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PITTSBURGH’S LEADING ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT NEWSWEEKLY

MARCH 14-21, 2018

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Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre brings dancer-choreographed works to life in New Works

Opens Saturday, March 17 See ad inside for details


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2018 Spring Break Free Days

EVENTS 3.16 – 5-10pm YOUTH INVASION 2018: STAY WOKE Teens take over The Warhol. Free with museum admission

3.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: COUNTER)INDUCTION The Warhol theater Co-presented by the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets $15/$10 students and seniors in advance, $20/$15 students and seniors at the door

3.21 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS For children ages 1 to 4 years old. Free with museum admission

3.28 & 3.9 - 10am-5pm 3.30 - 10am-10pm

The Jack Buncher Foundation is sponsoring three Free Days at The Warhol during Pittsburgh Public School’s Spring Break. Visitors will be able to L_WSVYLNHSSLYPLZVM(UK`>HYOVS»ZPUZWPYPUNHUKPUÅ\LU[PHS^VYRHUKQVPU artist educators in The Factory, the museum’s art studio, to learn about some of Andy Warhol’s signature art-making techniques. Both Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History are also free these days. Andy Warhol’s Silver Clouds installation at The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Photo by Abby Warhola

3.24 – 9am SENSORY-FRIENDLY WORKSHOP FOR TEENS & YOUNG ADULTS The Warhol entrance space Join us for this inclusive 90-minute workshop for teens and young adults (ages 13 – 21). Free

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 / Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 / FAX: 412.316.3388 / E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

EDITORIAL Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts and Entertainment Editor REBECCA ADDISON Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Food Writer CELINE ROBERTS News Writer RYAN DETO Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns EMILY BENNETT, SABRINA BODON, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

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PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

MARCH 14-21, 2018 // VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 11

ART Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

MARKETING+PROMOTIONS Marketing Director BETHANY RUHE Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Advertising Representatives ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN Digital Development Manager RYAN CROYLE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

ADMINISTRATION

ON THE COVER: Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s New Works program brings dancer-choreographed works to life. C OV E R PH OTO B Y JO H N ALT DO R F E R

Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

PUBLISHER EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

SATURDAY, APRIL 28

5K RUN & ONE-MILE WALK AVONWORTH AVONWORTH MIDDLE MIDDLE SCHOOL SCHOOL 256 JOSEPHS 256 JOSEPHS LANE LANE PGH, PA 15237 PGH, PA 15237 8th Grade Students are planning the event from start-to-finish in their Civics classes. All of the proceeds will be donated to the Hannah Milbert Memorial Fund, an Avonworth High School scholarship fund.

Online Registration is Now Available: www.ChaseTheAntelopes5k.com (student designed & updated regularly)

cost: $15 until April 1st Fee includes: Participation in event, t-shirt & goodie bag

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News+Views 6 Food+Drink 14 Arts+Entertainment 19 Calendar 36 Classifieds 43

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Opens March 17 TheFrickPittsburgh.org

The exhibition is organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

The Pittsburgh presentation of this exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Richard King Mellon Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Allegheny Foundation.

Image: Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917), Little Dancer Aged Fourteen (Petite danseuse de quatorze ans), model executed ca. 1880; cast in 1922. Bronze with net tutu and hair ribbon. 38 ½"H x 14 ½"W x 14 ¼"D; base: 2 ¼"H x 19 ½"W x 12"D. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. State Operating Fund and the Art Lovers’ Society. Photo: Travis Fullerton. © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

THEFRICKPITTSBURGH.ORG 412-371-0600 7227 REYNOLDS STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15208

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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NEWS +VIEWS

CP PHOTO BY JUSTIN MERRIMAN

Pennsylvania U.S. Senate candidate Lou Barletta (left) with other state and national Republicans at a Donald Trump event in North Fayette in January

.POLITICS.

ANTIIMMIGRANT SONG

U.S. Senate candidate Lou Barletta pushing his anti-immigrant agenda BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

FEB. 2 immigration article on the Kansas City Star website provided an interesting contrast for Pennsylvania readers. The article detailed the detainment of Ban.gladeshi undocumented immigrant Syed Ahmed Jamal, who has lived in the U.S. for 30 years, has no criminal record, and teaches at Kansas City-area universities. Jamal overstayed his visa and was allowed to stay in the country on a supervised basis since 2011. Regardless, he was detained by U.S. immigration officials and faces possible deportation. But that complex story ran in contrast to an ad placed on top of the article’s page by Pennsylvania U.S. Senate candidate and current U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta (R-Hazleton). Barletta’s message was simple: “We must stop the flow of illegal immigrants into the country.”

