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Ecolution Fashion Show kicks off Pittsburgh’s Earth Day celebrations in style

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EDITORIAL Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts and Entertainment Editor REBECCA ADDISON Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns EMILY BENNETT, SABRINA BODON, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

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APRIL 18-25, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 16

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ON THE COVER: Earth Day kicks off in style with Ecolution Fashion Show. C P PH OTO B Y JO H N C O L O MB O MO DE L S: T E R R ANC E AU ST IN, T E R E SSA SH AW AND ANNA AU PK E CLOTHI N G DE SIGNE R S: VANE SSA GE R MAN, E L E C T R IC C AT F ISH AND K AT Y DE ME NT H AIR AND MAK E U P: IZ Z AZ U SAL O N, SPA, SE R ATA & B L O WO U T S

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NEWS +VIEWS

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A natural-gas well pad in Westmoreland County

INFLATED E NUMBERS .ENVIRONMENT.

Natural-gas proponents and renewable-energy advocates disagree on fracking’s potential to grow jobs in Pittsburgh BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ACH YEAR, more and more studies show how natural-gas drilling, also called fracking, is harming the environment. Whether it’s contaminating drinking water or spewing methane into the air, it’s becoming harder to defend fracking from an environmental point of view. But despite environmental concerns, proponents of natural gas have always had a strong motivation to keep drilling: jobs. Pennsylvania House Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Marshall) is a champion of the natural-gas industry and he said in a 2015 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article that the fracking industry is “creating work for steel manufacturers, engineering firms and refineries.” Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald has also been supportive of fracking and believes it can help create jobs. In 2014, when the county allowed fracking on public land near the airport, he told KDKA that money generated from natural-gas drilling can “create jobs in this part of the county.” The Pittsburgh region, particularly its rural areas, has strug-

gled with high unemployment for decades. In December 2017, the Pittsburgh metro area unemployment rate was 4.5 percent; the national average was 3.9 percent. And in more rural areas like Fayette and Armstrong counties, December’s unemployment rates were significantly higher — 6.6 percent and 5.7 percent respectively. According to figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, from 2007 to 2012, Pennsylvania added more than 15,000 jobs in the oil and gas industry, with a large chunk of those concentrated in the Pittsburgh region. During this same time period, the Pittsburgh region’s overall employment also increased; 2012 was the first year in more than a decade that the region saw its population grow. But tying employment growth to increased natural gas production in the Pittsburgh region could be seen as a bit of a leap. There are many factors that can lead to growth in some gas-related industries, including job losses in other CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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areas. Natural gas is a direct competitor to other energy industries in the region, and its growth has already contributed to job losses at coal mines and power plants. And even though natural-gas production has drastically increased over the past few years, the gas-drilling job figures aren’t really following suit. But, natural gas proponents say job growth is happening in ancillary fields, which more than easily offsets the lack of robust growth at drilling pads. Environmentalists believe fracking is not a sustainable enough industry to deserve such broad support. They say energy and investment should be driven towards clean energy, like wind power. Either way, a choice between pursuing more cleanenergy or continuing to back natural gas is emerging. The decision could impact the region for decades to come. ACCORDING TO the U.S. Energy Informa-

tion Administration, since 2012, naturalgas rigs in the Appalachia region, which includes Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio and West Virginia, have seen huge growth in the amount of gas they produce. In 2012, Appalachian rigs produced about 3 million cubic feet of natural gas per day. By 2017, that number was 15 million cubic feet daily. But during this same time period, drilling jobs at natural-gas wells decreased. After 2014, oil and gas jobs started to drop off; from 2015 to 2016, Pennsylvania lost more than 10,000 jobs in the sector. In the Pittsburgh region, naturalgas jobs were at 3,039 in the third quarter of 2017, according to state data. While a slight increase from the same time in 2016, this is still well below Pittsburgh’s peak natural-gas employment. But Erica Wright, spokesperson for natural-gas industry group Marcellus Shale Coalition, notes natural gas is supporting thousands of other jobs in gasrelated industries. Construction projects for pipelines, power plants and the soonto-be-built Shell cracker plant in Beaver County have led unions to support fracking and its related industries. “Clean and abundant American natural gas supports hundreds of thousands of good-paying Pennsylvania jobs, especially across our hard-working and talented building-trade unions,” wrote Wright in a statement to City Paper. A 2017 study from Pittsburgh-based pro-business group McKinsey & Co. says Pennsylvania could see more than 100,000 additional jobs thanks to natural gas. The cracker plant in Beaver County is said to produce 6,000 temporary construction jobs and 600 permanent jobs. Cracker plants create plastics derived from natural gas, and proponents say plants can


help create manufacturing companies across the region that will use the plastic from the cracker plant to create products. Both the natural-gas industry and the cracker plant are backed by some of the state’s most powerful leaders. Not only do most Republican politicians in the area support more drilling, but Democrats like Fitzgerald and Gov. Tom Wolf have offered support to the cracker plant. Newly elected U.S. Rep. Conor Lamb (D-Mount Lebanon) represents heavily drilled areas in Washington and Westmoreland counties, and he campaigned on a pro-fracking stance. “Natural gas extraction is creating and supporting a lot of good, middle-class jobs in our region, and I want more of those jobs for our people,” wrote Lamb on his campaign website. Wright also noted that natural gas as an energy source is cleaner than coal, and its emergence has helped improve Pittsburgh’s air quality. “And as more cleanburning natural gas is safely produced and used locally to generate affordable electricity for consumers, our air quality is sharply improving ...,” she wrote. But Jacquelyn Bonomo, CEO of cleanenergy advocacy organization PennFuture, refutes many of these claims. She says the Pennsylvania Department of Labor projects flat job growth for natural-gas employment through 2024 (which doesn’t include jobs from gas-related fields like manufacturing). Bonomo says natural gas has too many boom and bust cycles to offer steady growth in employment. “To communities being sold a line about job growth, they are being misled,” says Bonomo. And some of the job growth that is generated from natural gas may be offset by job losses in other sectors. First Energy, a company that operates power plants in the region, recently declared bankruptcy. U.S. Rep. Keith Rothfus (R-Sewickley) told the Beaver County Times on April 6 that the county is in danger of losing between 1,300 and 1,400 jobs if First Energy’s coal-fired and nuclear power plants shut down. The natural-gas trade publication Natural Gas Intelligence wrote on April 2 that an abundance of natural gas was cited as a reason for First Energy filing for bankruptcy. Bonomo also notes while political leaders may support natural gas, some community groups do not. In January, a group of more than 140 Presbyterian churches in Allegheny County called for halting the cracker plant’s construction. The churches were concerned with the plant’s impact on pollution levels. Bonomo says community members across Pennsylvania have recently held protests and criticized the potential environmen-

tal impacts of the Mariner East 2 pipeline, which when completed will move natural gas from Western Pennsylvania to Eastern Pennsylvania and beyond. A recent study from the Environmental Defense Fund says fracking wells in Pennsylvania are producing five times as much methane as previously reported by state officials. Methane warms the planet 86 times as much as carbon dioxide, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Bonomo wants Pittsburgh leaders to start putting their weight behind the production of wind energy. She says ridge tops in Pennsylvania provide plenty of room to build productive wind farms. (For example, Somerset County, in the Laurel Highlands, is already home to nine wind farms, and two more are proposed in the area.)

“TO COMMUNITIES BEING SOLD A LINE ABOUT JOB GROWTH, THEY ARE BEING MISLED.” She says Pennsylvanians deserve good-paying jobs, and no one should “disparage people for wanting good jobs.” But she says the renewable energy sector in the state is already employing 70,000 Pennsylvanians, and Bonomo feels that number can grow. Bonomo says Pittsburgh is forging ahead in two divergent directions. Natural-gas and petrochemical industries have backing from politicians and business leaders alike, while also attracting tech companies like Amazon. However, Bonomo notes Amazon’s commitment to achieving a 100 percent renewable-energy global infrastructure footprint. She says Pittsburgh-area leaders shouldn’t be supporting natural gas and should shift support to renewable energy. “I think it is the path of least resistance,” she says of supporting natural-gas. “But particularly in Western Pennsylvania, where we have the finest universities that could be working on resources for renewables. Just think of the power that could be released with progressive leadership, if only the political will was there.” Bonomo says if Pittsburgh really wants to emerge as a tech center, local leaders need to acknowledge that supporting natural gas and petrochemicals is antithetical in attracting companies like Amazon. “How are we going to bring [Amazon] into Western PA, where the trajectory is defined by natural gas?” says Bonomo. “That is where there is a disconnect.”

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.ENVIRONMENT.

CLEAN-ENERGY PACT

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

TUESDAY, APRIL 24 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM LECTURE: RESTORING STATUES BORIS BRINDAR The restoration of statues is about more than improvement of an object. Statuary restoration involves taking three-dimensional art to the next level of artistic impact. Made of various media, sometimes exposed to elements, statuary sustains different kinds of damages. But whether they are profound or mild in nature, the damages can be stopped and the artwork restored to convey the artist’s original idea. This presentation will include a few examples of various approaches to professional sculpture restoration.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Boris Brindar is a second-generation art conservator. He got his start in the field at a young age, working with his dad, then the Head of Conservation Labs at the Russian State Museum in Leningrad. Boris is a graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Leningrad where he received a degree in conservation and art history. He has more than 33 years of professional experience.

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER IN APRIL. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NONMEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR CALL 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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BY SABRINA BODON // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HILE KATRINA Kelly-Pitou was

working in London at the World Energy Council from 2014 to 2016, she saw potential for Pittsburgh to be an international leader in affordable, renewable resources. In fact, she still sees its potential today. “Pittsburgh stands out as a city that could help the global community understand what the bottom-up contributions to global climate change could be,” says Kelly-Pitou. She isn’t the only one who saw promise. In March, the University of Pittsburgh joined forces with the Danish Energy Agency, part of Denmark’s government, to launch the Pittsburgh-Danish Energy Exchange. This collaboration seeks to research, develop and implement low-cost, reliable energy resources in Pittsburgh. “Sometimes we don’t embrace in the city of Pittsburgh that a lot of energy developments we’re tackling here are representative of what’s happening in America,” says Kelly-Pitou, who holds dual roles as manager of strategy and business development at Pitt’s Center for Energy and researcher at Swanson School of Engineering. One of the main goals of the partnership is to make sustainable resources accessible to underprivileged communities in hopes that other cities can replicate that model. The Danish Energy Agency will help by developing workshops for the region to showcase the country’s energy initiatives. By the end of 2019, the program hopes to establish a community microgrid or similar project to showcase affordable energy.

