfarmshow.com

Fairgrounds, Greensburg. westmorelandfair.com

Indianacountyfair.com

AUG. 11

AUG. 25-SEPT. 1 AUG. 28-SEPT. 1

Flood City Music Festival. Peoples Natural Gas Park, Johnstown. floodcitymusic.com

Annual Antique Gun Show.

AUG. 18

Harmony Museum, Harmony. harmonymuseum.org

Jam on Walnut. Live local and regional musicians. Shadyside. thinkshadyside.com

AUG. 3-5

AUG. 11-18

AUG. 18-SEPT. 24

Washington County Agricultural Fair. Washington County Fairgrounds,

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival.

Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Labor Day Festival. Vendors from 15 states,

West Newton. Open Saturdays, Sundays and Labor Day. pittsburghrenfest.com

petting zoo and live music. Westmoreland County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. familyfestivals.com

AUG. 21-25

SEPT. 7-9

Hookstown Fair. Hookstown.

EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta. Point State Park, Downtown. yougottaregatta.org

Washington. washingtonfair.org

AUG. 4

AUG. 13-18

Pittsburgh VegFest. Vegetarian food, live music and yoga demos, all in the name of animal advocacy. Allegheny Commons Park East, North Side. pittsburghvegfest.org

AUG. 4-5 Regatta at Lake Arthur. South Shore, Moraine State Park. lakearthurregatta.org

Big Knob Grange Fair. Rochester. bigknobgrangefair.org

AUG. 31-SEPT. 3

Lawrence County Fair. Lawrence County Fairgrounds, New Castle. lawrencecountyfair.com

hookstownfair.com

Pittsburgh Irish Festival. Riverplex at Sandcastle, West Homestead. pghirishfest.org

AUG. 16-19

AUG. 25-26

SEPT. 8

Little Italy Days. Live Italian music,

The Art Festival on Walnut.

Wine Time at the Colony. Wine tasting

celebrity bocce tournament and tons of pasta. Liberty Avenue, Bloomfield. littleitalydays.com

Fine arts displays from pottery and painting to jewelry and photography. Shadyside. thinkshadyside.com

with music from Five Guys Named Moe (none of whom are really named Moe). Saxonburg. winetimeatthecolony.com •

Organic seedlings & soils. Air plants, succulents, terrariums, bonsai, cacti & houseplants. Unique handmade gifts. City Grows is an urban organic garden shop in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Lawrenceville, home to some of the city’s most unique small businesses, restaurants, and boutiques. We have been p providing g organic gardening products for city dwellers since August of 2014.

City Grows, LLC Organic Garden & Gift Shoppe

5208 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-781-2082

55115 1 155 Butler Street Street, Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15201 56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

412-781-1119

www.citygrowspgh.com


GET OUT

OF

S p e c i a l A d v e rti s i n g S e c ti o n

TOWN

You don’t need to buy a plane ticket to escape from the city. Gather your family or friends together and visit any of these drivable d estination ns. Flip the pag ges to find your next vaca ation spot... destinations. pages vacation

Get out of town and experience something new! EXPERIENCE BUFFALO’S TRANSFORMATION THIS SUMMER! It’s a new day in Buffalo. The city’s once-in-a-lifetime transformation has reached new heights as a redeveloped waterfront, restored architectural gems, thriving neighborhoods and new hotels welcome visitors. New restaurants, breweries and distilleries greet visitors at every turn, and a burgeoning public art scene winds its way through the city’s neighborhoods. Grab a beer, rock climb and zip line at RiverWorks, the waterfront’s new-

est entertainment venue, or climb to the top of a grain elevator on Explore Buffalo’s Silo City: Vertical tour. If you prefer to be on the water rather than beside it, hop aboard the Spirit of Buffalo Schooner or a Buffalo River History Tour. Or rent a kayak, water bike or stand up paddleboard from Canalside, Buffalo’s waterfront playground. Let your hair down as you take a ride through history on an Open-Air Autobus Tour of Buffalo. These fun, interactive tours cover everything from the Queen City’s towering industrial grain elevators to Frank Lloyd Wright’s

restored Martin House Complex. If you prefer a slower pace, walking tours are also available from Buffalo Tours and Explore Buffalo. Buffalo’s summer festival season also offers something for everyone. Enjoy exhibits from more than 400 artists at the 61st annual Allentown Art Festival on June 9 and 10, or head to the Elmwood Avenue Festival of the Arts on August 25 and 26. Or stop and smell the roses at the largest free garden tour in the country – Garden Walk Buffalo – on July 28 & 29. Is all this summer fun leaving you

hungry? The Taste of Buffalo, held July 7 and 8, is the largest two-day food festival in the U.S. And if you’re crazy for wings, the National Buffalo Wing Festival, held Sept. 1 & 2 at Coca-Cola Field, is the place to be! Or, eat your way through the “Delicious Dozen� stops of the new Buffalo Wing Trail, America’s Tastiest Drive! Head to Visitbuffaloniagara.com for more information on all things Buffalo!

CRAWFORD COUNTY, PA. Come up and see us sometime! Affordcontinues on page 58

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SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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able vacation in Crawford County, PA. Pymatuning State Park features a 17,088-acre lake and has 19 miles of trails. The Park was named in the Top 10 in the Nation for the best family fishing vacations. A must see in the Park is “Where the ducks walk on the fish”. We have two-member Amusement Parks, Conneaut Lake Park and Waldemar. Love bird watching visit Erie National Wildlife Refuge with an observation deck and many hiking trails. Canoe or kayak our Upper or Lower French Creek Water Trail or boat on one of our 7 lakes. Boat Rental are available. Delight your taste buds and visit our; Frozen custard stand, Eddie’s Foot-long Hot dogs, Brew Pubs, Wineries, New distillery, Meandry, Cidery, and our Outdoor Farmers Markets. Crawford has miles

of scenic Hiking and Biking Trails. Golf on challenging, or fun golf courses. Our courses feature rolling hills with tree and water lined holes. You can play 18 holes of golf with a cart for $28 (seasonal). Hotel/Golf packages are available. Visit Drake Well Museum in Titusville. Edwin L. Drake drilled the first successful commercial oil well in 1859 which launched the modern oil industry. After your visit, take a ride on the Oil Creek and Titusville Railroad “Through the Valley that changed the World” and spend the night in a Caboose Motel. The OC&T hosts many fun events, like murder mystery dinner theatres, to Peter Cotton Tail and Santa runs. Titusville’s Annual Oil Festival is held in August. Events: Maple Taste and Tour, Thur-

ston Classic Hot Air Balloon Event, Pymatuning Waterfowl Festival, Fishing Tournaments, Crawford County Fair is the largest agriculture Fair in PA, Fall Pumpkin Fest, Antique Wood Boat Parade, Haunted Ghost Lake and so much more. Call and request our Visitors Guide, which includes a map, so you can find our member businesses. We have trail maps for hiking, biking, Taste and Touring for our brew, wine, distillery, cidery and Mead. You can also request our Events guide. All FREE just for you! Call 800-332-2338 or visit our website www.visitcrawford.org

MERCER COUNTY WINE & BREW TRAIL For groups looking for a different and fun way to celebrate birthdays, bridal parties or other special occasions – or would just love a relaxing weekend away – Mercer County, PA offers a Wine and Brew Trail in a picturesque setting. With eight wineries, six breweries, and a distillery, this Trail experience is tailored to each group’s wishes, and includes a customized itinerary, transportation, free wine tastings, en-

tertainment, and assistance in arranging an overnight stay and dinner. Getaways to Mercer County mean leaving the city behind and enjoying the beauty of scenic countryside. Joal Wolf, owner of Conneaut Cellar Winery and Distillery comments… “You can get away from the city and enjoy the countryside surroundings here, including woods, lakes, and the peacefulness of the Shenango River. Our backdrop is a big part of why people enjoy visiting our wineries and breweries. There’s also plenty to keep everyone busy, like great shopping and outdoor activities.” In addition to Conneaut Cellars Winery, area wineries include Fractured Grape, Knoggin Noggin, Lago Winery, Nova Cellars Winery, Volant Mill Winery, Webb Winery and Wilhelm Winery. Breweries on the trail have also become a major draw. Brewtus Brewing Company knows that customers are always looking for a great place to sit, relax, enjoy a couple beers, and have a delicious meal. Over the years, this family-owned business has grown to include a menu that includes favorites continues on page 60

TAKE A CRUISE ALONG THE MUSKINGUM RIVER ABOARD THE LORENA STERNWHEELER!

BED & BREAKFAST

CRUISING NOW THROUGH OCTOBER.

our Book Yway Geta y! Toda

Family reunions, weddings under 100, LBGT, retirement parties and more.

