Page 1

FREE EVERY WEEK!

PITTSBURGH’S LEADING ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT NEWSWEEKLY

MARCH 28APRIL 4, 2018

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM PGHCITYPAPER

PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

PGHCITYPAPER

PGHCITYPAPER


2

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM


The Magnetic Fields: 50 Song Memoir EVENTS 3.28, 29 & 30 2018 SPRING BREAK FREE DAYS The Jack Buncher Foundation is sponsoring three Free Days at The Warhol during Pittsburgh Public School’s Spring Break.

3.31 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY TOUR Free with museum admission

4.6 – 5-10pm SPECIAL HOURS Please note, we will be closed from 5-10 p.m.

6.19 & 6.20 - 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $40/$35 members one night, $70/$60 members both nights; visit warhol.org

The Warhol is thrilled to welcome back The Magnetic Fields to Pittsburgh, on their three-city limited 50 Song Memoir tour, which chronicles the 50 years of songwriter Stephin Merritt’s life with one song per year. The show is performed over two nights (songs 1–25 on night one, songs 26–50 on night two). The band is led by Stephin Merritt, who is widely considered one of the most talented songwriters of this generation. Co-presented with

4.13 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: FATOUMATA DIAWARA Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Nexus as part of its 2018 event series, Becoming Migrant… what moves you? and PANDEMIC Tickets $20/$15 members & students

4.14 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: COURT-CIRCUIT The Warhol theater Co-presented by the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets $15/$10 students and seniors in advance, $20/$15 students and seniors at the door

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

3


650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts and Entertainment Editor REBECCA ADDISON Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR News Writer RYAN DETO Interns EMILY BENNETT, SABRINA BODON, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

www.pghcitypaper.com PGHCITYPAPER

PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 13

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

MARKETING+PROMOTIONS Marketing Director BETHANY RUHE Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

ADMINISTRATION Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

PUBLISHER EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

4

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ON THE COVER: “To see McCutchen traded away for essentially a bucket of batting-practice balls and a Gatorade cooler is a real problem for me.”

News+Views 6 Food+Drink 12 Arts+Entertainment 18 Calendar 37 Classifieds 43

F IND O U R PIR AT E S PR E V IE W PU L L O U T O N PAGE 2 1

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.


Put your mind at ease with a 24/7 Nurse Line. UPMC for Kids keeps it simple. Let’s face it. Health care is complex. But with our UPMC MyHealth 24/7 Nurse Line, you and your child can connect with a registered nurse over the phone—anytime, anywhere. So choose the state’s largest CHIP plan—the one that keeps things simple: UPMC for Kids. Call 1-800-978-8762 today to learn more. TTY users call 1-800-361-2629.

UPMCHealthPlan.com/forkids

UPMC for Kids complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. ATENCIĂ“N: Si habla espaĂąol, tiene a su disposiciĂłn servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingßística. Llame al 1-800-650-8762 (TTY: 1-800-361-2629). ƛƌƥƼƙƌƥƞĆžÇŠÇ„Ç ƝǔĆźÇ‡ĆťÇ‡Ç‰Ç Ç‹ĆždžƚljnjNJNJǃLJDžÇ˜Ç€Ç”ÇƒĆžNjLJƝƚDžĆ˝Ç‡ÇŠÇ‹ÇŒÇˆÇ†Ç”ĆşĆžÇŠÇˆÇ„ĆšÇ‹Ç†Ç”ĆžÇŒÇŠÇ„ÇŒĆźÇ ÇˆĆžÇ‰ĆžĆťÇ‡Ć˝Ćš Ć ĆťÇ‡Ç†Ç Ç‹Ćž Ç‹ĆžÇ„ĆžÇ‹ĆšÇ‚Çˆ 

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

5


NEWS +VIEWS

CP ILLUSTRATION BY ASHLEY OLINGER

.SPORTS.

BUCCO BAN

Will protests by Pittsburgh Pirates fans have an effect on ownership? BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

6

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

ANS OF THE Pittsburgh Pirates are some of the most

resilient baseball fans on earth. Twenty years of losing seasons from 1993 to 2012 didn’t keep fans from PNC Park when the Buccos finally made the playoffs in 2013. But the 2018 offseason, after two consecutive losing seasons, was an especially hard pill to swallow for Pirates fans. Management traded away the face of the franchise in outfielder Andrew McCutchen, and shipped out arguably the team’s best pitcher, Gerrit Cole. On top of that, Major League Baseball’s players’ union filed a lawsuit against the Pirates and three other MLB teams, accusing them of unfairly benefiting from MLB’s revenue-sharing agreement. In March, the Pirates even upset a large group of fans when Pirates president Frank Coonelly spoke at a Republican Party fundraising event with U.S. Congressional

candidate Rick Saccone (R-Elizabeth). Even worse, Coonelly brought along the beloved Pirate Parrot to the fundraiser, further enraging fans. Following these moves and gaffes, calls for boycotts and protests started spreading on social media. Tens of thousands of fans are supporting these efforts, and some members of the sports media expect to see attendance drop off this year as a result. But will the demonstrations by fans actually affect how ownership manages the Pirates? Fans recognize their protests are unlikely to lead to significant action, like ownership selling the team. But, they are hopeful that if enough fans speak out, Pirates owners will work to rebuild trust with them. Historically, largescale boycotts and protests by sports fans are rarely followed through with much conviction. Sports journalists


understand the frustration from fans, but believe that anger just shows how hard it will be for fans to really quit the Pirates. “The thing that would hurt this team the most is apathy,” says Chris Mack, pregame/postgame radio host for Pirates baseball on The Fan 93.7 FM. “And I don’t think we are anywhere near that.” Jason Kauffman, of Ross Township, has been a Pirates fan for as long as he can remember. He told City Paper via email that this offseason was the most frustrating since 1992. In response to the Pirates 2018 moves, Kauffman started an online petition calling for Pirates majority-owner Bob Nutting to sell the team, “so that we can see a competitive baseball team year in and year out,” according to the petition. “I started the petition to give frustrated fans a voice,” wrote Kauffman. “I know that forcing Bob Nutting to sell the team is a pipe dream, so my intention was to draw attention to opportunities missed and the arrogance of the front office.” And the petition garnered a lot more attention than Kauffman presumed it would. Though he expected about 1,000 fans to join him, more than 60,500 people have signed his petition on change.org. Kauffman wrote that the petition’s support shows fans are incredibly upset and could be a force to be reckoned with. “I hope this leads to change,” wrote Kauffman. “It seems like a lot of people are going to choose to spend their money elsewhere this summer, and that’s what will really get the attention of management.” In a statement sent to CP, the Pirates responded to the growing number of fan protests and said they value the fervor from fans. Pirates spokesperson Brian Warecki says the last two seasons were “disappointing,” and he hopes the offseason moves will show a clear shift in direction. “We appreciate the passion of our fans and respect their desire to express that passion both in good times and bad,” wrote Warecki. “Our fans, along with our players, coaches and organization, have much higher expectations.” Warecki also wrote the Pirates will be “working hard every day to win back those fans” who may have lost faith in the team. Demonstrations by fans don’t always have the desired impact. Many times boycotts by fans don’t even materialize. Some Pittsburgh Steelers football fans claimed they were boycotting after players didn’t enter the field during the national anthem before a game on Sept. 24, 2017. But, as WTAE sportscaster Andrew Stockey pointed out in September on

TRUTHSAYERS SPEAKER SERIES

presents ANNA DEAVERE SMITH Playwright, actor, and educator Anna Deavere Smith uses her singular brand of theatre to explore issues of community, character, and diversity in America. The MacArthur Foundation honored Smith with the “Genius” Fellowship for creating “a new form of theatre — a blend of theatrical art, social commentary, journalism, and intimate reverie.”

APRIL 8 2018 | 7 PM

FOR TICKETS VISIT AACC-AWC.ORG OR 412.339.1011

980 LIBERTY AVENUE Q PITTSBURGH, PA 15222

CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

7


BUCCO BAN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

Annual Bridal Event

Saturday, April 7th 9:30AM - 6:00PM Squirrel Hill Only

CP FILE PHOTO

Will the fans still show up this year without McCutchen?

Twitter, the Steelers game following the anthem fiasco actually had higher TV ratings than the Sept. 24 contest. Even Pirates fans have questionable follow-through when protesting. In 2007, the Bucco faithful planned a walkout during a home game to protest the team’s losing ways. The walkout gained significant media attention, but only about 100 fans left PNC Park, instead of the thousands that were expected.

You enjoy a

home cooked meal

You belong at Holiday.

Learn Why - 866.912.6818 YouBelongAtHoliday.com

Bethel Park 2960 BETHEL CHURCH ROAD BETHEL PARK, PA 15102 ©2018 HARVEST MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL NIC MANAGEMENT LLC.

8

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

only things fans can do to try to impact Pirates owners, but Mack says even those steps are unlikely to change the tactics of ownership. “The only thing fans can do is stop watching and stop going to games, but that is really hard for a fan that loves their team,” says Mack. “And this organization is going to make money before they sell a ticket. Tickets are going to be down, but that’s not going to affect the owner’s pocketbook that much.” MLB’s revenue-sharing agreement insures all baseball teams get a share of the profits made by the entire league. And Mack says that TV advertisements and other revenue sources also help to keep the Pirates profitable, regardless of ticket sales. However, Nutting has seen Also, in January of this year, several some financial losses already, thanks to groups formed on social media calling for the Pirates’ offseason moves. In Februprotests and boycotts of the Pirates. Some ary, West Virginia-based Weirton Medieven claimed to be planning protests outcal Center temporarily pulled its ads side of PNC Park on Opening Day, April 2. from the Nutting-owned Ogden NewsCP reached out to three of them, and none papers in response to the Pirates responded to inquiries. Pittsburgh trading McCutchen. Mayor Bill Peduto’s spokesperson Mack also says the Pirates Keyva Clark told CP in an email S PIRATEW have a good amount of young that no permits for protesting talent that could help the PREVIE T the Pirates have been filed team compete sooner than with the city for April 2. PULLO2U page 1 fans might think. “They are not Mack, of 93.7 FM, says fans’ tanking like teams are tanking frustrations are real, and that in Miami and Tampa,” says Mack. the Pirates home-opener might not “They did sort of a rebuild this offseason.” sell out, but most of the efforts by fans to And if nothing else comes from fans’ protest the team are a bit of “saber-rattling.” protests, Kauffman, the Pirates fan from “I am not unsympathetic, I grew up Ross Township, hopes the owners will act in Pittsburgh, I get it,” says Mack. “People differently moving forward to acknowlare fed up ... but, the average fan is not edge that the fans’ voices are valuable. [avoiding] the park because they traded “They will have to rebuild trust with the the best players.” fans,” wrote Kauffman. “If they get close Mack does believe that attendance again, hopefully they will invest in a will be down this year. He says not buying player or two to put them over the top.” tickets and watching games on TV are the

“I HOPE THIS LEADS TO CHANGE.”


PHOTO COURTESY OF CARNEGIE NEXUS

A photo from Brian Cohen’s “Out of Many” exhibition

.NEWS.

TRAVELING EXHIBIT BY SABRINA BODON // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE WORLD BANK estimates 143 million people will become “climate migrants” by the year 2050 to escape problems like crop failures, sea-level rise and water scarcity. Carnegie Nexus, a collaboration of the four local Carnegie museums, wants people to deeply understand what this means and is creating a new exhibit to showcase the physical and psychological implications of human and animal migration across the planet due to climate change. “Migration is not just another movement, it changes the creature involved,” says Edith Doron, senior program manager of Carnegie Nexus. “People could be born and raised in the same place, yet are still marked by the passage of others.” Opening April 5, “Becoming Migrant ...What Moves You?” consists of nine events that will take place throughout

the month at venues including the Carnegie Museum of Art Theater, Carnegie Lecture Hall and the New Hazlett Theater. Though “Becoming Migrant” doesn’t have any large-scale physical installations, several items were selected to represent the meanings of migration. For example, the naturalization certificate of Andy Warhol’s mother, Julia Warhola, will be on display at The Andy Warhol Museum. The series will be largely events and performances, including a showing of Mali Blues, a documentary following four Malian jazz musicians who use their music as a means to fight oppression. The series will also include an April 6 conversation between the director of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Eric Dorfman, and Jad Abumrad, host of NPR’s RadioLab. They will be discussing the human influence on the earth and en-

vironment during a talk entitled “Atlantic Currents: Winds, Waters, and Migrations.” Also, in partnership with City of Asylum, on April 9, author Viet Thanh Nguyen will be talking about his book “The Refugees, which explores the lived experience of immigrants who have to traverse thousands of miles and many obstacles to get to their new homes.

BECOMING MIGRANT ...WHAT MOVES YOU? Additional information, ticketing and registration can be found online at www.nexus.carnegiemuseums.org.

Doron, of Carnegie Nexus, says the inspiration for the series comes from an intersection between the recent immigration policies of President Donald Trump’s administration and Pittsburgh’s history as a hub for immigrants.

BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

412-392-4900

According to U.S. Census figures, between 2010 and 2017, the Pittsburgh area saw an increase of 27,300 residents through international migration. “Human migration is the defining feature of our time,” says Doron. “It’s not just a distraction or political hot topic.” Doron wants “Becoming Migrant” to take on the idea of human influence on the environment. “One of the great segues out of ‘how do humans impact the environment?’ is the theme of migration,” says Doron. “Displacement of people isn’t talked about often with climate change.” By bringing together artists, academics and performers, Doron hopes to spark a conversation in the community about migration’s impact. “In collaboration, we created a nimble and lovely way to create a dialogue [about migration] across the museums,” says Doron.