Denmark ranks third globally in the 2018 Environmental Performance Index by researchers at Yale and Columbia Universities, which measures countries on environmental health and ecosystem vitality. In 2015, Denmark got 42 percent of its energy from wind turbines. The Pittsburgh-Denmark partnership began with Gregory Reid, director of the Center for Energy and the Energy Grid Research and Infrastructure Development (GRID) Institute. Two years ago, he brought on Kelly-Pitou to work on international relations while he worked domestically on relations in renewable energy. Last year, Reid travelled to Denmark to focus on clean energy technology. The collaboration fell into place from there. “Over the past year, Dr. Reid and I have worked to concretely develop strong relationships in relation to energies and sustainable cities,” says Kelly-Pitou. Especially since the fall of heavy industry in the region, Pittsburgh has a history of producing innovative technology and spreading environmental messages. Kelly-Pitou says these factors pair with Denmark’s commitment to cleanenergy research. “Pittsburgh has a name for itself in the innovation realm, which Denmark also has a reputation for,” says Kelly-Pitou. “Copenhagen has really aggressive, stateof-the-art energy systems they are globally known for. “There’s nobody better than Denmark. It’s great to have a partnership with a government that understands what we’re doing can have global effects.”


.NEWS.

WORKER PROTECTIONS BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

O

N APRIL 11, President Donald Trump signed into law a measure that its supporters say is necessary to combat human trafficking. The bill is a combination of two measures — the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act and the Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (SESTAFOSTA) — and was passed following two years of bipartisan advocacy. And while the goal to end sex trafficking is a much needed and noble one, sex workers and their advocates say the new law will make consensual-sex work more dangerous and obscure the online activities of sex traffickers, making them more difficult to find and prosecute. The Department of Justice defines sex trafficking as when “a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age.” SESTA-FOSTA targets online platforms and makes them liable for what their users post, say and do on their forums by revising the Communications Decency Act, a law that previously protected websites from being liable in civil court for their users’ actions on their platforms. In an increasingly conservative political climate, Jessie Sage, Moriah Ella Mason and PJ Sage are offering support and safe harbor for sex workers. They recently launched a Pittsburgh chapter of the Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP), a national network that works to protect the human rights of those involved in the sex industry and focuses on replacing the stigma and violence with education and advocacy.

DO YOU HAVE MOLD?

Jessie Sage (left) and Moriah Ella Mason (right)

According to the Sages, Mason and many activists, the law will force sex traffickers offline, making their activities harder for law enforcement to track. In addition, this also stands to affect the livelihood of consensual-sex workers and their ability to work safely. “When these platforms shut down, traffickers aren’t going to stop, they’re going to make the girls work on the streets, more dangerously and [they] will be harder to find,” says Mason. “For consensual sex workers, it also becomes more dangerous for them because they can’t work online either.” Mason is an interdisciplinary artist, massage therapist and educator. She’s also a former stripper and recently performed two runs of her one-woman show, Sex Werque, commissioned by Off the Wall Productions, that explores her experience in the adult entertainment industry. Jessie Sage was an academic getting her Ph.D. in feminist philosophy and teaching women and gender studies when, four years in, she became frus-

trated with academia and left to work as a doula. Her husband, PJ Sage is studying web camming and sex camming — a legal form of sex work where clients pay for live webcam time and interactions with a model — as part of his Ph.D. work in sociology. Out of curiosity, Jessie Sage decided to make a profile to see what the work was like.

For more information on SWOP, visit www.new.swopusa.org. “That was maybe a year ago and that really took off, surprisingly,” she says laughing. “It’s not where I expected to land,” she says of her career as a phone sex operator and webcam model, also known as a “cam girl.” The Sages and Mason met at a performance of Sex Werque and found that they were aligned in their passion to build solidarity and promote agency and justice among and for sex workers. Because all three of them are “out” publicly about

their sex work, it seemed natural to take on this responsibility. “We feel really strongly about speaking out about these two bills that have just passed, particularly because as a former sex worker and someone doing legal sex work, we don’t face the same challenges or risks by speaking up that a lot of our peers do who are working in prostitution or escorting and who are much more affected by these bills,” says Mason. Even before SESTA-FOSTA was signed, sex workers and internet users were seeing the limits it could put on free speech as it moved through the Senate. In March, Microsoft banned nudity and swearing on Skype effective May 1; on April 6, the FBI seized Backpage.com, where many sex workers advertised their services and shared information. “Google is heavily censoring and flagging anything that seems like adult content. Sex workers [like cammers] are having their pre-recorded content disappearing from Google Drive. When they go to send it to clients who have paid, it’s gone,” says Sage. “There’s no way to really recover it.” Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) tweeted his support of the signing, while those in the sex industry, like nationally syndicated sex-columnist Dan Savage are expressing their disappointment in what they think is a harmful bill. Kink and dating sites like FetLife are consulting with users on how best to proceed. Pounced.org, a dating site for Furries — people who like to dress up in animal suits and assume anthropomorphized animal personalities — shut down for fear of prosecution. In their statement they wrote, “We don’t promote prostitution or sex trafficking. We’re a personals site for the furry community, our goal was to allow members of our community to have a personals site dedicated solely to the community, and we’ve tried to serve our community well.”

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11,000 natural-gas wells drilled in Pennsylvania. At the same time, natural gas prices have plummeted by 80 percent. Shell is building a petrochemical plant in Beaver County to use the ethane generated at wells. But at what cost? Turns out, fracked wells are most productive in the first five years of operation. (There are already 100 wells in Washington County that are either plugged or inactive.) Some unlucky landowners are now paying the cost that their royalties won’t cover. We already have miles of gas pipelines built, with more planned. Also, the disposal of fracking waste water has changed the chemistry of our rivers and has had municipal drinking water authorities dealing with high levels of bromide and trihalomethanes. Although that’s now prohibited, the Allegheny River still has elevated bromide and radium levels. Injection wells are being permitted in Allegheny and Indiana counties and landfills are being inundated with drilling waste. There’s also groundwater contamination and dealing with well construction and traffic. Between 2004 and 2016 there were 9,442 complaints filed with the state Department of Environmental Protection — more than 4,100 of those are related to water issues, according to nonprofit investigative-journalism outlet Public Herald. Granted, natural gas burns much cleaner than coal, but fracking generates enough fugitive methane and other toxic emissions to offset the health benefits. So, when you add it all up, can you really say that natural gas is really all that clean? But don’t fret. There is an alternative that’s sustainable, carbon neutral, and actually generates revenue — biogas.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

If there is one thing people can produce, it’s waste. And waste can be converted into renewable natural gas (RNG) through biodigestion, the process when organic matter is decomposed by bacteria. It can convert any compostable biomass into methane for energy with high efficiency. The only byproducts to biodigestion are clean water and carbon-neutral fertilizer. But could this produce as much as we obtain through drilling? Given the amount of compostable waste the U.S. produces annually, yes. Cow and pig waste alone could produce more than 8 trillion cubic feet of RNG. Quasar Energy Group in Cleveland has built RNG-producing, multi-megawatt

power plants for farms, food companies, and municipal wastewater facilities. In Hermitage, Pa., installing biodigesters as part of their municipal waste facility upgrade saves the town $25,000 in monthly energy costs. So, on this Earth Day, as construction continues on the ethane cracker plant and new gas wells are being installed, remember that there’s an option out there for a truly sustainable source of natural gas and energy. It would be a waste not to give it a try.

John Stolz is the director of the Center for Environmental Research and Education at Duquesne University.

JENSORENSEN

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In the early history of the automobile, electric engines were more popular and common than gasoline-powered engines. They were less noisy, dirty, smelly and difficult to operate. It’s too bad that thereafter the technology for gasoline cars developed at a faster rate than the technology for electric cars. By the end of the first decade of the 20th century, the petroleum-suckers were in ascendance. They have remained so ever since, playing a significant role in our world’s ongoing environmental degradation. Moral of the story: Sometimes the original idea or the early model or the first try is better. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should consider applying this hypothesis to your current state of affairs.


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CP PHOTOS BY VANESSA SONG

Doce Taqueria serves customer at Pittsburgh Food Truck Park

.FOOD.

PARK AND EAT “We were really happy with the turnout.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ITTSBURGH’S FIRST-EVER food-truck park has only been open for a couple of weeks, but the demand is already high. The park, located on the water in Millvale, is already booked every weekend through Labor Day. The Pittsburgh Food Truck Park is the brainchild of Millvale natives and brothers, Shawn, Tony and Matt Lang. They started working with the Borough of Millvale two years ago in tandem with riverfront development. The park sits right off the water in the former Mr. Smalls skate park. The brothers are considering these first couple months as a “testing phase” while they finish building a bar and other permanent structures on the property. The Lang brothers have been in the restaurant business together for 10 years. Aside from the Pittsburgh Food Truck

Park, they also own Pig Iron Public House in Mars, and Steel City Samiches Bar & Grille and Twisted Jimmy’s in Indiana, Pa. They’ve spent a lot of time traveling to different cities to explore restaurant concepts; on one trip to San Francisco, a friend took them to a local food truck park. “We fell in love with the concept,” says Shawn Lang. “It was under an overpass. The bar was built out of an oldschool bus and it had about six trucks surrounding some tables.” They were thrilled when the space in Millvale became available and, after negotiations with the borough, began planning. “It was our first choice and we got it,” says Shawn Lang, smiling. The park bills itself as family-friendly and dogfriendly (read: well-behaved and leashed). Friday night CONTINUES ON PG. 16

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PARK AND EAT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 15

The “In-n-Aht” burger and “Jumbo Loney Sammich” from Pittsburgh Sandwich Society food truck

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happy hours will feature live music from local bands. A beer trailer offers patrons a chance to grab a brew and the food trucks offer their own selections of non-alcoholic drinks. Contrary to the long-standing rumor about more lax regulations, all food trucks are coordinated through the Allegheny Health Department and go through an inspection process. “That’s always top priority, making sure the trucks at the park do have their proper Allegheny Health Department regulations,” says Tony Lang. The events manager and vendor coordinator, Danielle Mashuda, has been working with food trucks for two years. She’s locked in 90 food trucks that will rotate through the park, and she’s intent on fostering positive relationships with the vendors. “I know these brothers are really excited about helping out new trucks and giving them an opportunity when they start out to get them shifts,” she says. The first weekend saw a lot of community support. “We were really happy with the turnout,” says Shawn Lang. The park comfortably hosts around 400 people and the Lang brothers say that they had a full rotation of people at all times. They are especially keen on making sure the space works for customers and vendors. “It’s all subject to change,” says Shawn Lang. Pat Joyce, owner of the South Side BBQ Company, which has a permanent location and a food truck, was pleased with the start of the season. “We had a great experience last weekend. It was well received by the community and well attended. Sales were unbelievable,” he says. “The food truck commu-

nity itself is growing really rapidly. I think [the food truck park is] going to be key for growth.” Ben Dougherty, owner of Pittsburgh Po’ Boy, is also excited for the new opportunity for his business. “From my perspective, it’s another outlet for us to showcase our business. But from the consumer aspect, I think it’s great because other cities have already had similar things like this for a long time so this coming to fruition here is really exciting,” he says.