We offer serveral different types of cruise options: Public Rides and Twilight Cruises Lunch and Dinner Cruises Civil War Reenactment Cruise Paint and Party Cruise The Wayfarers Concert Cruise Charter Cruises

www.alpineretreatbnb.com www.trenthouseinn.net Call Juliann now to plan your next getaway or event! 412-401-2041

For ticket information call the Zanesville-Muskingum County Convention and Visitors Bureau 1.800.743.2303

Two great options right outside of Pittsburgh! The Alpine Retreat B&B (5 bedrooms) or the Trenthouse Inn B&B (7 bedrooms) has attractions and activities for everyone from Skiing, Golf, whitewater rafting, Fallingwater, hiking, festivals and more! Rent either of these homes as a group whole house rental or individual rooms as a Bed and Breakfast. We also have a restaurant and cater at our facility or your location for any occasion.

TRENTHOUSEINN.NET ALPINERETREATBNB.COM 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

205 North Fifth Street, Zanesville, Ohio 43701 740.455.8282 • 1.800.743.2303 • kashby@zmchamber.com


DREW BROWN

INTRODUCING

america’s america ’s tastiest tastiest drive drive Buffalo’s corner taverns have been perfecting the chicken wing since it was invented at the legendary Anchor Bar in 1964. Secret recipes, historic charm and Buffalo-style hospitality make the new Buffalo Wing Trail an experience to be savored. Come to Buffalo this summer to taste the delicious dozen.

The wet naps are on us.

buffalowingtrail.com @buffalowingtrail

#WingBUF #NeverRanch

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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and craft beer that’s great for those who love to try homegrown drafts. The meticulous brewing process includes a seven-barrel brew system that creates the perfect in-house craft beer that can be changed through the seasons. “Besides our amazing brews, we focus on having a from-scratch kitchen that serves delicious farm-to-table meals. Our 1920s décor provides a friendly atmosphere, and we’re known for our fresh burgers,” says Brewery Manager Gabby Rahn. Other breweries in the area also have plenty to offer on the Brew Trail. Stone Church Pizza House & Brew Pub in Hermitage is housed is a vacant church, and is surrounding by sparkling stained glass windows. They take pride in using traditional and non-tra-

ditional processes to create an American take on classic European beer styles. Plus, their menu of Neapolitanstyle wood-fired pizza draws locals and out-of-towners. TimberCreek Tap & Table in the Grove City area has four flagship beers on tap year-round, plus seasonal selections. If you’re new to craft beer, they also carry lighter selections so that your introduction is smooth. Besides Black Angus burgers, they also feature fresh seafood, steaks, and ribs. Barley House Brewing Taproom & Grill is a nano brewery offering a fresh variety of craft beer made onsite, as well as a full service restaurant. Brew 32 features 10 beers on tap from traditional stouts, unique shady and even Jalapeno Mango. Enjoy live music every Friday night.

Heritage Music in Lofty Places

July 20 & 21 “In Harmony”

Located on the shores of Pymatuning Lake, Mortals Key Brewing Company relies on innovative recipes to produce its beer. The brewery, located in a tractor barn that the owners refurbished with repurposed materials, welcomes live entertainment and welcomes visitors with an outside area. To book a tour contact Peggy at 724-346-3771 or go to www.VisitMercerCountyPA.com, click on Wine and Brew Trail.

farms, hike scenic trails, fish in clear, cold streams or relax on the beach. Tour the many wineries the region has to offer and visit the shops and restaurants in and around North East. History buffs should stop by the Historical Museum and Lake Shore Railway Museum. Call the North East Area Chamber of Commerce at 814-725-4262 or visit www.nechamber.org for a complete schedule of activities and lodging information.

37TH ANNUAL WINE COUNTRY HARVEST FESTIVAL

PALACE OF GOLD

The 37th Annual Wine Country Harvest Festival opens September 28 – 30 in beautiful and historic North East, PA. This three day celebration features wine tastings, winery tours, live entertainment with over 20 bands, a Stomp Off competition, cruise-in car show, hand crafters, artisans, exhibitors, a variety of food vendors and much more. Hop on the free festival shuttle to experience activities taking place in two parks. Pre-sale tickets are available online at www.nechamber.org. While you are in North East, bike along meandering country lanes and

New Vrindaban, Land of Krishna and Home to the Palace of Gold. Hidden just an hour south of Pittsburgh is one of West Virginia’s most magnificent treasures. Deep in the rolling hills just outside of Moundsville, West Virginia, lies New Vrindaban, Land of Krishna and home to the Palace of Gold, a spiritual Hare Krishna community and place of pilgrimage. It was established in 1968 by Srila Prabhupada (founder and spiritual master of ISKCON) who envisaged a tranquil society communing with nature while spreading the teachings and continues on page 62

Northeast Ohio’s Best Vacation Value

Heritage Music Festival

18 hours of music performed in a historic barn and meetinghouse. Food, Beverages, Beer Garden, Kids’ activities.

Follow Us on:

Harmony PA 16037, Just off I-79, Exits 87 & 88.

Friday July 20 • 5PM-11PM Dearest Home, Echo Valley, Scott & Rosanna Spindler, Allegheny Drifters

Saturday July 21 • 10:30AM-10:30PM Jay Smar, Old Song Rescue Society, Buffalo Rose, The Early Mays, MillBillys, Snappin’ Bug String Band, South Wind, Pittsburgh Banjo Club, The Wayward Companions, Sarah Steranka and Devin Sherman, Pittsburgh Historical Music Society Orchestra, Well Strung, Cello Fury Sponsors:

Tickets & more info at InHarmonyFestival.com 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Directly off the Ohio Turnpike, Exit 187 Minutes from Cleveland, Akron, Canton & Youngstown 9 AFFORDABLE Hotels & 2 Serene Campgrounds 60 Nearby Attractions • 40+ Restaurants • Numerous Annual Events

Get Your FREE Vacation Value Packet & Coupons Just Call 1-888-558-5580 or visit StreetsboroVCB.com


BOOK YOUR

Wine&Brew TOUR TODAY!

Have an adventure on the Mercer County Wine & Brew Trail! Only $60.00 per person, payable by credit card one week in advance. Pick up and drop off at your hotel! Group size 4–13. Larger groups can be accommodated. Perfect for bridal parties, getaways, and special occasion celebrations.

How it works: • Review Northern and Southern Routes • Contact us at least one week before your desired tour date • We will build you a customized itinerary that will include at least three stops on the wine trail, brew trail, or both Each tour will feature: • Transportation, minimum group size of four • Tastings • Production tour based on interest • Meals & entertainment offered at several stops • Meal cost is not included in package price

Contact us at 724-346-3771 or mcpa@visitmercercountypa.com to get started planning a special wine and brew experience on the Mercer County PA Wine & Brew Trail.

Northern • Conneaut Cellars Winery & Distillery • Lago Winery / Mortals Key Brewing Company • Wilhelm Winery • Barley House Brewing Taproom & Grill Southern • Fractured Grape Wine Cellars • Knockin Noggin Cidery and Winery • Nova Cellars Winery / Brew 32 • Webb Winery • Brewtus Brewing Company • Stone Church Pizza House & Brewpub • Volant Winery

YOUR SOURCE FOR TRAVEL PLANNING

SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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ideals of Bhakti Yoga or Krishna Consciousness. Now celebrating 50 years in the Ohio Valley, New Vrindaban is a well-established part of the local community, welcoming some 50,000 tourists annually from all walks of life and all parts of the globe. When you begin your journey at Prabhupada’s Palace of Gold (coined “America’s Taj Mahal”) and tour its breathtaking gardens and landscape, you will feel as if transported to mystical India. Although you will see the Palace with over 8000 square feet of 22karat gold, antique teak-wood carvings, one of a kind artwork, and more than 250 tons of marble, the real beauty is in the unalloyed love and devotion that built this stunning memorial. No expert architects or experienced artisans were employed in the construction but young men and women who built it without blueprints and who were inspired to create a home for their spiritual teacher, Srila Prabhupada. It now stands as a memorial shrine dedicated to carrying on his loving spirit and universal message. Next you may take a short walk or drive to the main temple complex, which hosts various attractions, including a traditional Hindu temple, Govinda’s vegetarian/vegan restaurant, guest lodging, a newly constructed yoga pavilion, shops, nature trails, and much more. This unique experience will allow you to step outside of the ordinary and escape the hustle and bustle of modern urban life. New Vrindaban hosts a wide range of festivals all year long, so you will surely catch something that fans the fire of the soul. Whether it’s one of the daily gatherings in the main temple with dance and song, or a fireworks display over the lake (Saturday nights in the summer), or whatever way you end up spending your time, you will surely leave with happy memories that you would want to share with friends and family. Take time out for yourself this sum-

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mer, kick off your shoes and feel the grass beneath your toes, milk a cow, photograph a peacock, or watch the swans swimming in one of the many lakes. New Vrindaban is here for you, a haven of peace and harmony. Please visit us online at www.palaceofgold.com or www.newvrindaban. com, and plan your trip today.