MARCH 27-APRIL 1 HEINZ HALL

GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

TRUSTARTS.ORG /BROADWAY PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

9


LOVE US? HATE US? + RANTS RAVES EMAIL US AT INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM COMMENTS OF THE WEEK

.PITTSBURGH LEFT.

“Say it ain’t so! Pittsburgh is perhaps the most dirty, polluted city I’ve ever been to. But the locals (remembering the 70s) seem to think this place is clean and wonderful. Nope.” COMMENT ON “ENVIRONMENTALISTS SAY ALLEGHENY COUNTY’S AIR QUALITY IS A REPELLENT TO COMPANIES LIKE AMAZON”

Come on Spring weather Anticipation is real Need it, want it, please HAIKU SHARED VIA TWITTER FOR #CPHAIKU

“Proud of Mayor Peduto for taking a serious risk. And showing theatrical talent.” TWEET IN RESPONSE TO VIDEO OF MAYOR PEDUTO’S PERFORMANCE AT PITTSBURGH DAY OF PUPPETRY

“I have a Bill Murray shower curtain in my bathroom. It’s a profile picture done in the style of Napoleon. I often have to warn people using my bathroom on their first visit so that they aren’t surprised.” FACEBOOK COMMENT ON BILL MURRAY TICKET GIVEAWAY

“Misssed it — it is an enduring undying love story that wins us over. It is love and its triumph over this savage world we must inhabit that moves the audience.” COMMENT ON CP REVIEW OF SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE , 10 YEARS LATER

Free Will Astrology BY ROB BREZSNY

10

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DAYS OF THE CITIZEN LEGISLATOR, PRICED OUT IFTHETHEY EVER EXISTED, ARE LONG GONE. L BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM AST YEAR, Murrysville’s Aryanna

Berringer was the first Democrat to step up and say she planned on running against Lt. Gov. Mike Stack in 2018. Stack was mired in controversy last year, when he and his wife were investigated for poorly treating statefunded employees assigned to tend to the lieutenant governor’s home, as well as state police assigned to protect them. Berringer is a progressive Dem and an Iraq War veteran, and she wanted to serve her state. Honestly, I was likely to vote for her in the primary election. Unfortunately, neither I nor anyone else in the state will get that chance. Crippled by the lack of commonsense campaign-finance laws, Berringer just couldn’t continue. She was trying to run a grassroots campaign, but her opponents — Stack and Braddock Mayor John Fetterman — were, she told the Pittsburgh PostGazette, “bankrolled by their megawealthy families.” When he ran for the U.S. Senate last year, Fetterman received more than $50,000, as a gift from his parents. Stack recently disclosed a $60,000 loan from his mother and another $25,000 from a PAC with ties to Vincent Fuomo, a corrupt state senator who spent a lenient 55 months in prison for a host of charges, including wire fraud, conspiracy and obstruction of justice. Facing that kind of money in a campaign is akin to scaling Everest in flip-flops. “All this money, they’re going to dump that into TV ads, and people like me are going to get drowned out,” she told the P-G. That’s the problem with our campaign-finance system. Berringer may be the best person to serve in this position, and she doesn’t get the chance to

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

even have her voice heard because her parents don’t have a spare $100K lying around. That’s not how it should be. The days of the citizen legislator, if they ever existed, are long gone. It’s been replaced by a system that rewards candidates who are either wealthy or willing to be beholden to special interests, in order to afford massive TV-ad buys. Regardless of your feelings on how good a governor Tom Wolf is, that’s how

he got elected. Family fortune was also the reason that Kathleen Kane won the attorney general’s race. Her tenure was a dumpster fire that ended with a twoyear prison sentence for perjury. Aryanna Berringer and others like her don’t get a fair shot to show what they can bring to the table. Her situation is a stark reminder, as if we needed one, that our political system is rigged for the wealthy.

JENSORENSEN

NOT YOUR SIGN? VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM FOR OUR FULL ASTROLOGICAL FORECAST

A few years ago, a New Zealander named Bruce Simpson announced plans to build a cruise missile at his home using parts he bought legally from eBay and other online stores. In accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest you initiate a comparable project. For example, you could arrange a do-it-yourself space flight by tying a thousand helium balloons to your lawn chair. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Please don’t try lunatic schemes like the helium-balloon space flight. Here’s the truth: Now is a favorable time to initiate big, bold projects, but not foolish big, bold projects. The point is to be both visionary and practical.


APRIL IS FAIR HOUSING MONTH

DISCRIMINATION IS RARELY THIS OBVIOUS, BUT IT’S JUST AS REAL. AND JUST AS ILLEGAL. CP PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK

The Penn Plaza Apartments in 2015

.GUEST OPINION.

REDEVELOPMENT COSTS BY NATALIE KOURI-TOWE // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

IF A LANDLORD GIVES YOU THE RUNAROUND OR SAYS: We don’t take kids.

MOVED TO Pittsburgh in August 2017, two months after the Penn Plaza

Apartments were demolished. More than 6 months later, I learned the story of what happened to the complex and about the more than 500 residents who were evicted and displaced from their community. As a new faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh and a recent transplant to Pennsylvania, some of you may wonder why I care about the Penn Plaza redevelopment plan. You’d be right to question my motives, since the redevelopment of East Liberty directly benefits me. However, the story of Penn Plaza and its title holder, LG Realty, is a reminder of what I witnessed happen in Toronto, Canada, over the past decade. Everyday people priced out of their neighborhoods, and local businesses evicted following rent increases. I saw firsthand what happens when cities rapidly redevelop. I’m a university professor who was priced out of Toronto, the result of the unrestricted development of my neighborhood that led to a rapid increase in the cost of both residential and Natalie Kouri-Towe holds a Ph.D. commercial rents. While Pittsburgh is from the University of Toronto and is a ranked as one of the most affordable cities lecturer at the University of Pittsburgh. in America, the story of Penn Plaza signals a trend that we should all be concerned with. The replacement of affordable housing with high-end retail developments marks a short-term vision of urban revitalization. Without transparent communitydriven collaboration with the people most vulnerable in our neighborhood, cities like Pittsburgh are poised to become increasingly unaffordable for all its residents. We need long-term planning in the city around affordable housing, rent control, and integrating current and former residents with new residents attracted to East Liberty. LG Realty’s Feb. 26 development plan boasts a commitment to community development, but upon closer inspection, it has not included any designated affordable housing units in its building plans, nor has it addressed how the introduction of high-end retail space will drive rental costs up for local residents and businesses alike. Worse still, LG Realty makes no mention of affordable housing for the Penn Plaza residents driven from their homes. For Pittsburgh to remain a livable city in the future, we all need to play a role to ensure that large redevelopment projects, such as the proposal for Penn Plaza, meet the actual needs of the communities they’re transforming. Residents of East Liberty, like myself, need to take a stand and ensure that members of our community, especially those who were displaced, have a seat at the table and a voice that is not just heard, but drives the vision of our neighborhood for the future.

The apartment you asked about on the phone has been rented. We only rent to people who speak English g clearly. y We don’t take teenagers. The ad was wrong the rent is really $50 more. I can’t assign you a handicap parking space.

YOU COULD BE EXPERIENCING HOUSING DISCRIMINATION. The only way to STOP housing discrimination IS TO REPORT IT, SO WE CAN INVESTIGATE IT.

PITTSBURGH COMMISSION ON HUMAN RELATIONS 908 City-County Building, 414 Grant St, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

www.pittsburghpa.gov/chr/

412-255-2600

The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, familial status or disability. The Pittsburgh City Code includes the bases under the Fair Housing Act and also prohibits discrimination because of sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, and status as a survivor of domestic violence.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

11


FOOD+DRINK

CP PHOTOS BY KATE HAGERTY

Beef pudding (left) and potato pudding

.FOOD HISTORY.

HISTORIC CUISINE Cookbooks are one of the few historical forms in which women’s history and work is centered. BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

OCAL HISTORY can be dry, so spice it up by getting

a taste of life circa 1885. Pittsburgh Tested Recipes, a cookbook prepared by “The Ladies of Trinity M.E. Church” in 1885, caught the eye of local history enthusiast John Schalcosky. He is the founder of the Facebook page The Odd, Mysterious & Fascinating History of Pittsburgh, and a collector of all things involved in Pittsburgh history. Talking with him is an adventure in unusual stories, hundreds of dates and historical personalities, all rattled off at a breakneck pace. Schalcosky is a native of Ross Township, and after moving back from Hollywood in the mid-2000s, he became the president of the Ross Township Historical Society. While there, his attention to local history broadened and, in September 2014, he started the Facebook page documenting local history.

Several times a week, he posts historical photographs and data for anyone who might be interested; he currently has 102,527 followers. Schalcosky found a digital copy of Pittsburgh Tested Recipes in the Library of Congress, and posted it in its entirety to the page. The book is a collection of recipes contributed by the women of the Trinity M.E. Church and was printed by a local press. The profits were to benefit the church, and the preface insists that “It is not a hap-hazard [sic] collection of Recipes gathered at random from doubtful sources, but are what their title states, ‘Tested Recipes,’ being made up from the choicest bits of the best experience of hundreds who have affixed their signature to each, thereby vouching for the same.” Like many modern cookbooks, it’s broken into sections like “bread,” CONTINUES ON PG. 14

12

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

13


MEXICAN RESTAURANT AND BAR

IN THE STRIP DISTRICT

TACO TEQUILA THURSDAYS!

COMPLIMENTARY MINI TACOS WITH THE PURCHASE OF A MARGARITA, MIXED DRINK, OR SHOT OF TEQUILA. MINI TACOS ON SPECIAL EVERY THURSDAY! ASK YOUR SERVER FOR OPTIONS.

TORTILLAS M ADE FRESH DAILY! 2031 Penn Avenue [at 21ST] 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

WE CATER!

HISTORIC CUISINE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

“breakfast dishes” and “soup.” Scattered throughout are also snippets of advice in recipe form such as “To Preserve a Husband,” in the “Preserves, Jellies, Etc.” section. On men, Aunt Hannah of Erie, Pa., writes: “Be careful in your selection; do not choose too young and take only such varieties as have been reared in a good moral atmosphere. When once decided upon and selected, let that part remain forever settled, and give your entire thought to preparation for domestic use. Some insist on keeping them in a pickle, while others are constantly getting them into hot water.” There is also a section titled “Medical Department,” with recipes from home remedies like mulled buttermilk for fever and other ailments. American history as written by and about women’s lives is rare. Cookbooks are one of the few historical forms in which women’s history and work is centered. “Women really didn’t have any power,” says Schalcosky. “What women could do was join together and form these groups and clubs [like the church group that wrote the cookbook].” Given the times, the recipes reflect ingredients that were available in Pittsburgh and surrounding communities, and include dishes like roasted pigeon,

John Schalcosky, founder of The Odd, Mysterious & Fascinating History of Pittsburgh, cooks an old Pittsburgh recipe

meringue pie and fried chicken. “A lot of butter or lard was being used in these meals,” says Schalcosky, laughing. Schalcosky and I decided to make two of these older recipes — one from Pittsburgh Tested Recipes, and another he found for potato pudding, dated 1790, thereby making it the oldest local recipe he’s come across. Using older recipes presents a few challenges. Language has changed, and before standardized measurements, recipe-writers used a variety of terms to denote ingredient amounts. For instance, a recipe for baked cabbage calls for “butter the size of a hickory nut.” The author of the potato-pudding recipe refers to a “nogin” [other variants are noggin or naggin] of brandy. (According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a noggin is “a small quantity of an alcoholic drink, typically a quarter of a pint,” and dates to the mid-17th century.) These recipes are written in a casual manner, without instructions we take for granted today, like set temperatures; most recipes trust that the cook

will figure it out as she goes along. And today’s ingredients may not correspond directly to their long-ago counterparts. We made our selections to control as many of these factors as possible, but it’s hard to be sure our dishes tasted the same as the original authors.

TALKING WITH HIM IS AN ADVENTURE IN UNUSUAL STORIES. To see the entirety of Pittsburgh Tested Recipes and maybe try some of your own, visit The Odd, Mysterious & Fascinating History of Pittsburgh’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/OddPittsburgh/), and look in the photo albums for “Three Rivers Cookbook-1885 Edition.” Schalcosky will also be giving a lecture at the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation: 6 p.m. Thu., March 29; Landmarks Preservation Resource Center, 744 Rebecca Ave., Wilkinsburg; $10. See www.phlf. org for more information.

BEEF PUDDING FROM PITTSBURGH TESTED RECIPES SENT BY MRS. CARSON, ALLEGHENY, PA. Three pounds of chopped beef, one cup rolled oyster crackers, one egg, salt and pepper to taste, a little nutmeg, a tablespoonful butter; mix, put in a pan and bake one hour.

POTATO PUDDING RECIPE DATED MARCH 22, 1790 WRITTEN BY MARGARET BUNYAN MORGAN “Get a half a pound of piel’d [sic] potatoes, six ounces of butter, melted. Pound them together, very fine-put to it six ounces of sugar-half a nutmeg, grated, yokes of nine eggs well beaten-a full half nogin of brandy-an hour and half, will boil it-and an hour will bake it.” [original punctuation retained]

14

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM


.FOOD.

EAT ME BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Thank God for Green Chartreuse.

.ON THE ROCKS.

