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EVENTS 4.28 – 2pm ANDY WARHOL’S BUSINESS ART WITH ANTHONY E. GRUDIN, ALEX J. TAYLOR, AND BLAKE GOPNIK The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Department of History of Art and Architecture, University of Pittsburgh Free; Registration is suggested

4.28 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY A monthly tour that focuses on Warhol’s queer history. Free with museum admission

5.4– 6pm TEACHER WORKSHOP: ADMAN: WARHOL BEFORE POP Tickets $30; Registration is suggested

5.6 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: IMARHAN The Warhol entrance space Co-presented with PANDEMIC Free parking available in The Warhol lot. Tickets $20/$15 members & students

Andy always saw things differently.

5.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MARGARET GLASPY The Warhol theater Co-presented with WYEP Tickets $20/$18 members & students

: April 27 - September 2 This exhibition was developed collaboratively by The Andy Warhol Museum and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

Image: Alamy Images, New York City street view, circa 1950.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts and Entertainment Editor REBECCA ADDISON Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns EMILY BENNETT, SABRINA BODON, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

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APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 17

ART

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

MARKETING+PROMOTIONS Marketing Director BETHANY RUHE Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

ADMINISTRATION Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

PUBLISHER EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

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ON THE COVER: Pigs and bobcats and sloths, oh my!

News+Views 6 Food+Drink 24 Arts+Entertainment 32 Calendar 45 Classifieds 51

C P C OV E R IL L U ST R AT IO N B Y R AC H E L AR NO L D SAGE R

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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NEWS +VIEWS

CP PHOTOS BY JOHN ALTDORFER

Squeeeeeeee!: One of the pigs at Angel Eyes Farm

M

“ TO THE .ANIMAL ISSUE.

RESCUE

Angel Eyes Farm adopts out pigs, turkeys and chickens BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Y NAME somehow got out, and next

thing I know, I have 20 pigs out there,” chuckles Debbie Bowers, of Angel Eyes Farm, a small rescue operation for pets that’s been operating for about four years. At the moment, Angel Eyes has 20 pigs, two Belgian horses, a mini donkey, three goats, 11 turkeys, three peacocks, 11 guinea hens, four ducks and about 100 chickens and roosters combined. Plus three dogs, and two cats. But before all these furry and feathery creatures came along, there was Simon, a pot-bellied house pig. “We would take him for a walk, and people were so freaked out by the idea of that! People think they’re dirty, but our pigs are cleaner than our dogs,” says Bowers. Bowers’ son was diagnosed with leukemia, and the doctors

recommended that the pig be kept out of the house, despite veterinarians’ assurances that the pigs were clean. So, they bought Simon a little Amish house for the backyard and the pig spent the summer there. Unfortunately, Bowers’ son succumbed to his illness. “In order to not go crazy, I started rescuing animals,” she says. First, the family adopted a donkey, then a Belgian horse and another pig to keep Simon company. “The first pig we rescued was from Beaver Falls, and he was someone’s pet. He had been sold as a ‘teacup pig,’ and they charge like $2,000 for them,” says Bowers. “But they don’t exist! There’s no such thing. If you feed a pig, it’s going to get big.” Rather than try to rehome him, the family set him CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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loose. He was running around for four months, being chased by dogs and animal control. Eventually the escaped pig started showing up under the porch of Bowers’ friend in Beaver Falls, who fed him and gave him the name, Winston. Eventually, Winston trusted Bowers enough to be transported to her farm, where he stayed in a barn stall for three weeks. Now, he’s so comfortable at Angel Eyes that Bowers can take him with her into the yard and he stays with her. Once the Bowers family made a Facebook page for their farm, people began reaching out. The farm has since acquired pigs from Ohio and other parts of Pennsylvania. The pigs are named Simon, Winston, Mamma, Elliot (nicknamed “Chuck”), Rodney, Dixie, Lilly, Daisy, Pepper, Emerald, Ruby, Gavin, MJ, Nelson, Squeak, Homer and Moe. The Bowers family has all the MORES pigs spayed and neutered before PHOTOE they are adopted out, and they IN ONwLw w. make sure the owners’ homes at aper p ty ci h g p are properly zoned, even doing a .com site inspection to make sure the pigs (just enough to cover the pig is going to a good home. neuter), and the Bowers family “If there’s a right connection bewill trim the pigs’ hooves and tusks tween an animal and person, it’s so good. for the rest of their lives. “Day and But I cry every time an animal leaves night, anyone can call me if they have here, and it’s not just because I’m sad bequestions. The pig comes with me!” ascause I’m attached. It’s because I’m happy sures Bowers. that they get a good home,” says Bowers. Additionally, Angel Eyes runs a pro“Any animal that comes here, we take gram called Chickens to the Rescue, in in knowing they may live here forever,” which people who donate money to Anadds Bowers. gel Eyes are given a dozen eggs as thanks. It is not cheap to run an animal “Please support small rescues,” ensanctuary and rescue, and the Bowers courages Bowers. “Even if it’s not our family does it all themselves. They only rescue. The food, vet care and housing is charge an adoption fee of $150 for the taken care of by us.”


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PHOTO COURTESY OF JILL ARGALL, HUMANE ANIMAL RESCUE’S WILDLIFE CENTER DIRECTOR

The nautical bobcat of the Gateway Clipper

.ANIMAL.

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N JULY 1987, three Japanese macaques

escaped from Monkey’s Island at the Pittsburgh Zoo. Two were quickly apprehended, but the third proved more slippery. His name was Alfie. His great escape lasted six months and spanned three states. Alfie survived in the wild by dumpster-diving and relying on the kindness of (human) strangers. If you’re having trouble picturing a Japanese macaque and why folks would feed one, they’re furry, red-faced monkeys known for schvitzing together in hot springs. They’re pretty cute. In January 1988, Alfie was traced to the small town of Bridgeport, Ohio, 70 miles from Pittsburgh. He was lured by his pursuers using “fresh fruit scented with fecal matter from other macaques,” a Pittsburgh Zoo official said at the time. Pittsburghers and zoo employees were thrilled; Bridgeporters were bummed to see him go. According to a contemporaneous article from United Press International, T-shirts were made in his honor. Alfie then returned to Pittsburgh, where it was discovered he had contracted a form of herpes, and was sent to Florida to receive medical treatment. According to an article in the Pittsburgh Tribune, he was still alive as of 2005. Unkillable. No tale of rogue animals will ever rival Alfie’s. It has everything: elusive primates, fecal-scented fruit, Ohio. However, there are a few decent ones that took place in Southwestern Pennsylvania recently. On April 3, two goats were spotted on

the outside platform of a bridge in Lawrence County, perched more than 50 feet above the Mahoning River. They had escaped from a nearby farm, and through a collaborative effort from PennDOT, the state police, turnpike employees and a big crane, the goats were rescued and returned home. Officials were baffled as to how they got on the ledge, but what matters is they’re safe now. Then there was the wild bobcat who made his way onto the Gateway Clipper in March. According to my minimal research, bobcats are decent swimmers, but apparently this one went the “work smarter, not harder” route. He was safely contained, given a clean bill of health and returned to the wild by the Humane Animal Rescue staff. “Stu” the turkey took up residence on Washington Road in Mount Lebanon sometime last summer. He had a habit of fearlessly walking through traffic, which is either cute or terrifying depending on your perspective. (I lean terrifying; listen to the This American Life about “Tom the Turkey” for a primer on how evil these things can be.) Predictably (sadly?) Stu died in late March after getting hit by a car, to mixed reviews from his Mount Lebo neighbors. There are a number of other stories about rogue animals that have made impressions around town, but frankly they’re either boring or disturbing. A good rogue-animal story requires both weirdness and a relatively happy ending, like being rescued, or getting herpes and getting sent to Florida. I’ll keep my eyes peeled.


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RARE SPECIES TREATED AT HAR’S WILDLIFE CENTER IN PENN HILLS

ANIMAL ARITHMETIC BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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MOST COMMON WILDLIFE TREATED AT WILDLIFE CENTER IN 2017

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RABBITS

85 CATS

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.ANIMAL.

FOCUSED PETTING BY CHARLIE DEITCH CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Y

OU HAVE to admit, just hearing the words, “cat massage,” is kind of funny. It automatically produces images of cats in white robes walking around on their hind legs at a day spa. In reality, however, the practice can give new life to cats, especially felines in their golden years. Katie Tontala has been practicing cat massage for the past 20 years. A nurse by trade, she also became a licensed massage therapist in the late-1990s. An animal lover at heart, when she heard of cat massage, she decided to continue her education and traveled to Circleville, Ohio (located south of Columbus) to a place called Integrated Touch Therapy to learn the craft. “People thought I was crazy because at that time, no one knew anything about cat massage,” she says. “I was excited about it. But I found there wasn’t much of a call for this at the time. “That’s when I went to Animal Friends to begin working with the animals there.” Tontala, who runs a website called catbehaviordemystified.com, says there are two types of massage: wellness massage and therapeutic massage. Tontala teaches the former to cat owners and shelter volunteers in a series of classes she holds several times a year at Animal Friends, in the North Hills. Tontala says a wellness massage is best described as “focused petting.” It’s a treatment that anyone can learn. It’s a way of bonding with a cat and making them more socialized, something that is also extremely beneficial to shelter cats. “A lot of the cats you find in shelters

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Pet masseuse Katie Tontala

“YOU LEARN WHERE TO MASSAGE AND PET YOUR CAT IN A WAY THAT IS SOOTHING AND CALMING.” are scared and skittish,” she says. “This is a way to introduce them to touch and build trust. You learn where to massage and pet your cat in a way that is soothing and calming. “And you’ll know if you’re doing it

right because you’ll have a real massage junkie on your hands.” Therapeutic massage, Tontala says, should only be done by a trained massage therapist. This is used to treat cats who have medical conditions like feline arthritis or geriatric cats that have a hard time getting around in their old age. Tontala often fosters older cats and provides hospice care for cats in their final days. “Cats have a pretty high tolerance for pain and you might not always know they’re in pain,” Tontala says. “But if you observe them, you can tell. They’re probably not moving as fast or jumping up

on things like they used to. “I get in there and work the muscles, loosening them up very gently. It really does help their quality of life. That’s why I foster so many geriatric cats. I want to make them comfortable and, besides, no animal should ever die in a shelter.” Tontala is also a believer in both wellness and therapeutic massages for all types of animals, not just cats. “It’s the same premise and process,” she says. “I’ve done this for dogs, bunnies and even gerbils. I think I’ve massaged just about every kind of animal there is. Well, I’ve never massaged a fish.”