SUMMERTIME FUN FOR EVERYONE IN STREETSBORO! Streetsboro is also just a short drive to over 60 nearby attractions including antique malls, golf courses, amusement parks, train ride excursions, zoos, parks, museums, sporting activities, annual events and much more. Streetsboro is directly off the Ohio Turnpike, Exit 187 and within minutes to Cleveland, Akron, Canton and Youngstown. We offer exceptional accommodations at our 9 hotels and 2 campgrounds, as well as an assortment of dining options at more than 40 restaurants. Streetsboro offers an unforgettable experience and is the ideal location for an overnight stay or your next memorable trip.

ZANESVILLE, OHIO Looking for a way to get out on the water? Take a cruise along the Muskingum River aboard the Lorena Sternwheeler! Choose from Public Rides, Lunch Cruises, Dinner Cruises, and Twilight Cruises. The Lorena is also available for private charters and is perfect for birthday parties, anniversaries, reunions, and other special events. While in the area be sure to take time to visit many of the other great attractions including The Wilds, Zanesville Museum of Art, John and Annie Glenn Museum, National Road and Zane Grey Museum, Mission Oaks Garden, Alan Cottrill Sculpture Studio and Gallery just to name a few. Download the free mobile app by searching Visit Zanesville, Ohio and make your plans today!


Experience New Vrindaban, “Land of Krishna� and home to

Take a one-tank trip an hour south, and join us for an afternoon out of the ordinary. This spiritual retreat will allow you to dive into the traditional culture of Vedic India and delight your senses with tastes, sights, and sounds that

newvrindaban.com

will leave you refreshed, focused, and above all, happy!

palaceofgold.com

New Vrindaban, Palace of Gold 3759 McCrearys Ridge Rd, Moundsville, WV 26041 | Phone: 304-843-1600 SUMMER GUIDE 2018

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Find yourself at OpenStreetsPGH this summer. OpenStreetsPGH connects neighborhoods by creating a car-free environment for a few hours – opening our city streets for pedestrians to enjoy. There is something for everyone, from fitness workshops, to kids activities, shopping, brunch, community arts, and special promotions presented by over 100 local businesses and organizations.

Start with our Downtown Uptown South Side Route

May 27 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Coming soon: June 24 - Downtown | The Strip | Lawrenceville July 28 - Shadyside | East Liberty | Homewood

openstreetspgh.org


FREE SHIRT FRIDAYS PRESENTED BY SUGARDALE

STARLING MARTE Center Fielder

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE FOOL & >> THE MAGICIAN BY THE HILLS AND THE RIVERS SELF-RELEASED THEHILLSANDTHERIVERS.COM BANDCAMP.COM

On its latest record The Fool and the Magician, Appalachian folk collective The Hills and the Rivers have crafted a ten-song endeavor with roots and album imagery based on tarot symbolism. And just as pulling cards in a deck can provide you guidance on your life choices or relationships, the record THE HILLS AND THE RIVERS details a personal journey into the with AFRO YAQUI MUSIC unknown, armed with a little intuition and COLLECTIVE and the power of choice. COUSIN BONELESS With enchanting harmonies and vocal 8 p.m. Fri., May 18. Cattivo, work (just listen to the magic of “Mmbop”), 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. upright bass, violin, djembe, washboard, $5. cattivopgh.com tambourine, octave mandolin, mandolin and banjo, the group builds dynamic sonic voyages like “The Leap” and gently meandering tunes like “Middle Garden.” The energy kicks up on “Gotta Get My Thrill,” a raucous song that sounds like the chaotic, uncertain and messy search for bliss and truth. •

Summer Conc e rt S e r i es May 27 Flow Band May 28 Told Ya So! June 1 Ridgemont High June 2 Mercedez June 3 The Shriners June 8 Tony Janflone, Jr.

DEAD FUNNY

BY ALEX MCCANN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

HAVE A confession to make: I don’t really like superhero movies.

That feels like a particularly dicey confession to make right now since Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War are breaking box-office records left and right. My apathy toward superhero movies is based in their constant attempts to do everything: action, science fiction and fantasy, sprinkled with comedy, romance and drama. Well, that, and the fact that you have to watch 18 separate movies to be properly caught up before Infinity War. The good news is that Deadpool 2, like its predecessor, is not a superhero movie; it’s a dark comedy that just happens to be about superheroes. There’s this inherent trait of superhero movies that they just have to make references to the other films in their universe: Iron Man has a brief shot of Captain America’s half-finished shield, The Dark Knight Rises alludes to Killer Croc, and of course, those inevitable Stan Lee cameos.

DEADPOOL 2

Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM Best Live Bands Every Weekend!

it’s a destination!

1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com PGHCITYPAPER.COM

.FILM.

DIRECTED BY: David Leitch / STARRING: Ryan Reynolds, Josh Brolin, Morena Baccarin, Julian Dennison, Zazie Beetz, T.J. Miller Rated R. Starts Fri., May 18

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

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Ryan Reynolds and Karan Soni in Deadpool 2

Deadpool 2 takes that cliché and mocks the hell out of it. The film opens on Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) playing with a music box featuring Wolverine impaled on a spike. That’s just the first of an endless string of line-crossing humor. Everything from Batman v Superman to Reynolds’ native Canada is derided to hilarious effect, but never in a way that feels contrived or crueler than necessary. Nothing’s changed in regards to Deadpool. His dirty mouth, dry wit, fourth-wall breaks and violent shenanigans are, if anything, only ramped up in the sequel. In fact, much of Deadpool 2 takes what Deadpool did and takes it even further. There’s more comically exaggerated gore, to the point that one scene plays out like Final Destination. The major-studio music budget makes itself known with often-ironic song placements, such as Cher’s “If I Could Turn Back Time,” Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5” and a-ha’s “Take On Me.” A staggering number of films — everything from Basic Instinct to The Human Centipede — are referenced so often that Deadpool 2 sometimes feels like a dirtier version of Ready Player One. To be honest, the plot doesn’t matter much. Good guys and bad guys fight, someone is not who they seem to be and cameos come out of nowhere. We all know the drill. Aside from that, though, the real spoiler would be giving away the jokes, quips and the laugh-out-loud gags. No person or topic is off-limits, which is just how good comedy works (contrary to what Roseanne Barr thinks). It’s worth the watch for the laughs alone — especially if you, too, aren’t a superhero fan.


August 25th NOON-10 PM Forbes and Market Square Free Tickets at RRRPGH.com

Andrew W.K.

.MUSIC.

G. Love and Special Sauce Donavon Frankenreiter Passafire Roots of Creation Ras Prophet Flow Band Rhythm ‘n’ Steel DJ SMI P R E S E N T E D B Y:

Q&A WITH ANDREW W.K. BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NDREW W.K. has been partying since his 2001 release I Get Wet. Now, 17 years later, he’s released a fifth album, You’re Not Alone. City Paper chatted with W.K. by phone to talk about sustaining and motivating the celebratory lifestyle.

A

aspect of this work is the people I get to work with [musically and creatively]. They are the party gods’ most blatant display of blessings on me — that these people are here and with me and I get to spend the time of my life with them, doing this work together.

WHAT KEEPS THE PARTY GOING? I think we’re all bonded together in our pursuit of and obsession with a type of physical excitement and energy, something we’re worshipping and having rituals around. This common obsession with making life the most intense and exciting it can be, that’s what all the music is aiming for, giving you the mind and heart that you can take with you into the world and face it with enthusiasm, optimism and resolve. That’s what keeps me able to do this. The idea that doing this work would be tiring? The work is the refueling, the work is what enables me to live as a human. This is how I’m to figure out how to be a real person, have emotions, have a quest that forces me to rise [beyond] my own self and have a reason bigger than myself to do it.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE PARTY PEOPLE OUT THERE? It can become very easy to be so arrogant as to imagine that life is not going to be extraordinarily difficult. We owe it to ourselves to make a promise to inherently respect life, to prove ourselves worthy of it in a joyful way. It takes a tolerance of discomfort; an acceptance of confusion; embracing ordeals as an opportunity to develop powerful character. And it takes a sense of wonder and excitement.