HOLY SPIRITS

BY DREW CRANISKY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

HRISTIANITY HAS a decidedly complicated relationship with alcohol. On the one hand, wine flows freely throughout the Bible and plays an important role in Catholic ceremonies. On the other, some Christians preach total abstinence from alcohol, and the loudest among them succeeded (albeit briefly) in getting it outlawed entirely in the U.S. Regardless of your religious views, there’s no arguing that Christianity has shaped the way we drink. Early vineyards and breweries were often tied to churches and helped to perfect and preserve techniques for making beer, wine and spirits. With Easter just around the corner, let’s look at a few potent potables with holy histories. Trappist beer. You’ve likely seen the term “Trappist” on any number of products, from cheese to bread to clothing. But the term is mostly known and loved for its association with beer. Stemming from Soligny-la-Trappe, France, Trappists are an order of Catholic monks who have been brewing beer for centuries. Though the term “abbey” can be used more freely, just 12 breweries can market their beer as an “Authentic Trappist Product.” Some of these are Belgian breweries that are familiar to many beer drinkers, such as Orval, Chimay and Westmalle. But there are newer, lesser-known breweries as well. Spencer Brewery, for instance, is a Trappist brewery in Massachusetts that turns out stouts and IPAs, alongside the traditional Belgian styles. Chartreuse. We also have monks to thank for one of Earth’s most delightful substances: Chartreuse. According to leg-

end, this potent liqueur was born when, in 1605, the monks at small monastery near Paris were gifted with a manuscript for an “elixir of long life.” The document contained a complex formula for a healing herbal tonic — so complex, in fact, that it took more than a century for the monks to work out what it all meant. Today, the Grande-Chartreuse monastery produces several products, none more delicious than Green Chartreuse. Containing 130 herbs and plants in a formulation (supposedly) known by just two monks, Green Chartreuse is sweet and pungent, bursting with anise, mint and dozens more ineffable nuances. To quote the movie Death Proof, Chartreuse is “the only liqueur so good they named a color after it.” California wine. Long before Robert Mondavi and Ernest Gallo, there was Father Junípero Serra. Nicknamed the “Father of California Wine,” the Spanish Jesuit missionary established missions throughout California in the late 1700s. Requiring wine for sacramental purposes, vineyards were planted alongside the missions, paving the way for today’s booming California wine industry. The church also played a role in keeping American wine alive during Prohibition. Though many wineries closed, some were able to stay afloat by producing wine for religious purposes. Though something of a loophole, this allowed winemakers to survive Prohibition and avoid ripping out well-established vineyards, meaning California’s blossoming wine industry could continue to grow once Prohibition was repealed.

CP PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS

Let us Restore Your Home’s Beauty Locally Owned, Growing Business specializing in:

LOCATION: Apteka, 4606 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

AMBIANCE: Sage-scented air and large sprays of flowers and branches make this modern, sleek dining room feel cool and a little romantic.

• Hardwood floor refinishing • Vinyl & laminate installation • Tub and tile refinishing • Reclaimed wood walls • Interior painting EXCEEDING CUSTOMERS’ EXPECTATIONS DAILY! FREE ESTIMATES, FULLY INSURED.

412-304-1990 CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK!

WHAT WE ATE: Kanapki

COST: $6

HOT TAKE: Described as tartines on the menu, these hearty toasts topped with three vegetable spreads are bursting with flavor and have a satisfying crunch. The flavors rotate which means ordering kanapki never gets dull. The pink-beet spread was vegetal and light, compared to the spiciness of the mushroom spread. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

15


Family Owned and Operated

AUTHENTIC & FRESH Franchise Opportunities Available. Visit our website for more details.

5523 Walnut Street • Shadyside • 412-621-6220

mercuriosgelatopizza.com Piazza Talarico & Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar Rustic Italian food and housemade wine

50% OFF

one glass of wine

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BERNABO

Rabbit porchetta from Whitfield

.FOOD.

piazzatalarico.com

DINING GUIDE

3832 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15201 Valid for dine-in only with $10 minimum food purchase. Valid through April 1, 2018.

DAILY $1 FOOD SPECIALS N-THURS ATT THE THE BAR SUN-THURS

OPEN FOR O O LUNCH! C !

1025 Broad St, North Versailles, PA 15137 BroadStBistro.com 412-829-2911

Fresh, Seasonal, Local 1910 New Texas Road 724.519.7304 eightyacreskitchen.com 16

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE AGE-OLD debate between friends and lovers of where to go out to eat may be solved with a new online service called chefs.cloud. Pittsburgher and technology consultant John Clifford founded chefs.cloud in 2016 as a way to help diners find more of what they want in restaurants. “We’re a technology company with food as its muse,” says Clifford. “We’re looking to find new and interesting ways to introduce technology into the decision process of ‘what do I eat next?’ It’s the fun thing that we’re working on that I’m getting a lot of help with.” Chefs.cloud is a passion project that Clifford hopes to move into his full-time work. Currently, it exists as a YouTube channel with a set of one-minute-long videos of dishes being made and explained by Pittsburgh chefs. Pittsburgh filmmaker David Bernabo, known for his Food Systems film series, is behind the camera, bringing some of his signature style to the shorts. Thus far, videos of dishes include those made by area chefs such as Sonja Finn, of Dinette; Justin Severino, of Morcilla and Cure; and Curtis Gamble, of Station, among others.

“WE’RE A TECHNOLOGY COMPANY WITH FOOD AS ITS MUSE.” The website, which is in development, will feature menus of Pittsburgh restaurants, on which all of the ingredients of a dish will be listed. The menus will be searchable by ingredient, allowing the user to filter according to personal taste and dietary restrictions. Users will be able to privately rate dishes they’ve eaten, which will allow the database to generate information about each user’s palate. Users will also be able to see past menu items prepared by a particular chef or restaurant, and get a feel for the type of experience they might have. “There are 5,000 things that you could have for dinner in Pittsburgh tonight, if you were going to go out. How do you discover the new things? How do you find things that are going to be good for you? I have Crohn’s disease, so I have to figure out where and what I can eat,” says Clifford. Being diagnosed with Crohn’s, an inflammatory bowel disease, in his late 20s was part of what inspired Clifford to create chefs.cloud. “After I was diagnosed, I had to re-teach myself how to eat,” he says. He spent a lot of time and energy figuring out what and where he could eat without causing a flare-up. As he navigated this path, he became more interested in the growing Pittsburgh economies of health care, food and technology. Now, Clifford hopes that chefs.cloud will combine these interests in a way that will serve others.


DINING OUT

CP PHOTO BY KATE HAGERTY

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 MERCURIOGELATO PIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 / BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.

CASA REYNA 2031 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT CASAREYNAPGH.COM Find our Mexican hideaway just downstairs from Reyna Foods in the heart of the Strip District. Fresh tortillas come off the line and onto your plate, as you watch through the window. The menu is exciting; the dishes are fresh, local and delicious. The staff are friendly and knowledgeable, and the atmosphere inviting. Come for the tortillas, stay for the extensive tequila list and homemade artisan Mexican chocolate ice cream.

EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-to-table products.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 / FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service

2018

bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

SENYAI THAI KITCHEN 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE., SHADYSIDE 412-441-4141 / SENYAIPGH.COM Immersed in authenticity, Senyai Thai Kitchen creates an intricate fusion of food and design, where every detail transports you to a faraway place. Traditional favorites and new creations like jumbo lump crab curry make Senyai a destination.

WE’RE BACK!

Think you know who rocks the ‘Burgh? Nominate your local favorites. NOMINATIONS OPEN

MONDAY, APRIL 2ND pghcitypaper.com/bestofpgh

VOTING BEGINS

MONDAY, MAY 21ST Save the Date for the Best of PGH 2018 Party!

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9TH

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

17


ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

“Learning to fly,” by Lisa Rasmussen

.ART.

DRAWING AWAY “Seeing the theater creative process was really interesting.” BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

18

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ITTSBURGH CLO’S Up and Away tells the story of the world’s first superhero. In it, five actors take on the heroic task of performing the roles of more than 50 characters. It’s an admirable undertaking, to be sure, but when local artist Lisa Rasmussen attended one of the rehearsals for the new musical, she spent a lot of time thinking not of the actors assigned to such an ambitious task, but the people behind the scenes. “I was thinking, ‘This is a story about the first superhero,’ and looking around the room and thinking, ‘There are a lot of people working backstage, who are working really hard on the production, but they’re not really going to be recognized because they’re not onstage,’” Rasmussen says. She and five other artists had been invited to the rehearsals

for Up and Away as part of a new collaboration between Pittsburgh CLO and the Pittsburgh Society of Illustrators. “We were invited to sit there and observe and draw, and then we all went back to our studios and produced artwork based on what we’d seen,” Rasmussen says. “It was interesting during the rehearsals to see someone else’s creative process in a different medium. I know what my creative process is. I teach students all day long. I know what their creative process looks like. But it’s illustration and graphic design. Seeing the theater creative process was really interesting.” Several of the pieces created by the PSI artists are currently on display at CLO Cabaret’s Backstage Bar. Rasmussen’s pieces focus on what she calls the “unsung heroes in a play about a hero.” In one of her pieces, she focused on


SLEEP LIKE A

SAINT 15% OFF ALL FACTORY-FRESH “Rehearsing the music,” by Vince Ornato

the director standing in front of members of the cast. The director’s back was to Rasmussen, but the director is still the focal point of the piece. Up and Away takes place in Farmtown, USA, and centers around brothers Joe and Jerry Jessup. Joe wants to move to the big city, while Jerry is content with his life on the farm. But their lives are irrevocably changed when Joe realizes he has superpowers. It’s finally the opportunity he’s been waiting for. Joe rushes out of town on his way to find fame and fortune, but, as with most of life’s journeys, things don’t go quite as planned. When Joe runs into trouble, it’s non-superpowered Jerry who is there to help him. The show was created by composer Kristin Bair and writer-lyricist Kevin Hammonds. It stars Michael Greer, Christine Laitta, Quinn Patrick Shannon, Erika Strasburg, John Wascavage, Waseem Alzer and Julianne Avolio. “It was fantastically entertaining. It was funny, the music was great, it had

the right mix of pathos amidst the comedy,” says Vince Ornato, another of the illustrators whose work is featured in the Up and Away exhibit. The on-site work the artists were invited to do during the CLO rehearsals is second-nature to Ornato, who has been practicing the art for most of his career. He ended up creating 15 drawings from his observations, and five of them ended up in the exhibit.

MATTRESS SETS NOW THROUGH 3/31

5 GREAT STORE LOCATIONS SHARPSBURG • SWISSVALE CORAOPOLIS • MONROEVILLE CASTLE SHANNON

412-321-1071 • SLEEPLIKEASAINT.COM

UP AND AWAY continues through April 22. Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $38.75-59.75. www.trustarts.org

“I do a lot of on-site drawing, it’s how I developed my career. So, it was a natural thing for me,” Ornato says. “I like the confrontation. I still haven’t lost the thrill of having a blank piece of paper and a line, and within a few minutes, you create something out of thin air. It’s what they call ‘trying to make the line dance.’”

.MUSIC.

MP 3 MONDAY >> CLARA KENT Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “Clarity,” by Clara Kent. The track is a smooth R&B number that details the struggles of a workaholic. The soulful hook calls for clarity, and to be present and honest with oneself. Stream or download “Clarity” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com, and slip into dreamy comfort.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

19


BELVEDERES

APRIL 21ST, 2018 OPEN @ 8AM 20% OFF ALL USED VINYL & CDS!

10% OFF ALL NEW VINYL & CDS!

OVER 400 EXCLUSIVE RELEASES!

ULTRA-DIVE THURS 29 9:30PM

COVEN TREASURE NIGHT TAKEOVER $1 PBR TALL TIL 11

FRI 30 9PM

RIHANNA NIGHT DJ

SAT 31 9PM

513

POP ROCKS (Y2K SING+DANCE) DJS KILLJOY + NICEREC

MILLVALE

EVERY TUESDAY 9PM

GRANT AVENUE PGH, PA 15209

QUESTIONS? CALL US AT

412-821-8484

ATTICRECORDS@VERIZON.NET

The War and Treaty

.MUSIC.

A FAMILY AFFAIR BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KARAOKE

4016 BUTLER STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-687-2555 WWW.BELVEDERESULTRADIVE.COM

A

FTER MICHAEL TROTTER JR. and Tanya Blount met in 2010 and went on their first date, they never parted ways again. “[Tanya and I] are togetherness at its peak — we’ve been that way since our first date,” laughs Trotter on the phone during an interview with City Paper. “I went to her house, and I ain’t never went home.” It quickly turned out that their musical chemistry mirrored the intensity of their romantic chemistry, so they formed The War and Treaty, a soulful combination of roots, bluegrass, folk and gospel music. Blount’s powerful, soulful and impressive vocal range dances alongside Trotter’s tenor and falsetto to create an enveloping sound. Even through the crackle of the phone airwaves, the couple’s chemistry is tangible. Minutes before Blount joins the conversation, Trotter gushes about how great she is. The married couple has a 6-year-old son whom they home-school, and he gets in the van and tags along with them when they hit the road to perform. Trotter and Blount are just a few days out from climbing into the van with their son, a road nanny and a host of instruments. They have plans to go hat shopping and had taught their son how to do his own laundry that morning.