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CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

Hang in there: one of the National Aviary’s fan-favorite sloths

.ANIMAL.

ANIMAL PRAGMATISM BY HANNAH LYNN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN THE National Aviary

announced its newest acquisition, a baby sloth named Vivien Leigh, the internet glommed on, prompted by articles titled “Please look at this new baby sloth named Vivien” and “Vivien Leigh, a Baby Sloth From Pittsburgh, Is Very Relatable to Me Personally.” Vivien will be an educational ambassador for the zoo, a hook to teach visitors about the disappearance of her native rainforest. During a recent visit to the Aviary, I looked fondly at the sleeping Vivien and referred to her more than once as “my daughter.” Some researchers have argued such anthropomorphizing, or attributing human traits to animals, can help with education and relief efforts. Think of

Smokey the Bear warning against wildfires. In theory, making animals relatable to humans induces empathy. Other researchers argue that an attempt at empathy can actually backfire, causing humans to misread signals on animals. A viral video of a slow loris getting tickled adorably prompted experts to note that that the human gesture of tickling is actually painful for the animal, and its reaction is a defense mechanism. Two of the most famous recent zoo celebrities have come from the Cincinnati Zoo. In 2016, a Western lowland gorilla named Harambe was killed by zoo personnel after grabbing onto a child who had wandered into his enclosure. In the aftermath, the gorilla was co-opted into the most annoying meme


of an especially garbage-fire year. Later, the Cincinnati Zoo found a more positive star with a baby hippo named Fiona. After surviving a dangerously premature birth, she became an international sensation, with her own show on Facebook, fawning GIF listicles on Buzzfeed and a New York Times profile. While the public’s love for this hippo is genuine, it is also a very successful PR stunt on behalf of the zoo. The facility had deleted its Twitter account after the Harambe incident, but its revived account now boasts over 214,000 followers. (Comparatively, the Pittsburgh Zoo has 48,000 followers.) One of Fiona’s caretakers told the New York Times, “She absolutely knows she is a star” and “She loves the camera.” Of course, this is a projection of what we think; Fiona surely has no concept of what a camera is. It’s debatable whether it’s ethical to profit from the celebrity of animals in captivity, just as it’s questionable whether zoos themselves are even ethical. But until we settle just how “human” animals are, I will continue to shed a tear at a clip of Vivien Leigh napping to a lullaby, or Fiona’s destroying a pineapple at her first birthday celebration.

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LOVE US? HATE US? + RANTS RAVES EMAIL US AT INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM INCOMING

.GUEST OPINION.

“Thank you! I realise this is old..but I just had the misfortune of watching this film..and you are the only one who hates it in exactly the same way I do.” COMMENT ON CP ’S MAY 2017 REVIEW OF KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD

“Cassettes are so 2017. These days, I only buy music on 8 track. They sound so horrible that you can barely make out the music on them, which means that every new album you get becomes a whole new, distorted garbled mess of an album completely unique to the format.” FACEBOOK COMMENT ON CP BLOG ABOUT RECORD STORE DAY 2018

“I literally cannot wait to never pick up a Shitty Paper ever again.” COMMENT ON CP WEBSITE, FEATURING A LITERALLY CONFUSING DOUBLE-NEGATIVE

“democracy is dope kids” TWEET RESPONDING TO POST ABOUT CP ’S APRIL 12 CANDIDATES FORUM

Free Will Astrology 20

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POLITICAL CAPITAL BY ARYANNA BERRINGER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

GREW UP in a family that rarely dis-

cussed politics. The topics of concern for my parents were which bill they’d pay that month and how long they could hold off on the others. They worried about having enough food to eat or, if an emergency arose, how to cover it. Though politics was a factor in how we remained in poverty, it never occurred to my parents that they had the power to affect change. Money, and lots of it, gives people a voice when it comes to the political process. Not having two nickels to rub together silences those who need change most. It is safe to say the perspectives of those in poverty and the working class seldom have a seat at the table. We witness this in the debates over welfare reform bills or cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The perspective of someone who came from poverty is needed. So, in June 2017, I began a run for lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania. This past March, due to an overwhelming amount of personal wealth being poured into the campaigns of some competitors, I realized that I would not be able to compete and left the race. Pennsylvania has no limits when it comes to campaign contributions. None. Anyone can give any amount of money they want directly to a candidate. You think the Supreme Court decision on Citizens United was bad? It’s child’s play compared to Pennsylvania law. And do you want to know why issues impacting those in poverty, such as a fair increase in our minimum wage, are never dealt with? Consider this: A study first reported in the book White Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class Economics in Policy Making revealed that of 738 candidates elected to Congress over the course of a 10-year period, only 13 came from poverty or the working class. Still

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

wondering why minimum wage is only $7.25 an hour? So, when I ended my campaign, I didn’t just give up. I co-founded “Fight the Power” not only to call out hypocritical politicians who don’t care about our issues, but to help usher in a new generation of leadership that will give us a voice. People may have thought they were going to quiet my voice by forcing me out. What they didn’t know is that trying

to silence a young black woman who grew up in poverty made me stronger. My parents may have thought they didn’t have the means to fight a system that was set up to silence them. But damned if they didn’t show me that I do.

Aryanna Berringer is an Iraq War veteran, mom of three, founder of American Nutritional Security and co-founder of Fight the Power.

JENSORENSEN

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The Simpsons is the longest-running American TV sitcom and animated series. But it had a rough start. In the fall of 1989, when producers staged a private pre-release screening of the first episode, they realized the animation was mediocre. They worked hard to redo it, replacing 70 percent of the original content. After that slow start, the process got easier and the results got better. When the program completes its 30th season in 2019, it will have aired 669 episodes. I don’t know if your own burgeoning project will ultimately have as enduring a presence, Taurus, but I’m pretty sure that, like The Simpsons, it will eventually become better than it is in the early going. Stick with it.


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.OBITUARY.

REST IN POWER, BRUNO BY MEG FAIR // MFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

B

RUNO SAMMARTINO was one of the biggest stars that professional

wrestling has ever seen. But regardless of his fame, he never stopped being a Pittsburgher, living most of his life in the Steel City. On April 18, the icon known as “Italian Superman” died at age 82. Sammartino was a second-generation Italian-American immigrant who began his wrestling career at 24 with the local TV program, Studio Wrestling, before going on to compete in the World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF, which became the WWF, now WWE). He sold out Madison Square Garden 187 times and captured the hearts of fans as one of the longest-reigning world champions for WWF, holding the belt for nearly eight consecutive years (that’s 2,803 days). He racked up many accolades, including several “Match of the Year” honors from Pro Wrestling Illustrated, the magazine for wrestling fans for decades. Sammartino was respected and loved by his fans and his peers in the locker room. Sammartino’s life began in Pizzoferrato, Italy. During WWII, his family was forced into hiding during the Nazi occupation, and he nearly died from rheumatic fever. He survived thanks to the dedication and care of his mother, who he swore to make proud. When the entire family finally moved to the United States to be with Sammartino’s father in Pittsburgh, Sammartino suffered health ailments from those tumultuous war years spent in hiding, which led to bullying and teasing. He transferred that energy into bulking up physically. He lifted weights professionally, and in 1959 Sammartino set the world record in the bench press with a lift of 565 pounds (a fete completed without wrist or elbow straps). His strength as an amateur wrestler and his strongman stunts gained him the attention of local wrestling promoters, thus launching his career. As a personification of the American dream and an incredibly charismatic performer, Sammartino charmed and won the adoration of many wrestling fans. His persona was that of the eternal good guy, a superhero with morals of steel and muscles to match. He never once turned heel in his lengthy career. He was so serious about the integrity of pro-wrestling that he declined being inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame for years because of his opposition to the company’s use of steroids and what he viewed to be vulgar storylines beginning in the 1980s. He finally accepted in 2013. Sammartino is a legendary figure in the world of pro wrestling and in this city. His death is a reminder that neither wrestling nor the city of Pittsburgh would be where it is today without Bruno, “the Italian Superman.”

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Bruno Sammartino at his WWE Hall of Fame induction in 2013

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2018

NOMINATIONS END THIS SUNDAY! Think you know who deserves Pittsburgh gold? Time is running out to nominate your local favorites! Tell us who you think is the Best Of Pittsburgh now through April 29th.

pghcitypaper.com/bestofpgh #CPBESTOFPGH PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG

Michael Smalis, owner of Greek Gourmet, with his aquafaba ice cream

.FOOD.

BEANS INTO CREAMS Greek Gourmet in Squirrel Hill develops its own ice cream BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

24

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A

QUAFABA: the hip food that’s been making its

rounds through U.S. culinary circles over the last few years. What is it? Well, it’s literal translation from Latin is “bean water.” More specifically, it’s .the viscous liquid from canned chickpeas. In a perfect twist of fate, this gag-inducing by-product (for some people, including myself) can be transformed into the airy, tasty delight with a fancy name that vegan dreams are made of. It just takes a little bit of elbow grease. Aquafaba arrived on the culinary scene in 2015 when Goose Wohlt, a vegan software engineer from Indiana, was trying to make vegan meringues for a seder dinner. His wife mentioned seeing a video of two French chefs using chickpea liquid to achieve fluffiness in a chocolate mousse. He ran with the idea and posted his success on a vegan Facebook group. That’s when aquafaba started to take off. Now, it’s found a

place on several menus here in Pittsburgh. Michael Smalis, owner of The Greek Gourmet, has been practically drowning in aquafaba from doing a brisk hummus business for the past 12 years. He makes hummus for his shop as well as 10 different independent grocery stores, with Whole Foods as his biggest customer. When he found out that he could use aquafaba instead of throwing it out, he got to work developing a recipe for ice cream. “In the last three or four weeks, I’ve really nailed down the recipe,” says Smalis. Because when it’s whipped, aquafaba mimics the consistency of an egg in the way it can function as a binder and aerator, Smalis was able to closely match the creaminess of ice cream without adding any dairy, nuts, soy or eggs. It comes in chocolate and mint chocolate chip; the flavor is excellent but doesn’t coat your palate the way dairy-based ice


PHOTO COURTESY OF MIXTAPE

Haters Wanna Kiwi cocktail

creams can. If someone had handed it to this writer without telling her it was aquafaba, I’m not sure if I would have picked out the differences immediately. Now, Smalis is ready to sell his ice cream, named Peppi’s Plant Powered GreekFreez, to the East End Co-op and soon to Whole Foods. He named it for his mother, who started the Greek Gourmet and brought Smalis in to help. GreekFreez clocks in at 372 calories a pint. Compared to Häagen-Dazs’ chocolate pints (910 calories), or Ben and Jerry’s Chocolate Therapy (1,000 calories), that’s very low. About a quarter of GreekFreez’s calories come from fat as opposed to the around half in other traditional ice creams. Fat is not necessarily an enemy but if you’re specifically cutting calories, this an advantage. “Everybody is trying to trend toward lower-calorie products and lower fat and they are using additives and stabilizers to achieve that,” says Smalis. GreekFreez has six ingredients and uses natural vegan stabilizers like arrowroot, xanthan gum and guar gum. “I’ve tested it not only on vegan customers but on children, who are the harshest critics. And they look at it and say, ‘this is great ice cream.’ If kids can eat it and they like it, then it’s a good market,” says Smalis. Katie Molchan and Elaina Holko, coowners of the bar Mixtape in Garfield, learned about aquafaba from a customer comment on one of their social media platforms. “We use it in any drink we would traditionally use egg white in,” says Molchan. Mixtape keeps a menu of speciality drinks as well as classic cocktails. Many of those drinks, like ramos gin fizzes and whiskey sours, utilize egg white to get a foam. Molchan and Holko

have discovered that one ounce of aquafaba equals the equivalent of one egg white and that aquafaba actually makes stiffer, longer-lasting foam. They like the texture that even a small amount can bring to a cocktail and the flavor of the drink is unaffected. “The smell and flavor very quickly dissipate with whatever you add to it,” says Molchan.

