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Hannah Pallas laughs with her mother, Heather Shuker

.MARIJUANA ISSUE.

GROWING SUCCESS Medical marijuana making a big difference in the lives of sick children and their families BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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S

TRETCHED OUT in his recliner, Ryan Briggs is hav-

ing a great nap. Laying there in his Bob Marley Tshirt, you can hear him gently snoring. Although his slumber is intermittently interrupted by a slight seizure, this is starting out as a good day. At just 18, Briggs has already had a pretty rough life. When he was born, doctor error caused the child to go more than 20 minutes without oxygen. Briggs lived, but is nonverbal and unable to care for himself. Worse than that, though, were the seizures. He experienced close to 500 of them every day — some smaller, others larger and more violent. He received all kinds of treatments and medication, but few of them helped; some made things even worse. But his mother, Diana Briggs, was determined to keep looking for that one thing that would help.

“We went everywhere for treatment,” she says. “We did one called the starvation diet, we did hyperbaric treatments and even went out of the country for stem-cell treatments. But nothing seemed to help. The seizures would get so bad, and they were frequent. We tracked every one of them. In fact, that’s how my youngest daughter learned to count, by counting her brother’s seizures.” In 2014, Briggs saw a video that changed her life. It provided the same epiphany that parents across the state would have as the video was shared widely. The video showed that oil extracted from marijuana worked to stop the seizures of a 5-year-old Colorado girl named Charlotte Figi. Subsequently, a large group of parents across the state banded together to fight to bring


medical marijuana to Pennsylvania. It was an uphill fight, but on April 17, 2016, Gov. Tom Wolf signed the legislation into law, and earlier this year, Pennsylvanians could begin legally purchasing medical cannabis. There is no question that without the parents of sick children stepping forward to fight this battle, the law would never have been approved. But, as Briggs says, “It’s easy to say no to an adult, but it’s pretty hard to do that to a sick kid who’s suffering.” When the World Medical Cannabis Conference & Expo opens in Pittsburgh later this week, there will be many panels on “children and cannabis.” With that in mind, City Paper checked in on some families who have spent the past four years fighting for legalization and see how their lives have changed. Aside from Briggs, we also talked to Heather Shuker, an outspoken advocate for the product and the mother of Hannah Pallas, a 15-year-old who has dealt with intractable epilepsy her entire life. “A few years ago, Hannah was confined to a chair, she never smiled, she couldn’t lift her extremities, she was non-verbal,” Shuker says, as a walking, squealing Hannah moves about their apartment from room to room. “Look at her now. She has found her voice, and she has found her smile again. It’s an amazing transformation.” AN OBVIOUS positive of medical-marijuana dispensaries opening up across the state is having available product close by. But for many parents, this won’t be the first time they’ve purchased these medications. Last year, the state enacted a safe-harbor provision that made it legal for anyone who is qualified to receive the drug to have it in their possession. Many parents began going out of state for the product, and since it was still illegal in several states, transporting it over state lines was a felony. For other parents, though, having safe-harbor protections still wasn’t their first foray into buying medical marijuana. “I haven’t talked about this much before, obviously, but we’ve been experimenting with Hannah’s medication for a few years now,” Shuker says. Sometime between 2014 and 2015, Shuker began going out of state to get medical-marijuana products. She always traveled by plane and brought the oils back with her on the plane, a nerve-wracking experience. “I knew it was a risk, and I knew it would be bad

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if I got caught, because someone could try to take Hannah away,” she says. “But my daughter was sick, with zero quality of life. I had to help her, so at the end of the day, it wasn’t really a choice at all.” Briggs had the same feeling that Shuker did. She would fly to Colorado to get medication and bring it back with her. Once, because of some change she forgot to take out of her pocket, she was pulled aside and given a complete search, including having her bags searched. They didn’t find the oil, but it made for a tense moment. Because of the cost of going to Denver and the risk, she decided to find a local contact. While she won’t give many details about the person or the transactions, she says the dealer became part of the family. “That first Christmas, I baked him some cookies,” Briggs says. “I didn’t think it was strange at the time. I’m a mom — that’s what we do for family and friends, we bake cookies.” The other thing moms do is help others in need. In order to receive medical marijuana, a patient has to have one of 17 qualified conditions. If the patient can’t get their own medication, they can use a qualified caregiver, and that process takes about a month. Recently, Shuker got a call out of the blue from a man whose mother was in hospice care and completely out of it, during what were the last days of her life. The man asked if she knew how he could get medical marijuana. Shuker decided she would help the man and contacted Briggs to figure out how. If you are a caregiver, you can be a

caregiver to up to four patients. Briggs found a doctor willing to go to the woman’s home to check her out and qualify her for the medications. Shuker then obtained the medication, and the woman began taking it. “Her son said she was in a fog and was hoping that medical marijuana would help make her last days comfortable, but not in an opioid haze,” Shuker says. “I took her the medication, and she was able to spend three days with her family and didn’t take anything other than medical cannabis.”

“THAT MAKES ALL OF THE WORK WE DID WORTHWHILE.” Briggs realized that legalization wasn’t the last hurdle in this battle, because people would still need help getting educated about and navigating through the system. In an effort to help other people, Briggs launched a new business, PA Compassionate Caregivers. Since most caregivers aren’t dealing with four patients at once, they can help people in the interim until their own caregivers get certified. Briggs says the service will connect people with a caregiver and a doctor to make sure they have a qualifying medical condition. “There is a need for this,” Briggs says. “People shouldn’t be deprived

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Ryan Briggs and his family pose for a photo with Gov. Tom Wolf the day he signed the medical-marijuana bill into law.

of this medication if they need it, and they also shouldn’t be forced to take pain medications that reduce their quality of life in their final days. It’s all about quality of life.” THE LOW SNORE coming from Ryan

Briggs has gotten a bit louder. He’s in a deep sleep, and that’s because of his medication. The sound is music to Diana Briggs’ ears. Prior to his cannabis treatments, Ryan didn’t sleep much. But who could sleep while going through a series of grand mal seizures? It’s a simple wish — for your kid to sleep peacefully — but until medical marijuana, it was one that Briggs couldn’t grant until now. “I know that Ryan is never going to be able to walk or talk, but he deserves the best life that we can give him,” she says. “Right now, he’s averaging fewer than 100 seizures a day, and sometimes that number is under 50. And for the first time in a long time, he can sleep for 10 to 12 hours a night and get the rest he needs.

“That makes all of the work we did worthwhile.” Sitting in her home a few hours earlier, Shuker agreed. Although she doesn’t have to say it in words, she can just point to her daughter. It’s Hannah’s 15th birthday, and she’s spending it differently than she has in the past. Rather than sitting balled up in her wheelchair waiting for the next seizure, she’s gleefully walking around her house getting ready to go out for the day. And this time, she and her mom won’t be taking the cumbersome wheelchair. “She won’t sit still anymore,” Shuker says with a laugh, as her daughter lets out a loud scream. “She also won’t stop yelling. But I get it. For the first time in a very long time, she hears herself and sees herself walking. She doesn’t want to stop. It’s also nice to see her personality coming out. She’s even developed a teenage rebellious streak.” It’s true. Like a lot of teenagers, Hannah seems to push the envelope to see how much she can get away with. Because of her history of serious CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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GROWING SUCCESS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 9

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Ryan Briggs’ medical marijuana

seizures, Hannah wears a helmet — well, most of the time. As she trots around the house, Shuker tells her daughter to get her helmet. Hannah retreats to her room and carries it out. When her mother tells her to put it on, she squeals at her and shakes the helmet in a way that seems to say, “You told me to get it, not wear it.” Hannah’s progress has been remarkable in the past year. She began walking more and, at the end of 2017, she smiled — a simple act that she hasn’t done in years. “Seeing her smile then and now, it’s amazing to me,” Shuker says. “For the first time in years, I have my daughter back. This is true quality of life.” In her short lifetime, Hannah has had more than 100,000 seizures. On an average month, she would have hundreds, if not more than a thousand.

Last month, she had five. Shuker says not only is Hannah able to do more, but this new period of calm is giving her brain time to heal from the trauma of years of violent seizures. Hannah has a therapist, and a teacher who comes to the home several times a week. And she is becoming more active since finding her voice. In a year full of major progress, Shuker is hoping for another big milestone in Hannah’s life. “I’d love to hear her talk again. She was able to say a few words when she was much younger,” Shuker says. “They told me she’d never reach her teen years, yet here she is turning 15 today. I thought she’d never walk again or smile again, but look at her. “That is one of the most determined little girls I have ever met. I’ll never say never.”


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.MARIJUANA.

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE Can medical marijuana help combat Pennsylvania’s opioid crisis? BY RYAN DETO RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

CCORDING TO 2016 data from the Centers for Disease Control, of U.S. counties with more than one million residents, Allegheny County had the highest drug-overdose death rate. In 2016, Allegheny County lost about 50 lives to drug overdoses per 100,000 residents. These deaths were primarily caused by residents overdosing on opioids like fentanyl and heroin. And in 2017, according to a project of the Pennsylvania Opioid Overdose Reduction Technical Assistance Center, the amount of overdose deaths in Allegheny County only increased. But 2017 is also the year that patients in Pennsylvania have legal access to medical marijuana to treat some types of chronic pain. And medical-marijuana proponents believe the drug can be a game-changer in the fight against the opioid epidemic. Doctors, advocates and medical-marijuana business owners feel marijuana should be recommended after patients complete their regiment of prescribed opioids. They believe it is a safer way to manage chronic pain and can keep many people from getting addicted to opioids. Preliminary studies back up this case, as states that have allowed medical marijuana as a pain treatment have

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Patrick Nightingale, with his wife, Teresa, are marijuana advocates who believe medical cannabis can reduce the number of opioids prescribed in the Pittsburgh area.

seen some drop-off in opioid-related deaths. However, getting the Pennsylvania medical community fully on board may be a struggle, as marijuana as medicine hasn’t been studied as much as other pain-relieving drugs. But Pennsylvania officials recently passed a small change to the state’s medicalmarijuana statute, which could encourage more doctors to recommend medical cannabis and hopefully keep patients from forming an addiction

to opioids. Dr. George Anastassov is the CEO of Axim Biotechnologies, a company focusing on the research and development of pharmaceutical products created from marijuana. Anastassov has a background in surgery and pain management, and is bullish on the idea that medical marijuana can be used to treat chronic pain. Anastassov says opioids are still necessary to treat acute pain, or a

short-term pain that resolves as patients heal. But, he says medicine derived from marijuana would be better suited to treat any longstanding pain that remains as a result of surgery or a traumatic event, also known as chronic pain. “We are acutely aware of the opioid problem,” says Anastassov. “Opioids are here to stay, for acute pain, but not for chronic pain.” Anastassov says historically many CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

doctors prescribed opioids for chronic pain and were encouraged to do so by the large pharmaceutical companies that developed, studied and distributed opioids. He says this contributed to Pennsylvania’s growing opioid crisis, particularly in rural areas were medical options are limited. Anastassov recognizes other medicines can also replace opioids, but he believes medical marijuana is the best choice to help patients suffering from chronic pain. He says patients taking pharmaceutical cannabis products instead of opioids could play a role in keeping patients from developing addiction to opioids. “I think pharmaceutical cannabis is the frontrunner,” says Anastassov. “We can dramatically reduce the number of opioids.”