PITTSBURGH FOOD TRUCK PARK 52 River Front Dr., Millvale. www.pittsburghfoodpark.com

For these first couple of months, they are planning on a slow rollout. “We want to take advantage of the warm weather,” says Shawn Lang. The park will be open every Friday and Saturday in April, with a dinner shift from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays and two shifts on Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays will be added in May and Mondays in June. By 2019, the Langs plan to extend service to seven days a week. Meanwhile, they are collaborating with the borough on events like the Millvale Music Festival and building out private indoor space. They want to make the park as sustainable and environmentally responsible as possible and have eventual plans to install solar panel charging stations for vendors to run their generators from solar power.


.FOOD.

EAT ME

BY ALEX GORDON ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LOCATION: Me and my girlfriend’s house, Pittsburgh .ON THE ROCKS.

THE STIR ABOUT MARTINI GLASSES BY CRAIG MRUSEK // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE MARTINI GLASS is everywhere. Its iconic silhouette has been part of the

public consciousness for decades and is not only emblematic of the martini itself (the drink most often served in it), but of adult beverages as a whole. There’s a reason it appears in such diverse spots as airport signage, bar windows, and the four-fingered hands of cartoon characters — it’s immediately recognizable as a beacon of leisure. But not everyone is a fan. It turns out the classic symbol of all things alcohol isn’t as universally loved as one may assume. There’s a bit of a backlash brewing against the triangle-shaped drinking vessel that’s been ubiquitous since the Art Deco era. Among its most vocal critics are bar and restaurant staff, who frequently hold up the martini glass as a prime case of style over substance. “As a server, I hated them because they’re almost impossible to carry without spilling, especially if you have three on a tray,” says Jesse Maystein, a bartender at Kaya. “As a bartender, I have a mild disdain for similar reasons.” Jade Wilson, who regularly appears behind the bar at Butterjoint, agrees. “I think, aesthetically, that martini glasses look appealing. However, they’re not very functional,” Wilson says. “They’re hard to pick up and carry, and they’re also not easy to drink out of without spilling.” In an effort to avoid such awkwardness, many bartenders opt for either a “coupe” or a “Nick & Nora” glass, both traditional styles of stemware with bellshaped cups that predate the more modern martini glass. The consensus is that these types of glasses are much easier to handle, both for servers as well as customers. They also have an endearing, old-timey look that dovetails perfectly with the vintage cocktails that have been appearing more frequently on drink menus over the past several years. However, the classic martini glass still has its devotees. Heather Kubas of Smallman Galley and Kelly’s Bar & Lounge stands firm. “I do prefer them. I think they have such an elegant look,” Kubas says. “Something about the lines just really appeal to me. Plus, they’re sturdier in my opinion. And I think they feel better in your hand when drinking.”

“IT’S IMMEDIATELY RECOGNIZABLE AS A BEACON OF LEISURE.”

AMBIANCE: Chic, down-to-earth and tastefully decorated. Attractive clientele. An elegant, overweight cat snores in the dining room. No dress code.

WHAT I ATE: Swedish Fish Oreos

COST: $13.95

HOT TAKE: I ordered this gag-gift for my girlfriend more than a year ago and it finally arrived last month. I’d given up hope/ forgotten about it, so the delivery was a nice surprise. I imagined the two disparate flavors would coalesce somehow, like Milk Duds and buttery popcorn. But in actuality, they taste remarkably like Swedish Fish smushed between Oreo cookies, which is what they are. I would describe them as “bad tasting,” and “undelicious.” Buy them for your enemies, or not at all.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

17


.BEER.

GETTING CRAFTY BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

B

ACK FOR ITS seventh iteration, Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week kicks off 10 days of sudsy celebration on April 20. “It seems like every major brewing city has a craft beer week,” says Gene Ribnicky who’s been in the beer business for about 25 years and works for Vecenie’s Distributing Company. Ribnicky joined the event board last August. This year’s theme is comics, driven by the excitement of board member Todd McDevitt, owner of New Dimensions Comics. A beer-toting superhero is one of the official logos. Whether your goal is to low-key drink tasty brews with your friends or get a little more active while you sip, Craft Beer Week has got you covered. The festivities kick off April 19 with a pre-party that spans all Caliente Pizza & Draft House locations where they’ll be tapping kegs of the much-beloved beer, Founders KBS Bourbon Barrel Aged Stout. If stout isn’t your style, Caliente will also host an IPA challenge. Grab a scorecard and follow along with the IPA “flight of the night” until the last Saturday of PCBW. Then each night’s winners will square off to be crowned the week’s winner. Feel like getting active? Join East End Brewing on the morning of Saturday April 21 as they deliver their first kegs of Pedal Pale Ale by bicycle to a secret location. You can also run with the Pittsburgh Hash House Harriers [“a running club with a drinking

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problem”] for the PCBW Fun Run. Other events throughout the week include brewery tours with City Brew Tours, bottle releases and a cornhole tournament. There will also be a “If You Like it Hot!! Spicy Beer & Food Night” held at Caliente Pizza & Draft House in Aspinwall on April 28 that puts the classic pairing of spice and beer together by serving spicy food alongside beers made with peppers and spices. In the friendly spirit of the craftbeer community, many brewers elected to brew collaborative beers. These offerings are Ribnicky’s favorite part of the event.

PITTSBURGH CRAFT BEER WEEK April 20-29. Various locations. For a more complete list of events, visit www.pittsburghcraftbeerweek.com.

“The collaboration beers are really what capture the zeitgeist of what a craft beer week should be. It’s collaboration and solidarity,” Ribnicky says. A few collaborations beer lovers can expect to sip are Born and Raised Pennsylvania IPA by East End Brewing Company and Troëgs Independent Brewing Company, Bred (a reference to black and red Air Jordans) dark pale ale with cherries from ShuBrew and Drinking Partners, and the on-theme Kryptonite Imperial Margarita Gose, from Butler Brew Works and New Dimension Comics.


DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS S

CALLING ALL RESTAUR ANTS!

THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 WWW.ALLEGHENY WINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craf craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-to-table products.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan

H P I T T S B U R G

B U R G ER W EE K

gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 / PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

MAY 13-19 We’re calling on restaurants to create a ONE-OF-A-KIND BURGER to showcase for BURGER WEEK 2018. Head to PGHBURGERWEEK.COM & SIGN UP today! #PGHBURGERWEEK

SENYAI THAI KITCHEN 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE., SHADYSIDE 412-441-4141 / SENYAIPGH.COM Immersed in authenticity, Senyai Thai Kitchen creates an intricate fusion of food and design, where every detail transports you to a faraway place. Traditional favorites and new creations like jumbo lump crab curry make Senyai a destination.

Look for this symbol for Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants, committed to building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Love Pittsburgh. Eat Sustainably. www.EatSustainably.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

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ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO / MODELS: ANNA AUPKE AND TERRESA SHAW, DOCHERTY TALENT AGENCY

Recycled fashions by Katy DeMent and Electric Catfish for the Ecolution Fashion Show

.GREEN.

GREEN SLEEVES “There can be sustainability in art and fashion.” BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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A

CCORDING TO a recently released report by

the American Council for Energy Efficient Economy, Pittsburgh and the state as a whole still have some of the poorest air quality in the country. But despite current pollution levels, previous characterizations of the city as a toxic hub, complete with a smog-covered skyline, are increasingly becoming a thing of the past. Pittsburgh businesses regularly win awards for sustainability. And city government has enacted a number of green initiatives committed to improving the environment. Among them is the upcoming Pittsburgh Earth Day, three days of environmentally-focused events that celebrate sustainability efforts in the city. The annual event kicks off with the Ecolution Fashion Show on Thu., April 19. “It’s one of the most exciting fashion shows that we do

in the city because they’re using their creativity, using recycled materials and sustainable materials to create these costumes that are very unique,” says Ronda Zegarelli, president of Acrobatique Creative, the agency that works with the city to organize Pittsburgh Earth Day. For the fourth year in a row, Richard Parsakian, owner of vintage clothing store Eons Fashion Antique, will serve as curator of the show. This year’s theme is “Forces of Nature: That Which We Cannot Control Will Move Us.” “The reason we decided to do a fashion show is we wanted something showing that sustainability can live in different ways,” Zegarelli says. “It’s not just about LEED certified buildings. It’s also about fashion. There can be sustainability in art and fashion.”


As part of the eco-inspired show, be determined by a panel of five judges designers use recycled fabrics and and will receive stipends from Larrimor’s repurposed materials to construct clothing store. Judges include Natalie clothing and accessories. Past materiBencivenga, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Seen als have include repurposed neckties, Column editor; Sara Bauknecht, P-G Seen floppy discs, soda can tabs, film strips, Column editor; Patrick Moore, director paper towel tubes and plastic six of the Andy Warhol Museum; Eric pack holders. Dorfman, director of the CarnFOR “They actually use reegie Natural History Museum; MORE Y A D cycled materials or they reand Janis Burley Wilson, execH T EAR TS, purpose material to make utive director and president of EVEN SEE costumes. It’s stunning,” Zethe August Wilson Center for 1 4 PAGE garelli says. “One year we had African-American Culture. a bubble-wrap costume creatGuests will enjoy a complied. One time we had a dress made mentary featured signature Pittsout of coffee filters. One time, we had burgh Earth Day cocktail featuring Blume a designer use bottle caps. They’re just Honey Water, hors d’oeuvres and chocoexquisite costumes.” late creations from A519 Chocolate. The evening will begin with a spoken-word performance by Vanessa ECOLUTION German, and will also include special performances by Miss Thea Trix, FASHION SHOW 6 p.m. Thu., April 19. Fairmont Hotel, Weylin Gomez and Texture Contempo510 Market St. Downtown. $25-60. rary Ballet. pittsburghearthday.org Designers in the show include: Kat Belskey, Terry Boyd, Gina Cercone, Brandon Darreff, Katy DeMent, Juli“What we try to do with all the anne D’Errico, Electric Catfish, Mindy events we curate for Pittsburgh Earth Eshelman, Tom Higgs, Zain IslamDay is there are a number of differHashmi, JJ Designs, Lessa Kassler, Vicent ways that you can be sustainable,” toria Kerestes, Bradford Mumpower, Zegarelli says. “That’s really why we Karen Page, Jen Rocket Studio LLC, Ruby decided to start Ecolution — to come Dawn Designs, Sarah Jane Sindler and up with something that might be more Ange Vesco. Models in the show will be relatable. This is something where we styled by Izzazu Salon, Spa, & Serata. can get people excited in a different “This must-see fashion show is an way about sustainability.” eclectic mix of Pittsburgh artists working Pittsburgh Earth Day: From Steel together to continue the awareness to Sustainable is a citywide celebraand practice of sustainability. Izzazu is tion of advancements made in sustainpleased to be a part of this important ability, technology, and innovation in annual event,” says Emilio Cornacchivarious sectors of people’s everyday one, one of the principals of Izzazu. lives. The series of events takes place The top four scoring designers will April 18-21.