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“I’VE TESTED IT NOT ONLY ON VEGAN CUSTOMERS BUT ON CHILDREN, WHO ARE THE HARSHEST CRITICS.” Molchan and Holko also like that using aquafaba in place of egg whites for all off their drinks means that they don’t have to worry about possible contaminants from using raw eggs for customers that have dairy sensitivities or preferences. “This just works out so much better for us [keeping things clean] since we have a really small bar,” says Molchan. Chef Scott Walton of Acorn also likes the utility of aquafaba. “I started playing with it about three years ago in desserts. Then I started toward going towards savory with it,” says Walton. He particularly likes it for fish preparations because it holds up while not drowning the delicate flavors that meats like trout can have. “Egg whites go flat on you, especially when you add heat to them. Aquafaba gives you time to work with it,” says Walton.

Expires 5-30-18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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.FOOD.

EAT ME BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Greg Kamerdze, head brewer at Spring Hill Brewing

LOCATION: Morcilla, 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM WWW WW W SE S ENY SENY NYA NYAI A PG H CO M AIPG

AMBIANCE: After long months of rebuilding its interior due to a bad flood, Morcilla has retained and enhanced its warm, welcoming atmosphere with lots of wood detailing, a cozy dining room and the low, pleasant buzz of a busy space.

WHAT WE ATE: Arroz con pitu de caleya

COST: $52

HOT TAKE: Scraping the last bits of rice browned in the bottom of this pan was heaven. The creaminess of the rice brightened by the herbs was only heightened by tender, moist chicken meat. Crisp chicken skin was a special treat. 26

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.ON THE ROCKS.

FINALLY SPRUNG BY DREW CRANISKY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

RAPPY JOBS can yield unexpected rewards. You might become a trivia whiz thanks to idle hours on Wikipedia or turn into an accomplished artist after perfecting unflattering doodles of your boss. Or, like Greg Kamerdze, you might get serious about beer. Kamerdze, co-owner and head brewer of Spring Hill Brewing, keenly remembers his nightmare job. “It kind of [crushes] your soul, so you try to find something you really enjoy doing and want to do for yourself,” he says. So, he decided to take a longtime home-brewing hobby to the next level. He drafted a business plan, researched other breweries, and, along with partner Mike Seamans, searched for a home for his fledgling operation. In 2015, a friend approached Kamerdze with an idea. “He was like, ‘have you talked to Bill about this crazy building he bought up in Spring Hill?’” says Kamerdze. Bill Brittain, owner of Shadyside Nursery, was renovating the Workingmen’s Beneficial Union, a historic German social hall in Spring Hill. Though he had never even set foot in the North Side neighborhood, Kamerdze saw the potential right away. He struck a deal with Brittain and began to build his dream. “So here we are, three years later … seems like yesterday,” laughs Kamerdze. Though the process of renovating the aging building took longer than expected, an end is in sight. Spring Hill Brewing held their soft opening in early-April, and they plan to be open for regular hours sometime in May. A small taproom features a bar made from an old bowling alley Kamerdze found in the building, and a large yard and deck offer plenty of space to sip and admire the cityscape.

As for the beer, expect an approach that differs from many American craft breweries. “I like the kind of beers you can sit around and drink all afternoon,” explains Kamerdze. Rather than pursuing extreme IBUs and ABVs, Kamerdze aims to brew lowalcohol, easy-drinking beers inspired by traditional European ales. Spring Hill Brewing will offer four flagships, including a Belgian-style Witbier and a golden mild ale, alongside a handful of seasonal and experimental brews. Spring Hill Brewing’s unique location offers plenty of opportunities for collaboration. The building houses ample event space, meaning Kamerdze will be able to provide beer for concerts and private events. And he plans to work with Rescue Street Farms, a small urban farm on the property, to grow hops and indigenous herbs and provide honey for making mead and honey-spiked beer. Though Kamerdze may not have been aiming specifically for Spring Hill, his pride in his adopted neighborhood is evident. “When I came up here, it reminded me of all the reasons I love Pittsburgh,” he says. “You’ll live here for almost twenty years, and one day you’ll make a left turn and end up in a great neighborhood you didn’t even know was there.”


Be Greek for a Week St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral

57th Annual

Sunday, May 6 to Saturday, May 12 Enjoy Wonderful Greek Food, Pastries & Lively Dancing SERVING HOURS Sunday: Noon to 8p Monday thru Thursday: 11a to 9p Friday & Saturday: 11a to 10p (music til midnight)

.FOOD.

CITY CHICKS

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

(AND GOATS AND BEES) BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ITTSBURGH IS surrounded ed by

ss to farmland with great access ome locally grown food. But some omeurbanites want a taste of homethout grown, home-rasied food without sh eggs leaving the city. If cooking fresh from your own backyard or making nal goat cheese with milk from a personal herd sounds idyllic to you, the City of u from Pittsburgh won’t prevent you living your country dreams. b In 2015, the city updated its urban agriculture zoning ordinance, making it easier for residents to obtain permits to keep goats, chickens and bees. It still takes a little internet digging (helped along by GrowPittsburgh) to find the specifics so here’s a breakdown of how, where and what animals can be kept in Pittsburgh. The first rule? Absolutely no roosters (the d, but roosters’ reason for this isn’t clarified, noisiness and aggression are a safe bet). mit Residents with a permit and 2,000 square feet or more of land can keep up to five chickens or ducks. Each additional 1,000 square feet athered earns you one more feathered d up friend. If bees are more your speed, to two hives are allowed per 2,000 square feet of land as long as they are 10 feet from any property lines. After all, not all neighbors appreciate the dull buzz of bee colonies or the possibility of honeycomb straight from the hive. In addition to winged creatures, our four-legged friends also get their own set of rules. Each 2,000 square feet

*St. Nicholas Cathedral is located on the corner of S. Dithridge St. and Forbes Ave., across from The Carnegie Museum.

Take-out available Monday through Friday Visit the FOOD FESTIVAL section of our website stnickspgh.org to place your ORDER ONLINE!* *Online orders can ONLY be picked up between 11a-2p & 5p-8p

of land can be home to two miniature goats, while 10,000 square feet earns you the right to two adult goats. Add 5,000 square feet and make it a herd of three. There is a catch though, each goat must be dehorned. While this code may still seem strict to some, the city of Pittsburgh is actually leading th the way compared to areas W like Wilkinsburg and Penn Hills, w where only chickens are allo lowed. With the hyperlocal m food movement progressing and more pe people interested in having community gardens, the Urban Redevelopment Authority is piloting a FFarm-a-Lot L t program to turn vacant lots into productive spaces. The recent URA approval of the new urban agricultural policy, drafted with the Food Policy Council, gives residents a better shot at longer-term leases and lease-to-purchase agreements that will allow them to stay on the land. Add a few chickens or goats to the situation and dinner is just a growing season away.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS S

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 WWW.ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BROAD STREET BISTRO

Snackable content to read on the go.

1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-to-table products.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced

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Read it now!

happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SENYAI THAI KITCHEN 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE., SHADYSIDE 412-441-4141 / SENYAIPGH.COM Immersed in authenticity, Senyai Thai Kitchen creates an intricate fusion of food and design, where every detail transports you to a faraway place. Traditional favorites and new creations like jumbo lump crab curry make Senyai a destination.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Nataliya Slinko’s Crowd Pleaser

.VISUAL ART.

MARX AS ART “I think it’s an important point in time in human history to reflect on Marx.” BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

N

EXT WEEK would’ve marked German philosopher and political theorist Karl Marx’s 200th birthday. Marx’s theories were the foundation for communism, which calls for the redistribution of wealth and the end of social class. They’re especially timely in the current political climate as many wrestle with how best to address the social inequalities currently facing the United States and other countries around the world. Marx@200, a new exhibit inspired by Marx’s 200th birthday, furthers discussion of these ideas. The exhibit at SPACE features works by more than 25 artists from around the world. “I’m certainly not a Marxist myself but I’m interested in the idea of class in general and emancipation which is something Marx strongly believed in,” says Tavia La Follette, one of

the artists whose work is included in the exhibit. “It was an opportunity to create a work around these ideas.” The exhibit, presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and Carnegie Mellon University’s Humanities Center, opened April 6. It was curated by CMU professors Kathy Newman and Susanne Slavick. La Follette’s mixed-media installation at SPACE centers around cigarettes baring words from Marx’s Das Kapital, a theoretical text in materialist philosophy, economics and politics. “I wanted something that was sort of more of a rumination on Marx and society,” says La Follette, a former smoker. La Follette made a stamp with quotes from Das Kapital and stamped rolling papers with the text. She then CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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THE ELIXIR OF LOVE

A comic love story “A Fellini-esque vision of scooters, cappuccino machines and champagne fountains, set on a sun-washed hotel terrace overlooking the sea...” -The Guardian

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Photo: David Bachman Photography©

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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MARX AS ART, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

Tavia La Follette’s Smoking Marx

hand-rolled the cigarettes and sent them to people she knew who still smoke. “My greatest thinking was done while smoking. Just rolling the cigarette itself was a meditative process,” says La Follette. “So I sent these tins around the world and people ruminated on Marx. I asked them to go to a site where they could smoke. We had people smoking from Siberia to San Francisco, people smoking Marx.” The people who received La Follette’s cigarettes — Peter Stokkebye Premium Turkish tobacco wrapped in pure hemp rolling papers — were asked to film themselves smoking and send the recordings to her. “I was thinking about burning and how it has all these positive connotations but also negative connotations and how it’s a very ritualistic process, much like smoking is a very ritualistic process,” says La Follette. “Ash too is very important and symbolic in all sorts of different cultures.” Other works in the exhibit include Ukranian-born artist Nataliya Slinko’s gigantic version of Marx’s beard made of steel wool; artist Kathryn Clark’s “Foreclosure Quilt,” a stitched urban map of foreclosed homes, block by block; and a tiny embroidered barcode by artist Rayna Fahey that says, “Don’t just buy it/Make Revolution.” Many of the pieces in the exhibit are blunt in the way they seem to support Marx’s ideas on wealth redistribution and elevating the working class, while others are subtler, inspiring viewers to contemplate Marx’s theories

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without telling them how they should feel. But overall the exhibit carries an overwhelming feeling that exploring Marx’s life and work can help us better understand the current state of social inequality and figure out how to change it. “It’s an important time for us to be thinking about our disposable culture,” says La Follette. “I have faith. I had faith in the Occupy movement. I have faith in the Black Lives Matter movement. There’s all these little fires being lit up all the time. If we can rage that fire a little more, there’s hope for us.