“WE ARE GOING TO SEE LESS PEOPLE WITH OPIOID ADDICTION, IF THEY HAVE ACCESS TO MEDICAL CANNABIS IN EARLY STAGE TREATMENT.” Recent studies support that claim. A paper published April 2 in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine found a 14 percent reduction in opioid prescriptions among Medicare patients in states that allow easy access to medical marijuana. Another study also published in April in JAMA Internal Medicine found Medicaid enrollees filled nearly 40 fewer opioid prescriptions per 1,000 people in states that passed medical- or recreational-marijuana laws. Patrick Nightingale is a lawyer who represents clients with drug addictions and is the director of marijuana-advocacy group Pittsburgh NORML. He says many of his clients enter the criminaljustice system due to interactions with opioid-related drugs and, over the years, he has seen an increase in clients whose first interaction with opioids was a prescription for legitimate pain. Nightingale believes providing patients with medical marijuana to deal with chronic pain could be a better solution. “For someone new to pain treatment, these are the type of people to steer to medical cannabis, instead of giving them two to three months of

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opioids,” says Nightingale. “We are going to see less people with opioid addiction if they have access to medical cannabis in early stage treatment.” Anastassov agrees, but also says a pharmaceutical-cannabis chewing gum he is developing at Axim can help those already suffering from substance-abuse issues. He says the physical exercise of chewing helps people who are addicted, like how nicotine gum has been shown to help people quit smoking cigarettes. Anastassov believes a medical-marijuana chewing gum can help wean people off opioid addiction. The product has yet to hit the market, but Anastassov is confident Pennsylvania officials will welcome it as a way to combat the opioid crisis. Nightingale says the biggest obstacle in treating Pennsylvania patients who would normally use opioids with medical marijuana, is convincing prescribing physicians to recommend cannabis. Marijuana is still a Schedule I drug under federal law, and Nightingale says this has limited the amount of medical studies completed on marijuana, which has increased doctors’ skepticism of marijuana as medicine. But there has been progress. On April 9, Pennsylvania’s medical-marijuana advisory board broadened the definition of chronic-pain patients who qualify for access to medical marijuana. The decision still needs to be cleared by the Department of Health, but marijuana-advocate Chris Goldstein, of Philly NORML, says Pennsylvania physicians will be able to recommend medical marijuana as the first option for chronic pain, if the change is approved. Dr. Adam Rothschild is thrilled about this news. Rothschild practices family medicine in East Liberty and is a certified to recommend medical marijuana through Pennsylvania’s medicalmarijuana law. He says cannabis is much safer than opioids in treating chronic pain, and it should be much higher on our list of chronic-pain medications. According to Rothschild, the current rule about recommending medical marijuana for chronic pain has a caveat that states “in which conventional therapeutic intervention and opiate therapy is contraindicated or ineffective.” With that caveat likely to be removed soon, Rothschild believes more prescribing physicians in Pennsylvania will be open to recommending medical marijuana. “For the people worried about legal aspects of recommending medical marijuana,” says Rothschild, “this will make them more comfortable.”


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.MARIJUANA.

HIGH-LIGHTS

BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

RE YOU ATTENDING the World Medical Cannabis Conference & Expo at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Downtown Pittsburgh this week? Well, City Paper wanted to give you our recommendations on which talks and events to attend while you get high on some seriously sticky medical marijuana knowledge. Here’s our picks:

THU., APRIL 12

How to Cook Cannabutter

Hemp Oil or Cannabis Oil? What’s the Difference?

TIME: Noon DESCRIPTION: Learn how to make the building

TIME: Noon DESCRIPTION: An in-depth explanation of

block of all cannabis-infused edible treats.

known differences between cannabis sativa and cannabis ruderalis oils.

The Future of Cannabis in the Fitness and Wellness Industry TIME: 1 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Learn how cannabis is

infiltrating the fitness and wellness sectors.

Consumer Rights Session — DUIs, Guns and Employment TIME: 2 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Discussion on how law

enforcement is addressing DUIs in the context of medical cannabis and what rights patients have.

Pennsylvania Opportunities: How to Capitalize in Round 2 with a Winning Application TIME: 3 p.m. DESCRIPTION: How to create a strong

application for the state’s second phase of the medical-marijuana program.

Cannabis & Your Family: Meet the Parents of Children Using Cannabis

The Supremacy Clause — The Continuing Battle Between State and Federal Jurisdiction TIME: 2 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Pittsburgh NORML’s Patrick

Case Studies: Cannabis & Concussions Through the Forensic Lens TIME: 3 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Renowned forensic scientist

and former Allegheny County Medical Examiner Dr. Cyril Wecht shares insights on medical marijuana and concussions.

SAT., APRIL 14

A Caregiver’s Guide to Navigating the Medical-Marijuana Program TIME: 10 a.m. DESCRIPTION: Panel, including regular

City Paper source Heather Shuker, will participate in a discussion on how and where you start to become a caregiver.

their road to discovering cannabis and its role in transforming their kids’ lives.

Diversity in Cannabis

FRI., APRIL 13

TIME: 11 a.m. DESCRIPTION: Discussing how

TIME: 10 a.m. DESCRIPTION: Exploring how to bring the

marijuana community into social-media and digital age.

Talking to Your Children About Cannabis TIME: 11 a.m. DESCRIPTION: Even as marijuana is becoming

mainstream, consumers are hiding it from their kids. Learn how to effectively talk to your children about medical marijuana.

Russell L. Adams D.O. Owner, Elite Alternative Medicine 993 Brodhead Road, Suite 203 Moon Twp, PA 15108 • 412-506-3033 www.elitealternativemedicine.com

Nightingale will discuss the battle between state reform and federal prohibition, and its effects on state medicinal-cannabis programs.

TIME: 4 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Listen to advocates discuss

Inspiring the Next Generation

We are a medical clinic that specializes in providing certifications to qualifying patients for Medical Marijuana. We have been in operation for 2 years. We work out of both NJ and PA and plan to expand into Ohio this fall when their program begins. We focus on quality customer service and allow patients to maintain access to our clinicians to help answer all their questions and support them in optimizing their therapy.

medical-cannabis education can help underserved communities.

Strategies for Opioid-Free Living TIME: 3 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Panel will discuss the effective

tools, including medical cannabis, for building an opioid-free life.

Cannabis America’s Job Creator TIME: 4 p.m. DESCRIPTION: Experts will discuss how

legal marijuana can bring employment opportunities to urban and rural residents.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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.MARIJUANA.

WEED MONEY BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ENNSYLVANIA’S medical-marijuana program rolled out this February, but some state politicians are already looking to the next step: recreational marijuana. Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale and Braddock Mayor John Fetterman believe the state should legalize recreational marijuana as a way to create jobs, increase tax revenue, and save police resources that are spent on marijuana-related arrests. “We have a budget deficit right now, and we have this substance that we can legalize,” said Fetterman in an interview with City Paper in September 2017. “We can make it safe, take it out of the shadows, we could tax it. We could put those dollars toward whatever we as a Commonwealth decide to do.”

“WE CAN MAKE IT SAFE, TAKE IT OUT OF THE SHADOWS.” According to a September 2017 Franklin & Marshall College poll, 59 percent of Pennsylvanians say that recreational marijuana should be made legal, with only 31 percent saying it shouldn’t. Eight U.S. states and Washington, D.C., have already legalized recreational use. Because of Pennsylvania’s relatively large population, the auditor general’s office estimates the state could eventually bring in about $325 million in tax revenue yearly, if recreational marijuana is legalized, regulated and taxed. Below CP offers figures to show how a Pennsylvania recreational-marijuana tax could stack up compared to other states and other Pennsylvania “sin” taxes.

$325 million*

PENNSYLVANIA ANNUAL “SIN” TAX REVENUE

$763 million

Pennsylvania >>

$1.3 billion

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA ANNUAL TAX AND FEES REVENUE STATE BY STATE

Colorado >>

Oregon >> $70 million mi

$402 million

$325 million*

$247 million

Washington >> $319 million Recreational marijuana *According to estimates from Pennsylvania Auditor General (Other state revenue figures are from 2017 state budgets)

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Alcohol

Cigarette and tobacco products

Casino revenue

*According to estimates from Pennsylvania Auditor General office (Other tax figures taken from Pennsylvania 2017 budget)


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Free Will Astrology BY ROB BREZSNY

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HE ERA OF medical marijuana in Pennsylvania is upon us, and it has tremendous potential to change how certain medical conditions are treated. Well, as long as the state thinks your condition warrants it. There are only 17 qualifying diseases and conditions on the state’s list, including ALS, cancer, PTSD, intractable seizures, nerve damage, multiple sclerosis, autism and HIV/AIDS. And while Pennsylvania’s list is more inclusive than other states (and is the first state to allow its use on all forms of autism), it can still only be considered a good start. There’s more work to do because many other conditions where the drug has been useful have been excluded. Laws in other states allow for much more flexibility. For example, the state of Washington’s list of qualifying conditions focuses more on symptoms than conditions. As a result, more people have access to a treatment that’s easier on the body than many synthetic medications. Other states also allow a doctor to recommend cannabis to treat unlisted conditions at their discretion. Pennsylvania has no such regulation. The law also doesn’t allow patients to take medical marijuana instead of opioids for chronic pain. For pain, marijuana can only be prescribed when opioid therapy is deemed ineffective. But with the opioid epidemic touching every pocket of society, and opioid-overdose deaths increasing statewide by 100 percent between 2016 and 2017, how is it responsible to push opioids as the first line of treatment? Additionally, in the state of Pennsylvania, access to medical marijuana is closed off to most people with mental illnesses, with the exception of PTSD. The legislature made the decision based on a “lack of definitive evidence” that marijuana is an effective alternative for conditions such as anxiety, depres-

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

sion and schizophrenia, among others. But there is a moderate amount of research out there to suggest that marijuana does help some patients, and Pittsburgh is a city full of medical facilities and universities that boast groundbreaking research, so why not utilize the infrastructure that exists to encourage such work? When you see a psychiatrist for the first time to get medicine, there is a good chance that you will not find the

right prescription immediately. Doctors don’t throw Prozac or Xanax out the window entirely just because it doesn’t help everyone. Perhaps it’s time to open up the options and let medical professionals work through treatment with their patients, rather than have medical decisions dictated by a legislature of mostly non-medical professionals.

City Paper‘s editorial board is Charlie Deitch, Meg Fair and Celine Roberts.

JENSORENSEN

NOT YOUR SIGN? VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM FOR OUR FULL ASTROLOGICAL FORECAST

Aries statesman Thomas Jefferson was the third President of the United States. He wrote one of history’s most famous documents, the Declaration of Independence. He was an architect, violinist, inventor and linguist who spoke numerous languages, as well as a philosopher who was knowledgeable about mathematics, surveying and horticulture. But his most laudable success came in 1789, when he procured the French recipe for macaroni and cheese while living in France, and thereafter introduced the dish into American cuisine. JUST KIDDING! I’m making this little joke in the hope that it will encourage you to keep people focused on your most important qualities, and not get distracted by less essential parts of you.


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

19


APRIL IS FAIR HOUSING MONTH

DISCRIMINATION IS RARELY THIS OBVIOUS, BUT IT’S JUST AS REAL. AND JUST AS ILLEGAL.

CP FILE PHOTO

Gregory Polanco

.PITTSBURGH LEFT.