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.MUSIC.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAUNA MILLER

MP 3 MONDAY >> THE LAMPSHADES Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free, and this week we’re also premiering a music video to go along with it. The song is “Always On” by The Lampshades, an acoustic number filled with melancholic, dreamy harmonies about fearing loneliness and falling into bad romantic habits as a result. Watch the meandering, warm video (featuring empty mall footage) and stream or download “Always On” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Our health Our environment Must-read news about our environment

www.ehn.org/pittsburgh Join the discussion. Sign up for a free weekly newsletter PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

21


.GAME REVIEW.

PRESS PLAY BY REBECCA ADDISON RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I EXPECT YOU TO DIE >> BY SCHELL GAMES WWW.SCHELLGAMES.COM

If you’ve always wanted to try one of those cool escape rooms, but have been hesitant because you (I) suffer from claustrophobia, try out this title by local game-developer Schell Games. I Expect You to Die is a virtual reality escape-the-room puzzle game where you play the role of an elite secret agent. Players are transported to a variety of locales where they are given a series of deadly situations they must overcome in a quest to defeat their nemesis Dr. Zor and the Zoraxis organization. Oh, and you’re equipped with a top secret device that gives you the power of telekinesis. The game is available on Oculus Rift, HTC VIVE and PlayStation®VR platforms, making for a truly immersive experience. So strap on your VR device and buckle up. In the first mission, you’re trapped in a car that’s trapped inside an airplane. Your mission is to drive the car off the plane, but first you have to find the key. Sounds easy right? Watch out for the dynamite. •

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CP PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON

Dinosoul’s Donny Donovan and Carolyn Hilliard

.MUSIC.

TOGETHERNESS BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

INOSOUL HAS been through a lot.

Most recently the band ended up having to record its latest record twice (the first attempt ran into some technical issues). But despite personnel changes and personal challenges, the members of the band pushed through to complete their debut full-length, Elephant. The 11 tracks combine to deliver a sonically enormous synth-popmeets-indie-rock record, filled with ethereal synths and vocals as well as personal journeying. Dinosoul is couple Donny Donovan (vocals/guitar) and Carolyn Hilliard (vocals, keys), joined by drummer Glenn Durham. The three come from different musical backgrounds, but the sound they create carefully blends all three of their distinct styles to form a dark pop energy. Eleven is a record that mostly consists of songs crafted by Donovan and Hilliard that were brought to the band, and some of those songs were written as long as four years ago. In the lead up to the release, Donovan has been discussing the songs a lot. “The more I talk about these songs, I realize that a lot are about our relationship; a lot are about society from a neutral stance. It’s more about a desire for people to connect rather than find difference and hate each other,” says Donovan. “Our music is about love, but it’s also about self-awareness and self-development.”

In an effort to bring that kind of inclusive, connected energy, the band is celebrating its release at Metta: A Healing Arts Community. It’s a space not typically used for shows, but the band wanted a space that would be airy, spiritually charged and alcoholfree. Donovan and Hilliard are sober and wanted to create an environment in which families could come together (kids tickets cost less) and where people could feel safe. The event will feature live painting, local artists and vendors, food from Relish and non-alcoholic specialty drinks.

DINOSOUL ELEVEN RELEASE PARTY WITH SWAMPWALK, SLOWDANGER, THOUSANDZZ OF BEEZ 8 p.m. Sat., April 21. Metta: A Healing Arts Community, 5118 Penn Ave, Garfield. $5-12. www.dinosoulmusic.com

“We started this band based on a vision that we saw, and we want to spread that vision to the world. I have an intention, a mission statement, that we say before each show that brings us together and reminds us of that vision,” says Hilliard. “We want people to connect and have a beautiful time.” “We want people to be present, meet new people,” adds Donovan. “We want to bring people together.”


GALLERY CRAWL Spring 2018 Friday, April 27 5:30 – 10 pm

in the Cultural District

FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENTS crawl after dark COVER CHARGES MAY APPLY

30+ events including:

#CrawlPGH

Wood Street Galleries Macular – Cycles Four room sized kinetic light installations, including three world premieres.

SPACE Marx@200 Features 25+ works by artists from around the world representing a diverse range of perspectives on Karl Marx.

Agnes R. Katz Plaza Steeltown Horns Pittsburgh’s premier instrumental funk band is playing powerful original and classic funky instrumentals and featuring a truly all star lineup.

crawl after dark Trust Arts Education Center Live performers, a teaser of one of farESH’s premiere events in Drummer vs DJ, and an exclusive Pop-Up Shop featuring collaborative items available only during the Crawl. 10 pm – 2 am

TRUS TARTS.ORG/Crawl PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

23


WHERE BUSINESS HAPPENS

WEDNESDA 9:30 A.M. - 9:30 P.M. Registration Desk Open 9:30 A.M. - 7:30 P.M. Business Networking Cafe Open 9:30 A.M. - 9:30 P.M. Pittsburgh Business Pitch Presentations and Voting

APRIL 25 & 26, 2018 David L. Lawrence Convention Center FIND A LIST OF ALL EXHIBITORS AT

✧ WWW.PITTSBURGHBUSINESSSHOW.COM ✧

10 A.M. - 9:30 P.M. Exhibitor Hall and Conference Open 10 A.M. - 9:30 P.M. Total Sports Enterprises - Junior Achievement Silent Auction 10:30 A.M. ✧ Dr. Casey Reason, Grand Canyon University – Leadership in the Workplace ✧ Susan Miller, Women’s Small Business Association – #MeToo and Sexism at Work: How Female Execs Overcome Challenges in the Workplace ✧ Bob Floreak, Acuity HR – The Role of Human Resources in Business Planning: Metrics, Measurements and Linking HR to Financial Objectives ✧ The PitchWerks Podcast - Scot MacTaggart – A fast, easy way to sharpen your tools each week in sales, business development, marketing product management or politics. ✧ How to Volunteer in the Classroom with Junior Achievement – Our Families: Join JA to learn first hand how you can empower young people to own their economic success by watching our volunteers teach the Junior Achievement curriculum in a classroom setting. 11 A.M. Darieth Chisolm, 50 Shades of Silence – Everyday Courage: Your Plan for Reinvention 11:30 A.M. Andrea Wetherwald, Improvising the Workplace – Fun Over Friction: The Secret Sauce for Powerful Impressive Teamwork 11:45 A.M The YaJAgoff Podcast – John Chamberlain and Rachael Rennebeck A podcast all about the unique people and things going on in Pittsburgh! 12 P.M. Business For Business Speed Networking Event – Registration Begins at 11:30 A.M. Presented by Pittsburgh North Regional Chamber of Commerce

SAVE

FREE ADMISSION

$79

Purchase Tickets at PittsburghBusinessShow.com Use Code CityPaper TICKETS COURTESY OF:

The Annual Pittsburgh Business Show Is a Woman-Owned Business and Is

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AY APRIL 25 1:00 P.M Podcasting B2B-to-YB – YaJAgoff, No BullSh!# Marketing and The Broadcast – Learn from the Podcasters about what podcasting is and how can it affect your marketing and PR strategy? 1:30 P.M. ✧ Bill Flanagan, Allegheny Conference on Community Development – Pittsburgh’s Great American Comeback – Lessons Learned in Leadership and Image Building ✧ Rob Costanza, Growth Coach 3 Rivers – Getting Strategic - Driving Success and Balancing Life ✧ James Julius, Visimo – Think Smarter, Grow Faster, and Increase the Bottom Line 2 P.M. ✧ Vanessa Dodds, Connections 4 Success – Accelerate Success with Business Alignment ✧ No Bull$h!# Marketing – Podcast – Dave Mastovich –The No BS Marketing Show is about creating a world free of BS marketing and full of bold solutions, big ideas, and messaging success. 2:30 P.M. ✧ Dr. Shellie Hipsky, Inspiring Lives Magazine – Inspiration Is Just a Story Away ✧ How to Volunteer in the Classroom with Junior Achievement – Our Community 3 P.M. ✧ Andrea Wetherwald, Improvising the Workplace – Fun Over Friction: The Secret Sauce for Powerful Impressive Teamwork ✧ Going Deep with Aaron Watson Podcast – a forum for having meaningful, deep conversations about the passions, fears and problems of people from all walks of life. Guests talk about entrepreneurship, sports, finance, comedy and lifestyle design. 3:30 P.M. ✧ Dan Harmon, Higher Images – The New Age of Local Digital Marketing: User Experience and Digital Knowledge Management ✧ Dr. Scott Miller, Edinboro University – Re-envisioning the MBA: Structure, Content, and Delivery ✧ Eric Davis, Elliott & Davis, P.C. – Using Service Contracts to Set Customer Expectations, Limit Liability, and Get Paid 4 P.M. Vanessa Dodds, Connections 4 Success – Cultivating a Workforce Pipeline of Skills and Efficiency 4:30 P.M. Dave Weber, Dollar Bank – The Bankability Factor 5:30 P.M. Business Choice Awards Ceremony – Join hundreds of Pittsburgh’s top business owners as they are honored at the Inaugural Business Choice Awards! 6:30 P.M. How to Volunteer in the Classroom with Junior Achievement – Our City 7:30 P.M. Celebrate Pittsburgh Business Networking Event – Join the Pittsburgh Business Show Exhibitors, the Business Choice Award Winners, Chambers of Commerce, Professionals and Entrepreneurs in a one-of-a-kind networking event with Moxie Events.