MARX@200 Continues through June 3. SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. spacepittsburgh.org

“We have to change. We can’t keep going on the way we’re going on. I think it’s an important point in time in human history to reflect on Marx.” And if La Follette’s installation is any indication, people are doing just that. After just a few weeks, all of the cigarettes on display as part of her work are gone. “I was amazed at how quickly all the cigarettes disappeared,” La Follette says. “I’m going to have to send more to SPACE.” SPACE will host a Marx bicentennial program and reception on Saturday, May 5 from 7-9 p.m. Normal gallery hours are Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m.– 6 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m.– 8 p.m.; and Sundays 11 a.m.–5 p.m.


This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists.

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Swiss Army

.MUSIC.

A NEW MOUNTAIN BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

N 2016, Pittsburgh-raised vocalist and guitarist Brandon Lehman released an EP

called Swiss Army, his first foray into songwriting. “I had things to get off my chest that had been an element of my life,” says Lehman. “The first EP was terrifying to put out, but it got a semi-good response, so I wanted to keep doing it.” Not long after, collaborators started coming along to form the full Swiss Army band. Dave Yarkovsky joined on guitar, Chris Hawthorne on the drums and Jeff Morgan on bass. “We didn’t have anything in mind yet because the band was still new, and we didn’t write together yet,” says Lehman. “We were like, ‘Let’s just write and see what happens,’ and it started happening quickly.” All of the members knew each other for years through school and playing shows with each others’ bands, and it’s evident in the band’s chemistry. Morgan, Lehman and Yarkovsky gathered around at a table at a coffee shop trading jokes as they talked to City Paper about Paris Mountain, the project’s first full-length record, out on A-F Records.

Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

SWISS ARMY PARIS MOUNTAIN RELEASE SHOW 7 p.m. Sat., April 28. The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 21 and over. $8-10. smiling-moose.com

Between Yarkovsky, Lehman and Morgan’s riffs, each succinct song on Paris Mountain features harmonized solos and clever guitar licks in a wave of shredding instrumentation anchored by the smart drumming of Hawthorne. And Hawthorne’s roots are important to balancing out the big Boston-esque riffs that pop up on tracks like “1,000 Pardons.” “He’s a self-professed big rock drummer,” explains Yarkovsky. “He doesn’t overplay, and he knows how to let us do our thing and not make it sound like a mess. We can be a little self-indulgent, but he reins us in.” From a lyrical perspective, the album is full of relatable anxieties about everything from your life’s purpose, to the political climate, to facing personal challenges head on. “It is strange because there are stories about people who have heard these songs and they know it’s about them, and you have to have those discussions with people and understand that [these songs] are written at moments when relationships and your mind are in a certain place, and that changes all the time, but it’s in a song now, so the moment is set in stone, or vinyl, I guess, at this point,” says Lehman. “And while they are personal to me, I think they’re universal themes. Our personal experiences make up our listening experiences.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

.WEB SERIES.

SUPER WOMEN

- A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

THURSDAY, APRIL 26 • 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM FILM SCREENING: THE EXPERIMENTAL CITY CHAD FREIDRICHS The Experimental City is a documentary about the Minnesota Experimental City project, a futuristic attempt to solve urban problems by creating a full-size city from scratch in the isolated woods of northern Minnesota. At the heart of the story is renowned scientist, inventor and comic-strip author Athelstan Spilhaus, who dreams of a new kind of planned city, a truly experimental city that continuously changes to find workable urban solutions. This new city would employ the newest technologies in communications, transport, pollution control, energy supply – even large-scale domed enclosure – in an attempt to create more livable cities for the 21st century. Following the screening will be a short Question-and-Answer session by the filmmaker, Chad Freidrichs.

BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

SUPERHERO series that tackles the subject of gentrification? It might .sound weird but in a new episode of Heroineburgh, being released this month, superhero Savanna must defeat Serpentena, a mercenary working for a greedy real estate developer. “She goes around and starts to scare citizens out of their homes in Homewood,” says Pittsburgh artist Janeka Johnson, who plays Savanna. “But I intervene and prevent her from gentrifying the neighborhood.” Johnson is featured in episode 9 of the ongoing live-action series produced in Pittsburgh. The series features all original female superhero characters from various neighborhoods, ethnicities, professions and sexual orientations.

HEROINEBURGH 6 p.m. Sun., April 29. Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $8. heroineburgh.com

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER IN APRIL. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NON-MEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR CALL 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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“There aren’t a lot of female superheroes that have the platform that most male superheroes do,” says Johnson. “When you think of superheroes you automatically think of Superman, Batman, not necessarily these empowering female figures. To have this and be a part of this is a really enriching experience. “I thought it was a really interesting opportunity. I used to be a really big comic book nerd and my dad has always been a comic book nerd.”

The new batch of shows pick up with episode eight, “The Liquid Engineers,” featuring Stephanie Wallace as Dysphoria. (Almost all the episode titles are direct references to 1980s post-punk and new-wave songs.) Dysphoria works with Carnegie Mellon University scientist Kimberly Chiang as a lab assistant. But due to a mix-up in the lab, she becomes cursed with the power to turn anything she touches into dust. Dysphoria blames Kimberly for her problem — as villains are wont to do — and a battle ensues. “It’s fun, there’s a lot of humor, drama and really cool costumes,” says Wallace. “All of the characters are really unique and cool, there’s such a wide spectrum of characters and storylines and it’s all local, too.” Wallace plays guitar in the local female-fronted alternative/punk band Murder for Girls, so taking on a role in an all-female series was a natural fit for her. She hopes Heroineburgh will send a positive message to women and girls. “Little girls can be the strong, powerful, smart ones that can solve problems. But that’s not traditionally, unfortunately, the way women have always been depicted and raised in our culture,” Wallace says. “It’s a great and important thing, especially in this culture, to teach women that they are powerful and that they can overcome anything they want if they put their minds to it.” The first season of Heroineburgh will consist of 13 episodes. Episodes 8, 9 and 10 will debut at Pittsburgh Filmmakers on April 29.


TOP 5

APPS FOR ANIMAL LOVERS BY LISA CUNNINGHAM LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Friskies Cat Fishing 2

ANIMAL CROSSING: POCKET CAMP You’re pretty much a servant to the cartoon animals in this game. You run a campground for them, dress them up and do chores for them. I thought it’d get boring, but I just reached level 55 and can’t stop.

ALPHABEAR This word search game rewards you with cute bears dressed up as monsters, houses, even other animals! The more words you find, the more cute bears appear. Warning: While adorable, the higher levels are actually really challenging.

A PROJECT OF THE AUGUST WILSON CENTER AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE CENTER PRESENTS

FORMER NATIONAL PRESS SECRETARY FOR BERNIE SANDERS CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR

SYMONE SANDERS MAY 3, 7 PM

NEKO ATSUME: KITTY COLLECTOR This is the perfect stress reliever if you love seeing sweet, animated cats playing with the virtual toys you left out for them. And if you don’t, then who are you?

AUDUBON BIRD GUIDE This must-have app for amateur bird-watchers identifies species by pictures, descriptions and audio clips. I played one of the cardinal songs outside my house and, no joke, a red cardinal flew by right after.

FRISKIES CAT FISHING 2 (A GAME FOR CATS!) My cats are so obsessed with catching the fish in this game that they bat at my phone even when it’s off, trying to get the game to come back on.

TICKETS VISIT AACC-AWC.ORG OR CALL (412) 339-1011

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HILO >> BY JACK STAUBER SELF-RELEASED JACKSTAUBER.BANDCAMP.COM

Jack Stauber has a knack for pulling unrelated sounds and influences into its music, throwing them into a bowl and tossing them into a strange salad that challenges your musical taste buds. On tracks like “Leopard,” Stauber goes from Frank Sinatra, to Depeche Mode, to of Montreal, to Connan Mockasin, all under the span of five minutes. It’s absurd and theatrical, and yet it works for Stauber. HiLo features pop melodies and synth sounds intertwined with strange, sinister effects and off-kilter lyrics. Many numbers feature incongruous contrasts, like the combination of dancy instrumentation and dark lyrics on “John & Nancy.” Stauber does step away from that formula at times, however, like on “Alright.” It’s a sad, down-tempo indie rock number with lyrics that sound like someone talking themself out of a fit of sadness, marked by choruses with synth bursts like screeching fireworks outside your window. On HiLo, Stauber is beginning to show a little theatrical restraint. But if you turn to Stauber for the ludicrous lyrics and wild mouth sounds, just turn on “Gettin’ My Mom On,” a 1980s-styled pop song about pursuing day sales at J. C. Penney and drinking mimosas.

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Alvvays

.MUSIC.