WHAT’S THE MOST EXCITING PART OF THIS ENDEAVOR, AND BEING ABLE TO CREATE AND PERFORM MUSIC FOR SO LONG? I’m very thankful I get to do this. It’s only become more amazing to me as time has gone on that any of this has unfolded. The most powerful and meaningful

ANDREW W.K. WITH RAINBOW MACHINE 8 p.m. Tues., May 22. Mr. Smalls, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $22. mrsmalls.com

Celebrating every aspect of the fact that we get to exist, almost relishing in the most difficult things, as if to take away the power from the hurt. Life is like a friend, it’s this being, this thing we get to interact with. You can interpret all those [difficult] things as life teaching you how to be a better version of yourself, like a drill sergeant. But it’s trying to break you down into something more noble. Stay strong, and don’t be afraid.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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WE BUY RECORDS & CDS

TOP 5

HIKING TRAILS BY REBECCA ADDISON RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TOP PRICES PAID FOR QUALITY COLLECTIONS TI

CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON

Three Rivers Heritage Trail on the South Side The Mini-Market at PULLPROOF Studio in April

EMERALD VIEW PARK SINCE 1980 MON-FRI 9AM-6PM SAT 10AM-5PM 513 GRANT AVENUE • MILLVALE Questions? Call Us 412-821-8484

ATTICRECORDS@VERIZON.NET

FEATURED ON INK MASTER :ANGELS

PYRAMID

TATTOO & Body Piercing

Encircling the neighborhoods of Mt. Washington, Duquesne Heights and Allentown, this trail offers scenic views of the city. pittsburghparks.org/ emerald-view-park

FRICK PARK Spanning more than 500 acres, this park has several hiking trails. pittsburghparks.org/frick-park

RACHEL CARSON TRAIL Named for environmentalist Rachel Carson, this Western Pennsylvania trail spans more than 170 miles. rachelcarsontrails.org

RIVERVIEW PARK The hiking trails at this 259acre park include the wooded Forest Trail. pittsburghparks. org/riverview-park

THREE RIVERS HERITAGE TRAIL PYRAMIDTATTOO.COM

BRIDGEVILLE, PA

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Running along both sides of the Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio Rivers, this trail is 37 miles long. friendsoftheriverfront.org/trails/ three-rivers-heritage-trail

.ART.

MAKER PLACE BY FRED BLAUTH // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

AKERSPACES ARE places one can go to use tools that are otherwise inaccessible or unaffordable. Oftentimes, these tools are critical in the development of an artist’s practice. No one knows this better than Charlie Barber, Christina Lee, Aaron Regal, Anna Shepperson and Matt Van Asselt, the artist lead team behind PULLPROOF Studio, an in-progress printmaking studio that moved in to a building on Penn Avenue last February. Born out of a need for screenprinting equipment, 24-hour access to a facility and complete control of the processes involved, the artist-lead team launched an Indiegogo campaign with the hopes of crowdsourcing $15K to make it happen. They have since surpassed that goal ($15,843 at press time) and recently extended their campaign to a stretch goal of $25,000. Pittsburgh wasn’t completely devoid of printmaking resources before PULLPROOF. Artist Image Resource (AIR) on the North Side and the Braddock Carnegie Library Neighborhood Print Shop both emphasize guided learning and education for beginners looking to explore printmaking. PULLPROOF recognizes the appeal of these spaces but seeks to be a collective with a shared studio space and membership-based structure. “We’re looking for screenprinters that need the space but not the knowledge of ‘how to,’” says Van Asselt. “Printmaking, specifically silkscreening is so process intensive,” says Regal. “The amount of time it takes to bring a design all the way through requires so

many different steps and material usages. Sometimes you need access to a piece of equipment for an hour, other times you need equipment for several. We’re all working artists and can’t cram the work we need to have done into tight slots of time.” While renovations are still in the early stages, PULLPROOF has opened its doors to the Garfield, Penn Avenue community by way of programming. The now-bare studio serves as an impromptu exhibition space in this time of transition. From art markets to solo exhibitions, the team at PULLPROOF has already produced multiple events and tapped into the audience the street generates from the monthly Unblurred, First Fridays event.

PULLPROOF STUDIO For more information visit pullproof.studio.

“Screenprinting for me is like the democratized version of photography and painting,” says Regal in regard to being a printmaker in the 21st century. “It’s a way of making my work accessible, distributable and inexpensive to own. It’s also an incredible propaganda tool for communicating to people, making them think or even changing their minds about things. That’s the beautiful thing about printmaking: it exists in multiples. You can disseminate it rapidly and widely.” PULLPROOF Studio plans to be fully operational as a studio space by Fall 2018 and its Indiegogo Campaign closes on May 17.


Use code CITYCITY to save $5 on single tickets

A new play about growing up with nothing in the land of plenty

PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN

Hir at Black Box Theater

.STAGE.

RIGHT HIR

BY MICHELLE PILECKI // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

TART WITH FAMILY dysfunction writ large, stir in heaps of souring masculine

privilege, spice with gender continuum, garnish with physical and verbal humor — and there you have Taylor Mac’s Hir at barebones productions’ Black Box Theater, directed by artistic director Patrick Jordan. Pronounced “here,” hir is a non-gender-specific pronoun, objective case, and Mac makes quite an objective case in skewering social norms, especially the rigid definitions of male and female, sexually as well as socially. Pronouns are important. For the record, Mac prefers “judy” as a personal pronoun, as in “everybody in judy’s 2014 comedy has gotten the short end of the stick.” The center of the family is, of course, the mother. Local legend Helena Ruoti bites into the role of Paige with glee: bubbling rage turned into rebellious creativity, while seeking refuge in an unplanned future. The long-suffering battered wife wreaks vengeance daily on her tormentor, now nearly a zombie after a stroke. At first, Arnold seems pathetic, worthy of pity. Douglas Rees bravely embraces the mockery, but he lets the character’s evil bubble up.

HIR Continues through May 26 at barebones Black Box Theater, 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. barebonesproductions.com

If mom and dad have been at war for decades, imagine the collateral damage to the kids, noncombatants in name only. Isaac — whose nickname is a revealing “I” — returns from the actual war in Afghanistan, with PTSD among other problems, to a “home” turned upside-down. Tad Cooley flashes through dismay and despair (not to mention hilarious exchanges with Ruoti) as he tries to dominate the battleground that is his family. And then there’s Max, whose transgendering status is behind the title. Liam Ezra Dickinson seems a bit old for hir (ze’s [correct non-gender-specific pronoun, subjective case] still just a kid, after all) but portrays the insecurities and self-explorations of a teen coping with way too much. The changing alliances of the characters seem like choreography. It’s quite a tight production, if rather crowded in the first act. Jordan designed the set, masterfully managed by Brittany Spinelli. And let’s applaud the design team: technical director Douglas McDermott; Andrew Ostrowski, lighting; Angela Vesco, costumes; Carolyn Slothour, sound; and fight director Randy Kovitz. Vicious, funny, madly topical — Hir can be discomfiting but stimulating, sometimes simultaneously.

by CARLA CHING directed by BART DELORENZO

MAY 12 – JUNE 3, 2018 TICKETS ON SALE NOW B O X O F F I C E 412.431.CITY (2489) W E B CITYTHEATRECOMPANY.ORG 1300 BINGHAM STREET / SOUTH SIDE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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Kick it with a

TASTY GROOVE

Djs are every Wed, Fri, & Sat. 10pm - 1am. Bands start between 8 - 9 pm on Thursday nights.

May 17th

Casual Hobos Blue Grass

May 24th Told Ya So

May 31st

Acoustic Open Mic with Jay Constable

June 14th

Eden Sparks Trio

June 21st

CP PHOTO BY SARAH HUNY YOUNG

Juan & Co.

Pittsburgh artist Lauren Valley

.ART.

June 28th Told Ya So

DJs & A LIVE MUSIC Outdoor seating now open

EatShady.com

412-697-0909

5500 Walnut Street, Shadyside

DIGITAL SPACE

BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM CCORDING TO a 2017 study con-

ducted by The City University of New York Guttman College, a place known for its cultural abundance, women of color make up fewer than six percent of artists represented by top galleries in New York City. Pittsburgh artist Lauren Valley doesn’t need a report or statistics to tell her women of color are largely underrepresented in the art community. As a minority she’s experienced it first-hand. Valley’s new project, Electric Women, highlights the work of women of color in the digital arts space through a collection of profiles. An online digital art gallery will feature work from artists working in the realm of art, science, technology and social practice. Think of it as a social-media site for female

artists of color. “A lot of my work deals with social media and online personas,” says Valley. “I began to wonder what other women of color, who are also doing technology and social-media-based work, were doing. I was looking for a community that didn’t quite exist. I began to talk to other women like me and they noted the lack of a common online space. This project began out of a want for this online resource that I definitely needed.” Valley is a Fifth Year Scholar, spending an extra year of study at Carnegie Mellon University. She completed a residency at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) in 2016, and at ACRE, July 2017. As a student at CMU, Valley began incorporating technology into her art

ELECTRIC WOMEN For more information about the site and to learn about the artists profiled, visit Electric-Women.com.