THE WAR AND TREATY 7:30 p.m. Tue., April 3. The Roots Cellar, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $10-30. www.calliopehouse.org

If the thought of an entire family traveling nonstop for weeks at a time sounds stressful, fret not — The War and Treaty has got it under control. “[Our son] is with us every step of the way,” explains Blount. “He’s home-schooled, so we just take our life on the road.” “All three of us love traveling. I think the only challenge is that I can’t take my recliner with me,” jokes Trotter. When the group has spare time on the road, they like to take in the food, culture and vibe of the city in which they’re playing. In addition to being fun, it’s a teaching lesson for their son. “He learns about life when we travel,” Blount said. “You got to school to learn how to live, and he gets to learn all that and see museums in a ton of different cities.” And there’s a pretty good chance that those people and places The War and Treaty witness and experience along the way will end up in future songs. “Driving, walking, breathing, talking — that’s all song material right there,” says Trotter. “Great songwriters write to understand, not to be understood. So, life is my songwriting process.”

20

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM


PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ARRIGO/PITTSBURGH PIRATES

Starling Marte

AROUND THE HORN City Paper hosts Pittsburgh Pirates superfan roundtable BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HIS PAST MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL OFFSEASON, it’s been hard to be affiliated with the Pittsburgh Pirates, whether as a player or a fan. Andrew

McCutchen and Gerrit Cole were shipped out of town. General Manager Neal Huntington and owner Bob Nutting have been on the hot seat. During the offseason, we’ve heard from players and Pirates management about the state of the team. But, for our annual Pirates Preview, we wanted to find out what the fans were thinking and what they were expecting heading into the 2018 season. We rounded up five Pirates superfans to get their takes on the state of the Buccos.

PULLOUT COVER PHOTO OF FRANCISCO CERVELLI BY CHARLIE DEITCH

CITY PAPER ’S 2018

SUPERFAN PANEL >>

Javé Brown

Benjamin Cantor

works for a local nonprofit and is also the special-teams coach for North Hills High School.

works locally in finance and, while he is a fan (he frequently can be found arguing Pirates baseball on three different message boards), he says he’s not a “homer.”

CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

PIRATES PREVIEW 2018


CITY PAPER: It’s been a busy offseason

BW: Nobody wanted to see McCutchen

for the Pittsburgh Pirates but not in a good way, with the trades of Gerrit Cole and Andrew McCutchen. What’s your mindset going into the season with moves made by GM Neal Huntington and owner Bob Nutting?

leave, but this is the culture of Major League Baseball. There are six or seven other teams that operate the same way the Pirates do.

JODY DIPERNA: Cutch is a guy who is larger than his stat sheet. He’s larger than his OPS and his slugging percentage. He is a Willie Stargell-type player. I feel lucky that I got to see two of those guys play for this team in my lifetime. And to see McCutchen traded away for essentially a bucket of batting-practice balls and a Gatorade cooler is a real problem for me. For a franchise that has a PR problem, like they do with three winning seasons in a quarter of a century, it wasn’t a great move.

JAVÉ BROWN: Harvey and I were already talking about this. I can understand from a business perspective why they pushed McCutchen out. But McCutchen was a great guy to have in the clubhouse. He was a great face for the franchise. When Neil Walker was traded, this team and this city leaned on Andrew McCutchen. Who are we going to lean on now? J-Hay [Josh Harrison]? I don’t know. HARVEY MAZEL: Every decade or so in baseball a guy comes along who becomes the face of the franchise — Derek Jeter for the Yankees, Yadier Molina for the Cardinals. For the Pirates way back, Willie Stargell was that face. He was the leader of those teams. And while McCutchen didn’t always say a whole lot, he was able to convey that he was this team’s leader. He put the team, in fact the whole franchise on his back, and he has carried them. He was a great spokesman for the team, the city and the region. So, I feel like trading McCutchen wasn’t just a baseball move. They traded away the fabric of this team. He had a year left on his contract, and they traded him away for nothing.

JB: Right, they care so much about money, but they gave away their money-maker. HM: I think McCutchen’s presence is equivalent to filling 5,000 seats per game.

JD: I do too. They’re going to have a real attendance problem this year.

JB: They’ve had an attendance problem the past three years. HM: They have, but I think this is going to be unlike anything they’ve seen in quite a while.

JD: Neal Huntington hasn’t had a good

BEN WOLFORD: As a team who’s in a financial situation like the Pirates, you really have to get a lot of talent back when you trade a player like McCutchen or you’re setting yourself back …

JB: Right, and that’s why they were in the situation they were in for 20 years, because of bad deals like this.

BW: Yeah, but it didn’t help that McCutchen wasn’t at peak value the past two seasons.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ARRIGO/PITTSBURGH PIRATES

“I PUT THE BLAME 80 PERCENT ON NUTTING AND 20 PERCENT ON HUNTINGTON.”

Francisco Cervelli

run in the past six months. It started when he put Juan Nicasio on unrestricted waivers. That may be one of the stupidest moves that anyone has made in a long time.

HM: You’re right, he wasn’t at peak value, but he signed a very teamfriendly contract, and he did perform over-value. I think they should have let him play out his final year, and if a deal couldn’t get done, let him go. But this wasn’t the way to do it. They essentially abandoned him.

HM: I think his run started even earlier than that. Last year, the Pirates made a wild-card run that nobody expected, and it seemed like the front office didn’t want them to succeed. When Gregory Polanco went down, Jay Bruce was sitting out there, a viable outfielder >>

Jody DiPerna

Harvey Mazel is a sales

Ben Wolford works

is a freelance writer, longtime City Paper sports contributor and lifelong Pirates fan.

representative for WTAE-TV and, despite growing up in Rochester, N.Y., he has been a Pirates fan since 1970. Mazel took a job with 3WS radio in 1987, specifically to be in the same town as the Pirates.

locally in transportation and is a lifelong Pirates fan. He says proof of his fandom is the fact that he counts Pokey Reese among his favorite Pirates of all time.

PIRATES PREVIEW 2018


FIVE TO WATCH Players who should make a difference as the Pittsburgh Pirates begin their 2018 campaign BY CHARLIE DEITCH CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM PHOTOS COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PIRATES

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ARRIGO/PITTSBURGH PIRATES

Josh Harrison

with a good bat, and nobody moved on him. We could have had him for a song.

JD: I’ve been a Huntington fan, but

Starling Marte One of the first signs that the Pirates planned to dump Andrew McCutchen was replacing Cutch in centerfield with Marte. It was almost as if they were saying, “He’s the guy now, love him like you love McCutchen.” That operation didn’t quite go as planned, however, when Marte was suspended 80 games for testing positive for the steroid stanozolol. Well, this year, Cutch is gone, and Marte is firmly planted in center. It’s now his time to either show he’s a leader and the offensive weapon this team needs, or get ready to probably be the next guy shipped out of town.

it’s been a disastrous eight months for him.

JB: The bottom line is, he doesn’t make decisions that cater to getting fans in the seats. He’s all about … actually, I don’t know what he’s all about. Because if it’s not about winning a World Series or boosting attendance or getting fans to buy merchandise, what is driving his decisions?

likes to play both sides of the fence.

BW: They still don’t have pitching.

BW: He’s thinking, ‘Yes, we want to win

JD: Yeah, but they’ve got excitement.

a World Series this year, but we also want to be OK next year too.’

JD: I’ve got to be honest, I’d put all my chips on the table for a World Series win now and then be bad for 20 more years. I want that World Series.

CP : We’ve talked about Huntington and moves that he did or didn’t make. How culpable is team owner Bob Nutting and his family? Do you look at Huntington and Nutting through the same lens? Do they share the blame?

YOU HAVE TO BE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS TO REAP THE REWARDS.

BW: Neal Huntington seems to be content just hanging around in the middle. He doesn’t like to spend money to make the team better, and he doesn’t like to trade away prospects to acquire talent. He seems to be a guy who’s just always looking for stopgaps.

HM: He won’t acquire players, and he won’t commit to a complete rebuild. He

HM: You can do that, but that’s never a

HM: No, I put the blame 80 percent

guarantee that you’ll succeed.

on Nutting and 20 percent on Huntington. Huntington had a bad year, but the brunt of this problem falls squarely on the Nuttings. For years and years, I defended them thinking that once we got good, they’d spend the money. Well, we got good, the window was open, but it closed way

JD: True, but you’ve got to try at some point. Look at the Brewers last year. They were better than anyone thought they’d be, and they went out and got Christian Yelich. If I was a Brewers fan, I’d be super-psyched about this year.

PIRATES PREVIEW 2018


too fast because they didn’t invest in the team.

FIVE TO WATCH CONTINUED

JD: Not capitalizing on that period in time falls squarely on the owner because Huntington’s hands are tied in a lot of ways.

CP : What could they have done differently? BW: Well, when they had the 98-win season, they should have built on that. They should have gotten a power bat to bolster that lineup and, instead, they did nothing.

JD: Yeah, maybe you win the division instead of running into a buzzsaw like Jake Arietta in a one-game playoff.

BENJAMIN CANTOR [just arrived due to traffic issues]: The crux of it seems to be the decisions they made after the 2015 season. They did nothing to improve the team and have subsequently fallen back into mediocrity.

HM: Again, [Pirates President Frank Coonelly] stood at Pirates Fanfest and said when we get good, we’ll spend money. They didn’t. Why?

BC: They’re very risk-adverse. A risky move would be dealing prospects that you’ve put a lot of time into. If they then turn out to be good, you’ve wasted six years. Or you could end up handcuffed for the long term to a free agent who didn’t pan out.

Joe Musgrove This third-year right-hander might be the only player of value that the Pirates got out of the Gerrit Coleto-Houston trade. Like any Pirates acquisition, Musgrove comes with both an upside and a downside. First the negative: He started last season as a starter with the Astros and promptly stunk up the joint. Heading into July, Musgrove had an ERA north of 6.00 and a rapidly dwindling career as a starter. However, once he was moved to the bullpen, Musgrove was reborn. He became a solid middle reliever, had an ERA of 1.44 the rest of the way and was key to the Astros World Series win. That said, he’s currently on deck to be the Pirates third starter, not a reliever. Here’s hoping that the magic that happened after the trip to the Astros’ bullpen continues this season.

JB: But you have to be willing to take risks to reap the rewards. We’ve played it safe for years and haven’t won anything. Let’s try the opposite. Let’s take some chances.

BC: I think management thought they were smarter than everyone else. They thought they could continue to get value out of nothing. I think back to the 2015 season, and when they played teams in the NL East and NL West, they were playing .800 baseball. But in their own division, they were around .500 and losing to teams like the Reds and the Brewers. I think the teams started figuring out their shifts and that they were pitching for contact and ground-ball outs. And the pitching staff was a disaster.

JD: We’ve talked about losing McCutchen, but Starling Marte is the biggest elephant in the room. He’s just >>

Francisco Cervelli We were all skeptical a few years ago when Cervelli came in to replace everyone’s favorite catcher, Russell Martin. But he turned the fans around. He was an offensive dynamo for the Bucs and was key to the team’s success in 2015. Since then, however, he’s been besieged with injuries and has had trouble staying on the field. But, according to reports from spring training, Cervelli used the offseason to get healthy. He got a new trainer and a new regimen, and could be ready to reclaim some of that pop he’s lost in the last couple of seasons.

PIRATES PREVIEW 2018


FIVE TO WATCH CONTINUED

Josh Bell Bell is the future of this franchise. He stepped in last year and took over first base from a revolving cast of ne’er-do-wells who, for some reason, couldn’t catch the ball or hit for power in a position where you stick guys who can hit for power. We’ll see more of what he can do this year, as he attempts to avoid a sophomore slump. He hit 26 home runs with 90 RBI and a needs-tobe-improved batting average of .250 last season. His defense was good and got better as the season went on. Manager Clint Hurdle recently announced he’ll hit fourth in the Pirates lineup, so look for big things.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ARRIGO/PITTSBURGH PIRATES

Pirates coach Clint Hurdle

one bad drug test away from tanking the entire season.

BW: He did it last year and that combined with Jung Ho Kang [who was denied a visa following a conviction on drunk-driving charges] was a big part of why last season went the way it did.

HM: But who’s the real Starling Marte? Was he only hitting like that because of the PEDs?

Cory Dickerson He’s the new piece in the Pirates outfield, a unit that was at one time considered one of the most elite in baseball. Dickerson is good. He showed it in Colorado, and he’s shown it in the last two seasons in Tampa. After the offseason the Pirates had, it was good to see the Bucs get somebody who will actually be of service this season.

JD: Maybe, but I don’t even think he has to hit for power. He’s got great wheels and a great on-base percentage.

CP : So, with McCutchen gone, whose team is this now? Where does the leadership come from? Who’s the face of this franchise now?

trade. He’s ready to get traded.

JD: I like Josh Harrison. I think there’s

BW: The first face that popped in my

something to be said for speaking truth to power in that locker room.

head was Josh Bell.

JB: I think Josh Bell will become that JD: Mine too. BW: I agree [with] what you said about Josh Harrison and the things he said and how he came off about the front office.

HE SEEMS TO BE A GUY WHO JUST ALWAYS LOOKING FOR STOPGAPS.

face in time. But if people are coming to the ballpark, they want to see a familiar face and that’s what J-Hay brings.

CP : So, what do you want to see out of the Pirates this year? How do you think they’ll fare in the division? HM: Cubs, Cardinals, Brewers and then the Pirates.

BW: I’m optimistic, so I’ll say third. I think the best-case scenario is 85 wins.

CP : Yeah, but isn’t part of being that veteran clubhouse leader, speaking up in situations like that?

BC: There are just so many questions going into this season. They have a lot of pieces, but how will they perform as a team?