PATIENCE AND POTENTIAL BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

RANKIE ROSE is a patient songwriter, the kind of artist who will tweak a song for a year until it feels right. It took her that long to write Cage Tropical, her 2017 release written during a time in which she was working for a catering company and living in her hometown of Los Angeles. And due to her process and the time she takes to craft music, performing the songs that are derived from personal hardship and alienation doesn’t reopen any wounds for Rose. “It’s weird, because even though these songs are personal to me and have a personal theme, by the time I’m done making the song, I usually have very little feeling,” says Rose on the phone with City Paper. “It’s almost this abstract thing — when you perform it, it’s almost like I could be performing a cover at that point. It gets worked and worked so I stop having a personal feeling about it anymore.” The songs on Cage Tropical reflect a new wave, goth-pop sound that leans into distinct synth textures to create feeling. It’s the kind of music that defies easy labelling but still, there are recognizable influences like The Cure, Cocteau Twins or Bauhaus.

ALVVAYS with FRANKIE ROSE 8 p.m. Tue., May 1. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18-20. mrsmalls.com

“It’s pretty hard to define my music, which maybe makes it more difficult for me in the end,” says Rose, “But I’m influenced by a lot and draw upon the best of each thing. There are sounds I really like that I want to be present in my music, and a lot of them are from the ‘80s.” Those sounds include cold drums and synthesizers, drawing from goth bands from that era. “I really like things a little dark,” says Rose. What isn’t dark, however, is the musical growth and personal changes Rose has made as of late. She’s opened herself up to letting the universe take the reins. “What I’ve noticed is the more I let go of the wheel and stop forcing my will onto everything, [the more] everything works out,” explains Rose. “Not only is it more gentle on me because I’m not as attached to results, but it seems like doors fly open better.” When the door flew open for Rose to tour with Alvvays, it presented a surprise opportunity for her to update her lineup and sound before hitting the road. “There’s even a visual element I made myself,” says Rose. “The record is being presented in a different way than I’ve ever done it before, and that’s really inspiring to me.” “It’s exactly the way I want it to be, maybe for the first time ever,” adds Rose with a chuckle, “It’s really cool.”


ALL SEVEN HARRY POTTER BOOKS IN SEVENTY HILARIOUS MINUTES! BACK BY MAGICAL DEMAND “CASTS THE PERFECT SPELL OVER THE AUDIENCE!”

“IT’S THE SINGLE FUNNIEST THING I HAVE SEEN IN AGES!” Toronto Star

The New York Times

PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER MULL

Brandon Meeks and Erika Cuenca in Byhalia, Mississippi

.STAGE.

LOUD AND BROKE BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

ITTING DOWN for Byhalia, Mississippi

at off the WALL’s Carnegie Stage, a number of audience members remarked how similar the stage looked to the set of the TV show Roseanne. It’s an interior of a small, one-story house: couch at center, TV on the floor, tables cluttered with magazines, a compact kitchen and a fridge seemingly stocked entirely with light beer and a single Brita filter. The play’s program tells us that the house’s inhabitants are “loud,” “broke” “proud white trash,” so maybe that label helped usher the comparison. Without wading into the mud of Roseanne’s controversial return to television this year, I’ll just say that the issues addressed on that show — economic stress, race, “real America” — are also confronted here, but it’s way funnier and not so ham-fisted. No one wears a pink pussy hat and the president is not mentioned, but that world still hangs over Byhalia. The “proud white trash” couple at the center of Byhalia are Jim and Laurel Parker. When we first meet these characters, a very pregnant Laurel is bickering with her mother about the way she eats bananas (too fellatious, says Laurel); Jim is sneaking onto their shed outside to smoke a bowl until Mama leaves. Life is not perfect. Money’s been tight since Jim left his lucrative construction job and there are hints of darkness buried in the family dynamic. But hey, there’s a baby on the way and that’s always an occasion to bury hatchets. OK, needless to say, that does not happen. The betrayals don’t stay buried for long and shit eventually hits fans. However, the production handles the heaviness

with an impressively light hand. Like all good dramas, there’s subtle humor in all the “serious” parts, and underlying tension in all the big laughs. Mama (off the WALL’s artistic director Virginia Wall) is straight-up electrifying to watch; the one-liner she delivers in response to the banana-fellatio accusation nearly killed me. Brandon Meeks and Erika Cuenca nail it as Jim and Laurel. Laurel’s pronunciation of “Mama” conveys a lifelong, complicated, interdependent relationship; Jim reduces “Laurel” to a single syllable. Lamar Cheston plays Jim’s supportive and hilarious best friend, which may sound a little icky in terms of one-dimensional black best friends, but that dynamic plays out with brutal honesty and no kid gloves. Hope Anthony, as Ayesha, doesn’t show up until the second act and was so good I was hoping for a third act just to let her shine.

APRIL 27-29, 2018 • BYHAM THEATE R

BOX OF F ICE AT TH EATE R SQUAR E • 412- 456 - 6666 • G ROU PS 10+ 412- 47 1 - 6930

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A BRAVE & COMIC LOOK AT THE SCIENCE OF SOBERIETY

BYHALIA, MISSISSIPPI Continues through May 5. Off the WALL’s Carnegie Stage, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. 724-873-3576 or insideoffthewall.com

There’s a lot to love about Byhalia, but up top is the way the script navigates racial, class and economic tensions without sacrificing the substance of the characters or the story. It’s not about those things, but the story recognizes how those “big ideas” wiggle their way into the lives of Americans in both subtle and explosive ways. It’s a fine line to walk, but this production and these five magnetic actors handle the challenge brilliantly. Go see it.

by

SEAN DANIELS SHERYL KALLER

directed by

APRIL 7 – MAY 6, 2018

USE CODE CITYCITY TO SAVE $5 ON SINGLE TICKETS

TICKETS ON SALE NOW 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org / South Side PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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Kick it with a

TASTY GROOVE

Djs are every Wed, Fri, & Sat. 10pm - 1am. Bands start between 8 - 9 pm on Thursday nights.

April 26th

Ridgemont High (80s covers)

May 3rd

Juan & Co.

May 17th

Casual Hobos Blue Grass

May 24th Told Ya So

May 31st

Acoustic Open Mic with Jay Constable

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK CLAYTON SOUTHERS

King Hedley II

.STAGE.

DJs & LIVE MUSIC I

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5500 Walnut Street, Shadyside

August Wilson’s Seven Guitars staged at his childhood home in 2016, rest easy. King Hedley II, another entry in Wilson’s iconic Pittsburgh Cycle, returns to 1727 Bedford Ave. this week. Hedley is the penultimate act in the Pittsburgh Cycle, a ten-part series chronicling the lives of African Americans living in Pittsburgh in each decade of the 20th century. Hedley is set in the 1980s in Pittsburgh’s Hill District. At the center of the story is King, a man in his mid-thirties, returning home to his old neighborhood after a stint in prison. King’s father (Hedley I) and his mother Ruby were first featured in Seven Guitars, but it’s not an outright sequel. Like all the chapters in the Pittsburgh Cycle,

the struggles of each family and each decade are unique but painfully universal and consistent. While not as famous as other Wilson works like Jitney or Fences, Hedley II is a unique part of Wilson’s legacy. The themes are notably darker overall, which might be chalked up to the close proximity between the time it was written and when it takes place. The early 1900s entries in the Pittsburgh Cycle have the padding of nostalgia and fable; the mid-century works like Fences and Guitars convey the ache of Wilson’s childhood; but Hedley II takes place only a decade or so before it was staged. There’s something about the scars in this one that feel particularly raw.

KING HEDLEY II Runs April 27 to June 3. August Wilson House, 1727 Bedford Ave, Hill District. $37.50 in advance. pghplaywrights.org

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Co-directed by Mark Clayton Southers (who directed Seven Guitars at the August Wilson House in 2016), Monteze Freeland and Dennis Robinson Jr. and presented by Pittsburgh Playwrights, King Hedley II will kick off on Wilson’s 73rd birthday on April 27 and run through June 3. City Paper spoke with Southers eight days before the premiere to learn about the challenges of on-site staging, overcoming anachronisms and what makes King Hedley II unique. YOU STAGED SEVEN GUITARS AT THIS LOCATION BEFORE. WHY CHOOSE KING HEDLEY II TO FOLLOW IT UP HERE ON AUGUST WILSON’S BIRTHDAY? Well, initially we were gonna do Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, but the rights weren’t available. So we had to change it, choose something else to take advantage of the setting back there. King Hedley II takes place at the same setting [as Seven Guitars but] 40 years later. It takes place


in the 1980s whereas Seven Guitars takes place in the ‘40s. SINCE THERE ARE 40 YEARS SEPARATING THE TWO, WHAT CHANGES DID YOU MAKE TO THE PERFORMANCE SPACE TO SHOW THAT PROGRESSION OF TIME? Costumes and the music, for one. But it’s pretty much the same. Just have to make it look more ‘70s/’80s. It’s the same house. It’s Pittsburgh, a lot of the houses were built in the 1900s. We’ll probably paint the wood trim on the windows, change the curtains. Won’t be no chickens running around. But pretty much just the costumes and music. Of course August took care of the dialogue.

week before we started rehearsals, I had an infection in my knee, I got really sick … I was in bad shape. I talked to Monteze and he was able to take over the first week of the rehearsal while I was at the hospital. So I brought him on board, and then [actor] Sala Udin had his knee replaced and I thought it’d be a lot easier for Dennis to go work with Sala at his home, oneon-one, so I just decided to do something that hasn’t been done before and make us all directors. At different phases of the play we’ve all been directors. I blocked the first act, Monteze blocked the second act except for the final scene, and Dennis blocked the final scene. So we’ve all been working with it.

WINNER of TWO GRAMMY AWARDS!

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TELL ME ABOUT THE CAST YOU’RE WORKING WITH. I think we got some really epic actors in this one. We got Sala Udin; this will be his third production with us. He was one of August’s childhood friends. And Etta Cox, one of Pittsburgh’s iconic jazz singers, playing a role that’s really fitting for her, as Ruby, who was a former jazz singer. I think it will be a great opportunity for Pittsburghers to see two iconic actors sharing the stage, along with Wali Jamal, who will be completing his cycle with this play. YOU’RE CO-DIRECTING THIS ONE WITH MONTEZE FREELAND AND DENNIS ROBINSON JR. WHAT WAS BEHIND THAT DECISION? Right! Monteze was supposed to direct this play initially. But he got cast in Hamlet at the Public [Theater]. I was supposed to direct In The Heat of the Night. About a

“IT’S JUST ONE OF THOSE PIECES THAT HAD TO BE WRITTEN.” IN THE PITTSBURGH CYCLE, WHAT MAKES KING HEDLEY II UNIQUE? There’s some really great monologues. This is the play where Viola Davis won her first Tony Award, playing Tonya on Broadway. It has some great arias. People always say, “what’s your favorite August Wilson play?” Well, this one ranks at the top for me. However, whatever August Wilson play you’re working on usually is your favorite. [King Hedley II] is a rough piece. It’s a very dangerous play. It’s nothing you walk away from feeling proud of, as far as what’s in the play. It’s just one of those pieces that had to be written.