IF A LANDLORD GIVES YOU THE RUNAROUND OR SAYS: We don’t take kids. The apartment you asked about on the phone has been rented. We only rent to people who speak English g clearly. y We don’t take teenagers. The ad was wrong the rent is really $50 more. I can’t assign you a handicap parking space.

YOU COULD BE EXPERIENCING HOUSING DISCRIMINATION. The only way to STOP housing discrimination IS TO REPORT IT, SO WE CAN INVESTIGATE IT.

PITTSBURGH COMMISSION ON HUMAN RELATIONS 908 City-County Building, 414 Grant St, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

www.pittsburghpa.gov/chr/

412-255-2600

The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, familial status or disability. The Pittsburgh City Code includes the bases under the Fair Housing Act and also prohibits discrimination because of sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, and status as a survivor of domestic violence.

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BRIGHT SIDE

BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

MERICANS LOVE current events, like really current events. If something is

happening in the world, we want to know about it right away. And thanks to social media and a 24-hour news cycle, we can learn about events, quickly pass judgment, and then move onto the next thing. I’m certainly guilty of that. Whether it’s politics, sports or anything else, I react to what’s happening right now. Take the Pittsburgh Pirates, for example. They were going to be horrid, we said. We can’t survive without Andrew McCutchen, we said. We traded away good players without getting a significant return, we said. Except here we are, just 10 days into the regular season, and the Buccos are killing it. As of this writing, the Pirates are 7-2; Gregory Polanco is hitting like a young Andrew McCutchen; and Colin Moran, the guy we traded Gerrit Cole for, is hitting .345 and seems to be the third baseman the team has been missing since Jung Ho Kang. We are all shocked by this because we were so sure things would be a debacle from opening day. Of course, the season is still very young, and many folks still assume the Pirates will tank. I’m usually one of those people, but not this time. This time, I plan to have hope, not just about the Pirates, but in all things. I want to have the kind of hope that Barack Obama promised in 2008 and spent the next eight years working to deliver. I’m a cynic by nature. But in the past week, I’ve seen what can happen when hope pays off. I’m talking about the Pirates, sure, but that’s just sports. As you’ve read elsewhere in this issue, I spent some time last week with patients and their families who are benefiting from medical marijuana. I knew these folks, because I’ve covered this issue since the fight to legalize the drug intensified four years ago. When I first met Hannah Pallus, for example, she was sitting slumped in a wheelchair, expressionless, and suffering hundreds of seizures a day. When I saw her last week, the wheelchair sat empty in the kitchen of her Warrendale home, as Hannah walked about the house on her own, using her voice to yell and screech, as if she’s trying to communicate. And last month, the little girl who had more than 1,000 seizures a month, had just five. That’s hope paying off, and while it took a long time to do so, it was well worth the wait.

I’VE SEEN WHAT CAN HAPPEN WHEN HOPE PAYS OFF.


About the 2018 Deutschtown Music Festival The 6th Annual Deutschtown Music Festival will take place on Pittsburgh’s Northside on Friday and Saturday, July 13th and 14th. The award-winning, free, two-day festival has become the most significant local music event of the year. With over 250 bands, 11 outdoor stages, and 26 indoor venues, the festival has a little bit of something for everybody. Friday and Saturday will be full-day events taking place across multiple outdoor and indoor stages. Three main stages are featured during the day, two in Allegheny Commons Park and the other on a closed-off block of Foreland Ave. A beer garden will exist in a closed-off portion of the city-owned parking lot next to the main stage. Family-friendly programming is featured during the daytime, with over 20 food trucks, children’s activities, an artists’ market, and other activities to supplement the music. Throughout the day and night free school bus shuttles with multiple stops in the NorthSide and NorthShore will be available for the over 25,000 people that are expected to attend. Numerous bars and clubs will participate throughout the night, allowing one to visit many different venues within a short walking distance. This non-profit, volunteer driven event has remained steadfast in its goal of 1) fostering economic and community development in the Northside and 2) also supporting and promoting Pittsburgh’s vibrant live music scene.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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FOOD+DRINK

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Aaron Sukenik and Sarah Baxendell in the fields at Hilltop Urban Farm

.FOOD.

FARM FRESH “We’re just going to get down to kicking shovels into the ground and making the minute decisions.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

FTER FIVE YEARS of collaboration and planning, the Hilltop Urban Farm Project is ready to come into full bloom this spring. “This year, it’s going to look like a farm, not just a field of dreams,” says Sarah Baxendell, the Hilltop Alliance’s project manager of greenspace asset development. “We’re just going to get down to kicking shovels into the ground and making the minute decisions.” Baxendell and Aaron Sukenik, the Hilltop Alliance’s executive director, are excited to welcome the public onto the farm for public work days through the fall, continuing their commitment to the hilltop community’s needs. Hilltop Urban Farm is a project of the Hilltop Alliance, a body that serves the 11 southern hilltop Pittsburgh neighborhoods and the borough of Mount Oliver. The plan for the farm was drawn out of three large community meetings that took place

in 2013 and 2014, in which a menu of urban-agriculture components was prioritized. The site sits on a hill, with the Pittsburgh public school Arlington Elementary across the road, and the Lighthouse Church perched on the slope above. These are two of the project’s neighborhood partners and eventual beneficiaries of community programming to be held on the property. Last year, heavy preparation of the farm acreage began with tilling the soil and adding 23 truckloads of organic mushroom compost. Tilled areas are now becoming bright green with tiny plants, seeded as cover crops to help aerate the soil. Baxendell points out forage radishes, nicknamed “tillage radishes,” which break up the soil by growing roots that extend 8 to 14 inches. The roots then die off and leave holes that help the soil dry as the weather warms. CONTINUES ON PG. 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

23


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And warm weather means the beginning of this season’s main project: building the youth farm. “We want to start with our kids,” says Baxendell, pointing to a plateau where the youth farm will be. The area is over an acre and will eventually be surrounded by an 8-foot-high fence to keep the white-tailed deer out and kids safely in. Lighthouse Church hosts afterschool programming for 35 children and summer programming for 150 children; Arlington Elementary has 363 kids enrolled. Both will send students to learn the five pillars of the farm’s youth-education goals: growing food, agricultural as a career pathway, nutrition, ecology of Western Pennsylvania and food systems. To help build curriculum, the farm is partnered with Grow Pittsburgh, Allegheny Land Trust Education Department and Penn State Extension. Raised beds, classroom space, solar panels and shipping containers for storage are set to be put in this year. “This August through April, i.e. next school year, our program manager for the youth farm and our program providers will be going into the school across the street and doing workshops with kids and trainings for the teachers,” says Baxendell. The goal is to create a comfortable transition for the kids and teachers to later utilize the farm for teaching. The youth farm will officially open in April 2019 for its first full growing season, with in-school, after-school and summercamp programs. Also in 2019, the build-out of the farmerincubation program will begin. This is a workforce-training program for new farmers starting for-profit businesses. Quarter acres are set aside for each farmer,

and successful applicants will have access to shipping containers, hoop houses, solar panels and coolers, all for a flat fee. Baxendell and Sukenik hope to open the program for applications in August 2019. This program is partnered with Penn State Extension, and participants will have access to its curriculum for new farmer training, designed to provide production, business-management, and planning experience. “The idea is that after three years on the site, they’ll be able to graduate off the site, and go on to launch new urban or rural farms in Western Pa., either in the city or on other preserved land in the county,” says Baxendell. This year’s community work days are April 21, May 3 and 5, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 15 and Oct. 13. For more information on how you can get involved, visit Hilltop Urban Farm’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/HilltopUrbanFarmPGH/.

The future holds other initiatives, including pollinator gardens; community amenities such as gardening space and a farmers’ market; a production orchard to serve as a training tool on orchard management; and a food forest. A section has also been set aside for immigrant farmers, so they can grow food as a community. “We have a lot of Bhutanese, and now some Somali people in the area that we serve,” says Baxendell. “The community engagement [now] is about building awareness of what this will be. Hopefully, people will take advantage of the opportunities like the incubator farm and the farmers’ market,” says Sukenik.


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On tap at Strange Roots in Millvale

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FRESH ROOTS BY DREW CRANISKY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

FELL IN LOVE with Draai Laag years ago after sampling a few funky, Flandersstyle ales at its Millvale taproom. But as it turns out, beers with tasting notes like “horse blanket” have a somewhat limited appeal. Last month, Draai Laag officially relaunched as Strange Roots Experimental Ales, making the brewery far more accessible and a whole lot easier to spell. “You see a Draai Laag beer on the shelf and, without even actually looking at the beer, you identify it and say ‘that’s probably a sour beer,’” explains founder Dennis Hock. While sours are gaining popularity among American craft-beer drinkers, it’s still a niche market. And after seven years of exclusively making Belgian-inspired sour and wild ales, Hock and his team were ready for a change. “We love sour beer … but from a creative perspective, we were kind of limiting ourselves.” Though he initially considered launching a second brand to market those “defunked” beers, Hock realized they lacked the resources to support a separate brand. So, after talking to customers and distributors, Hock decided to go all in and change the name entirely. “We wanted to tip the cap to Draai Laag, and Draai Laag has always been a strange little brewery,” he explains. “We figured that’s our roots — Strange Roots.” Hock estimates that about 10 percent of Strange Roots will be dedicated to “traditional” beers that continue in the style of those they brewed as Draai Laag. About 70 percent will be what Hock describes as “softer” sours: approachable, lower-alcohol beers without the heavy funk of many of their previous offerings. The remaining 20 percent or so will be forays into entirely different styles, such as hefeweizens and IPAs. But even these more familiar styles will embrace the experimental aspect of their name. Barnyard Synthesis, for instance, is an IPA fermented with Brettanomyces, a yeast strain that balances hop bitterness with a bit of earthy richness. The new beers also come with a new place to drink them. At its Gibsonia brewery (where the team has brewed since September 2017), Strange Roots is adding a colorful taproom offering 12 drafts that show off the new range of options. Though it will open without food, Hock hopes to eventually add a kitchen, and is exploring options for opening a sizable beer garden as well. For now, though, you’ll have to head to the Millvale taproom to experience all the weird and wonderful things brewing at Strange Roots. At press time, an opening date for the Gibsonia location was still pending, as Hock waited on final permits from the township. Whether you drink it in Millvale, Gibsonia or one of the dozens of states where Strange Roots beer is distributed, expect to see as much experimentation and passion as ever. As Hock gushes, “I love beer, and I’ll love beer till the day I die.”

AMBIANCE: The decor is intense, like Day of the Dead meets your moderndesign course in college. The corner bar is nice, because it gets light from all sides.