THURSDAY APRIL 26 7:30 A.M. - 3:30 P.M. Registration Desk Open 7:30 A.M. - 2:30 P.M. Business Networking Cafe Open 8 A.M. - 1:30 P.M. Pittsburgh Business Pitch Presentations and Voting 8 A.M. - 3:30 P.M. Exhibitor Hall and Conference Open 9 A.M. How to Volunteer in the Classroom with Junior Achievement – Our Region: Join JA to learn first hand how you can empower young people to own their economic success by watching our volunteers teach the Junior Achievement curriculum in a classroom setting. 9:30 A.M. ✧ Darieth Chisolm, Visibility and Media Strategist – The 5-Step Method and Formula to Making $5K+ a Day Hosting Workshops, Boot Camps, and Retreats. ✧ Sal Acosta, Landon and Acosta – Secrets to Buying or Selling a Business 10 A.M: Vanessa Dodds, Connections 4 Success – Accelerate Success with Business Alignment 10:30 A.M.: ✧ Joy Bufalini, Upgrade Your Business – Three Keys to Positioning Yourself as a Leader in Your Industry ✧ Dr. Denis Rudd, New Horizons – Office 365: The Cloud Beneath Your Wings ✧ Bob Floreak, Acuity HR – Compensation and Performance Management: Going Beyond the Performance Appraisal and Annual Compensation Plan 11 A.M. How to Volunteer in the Classroom with Junior Achievement – Our Nation 12 P.M. Business For Business Speed Networking Event – Registration Begins at 11:30 a.m. Presented by Pittsburgh North Regional Chamber of Commerce 1 P.M. How to Volunteer in the Classroom with Junior Achievement – Economics for Success 1:30 P.M. ✧ Jennifer Sikora, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – Talk Saves Lives: Suicide Prevention in the Workplace & Communities ✧ Alex Rutkowski, Higher Images – Converting Your Business’s Website Into a Customer Generation Engine ✧ David Maniet, Maniet FInancial Services – Investing in the New Normal ✧ Andrea Wetherwald, Improvising the Workplace – Fun Over Friction: The Secret Sauce for Powerful Impressive Teamwork 2 P.M. Junior Achievement of Western PA 2:30 P.M. ✧ Presentation of Charitable Contributions ✧ Presentation of Pittsburgh Business Pitch Winners

s a Show Supported by Pittsburgh Companies for Pittsburgh Companies.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

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.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ASTERS AND >> DISASTERS BY COME HOLY SPIRIT WATER WING RECORDS WWW.COMEHOLYSPIRIT1. BANDCAMP.COM

Come Holy Spirit is one of those bands whose sound has a distinct energy and vibration: Its grit, sinister dynamics and energetic heartbeat make it hard to forget. On its latest, Asters and Disasters, Come Holy Spirit sews together experimental punk, folk and no wave to create a heavy, mysterious quilt. “Human Animal” is a great introduction for those new to the band’s sound. It begins with a long, tense buildup laced with distortion and the entrancing, expressive vocals of bassist, organist and guitarist Gina Favano. The song is nearly nine minutes in length and packed with thoughtful details. From tense buildups to swampy, eerie instrumentals and explosive climaxes, Come Holy Spirit flexes its dynamic range. From the persistent and grimy “Essayons” to the gentle, bittersweet “S.O.L. Song” with organs and horns steering the instrumental melodies, Come Holy Spirit shows range. The band isn’t afraid to think outside the sonic box, and thus creates a mesmerizing album. •

Dance | Video | Music | Passion

www.attacktheatre.com/maybe April 19–26 | The Waterfront 26

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PHOTO COURTESY OF NETFLIX

Nicole Byer and Jacques Torres of Nailed It!

.SCREEN.

THE FUN OF FAILURE BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE INGREDIENTS for Netflix’s

new baking show, Nailed It!, are simple. Three amateur bakers attempt to recreate elaborate, exceedingly difficult cakes — gravitydefying structures, vibrant colors, tricky fondant work — and fail miserably. It’s hosted by comedian Nicole Byer, chocolatier Jacques Torres and a guest-judge-per-episode, who stifle their laughter (kinda) as the confectionary trainwrecks are revealed. The leastterrible contestant leaves with $10,000. If that premise sounds like American Idol audition-tier cruel, you should know it’s mostly not. The challenges are nearly impossible — any semblance of success is lauded and the baldly hilarious missteps are treated sympathetically. There’s a lot of equivocating: This looks like melted garbage but the frosting is delightful! Everybody’s pretty nice. Nailed It! taps into the well-worn reality-TV formula of allowing the audience to laugh with the subjects as much as they laugh at them. It’s not mean-spirited. The bakers seem as entertained by their mistakes as the judges. And the forced backstory-sappiness of most food show contestants is absent here. It’s very clear they know they’ll fail and that levity makes the whole thing easy to stomach. Chalk most of that up to Byer, an Upright Citizens Brigade alum, who splits her time dropping well-timed one-liners and mugging excessively at the camera. There’s a subtle mockery of the entire premise in every line she lands, but it’s never disingenuous and it’s always funny. Her shouting

“ya done!” at the close of every baking round makes me laugh uncontrollably every time. It should not be that funny. Torres plays the resident expert, padding the comedy with tidbits of baking advice and occasionally playing the role of French heartthrob (he’s sort of this show’s Paul Hollywood). The “Queen of cakes,” 87-year-old Sylvia Weinstock, steals most of the first episode as guestjudge, throwing back vodka and landing some killer quips. I missed her for the rest of the episodes.

EVERYBODY’S PRETTY NICE. The season finale is probably the strongest. Building on the self-satire and absurdity of the preceding five, this episode is the most untethered. The guest is comedian and director Jay Chandrasekhar (Super Troopers), who disappears for the bulk of the episode to pick up his kids and returns later with iced coffees for the judges. Later, the final challenge involves baking a cake in the shape of Donald Trump’s upper body. “Notice the puffy jowls, the orange skin-tone,” Byer advises. Nailed It! was an immediate success. There’s nothing cerebral about the show or its premise. The show was inspired by a meme of the same name, so it shouldn’t be a surprise that its sensibility is uncomplicated, silly and accessible. The only shocker here is that the final product is so sweet and satisfying. And lucky for us, season two is already on the way.


TOP 5

THINGS AL HOFF WON’T MISS ABOUT REVIEWING MOVIES BY AL HOFF // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE ELIXIR OF LOVE

Avengers Infinity

N0. 1 Watching screeners on a laptop with my name burned into the image. Double this for a sex scene.

N0. 2 “Healthy dining” at theatrical evening screenings: sneaking in sandwich bags of crackers, carrots, pieces of cabbage.

N0. 3 Wearing 3-D glasses over my glasses.

A comic love story “A Fellini-esque vision of scooters, cappuccino machines and champagne fountains, set on a sun-washed hotel terrace overlooking the sea...” -The Guardian

N0. 4 Endlessly explaining how lame most roles are for actresses, a.k.a. Achievement in “Worried Wife on the Phone.”

N0. 5 Avengers anything. After nearly 20 happy years at City Paper and 10,000,000 movies, Al Hoff has left the building. Regards to all!

Opens Saturday!

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PHOTO COURTESY OF INGRID SCHAFFNER

Members of the Art Labor collective study coffee herbarium specimens at Carnegie Museum of National History with Mason Heberling, postdoctoral research fellow

.ART.

INTERNATIONAL ARTS BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

O

NE independent exhibition-

maker, six art collectives and collaborations, 13 individual artists who use the pronoun “he” and 17 individual artists who use the pronoun “she.” That’s the breakdown of artists whose work will be included in the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018. The triennial event, which runs Oct. 13, 2018 to March 25, 2019 at the Carnegie Museum of Art, will feature artists from more than 25 nations including Austria, Bahamas, Cameroon, Cherokee Nation, Colombia, England, Germany, Ghana, India, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Navajo Nation, Nigeria, Nonuya Nation, Pakistan, Palestine, Scotland, Senegal, Switzerland, United States of America and Vietnam. The 32 artists and art collectives will present works in a range of mediums including sculpture, installation, photography, drawing, painting, film and performance art. “The International is sort of about checking in on the mediums of contemporary art,” says Ingrid Schaffner, curator of the project. “The International isn’t an exhibition. The International is a curatorial project.” Schaffner had worked as chief curator of the exhibition program at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania since 2000 before taking over the International in 2015. Her work on the project began with a series of research trips with five curator colleagues who served as her traveling and thinking companions: Magalí Arriola, Doryun Chong, Ruba Ka-

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trib, Carin Kuoni and Bisi Silva. “It can be sort of overwhelming to think, ‘how am I going to cover the world,’” Schaffner says. “So I decided to invite five colleagues, whose work I admire, but who I’d never met.” As a result of those trips, Schaffner crafted her vision for the International which invites visitors to explore what it means to be “international” in present day. The museum itself is a major component of the project as it is designed to emphasize the importance of enjoying art in the company of other people.

CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL Can’t wait until October? Programming has already begun. Visit 2018.carnegieinternational.org/ programs for more information.

“Our museum is referred to as the ‘immense building,’” says Schaffner. “The International is about really bringing people into the world that is this museum.” Highlights of the International include a collaboration between novelist Han Kang and filmmaker IM Heungsoon; an exhibition-within-the-exhibition by Koyo Kouoh that interacts with pieces from the museum’s collection; and an interpretation by Lenka Clayton and Jon Rubin of rejected works from the archives of the International dating back to the 1800s. (The International was established in 1869.) The project will also feature International alumni who will be bringing back previous works to the museum.


PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER

The White Chip

.PLAY REVIEW.

REHAB WORK

BY HARRY KLOMAN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

O

NCE UPON a time, the playwright/director Sean Daniels got a good review in The New York Times. But even that couldn’t persuade him to stop destroying his life with alcohol. In his autobiographical play, The White Chip, staged by City Theatre at Lester Hamburg Studio, Daniels (portrayed by Kyle Cameron) tells his story in a virtual monologue, with two other actors — called #1 and #2 in the program — serving as parents, friends, lovers, colleagues, and rehab counselors, among others. They also keep score on a chalkboard: For every good thing Sean discovers about drinking to excess, “Pro” gets a slash, and for every bad thing, one point for “Con.” Spoiler alert: Pro loses. Daniels grew up the son of lapsed Mormons, so when he finally enters rehab — after losing a prized job at a theater in Kentucky — he chooses a rather Jesus-y place. It doesn’t work. Then, he gets counseling from Jews, who teach him about the science of alcoholism. This stint sticks, and in a mercifully short mini-lecture (and final jab at religion), he says, “How many didn’t make it because we lead with God and not with science?”

THE WHITE CHIP continues through Sun., May 6. Lester Hamburg Studio, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-44. citytheatre.culturaldistrict.org

The production is handsomely constructed, making terrific use of myriad sound effects and musical riffs, all impeccably timed. The stage floor itself is a giant chalkboard, which Daniels uses to document moments in his life, and the wall at the back of the stage contains doodles, aphorisms and the molecular structure of alcohol. Daniels approaches his story with a wit that ranges from the playful to the sardonic, and director Sheryl Kaller sees no reason to contradict him: Her fast-paced, broadly humored, genially crowd-pleasing production only quiets down occasionally for touches of drama and self-discovery. But she (or Daniels) might have chosen a more nuanced approach that doesn’t force each scene to be one thing or the other. This sometimes leaves us wondering whether Sean’s rapid-fire horror stories aren’t as much hyperbole as fact. We clearly witness this all from Sean’s point of view, which may explain why Daina Michelle Griffith and Daniel Krell, as #1 and # 2, usually perform in broad (and occasionally irritating) ways that border on the cartoonish. Only for a moment at the end, when Sean and his mother get and stay sober, does #1 become a woman who seems real. Cameron — lean, bearded, energetic — is relentlessly agreeable as Sean, and when he’s allowed to tamp it down, you sense that he could have handled the more complex version of Sean that might have been.

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.MUSIC.