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during her sophomore year and now considers herself a new media artist. For example, in her video pieces, she incorporates mechanical robotic parts. Her YouTube channel, where she goes by the name Junie Genius, includes a series called Mad Science Wednesdays where she features different robotic pieces she has made. “I have been doing art my entire life. Using technology has been a relatively recent development in my artistic practice,” Valley says. “As I began to dive deeper into the online new media world and started seeing how other women of color use technology, I began to realize there wasn’t much of an online community for women of color working across art and technology.” Valley says she wishes there was a space like this when she was in middle school and high school and looking for artists like her. And from talks with other artists she asked to participate in the Electric Women project, she


realized that her frustration in the art world is shared by many women of color. “Each of the artists I’ve contacted has said having this common resource and being able to find other women like them is something that has been extremely helpful,” Valley says. “Overall, the reaction has been very positive.” Valley grew up in Fox Chapel, a Pittsburgh suburb lacking in diversity. She says attending CMU has exposed her to a variety of cultures that have helped shape her art and influenced her work on Electric Women. “It really encouraged me to explore myself as a person of color and to connect with more people that look like me,” Valley says. “Having the diverse community on campus encouraged me to carve out this online space for other people. If I hadn’t come to as diverse a place as Carnegie Mellon I might not have pursued this project.” Among artists involved in the project is Alisha B. Womsley, whose project “There Are Black People In The Future,” made headlines when those words were posted on a billboard in East Liberty. The words were taken down after alleged complaints from members of the community, but the action drew backlash. Other artists involved in the project include Allison Maria Rodriguez, Anna

Luisa Petrisko, Bonnie Jones, Emilia Yang, Gaby Cepeda, Hackers of Resistance, Hiba Ali, Hyphen-Labs, Ingrid Zhuang, Jennifer Chan, Joanna Cheung, Joy Poulard Cruz, Julieta Gil, Laleh Mehran, Lauren McCarthy, Legacy Russell, Lisa Park, Mary Maggic, Morehshin Allahyari, Nicole Maloof, Peiqi Su, Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo, Sixing Xu, Tale of Tales, Tamiko Thiel, Tonia Beglari, Wednesday Kim, Yo-Yo Lin and Yuehao Jiang.

“I WAS LOOKING FOR A COMMUNITY THAT DIDN’T QUITE EXIST.”

’ LET S

GET S CIAL

“The first iteration includes 30 people but it’s going to be a growing online resource,” Valley says. She also plans to create a physical book version of Electric Women. Disciplines of art represented through the project include 3D printing, virtual reality, robotic installation and biohacking. Artists interested in being highlighted can submit their work through the Electric Women website.

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

.SPORTS.

Former Pittsburgh Pirate outfielder Andrew McCutchen received a standing ovation when he returned to PNC Park for the first time as a San Francisco Giant over the weekend. Check out more of our photos of Cutch’s return at pghcitypaper.com.

@PGHCITYPAPER FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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.FILM.

ON OUR SCREEN BY REBECCA ADDISON INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HALF BATH >> BY REESE HAYES DASHING AGENT

It might be hard to believe, but this web series was produced in nine days. Written by Reese Hayes, whose credits include Netflix’s MINDHUNTER and produced in part by fellow Pittsburgh filmmakers Erick Rigby and Daniel Kusnir, who also served as director of photography, Half Bath is an enjoyable addition to the growing collection of web series coming out of the city. The series follows the struggles of a young couple (played by Dan Helbling and Olivia Vadnais) as they attempt to repair their fractured relationship. Their efforts lead them to lease a new apartment, but it’s not exactly the solution they were hoping for. The episodes, available on Vimeo, tackle common issues arising from relationships, friendships and perhaps the most frustrating of all, dealing with crazy landlords. But the locales featured in each episode, like Murphy’s Taproom and the Square Café in Regent Square, are sure to be even more familiar to Pittsburgh viewers. •

This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM LARKIN

RYDING ON

BY MEG FAIR AND ALEX MCCANN // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T’S NOT THE first time he’s been on the Smiling Moose’s stage, but on this night, he’s the de facto emcee on a bill featuring several other hiphop artists. A dozen smartphones rise above the crowd to capture the man in the spotlight. “[I] made a lot of sacrifices for this,” he says. “We ‘bout to turn the f*ck up.” Goest Ryder has been through a lot to get to where he is today. Née Andy Streshenkoff, Goest Ryder went from troubled youth to successful contractor and business owner to drug addict and incarcerated individual.

GOEST RYDER Check out music and upcoming performances at goestryder.com

ED! RECE NTLY POST

” SESSIONS: “THE SWEATER OWNS THE BUCKLE D

Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

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Goest Ryder

.MUSIC.

Now five years out of prison, he’s spending his time putting out music and supporting other musicians through his label/collective Lafiosa Enterprise. Lafiosa is an acronym for “Loyalty Amongst Family Is Our Strength Always.” Streshenkoff began writing most of the lyrics to his forthcoming record Goest Stories: The Prologue while he was incarcerated. As a kid he’d freestyle with friends, but he never took it seriously until he was in prison. “The name Goest Ryder actually came from my passion to ghost write. I never saw myself as an artist, but I’d battle dudes [in prison] and they’d be like, ‘You’re not a ghost writer you’re a ghost rider,’ because the shit was hot,”

explains Streshenkoff. When he got out, he went into the studio with lyrics, never having put a full song together. Not long after recording some tracks, he found himself opening for Juicy J. And the songs Streshenkoff has written are intensely personal. “There are so many people that relate to these things — drug addiction, being in juvenile detention, being in prison as an adult, living a blue collar work ethic, growing up in a single parent home,” explains Streshenkoff. But he has no problem writing and performing the vulnerable, honest music he’s written. “It’s genuine,” he explains. “It’s all from my own personal experience.” In addition to hustling musically, Streshenkoff is giving back by speaking to troubled youth at the school where he spent some of his teenage years, George Junior Republic, as well as the Shuman Center in Pittsburgh. “I’m trying to use my position to show these kids that they can accomplish anything in life if they set their mind to it,” says Streshenkoff. “It’s good for the kids, and it’s good for me. To be at [George Junior] as a child, never thinking I would be here where I’m at right now, and being able to go back — I’ve been in that position so I know what they’re going through mentally, emotionally, being away from home, going through legal problems. It’s giving them a glimpse of hope, saying, ‘you can achieve anything you want to achieve, be anything you want to be.’”


.STREAMING.

KID GORGEOUS BY ALEX GORDON ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

J

OHN MULANEY isn’t the first co-

median to perform with a musician on stage — Hannibal Buress had a DJ for years; Mitch Hedberg had his stand-up bassist — but bringing a Grammy award-winning producer and composer and his wurlitzer on stage for a Radio City Music Hall special is something new and unexpected. But it’s a good call. Jon Brion, producer behind Kanye West’s Late Registration, film scorer for Boogie Nights, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Lady Bird, has provided music for Mulaney’s past two specials. He composed the intro for Mulaney’s 2015 stand-up special, The Comeback Kid, with an oddly pensive and downbeat orchestral piece. It was a far cry from the lets-get-amped opening music you might expect of a comedy show. Then Brion joined Mulaney on stage for his most recent Netflix special,

PHOTO COURTESY OF NETFLIX

Not a robot: John Mulaney

Kid Gorgeous, and once again, sets up a weirdly solemn and melodramatic vibe for the performance. “The first theaters were cathedrals and they had organs, and the Chicago

Theatre does have one of the original Wurlitzer organs. That’s why there’s kind of a dirge when you’re pushing backstage to [Brion]’s score,” Mulaney told Splitsider in 2015.

JOHN MULANEY You can, and should, stream Mulaney’s past three stand-up specials (New In Town, The Comeback Kid, Kid Gorgeous) on Netflix now.

“It is funny how you talk about it, because it’s a lovely score with a little tension, and that’s how it felt arriving at the Chicago Theatre that night.” If you’ve been following Mulaney’s career, as a writer for Saturday Night Live, in his short-lived sitcom Mulaney, or as a standup, his taste for oldfashioned performance tricks should come as no surprise. He’s not exactly Borscht Belt, but there’s an old school sense of class to his well-tailored suits, ornate theaters, and original classical scores. It creates an effective contrast to his personality, which, if the word “kid” in his past two titles didn’t tip you off, can be fairly silly and unimposing. That aesthetic comes into focus in a bit from Kid Gorgeous, where Mulaney points to the irony of web security measures in having to convince a robot that you are not a robot. After the setup, he takes on a vaudevillian voice and starts imitating the CAPTCHA robot in rhyme: “You look and you type what you think you see! Is it an E or is it a 3? That’s up to ye. The passwords that passed, you correctly guessed, but now it’s time for the robot test!” It’s a perfect Mulaney bit: silly, implacably dark and completely original.