JB: That’s why I have to go with J-Hay.

JB: Honestly, I don’t even think they’ll

I hear what you’re saying about Josh Bell. He’s going to be around a long time, he grew up in our system.

finish fourth in the NL Central. I truly think this is the year when the shit hits the fan.

JB: I have to say J-Hay [Josh Harrison]. HM: I don’t know if I can say that now after the words he spoke about management following the McCutchen

PIRATES PREVIEW 2018


SUNDAY SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Free concerts every Sunday beginning May 27th 2-6PM

OPEN ALL YEAR!

CP FILE PHOTO

Gregory Polanco

BE BOLD BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HAT GOOD are pro sports if you can’t pretend you’re an expert and make loud, sometimes unrealistic prognostications? So, with that in mind, here are my six bold predictions for the Pirates and the 2018 Major League Baseball season.

1:

Jordy Mercer will win a Gold Glove Award

2:

Sean Rodriguez bobblehead night will be a sellout

Mercer is an extremely underrated shortstop whose offensive skills have improved in recent years. Since 2014, his fielding percentage has been in the top three among all major leaguers at the position.

If there’s one thing that we all now know, it’s that Pittsburgh fans love Sean Rodriquez. When he was re-signed last season from Atlanta, it was a highlight of an otherwise crappy season. The bobblehead, to be given away on the June 23 game against Arizona, will feature the walk-off home run Rodriguez hit on his first night back last season. I’m still waiting for the bobblehead depicting Sean Rodriguez beating up a cooler during the playoffs a couple of years ago.

3:

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! Outside bar and deck opens Memorial Weekend with live entertainment every Friday and Saturday evening each weekend- ALL SUMMER LONG!

Starling Marte will hit 20 home runs and steal 50 bases

Open Daily: 11:30 AM Lunch-Dinner-Late Night Fare Happy Hour Monday-Friday: 5-7PM

I’m starting to feel like that person who calls for a home run on every pitch, and then when it eventually happens, I claim that I could “feel it in my bones.” In 2016, I predicted that Marte would slam 30 homers and swipe 30 bags, and I felt good about it. He’s never stolen fewer than 30 bases, although the home-run total was a bit ambitious. Turns out it didn’t matter because he got caught using ’roids and was hit with an 80-game suspension. He’s got something to prove this year. He’s never hit 20 homers or reached 50 steals. This is the year.

4: 5:

The Chicago Cubs will not make the playoffs

They broke the curse or jinx or whatever you call it, so it’s time to begin the second year of Chicago’s new World Series drought.

The Baja Bar & Grill is not just a bar and restaurant...

The Pirates will be in the hunt at the All-Star Break

This team has something to prove. Expect the “Pirates of the North Shore” to come out of the gates with cannons blazing. They’ll be leading the Central by four games in July, but a late-summer swoon is in the cards, as in the St. Louis Cardinals. A combination of bad deadline trades and injuries will cause the team to plummet.

6:

Best Live Bands Every Weekend!

Gregory Polanco breaks out

Since he joined the Pirates, experts have been talking about how high Polanco’s ceiling was. He’s put together parts of great seasons, but never been able to string a truly great one together. He’s been building up power over the past three years in anticipation of a breakout season. Now in his fifth year, if he stays healthy, this will be his year.

it’s a destination! 1366 Old Freeport Road • Pgh, PA 15238

412.963.0640 • www.bajabargrill.com

PIRATES PREVIEW 2018


There’ll be plenty of

save opportunities

this season when you use your ConnectCard. Your Port Authority ConnectCard will not only get you to and from the ballpark this season, it will help you save big on your game tickets. Use your ConnectCard and save up to $10 per ticket on any Sunday through Friday Pirates home game from April 4 to September 23. • Save $10 per ticket on Outfield Box seats • Save $6 per ticket on Infield Box Seats • Save $3 per ticket on Grandstand seats (Sunday-Tuesday/Thursday-Friday)

Special offer for Port Authority ConnectCard customers only. • All Grandstand seats are just $10. (Wednesdays only) Simply show your ConnectCard at the Pirates box office the day of the game or purchase in advance by going online to Pirates.com\ConnectCard. Connect and Save with this special offer today.


.BOOK REVIEW.

ON OUR SHELF BY REBECCA ADDISON RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WHAT WE DID WHILE >> WE MADE MORE GUNS BY DOROTHY BARRESI UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH PRESS WWW.UPRESS.PITT.EDU

Anthony Jeselnik

.COMEDY.

TOO SOON

BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

OMEDY CENTRAL hasn’t held a

“roast” since 2016, but it feels like it’s been way longer than that. The event, born out of the New York Friars Club tradition, features a stable of comedians and marginal celebrities making deliberately tasteless jokes at the expense of the roastee. Pamela Anderson, William Shatner, Flavor Flav, Larry The Cable Guy and Joan Rivers have all sat in the hot seat throughout the show’s run, starting in 2003. The jokes are gleefully offensive and occasionally funny, but the whole thing feels a little archaic now. The idea of reveling in tastelessness for the sake of it — AIDS, 9/11, haha — just seems kind of dumb and juvenile in 2018.

IT’S NOT FOR EVERYBODY, BUT HE’S GOOD AT WHAT HE DOES Depending on your palate, comedian Anthony Jeselnik is either the exception to that approach or an example of it. Fittingly, the Upper St. Clair-born comedian was introduced to mainstream audiences at the 2011 roast of Donald Trump (which, once again, feels like a million years ago). He joked about Larry King being old and Jewish, Law and Order actor Jerry Orbach donating

his eyes, and actress Marlee Matlin being deaf. In terms of low-hanging fruit, Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino, of MTV’s Jersey Shore, was also there.

Published on March 25, one day after the national March For Our Lives, Dorothy Barresi’s fifth poetry collection, What We Did While We Made More Guns, couldn’t be more timely. In it, Barresi takes on violence in its many forms — from the sands of the Middle East and America’s War on Terror, to the inner-city streets in the heart of the U.S., where stories of African-American men killed by police often beget outrage and further violence. Throughout the collection, Barresi takes readers to the brink of the horrific before delivering a tender image that reins in our revulsion. In the titular poem, Barresi writes, “Ate the mice that overran the field / instead, blood and small hides / in our cupped hands, and / purpose, / our hair / dripping as though we had just stepped / from a bath with our beloved.” Through this juxtaposition, Barresi reminds us that pain and suffering are not remote ideas, happening to someone else, somewhere else, but are very much a part of the “American Dream.” •

ANTHONY JESELNIK 7 p.m. Sat., March 31. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $39.25. www.trustarts.org

It’s hard to pinpoint, but Jeselnik’s approach feels smarter and funnier than standard roast-fare. The same elements are there, but his delivery and timing sell it way better. It’s more often funny, rather than shocking for shocking’s sake. It’s a persona — an arrogant, mean and asshole-ish one — but still, clearly an act. If you’re curious, his Comedy Central show The Jeselnik Offensive works as a good intro. He also worked as a writer for The Late Show With Jimmy Fallon in 2009. On his 2015 special Thoughts and Prayers, Jeselnik says “I like to test myself by joking about horrible things and nothing but. One of my favorite ways of testing myself, I like to make jokes about tragedies the day they happen. I don’t believe in ‘too soon.’ I’m on a tight schedule. And I’m good at it.” He goes on to talk about the Aurora, Colo., shooting at The Dark Knight Rises premiere and his related tweet, “other than that, how was the movie?” Yeah, it’s not for everybody. But if it fits with your sense of humor, Jeselnik is right: He’s good at it.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

29


REBALANCE APOTHECARY murray avenue

Compounding Pharmacy Boutique

YOUR BIOCHEMISTRY!™

Looking for CBD Hemp Oil? Introducing

Lab NaturalsPCR

Broad Spectrum Plant Oil Learn More About CBD & View A Price List at

www.LabNaturalsPCR.com Restoration Therapy®

Susan Merenstein, RPh/Owner Has 37 Years of Clinical Pharmacy Experience & 17 Years of Experience in Hormone Restoration Therapy

Call 412.421.4996

4227 Murray Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217 www.MAApgh.com

This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists. ED! RECE NTLY POST

R” SESSIONS: “THE SWEATEN MORGA ERINA

Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

30

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A different kind of stage

ROCK ’N’ RING BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HEY DON’T CALL professional wrestler Chris Jericho the “Ayatolla of Rock ’n’

Rolla” for no reason. When he’s not performing in five-star matches in New Japan Pro Wrestling, locking in mad “Walls of Jericho” (his signature submission move) or putting “stupid idiots” on his infamous hit list (“The List of Jericho”) for the WWE, the charismatic musician performs with his heavy-metal band Fozzy. The band used to make 1980s-leaning metal, but it currently writes music that leans into a hard-rock sound, with gritty vocals provided by Jericho. It’s the kind of music designed for alternative-radio airplay. Fozzy formed in 1999, and Jericho joined permanently in 2000. Initially, he performed under the stage persona of Mongoose McQueen, and he refused to acknowledge that McQueen and Jericho were the same, no matter how hard reporters pried. McQueen FOZZY pretended not to know who Jericho was, and 6 p.m. Tue., April 3. Jergel’s Rhythm Jericho expressed his love for the band Fozzy. But Grille, 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. that kind of kayfabe can be a nuisance, so Jericho $20-35. www.jergels.com dropped the McQueen persona in 2005. The band has since embraced the crossover potential as fans of the legendary wrestler are as likely to support Fozzy as fans of heavy metal. And it’s not like Jericho has a problem with those two worlds meshing. Although he didn’t wrestle at NXT Takeover: Chicago last May, Fozzy’s titular single “Judas,” off its October 17 release, was the featured song of the event. The connection between the wrestling and music world is closer than most would think, s. Much like and with many commonalities. lers travel professional musicians, wrestlers e world, from town to town, all over the performing for a new crowd every all; night in venues big and small; both sets of performers put all o their energy and talents into h emotionally connecting with ng the audience, or at least giving them one hell of a show. And Jericho’s invested in crosspollinating the two scenes. Let this perfor-up for his Rock mance at Jergel’s be a warm-up ’n’ Wrestling Rager at Sea in October, a cruise zy, Shoot to Thrill, that will showcase bands Fozzy, stlers from Ring of Cherry Bombs, as well as wrestlers ing and legends of Honor, New Japan Pro Wrestling WWE’s past.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WWE.COM

Hormone

A Patient-Centered Pharmacy Practice

.MUSIC.

Chris Jericho putting a whole city on his list

Gentle

PHOTO COURTESY OF ADRIENNE BEACCO


.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE SOIL AND >> THE SEED BY BUFFALO ROSE SELF-RELEASED WWW.BUFFALOROSE. BANDCAMP.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF BOXHEART GALLERY

Sara Catapano’s “Young Gun”

.ART.

HERE AND NOT HERE BY FRED BLAUTH // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HERE ARE many balancing acts

at play in the two-person show Ephemeral, by Sara Catapano and Hannah Pierce. Growth and decay, nature versus man, vice and virtue, death and birth. Even physically, Catapano’s and Pierce’s sculptures seem to twist and pull apart from each other in complicated compositions. It is this tension that unites the two artists, and transforms the gallery into a dystopian landscape. Catapano’s sculptures appear to be simultaneously dying and growing at the same time, not unlike the ways a virus spreads. “I’m really fascinated with the gestation process of animals and plants, but what’s even more so, or equally as fascinating, is watching these seemingly important entities degrade and rot back into nothingness,” says Catapano. “It’s a cyclical system of the earth that I think humans have a hard time seeing themselves in the process, but we’re just a step in the cycle, too.” Finding the humanity in Catapano’s biomorphic sculptures isn’t hard when you consider the female form. Works like “Young Gun” and “Unrequited” feel sensual, even yonic in the way they swell and fold in on themselves, and are prime examples of the level of craft and detail Catapano is operating at in her practice. Pierce also speaks to the human condition, if not more directly. Figures are caught in labyrinths of dilapidated buildings, and struggle with addictions and unhealthy relationships. Coming from a printmaking and illustration background, her style gives the work a

fairytale, moral-of-the-story feel. By constructing not just the figures, but also the environments they dwell in, Pierce can explore themes more easily accessible in a 3-D medium. “In a metaphorical sense, [the work] is about how we build walls around ourselves to protect us from one another, and exploring what shelter means in a more physical sense,” says Pierce. Ephemeral came together organically, says Nicole Capozzi, owner and director of Bloomfield’s BoxHeart Gallery. Pierce and Catapano are the only third-year ceramic MFA students in their graduating class at Edinboro University, and it was the two who reached out to Capozzi.

EPHEMERAL continues through April 6. BoxHeart Gallery, 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. www.boxheartgallery.com

“They are both making comments on society in their own way,” says Capozzi. For as macabre as Ephemeral is, there is an unmistakable humor found in Catapano’s and Pierce’s works too. The way Catapano’s sculptures awkwardly perch on too-small pedestals and spill over shelves points to the absurd idea that we can control nature or tame it. “You can learn a lot of things from the flowers,” sing the pansies in Alice in Wonderland, and so can we from Catapano’s work. Pierce’s pop-surrealist figures wrestle with addiction, anxiety and abandonment, but sprinkled in between these vignettes are dreamy balloons and chewing-gum bubbles glazed in pinks and reds, blown tongue in cheek.