WHAT I ATE: The Mantis Taco

COST: $4

HOT TAKE: The jackfruit makes for a great vegetarian option, without sacrificing texture or flavor. Habañero-mango barbecue is tangy and hot, and a nice contrast to the fatty cheese which pulls the whole taco together. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

25


WINE, BEER &

COCKTAILS

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HEALING CENTER

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HRIS KOHAN and Jay Richards are bringing three new medical cannabis dispensaries to the Pittsburgh area, but their vision goes beyond the sterile approach of a medical facility. The Healing Center, which will have locations in Washington, Monroeville and Cranberry, is designed to be a health-care community, offering massage therapy, counseling and support groups, as well as providing a safer alternative to prescription opioids. “The reason we got into dispensing is now we got a good law passed, and we have some seriously ill Pennsylvanians who need a good place to go to,” says Kohan. Around eight years ago, Kohan and Richards began advocating for the legalization of medical cannabis in Pennsylvania. The subject was personal; Richards’ sister had died of cancer. “We started knocking on doors trying to get people to consider some responsible cannabis legislation,” says Kohan. From there, they continued to meet with advocates, lawmakers and entrepreneurs all over the state. “I think it helped us because we were looked at more as advocates than entrepreneurs,” says Kohan. Now, under the Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Act, marijuana for medicinal use can be obtained in the following forms: pill, oil, topical, tincture, liquid and vaporized. Richards and Kohan will be able to provide all of the above to those with a medicinal-mari-

juana license, but they are also setting their sights on broader health initiatives. Edibles made with medical marijuana cannot be legally sold in Pennsylvania, but Kohan says that patients may want to make them themselves. “It might be easier for a child to eat a cookie than to take a medicine, or try to spread a tincture under their tongue,” says Kohan. “We want to be a resource for people, with things like YouTube tutorials to help them to cook at home with [medical marijuana].”

The Healing Center in Cranberry is now open, and the Washington and Monroeville locations are set to open at the end of May. For more information, visit www.thehealingcenterusa.com.

The Healing Center is currently working with renowned cannabis chef Melissa Parks to help its clients cook at home. Parks, who is originally from Wheeling, W.Va., trained at Le Cordon Bleu, in Minneapolis, and is now based in Las Vegas. She’s the author of Herb: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis. “It’s a different delivery system [for the cannabis], and it’s absorbed through your intestinal tract. It takes longer to do, but it has much more long-lasting effects,” says Kohan. “It also retains the most healing properties because the CBD [cannabidiol] isn’t being burned off.”

Disclosure: Chris Kohan once worked for City Paper ’s former parent company, Steel City Media.

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DINING OUT

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

CALLING ALL RESTAUR ANTS!

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THE ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER 5326 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-252-2337 WWW.ALLEGHENYWINEMIXER.COM Wine bar and tap room in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. Offering an eclectic list of wine by the glass or bottle, local beer, craft cocktails, cheese and cured meats, good times and bad art.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

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FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere

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are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 / SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

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ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

CP PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO

George Davison

.TV.

INNOVATION LAND “If we empower the art of creation with our youth, they will out-innovate us.” BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

30

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W

ALKING INTO Inventionland — a busi-

ness incubator in O’Hara Township that’s part office space, part maker space — is like walking into a Disney theme park or Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. There’s a tree house, knights in shining armor, human-sized sweets and a whole lot of futuristic-looking technology. “We built Inventionland around the question of ‘how do we make work fun’ and to create a better immersive environment,” says Inventionland founder George Davison. “I’d rather go to work in this environment than go to work in cubes every day. Immersive, creative environments work. We’ve proven that here.” Inventionland is also the setting for a new Science Channel television show, Tomorrow’s World Today. Premiering in May, the show will focus on the innovation process and highlight

those that already exist in our everyday lives. “We knew we wanted to shape a story for the audience around innovation,” Davison says. “The process of creation is exposed in the show. Failing your way forward in innovation is shown in the show. How to think differently, so you can innovate and make things better than those who came before you, is also shown. If we empower the art of creation with our youth, they will out-innovate us.” Hosted by Davison, the show will also highlight his plans to build a “Park of the Future” in Pittsburgh. Inspired by Inventionland, Davison says a real-life theme park could be completed within a decade. The show also features Emmy award-winning writer and actress Tamara Krinksy, who will serve as the show’s discovery reporter and is currently Marvel’s


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West Coast correspondent. In Tomorrow’s World Today, she’ll travel the world in search of innovative pioneers who are creating new sustainable ways to harness the power of the earth’s natural and technological resources. “That’s an important part of this. Yes, it’s about technology, but there are people behind the technology,” Davison says. “You’ll hear from these people who have worked their whole lives to make a contribution to their area of science.” The Pittsburgh-produced show is a remake of the 1980s classic BBC series Tomorrow’s World. That show introduced the world to CDs, laser eye surgery and touch-screen technology, all innovations taken for granted today. The first episode of the reboot will feature local institutions like Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden, and Haine Elementary School in Cranberry. Subsequent episodes will feature PNC Bank, Cheniere Energy, NASA and Gildan. And like any engaging children’s program, there’s a lovable cartoon character: Chipper Cloud. Chipper is Inventionland’s mascot, who represents creativity, positivity and the power of imagination. But the show has plenty for adults as well. Chipper’s foil character, Stormy Cloud, represents the negative voice, whether external or internal, that stands in the way of progress. It’s a character frequently found in office buildings around the world. “In your life, have you ever had anybody acting like a nemesis? That’s Stormy,” says Davison. “Everybody has these Stormy characters. And in the

world of innovation, one of the largest challenges are these Stormy characters. They slow down the pace of innovation.” This isn’t Davidson’s first time experimenting with television. He’s had a few short pieces on the Lifetime Channel and a special on the History Channel. But the theme of innovation has been at the center of all of his endeavors. And it’s not just the theme of his television shows; encouraging innovation is Davison’s life’s work. Inventionland has played a role in producing more than 300 inventions. Many of them hang on a rotating conveyor belt that traverses the 60,000-squarefoot space as a constant reminder of what’s possible.

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“As more and more of our manufacturing jobs are outsourced overseas, I get very nervous. Because the art of innovation and manufacturing could be lost. That gets my blood going,” says Davison. “I’m all about making sure our country maintains our position as a leader in innovation. As we keep moving more and more stuff overseas, our children won’t have the opportunity to see that.” He adds: “We’re trying to bring back that moment when you’re young, laying on your back, looking up at the stars or the clouds, and thinking, dreaming or wondering what could be.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

31


A BRAVE & COMIC LOOK AT THE SCIENCE OF SOBERIETY

by

SEAN DANIELS SHERYL KALLER

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APRIL 7 – MAY 6, 2018

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org / South Side

ALL SHOWS ON SALE APRIL 13

MAGINE A dance performance where you choose what you will see. Now imagine your choices give you an experience that somehow colors your perceptions of the dance performance differently than what many of your fellow audience members report experiencing. This intriguing scenario is at the center of If | Maybe | Then, the latest brainchild of outside-the-box-thinkers Attack Theatre. The 90-minute, interactive-media production, going on April 12-29, blends video-projection mapping and motion-tracker technologies, with a bit of willful psychology to both dazzle and bemuse audiences, as they consider the motivations behind a group of fictitious time-traveling strangers who perform for them. The idea for If | Maybe | Then came some three years ago, says Attack company dancer Dane Toney who, for this project, is taking on the role of video artist/technician. Toney, an artist-in-residence at the Carnegie Mellon University Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, says he was approached by Attack co-founder Michele de la Reza to take the lead in creating an interactive-media work for the company.

IF | MAYBE | THEN

Photos: Matthew Murphy

Fri., April 12-Sun., April 29. Former Office Depot, The Waterfront, 630 E. Waterfront Drive, Homestead. $15-40 (pay-what-moves-you pricing for returning attendees looking to see the show again). www.attacktheatre.com/maybe June 22 - July 1

June 12 - 17

July 6 - 15

1/2 Price

for Children 3-14!* Sponsored by

August g 7 - 12 July 17 - 22

July 27 - Aug 5

*Certain Restrictions

pittsburghCLO.org • 412-456-6666 Groups 10+ 412-325-1582 At the Benedum Center

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Buy S Tickets eason & See 3 Sh Save ows for $ 412-28 60! 1-2822

The result is a new site-specific work, choreographed by the company, directed by de la Reza and co-artistic director Peter Kope, and staged in a 35,000-square-foot former Office Depot in Homestead. Within it, Attack’s four dancers (plus cameos by its directors) will perform eight unique, character-driven, mature-themed vignettes, broken up into six 10-minute solos in intimate chambers, and two 20-minute group dances in a larger space. A main goal of the work, says Kope, was to maintain the collective viewing experience by not incorporating technology that would require audience members to wear special headgear. “We wanted a large-group viewing experience that would be individual as well as collective,” says Kope. Each of If | Maybe | Then’s 14 performances will be limited to an audience size of up to 60, that will be split up into two groups of 30. Viewers will travel within the space to experience the differing vignettes. Through the use of tracking software, says Toney, the dancers in each vignette will interact with animations such as falling letters, words and fireballs. Add to that, an eclectic sound score by Brazilian conductor and composer Flávio Chamis, creative scenic design by Britton Mauk and, says Kope, “some amazing things done with a tablecloth,” and you have an Attack Theatre show unlike any other.


SPRING Cleaning?

DONATE YOUR GENTLY USED CLOTHES & HOUSEHOLD ITEMS AT ANY ST. VINCENT DE PAUL STORE LOCATION! “NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS” Built To Spill

.MUSIC.

BOWIE’S STILL COOL BY ELI ENIS // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“I

two decades and, in some circles, holds DON’T KNOW what I’m doing a near-divine status. Somehow — and at all. I don’t understand music this says a lot about the actual impact of at all,” Doug Martsch told City press narratives and the effect of what’s Paper on the phone last month. become known colloquially as “stanning” Martsch is the lead singer of beloved — Martsch has avoided any inkling of indie-rock band Built to Spill. He’s the guy self-importance, and openly views his who wrote the immeasurably addictive career as a mere fluke. hook in “Big Dipper” and the no-less“I just feel like we’re just another than inspiring guitar crescendo in band,” he says. “For whatever “Broken Chairs.” And he’s spent FULL reason, our stuff kind of got out the better part of a decade putA WITH & Q there enough that a lot of peoting out increasingly virtuosic H MARwTwSwC. ple were able to discover it. It’s psych-rock. t a er p a p kind of arbitrary to me. They Martsch inspired a generaty ci pgh .com could’ve just as easily ended up tion’s worth of indie rockers to getting into something else.” pick up a guitar, pen that wonky To Martsch, the greatest complilyric, or create that weird, convenment isn’t how far-reaching and referentionally improper melody. But the guy tial his music has become, but how much who made a song as shimmering and of an impact it’s had on people outside soundtrack-ready as “Strange” claims the circle that regards his songwriting he’s as misguided as the rest of us, and as sacred. that’s one of the most reassuring things “I guess I always kind of like the idea this writer has ever heard. of someone saying Built to Spill [was] the first alternative music they ever listened BUILT TO SPILL + to. I always liked that story ’cause it’s cool AFGHAN WHIGS to be something different,” Martsch says. 7 p.m. Sat., April 14. Mr. Smalls, “Sometimes I think our music is pretty 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $35. mainstream, so it’s nice to hear that it’s www.mrsmalls.com pretty weird to some people.” For the uninitiated, Martsch’s mindset means there’s never been, and there “I never imagined that we would be never will not be, a better time to get into an influential band, and even today, I Built to Spill. For the superfans, you’ll be don’t think of us in those terms at all,” he happy to know he not only still thinks says. “I still think of us as a band who’s “Bowie’s cool,” but still writes with the still trying to figure out what we sound Duke in mind. like, trying to prove ourselves.” “When I’m writing songs, I [ask Twenty-five years and eight records myself], ‘What would so-and-so think in, and Built to Spill still feel like newof this?’” Martsch says. “’What would comers. The band has been one of the David Bowie think of this?’” most critically lauded rock acts of the last

5 GREAT STORE LOCATIONS SHARPSBURG • SWISSVALE CORAOPOLIS • MONROEVILLE CASTLE SHANNON

412-321-1071 • SVDPPITT.ORG

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Check out more of our photos from

P!nk’s Pittsburgh tour stop at PPG Paints Arena on our FFW> music blog online at www.pghcitypaper.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SAMANTHA CAUN PHOTOGRAPHY

Part of the ensemble at University of Pittsburgh’s Recoil

.STAGE.