RECORD STORE SHAKE-UP BY MIKE SHANLEY AND MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“W

OW, YOU DON’T see that very often.” I hear that frequently when someone catches me with my Discman. But since people are still releasing CDs — and I try to keep up with new releases — I’m in no rush to throw out my portable device. Of course, when I had a bag of freshly purchased albums under my arm, the comment used to be, “Do they still make records?” They still do. And now things have come full circle: Vinyl is back, according to the masses. CDs are out. Streaming is the other way to go. But that’s a story for another day. Sat., April 21 is Record Store Day, an event created 11 years ago to salute independent record stores and to generate interest in them with a slew of new vinyl releases made available that day.

(Never mind the fact that for some of us, every day is Record Store Day, really.) The seeds of this story were actually planted late last year, when guitarist Nels Cline went off on a tangent during a conversation with me about the problems he’s faced when releasing music on vinyl. So to mark the event, City Paper included Cline’s thoughts and we also picked the brains of some folks involved in the making and selling of records. – Mike Shanley

RECORD STORE DAY Sat., April 21. www.recordstoreday.com WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Getting the records to eager listeners JOHN VILLEGAS (Cruel Noise Records, Polish Hill)

Record Store Day is a contentious event for stores around the country. Although intended to be an event that generates record store sales, RSD has a tendency to jam up record pressing plants’ work on new releases in order to press special re-releases that end up languishing in stores for months or years.

5500 Walnut Street, Shadyside

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And most record stores have to pay a fee to even be able to order certain titles. CP chatted with John Villegas of Cruel Noise Records in Polish Hill to talk about alternatives to RSD and alternatives to records in general. – Meg Fair

I think I’m the only place in Pittsburgh that actively buys and sells cassettes. I sell tons of them, because I think people know they can come here and find cassettes they actually want and not dig through trash hoping for some little treasure. Active bands like to put them out because it has a much quicker turnaround, and that ties into RSD. Huge labels buy blocks of time at record pressing factories and sometimes won’t even use them. They just want


A customer browses records at the Attic Record Store in Millvale

it in case they need to repress the first Boston Record, which nobody needs to repress because you can find them anywhere for a dollar. But they want to sell it to you for $25 because they know their industry is doomed and they’re trying to do whatever they can to save it…If people can benefit from Record Store Day, that’s great for them, but it’s definitely a cash grab for a dying industry that I don’t support.

people that are buying the records. A lot of the people that grew up with records are the people that are still buying CDs. And a lot of the people that are buying records didn’t grow up buying records, or they didn’t know what records were they were growing up. So it’s a younger and younger audience that are getting into it. That’s another reason why I don’t believe it’s a bubble, because of the age category of people that are buying it.

JEFF GALLAGHER

Vinyl – Good for the ears, good for the plant

(Juke Records, Bloomfield) My plan, when I bought the store, was that the vinyl would be in the center part of the store and the CDs would ring [the surrounding walls]. It didn’t take very long before I realized that that we were bringing in CDs that wouldn’t ever sell. My only regret is that I didn’t get out of the CD business an hour after I bought the store. The quality [of vinyl] has been pretty good. That’s something that’s very risky for the store because it’s rare when I can return a record, because we take back defective records and I eat those [financially] for the most part. I think as more new presses come on line in the states, that the quality will get better still.

FRED BOHN, JR. (The Attic, Millvale) The record business — people keep saying it’s a bubble. It’s past the point of it being a bubble, and not just in the United States. It’s worldwide. Of course it’s not all records, there’s still easy listening [records that aren’t in demand]. It’s young

NELS CLINE (improvisational guitarist in various projects, also a member of Wilco) Having grown up with records, loving them and working in a record store for 10 years and having a ton of vinyl here, I love it. But I also feel like this sort of vinyl resurgence, as it were, is not all that convincing to me. All the [pressing] plants are backed up, and what’s their incentive to have great quality control? Not really that much because any records that are defective, you used to be able to [return them]. They would just melt them down and recycle them, which we’re not doing now. So given the fact that vinyl is a planet-killing substance — it’s extremely toxic and awful for the planet — I’m looking sideways at this vinyl resurgence. On the Lovers record [Cline’s 2016 album on Blue Note], we calculated the carbon imprint and carbon offset credits, and not just vinyl but all the new formats. And nobody who wrote about Lovers wrote about the carbon offset credit. There wasn’t one thing!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

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Terrell Rogers in Jennifer Archibald’s “Orenda”

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ATIVE AMERICAN mysticism, a nod to “Furry fandom” and a lamentation over the loss of imagination, all play a role in Conservatory Dance Company’s Spring Dance Concert, happening April 19 – 22 at Point Park University’s George Rowland White Performance Studio. The annual student production will once again feature works by some of today’s brightest contemporary choreographers. Cincinnati Ballet Resident Choreographer Jennifer Archibald’s new work, “Orenda,” takes its name from the invisible power the Iroquois believe flows through all animate and inanimate natural objects. The 11-minute piece for 15-dancers to music by composers Roger Goula and Serge Houppin, was inspired by the quote from German-American philosopher Walter Kaufmann, “Life ceases to be so oppressive: we are free to give our own lives meaning and purpose, free to redeem our suffering by making something of it.” The work’s movement, says Archibald, blends urban aesthetics with classical technique and uses a lot of physical partnering with the dancers using their own life experiences to personalize Kaufmann’s quote. Polka music, 100 black balloons and two “furry” animal heads — while that may sound like the ingredients for a wild night out, they are instead some of what’s found in Dark Circles Contemporary Dance founder/artistic director Joshua Peugh’s world-premiere work, “Black Balloons.” The 15-minute piece for 13-

dancers uses a mish-mash of Pennsylvania kitsch, as seen through the eyes of Peugh, to explore sensations of “heavy lightness or light heaviness.” “Parade of Exuberant Things” is Point Park assistant professor of ballet Matthew Powell’s latest creation for CDC. Powell says he was inspired by a perceived loss of imagination in our society. The 30-minute work for 19-dancers and set to composer John Adams’ “Fearful Symmetries,” aims to let audience members explore their own imaginations as to the meaning behind the work’s series of vignettes.

SPRING DANCE CONCERT PRESENTED BY CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY 8 p.m., Thu., April 19, Fri., April 20; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Sat. April 21; 2 p.m., Sun., April 22. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. $20-24. www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Rounding out the program’s offerings will be Sidra Bell’s “wreckage.” No stranger to Pittsburgh dance audiences who have seen several of her works in recent years, Bell, by phone from North Carolina, describes her new 23-minute work for CDC as being “like a mural whose poetic landscape features images of falling and falling apart.” Danced to a layered original score by Pittsburgh’s slowdanger, the work for 11-dancers uses Bell’s signature movement language that she describes as being “technically virtuosic and architectural from root to tip.”


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WARRENDALE. $25-38. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest The Cringe.

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$10-12. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Ehiorobo, Lumariia & Brittney Chante.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN

From left: Sarah Pidgeon, Timiki Salinas and Will Brosnahan

PLAY REVIEW.

TIMELY MATERIAL BY TED HOOVER // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

N

EARLY A decade before his 1993 Broadway explosion with Angels in America, Tony Kushner debuted A Bright Room Called Day and even here his enormous imagination and intellect are apparent. The show’s never been seen in Pittsburgh, a situation rectified by a remarkable Carnegie Mellon University production directed by Jed Allen Harris. As befits a Kushner script, Bright Room contains two plays; the bulk of the evening is set in the 1932 Berlin apartment of film actress Agnes Eggling. Her group of friends is, like her, liberal and mostly Communist. The Weimar Republic is collapsing and they are forced to confront the rise of Hitler, a man so comically villainous that nobody on the left has taken him seriously. (Hmmm, parallels much?)

A BRIGHT ROOM CALLED DAY continues through Sat., April 28. Philip Chosky Theater, Carnegie Mellon campus, Oakland. $10-33. drama.cmu.edu

The other play features monologues delivered by a woman named Zillah Katz; her intercut scenes are set in the mid1980s (when the play was first written) and as she experiences the murderous Reagan administration, she outlines for us comparisons between the rise of the Republican right and the Third Reich. Yes, it’s heavy handed, polemical and unabashedly biased. And Kushner cer-

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tainly pounds home his point. But here’s the thing — when so much film, television and theater is small stories about small people, the molten lava-shower of ideas and theatrical brilliance Kushner parades before us is mesmerizing. American theater is resolutely non-political so it’s electrifying to grapple with such huge political ideas. I probably need to see the play several more times to understand some of Kushner’s more abstruse dialectics. But considering how compelling this CMU production is, that wouldn’t be a bad thing. Harris, amazingly, manages to both honor the extravagance of Kushner’s imagination while focusing on the essential need for storytelling: I suspect directing this show must have been like bull-riding. Sarah Pidgeon makes the emotional and intellectual paralysis of Agnes achingly real and Kennedy McMann as an opium addicted fellow film actress is droll, bitchy and desperately sad. Aleyse Shannon brings a great deal of humanity to Zillah’s discourses. And playing two men who are, in different ways, rendered powerless in the face of evil, Will Brosnahan and Timiki Salinas score mightily. And then there’s Clayton Barry as an ersatz Mephistopheles. Kushner ends the first half of Bright Day with a demon dropping in for a visit (like the Angel does in Angels in America). It’s the most thrilling role in the piece and Barry’s performance is breathtaking.