About the 2018 Deutschtown Music Festival The 6th Annual Deutschtown Music Festival will take place on Pittsburgh’s Northside on Friday and Saturday, July 13th and 14th. The award-winning, free, two-day festival has become the most significant local music event of the year. With over 250 bands, 11 outdoor stages, and 26 indoor venues, the festival has a little bit of something for everybody. Friday and Saturday will be full-day events taking place across multiple outdoor and indoor stages. Three main stages are featured during the day, two in Allegheny Commons Park and the other on a closed-off block of Foreland Ave. A beer garden will exist in a closed-off portion of the city-owned parking lot next to the main stage. Family-friendly programming is featured during the daytime, with over 20 food trucks, children’s activities, an artists’ market, and other activities to supplement the music. Throughout the day and night free school bus shuttles with multiple stops in the NorthSide and NorthShore will be available for the over 25,000 people that are expected to attend. Numerous bars and clubs will participate throughout the night, allowing one to visit many different venues within a short walking distance. This non-profit, volunteer driven event has remained steadfast in its goal of 1) fostering economic and community development in the Northside and 2) also supporting and promoting Pittsburgh’s vibrant live music scene. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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Saturday May 19, 10 am-4 pm Hartwood Acres Stables Complex

WED., MAY 30 DIAMOND HEAD 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $17-28. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Argus & Klaymore.

Celebrate the “Outlander” book and TV series with talks, exhibitions, buffet lunch and whiskey tasting!

THU., MAY 31 RAVEN BLACK 7:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE UPSTAIRS SOUTH SIDE. 21 AND OVER. $12-14. 877-4-FLY-TIX or ticketfly.com. With special guests Hail Sagan, Aboleth & Over My Dead Body.

$55 for county residents & $69 for non-residents Purchase tickets at alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms

THU., MAY 31 HAMMERFALL 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. ALL AGES. $14.50-70. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guests Flotsam and Jetsam & Bravura.

THU., MAY 31 RED ELVISES 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $9.75-15. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guests Prime 8 & Chase and the Barons.

THU., MAY 31 THE DECEMBERISTS 8 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $41.75-229. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

TUE., JUNE 5 TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL

FRI., JUNE 1 CALVIN BROWN 10 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $10. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., JUNE 2 BODIOGRAPHY SPRING CONCERT

412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

1 P.M. BOYCE PARK FOUR SEASONS LODGE BOYCE PARK. Free (registration required). 724-733-4656 or alleghenycounty.us/ parkprograms.

7 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $30.75. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

MON., JUNE 4 MEN I TRUST

SAT., JUNE 2 LISA LAMPANELLI

7:30 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. $12-15. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com.

12 P.M. POINT STATE PARK DOWNTOWN. Free. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

7:30 P.M. THE PALACE THEATRE GREENSBURG. $55-98. 724-836-8000 or thepalacetheatre.org

TUE., JUNE 5 DIRTY HEADS

FRI., JUNE 1 BYRON CAGE & ANITA WILSON

SAT., JUNE 2 TOMMY JAMES & THE SHONDELLS

7:30 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $40-70. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

8 P.M. THE MEADOWS CASINO WASHINGTON. $29-64. 724-503-1200 or ticketmaster.com.

6:30 P.M. HIGHMARK STADIUM STATION SQUARE. $38.75-43. 412-224-4900 or ticketmaster.com. With special guests Iration, The Movement & Pacific Dub.

FRI., JUNE 1 DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL

FRI., JUNE 1 LORRIE MORGAN & PAM TILLIS 8 P.M. THE MEADOWS CASINO WASHINGTON. $24-59. 724-503-1200 or ticketmaster.com.

SAT., JUNE 2 LEA MICHELE & DARREN CRISS 8 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $29.50-499.

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TUE., JUNE 5 TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE 8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $35-60. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF REDFISHBOWL

^ Sat., May 19: Lawrenceville Art Crawl

THURSDAY MAY 17 THEATER Want to expose your child to the theater but don’t want a drama or death-filled musical? The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust has your back; today starts the EQT Children’s Theater Festival. The festival includes free cultural and education activities, family-friendly art installations and galleries, pop-up performances, a scavenger hunt with a fun prize and staged performances from international artists. Taking place throughout the Cultural

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District, the festival aims to teach children about the many different perspectives in the world and how to express themselves artistically. Continues through May 20. Lauren Ortego 10 a.m. Downtown. $9. pghkids.trustarts.org

FOOD Starting today, sample a bevy of tasty sandwiches during the annual Northside Sandwich Week in which restaurants go head to head to find out who makes the best sammy. Participating restaurants include Kaffeehaus, Badamo’s Pizza, Threadbare Cider, Legends of the North Shore, Penn Brewery, Huszar, Rivers Casino, Fig and Ash, Brugge on North, Chateau

Cafe & Cakery and Flavors Street Food. This year’s judges Melissa McCart, Max Somerville, Nathan Zoob, Day Bracey and Salena Zito will award the honor of Northside Sandwich King or Queen. This evening you can sample some of the offerings at Sandwich Sampler: The French Bread Connection. Sandwich week continues through May 27. Celine Roberts 6 p.m. Priory Grand Hall, 614 Pressley St., North Side. $35. sandwichweek.pittsburghnorthside.com

MUSIC Nearly a year after the release of its long-awaited third record, Fleet Foxes is on top of the folk world once again.

After a six-year wait between 2011’s Helplessness Blues and June’s Crack-Up, the Seattle-borne five-piece has stormed back onto the scene. As if the group’s choral harmonies and ethereal aura couldn’t get stronger, its Record Store Day release of two singles — “Crack Up (Choral Version)” and “In The Morning (Live in Switzerland)” — further embraces its now-famous rustic blend of folk and chamber pop. Tonight, the group plays the Benedum Center. Psych-folk group Amen Dunes, fresh off the March release of the acclaimed Freedom, will set the mood with symphonic, radiant melodies. Alex McCann 8 p.m. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $38.75-83.75. trustarts.org


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^ Thu., May 17: EQT Children’s Theater Festival

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FRIDAY MAY 18 OUTDOOR According to a recent study published in the British Medical Journal, the likelihood of contracting or dying of heart disease is about 50 percent smaller for bike commuters compared to sedentary commuters. With that motivation in mind, local bike advocacy group Bike Pittsburgh is hosting a Bike to Work Day event today to encourage you to pedal to the office. Cyclists can ride from all over to their jobs, but two commuter cafes will be set up in Downtown and Oakland and will offer free coffee and pastries. People who become Bike Pittsburgh members today will also get a free gift. Ride on! Ryan Deto 7:30-10 a.m. Market Square, Downtown and Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. bikepgh.org

ART Humans share a few defining qualities, but what The Spinning Plate Gallery’s latest installation, Similar Yet Different, aims to teach us is that those similarities are ^ Fri., May 18: Bodega Bamz

even present in the differences between us. Tonight, the gallery will have a special jazz performance entitled Halo Head and the Sound Cloud are in the House. The musicians consist of Elizabeth Douglas, a jazz performer and sculptor, along with Sound Cloud, a group made up of noted saxophonist Rex Trimm and percussionist Christopher McCune. The group will be adding an instrumental element to the exhibit that reflects their own interpretations of the art just for tonight. LO 7 p.m. 5720 Friendship Ave., Friendship. Free (donations encouraged). paulaartist@ gmail.com

Keep up to date on the latest news and events in the city.

Snackable content to read on the go.