Manfred Honeck, conductor The Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh [Directed by Matthew Mehaffey] Simona Saturova, soprano • Kate Aldrich, mezzo-soprano Konu Kim, tenor • Jan Martinik, bass VERDI: Requiem

FRIDAY, MAY 11 AT 8:00 P.M. SATURDAY, MAY 12 AT 8:00 P.M. SUNDAY, MAY 13 AT 2:30 P.M. HEINZ HALL

Michael Krajewski, conductor • Storm Large, vocals From Cole Porter and Frank Sinatra to Elton John, The Pixies and Queen, join the sensational and sultry Storm Large on a pulse-racing tribute to Love, Lust & Rock ‘n’ Roll, with powerful hits including “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” “Forbidden Fruit,” “Somebody to Love,” and much more!”

.MUSIC.

MP 3 MONDAY >> KAHONE CONCEPT

AUGUSTIN Hadelich R e t u r n s

Outdoor Overtures SATURDAY, MAY 12

DISCOVERY TIME ADVENTURES: 10 A.M., • CONCERT AT 11:15 A.M.

HEINZ HALL

Discover the music of the great outdoors with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra! Travel to the wild west with Copland’s Hoe Down and soar with RimskyKorsakov’s Flight of the Bumblebee! The stars at night are big and bright in this fanciful outdoor adventure! PRESENTING PARTNERS

Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free, and this week it’s “Windup” by Kahone Concept. “Windup” is a shiny pop number with layers of synthesizers to float beneath the tenor vocals. Stream or download “Windup” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

FRIDAY, MAY 18 AT 8:00 P.M. SUNDAY, MAY 20 AT 2:30 P.M. HEINZ HALL

Cristian Macelaru, conductor Augustin Hadelich, violin ENESCU: Romanian Rhapsody No. 1 &81Į- Violin Concerto COPLAND: Symphony No. 3

TICKETS START AT $20! GET YOURS TODAY! *GKP\*CNN$QZ1HƂEG | 412.392.4900 | pittsburghsymphony.org BRING YOUR GROUP AND SAVE! 412.392.4819 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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.BOOK REVIEW.

ON OUR SHELF BY REBECCA ADDISON RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE SEROTONIN >> CRADLE BY MORGAN BOYER FINISHING LINE PRESS FINISHINGLINEPRESS.COM

In her soon to be published poetry chapbook, Pittsburgh writer Morgan Boyer explores her experiences growing up with autism. In this debut work, the Rust Belt native takes on sobering topics ranging from opioid addiction to World War II. It’s in the pieces where Boyer’s humor emerges that the author really shines. In “Upon visiting my father’s trailer park” she writes, “a crumbling cardboard sign reads:/“BEWARE OF dog BITCHES”/as if the man with his Sharpie/realized halfway through the various/ways it could be interpreted.” But more serious pieces, especially when Boyer turns introspection, are also compelling. In “Facebook Politics” Boyer writes, “I feel like a tiger, but not a free one like the one Nakajima writes about in/Moon Over the Mountain. I’m one with a collar, watching as donkeys and/elephants perform for the spectators tossing virtual peanuts at me.” While Boyer often appears as an observer on the outside looking in, her keen observations often reveal universal truths about human nature.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JIM SUMMARIA, CREATIVE COMMONS

Heart’s Nancy Wilson and Robert Fisher on stage in 1978

.ANIMAL ISSUE.

PET SOUNDS

BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

S YOU’VE no doubt realized by now, this is our annual Animal .Issue. We’ve had nothing but animals on our brains for the past week. So naturally, I started thinking about my favorite animal-related songs. There’s a full playlist online at pghcitypaper.com, but here are my five favorites.

“Elephant,” Jason Isbell I don’t want to start off on a sad song, but I also don’t want to listen to Isbell’s classic song of pain after coming off something peppy like “Dominic the Donkey” (spoiler alert: it’s not on this list.) This tune is about a woman’s last days fighting cancer and trying not to talk about the inevitable elephant in the room. The song is gut-wrenchingly beautiful, painful and worth every single tear you shed while listening to it.

“Leave My Monkey Alone,” Warren Zevon Zevon is easily one of my five favorite recording artists of all time and Sentimental Hygiene is easily my favorite Zevon record. “Leave my Monkey Alone” is a sweet surprise, a dance song on the same record as my favorite Zevon tune, the dark and brooding “Boom Boom Mancini.” Despite its poppy sound, the theme is still very Zevon — the fight for decolonization in Africa.

“Barracuda,” Heart The Wilson sisters play the crap out of this hard-rock tune that’s recognizable

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as soon as you hear those opening guitar riffs. There are so many reasons to love this song — the music, the lyrics, the theme (a takedown of record company “promotion” techniques). And in the 2008 election, it was used as a theme song for Republican candidate for vice president Sarah Palin. The band got pissed, called out the GOP publicly and got fat royalties from the song’s illegitimate use.

“Typical American,” The Goats This song and the album it appeared on, Tricks of the Shade, is, the greatest political hip-hop record in history. The Goats were a socially conscious trio out of Philadelphia and this album was a 29-cut concept record/ takedown of policies from the Reagan-Bush era that led the country into war and made the poor poorer. The message is strong and the rhymes are stronger.

“Glorified G,” Pearl Jam Yes, this is a song about the absurdity of our nation’s gun culture, but here me out while I explain the animal ties. First, this tune is on Pearl Jam’s Vs. album, which of course has a ticked-off sheep on the cover. And secondly, when I first heard this song and Eddie Vedder sang the line, “Glorified version of a pellet gun,” I thought he said, “Glorified version of a pelican.” In fact, I still sing that line on occasion today.


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WED., MAY 9 DDG 6 P.M. CATTIVO LAWRENCEVILLE. All-ages event. $18-70. 412-687-2157 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Young Guy, Burkett, Young Hoag & Alec Munson.

WED., MAY 9 LUKE WINSLOW-KING 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $10-12. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

THU., MAY 10 ZELIENOPLE LIBRARY PRESENTS HEATHER TERRELL (AKA MARIE BENEDICT) 7 P.M. ZELIENOPLE PUBLIC LIBRARY ZELIENOPLE. $8. 724-452-9330 or eventbrite.com.

THU., MAY 10 STRYPER 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $28-42. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

THU., MAY 10 A FAMILY AFFAIR: A CELEBRATION OF THE MUSIC OF SLY & THE FAMILY STONE

SAT., MAY 12 RIVAL SONS REX THEATER

FARM ELIZABETH. Free event (registration required). 412-384-4701 or alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms.

SAT., MAY 12 STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY 7 P.M. PITTSBURGH INDOOR SPORTS ARENA. $15-20. Steelcityrollerderby.org.

SAT., MAY 12 BLACKBERRY SMOKE

8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. Over-21 event. $15-18. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest Steeltown Horns Band.

8 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $39-59. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown.

FRI., MAY 11 LUKE PELL & LOGAN MIZE

SAT., MAY 12 RIVAL SONS

8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $18-50. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest 17 Memphis.

8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. ALL-AGES EVENT. $25-28. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guests Welles and SuisideBurns.

FRI., MAY 11 WILL DOWNING: SMOOTHFEST WEEKEND

SAT., MAY 12 HIGHLIGHTS

8 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $48.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., MAY 12 DOWN ON THE FARM DAY 11 P.M. ROUND HILL PARK EXHIBITION

SUN., MAY 13 TEXAS HIPPIE COALITION 7 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $18-28. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

SUN., MAY 13 LYFE JENNINGS 7 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $35-100. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., MAY 15 TOMORROWS BAD SEEDS 6 P.M. SMILING MOOSE UPSTAIRS SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $13-15. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Sundried Vibes, THICKER THAN THIEVES & The Moat Rats.

TUE., MAY 15 JAKE MILLER

8 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $25.75. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. ALL-AGES EVENT. $20-60. 412-381-168 or greyareaprod.com. With special guests Devin Hayes & Tristin Dare.

SAT., MAY 12 MARION MEADOWS

TUE., MAY 15 THOMAS WENDT

8 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $48.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

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.ART.

ART NIGHT BY MICHELLE PILECKI INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

T 21 YEARS old and all grown up, Art All Night is leaving home. This year, Lawrenceville’s free, uncensored, non-juried art show moves to South Side’s Highline. “We worked really hard to find a place in Lawrenceville,” says Art All Night’s self-defined “publicity poobah” Kate Bechak, who explains that the event requires a minimum of 50,000 square feet. When the all-volunteer Art All Night began in 1998 with 101 pieces of art and 200 attendees, part of the motivation was to focus attention on one of Pittsburgh’s best kept secrets: Lawrenceville. Moving from one empty warehouse to another for 20 years, Art All Night has steadily grown with hundreds of volunteers and participating artists, and thousands of visitors of all ages and artistic abilities. The event’s philosophy is “everyone is an artist.” This year, two stages will accommodate musicians (already confirmed are Timbeleza and Col. Eagleburger’s High-

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CP FILE PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK

Artists live paint during Art All Night in 2016.

stepping Goodtime Band) and other performers, including the interactive Dream Grimoire. Some 50 to 60 artists will create collaborative paintings on site, with two people working on each

ART ALL NIGHT 4 p.m. Sat., April 28 to 2 p.m. Sun., April 29. The Highline, 198 S. 4th St., South Side. Free. artallnight.org

piece, explains Art All Night art captain Jennifer Bechak. Outside, glassblowers from the Pittsburgh Glass Center will demonstrate their talents. Additionally, master woodworker Joshua Craig will recycle industrial pallets into art. Inside, the Video Lounge returns to showcase short original films and animation. Children’s activities (4-8 p.m. Saturday

and 10 a.m.-noon Sunday) include both collaborative art and individual projects that can be taken home, says coordinator Wendy Coester. Part of this entails three large installation pieces: two walls — one solid and one of snow fencing — on which children can weave colored yarn or other materials that strike their fancy; and a mosaic by number, pasting bits of colored paper on predesignated areas. Old favorites like button-making and silk-screening return. The Cardboard Village comes pre-constructed this year, awaiting decoration with stickers, markers and the like. There’s also a new emphasis on art, not just crafts, and kids will be able to learn about artists and their techniques. There’s also a “claydough” table that lets participants try out sculpting. Dress appropriately. “Part of art is getting messy,” Coester says. To participate, artists, videographers and musicians can register at www. artallnight.org. Drop off ready-to-hang art from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sat., April 28. As for how to get to the new location, the entrance is at the northeast corner of the Terminal Building, near the railroad tracks and the bike trail. Park on the street or between the railroad and the river.