The Soil and The Seed by Buffalo Rose is a well-produced, cozy folk record with soulful harmonies. Vocalists Mariko Reid, Lucy Clabby and Shane McLaughlin join together to create a wall of sound, with the gently plucked guitar (McLaughlin), dobro (Malcolm Inglis), bass (Jason Rafalak) and mandolin (Bryce Rabideau). FOR FANS OF: In 12 tracks, Buffalo Rose energetically tackles The Avett Brothers, a variety of Americana-ish songs, ranging from picnics at Linn Run, boisterously upbeat (ripe for singalongs) to gently wine in mason jars sweet and tenderly sad. The album-opener, “God Willing,” is a fun stomp- and clap-heavy number, but the band shines brightest on tracks like “Poison Oak.” It’s a bittersweet number about learning from heartbreak, and finding light and a home after the hurt. The beautiful female vocals softly sing: “I opened up the blinds and let the sun in,” an affirmation about inviting happiness back into your life. •

$88

+tax

er us tom c w e -n al* -

i - spec

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

31


Kick it with a

TASTY GROOVE Djs are every Wed, Fri, & Sat. 10pm - 1am. Bands start between 8 - 9 pm on Thursday nights.

March 29th Told Ya So

April 5th Juan & Co.

April 12th

The Cause (dead cover band)

April 19th Told Ya So

April 26th

Ridgemont High (80s covers) CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Elaine Healy

.FASHION.

DJs & LIVE MUSIC P

FASHION FORWARD

ITTSBURGH HAS come a long way

Outdoor seating now open

EatShady.com

412-697-0909

since being named No. 1 on GQ’s Worst Dressed List in 2011. A string of boutiques offering local wares have popped up in neighborhood business districts. There is a cadre of local designers whose social-media followings have launched them onto a national stage. And events celebrating their work and the city’s growing style scene are occurring annually. Among the local stars whose work is putting Pittsburgh on the map is Elaine Healy. And last week, the Pittsburghbased fashion designer debuted her new collection at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W 2018 Season. “The backstage manager actually reached out to me and told me she found me on Instagram,” Healy told City Paper who spoke to the designer as she was

BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

preparing for the big event. “It’s definitely true that in this digital age, a lot of us definitely get caught up on that medium, but there’s something to be said for putting that effort in for your brand. It definitely paid off for me. If you can do it in a smart and constructive way, it can pay off.” Healy’s brand focuses on luxury womenswear and unisex styles. Known for her signature faux-fur pieces, the designer uses new technologies to create garments that are both intricate and wearable. “What’s really kept me excited about the medium and the industry is all the technological developments that are coming at us at breakneck speed,” Healy says. “There’s always something new, whether it’s a new process or new evolution with 3-D printing, laser machines for cutting and speeding up the manufacturing process. You’re always learning through

5500 Walnut Street, Shadyside

ELAINE HEALY Instagram: @vixenscream. www.elainehealy.com

32

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

keeping up with what’s going on.” Healy got her start in the fashion industry when she learned how to sew during a home-economics class. She got her first sewing machine when she was 12. “In home [economics], we had to learn how to sew and I kind of got the bug from there,” Healy says. “I was always sort of playing around with different patterns and learning things on my own. I started to pick apart T-shirts and thrifted garments to learn how garments were constructed. I had a very curious nature.” Later, Healy went to college at Ohio University and studied print-making. That’s where she found a love for prints and designing her own graphics and patterns. She took what she learned about screenprinting and lithography, and applied that experience to textiles. “I realized what was next for me was to learn the technical skills of fashion design, all of the construction, pattern drafting, draping and that kind of thing,” Healy says.


Elaine Healy’s Purple Fluff Crop, one of the designs available for sale on her website

Healy went on to study fashion at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. There, she was first exposed to the ways in which technology can influence fashion when she had access to industrial machines like laser cutters. This relationship between technology, machinery and fashion is something Healy explores through her work. “What I really strive for in my work is this man vs. machine marriage of opposites,” Healy says. “So maybe using a heavy piece of technology to create an end result that looks dainty or handmade.” It’s the theme behind her latest collection, shown last week in Vancouver. To create the pieces, she combined machine processing with hand-sewing techniques. Made with utility fabrics in a minimal color palette, the pieces are fresh and modern, with a sense of timelessness about them. “I’m constantly wanting to set myself off from previous collections,” Healy

says. “So as I use different fabrics and combine them in different ways, I’m also thinking of how to add onto them, or even manipulate the surface of that fabric to make it different again and make it stand out. There’s always something new to be done.” To get your hands on a piece from one of Healy’s previous collections, visit her online shop where you’ll find a mix of crop tops and jackets, many made from her staple faux fur in colorful hues ranging from bubblegum pink to lilac. Healy uses a lot of technical fabrics such as utility mesh, neoprene and scuba jersey. But her staple fabric, faux fur, is where she can best explore the dichotomy of hard versus soft that makes her pieces so versatile. “The girl or man or woman I’m trying to appeal to wants to stand out, is creative in their own wardrobe and really versatile as well,” Healy says. “I like my customers to create their own look.”

Compassionate Certification Centers Presents the 2018

Co-hosted by

MEDICAL CANNABIS

The Intersection of Cannabis Culture EVENT HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: • On-site • Cannabis Career Fair with local and national companies • Campaign For Compassion on-stage fundraiser

.PUPPETS.

• 4.2 Mile Run/Walk in partnership with the 420 Games

OVERHEARD

• Riverboat cruise and fundraiser for the Disabled American Veterans and Make a Wish Foundations.

AT CITY HALL ON WED., MARCH 21

“What’s going on?” “I don’t know, but it’s creeping me out. Let’s leave.” — COUPLE WALKING AMONG THE PUPPETS ON THE INAUGURAL PITTSBURGH DAY OF PUPPETRY

Nearly 6,000 attendees are expected to attend the second-annual event, including hundreds of exhibitors.

April 12-14, 2018 David L. Lawrence Convention Center | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

www.cccregister.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

33


TOP 5

PODCASTS BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF NETFLIX

Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, with followers

.TELEVISION .

HEAVEN’S GATE Hosted by veteran podcaster and former Worldwide Church of God cult member Glynn Washington (Snap Judgment), this podcast explores why 39 Heaven’s Gate cult members took their own lives in 1997.

EAR HUSTLE Head into San Quentin State Prison with Ear Hustle, and hear what life is like on the inside. Hosted by inmate Earlonne Woods, with help from volunteer visual artist Nigel Poor.

TERRIBLE, (THANKS FOR ASKING) Nora McInerny hosts this podcast that forces examinations of life’s difficult things, such as the death of a spouse or the loss of memory. McInerny deftly inserts humor, while creating space for the stories her guests have come to share.

REPLY ALL Listen to a two tech nerds and best friends take on the mysteries of the internet one tech-support problem and story at a time. Do not miss the two-parter episode “Long Distance” (No. 102 and 103).

CRIMINAL Let Phoebe Judge’s soothing tones lull you, as you listen to stories of crimes throughout eras and cultures. This true-crime podcast examines why we do the things we do. 34

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE OREGON TRIAL BY AL HOFF // AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

F YOU’RE under 40 or so, you may never have heard of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and his cult-communereligion-whatever that grabbed headlines in the early 1980s, before flaming out in quite spectacular fashion. But no worries: Wild Wild Country, a new sixpart documentary on Netflix tells the saga, and it’s jaw-dropping. The series, directed by brothers Chapman and Maclain Way, is a bit thin on the origins of Bhagwan, but it begins fleshing out his organization when it matters, in the late 1970s, when the “guru” is attracting large groups of Westerners to his ashram in India. The story really kicks in when Bhagwan and his many followers relocate to Oregon in 1981. They purchase a 63,000-acre ranch in the middle of nowhere, but close enough to the tiny hamlet of Antelope to cause concern. There, the Rajneeshee build a new town from scratch, complete with housing, infrastructure, a dam, farms, an airstrip and, naturally, space for Bhagwan’s many Rolls Royces. Rajneeshism is a hybrid religion, combining ancient Eastern philosophies with contemporary ideas of open sexuality, assorted Western therapies and a commitment to capitalism and living well. (The most obvious restriction: The Rajneeshee dress only in one color, shifting over the years from the more traditional saffron to hues of red and purple.) But the members are highly educated and ambitious, and this contributes to both the organization’s success — engineers to build

the town, and even in-house counsel to fight legal battles — and ultimately, its downfall. No spoilers, but let’s just say that having an in-house chemist proved problematic. The Ways unfold the tale in mostly linear fashion, and the history benefits from in-depth interviews with former Rajneeshee, including the Bhagwan’s righthand woman, Ma Anand Sheela; aggrieved Antelope residents; and assorted state and federal law enforcement, as well as plenty of local and national TV footage. But more fascinating are the hours and hours of video the Rajneeshee, ever self-absorbed and self-promoting, shot of themselves — activities from the mundane to the alarming.

“IT’S JAWDROPPING.” I’m reluctant to get into the specifics, since newcomers with any interest in cults, communal living, charismatic movements, true crime, land use and bio-terrorism should just let this story unfold. Because after you’ve learned of one unbelievable thing, bam! there comes another. I am no stranger to the Rajneeshee — a group of these “orange people” lived on my street corner in the pre-Oregon days, and I endured their chanting and screaming while waiting for the bus. But even for a longtime observer like myself, Wild Wild Country is a veritable treasure trove of fascination.


Sponsored by

EARLY WARNINGS SPONSORED UPCOMING EVENTS FROM CITY PAPER’S FINE ADVERTISERS

WED., APRIL 11 BOSTON MANOR 6 P.M. MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE MILLVALE. ALL-AGES EVENT. $16. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com. With special guests Free Throw, Homesafe, Hot Mulligan & Save Face.

WED., APRIL 11 IN CONVERSATION WITH DAYANITA SINGH 6 P.M. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY BLOOMFIELD. FREE EVENT (REGISTRATION REQUIRED). 412-622-3131 or cmoa.org. PHOTO CREDIT: Sami Lipp

THU., APRIL 12 CHRIS D’ELIA

THU., APRIL 12 HERE COME THE MUMMIES

7:30 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. ALL-AGES EVENT. $25-65. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

THU., APRIL 12 HERE COME THE MUMMIES 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. $25-39. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

THU., APRIL 12 SUICIDE GIRLS BLACKHEART BURLESQUE 8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. OVER-21 EVENT. $35-95. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

THU., APRIL 12 JD MCPHERSON 8 P.M. MR. SMALLS THEATRE MILLVALE. ALL-AGES EVENT. $18-20. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com. With special guest Jake La Botz.

THU., APRIL 12 BRIT FLOYD 8 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $33.75-88.75. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FRI., APRIL 13 JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT 7:30 P.M. THE PALACE THEATRE GREENSBURG. $19-51. 724-836-8000 or thepalacetheatre.org

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE

FRI., APRIL 13 DAVE PAHANISH

MON., APRIL 16 LILLIAS WHITE

8 P.M. MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE MILLVALE. OVER-21 EVENT. $10. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com. With special guest Joe Zelek.

7 AND 9:30 P.M. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. $55-65. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., APRIL 14 WILD KRATTS

MON., APRIL 16 TODRICK HALL AMERICAN

1 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $30-100. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., APRIL 14 BODYTRAFFIC 8 P.M. BYHAM THEATER DOWNTOWN. $10-60. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SAT., APRIL 14 HILL DANCE ACADEMY THEATRE 8 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $10-60. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

SUN., APRIL 15 DISNEY JUNIOR DANCE PARTY ON TOUR! NOON AND 3 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER DOWNTOWN. $33.75-58.75. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

7:30 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTH SIDE. ALL-AGES EVENT. $25-194. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

TUE., APRIL 17 NOËL QUINTANA & THE LATIN CREW 5 P.M. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE DOWNTOWN. Free event. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

TUE., APRIL 17 AN EVENING WITH THE MUSICAL COMPOSITIONS OF MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD 8 P.M. AUGUST WILSON CENTER DOWNTOWN. $38.25-48.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

35


.PLAY REVIEW.

UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLE BY ALEX GORDON ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE CONNECTION between the title and the plot of Heisenberg may seem a little foggy at first, but it’s not quite as heady as you might think. Simon Stephens’ drama tells a meandering story about an unlikely romance (not a Breaking Bad musical, although that sounds terrific), in which the two leads are never quite sure of each other but are inexplicably drawn together. It’s part romantic comedy, part dramatic character study, featuring a young American woman named Georgie (Robin Abramson) and an older Irishman named Alex (Anthony Heald). The story begins with the two characters waiting alone at a train station in London. Alex is bashful, well-dressed and polite; Georgie is uninhibited, funny, a little pushy and almost cartoonishly American. Their night-and-day personalities are almost as evident as their age difference, but an unexpected

PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL HENNINGER

Odd couple: Anthony Heald and Robin Abramson in Heisenberg

HEISENBERG continues through Sun., April 8. O’Reilly Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-65. www.ppt.org

chemistry emerges. Georgie kisses Alex impulsively, setting the play in motion.

What follows is a rocky but endearing story of an indistinct love that develops between the two. Heald (two-time Tony nominee, he played the head doctor of Hannibal Lector’s prison in Silence of the Lambs) is likable and sincere as Alex, though at times so meek you just want to give him a blan-

ket. Abramson takes what could veer into pixie-dream-girl territory and grounds Georgie with humor and a convincing underlying mania. The actors — and the characters — shine best when sparring, and since this is a two-person cast with almost no set and few production frills, there’s a lot of sparring to go around. The title refers to the German physicist Werner Heisenberg, most famous for publishing his “uncertainty principle” in 1927. The show’s program dedicates several pages to Heisenberg’s biography — the characters make no reference to the man or his principle on stage — and explains the theory as the idea that “the act of observation affects whatever is being observed, making it impossible to predict the outcome.” It’s fitting, then, for Heisenberg to be staged theater-in-the-round style, leaving the characters exposed on all sides to both the audience and each other. It’s a minimal set, leaving nothing for the couple to hide behind, as the push and pull of their romance develops. There’s mistrust and attraction on both sides, and as happens in courtship, moments of posturing, and of vulnerability. They want to share themselves with each other, but can’t help be affected by the other’s attention. OK, maybe it’s a little heady.