CALENDAR APRIL 18-25

PHOTO COURTESY OF FRIENDS OF THE RIVERFRONT

^ Sun., April 22: Riverfronts Naturally Earth Day Cleanup

THURSDAY APRIL 19 MUSIC Hop Hop’s latest single “Scratch” is a fiery, liberating anthem that begs to be danced to. The Buffalo-based rapper is sharp-witted and honest — she can spit bars about staying in to watch Golden Girls (“The Girls”), the struggles of being biracial (“Swiss Miss”) or schooling scummy misogynistic dudes (“Domination”). And each hits with power. Tonight she’ll be joined at the Mr. Roboto Project

with Pittsburgh’s movement-based, inspirational rapper and poet Brittney Chantele, alt-hip-hop artist I, The Conflict and groovy rapper Akono Miles. Meg Fair 7 p.m. Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. www.therobotoproject.com

MUSIC There’s one thing for certain about the gig at Mr. Smalls tonight. The performer is never going to give you up — no sir, he’s never going to let you down; never going to turn around and desert you. Yes, Rick Astley himself will be bringing his talents to Millvale for a night in

celebration of his musical career. But don’t kid yourself. “Never Gonna Give You Up” is a delightfully fun classicturned-meme, but Astley has been cranking out hits, including a dozen on his successful 2016 release 50 alone. Don your dancing shoes. MF 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $30. www.mrsmalls.com

DANCE With the aim of highlighting the Staycee Pearl dance project and Soy Sos’ performance work, worx will act as a concert of variety — featuring excerpts from sol., a new soulful movement and

sound experience. Sol. is an experiment in blending late-1950s to mid-1970s rhythms in an upbeat and funky presentation. Staycee Pearl dancers will be vibing and grooving to music expertly mixed and curated by Soy Sos. The concert, which opens tonight with an encore presentation Fri., April 20, will also feature ...on being..., a contemporary exploration in African Diaspora and the conversation about blackness and race, along with excerpts from OCTAVIA and circlePOP. Lauren Ortego 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $20 ($10 for students). www.pearlartsstudios.com CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK SIMPSON PHOTOGRAPHY

^ Fri., April 20: Cocktails & Conservation

FRIDAY

APRIL 20

will be on hand with historical drinks. Celine Roberts 6 p.m. 24 Maryland Ave., Millvale. $100-1,941. vankamurals.org/ cocktails-and-conservation-2018

party hosted by DJ Nugget. You don’t want to miss this party. LO 6:30 p.m. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. $50-225. www.citytheatrecompany.org

create her pieces; and Jon Coulter, an illustrator of more than 30 surgery books. LO 7 p.m. Carpatho-Rusyn Society, 915 Dickson St., Munhall. Free. www.c-rs.org

DRINKS

STAGE

ART

MUSIC

The legacy of Croatian artist Maxo Vanka is painted across the walls of Millvale’s St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church. The murals depict faith, social justice and the lives of immigrants in 25 panels that Vanka called his “gift to America.” Buy a ticket to one night of revelry at Cocktails & Conservation to help support the preservation of these murals and enjoy live entertainment, a cocktail reception, an art auction and a program by local historian and author, Brian Butko. Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails

Join City Theatre tonight as they celebrate the 2017-2018 season and their donors with their annual benefit, The New Do! at Heinz Field’s East Club Lounge. They’ll have everything from the classic silent auction to mystery bags to the Laughing Hat Photo Booth. After dinner, the Robert M. Frankel Awards, honoring the late Robert M. Frankel, will be given to members of the community who have shown outstanding commitment to supporting the theater and the creation of new plays. Following the awards ceremony will be a dance

In their inaugural exhibition, the Carpatho-Rusyn Society presents Four Artists Walk into a Church. Featuring four artists with varying styles and subject matters, the exhibition opens tonight and will run through May 19. Though their direct subjects are differing, all draw upon the same inspiration — life and vitality in their painted forms. The artists include Michael Walter, whose paintings focus on geology and current events; Jana Houskova, an artist specializing in realistic portraits; Janet Carlisle, who uses transformative cutting and slashing to

The Warhol’s Sound Series is bringing two powerhouse songwriters to the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall tonight. The headliner is the ethereal, brilliant Julien Baker whose cherished 2017 album Turn Out the Lights nestled her even further into the hearts of music critics and dedicated followers alike. I dare you to listen to Baker’s catalog without tearing up; if you can, you’re definitely a robot and not a human being. Baker will be joined by indie rock wizard Tancred, whose music is vulnerable and fun at the same time. It’ll be a magical,

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA MARTIN

^ Thu., April 19: Hop Hop

spiritual experience for all who attend. MF 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-20. www.warhol.org

FILM Mark out the whole weekend for Reel Q’s Pittsburgh Underground Film Festival (PUFF), a program celebrating the queer community with films by women and people of color, at the Melwood Screening Room, in Oakland. But tonight, it’s the kick-off at Regent Square Theater with Idol Worship, an uncensored stage show combining cabaret and film, and featuring a pair of underground luminaries: longtime John Waters collaborator Mink Stole, and filmmaker and drag queen Peaches Christ. Also part of PUFF: a Jellyfish dance party at P-Town, on Sat., April 21, and on Sun., April 22, a screening of Expanding Gender: Youth Out Front, short documentaries that explore the identities of trans and gender-expansive youth and young adults. Al Hoff 8:30 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. $15-45. www.reelq.org/puff

Pittsburgh. Gooski’s has tasty food too for your inevitable case of the munchies. Happy 4/20, y’all. MF 9 p.m. 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $5. 412-681-1658

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^ Fri., April 20: Idol Worship, at PUFF

SATURDAY APRIL 21

MUSIC

GAMING

Gather up your finest greenery and water bottle (hydration is important!) and get ready to spend your evening in a haze of sludgy, dark rock ‘n’ roll up at Gooski’s. Find your brain tickled and mesmerized by avant punk rock outfit Night Vapor, as well as Urns, a doom-drenched sludge rock band. For a deep tissue brain massage, enjoy the noisy, technical grunge post-rock of Derider, one of my favorite bands to watch in

Are you a Super Smash Bros. pro? Do you regularly beat your friends in head-to-head matches on Street Fighter IV? If so, head down to the Pittsburgh Retro Gaming Convention and face off in one of their tournaments this weekend. The annual event celebrates all things retro gaming with a heavy dose of nostalgia for those classic titles from the 1990s. The event will feature vendors, contests and panel discussions. There will also be live

Served fresh from CP Marketing

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performances by Danimal Cannon, Dethlehem and Klaymore. The two-day event starts today. Proceeds from the event benefit the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and the Children’s Miracle Network. Rebecca Addison 10 a.m. Ace Hotel, 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. $12. pittsburghretrogaming.com

KIDS Calling all new and expecting moms. Bloom Pittsburgh 2018 is here for all of your parenting needs. At this expo, guests will have the chance to learn about the joys of motherhood from a group of experts and receive some much-needed pampering. Hosted by the Pittsburgh Moms Blog, this event will give guests the opportunity to meet other moms and local businesses catering to parents and families. Have your picture taken by a professional photographer at the bump station or enjoy a mini massage. Why not do both? RA 12 p.m. Wexford Health + Wellness Pavilion, 12311 Perry Highway, Wexford. $15. pittsburgh.citymomsblog.com

FESTIVAL Come join friends and neighbors in Schenley Park for this year’s Wilkins Block Party. Every year this music and arts festival features local artists and musicians playing for a good cause. Come get down to Jasiri X, Beauty Slap, Cousin Boneless and others. Take a break from dancing to play some games on the video game bus, browse the artists market or get some body paint. Craft beer and food trucks will be on site. All of the proceeds benefit 1Hood Media. CR 1-10 p.m. Vietnam Veterans Pavilion, Oakland. Free (Wristbands available with $5 donation). www.wilkinsblockparty.com

COMEDY Everyone has secrets or embarrassing stories they’d never dream of telling

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BACHMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

^ Sat., April 21: The Elixir of Love

anyone. But Risk! True Tales, Boldly Told proves these stories make for the best kind of entertainment. The live show, hosted monthly in New York and Los Angeles has featured guests like Janeane Garofalo, Lisa Lampanelli, Kevin

Nealon, Margaret Cho, Marc Maron, Sarah Silverman, Lili Taylor, Rachel Dratch and Andy Borowitz. Hosted by Kevin Allison of the TV sketch comedy troupe, The State, this award-winning live show comes to Pittsburgh tonight. Risk! Live

in Pittsburgh promises to feature everything listeners love about the Risk! podcast with a night of “hilarious, jaw-dropping and gut wrenching stories.” RA 8 p.m. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-20. risk-show.com


STAGE What’s more exciting than a story about unrequited affection and a love potion from a mysterious stranger? Tonight at the Benedum Center, the Pittsburgh Opera presents The Elixir of Love, a tale of Nemorino, who has fallen for a wealthy woman totally out of his league. After taking a potion from a medicine man, Nemorino finds himself being the point of attraction for all of the ladies in the village. To add to the fun, Wigle Whiskey will be providing their very own free samples of an Elixir of Love before the show. So come on and see what a little love potion can do. The shows runs through April 29. LO 8 p.m. 237 7th St., Downtown. $6.75-159.75. www.pittsburghopera.org

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THURSDAY Garfield Community Farm Volunteering

LIKE US ON ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK

5:30-8:30 p.m. 509 Wicklow St., Garfield. www.facebook.com/ GarfieldCommunityFarm

@PittsburghCityPaper

FRIDAY

Keep up to date on the latest news and events in the city.

Paint the Square Green 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Market Square, Downtown. pittsburghearthday.org

SATURDAY Pittsburgh Earth Day Food Truck Festival PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF ASYLUM

^ Sun., April 22: Jeffrey Bolden

SUNDAY

11 a.m.-2 p.m. Smithfield Street across from the Oliver Building, Downtown. pittsburghearthday.org

SUNDAY

APRIL 22

Earth Day Clean-Up in South Side Park with SCA Conserve

GREEN South Side gets a bum rap as a neighborhood dedicated entirely to partying, but smart folks know it’s also home to some of Pittsburgh’s finest river-adjacent trails and parks. Kick off your Earth Day by redding up the Three Rivers Heritage Trail and Water Trail by South Side Riverfront Park. Friends of the Riverfront and REI will provide all the bags and gloves and whatnot, so all you gotta do is get yourself there (and maybe bring some sunscreen). Alex Gordon 9 a.m. Three Rivers Heritage Trail, South Side. Free (duh). friendsoftheriverfront.org

GREEN There are surely many ways to spend Earth Day in Pittsburgh this year. You could volunteer your time to a community beautification project, join a tree planting initiative or commune with nature during a hike deep into the woods. Or, you could get your grub on at the Breakfast in Bed:

10 a.m.-2 p.m. Greeley Street, South Side. www.thesca.org/earthday-blog

MONDAY Sembène Film Festival: Taking Root 7 p.m. City of Asylum, North Side. www.alphabetcity.org

TUESDAY Natural Soapmaking with Apothecary Muse 6:30 p.m. Workshop PGH DIY School, Garfield. www.workshoppgh.com

WEDNESDAY Didgeridoo Journey Meditation 7:30 p.m. Village Center for Holistic Therapy, Glenshaw. www.facebook.com/VillageTherapy

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^ Mon., April 23: Bit Brigade

Planet Organic brunch at the Mattress Factory. The event, sponsored by Green Mountain Energy and presented by the Factory Fellows, will include breakfast bites and sorbet mimosas. And lest you think this event celebrating spring won’t satisfy your environmental yearnings, there will be eco-friendly DIY projects and installation art. RA 11 a.m. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. $30. www.mattress.org

soundtrack — but this is not one to miss. Dethlehem and Greywalker open. AG 7 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10. spiritpgh.com

READING Jeffrey Bolden is a motorcyclist on the road of life. So says his biography on City of Asylum’s website. The Chatham University student is known for his stage presence at readings around the city and tonight he’ll bring his talents to Alphabet City for this month’s Free Association Reading Series, an evening of intimate readings with local writers. The series is co-curated by local author Pat Hart and Chatham professor Marc Nieson and was established to highlight emerging Pittsburgh writers of prose, poetry and non-fiction. RA 5 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. www.alphabetcity.com