CALENDAR APRIL 26-MAY 2

PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNY KARLSSON

^ Sat., April 28: Great Shadyside Yard Sale & BARK Shadyside Pup Walk

THURSDAY APRIL 26 FILM 412 Food Rescue is capping off its celebration of Earth Week with a screening of WASTED! The Story of Food Waste. Over 40 percent of food in America is wasted. Anthony Bourdain’s 2017 documentary looks at the way people buy, cook, recycle and eat food and what we can do to reduce our footprint on the planet. Get there at

6:30 to grab a refreshment and listen to a panel discussion before the film starts. Celine Roberts 6 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Free. 412foodrescue.org

FILM Tonight marks the start of Film Pittsburgh’s 25th Annual JFilm Festival, an event celebrating Jewish culture in film. The festival is 11 days long and will feature a variety of guests discussing topics to expand the audience’s understanding of Jewish themes. Opening the festival is the Pittsburgh

premiere of Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel, a story about Israel’s national baseball team. With a makeshift squad of Jewish-American MLB players, some of whom never set foot in Israel, they go on to do what seemed impossible. Lauren Ortego 7:30 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, 425 Cinema Drive, South Side. $70 ($25 if you’re 26 or under). filmpittsburgh.org

MUSIC ‘Twas a dark and stormy night full of pitch black, riotous post-punk music.

Chi-town’s Ganser, whose album Odd Talk is so full of crunchy and moody vocals and riff patterns, you’ll swear it’s moving, possibly underwater, sinking to the bottom of an inky black ocean. Death Instinct is set to headline — the epitome of what a good post-punk act should resemble. The band is just not quite simplified enough to be punk, and just avant garde and lo-fi enough to be a roaring good post-punk time. Bloody Knives and Silver Car Crash finish out the bill for this show. Emily Bennett 9 p.m. Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $7. howlerspittsburgh.com CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MACULAR

^ Fri., April 27: New Works at Wood Street Galleries at the Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District

FRIDAY

APRIL 27 ART Looking for a gallery crawl that has everything from comedy to live music to film? Join the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust for the spring Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District. Scattered down Liberty Avenue, the crawl features everything from an interactive installation that disseminates information and combats mental health, to an improvised comedy based on audience suggestions at the Arcade Comedy Theater. Late options are available for night owls, including Salsa Friday (the dance, not the dip) from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. The next crawl won’t be until July, so why wait? LO 5:30 p.m. Downtown. Free (after-dark cover charges may apply). crawl.trustarts.org

PARTY Sometimes it can be really hard to muster the energy to go out for a night

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of dancing, especially when plenty of places don’t really get bumping until 11 p.m. or later. But In Bed By Ten is here to help. The monthly event lets party-goers get their groove on and get home long before the clock strikes midnight. This month features guests DJ Diana Boss and DJ Queen Yas Queen of Divas Nite. All profits will go to Ladyfest, benefiting Girls Rock! Pittsburgh and the Women’s Center & Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh. RA 6 p.m. Spirit Hall, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. inbedbytenpgh.com ^ Fri., April 27: Poltergeist at April Ghouls Drive-In Monster-Rama

FILM

MUSIC

For the sixth year in a row, the Riverside Drive-In Theatre is hosting two nights of classic horror and monster movies. The 2018 April Ghouls Drive-In Monster-Rama will include Poltergeist, Lifeforce, The Funhouse and Invaders from Mars on Friday; Alligator, The Boogens, Critters and The Deadly Spawn on Saturday. Each night will also include a variety of vintage monster and exploitation movies trailers. The event starts at dusk and promises to go late into the night, so grab plenty of snacks from the Riverside concession stand and get comfortable; it’s going to be scary night. Rebecca Addison 7 p.m. Route 66 N., Vandergrift. $10 per night. riversidedrivein.com

Presented by your pals at WYEP, one of Nashville’s newest and biggest stars is headed to Pittsburgh. Margo Price made her way onto the scene in 2016 with the compelling, autobiographical Midwest Farmer’s Daughter; her most recent, All American Made, features a guest spot from Willie Nelson and showcases a mature sense of storytelling. The record could be confused for a blistering Cormac McCarthy novel set to song. Price is a country songstress signed to Jack White’s Third Man Records, and like White, Price has a reputation for telling the truth and ripping your heart out with tender tone. EB 7 p.m. The Club @ Stage AE, 400 N. Shore Drive, North Shore. $20. All ages. promowestlive.com

LECTURE A woman of many job titles — actress, professor and playwright — Anna Deavere Smith is coming to the August Wilson Center tonight as part of the TRUTHSayers series. The talks focus on black female activists who are on top of their respective fields. Smith has an extensive portfolio


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and a slew of awards under her belt — from the Dorothy & Lillian Gish Prize, to the National Humanities Medal (given to her by former President Barack Obama). Her focus is on community and diversity, and she has been called, “the American theatre’s most dynamic and sophisticated oral historian,” by The New York Times. LO 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. trustarts.org

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sale and pups, the Neighborhood Flea will be present, with bargains and food trucks to keep you and your dog going throughout the morning. LO 9 a.m. Liberty School Lot, 600 Ivy St., Shadyside. $15 ($20 day-of registration and $5 for each additional pet). humaneanimalrescue.org/bark-shadyside

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MUSIC Local label Library Collaborative is gonna show you a good time. aRT&B is an audiovisual experience, a medley of live music and live painting, the latter of which is brought to you by Hollywood Here We Come. The name is a slick pun, and if you don’t like slick puns then I don’t like you. Hip hop, R&B, and soul jams are headed to you from Cam Chambers, Clara Kent, 412 Juice, MYFAVORITECOLOR, NVSV and Sierra Sellers. Bring a friend and allow yourself to retreat into the healing goodness of rhythm and blues. No standing still, just dancing. EB 8 p.m. Karma, 1713 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. libco.co

SATURDAY APRIL 28 PET What could mark the beginning of spring better than a huge yard sale and a bunch of pups walking for a good cause? Today is the 8th Annual Great Shadyside Yard Sale & BARK Shadyside Pup Walk, whose proceeds will benefit the Humane Animal Rescue. All dogs involved will even get their own goodie bag at the end. In addition to the yard

^ Fri., April 27: Anna Deavere Smith

HEALTH Put on your favorite superhero garb — whether that’s a fully caped costume or just a t-shirt — and join in on the fun happening today in North Park. The Superhero Run allows joggers of all ages to get some exercise while supporting a good cause. Proceeds from the run benefit CASA of Allegheny County, an organization that provides assistance to neglected children in the child-welfare system. Participants can take part in the

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5K run or walk, or a shorter 1k walk; you don’t have to be the Flash. Families with children are encouraged to take part. Runners and walkers start at the North Park Swimming Pool, then follow the paved path through the park. Ryan Deto 9:30 a.m. S. Ridge Drive, McCandless. $20-$30. pittsburghsuperherorun.org

BOOK For the fourth year in a row, City of Asylum will join more than 500 bookstores around the country to celebrate Independent Bookstore Day. Activities will include a family-friendly story hour, raffles and “blind dates” with a book where participants might just find a new favorite. The store will also be offering exclusive merchandise created especially for the occasion including a special edition of Ungrateful Mammals with unique original pieces of art by Dave Eggers slipped into each edition. Last year, stores participating in the national event saw an average increase of 200 percent in sales. RA 11 a.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. alphabetcity.org

SUNDAY APRIL 29 FASHION To honor Fashion Revolution Week, Flux Bene, Valley Vintage and Third Hand Vintage are hosting a clothing swap at Ace Hotel, today. If you’re tired of your current wardrobe, all you have to do is come with clothes you’re willing to part with, look around at clothes other people have dropped off and find your new look. Clothing swaps are a new trend that replaces shopping with a much cheaper option. All proceeds collected will benefit the Sew Forward

ART (DETAIL) BY SCOTT HUNTER

^ Mon., April 30: Art for Change

program at the East End Cooperative Ministry, a career development collaboration providing youth and adults with sewing classes. LO 12 p.m. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. Suggested $10 donation at door. acehotel.com

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Rosemary that way (she passes out, gets impregnated by Satan, it’s a whole thing). If the infant antichrist stuff of the talky version left you too spooked, you might prefer tonight’s musical interpretation at Glitter Box Theater, with original tunes by

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local talent. All proceeds will be donated to the National Network of Abortion. Snacks and drinks available. Alex Gordon 6:30 p.m. 480 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5 suggested cover. theglitterboxtheater.com

7 DAYS

OF SPORTS BY CHARLIE DEITCH CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MONDAY

CALLING ALL RESTAUR ANTS!

APRIL 30 BENEFIT

Pittsburgh nonprofit organization Persad Center has been serving the LGBTQ community for more than four decades. Tonight is their annual benefit Art For Change, an art auction now celebrating its 30th anniversary. This fundraising event will feature more than 200 donated works of art for guests to bid on. These works will include paintings, photography, jewelry, and 3-D works in porcelain, bronze, wood, and more. There will also be travel, luxury and cultural event gift baskets for guests to bid on. The event is sponsored by UPMC. RA 6 p.m. Westin Convention Center, 1000 Penn Ave., Downtown. $80-225. persadcenter.org/ art-for-change

CP PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH

Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Chad Kuhl

THURSDAY Pittsburgh Public Schools City League Tennis Doubles Championships 1 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. pghschools.org

H P I T T S B U R G

B U R G ER W EE K

FRIDAY St. Louis Cardinals vs. Pittsburgh Pirates 7:05 p.m. PNC Park, North Side. pirates.com

SATURDAY Football: Pittsburgh Passion vs. D.C. Divas 6:30 p.m. Joe P. Demichela Stadium, Imperial. pittsburghpassion.com

SUNDAY ^ Mon., April 30: Dumplings

MUSIC Calling all true freaks! Not all Mondays have to be boring, quiet endeavors. In fact, you could assemble your change and walk on up to the Rock Room for an evening of strange, tantalizing and abrasive sounds (and whole wings that only cost 40 cents). Hailing from Denton, Texas, Flesh Narc brings disorienting experimental noise rock, while Athens, Ohio, noise artist Shane Riley delivers a unique brand of audio wizardry and experimentation. Pittsburgh’s old-tyme praying and noise ensemble In Arthur’s Court and rambunctious, noise punk band CHOIR hold it down for us locals n’at. Meg Fair 8 p.m. 1054 Herron Ave., Polish Hill. $7. 412-683-4418