ON EDGE

BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ATCHING Recoil — a new play

about gun violence from the University of Pittsburgh Theatre Arts Department — got me thinking about how artists have addressed that topic over the past few decades. Specifically, I remembered Elephant, Gus Van Sant’s hyper-realistic fictional retelling of the Columbine school shooting, and how uncomfortable it made me. The film was supposed to be disturbing, but it wasn’t only the violence. There’s just something gross about dramatizing a school shooting that left me desperate for a shower and wondering what exactly the film was trying to accomplish. Did Van Sant think the horror of Columbine eluded the general public? Does it really need underlining?

RECOIL continues through Sun., April 15. Richard E. Rauh Studio Theatre, Cathedral of Learning, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $12-25. play.pitt.edu

Recoil left me feeling similarly ambivalent and anxious. The 90-minute drama, directed by Cynthia Croot, and conceived by Croot and the students of Pitt’s Theatre Arts Department, consists of loosely threaded vignettes about gun violence. The majority of them address mass shootings, but ties between domestic violence and gun violence are also looped in. The ensemble of 13 — all engaging, likable and deeply earnest — rotate from character to character and occasionally address the audience directly. There’s not much of a set to speak of, which make the transitions between scenes a little easier on the imagination. Projections behind the performers chip in with context blurbs and

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some set dressing, as during the portrayal of the shooting at The Dark Knight Rises screening in 2012. The scenes of the mass shootings were the toughest to watch, for a number of reasons. On one hand, it’s eerie. Pitt is my alma mater and watching these students perform these scenes — in the Cathedral of Learning, no less — reminded me of being that age at this school as these shootings became more common. I remember watching the Virginia Tech shooting play out on cable news from my apartment on Atwood Street, where, coincidentally, I was later held up at gunpoint. OK, sorry, this is clearly not about my baggage, but still, it brought back a lot. I can’t imagine what it’s like to be a student now and to have grown up in this reality. The empathy was real. I liked these performers so much, and the line between performer and character was deliberately and consistently blurred. But other aspects made it hard to watch simply because it was clumsy. The portrayal of the Pulse nightclub shooting included two young men pretending to snort cocaine in a bathroom before the shooting started. The production was dotted with similarly what-the-what decisions that made it tough to focus on the more empathetic aspects of the performance. And even the base decision to stage a montage of mass shootings (with which the audience is surely familiar) struck an ugly chord for me. However, the effort of all 13 performers carries Recoil away from its awkward missteps. The earnestness, the vulnerability and the fear all add up to something uncomfortable, but it’s clearly a discomfort with a purpose.


.MUSIC.

LOCAL BEAT

BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Quick takes on three new demo EP releases from Pittsburgh artists

<< DEMO BY BITROT Sinister, echoing growls lurk among tumultuous noise throughout the six blistering tracks on this EP. This unrelenting tone feels like being tossed around a cramped mosh pit, but one in which you always get picked up, before hitting the floor and having the chaos consume you.

<< DEMO 2018 BY PAINTED EYES The group crafts punk rock with jangly riffs and thoughtful guitar solos. The vocals of Matt (bass) and JB (guitar) mingle together to strengthen choruses and build fun harmonies. While the whole EP is bouncy, songs like “Grasp” take a darker tonal turn.

<< DEMO.N.STRATION BY PLASTIC IDEA demo.n.stration is a dreamily concocted EP that blends post-punk sensibilities with new wave and shoegaze-y sounds to create five songs that permanently plant themselves in your psyche. MJ’s vocals, swimming through a sea of warm instrumentation, are arresting and mesmerizing. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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mane Hu

Animal

Re s u e c

DONATION DRIVE Humane Animal Rescue is partnering with Goodwill of Southwestern Pennsylvania to host a donation drive fundraiser!

Wednesday, April 18, 2018 4:00 - 7:00 pm Goodwill of SWPA Southside 2700 East Carson Street

Jordan Corcoran

.LITERARY.

WRITE IT

BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

UTHOR JORDAN Corcoran was diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder when she was a freshman in college. One of the biggest struggles she faced at the time was being able to effectively communicate what she was experiencing. “Mental illness is a very lonely illness if you don’t have the tools to communicate,” Corcoran says. “I had this amazing support system, but I didn’t have any idea how to explain to them what was going on.”

Pittsburgh, PA 15203

STORIES THAT HEAL

You can raise money for animals by simply donating your gently used c clothing, shoes, housewares, and more! HAR earns money for every pound of donated items! humaneanimalrescue.org 36

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

7 p.m. Wed., April 18. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. www.namikeystonepa.org

So the Pittsburgher turned to writing. “I would write about panic attacks, I would write about what was stressing me out, and I would work through it,” Corcoran says. “And as I slowly started to write more and more, I began to heal, and it gave me the ability to speak on something that was consuming my life.” Next week, Corcoran will be featured in the first of a four-part reading series focused on mental health and hosted by NAMI Keystone Pennsylvania, a mental-health nonprofit, and arts organization City of Asylum. Corcoran has essentially livestreamed her battle with mental health via social media over the past five years. And in her book, Write It

Out, Corcoran gives readers 40 writing prompts to put a voice to their own struggles, even if they’re the only ones who ever read it. “I hope people feel inspired to accept themselves,” Corcoran says. “They are worth fighting for their health and taking care of themselves. Life is busy, and we’re all going in a million different directions, but we need to keep our mental and physical health as a top priority. The first step to that is accepting who you are.” At the Stories That Heal event, Corcoran will ask the audience to respond to a few of the prompts from her book. But she won’t ask them to share any personal experiences she isn’t ready to share herself. Before each of the writing prompts, she’ll share her own stories — from her most embarrassing moment to how she has dealt with the death of a loved one. “I hope that inspires them to not feel ashamed of what they’re going through, but to take control and take back some of that power that they lost when they were in the darkness of their struggle,” Corcoran says. “I want them to see the light is there.” Corcoran’s session promises to achieve what NAMI set out to accomplish with the reading series. “Jordan’s message is one of inclusiveness,” says Susan Caban, director of education at NAMI Keystone Pennsylvania. “People dealing with mental health often feel very isolated and alone. It’s about knowing you’re not alone.”


TOP 5

MARIJUANA FILMS BY CHARLIE DEITCH CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Friday

REEFER MADNESS This 1936 exploitation film preaches the extreme dangers of marijuana. It was made by a church group to scare adults into scaring their children — just one hit of weed will make you commit a hit and run, murder and sexual assault. It’s still used by mostly GOP legislators to keep weed illegal.

UP IN SMOKE Every stoner film you’ve ever loved was inspired by Cheech and Chong’s 1978 comedy. This is the genre’s Citizen Kane.

FRIDAY After getting fired on his day off, Craig (Ice Cube) and his dealer best friend Smokie (Chris Tucker) have an adventure-packed day in their South Central neighborhood. There’s weed, sure, but there are also lessons about friendship, standing up to bullies and saying goodbye to Felisha.

PINEAPPLE EXPRESS Pound-for-pound, this Seth Rogen/ James Franco movie may offer more weed smoking than any other film in history. Franco is Rogen’s clingy drug dealer, and after the latter witnesses the former’s boss commit a murder, they go on the lam.

TRUTHSAYERS SPEAKER SERIES

presents ANNA DEAVERE SMITH Playwright, actor, and educator Anna Deavere Smith uses her singular brand of theatre to explore issues of community, character, and diversity in America. The MacArthur Foundation honored Smith with the “Genius” Fellowship for creating “a new form of theatre — a blend of theatrical art, social commentary, journalism, and intimate reverie.”

APRIL 27 2018 | 8 PM

FOR TICKETS VISIT AACC-AWC.ORG OR 412.339.1011

DAZED AND CONFUSED Barely edging out Half-Baked, this film that launched the career of Matthew McConaughey, makes you nostalgic for getting high and acting like an ass. Set in 1976, a group of incoming high school seniors throw a “party at the moon tower” on the last day of school.

980 LIBERTY AVENUE Q PITTSBURGH, PA 15222

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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Kick it with a

TASTY GROOVE

Djs are every Wed, Fri, & Sat. 10pm - 1am. Bands start between 8 - 9 pm on Thursday nights.

April 12th

David & Pappy from The CAUSE

April 19th Told Ya So

April 26th

Ridgemont High (80s covers)

May 3rd

Juan & Co.

May 17th

Casual Hobos Blue Grass

CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Swingin’: NSX’s Joe Palacki, Dave Frye, Mike Urick, Walter Hunter and Ken Reeser, outside NOLA on the Square

May 24th Told Ya So

.MUSIC.

DJs & N LIVE MUSIC

JUST KEEP SWINGING BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EON SWING X-Perience began

Outdoor seating now open

EatShady.com

412-697-0909

5500 Walnut Street, Shadyside

when the band’s original members were in high school and came together for a talent show. Twenty years later, they’re still going strong. “It means that I don’t know when to quit, I don’t know when to give it up,” jokes Mike Urick, about the time he’s spent rocking and swinging with NSX. “We never thought we would play anything past the one show,” says Urick, NSX’s lead vocalist. “We had such a great time that we decided to just keep doing it. But no one ever thought in 20 years it’d still be going!” The band began as a cover act under the name Neon Spam X-Perience, because the members wanted the name to include an element from the period-

ic table (neon), as well as a misspelling. “We were so nerdy,” laughs Urick. But NSX was worried about copyright issues stemming from the canned-meat product. But they wanted to keep the same initials, so “Spam” was changed to “Swing.” “Swing made sense, because we’ve always had horns in the band. Why not lean into that sound?” says Urick. Growing up, Urick had a close relationship with his grandfather, and the two would listen to big bands and Louis Armstrong. “He had played in a band for 65 years, and he played a lot of the same music we ended up covering,” says Urick. But Neon Swing is not your traditional swing band. “We have elements of classic swing,

NEON SWING X-PERIENCE 8:30 p.m. Fri., April 13. Hard Rock Café, 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $15. www.neonswing.net

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but we picked up lots of other genres along the way, too,” he says. To mark its 20 years, the band is releasing We’ve Only Just Begun, a 15song album with originals, covers and reworked classics from the band’s tenure. It is the band’s eighth release, and it features energetic covers of songs like “I Wanna Be Like You,” from The Jungle Book, and “In Heaven There Is No Beer,” a polka standard. It also features originals like “275 Miles,” a song about the time that Urick spent driving 275 miles back to Pittsburgh to play with NSX when he lived in Cincinnati. Then, there’s “Thomas, WV,” a song about the band’s first, but comically unfortunate, out-ofstate show. “For our 10-year-anniversary album [Here to Stay], we went for more of a ‘best of’ feel. But this record was more about having fun and picking songs that had meaning for us, and seeing how it would all hang together,” says Urick.