MONDAY APRIL 23 MUSIC The land of Hyrule (home of Princess Zelda, Link, Dark Link etc ...) lands in Pittsburgh tonight at Spirit. Bit Brigade, a five-piece outfit from Athens, Ga. dedicated to bringing the soundtracks of 8-bit Nintendo games to life on stage, will perform the soundtrack for The Legend of Zelda live. Joining them will be a consummate gamer playing the Nintendo game on a big screen. The band is best known for its Mega Man covers — to be fair, a killer game

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC RYAN ANDERSON

^ Tue., April 24: Branford Marsalis

TUESDAY APRIL 24 MUSIC Branford Marsalis is a certified Jazz Master according to the National Endowment for the Arts, in addition to being a three-time Grammy Award-winner. He’s spent time as the music director of the Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and he’s also toured with Sting, collaborated with the Grateful Dead, Harry Connick Jr. and Bruce Hornsby — no big deal. The composer, musician, bandleader and visionary saxophonist blends his skills in the worlds of jazz and classical to create a mesmerizing live show, a show that you can witness for yourself tonight at the August Wilson Center. MF 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown $58.25. www.trustarts.org •


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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Uber Technologies, Inc. has MULTIPLE POSITIONS open in Pittsburgh, PA for the following:

Software Engineer (Ref#18MARSWPITT) Dsgn/archtct, dev &/or test SW apps using Uber’s tech stack. Refer to Ref# & mail resume to Uber Technologies, Inc, Attn: A. Aldrich, 685 Market St, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94105

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED IT SYSTEMS ANALYST

HELP WANTED IT SYSTEMS ANALYST

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks IT Testing & Quality Analyst to work in Pittsburgh, PA, to plan, develop, analyze, & invoke critical sftwr engnrng processes by prfrmng data analysis & identifying risks & key process issues. Apply at https://careers. highmarkhealth.org, using search term J119748.

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks IT Systems Analyst to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to provide app. development services & supplemental specs for new apps. Will analyze change req’ts/ enhancements in existing apps. thru close collab. w/ customer/partner/bus. areas to identify app. needs, project specs, & cost sheet analysis. Apply at https:// careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J119451.

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks IT Systems Analyst to work in Pittsburgh, PA & to provide app. development services & supplemental specs for new apps. Will also analyze change req’ts/ enhancements in existing app thru close collaboration w/customer/partner/bus. areas to identify app. needs, project specs, & cost sheet analysis. Apply at https:// careers.highmarkhealth.org, using search term J119742.

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HELP WANTED DATA REPORTING ANALYST

HM Health Solutions Inc. seeks Data Modeling Ana-

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Familylinks Interview Day - Come work with us! Familylinks is hiring direct care Teacher/Counselors at our youth residential facilities in Plum, Verona, Uptown, McKeesport and Wilkinsburg. Opportunities include working with males and females between the ages of 10 and 21 with a mental health diagnosis. Hourly rates from $11.20 to $15.00 per hour based on location and education. Applicants must be at least 21 years old, have a valid driver’s license and access to transportation to and from the job site. Act 33, 34 and FBI clearances are required upon hire and applicants will be required to have a pre-employment drug screen and physical exam. If you’re looking for an opportunity at a nonprofit that helps families across western Pennsylvania, Familylinks is the place for you!

HELP WANTED DATA MODELING ANALYST

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ART Department

Pittsburgh City Paper is seeking a Graphic Designer to join its Art Department. Qualified candidate must possess: • Strong communication and organizational skills. • Strong design skills with extensive knowledge of InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator. • Ability to work in a fast-paced, deadline oriented atmosphere. City Paper offers paid vacation, medical benefits and 401K. Applicants should send resume and design samples to: Kevin Shepherd Pittsburgh City Paper 650 Smithfield St. Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Or via e-mail to: kshep@pghcitypaper.com No phone calls please. • Pittsburgh City Paper is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Familylinks is an Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

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get your yoga on!

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ACROSS

1. Word on one of a pair of coffee mugs 5. Homophone of “yours,” to some 9. Setting for Van Gogh’s “Cafe Terrace at Night” 14. Follower of Lollipop, Marshmallow, and Nougat, in Android version names 15. Waimea Valley island 16. “The Neon Bible” author 17. Poker player’s change in behavior 18. Mockery of a Native gathering? 20. Islamic ruler 22. Bad note collector 23. Big racket 24. Poem about ancient wars, perhaps 25. Michael’s “We Are the World” co-writer 27. Obey 28. Quick clique 30. Boolean logic word 31. Dr. ___ Hunt (Kevin McKidd’s “Grey’s Anatomy” role) 32. Chocolatehued heifers wax obsequious? 36. Cauliflower ___ (rugby player’s problem) 37. Cosmopolitan folk: Abbr. 38. Overly ornate sports program that

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involves pinning? 45. Pre-1917 leader 47. “We Love Logistics” co. 48. Affluent Minneapolis suburb 49. Treat squeaks 50. Highlight, in a way 52. Touring band’s wheels 53. Target of early2000s UN inspections 54. Middle East Strip 55. Thumbs-up alternative 57. Schnauzer’s snappy comeback? 60. Daughter of Rhea 61. Electrolysis bit 62. Morales of “Paid in Full” 63. ___ League 64. ___ Montgomery (star of the WNBA’s Atlanta Dream) 65. Taken in 66. Ready for anything

DOWN

1. Straightening implement 2. Bookworm’s gizmo 3. Menu word meaning “stuffed” 4. Songs sans backing 5. Dinosaur in Mario games 6. Dentist’s chair utterance 7. “Where do we go from here?” 8. School breaks 9. Heaps

10. Time for fisticuffs 11. Despicable 12. Heroine in Kay Thompson books 13. Affixed, as buttons 19. Hang (around with) 21. Two-dimensional 26. Voice actress in “Isle of Dogs” 27. Searched pseudoscientifically 29. Says “shit” 33. ___-Mags (punk band) 34. Hardly any 35. Trade publication that publishes TV ratings 38. Trump impersonator

39. BuzzFeed fare 40. Elevate 41. Key near 1 42. Mediterranean resort area 43. See the point of Theo Epstein? 44. Superfan 45. U-Haul attachment 46. Nina whose autobiography was “I Put a Spell on You” 50. Corn maze cry 51. Go to check the mail, say 54. No longer in stock 56. Floor covering type 58. Emo vibe 59. Glaswegian’s “Get outta here” LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 18-25, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Background: I, a 21-year-old male, enjoy rear play. I’ve also had constipation problems all my life. Question: I saw my doctor recently, and he tried to link my sexual activities to my constipation. My understanding was that there was no causal relationship, assuming no serious injuries occur. Is there something I don’t know? Was my doctor just trying to be helpful?

not blamed on any type of anal sexual activity,” said Dr. Shalit. Finally, your doctor was misinformed, which is not helpful. If you don’t feel comfortable telling your doctor EVERYTHING you’re doing “down there,” you can find a new doctor — one you can breathe, relax, and open up to — under “find a provider” at GLMA.org.

FEARING INNER SANCTUM TARNISHED

I’m a 35-year old straight male, engaged to my girlfriend of eight years. While we have a good sex life, she often won’t let me give her oral. When she does, she enjoys it and easily climaxes. But her higher brain functions get in the way, as she has internalized our culture’s body shaming. She has likened me “sticking my nose down there” to “sticking my head in the toilet.” Whenever I mention it, she reacts with a mood killing “eww.” But she says she would enjoy it if she could let me. I can’t make heads or tails of it! When we have sex, she cuts foreplay short and gets straight to penetration. Since she is not yet fully aroused and wet, we use lube and I climax long before she does. She feels pleasure and moans, but she really does not value her own orgasm. But I do, and I miss seeing her climax! I wish I could help her overcome her body issues — but when I “use my words,” she feels pressured and can’t relax. I am at a loss. Please help!

“There are many myths about anal sex, but this is the first time I’ve heard this one,” said Dr. Peter Shalit, a physician in Seattle and a member of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. These are safe activities “provided that both the top and bottom are sober at the time,” said Dr. Shalit. “It does not cause damage or constipation or any other type of bowel problem. The same applies to other anal sexual activities including anal receptive intercourse and use of toys for anal stimulation — again assuming this is voluntary on the part of the bottom and that both partners are not under the influence of mind-altering drugs during sexual activity.” While many people engage in anal play while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and most emerge unscathed, uninfected, and un-constipated, getting wasted before these activities is not a best practice. Despite the fact that millions of people safely engage in anal play, many people believe that anal play does irreparable harm to the anus — or the soul — and that sadly includes many doctors. “There is a misconception that these activities can cause damage by stretching or tearing the tissue, when actually the anus is very elastic and much of the ‘permission to enter’ actually involves intentional relaxation of the muscles by the bottom” and not force applied by the top, Dr. Shalit affirmed. “If a person suffers from constipation, that should be addressed as its own problem and

YOU COULD GO WITH A GRAND, ROMANTIC, AND SLIGHTLY DEMENTED GESTURE.

LOVES INHIBITED CARNAL KILLJOY

You could go with a grand, romantic, and slightly demented gesture: clean the toilet and then stick your head in it to make a point about cleanliness making all the difference — and since the vagina is a self-cleaning organ and your girlfriend showers, you should be able to stick your nose down there. Or you could use your words — but don’t use them when you’re about to have sex. Do it at a neutral time (a time when you can’t have sex), so

she doesn’t feel like you’re attempting to initiate by raising the subject. First, ask her if she enjoyed oral when she allowed you to go down on her. If oral is pleasurable for her when she can allow you to go down on her, figure out what was different about those times. Had she just stepped out of the shower? Was she a little tipsy or high? Did you go down there without asking, which didn’t give her higher brain functions/inhibitions a chance to kick in? (Please note: Not asking isn’t an option for new partners or new moves.) If you can figure out what worked and why, you won’t have to stick your head in the toilet to prove a point. My boyfriend and I just got back from Berlin, and we had a great time — until the last night. There was a dark room in the basement of this gay bar, and my boyfriend wanted to check it out and I did not. We are monogamous for now — I’m open to opening things up down the road — and I didn’t see the point of going down there. I told him that drunk in a gay bar at 3 a.m. wasn’t the right time to open up our relationship, and he angrily insisted he wasn’t trying to do that. But if we’re monogamous and want to stay monogamous, why go into a dark room at all? DUDE INTO MONOGAMY

If it was your boyfriend’s intent to reopen negotiations about monogamy while horny men circled you in a dark room, that wouldn’t be okay. But it is possible for monogamous couples to enter sexually charged environments like dark rooms, sex parties, or swingers clubs and emerge with their monogamous commitments intact. It’s advisable even — or at least I’ve advised monogamous couples who want to keep things hot to visit those kinds of spaces. Go in for the erotic charge, soak it up, and plow that energy into each other. So next time, go down there. You might have to bat a few hands away, but once the other guys realize you two aren’t there for anyone else, they’ll turn their attentions to others who are. On the Lovecast, poly expert Cunning Minx: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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April 18, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 16

April 18, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 16