MUSIC Though his debut album is titled Rolling Stoned, don’t mistake Smoke DZA for just another weed rapper. His bars focus on more than just getting high — though it is a favorite topic of his — and he’s collaborated with stars like Kendrick Lamar, Wiz Khalifa and Joey Bada$$. Like Smoke DZA, Bodega Bamz got his start in hip hop in his native Harlem. After dropping 20 pounds by giving up alcohol and appearing on the Showtime comedy, SMILF, the rapper is fresh off the release of his second fulllength, PAPI. Tonight, he’ll perform at Spirit along with 18-year-old rapper Jayy Grams, whose flow and anti-corrupt police rhymes are reminiscent of Ice Cube, as well as trap duo the Yutes. AM 8 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $28. spiritpgh.com.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SEAN PECKNOLD

^ Thu., May 17: Fleet Foxes

STAGE Starting tonight, the Glitter Box Theater will be taken over by the locally-grown musical Sea Turtle in Space. It’s an original musical written and directed by Teresa Martuccio of Pittsburgh whose prior work includes Meow!, The Soiled Dove, and Amelia the Musical. The story follows a sea turtle who has been floating around space, waiting for companionship. Heads up: the show contains adult language and content, as well as potentially triggering instances of misogyny, so this will be for adults only. But fear not — there’s no place in space for patriarchy! Spacey, futuristic metallic and sparkly attire is encouraged. Continues through May 20. Meg Fair 8 p.m., Fri., May 18 and Sat., May 19, 7 p.m., Sun., May 20. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10-15. theglitterboxtheater.com

SATURDAY MAY 19 COMICS The differences between 3 Rivers Comicon

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and other fan conventions is really simple to spot. This convention, which starts tonight at the Century III Mall, actually focusess on comics and the artists who create them. Just a small sampling of the talented artists scheduled y to appear today and tomorrow at the ed by New event, sponsored mics, are Dimension Comics, e Amazing Ron Frenz (The or, r Captain Spiderman, Thor, skor (American ( America), Ed Piskor en: Grand Splendor, X-Men: Design), comicss writer Amy Chu d Sonja, Green (Poison Ivy, Red ccasional City Hornet) and occasional ting artist DJ Paper contributing d Hero by Coffman (God Child,

> Sat., May 19: The Burlypicks PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC PAUL OWENS

Night, t The Hulk 100 Project) t In Project). addition, there is a full slate of ven vendors; one-day tickets are a barg bargain at $9.99 for ad adults and $4.99 for kids. There is also a VIP/beer party tonight w where recipients wi will get the 2018 customcustom-made 3 Rivers Com Comicon craft beer from Helltown Brewing. Charlie Deitch h1 11 a.m.7 p.m. Sa Sat., May 19 and 10 a. a.m.5 p.m. Sun., M May 20. 3075 Clairton Road, West Mifflin. $4.99-69.99. 3riverscomico 3riverscomicon.com

ART The Silver Eye C Center for Photography’s mission is con to promote contemporary photography an and visual

storytelling. Today marks the organization’s annual benefit auction. Proceeds from the 2018 Benefit Auction will go toward supporting Silver Eye’s exhibitions and educational programing. The auction features work by contemporary artists, ranging from prominent mid-career and established photographers, to emerging photographic talent. The auction also includes vintage and historical photographs. A preview exhibition for the auction will be open until Fri., May 18 at 6 p.m. Rebecca Addison 11 a.m. 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $75. silvereye.org

ART Are you longing for a Lawrenceville-based art celebration since the annual Art All Night relocated out of the neighborhood this year? Look no further than the Lawrenceville Art Crawl happening today. The event was organized, in part, by art collective Redfishbowl with the goal of bringing together small businesses and the local arts community. The event will run along Butler Street from 40th Street to 52nd Street. More than 25 venues are expected to participate and more than 15 bands are expected to perform. The event will feature more than


150 visual artists. Other highlights will include food trucks, mime performers, interactive freestyle and dance performances, glass blowing demonstrations, drag performers, caricatures, body painting, tarot card reading and more. RA 3-9 p.m. Butler Street, Lawrenceville. Free. redfishbowl.com

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BURLESQUE If you’re looking for a group of multi-talented burlesque performers from across a range of experience, look no further than tonight’s performance of The Burlypicks at Club Café. A one-of-a-kind show, local and national performers will put on their best acts and the winners could earn spots in the The World Championship Burlypicks Weekend. They’ll lip-sync, dance, sing, twirl their tassels and maybe throw in an improvisational striptease or two. At the end of the night, only one will be named Best Overall Act. LO 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. burlypicks.com

LGBTQ It’s almost Pride season and kicking it off is the Miss Gay Pittsburgh Pride Pageant tonight at There Ultra Lounge. Contestants will answer questions Miss Congeniality-style from “What does Pride mean to you?” to a utes, talent portion that will allow five minutes, nd dismantle any with one minute to set up and ges. Contestants will also props or set changes. ick a color have to pick e Pride from the rainbow flag (or use all off them) to n outfit to create an e judges. wow the ured guest The featured ast year’s will be last winner Miss Scarlet ther. The Fairweather. winner will receive a ze of $150, cash prize wn and the crown O 10 p.m. more. LO rty Ave., 931 Liberty wn. Free. Downtown. k.com/ facebook.com/ ltra THEREUltra

MUSIC IC

THURSDAY

2018 2 0 18

Lou Barlow 7 p.m. Get Hip Recordings, North Side. gethip.com

FRIDAY Y La Bamba 9 p.m. Howlers, Bloomfield. howlerspittsburgh.com

SATURDAY Melvins 7 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. rextheater.net

SUNDAY Concealed Blade, Lace, Aquarium, Silence 9 p.m. The Rock Room, Polish Hill. 412-683-4418

MONDAY ‘68 7 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. cattivopgh.com

TUESDAY > Sat., May 19: Amuck

Growing g up doesn’t happen in n an instant. Amuck is in n his 30s, but the rapper still eats sugary y cereal and laughs at toilet humor. Tonight, ght, he’ll perform along with little good ood bad, The Moat Rats and Ugly Blondes. ndes. The EDM-influenced beats Amuck raps aps over are similar to those found on n the songs of little good bad, a high-energy electro pop duo that blasts out pulsating bass drops. Conversely, while its performance of Radiohead’s “Creep” as a swing tune is an extreme example, it’s no stretch to say that collective the Moat Rats isn’t easily boxed into one genre, mixing everything from R&B to acid jazz. And rounding out the lineup, rock band Ugly Blondes will be playing the first of its four Pittsburgh dates this summer. AM 10 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $7. smiling-moose.com

Y La Bamba

Portugal. The Man 6 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. promowestlive.com

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WEDNESDAY Kali Masi 8 p.m. Howlers, Bloomfield. howlerspittsburgh.com

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^ Tue., May 22: Jenny Don’t and The Spurs

SUNDAY MAY 20 OUTDOOR Get a vertical tour of Spring Garden and Troy Hill with Laura Zurowski, the creator of the Mis.Steps project. Mis.Steps is exploring Pittsburgh’s more

because learning begins at birth.

than 700 city staircases in Bob Regan’s book The Steps of Pittsburgh and documenting them with Polaroids and short memories. Start at the Cider House and walk the steps, grabbing slices of pay-as-you-go pizza on the way. A ticket gets you a tour and a cider flight from Threadbare. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Mis.Steps project. CR 11 a.m. Threadbare Cider House &

Meadery. 1291 Spring Garden Ave., Spring Garden. $12. threadbarecider.com

FASHION Explore the street fashion of Pittsburgh today at the Mixed Threads Spring 2018 Expo. The expo, which happens four times a year, will feature local artists, entrepreneurs and designers with the goal of not only showcasing their work, but to give creators

the opportunity to meet and discuss ideas. Taking place at KST Alloy Studios, the theme for this year’s expo is Vintage and Streetwear. Some of the vendors present will be locally owned shops Native412 and farESH Brand, both of which specialize in designing and selling Pittsburgh-branded streetwear. LO 12 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay what makes you happy. mixedthreadsexpo.com

It’s never too early to start reading to your baby. The more words children hear, the more the speech and language parts of their brains are stimulated. So reading aloud is helpful even before babies can understand the meaning of words. Each year since 2000, a list of ten titles, identified as the Best Books for Babies published in the previous year, has been created by a panel of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh librarians and local child development and early literacy experts. This nationally recognized annual guide assists parents, teachers, and caregivers in selecting quality materials to share with babies age birth to 18 months.