Twenty years is a long time to be a band, and there’s bound to be some personnel changes. About 40 members have rotated in and out of the ensemble, and the group currently performs as an eight- or nine-piece. The current lineup, as featured on the album, is as follows: Urick sings and plays trumpet and nose flute; Walter Hunter plays saxophone, clarinet and trumpet; Joe Palacki mans the drums and percussion; Steve Tomkowitz sings and plays saxophone; Dave Frye riffs on the guitar; Chris Dufalla sings and plays trombone; Carmen Marotta plays piano and keys, and sings; and Ken Reeser and Randy Miller take turns sharing bass duties, depending on who is free for the many gigs that NSX performs. “The first tour that we did was a lot of fun, and at the time, I was at the point where I was thinking I wanted to slow down, maybe be done with it. But we figured, let’s go on the road and give it a shot,” explains Urick. “It was so much fun that we didn’t want to stop doing it.” Since then, the band has performed at dream venues and opened for its idols in Pittsburgh and across the country. “Ten or 11 years ago we performed in Hollywood in the Derby, where Big Bad Voodoo Daddy played in the movie Swingers, and we really love Big Bad Voodoo Daddy,” says Urick. The group has also performed on the same Central Park stage in New York City where Duke Ellington’s band performed, and have played at big rock-

abilly festivals like Viva Las Vegas. NSX is now an institution in Pittsburgh. The band performs each month at NOLA on the Square, and this year, Pittsburgh City Council proclaimed April 13 to be “Neon Swing X-Perience Day.” In an effort to catalog its legacy thus far, the band will perform two sets at the Hard Rock Café this Friday. The first is a performance of We’ve Only Just Begun in its entirety, and the second set is a mix of “best of” songs and requests from the audience.

“BUT NO ONE EVER THOUGHT IN 20 YEARS IT’D STILL BE GOING!” “We’re trying to use [the second set] to hit some things that didn’t make it to the album that means something to us, and also to be able to take requests from our repertoire,” explains Urick. “Rehearsing for the second set has been kind of fun, because it’s a work in progress.” Urick is just excited to share the album with NSX’s fans, and to perhaps get people dancing the night away. “The bottom line is, we just want people to have a good time and enjoy the album,” says Urick. “It was really a labor of love putting it together, and we just hope people enjoy it as much as we do.”

.MUSIC.

MP 3 MONDAY >> THROUGH BINOCULARS Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “Marlayna / One More Day,” by Through Binoculars. It’s a beachy folk number full of choral harmonies and longing. Stream or download “Marlayna / One More Day” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at www. pghcitypaper.com and slip into dreamy comfort.

ITALIAN SUMMER CAMP!!! Speak, sing, cook... all in Italian!!!

During this one week jam-packed with fun and creative activities, children will be learning about the Italian language and culture thru role plays, skits, singing, cooking, acting, a puppet theater, and even a virtual journey into a different city of Italy for every day of camp! CAMP 1 June 18th - 22nd CAMP 2 June 25th - 29th CAMP 3 July 16th - 20th FULL TIME: 9am-3pm PART TIME: 9am-12pm

ISTITUTO MONDO ITALIANO 7604 Charleston Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15218 Tel: (412) 478-2681 (Viviana Altieri) Online: www.istitutomondoitaliano.org Email: mondoitaliano@earthlink.net

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19 • 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM DEMONSTRATION WORKSHOP: CUTTING AND GLAZING GLASS FOR WOOD AND METAL WINDOWS

REGIS WILL This workshop will focus on basic glass cutting with the goal of fitting glass into a wooden window sash. You will learn how to secure and seal the glass with glazer points and glazing putty. Many of the techniques shown will also be applicable to metal casement windows. ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Regis Will is a woodworker, craftsman, and owner of Vesta Home Services, a consulting firm on house restoration and Do-it-Yourself projects. He blogs about his work at The New Yinzer Workshop

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER IN APRIL. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NONMEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR CALL 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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.FILM.

DOG DAZE BY AL HOFF AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

ONSIDERING Wes Anderson’s cinematic ouevre, there are three camps of viewers: the diehard fans (“Wes is a whimsical genius!”); the haters (“Insufferable! Culturally insensitive!”); and the rest of us: “I liked it OK; it looked great; it didn’t quite grab me, but I’m a Bill Murray completist”; and so on. His latest film, the stop-motionanimated Isle of Dogs, is sure to draw predictable responses. The story takes place in a highly curated, Andersonian realm, the fictional Japanese city of Megasaki 20 years in the future. The mean mayor has banished all dogs to Trash Island (just what it sounds like). A boy named Atari finds his way to Trash Island, seeking his discarded pet. There, Atari is aided by a pack of dogs (variously voiced by Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray and Jeff Goldblum). It’s a standard quest-and-redemption narrative, but rife with assorted trappings — language play (simultaneously translated Japanese, haikus); fantastic

The dogs of Trash Island

ISLE OF DOGS DIRECTED BY: Wes Anderson STARRING: Bryan Cranston, Bill Murray, Greta Gerwig In Japanese and English

sets; a subplot involving scientists; flashbacks; a re-telling of a myth; and a mini-lesson in sushi preparation. In Anderson’s use of Japan and many of its cultural signifiers, there is a self-conscious “accessorizing” that borders on exoticizing another culture for entertainment. (Note, too, that villains are the Japanese people we literally cannot understand,

and the heroes are the dogs voiced by recognizable American actors.) A charitable interpretation would chalk it up to homage, but “Japan” here feels as about as inauthentic, if still charming, as the skyway trash-conveyor the dogs use to traverse the island. An animated movie about talking dogs set in a not-so-real place gives a filmmaker plenty of leeway to craft a story not beholden to the same old rules, so it’s a disappointment to see the female characters get typical short shrift. Among the humans is an American exchange student, Tracy (Greta Gerwig), who, while a person of action, is a hot mess of manic,

Pay-What-YouWish! ($10 Suggested)

conspiracy-mined and boy-crazy, trapped beneath a blonde Angela Davis ’fro. (Does this movie, with its already complicated outsider’s take on another culture, really need a white American savior?) And of all the dogs on the island — that is, every dog ever in Japan — only two females are featured: the glossy, unattainable beauty, Nutmeg (Scarlett Johansson), a former show dog; and a wife and mother of many puppies. C’mon, dude: There couldn’t have been a couple of feisty female dogs in the gang? This isn’t a movie about Navy SEALs, Franciscan Brothers or some other gender-restricted group. Give every dog its day!

BACHBOOMBOX B AAC M 31, 2018 @ 7PM May Ma Bare Ba Barebones Productions

Turn the dial for an eclectic live performance with Magic Organs, Anqwenique,and more!

Tickets: 412-624-4129 www.chambermusicpittsburgh.org

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MEET THE CANDIDATES! Pittsburgh City Paper and Women for the Future of Pittsburgh are hosting a Candidate Forum so you can get to better know a candidate. Join them as they explore the visions and policy stances of candidates in PA Districts 21, 34 and 38.

When: Thursday, April 12th, from 6:00 – 9:00 Where: Spirit, Lawrenceville Moderators: Representatives from the City Paper and WTF Pittsburgh Admission to this event is free, and it is open to the public. Just like Pittsburgh City Paper isn’t your typical publication, and WTF Pittsburgh isn’t your typical PAC, this will not be your typical forum. Expect fast-paced, fun, and as always, informative.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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.PODCAST.

STUFF WE LIKE

BY REBECCA ADDISON RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GIVE ME MURDER >> OR GIVE ME DEATH EPICAST NETWORK EPICASTNETWORK.COM

If you’re sick of the drama surrounding your favorite true-crime podcast (ahem, Sword and Scale), tune into this local offering from hosts Lena Berry and Alex Stypula. Give Me Murder or Give Me Death puts a comedic twist on the true crime genre — think My Favorite Murder and The Last Podcast on the Left. In some episodes, the hosts take on cases ripped from the headlines, like the story of the Central Park Five. In other episodes, they discuss more local stories, such as a recent episode on Pennsylvania ghost stories. And still more episodes delve into generally creepy topics, like one from January that explored necrophilia. Listening to this podcast feels like sitting around the camp fire with friends trading scary stories, debating the criminal-justice system, or falling down the Wikipedia-page rabbit hole for a fascinating crime you’ve never heard of before. •

$88

+tax

er us tom c w e -n al* -

i - spec

CP PHOTO BY CHANCELOR HUMPHREY

Amir Miles

.MUSIC.

REAL DEAL

BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

LOT HAS happened in the roughly 12 months since City Paper first wrote

about Amir Miles, a fledgling alt-R&B artist who had recently dropped out of college to focus on his music full time. A year ago, he had just scored a gig as the opening act for GZA, of the Wu-Tang Clan, at the Rex Theater, and his tunes were gaining traction online. His newest song, “Bad Habits,” had received 60,000 online streams in a single day — pretty good for a new artist guiding his own career. He knew he would build upon those successes; he just didn’t know how much or how quickly. “Dude, it’s been awesome,” Miles tells CP. “After I was on the cover of CP, I got a great gig with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and started opening up for a lot of different bands, did some house shows and opened up for [hip-hop trio] Migos at WVU. I released a new single through an indie-record label, and then in September, I released my EP, Face•Less. And after that, I got the call.” That call was from Capitol Records. The label loved the EP, which hit a million streams in January, and signed Miles to a three-single distribution deal.

LISTEN TO AMIR MILES’ LATEST SINGLE On SoundCloud (soundcloud.com/amirmiles), Spotify (https://tinyurl.com/amirmiles) and other music streaming services.

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

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* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

“Apparently, they had been following me since ‘Bad Habits’ blew up,” says Miles, about the single that has now been streamed nearly a million times. “That’s how major labels work these days. They don’t go to shows, you don’t reach out to them. They go online and see what music people are listening to. “Once the EP hit and it did well, they realized, ‘Hey, this kid can write more than one or two good songs.’” Miles recently released the first single in that deal, “Neon//Love,” and in March, he played his first headlining gig, selling out The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, along with his long-time producer NXFCE. “It was an amazing experience,” Miles says of the Funhouse show. “I’m on that stage, and people are singing along to my songs. That’s happened a couple times, maybe they know a song. But this was a big crowd, and they’re singing along, and they know the words to all of my songs. “When I saw that, it hit me that people really like what I was doing. My songs were getting into their heads, and they were sticking. I first started writing music because I thought it would be fun, and girls would like me. But it’s so much more than that now. I’m connecting with a lot of people through my music, and that feels pretty special.”


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WED., APRIL 25 SAIL ON: THE BEACH BOYS TRIBUTE 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $20-140. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

WED., APRIL 25 BILLY STRINGS 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. $15-18. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest JP Biondo of Cabinet.

THU., APRIL 26 THE CADILLAC THREE 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $22-35. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

THU., APRIL 26 WALKING PAPERS 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. $10-12. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

PHOTO CREDIT: Jeff Dean

SUN., APRIL 29 DWEEZIL ZAPPA

THU., APRIL 26 JON LANGSTON 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $12.50-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Jacob Powell.

FRI., APRIL 27 POTTED POTTER 7:30 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $35.25-70.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FRI., APRIL 27 STARS ON ICE 7:30 P.M. PPG PAINTS ARENA DOWNTOWN. $12-150. 412-642-1800 or ticketmaster.com.

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MON., APRIL 30 MUSHROOMHEAD 5:30 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $20-23. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guests Vyces, Gabriel And The Apocalypse, Ventana & Blood Sun.