LOCATIONS IN: BEN AVON • EAST LIBERTY WASHINGTON, PA • MORGANTOWN, WV

• Get ready for swim suit season • We host parties! s e s s a l C s s e n it F e e Bung Now Available! PITTSBURGHAERIALSILKS.COM • 412.681.0111 36

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM


CALENDAR MARCH 29-APRIL 4

^ Thu., March 29: O’Ryan the O’Mazing at Socialist Sprouts Picnic Party

THURSDAY MARCH 29 KIDS Being a parent and caregiver can be exhausting, and childcare is rather expensive. But thanks to the Pittsburgh Democratic Socialists of America, you can experience an afternoon with free food and entertainment in the relaxing beauty of The Glitter Box Theater for the Socialist Sprouts Picnic Party. As you unwind, drenched in the natural light from the big windows, your child will be “O’mazed” by the eccentric, vibrant stilt-walking,

juggling and magic tricks of O’Ryan the O’Mazing. He may even teach your sprout how to juggle! Meg Fair 11 a.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. www.theglitterboxtheater.com

DRINK Turn back the clock for a drink at the Heinz History Center’s 21+ Speakeasy Social. Nestled deep in the heart of the new American Spirits exhibition is a little bar to help you shrug off your cares, while teaching you about Pittsburgh’s history. Wigle Whiskey will be there to help you build specialty cocktails. Put on your dancing shoes to learn The Charleston, munch on some treats, or play some trivia

while you tipple. And just to keep things authentic, a secret password for entry will be emailed before the event. Celine Roberts 5:30 p.m. Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $12. www.heinzhistorycenter.org

HISTORY John Schalcosky is the founder of The Odd, Mysterious & Fascinating History of Pittsburgh, a popular Facebook page with more than 100,000 followers. Tonight, at an event bearing the same name and hosted by the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, Schalcosky will share quirky and unusual stories from Pittsburgh’s history. Some will be stories

he’s previously shared on his page, and others will be never-before-heard legends, historical mysteries and fascinating facts from the annals of Pittsburgh’s past. Rebecca Addison 6 p.m. Landmarks Preservation Resource Center, 744 Rebecca Ave., Wilkinsburg. $10 for non PHLF members. www.phlf.org

TECH Numerous pieces have been written about the prevalence of sexism in the tech industry in Silicon Valley and beyond. But many are now turning their attention to another problem in the industry. Tonight’s workshop, “How white feminism has infiltrated tech and how to make space CONTINUES ON PG. 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

37


CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS COWGER

^ Sat., March 31: Riverhounds home-opener

for everyone,” hosted by Prototype, a feminist makerspace, will focus on centering women and femmes of color. The discussion will feature Liana Maneese, of the Good Peoples Group. Maneese’s organization works with corporations, nonprofits and small businesses on issues like institutionalized oppression. The discussion will examine concrete ways to promote intersectional feminism in the workplace. RA 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Filmmakers, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. www.prototypepgh.com

FILM Kicking off its project, Channel Silver Eye, Silver Eye Center for Photography presents a micro cinema series of three films tonight, all by female artists in Imag(in)ing Loss: Media and Melancholy in Feminist Experimental Film. Each work explores the feelings of loss. Curated by University of Pittsburgh student Emi Finkelstein, the films include Mona Hatoum’s Measures of Distance (1988), Shigeko Kubota’s My Father (1973-75) and Hito Steyerl’s Lovely Andrea (2007). This event is the first series in which History of Art and Architecture

38

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

students at Pitt worked with the gallery to curate a night of three films. Lauren Ortego 7:30 p.m. 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Pay what you want. www.silvereye.org

FRIDAY

MARCH 30 MUSIC Put your benevolent pants on, grab the kids, and join the Hard Rock Café in kicking off its annual CureRock fundraiser concert. There’s no better lineup to raise awareness (and funds) for the fight against childhood > Fri., March 29: Liana Maneese PHOTO COURTESY OF NJAIMEH NJIE

cancer than this one. Americana rock band The Alternate Routes are headlining, and hometown heroes Nevada Color will be sending out its indie-pop vibes, with four-piece Working Breed bringing the art rock. Tickets start at $25, but patrons are encouraged to donate a ticket to allow a childhood cancer patient to attend. The kitchen will be open until 10 p.m. Emily Bennett 8 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive. South Side. $25-300. www. hardrock.com/ pittsburgh

MUSIC Shannon and the Clams were born to play a venue like Spirit. Think doo-wop, surf rock and garage psych rolled into one glorious Californian four-piece, and you’ve got these guys down to a T.

But the fun doesn’t stop there: The Clams are as surprising as they are interesting, and there’s no way a living, breathing, sentient person couldn’t enjoy themselves at one of its shows. Listen to “The Boy,” and bask in the rockabilly sounds, baby. Local support from Painted Eyes and Thousandzz of Bees is going to send you whirling. EB 8 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15. www.spiritpgh.com

MUSIC In celebration of the second fulllength album from Man’DANCE, a Pittsburgh-based group that excels in the psychedelic aspects of music, Brillobox is hosting an album-release party that will also include performances by fellow Pittsburgh acts slowdanger, Mrs. Paintbrush and Junk Foods. The groups in attendance all have one thing in common — they claim to be like nothing the mainstream media has seen before: slowdanger is a performance duo that fuses sound and movement; Mrs. Paintbrush’s genre is listed as Tropical Goth; and Junk Foods is a combination of old and new hip hop.


Only one thing is guaranteed — things will get weird. The event is 21 and over. LO 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. www.brilloboxpgh.com

SATURDAY

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MARCH 31 PSYCHIC

If you’ve ever felt curious about your aura — that imperceptible energy your body and soul communicates to those around you — head down to Spirit today for the LightWay Psychic & Energy Fair for an answer. There, you’ll have the opportunity to have your aura photographed using a special camera; get readings from local psychics; and poke around the marketplace of crystals, jewelry and other holistic products. And if you have doubts about the health of your aforementioned aura, don’t worry: Energy healers will be present on location. Alex Gordon 11 a.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. Free (donations accepted). www.spiritpgh.com

of Montreal

THURSDAY of Montreal, Delicious Pastries, Mega Bog 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

FRIDAY Nightshade Queer Dance Fundraiser 9 p.m. The Glitter Box Theater, Oakland. www.theglitterboxtheater.com

SATURDAY

Shelter

Sleepover April 7 & 8

From April 7th - 8th, a group of participating volunteers will commit to live the life of a shelter animal for 31 hours. Living with them in their quarters, on their schedule, they will help increase awareness of the importance of adopting your next companion animal from a shelter, and raise critical funds to care for our animals.

www.humaneanimalrescue.org/shelter-sleepover

Bugg 7 p.m. The Shop, Lawrenceville. www.theshoppittsburgh.com

Humane

Animal

Rescue

SUNDAY Control Top 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com ^ Sat., March 31: LightWay Psychic & Energy Fair

MONDAY Baby Raptors, Bryce Vine

SPORTS Pittsburgh’s professional soccer franchise, the Riverhounds SC, had a whirlwind of an offseason. Their top scorer, Corey Hertzog, left for greener pastures, and a whole lot of roster turnover occurred to fill that void. But there’s reason for fans to be excited for today’s Riverhounds home-opener at Highmark Stadium. The Hounds signed a new head coach, Bob Lilley, who has won championships in the United Soccer League. Soccer enthusiasts should also get geared up for a new-and-improved Highmark Stadium, which added 1,000 seats. Fans will now have even more vantage points to watch the Riverhounds score goals, all while viewing the beautiful backdrop of the Pittsburgh skyline. Go Hounds! Ryan Deto 7 p.m. 510 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $11-39. www.riverhounds.com

8 p.m. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

TUESDAY Nobunny, The Lopez 8 p.m. Howlers, Bloomfield. www.howlerspittsburgh.com

WEDNESDAY Belus, Mere Phantoms 7 p.m. Brillobox, Lawrenceville. www.brilloboxpgh.com

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS ONLINE AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

39


CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

MUSIC I dare you to try to think of a better way to spend your Saturday night than watching a bunch of long-haired Tennessee rock ’n’ rollers jump 10 feet high, instruments in hand. J. Roddy Walston has somehow managed to acquire the skill of piano-punching — he’s guaranteed to play the hardest of any piano-player this side of the Mississippi. There’s a lot of leaping and landing, and howling about women and “sinner friends” and selling farms. And if you get a close enough look, you’ll see Walston’s got wild eyes to match that wild heart. EB 7 p.m. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $18. www.promowestlive.com

SUNDAY APRIL 1 MUSIC No, this isn’t an April Fool’s Day joke, although this is the epitome of an April Fool’s Day show. YouTube sensation turned rapper, Froggy Fresh (formerly Krispy Kreme — his fans rioted and forced him to rebrand) debuted an album at No. 3 on the comedy charts. He’s been endorsed by John Cena and has made Tosh.0 appearances, but he’s still just a guy who wants to recover the neighborhood kids’ missing bikes. He’s a Los Angeles boy now and is aspiring to be an actor, but once every blue moon, he DJs and does snazzy video-projecting at venues. Show up at Spirit and fight some sharks. EB 8 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15. www.spiritpgh.com

MUSIC Soul artist Curtis Harding is bringing his

HECTOR HERNANDEZ, BULCA, 2015 / PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBB HERNÁNDEZ

^ Tue., April 3: Robb Hernández

fresh fusion of gospel, blues and rock to The Rex Theater tonight. Harding’s music has been described as psychedelic and reminiscent of the 1960s- and ’70s-era funk that has landed him in Rolling Stone’s 20 Best R&B Albums of 2017 and an interview with National Public Radio.

Get PrEP today! A once-a-day pill to protect you against HIV

GQ magazine called his latest album, Face Your Fear, “a journey into the roots of soul music.” Now on an international tour, Harding’s stop in Pittsburgh won’t be one to miss. The show is all-ages. Doors open at 7 p.m. LO 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-18. www.rextheater.net

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MUSIC This year, the Black Political Empowerment

(RESTRICTIONS APPLY)

Hom me Proteectioon Never Loookeed So Goodd! TIME TO BUY! Prices are at their lowest! LEARN TO SHOOT ONE ON ONE CLASSES AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

$IIRUGDEOH&RQğGHQWLDO &RQYHQLHQW

40

APRIL 2

THE ONLY INDOOR RIFLE RANGE OPEN EVERY DAY!

To learn more about PrEP and if it’s right for you, call us or visit our website to make an appointment.

933 Liberty Avenue 1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA

MONDAY

(AS LITTLE AS 1 DAY NOTICE)

CLASSES SAVE $20 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)

FREE RANGE PASS Free range time or gun rental your choice expires 3/31/18

& SHOOTING CENTER

2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M


CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

People took to the streets of Downtown Pittsburgh on Sat., March 24 for March for Our Lives. Check out more photos from the march on our social media sites and online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW CORREIA

^ Sun., April 1: Curtis Harding

Project, a nonprofit community activism group, marks 30 years. During its tenure in Pittsburgh, the group has spearheaded efforts to increase voter turnout, reduce gun violence and improve communitypolice relations. But they’ve also been a staple of the city’s jazz community, hosting regular programming. Tonight B-PEP will host the 13th Annual B-PEP JAZZ Concert. The event will feature a number of Pittsburgh’s jazz bands, musicians and vocalists, including Roger Humphries & The RH Factor, The Tim Stevens Project, Artistree Live, the Afro American Music Institute Youth Jazz Ensemble Band, Center of Life (COL) Jazz Combo, saxophonist Lee Robinson , and vocalists Etta Cox, Flo Wilson and Phat Man Dee. RA 5:30 p.m. Wyndham Hotel, 100 Lytton Ave., Oakland $30-35. www.b-pepjazz.org

culture at the University of California. LO 6:30 p.m. 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www.art.cmu.edu

PGHCITYPAPER

PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

Snackable content to read on the go.

TUESDAY APRIL 3

^ Sun., April 1: Froggy Fresh

ART

MUSIC

Robb Hernández, a Latinx artist and scholar, is coming to the Kresge Theatre tonight as part of a lecture series at Carnegie Mellon’s School of Art. His book Finding AIDS: Archival Body/Archival Space and the Chicano Avant-garde delves into the roles of gender and sexual transgression, using art to reveal what and how Latinx communities of artists came to respond to an AIDS epidemic. Hernández’s articles have appeared in Aztlán, Collections, Museum and Curatorial Studies Review, MELUS and Radical History Review. He also worked as assistant professor of Latinx literature and visual

Certain records come out and worm their way into your brain, planting little riff seeds that live there forever. For me, that was Ought’s 2015 release, Sun Coming Down. It was an experimental post-punk album that was delightfully strange and sinister. Then, like magic, in February 2018 the band released Room Inside the World, another sonic exploration full of twists and turns that beg you to get lost within it. And tonight, you can do that in the intimate room of the Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, with Flasher and locals Silver Car Crash. MF 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $12-14. All ages. www.mrsmalls.com

Served fresh from CP Marketing

Read it now!