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^ Sun., May 20: Tou TO COURTESY OF LAURA ZUROWSKI r Spring Garden an d Troy Hill with Mi s.Step

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LECTURE Writer Alison Taverna earned her master’s degree in poetry and publishing from Chatham University, where her thesis, If We Keep These Bodies, won the Best Thesis in Poetry award. She currently serves as assistant editor at Autumn House Press and as the poetry instructor at Pittsburgh’s Creative and Performing Arts High School. Her first chapbook, What Hollywood Taught Me, won the 2015 Robin Becker Prize from Seven Kitchens Press. Tonight, she will be the featured writer at City of Asylum’s Free Association Reading, established to promote emerging Pittsburgh writers. RA 5 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. alphabetcity.org

MONDAY MAY 21 LECTURE In 2016, Poet Daniel Borzutzky won the National Book Award for his collection, The Performance of Becoming Human. Last month, the author’s new collection, Lake Michigan was released by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Lake Michigan includes a series of 19 lyric poems that imagine a prison camp located on the beaches of Chicago. Tonight, the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall will host Borzutzky as part of the Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures series. RA 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. pittsburghlectures.org

TUESDAY MAY 22 MUSIC At some point in the past decade or so, country musicians decided their guitars

needed to be electronically accompanied and their lyrics had to focus on drinking beer, driving pickups and chasing cliché girls. That’s a trend Jenny Don’t and The Spurs ignored, instead sticking to the genre’s roots. Lead vocalist Jenny Don’t croons about love, loss, sunsets and the open road; every word bleeds with emotion. In an age of countless straight white men in never-dirtied cowboy boots, the band’s genuine outlaw country sound is refreshing. Tonight the band performs at Howlers. Local indie rock group Ancient History, whose oftensolemn lyrics and dark ambience are evocative of The National, will open. AM 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $10-12. howlerspittsburgh.com

WEDNESDAY MAY 23 EVENT For the upcoming 2018 midterm elections, a record number of women filed to run for seats in the U.S. House, with more than two dozen women running in Pennsylvania. Local organizations She Runs SWPA and Coro Pittsburgh are putting on an event to highlight the women who are running and encourage more women run. At the Women in Politics forum, female politicians like Pittsburgh City Councilor Erika Strassburger and former McKeesport Councilor Fawn Walker-Montgomery will discuss challenges women face when in elected office. Other experts will discuss why we have seen a marked increase in female candidates running for office, managing campaigns and entering governmental roles in general. RD 6 p.m. Coro Pittsburgh, 26 S. 27th St., South Side. Free. Facebook search “She Runs SWPA” •

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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ACROSS 1. Wink at someone, say 6. You can see right through it 10. Ship’s shelter 14. One with a tank 15. The Herman Melville book that isn’t “Moby Dick” 16. Having the skill 17. Court debacle in Tehran? 20. Sweet crop 21. Guest columns 22. Like some sloppy kisses 23. Fruity cupful 24. Go past on the track 27. Hysterical line dances? 34. Out in the open 36. Email heading words 37. Fruity treat 38. Current line 39. Clotho and her crew 40. Currency with eight different coins 41. Made a case for 42. Louisiana Purchase state 43. Fenway Park instrument 44. “That Shirley Booth character’s female? Really?!”? 47. Contact spot

48. Lock in place 49. Bad guy 51. Shoot for the moon 54. Deemphasize 60. Phrase of mock hysteria, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 62. Sick __ 63. “I can’t believe you fell for that” 64. Opera character that [SPOILER ALERT] jumps off a parapet 65. Hosp. workers 66. Maze goal 67. Big boom maker

DOWN 1. Banking letters 2. It’s spent in Istanbul 3. Director Reitman 4. Self preservation plea? 5. Cut into thirds 6. Over three hours 7. Student activist González 8. Spooky film genre 9. “We’re taking on water!” 10. One who works with lots of studs 11. Award for “Oslo” 12. Slugger Guerrero, commonly 13. Shocking predators 18. Enterprise vehicle

19. List words 23. You can’t return them 24. Acidic 25. Central Spanish city 26. Blogger Hilton 28. Persian cry: Var. 29. Split 30. Coffee go with 31. Measure out 32. Grand display 33. It’s about 14 pounds 35. Interior decorator’s jobs 39. Official decree 43. Walking where everyone else did in the woods

45. Block name 46. When Laertes [SPOILER ALERT] dies 50. Place to get off 51. Taunt 52. Fallopian tube germ 53. Muppet in a verticalstriped shirt 54. Big Star’s label 55. “I didn’t recognize you!” 56. Accomplishment 57. Scrip amount 58. Lob’s paths 59. Exam for some coll. seniors 61. “Here’s ___ last one” LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 16-23, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Savage Love Live at Denver’s Oriental Theater last week was epic. I fielded sex questions in front of a sold-out crowd, singer-songwriter Rachel Lark performed amazing new songs, comedian Elise Kerns absolutely killed it, and Tye — a token straight guy plucked at random from the audience — joined us onstage and gave some pretty great sex advice! We couldn’t get to all the audience questions during the show, so I’m going to race through as many unanswered questions as I can in this week’s column … I enjoyed a great sex life with many kinky adventures until my husband died suddenly two years ago. I have insurance $$$ and a house to sell and a dream of using the proceeds to become a sexpositive therapist. Crazy idea? Or something the world needs more of? Judging by how many people tell me they’re having a hard time finding sex-positive, kink-positive, open-positive, and poly-positive therapists, I would definitely file “sex-positive therapist” under “world needs more of.” Chase that dream! How do you introduce your inexperiencedbut-willing-to-try partner to BDSM? By starting a two-person book club. Order Playing Well with Others: Your Field Guide to Discovering, Exploring, and Navigating the Kink, Leather, and BDSM Communities by Lee Harrington and Mollena Williams, The Ultimate Guide to Kink: BDSM, Role Play, and the Erotic Edge edited by Tristan Taormino, and SM 101: A Realistic Introduction by Jay Wiseman. Read and discuss, and discuss some more—and when you’re ready to start playing, take it slow! What resources are available — which do you recommend — to share with my male partner so he can improve (learn) oral sex? Try The Ultimate Guide to Cunnilingus: How to Go Down on a Woman and Give Her Exquisite Pleasure by Violet Blue, and She Comes First: The Thinking Man’s Guide to Pleasuring a Woman by Ian Kerner. My boyfriend told me that women orgasm only 60 percent of the time compared to

men. I said I want orgasm equity. How do I navigate his male ego to find a solution? The orgasm gap — 91 percent of men reported climaxing in their last opposite-sex sexual encounter compared to 64 percent of women (National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior) — doesn’t exist for lesbians and bi women in same-sex relationships. So the problem isn’t women and their elusive orgasms, it’s men and their lazy-ass crap. A contributing factor is that women often have a hard time advocating for their own pleasure because they’ve been socialized to defer to men. There’s evidence of that in your question: You want to navigate this problem — the problem being a selfish boyfriend who doesn’t care enough about you to prioritize your pleasure and has taken cover behind the orgasm gap — but you want to spare his ego in the process. F**k his precious ego. Tell him what you want and show him what it takes to get you off. If he refuses to do his part to close the orgasm gap in your apartment, show him the door. How do you prioritize sex with your partner when life gets so busy and masturbation is so much easier? My fiancé is down for quickies sometimes but not always. Forgive my tautology, but you prioritize sex by prioritizing sex. Scheduled sex can be awesome sex — and when you’re truly pressed for time, you can always masturbate together. How do I come out to my family as a stripper? I’ve been dancing for more than two years and don’t plan to stop. Some of my family members are biased against sex workers, but I’m tired of keeping up the facade (I told them I’m a bartender). It’s a catch-22: People are afraid to come out to their closed-minded families as queer or poly or sex workers or atheists, but closedminded families typically don’t open their minds until after their queer or poly or sexworking or nonbelieving kids come out to them. To open their minds, you’ll have to risk blowing them first. Tell them your truth and stand your ground.

I keep having sex dreams about Kanye West. What does that mean? You’re Mike Pence. Am I doing society a disservice by dating an international drug dealer? A sexually frustrated international drug dealer is arguably more dangerous than a sexually satisfied international drug dealer — so you may be doing society a service. Can I want to be monogamous without any reasoning? My boyfriend would probs be in an open relationship, but I’m not interested for no reason in particular. Speaking with a low-information voter is frustrating because they can’t tell you why they voted for someone; speaking with a low-information lover — someone who can’t tell you why they’re doing/screwing what they’re doing/screwing — is just as frustrating. It’s even more frustrating when the lowinformation/low-self-awareness lover happens to be the person you’re in bed with. It’s fine to want what you want — because of course it is — but unless you’re interested only in solo sex, you need to be able to share your reasons. I dated a guy who said he was in an open relationship. We started working together on a podcast. I got irritated because after two months he never did any preliminary research. When I pointed that out, he deleted all our work and blocked me on FB. Now he’s asking for some stuff he left at my place. Do I give it back? Yep. As tempting as it might be to hold on to his stuff or trash it, that just keeps this drama alive. If you keep his stuff, he’ll keep after you for it. If you trash his stuff, you’ll have to worry about the situation escalating. If you want him out of your life and out of your head, put his crap in a bag, set it on your porch or leave it with a neutral third party, and tell him when he can swing by and get it. On the Lovecast: A study of lethal asphyxiation. Spoiler: Don’t do it. Listen at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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CHRIS JAMISON FRIDAY, MAY 25

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Pittsburgh Summer Guide  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 28 Issue 20

Pittsburgh Summer Guide  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 28 Issue 20