MUSIC More than once, I’ve found myself walking the relatively tranquil streets of Polish Hill. It could be a Monday at 9 p.m.,

Softball: Point Park University vs. Indiana University Southeast 12 p.m. Fairhaven Park, McKees Rocks. pointparksports.com

MONDAY High School Baseball: Obama Academy vs. Hampton 3:45 p.m. Hampton High School, Allison Park. pghschools.org

MAY 13-19 We’re calling on restaurants to create a ONE-OF-A-KIND BURGER to showcase for BURGER WEEK 2018. Head to PGHBURGERWEEK.COM & SIGN UP today! #PGHBURGERWEEK

TUESDAY Softball: Kent State vs. University of Pittsburgh 4 p.m. Vartabedian Field, Oakland. pittsburghpanthers.com

WEDNESDAY Baseball: Maryland Eastern Shore vs. University of Pittsburgh 6 p.m. Charles L. Cost Field, Oakland. pittsburghpanthers.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ARCHIE CARPENTER

^ Tue., May 1: Arriba Arriba, The Roberto Clemente Story

but opening that graffitied door at the threshold of Gooski’s opens a portal to ping pong, sloshed beer and droves of crust punks. Dumplings are playing their first show of 2018 at that very beloved old vintage watering hole, and you shouldn’t miss it. I hope you hear “Wash Clothes!” which is, well, a song about getting fired for not washing your clothes. This show’s got you surrounded with talent including Greenfield doo-woppers The Spectres and jangly alt-rockers Jollys. EB 9 p.m. Gooski’s, 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $7. Facebook.com (“Gooskis”)

TUESDAY MAY 1 STAGE Honoring one of the most revered baseball players in history, the Clemente Museum is hosting the Pittsburgh CLO’s Gallery of Heroes program, Arriba Arriba, The Roberto Clemente Story. Clemente was an objectively amazing baseball player on the field and an influential humanitarian off it. He was picked up by the Pirates in 1954 and went on to make history in more than one way, and this musical covers as much of that story as can fit into less than an hour. The show is appropriate for baseball fans of all ages and walks of life. LO 6 p.m. 3339 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. $25. pittsburghclo.org

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PHOTO COURTESY OF POLYVINYL

^ Wed., May 2: Jeff Rosenstock

WEDNESDAY MAY 2 MUSIC There is little else in the world that offers as much cathartic release as bouncing around, earnestly belting out Jeff Rosenstock’s lyrics in a sea of equally anxious, sweaty lost souls just trying to survive this insane world. Tonight you can do just that at Spirit Hall as Rosenstock tours on his latest release, POST-. Also performing is the pop-punk band Martha from across the pond (specifically Durham, U.K.) and Bad Moves, a power-pop band from Washington D.C. All three of these bands are bound to get you moving and shaking off the existential dread. MF 7 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15. spiritpgh.com •


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ANTISOCIAL NETWORK

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. It might be covered in powdered sugar 6. “Hey, Haole!” 11. Gear tooth 14. Money for something 15. Lacking originality 16. $5, slangily 17. Eventually got around to unleashing annoying tweets from one’s fake account? 19. Ideal number 20. Shop tool 21. “And one more thing” 22. Charon’s river 23. Kamasi Washington’s instrument 25. Kathmandu’s nation 28. Truly awful thing shared on the Internet? 34. One new to the company 35. “Cease!,” at sea 36. Anime unit 37. Line of calculus 38. Years old 39. Pie chart material 40. [] comment 41. “Killing Eve” actress Comer 42. Rachel from Skid Row 43. Those in charge gonna start flame wars?

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46. “I’m guilty!” 47. Over-___ headphones 48. Post sauna getup 50. What a freelancer writes on 53. “Science is organized knowledge; wisdom is organized life” philosopher 57. Night screecher 58. Guy who scours for negative content on a lolcatfilled forum? 61. Character actor R. ___ Ermey 62. Original: Prefix 63. Tapped letters 64. Dime guy 65. Snopes debunkings 66. Ease back

DOWN 1. “Lay All Your Love on Me” group 2. Urge 3. Fancy hotel name 4. Dwells on 5. Movie hero who can dodge bullets 6. His brother killed him 7. Map lines: Abbr. 8. Bialy’s cousin 9. Easter serving 10. It has a bit of a bite and hops 11. Open audition 12. “Do as I say”

13. Kids on “Stranger Things,” collectively 18. Extra-long skirt 22. Oscar winner Rockwell 24. Dumb brute 26. Additional to 27. Bad attitude 28. The South 29. “Passage of Arms” author 30. Snap you’re not prepared for 31. Be of use to 32. Baroness genre 33. Certain style 34. Breakfast jumble 38. First state to allow women to practice law 39. Closing agent?

41. Fugue composer initials 42. Push up, say 44. Coloring stuff 45. Wearables, e.g. 48. Deep massage 49. Had some obligations 51. Maze solution 52. TV actress Mireille 54. Blade name 55. Home in a 56-Down 56. Spot for a 55-Down 58. When some “happy hours” begin 59. Weep 60. Interior designer Stewart LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a straight male in my 30s. I’ve been with my wife for 12 years. I have had several affairs. Not one-night-stand scenarios, but longer-term connections. I didn’t pursue any of these relationships. Instead, women who knew I was in an “exclusive” relationship have approached me. These have included what turned into a one-year affair with a single woman, a three-year affair with a close friend of my wife, a seven-month affair with a married coworker, and now a fairly serious four-months-and-counting relationship with a woman who approached me on Instagram. On the one hand, I do not regret my time with any of these women. On the other hand, I have been deceitful and manipulative for almost my entire adult life. I am a terrible husband in this respect. Also, I’m going to get busted eventually, right? Finding out about this would crush my wife. I love her, we get along great, and the sex is good — if I wasn’t such a lying piece of shit, you could even say we make a pretty good team. I don’t want to leave, but I suspect I should. And if so, I need help considering an exit strategy. Part of my motivation for writing is that I am particularly attached to the woman I’m having an affair with now, and both of us fantasize about being together openly. I’m a liar, a cheat, a user, and a manipulator — and it just keeps happening. A SERIOUSLY SHITTY HUSBAND ON LOSING EVERYTHING

P.S. I’m expecting you to rip me to shreds. It doesn’t “just keep happening,” you keep doing it. And these women didn’t “turn into” one-year, three-year, seven-month, and four-months-andcounting affairs on their own. You turned them into affairs by continuing to show up. The first step toward holding yourself accountable for your appalling actions — a close friend of your wife? really? — is doing away with the passive voice. Don’t ask yourself, “How’d that happen?!?” as if the universe were conspiring against you somehow. You did these things. You had these affairs. You. Zooming out: If all it takes for some rando to get her hands on your otherwise committed

ass is to DM you on Instagram, you have no business making monogamous commitments. If you’d sought out a partner who wanted an open relationship you could have had concurrent, committed, non-exclusive relationships and avoided being “a liar, a cheat, a user,” etc. Seeing as you’re a reader, I suspect you knew an honest open relationship was an option but you didn’t pursue that. And why not? Maybe because you don’t want to be with a woman who is free to be with other men. Or maybe the wrongness and the self-loathing turn you on. Or maybe you’re the wrong kind of sadist: the un-self-aware emotional sadist. You say you love your wife, but you also say she’d be crushed if she discovered what you’ve been doing. Be honest, just this once: Is the destruction of your wife a bug or is it a feature? I suspect the latter. Because cheating on this scale isn’t about succumbing to temptation or reacting to neglect. It’s about the annihilation of your partner. So, what do you do now? It seems like you want out, and your wife definitely deserves better, so cop to one affair, since copping to all of them would crush her. People are often way more resilient than we give them credit for, and convincing ourselves that our partners can’t handle the truth is often a convenient justification for lying to them. But on the off chance it would crush your wife to be told everything, just tell her about Ms. Instagram. That should be enough. P.S. Get your ass into therapy.

ation. He told our therapist that every time I hooked up with someone, he was retraumatized because it reminded him of the time I broke up with him for six months 20 years ago. I agreed to a monogamous relationship, and I’ve gone a year without hooking up with anyone else. He seemed genuinely relieved and said he felt more secure. But almost immediately, he began talking about how he wanted to hook up with others. I’m at a loss. I feel tremendous guilt for even thinking about splitting up, so I keep hoping we’ll stumble on the thing that will work for us. I don’t know what to say when he says I should be monogamous to him while he gets to hook up with others. He says this would be best, since my hooking up triggers him. GAY MARRIAGE HAVING CRISIS

I’ve written about a few gay couples where one half gets to hook up with others while the other half doesn’t. But they were cuckold couples, and the half who didn’t “get to” hook up with others didn’t want to hook up with others. The cuck half of a cuckold couple gets off on their partner “cheating” on them. While people outside the relationship might perceive that as unfair, what’s more ideal than both halves of a couple getting just what they want? But if an eroticized power imbalance doesn’t turn you on, the creepily manipulative arrangement your husband is proposing certainly isn’t going to work. Which means it’s both ultimatum and bluffcalling time. So long as your husband thinks he can dictate terms by pointing to his triggers and his trauma, he has every incentive to continue being triggered and traumatized. So with your couples therapist there to mediate, tell him your marriage is either open or closed. You’re not interested in being his cuckold and he can’t point to his trauma to force you into that role. P.S. If your therapist is taking your husband’s side in this, get a new therapist.

YOU HAD THESE AFFAIRS. YOU.

I’m a 42-year-old gay man. I’ve been with my husband for 21 years. We met in college and, except for a six-month break, we’ve been together ever since. I made an open relationship a requirement at the start. While my husband had jealousy and trust issues, he hooked up with others regularly. After a few tense years, we started couples therapy. During therapy, my husband revealed that he was never in favor of the openness. After trying some new arrangements — only together, only at sex parties, DADT — he realized he wasn’t comfortable with any situ-

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PITTSBURGH Methadone 412-255-8717 • Suboxone 412-281-1521 NOW ACCEPTING MEDICAID - info@summitmedical.biz

PITTSBURGH • SOUTH HILLS Methadone 412-488-6360 • info2@alliancemedical.biz

BEAVER COUNTY Methadone 724-857-9640 • Suboxone 724-448-9116 • info@ptsa.biz PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018

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April 25, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 17

April 25, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 17