7:30 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $45-95. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

TUE., MAY 1 DWAYNE DOLPHIN

SAT., APRIL 28 RUSSELL DICKERSON

5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412456-6666 or trustarts.org.

8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $18-30. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Livy Jeanne.

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SAT., APRIL 28 FULL MOON HIKE 8 P.M. BOYCE PARK MONROEVILLE.

7:30 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. 412-653-2695. $15-17. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. With special guests Lullwater, Shattered & Venus in Furs.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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CALENDAR APRIL 12-18

PAIGE TIBBE’S “WHO HAVE I BECOME”

^ Thu., April 12: I See You

THURSDAY APRIL 12 ART Taking portraits to a new level, the I See You exhibition reveals more about the artists’ subjects than just their physical likenesses. The exhibition will be on display at Point Park University until May 1, and features work from six members of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh — Peggi Habets, Annie Heisey, Kenneth Nicholson, Marian Phillips and Paige Tibbe. Utilizing contemporary portraiture, each artist presents the image of the subject with

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great detail and thought — creating a wider range of emotion connected to the paintings and a greater sense of familiarity. Tonight, there will be a curator-led artist talk, In Conversation. Lauren Ortego 6:30 p.m. Lawrence Hall, 201 Wood St., Downtown. Free. www.aapgh.org

WORD For the past year, dozens of poets throughout the Pittsburgh area competed to qualify for Steel City Slam’s annual Grand Slam competition. Steel City Slam, the city’s adult poetry-slam league, has been hosting competitions since the mid-1990s. The group is now part of

the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective, an organization that provides a space for self-expression, identity exploration and social justice, through spoken-word leagues, performances and community writing workshops. Tonight, 14 people will compete for a shot at the 2018 title. The winner will receive a cash prize and the right to represent Pittsburgh at the National Poetry Slam in Chicago. Rebecca Addison 7 p.m. City of Asylum, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. $11.42. www.facebook.com/steelcityslam

STAGE Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre revolutionized fiction with its coming-

of-age story told from a female perspective. Tonight, PICT Classic Theatre continues its production of the 19thcentury classic. The work was adapted from Brontë’s novel by PICT artistic and executive director Alan Stanford. His dramatization was originally commissioned by the Gate Theatre, in Dublin, and has also been performed at The Guthrie Theater, in Minneapolis. The show features Karen Baum in the title role, Paul Bernardo as Mr. Rochester, and James FitzGerald as Mr. Brocklehurst; Stanford directs. Closing night is Sat., April 28. RA 7:30 p.m. WQED’s Fred Rogers Studio, 4802 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $13-39. www.picttheatre.org


Love Beer?

PHOTO COURTESY OF PICT CLASSIC THEATRE

^ Thu., April 12: Paul Bernardo and Karen Baum in Jane Eyre

COMEDY Eleven comedians walk into a theater. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the set-up for a joke, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the actual set-up for the Burning Bridges Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second event happening tonight. The Super Stacked Showcase continues four days of comedic performances occurring at venues around the city. The show will feature Aston Wallace, Louis Michael, Garrett Titlebaum, Diego Atinasio, Joe Pettis, JohnMichael Bond, Mary Jane French, William Spottedbear, Joey Marchi and Arish Singh. Other headliners slated for the festival, now in its third year, include Liza Treyger, Bill Crawford, Dave Ross and Emma Arnold. The festival continues through Sun., April 15. RA 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, 943 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $12. www.burningbridgesfestival.com

WRITING In 2013, University of Pittsburgh student Alex Rowan passed away at just 23 years old. To honor her love for writing, the Alexandra L. Rowan ^ Thu., April 12: Allison Amend at Alexandra Rowan Writing Festival

Foundation is holding its fourth Annual Creative Writing Festival with guest author Allison Amend, a former visiting assistant professor at Pitt, who is speaking tonight at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium. Amend is the author of the Independent Publisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award-winning short-story collection Things That Pass for Love. The rest of the festival will continue into Friday, with Amend judging writing entries in three categories â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fiction, nonfiction and poetry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and a fund awarded to a student for a writing-related internship. LO 8:30 p.m. 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. www.alexrowanfoundation.org

April 27 & 28, 2018 There are many beer tasting events to choose from these days, but not many are at the base of a mountain and none are in the best ski EDULQWKHUHJLRQ7KH)RJJ\*RJJOH(QMR\WKHoQHVWVSHFLDOW\DQG craft beers from a unique selection of breweries from across the US and world featuring more than 110 beers from 50 breweries that include New Belgium, Duclaw, Elysian, Blue Point, 412 Brewing, Ballast Point, Erie Brewing, Fatheads, and many more!

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FRIDAY

APRIL 13 DRINKS Raise a glass with other history-lovers at Cocktails & Camaraderie, the first museum cocktail night of 2018 for Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum. Guests will be offered four popular mid-century cocktails to sip, as they tour exhibits that focus on the Civil War, World War II, Korea and

VSULQJVFRP

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^ Fri., April 13: Guerilla Toss

Vietnam. House docents will be available to help visitors explore artifacts and learn about these eras in history. The proceeds will benefit Soldiers & Sailors. This event is for 21 and older. Celine Roberts 6 p.m. 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $5 ($10 at the door). www.soldiersandsailorshall.org

MUSIC Your fav local tapes-only label is throwing a birthday party at the Mr. Roboto Project, and you’re invited. Crafted Sounds, run by up-and-coming Pittsburgh legend Connor Murray, is celebrating its second year of life on this earth, and we think that’s something you should get excited about. Some of Pittsburgh’s DIY finest are taking over Roboto for the frolic, including pop-punk lads Short Fictions and indiewave Dinosoul. Also featured are Surf Bored, Just Fern and Romance Nyogu. The first 30 people to show up get a

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limited-edition pin. Emily Bennett 6:30 p.m. 5016 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. www.therobotoproject.com

MUSIC Singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara visits the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall tonight. Originally from Mali, Diawara recently found a home among the French — making her an exceptional fit for the Warhol/Carnegie Nexus event series “Becoming Migrant ... What Moves You?” Diawara’s impeccable vocal tone and control combined with emotive melodies will make this event a magical evening of world music. Her unconventional approach to both electric and acoustic guitars is refreshing. Diawara once described her song, “Kélé,” as about finding peace — specifically for Mali — but also within the hearts of anyone listening. EB 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $20. www.warhol.org

PLAY Imagine showing up at an art class only to find out the guy you’ve been messaging on Tinder is the model. That’s the premise of Pittsburgh-based playwright Brian Pope’s Milo de Venus. The world premiere tonight features Joanna Getting, Hazel Leroy, Jalina McClarin, Max Reusing and Mike Zolovich, and is directed by Shannon Knapp. Says Pope, “My goal with the script is to subvert the artist-muse complex I watched play out in shows like Sunday in the Park With George, not just by casting a woman in the role of the artist and a man in the role of the muse, but also by bringing that conflict down to earth.” RA 8 p.m. The Glitter Box Theater, 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $1525. milodevenus.brownpapertickets.com

MUSIC New York City may be famous for its pizza and Broadway — but what about its

acid rock? Guerilla Toss will certainly have you believing in the power of trippy New York rock ’n’ roll at The Rock Room, with a sound that billows and twists, and lyrics that leave you seeing in Technicolor. The bands on the bill make this a journey of several genres, with IT IT, a conglomerate of field recordings with post-punk influences; hardcore punkers Microwaves; and Plastic Idea, with its dreamy 1980sproduction-style influence totaled out with riffy hooks. This is the perfect mashup for a weird Friday night in Pittsburgh. EB. 9 p.m. 1054 Herron Ave., Polish Hill. $10. www.brownpapertickets.com

SATURDAY APRIL 14 ART Experience the art that nearby Greensburg


has to offer by attending this year’s ArtsWalk. Taking place all afternoon, ArtsWalk presents you with a plethora of places to visit and check out the work of local artists, all while enjoying a leisurely walk around town. There’s something for every art aficionado, from mosaic-art activity with Pottery Playhouse at Art in the Alley to an artwork sale from Students in the Arts and Student Art Therapy Association at Seton Hill Arts Center. You can get a PDF version of the walk on the website and even check out which businesses are offering specials to participants. LO 11 a.m. Westmoreland Museum of Art, 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. Free. www.thewestmoreland.org

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SATURDAY M. Ward 8 p.m. Club Café, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com ^ Fri., April 13: Fatoumata Diawara

WRESTLING A week after the Supercard of Honor in New Orleans — one of the most closely watched Ring of Honor events of the year — Ring of Honor is bringing its dynamic wrestling back to Stage AE with Steel City Excellence. I’m writing this paragraph before the insanity goes down in NOLA, so by this Saturday, there may be brand-new champs, as well as fresh feuds to build and scores to settle. But, most importantly, there will be an appearance from whomever the inaugural Women of Honor Champion ends up being. (I’ll riot if it’s not Tenille Dashwood.) Meg Fair 5:30 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $30-75. www.promowestlive.com

SUNDAY Lawn Care, BBGuns, Calyx, Today Is the Best Day Ever 6 p.m. Brookline Teen Outreach, Brookline. www.brooklineteenoutreach.org

MONDAY Hear Tonight 6:30 p.m. Hard Rock Café, South Side. www.hardrock.com/Pittsburgh

TUESDAY Maxo Kream 7 p.m. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

WEDNESDAY

PARTY Have you ever felt you were meant to live in another time from decades gone by? Tonight, Quantum Theatre hosts its annual Q Ball, and this year’s theme is the underground art scene of the 1930s. Quantum is a comprised of playwrights, directors and actors who host theatrical experiences in uncommon settings. At Q Ball 18 Cabaret Voltaire, guests will

Pillärs 7 p.m. Black Forge Coffee House, Allentown. www.blackforgecoffee.com

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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get a taste of Josephine Baker’s Paris, the films of Fritz Lang, and German expressionist dancing. Suggested attire is 1930s cabaret, and Quantum poses the question: “Are you the star or the voyeur?” RA 7 p.m. Gym at Butler Street Lofts, 4434 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $50-225. www.quantumtheatre.com

MUSIC Looking for an artist who blends rock ’n’ roll and soul, with a history in the local music scene involving thrash metal, jazz, the blues and hip hop? Look no further for that unique blend than Byron Nash & Plan B. Featured weekly on 91.3 WYEP FM’s The Soul Show, the band has proved it has what it takes to blend genres and please crowds. Byron Nash & Plan B are Pittsburgh artists of many talents, but don’t take our word for it — check out the performance tonight at The Stage at Karma. LO 8 p.m. 1713 E. Carson St., South Side. $12 at the door; $10 advance. www.jamesstreetpromotions.com

MUSIC Tonight, at Cattivo, The Lampshades is releasing an album called Astrology, and I guarantee it’s going to be as technical and vast as the album name suggests. The single “Astrology II” is a slightly fuzzy bass- and effects-driven number from the 14-song album. The other single, “Civilization and Its Discontents,” features a ton of floor toms, and a sleepy singer we know from the band’s last four albums, barely rising above the circle of background vocals. Alt-rockers Rave Ami (you knew them previously as Honey) and local mutant-noise rockers Choir are also paying a visit, and you don’t want to miss this show. EB 9 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $5. www.cattivopgh.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF ADAM MILLIRON