CONTINUES ON PG. 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

41


CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

^ Wed., April 4: Mummenschanz

WEDNESDAY APRIL 4 LECTURE

PITTSBURGH’S PITTSBU S PREMIER DERBY EXPERIENCE ERIENCE

Saturday May 5th 4:30 - 7:30 pm

Rivers Casino Drum Bar

TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT COOLTIX.COM

Cecile Richards served as head of Planned Parenthood Federation of America for more than a decade. Since taking over as president of the reproductive-healthcare organization in 2006, there have been many threats against reproductive rights in America, and Richards has served as vocal advocate in the ongoing battles for social justice and women’s rights. In her memoir, Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead, the now-retired Richards tells her story from the frontlines of these battles. Tonight, she visits the city as part of the Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures series; the ticket includes a copy of her book. RA 7 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $35. www.pittsburghlectures.org

STAGE Using both light and shadows, Mummenschanz has revolutionized visual theater for more than four decades, and ^ Wed., April 4: Cecile Richards PHOTO COURTESY OF PLANNED PARENTHOOD FEDERATION OF AMERICA

42

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

tonight the performance troupe is coming to Pittsburgh. The Switzerlandbased group has taken its shows all over the world, and are now performing its new show you & me. The show will focus on the relationship between audience member and performer, the joy both parties feel during performances, and will feature the group’s classic large-scale masks used for storytelling. The show will also highlight traditional acrobatic stunts. Mummenschanz is truly a group whose shows appeal to all ages. LO 7 p.m. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $30-40. www.trustarts.org

COMEDY For more than a decade, comedian Chelsea Handler elicited millions of laughs on her E! television and webseries Chelsea Lately and Chelsea Does on Netflix. Her brand of feminist humor was a welcome addition to a world where men dominated late-night talk shows. But in October 2017, Handler announced she was leaving the talk-show business to pursue political activism. Since then, she’s been organizing around issues like women’s rights, LGBTQ rights and gun control. Her event tonight, produced by local LGBTQ organization the Delta Foundation and hosted by gay comedian Bruce Vilanch, will benefit Pittsburgh’s LGBTQ community. RA 7:30 p.m. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $43.25-153.25. www.trustarts.org


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

MASSAGE $40/hr. 24 hrs 412-401-4110 2 Locations Near Rivers Casino & Downtown 1106 Reedsdale St. 322 Fourth Ave.

HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

ADOPTION

HEALTH SERVICES

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Rehearsal Space

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

A LOVING couple dreams of adopting your newborn. Promising secure life and forever LOVE. Exp. Pd Jen & Rich 1-800-296-8455 www.jandrhopetoadopt.com

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855732-4139 (AAN CAN)

CAREER TRAINING Massage Therapy at Career Training Academy

HELP WANTED SENIOR SIGNALING DESIGN ENGINEER – INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS

HELP WANTED SIGNALING FUNCTIONAL DESIGN ENGINEER – INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS

Ansaldo STS USA, Inc. is seeking Senior Signaling Design Engineer – International Projects to work in Pittsburgh, PA, & be resp. for designing complex & medium national/ international railroad signaling functional sys (incl hardware, software, functional & configuration design & production checks). Apply at: www.ansaldo-sts.com, #50021683.

Ansaldo STS USA, Inc. is seeking Signaling Functional Design Engineer – International Projects to work in Pittsburgh, PA, & be resp. for designing medium national/international railroad signaling functional sys (incl hardware, software, functional & configuration design & production checks). Apply at: www.ansaldo-sts.com, #50021686.

Our accelerated Massage Therapy program teaches many different techniques of massage and bodywork. At CTA, you won’t just learn what it takes to do the job well; you’ll learn what you need to stand out from the crowd, adapt, and succeed. To plan a visit to our Pittsburgh Campus, call 412-385-7903 or visit careerta.edu.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

get your yoga on!

CREDIT REPAIR Denied Credit?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yin yoga ÁRZ\RJD meditation

teacher training ashtanga yoga prenatal yoga family yoga

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

east liberty squirrel hill north hills

HELP WANTED PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1000 a Week Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately www.AdvancedMailing.net (AANCAN)

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time April 17, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

• DIESEL FUEL AND GASOLINE General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/ default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

TIGER SPA Best of the Best in Town!

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to East Market Street. End of downtown Warren, on right hand side.

Open 8am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Bring this ad for a special treat! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

43


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My girlfriend of four months has unofficially moved in with me. We began as a long-distance thing; I live in New York City, and she lived in the Deep South. What began as her visiting me for the holidays ended up with her staying with me indefinitely. She comes from a very poor family, and going back home means sleeping in her grandma’s living room. Things are going well, but we are moving fast. I’m not sure how I feel about this. On one hand, I’m loving it and loving her. On the other hand, I feel like she could be using me. She has found part-time work. She hasn’t pitched in for rent — I also have a roommate — but she has pitched in for groceries. Do I ask her for rent money? Do I send her back to her grandma’s place? I don’t know what to do because I feel like I am housing a refugee. SHE’S HERE INDEFINITELY NOW

Instead of ending things now to protect yourself from retroactively feeling crappy about this relationship if it ends at some point in the future, SHIN, you should have a convo with your girlfriend about rent, reality and roommates. Tell her that it can’t go on like this indefinitely — living in your apartment rent-free — as it’s unfair to your roommate and that kind of support is too much to expect from someone she’s been seeing for only four months. Tell her you appreciate the ways she’s kicking in now — helping with groceries — but eventually she’ll need to start kicking in on rent too, and then set a realistic date for her to start paying rent. You should also encourage her to think about getting her own place. Not because you want to stop seeing her — you’re loving it and loving her — but because a premature commitment (and cohabitating is a commitment) can sabotage a relationship. You also don’t want her to feel so dependent on you that she can’t end things if she needs to. You want her to be with you because she wants to be with you, not because she’s trapped. You ran a letter from a man whose wife wouldn’t let him spank her. I’m a woman

whose husband won’t spank me. I found a man like WISHOTK, and we meet up for spanking sessions. Neither of our spouses know. It’s only spanking, no sex. How bad should I feel? REALLY EROTIC DALLIANCES BUT, UM, MARRIED

Very bad. In fact, REDBUM, I think you should be spanked for getting spanked behind your husband’s back — then spanked again for getting spanked for getting spanked behind your husband’s back. And then spanked some more. I’m in D/s relationship. I’m not submissive around the clock, but my partner owns my penis. We’ve purchased several male chastity devices, but I can pretty easily get out of them. My partner did some investigating and learned that the only effective devices work with a Prince Albert piercing — a ring through the head of the penis that locks into the device, preventing the sub from pulling out. My partner now wants me to get a PA. I don’t want to get pierced there and I’ve said so, but I haven’t safeworded on it. I would very reluctantly do it to please her. My partner made an appointment for a piercing three months from now, on our second anniversary. She told me that we can cancel it if I can find an effective chastity device that doesn’t require a piercing. Do you or any of your contacts in the fetish world know of any devices that are inescapable?

United Kingdom with his partner of 15 years. Male chastity devices have fascinated him for more than two decades and, as of this writing, he owns 37 different kinds of cages. His partner frequently keeps his penis locked up for weeks or months at a time — and if there were such a thing as a commercially available male chastity device that was inescapable, Sheets would know about it. “However, all is not lost,” said Sheets. “Piercing is one of two ways to ensure the penis cannot escape. The other is a full chastity belt. Now, full belts aren’t without their drawbacks — they are generally more expensive, are harder to conceal under clothes, and take longer to get used to, especially at night. But they are secure. I have three customfitted chastity belts and, once properly fitted, they’re inescapable.” Sheets’ chastity belts were made for him by Behind Barz (behindbarz.co.uk) and Fancy Steel (fancysteel.com.au). But if most commercially available male chastity devices aren’t inescapable, what’s the point? Why would a person bother to wear one? “You can only partially escape,” said Sheets. “It’s possible to pull out the penis but not remove the device,” which is anchored around the balls and base of the shaft. “And a partially removed device is awkward and uncomfortable.” For many male subs and their Doms, the symbolism of a male chastity device is what matters most, not its inescapability. And as with other forms of sex play and most aspects of healthy relationships, the honor system makes it work. “As in any negotiated relationship, you can cheat,” said Sheets. “But why cheat? They’re easy to keep on if you’re genuinely interested in submitting.”

EVENTUALLY SHE’LL NEED TO START KICKING IN ON RENT TOO.

PIERCING APPENDAGE UNNECESSARILY SCARES EAGER SUB

“I’ve never come across a standard male chastity device I couldn’t pull out of,” said Ruffled Sheets, “so PAUSES’s partner has obviously researched regular chastity devices well.” Sheets is an IT consultant who lives in the

On the Lovecast, the urologist is IN: savagelove cast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

44

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM


FALLING HAIL

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. Hitting noise 4. Like all angles that are less than 90° 9. Floor wax spreader 12. “Too bad” 14. Grandmas 15. “I agree as well” 16. Big name in bubbly 17. Rapper who is third on Forbes wealthiest hip-hop acts for 2017 (behind Jay-Z and Diddy) 18. Cawing bird 19. With 51-Down, “Hope yer successful!” 21. Capsule you can use to escape from a spacecraft 22. Japanese zithers 23. “I want another card” 25. Last Supper question 27. Allow firstclass passengers to board first, say 29. Bone stabilizers in some casts 32. Kinda crummy, as weather 33. Bad way to be caught, when confronted by an angry parent, say 34. Biceps site 35. Strategies 39. Sport ___ (all-terrain vehicle) 40. Art ___ (style)

42. Medicine or law or (if you’re like me) puzzle making, e.g. 43. Wins or losses 44. Instruction to play with the bow 45. “Holy cow!” 46. “Zoinks!” 47. Princess in L. Frank Baum books 49. Jaguar roller 51. Family tree 54. Made happy 57. Senorita’s “a” 58. Fuel pipeline 60. Knuckle head? 61. Grand ___ (wine making phrase) 62. Students in the workplace 63. “So ___ heard” 64. Thing tapped at a party 65. Head covering 66. House Stark’s head, on “Game of Thrones”

9. Celebration of a civil rights leader held every January 10. Herman Melville’s “Typee” sequel 11. Church seats 13. “Yes, yes, yes,” to José 15. Nova ___, Canada 20. Controversial nuclear explosion event 22. Pottery ovens 24. Activist who said “My religion has no geographical limits” 26. Made more interesting 27. Designer bag name 28. More hard to come by 30. Business legend

31. Make certain of 36. Turn on the waterworks 37. Dog’s ID 38. “Sign me up!” 41. Liquid’s sluggish flow 43. Achy 48. Wise guys? 50. Strong urges 51. See 19-Across 52. Business letter opener 53. This, in Spain 54. Actress-model Delevingne 55. Roof overhang 56. Colored, as grey hair 59. French sea LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

DOWN 1. False god 2. As well as 3. Best Actor for “Dallas Buyers Club” 4. As well as 5. Runner on the stairs 6. Backpedal, in the word processor 7. Time machine that is bigger on the inside than the outside 8. Adelaide-toMelbourne dir.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

45


Recovery United

JADE Wellness Center

NOW OPEN IN SOUTH SIDE Locations in Monroeville, Wexford and South Side, PA

Premiere, Family Owned and Operated Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment:

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL • Group and Individualized Therapy

Pittsburgh, Inc.

THERE ARE MANY PATHS TO RECOVERY

NEED HELP? CALL TODAY INSURANCES ACCEPTED

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Treatment for Opiate Addiction Methadone/Suboxone

PITTSBURGH Methadone 412-255-8717 • Suboxone 412-281-1521 NOW ACCEPTING MEDICAID - info@summitmedical.biz

PITTSBURGH • SOUTH HILLS Methadone 412-488-6360 • info2@alliancemedical.biz

BEAVER COUNTY Methadone 724-857-9640 • Suboxone 724-448-9116 • info@ptsa.biz 46

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

412-291-8039

409 DINWIDDIE STREET PGH., PA 15219 • WWW.RECOVERYUNITEDPITTSBURGH.COM


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 28-APRIL 4, 2018

47


MAY 11 // PHIL VASSAR* MAY 12 // AMERICA* MAY 19 // WFC BOXING* MAY 25 - 27 // FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL JUN 1 // LORRIE MORGAN & PAM TILLIS* JUN 2 // TOMMY JAMES & THE SHONDELLS* JUN 15 // BRUCE HORNSBY & THE NOISEMAKERS* JUN 16 // HERMAN’S HERMITS STARRING PETER NOONE* JUN 29 // SAWYER BROWN JUN 30 // CANDLEBOX

JUL 6 // VINCE NEIL THE VOICE OF MÖTLEY CRÜE JUL 7 // BLUE OYSTER CULT JUL 20 // TONE LOC / COLOR ME BADD JUL 21 // STARSHIP FEATURING MICKEY THOMAS AUGUST 4 // WFC BOXING AUGUST 25-26 // CRAFT BEER AND WINE FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER 14 // SUGAR RAY SEPTEMBER 15 // MORRIS DAY & THE TIME SEPTEMBER 21 // THE RAT PACK IS BACK SEPTEMBER 22 // THE VILLAGE PEOPLE *Tickets on sale now. To buy tickets for all shows visit ticketmaster.com

For more information and to get on-sale dates, visit meadowsgaming.com THE ONE. THE ONLY.

Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER

March 28, 2018 - Pirates Preview  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 28 Issue 13

March 28, 2018 - Pirates Preview  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 28 Issue 13