^ Sat., April 14: Greensburg Art Walk

SUNDAY APRIL 15 CRAFT This afternoon, the Avant-Garde Art & Craft Show will combine your love of buying original handmade crafts with

your other love of donating to charitable causes. The organizers of the event started it in 2011 as a way to showcase local artists, and to bring the community together for a cause that benefits the surrounding area. This particular show will be donating a portion of the proceeds to the Bartko Foundation, a private nonprofit organization whose mission is to invest in

the self-sufficiency of single minority mothers. LO 10 a.m. The Georgetown Centre, 526 E. Bruceton Road, Pleasant Hills. $3 (children under 12 are free). www.avantgardeshows.com

FILM The second half of the 20th century saw a rise in global cinema, as countries

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th 30 Anniversary

Weekend April 12-14 Thursday April 12 The #1 and only original Blues Jam from 1988 w/ The Hell Hounds 9PM ^ Sun., April 15: Avant-Garde Art & Craft Show

embraced the medium to tell their stories. One new voice was the Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray, who debuted in 1955 with Pather Panchali, a story depicting the lives of a poor rural family just as the country begins to modernize. Among the indelible scenes in this visually poetic neo-realist-influenced feature is that of the young boy, Apu, running through a field of grain to catch a glimpse of a train. Ray would follow Apu’s journey with two more films, a.k.a. The Apu Trilogy, but you can catch the first chapter tonight at Pittsburgh Filmmaker’s Regent Square Theater. Al Hoff 6 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. $8. www.cinema.pfpca.org

Friday April 13 Bill Toms w/ Hard Rain 7:30PM Saturday April 14 The Rhythm Aces 4-8PM Aris Paul 9PM-Midnight 2526 E. Carson Street • Southside 412.431.4090 • Excusesbarandgrill.com

MONDAY APRIL 16 MUSIC You might know him from his MTV reality-television show Todrick, or maybe providing choreography for Beyoncé in her “Blow” video. Or perhaps you’ve heard of him from his creation of multiple musical parodies on YouTube? But at the Rex Theater, you’re going to know Todrick Hall as a pop icon in the making. This is the first world tour he’s ever headlined — and he’s selling out venues in London, Los Angeles and New York City. Honestly, it’s worth it just to see the man dance. EB 7:30 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20. All ages. www.rextheater.net

TUESDAY APRIL 17 HISTORY Doris Kearns Goodwin went from being

^ Mon., April 16: Todrick Hall

a White House intern to a member of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s staff to a professor at Harvard University. Now, she’s coming to Pittsburgh. Goodwin is a noted historian and author with a few famous presidential autobiographies to her credit. Presented by the Chatham University Pennsylvania Center for Women & Politics, Goodwin will be discussing her most recent book, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism, along with her other works. This event is currently seating on a first-come/first-served basis with overflow seating available on campus at a secondary site. LO 6 p.m. Chatham University Memorial Chapel, 5799 West Woodland Road, Shadyside. Free. www.chatham.edu/pcwp •

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Volunteers at Humane Animal Rescue’s North Side and East Liberty shelters lived in cages last weekend to raise awareness for their adoptable animals.

Check out more of our photos on our Blogh at www.pghcitypaper.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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West Penn Allegheny Health System, Inc. seeks Social Worker to work in Pittsburgh, PA, & collaborate with all disciplines for the purpose of assessing, planning, implementing & evaluating/documenting psychosocial factors that contribute to patients’ illnesses &/or have an impact on continuity of care. Apply at: https://highmarkhealth. wd1.myworkdayjobs. com/highmark/job/ West-Penn-Hospital/ Social-Worker_J116501.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time April 17, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

• DIESEL FUEL AND GASOLINE General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/ default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

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FOOD HOT TAKES

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ACROSS 1. Hot bedtime drink 6. Have legs 10. Behind 13. Sky blue 14. Around 15. Alibi ___ 16. Hot take #1: Stockpiling the Half and Half? 18. Ticked a box 19. Shorn females 20. Hairy chest beater 21. Kind of engine 22. Drum fill sound 24. Hot take #2: Weenie that’s been in the water too long? 26. Feel (for) 28. Lays down the lawn 29. Hot take #3: Biblical brother’s sausages? 34. Make a wager 37. Fare poorly 38. Wraps up, as with cables 40. Altar in space 41. Thorny patch 44. Hot take #4: Indian takeout enjoyed mid-flight? 47. Jump in the rink 49. Distort 50. Hot takes #5 and #6: Bag for Japanese rice wine?

54. Country singer Darius 58. “Fudge” 59. Big name in hotels 61. Waithe of “Ready Player One” 62. Olive ___ 63. Hot take #7: Horse meat served at a deli? 65. Tire inflation meas. 66. Solo songs 67. 2017 World Series winner 68. “A spider!” 69. Eat off the floor? 70. Particle with a quark

DOWN 1. Stunning weapon 2. Maestro Seiji 3. Bed cover 4. Cold medicine brand 5. Strong urge 6. Turkish greens 7. Team building 8. Guitarist Boz 9. Scottish cap 10. Nebula that shows no movement 11. Vermont ski resort 12. Make a second hole 14. John Fogerty’s band, briefly 17. Like some Neil

Gaiman works 21. ___ Park 23. Part of the body oft-torn by athletes 25. Chunk of gum 27. Eve’s grandson 29. Wine selection, briefly 30. Pump stuff 31. 1988 Olympic men’s singles figure skating gold medalist 32. Model package 33. Took care of some dragons 35. Benjamin who sang “Just What I Needed” 36. Rejecting vote

39. Laconophile’s love 42. Sent packing 43. Scale notes 45. Wine specification 46. Face-to-face 48. Pakistan metropolis 50. Listerine rival 51. Come into being 52. Bitter person 53. Boat for one 55. Some cigarettes 56. Diciembre follower 57. Hose makeup 60. NBA playoffs channel 63. Baby food 64. Escape plan? LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 36-year-old straight woman. I was sexually and physically abused as a kid, and raped in my early 20s. I have been seeing a great therapist for the last five years, and I am processing things and feeling better than I ever have. I was in a long-term relationship that ended about two years ago. I started dating this past year, but I’m not really clicking with anyone. I’ve had a lot of first dates, but nothing beyond that. My problem is that I’d really love to get laid. The idea of casual sex and one-night stands sounds great — but in reality, moving that quickly with someone I don’t know or trust freaks me out, causes me to shut down, and prevents me from enjoying anything. Even thinking about going home with someone causes me to panic. When I was in a relationship, the sex was great. But now that I’m single, it seems like this big, scary thing. Is it possible to get laid without feeling freaked out? SEXUAL COMFORT AND REASSURANCE ELUDES DAME

It is possible for you to get laid without feeling freaked out. The answer — how you go home with someone without panicking — is so obvious, SCARED, that I’m guessing your therapist has already suggested it: Have sex with someone you know and trust. You didn’t have any issues having sex with your ex because you knew and trusted him. For your own emotional safety, and to avoid recovery setbacks, you’re going to have to find someone willing to get to know you — someone willing to make an emotional investment in you — before you can have sex again. You’ve probably thought to yourself, “But everyone else is just jumping into bed with strangers and having amazing sexual experiences!” And while it is true that many people are capable of doing just that, at least as many or more are incapable of having impulsive one-night stands because they too have a history of trauma, or because they have other psychological, physical or logistical issues that make one-night stands impossible. Your trauma left you with this added burden, SCARED, and I don’t want to minimize your legitimate frustration or your anger. It sucks, and I fucking hate the people who victimized you. But it may help

you feel a little better about having to make an investment in someone before becoming intimate if you can remind yourself that you aren’t alone. Demisexuals, other victims of trauma, people with body-image issues, people whose sexual interests are so stigmatized they don’t feel comfortable disclosing them to people they’ve just met — lots of people face the same challenge you do. Something else to bear in mind: It’s not unheard of for someone re-entering the dating scene to have some difficulty making new connections at first. The trick is to keep going on dates until you finally click with someone. In other words, SCARED, give yourself a break and take your time. Also, don’t hesitate to tell the men you date that you need to get to know a person before jumping into bed with him. That will scare some guys off, but only those guys who weren’t willing to get to know you — and those aren’t guys you would have felt safe fucking anyway, right? So be open and honest, keep going on those first dates, and eventually you’ll find yourself on a fifth date with a guy you can think about taking home without feeling panicked. Good luck.

moralizing bigot, DES, so the fact that this particular dishonest, moralizing bigot is incapable of hiding her truly repulsive feelings isn’t a reason to consider seeing her. Not being able to mask hateful feelings isn’t a redeeming quality — it’s the opposite. My boyfriend and I love each other deeply, and the thought of breaking up devastates me. We also live together. I deeply regret it and am full of shame, but I impulsively went through his texts for the first time. I found out that for the past few months he has been sexting and almost definitely hooking up with someone who I said I was not comfortable with. After our initial conversation about her (during which I expressed my discomfort), he never brought her up again. Had I known that he needed her in his life this badly, I would have taken some time to sit with my feelings and figure out where my discomfort with her was coming from and tried to move through it. We are in an open relationship, but his relationship with her crosses what we determined as our “cheating” boundary: hiding a relationship. How do I confess to what I did and confront him about what I found without it blowing up into a major mess?

CONS: CRIMINAL, IRASCIBLE, GRANDIOSE SENSE OF SELF, RACIST, ABSTEMIOUS.

This is about a girl, of course. Pros: She cannot hide her true feelings. Cons: Criminal, irascible, grandiose sense of self, racist, abstemious, self-centered, anxious, moralist, monogamous, biased, denial as a defense mechanism, manipulative, liar, envious and ungrateful. She is also anthropologically and historically allocated in another temporal space continuum. And last but not least: She runs less quickly than me despite eight years age difference and her having the lungs of a 26-year-old nonsmoker. Thoughts? DESPERATE EROTIC SITUATION

If someone is criminal, racist and dishonest — to say nothing of being allocated in another temporal space continuum (whatever that means) — I don’t see how “cannot hide her true feelings” lands on the “pro” side of the pro/con ledger. You shouldn’t want to be with a dishonest,

UPSET GIRL HOPES RELATIONSHIP SURVIVES

Snooping is always wrong, of course, except when the snooper discovers something they had a right to know. While there are definitely less-ambiguous examples (cases where the snoopee was engaged in activities that put the snooper at risk), your boyfriend violating the boundaries of your open relationship rises to the level of “right to know.” This is a major mess, UGHRS, and there’s no way to confront your boyfriend without risking a blow-up. So tell him what you know and how you found out. You’ll be in a better position to assess whether you want this relationship to survive after you confess and confront. On the Lovecast, Mistress Matisse explains the horrifying SESTA-FOSTA bill: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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2018

NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN! Think you know who deserves Pittsburgh gold? Tell us who you think is the Best Of Pittsburgh now through April 29th.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 11-18, 2018

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Compassionate Certification Centers Presents the 2018

Co-hosted by

MEDICAL CANNABIS

The Intersection of Cannabis Culture EVENT HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: • On-site • Cannabis Career Fair with local and national companies • Campaign For Compassion on-stage fundraiser • 4.2 Mile Run/Walk in partnership with the 420 Games • Riverboat cruise and fundraiser for the Disabled American Veterans and Make a Wish Foundations.

Nearly 6,000 attendees are expected to attend the second-annual event, including hundreds of exhibitors.

April 12-14, 2018 David L. Lawrence Convention Center | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

www.cccregister.com

The Marijuana Issue - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 15

The Marijuana Issue - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 15