This is just one tactic by the Barletta campaign to showcase the candidate’s opposition to immigration. Pittsburgh City Paper discovered the ad on the Kansas City Star website, but also found Barletta’s online ads stating, “we must secure the border” next to a January CP story about a Pittsburgh undocumented Mexican immigrant. Throughout 2018, Barletta has included harsh anti-immigrant messaging in campaign mailers and emails. And last year, a Barletta-linked group that advocates for less immigration, put out an ad against Barletta’s senate-race opponent, U.S Sen. Bob Casey (D-Scranton), demanding Casey support funding for a border wall. These tactics have led Democrats and immigration proponents to claim Barletta is attempting to gain CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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ANTI-IMMIGRANT SONG, CONTINUED FROM PG. 6

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JOHN KANE: AN IMMIGRANT LABORER AND PITTSBURGH ARTIST

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March 24 • 12 - 4pm

In 2017, Pat McArdle and his son Reese mounted a valiant campaig in their effort to rename the Beechwood Boulevard Bridge, commonly known as the Greenfield Bridge, for the Pittsburgh laborer and artist John Kane. The Pittsburgh Naming Commission overwhelmingly chose not to rename the bridge even as members noted that John Kane is a Pittsburgh icon whose works and legacy we ought to be celebrate more. In this lecture, Pat and Reese McArdle continue telling the story of John Kane and why he matters.

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support through xenophobia and fearmongering. The Barletta campaign says the candidate is pro-immigrant, but that immigrants should enter “through the proper legal channels.” Either way, University of Pittsburgh political science professor Jerry Shuster thinks Barletta’s campaign strategy is too focused on a narrow group of voters and could backfire. Barletta has espoused hardline immigration stances for more than a decade, and for that reason, Shuster expects more anti-immigrant rhetoric as Pennsylvania’s 2018 U.S. Senate race heats up. Barletta has a few Republican challengers for the upcoming May primary election, including Pennsylvania state Rep. Jim Christiana (R-Beaver) and national-security expert Cynthia Ayers. In 2006, Barletta initially gained notoriety, when as mayor of Hazleton, a former coaltown in Luzerne County, he passed immigration laws. He signed laws instituting fines on Hazleton landlords who knowingly rented to undocumented immigrants; denied permits to businesses that hired undocumented immigrants; and made English the town’s official language. This was in response to an influx of Latino immigrants into Hazleton, drawn there by the area’s new meat-packing plants.

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Barletta boasts about his personal history in a campaign mailer he sent to voters in February, writing: “I took a stand on illegal immigration — long before it was a popular issue — and I didn’t back down.” This mailer also declared “America is at war” with “violent criminal aliens.” Jamie Longazel is a Hazleton native and activist with Anthracite Unite, a Hazleton-area pro-immigrant and socialjustice collective. He wrote a book on the immigrant laws passed under Barletta. Longazel says Barletta is trying to play to people’s economic fears, since Hazleton and many towns in Pennsylvania have been stuck in cycles of decline. But, according to Longazel, instead of blaming economic factors, Barletta is intentionally casting immigrants as the enemy of working-class white Pennsylvanians. “We have seen him do this for more than a decade,” says Longazel. He says it has worked for Barletta so far, because it “appeals to people’s fears and anxieties and sense of uncertainty. In that context, they need an explanation, and Barletta tells them that immigrants are the problem.” Barletta’s campaign manager, Jon Anzur, disagrees with the assessment that Barletta is anti-immigrant. “Congressman Barletta is campaigning on a pro-immigrant message,” wrote Anzur in a statement to CP, noting that Barletta wants immigrants to enter the U.S. through the legal channels. Anzur also wrote that Barletta “understands how people entering the country illegally affects small towns by straining local budgets and threatening American jobs.” But Longazel says it was actually Barletta that strained Hazleton’s budget as mayor, since his immigrant laws were ruled unconstitutional and cost Hazleton taxpayers $1.4 million in legal fees. Also, a 2017 report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says that “immigration has an overall positive impact on long-run economic growth in the U.S.” Longazel also disagrees that Barletta is pro-immigrant and says Barletta’s views have evolved from being critical of illegal immigration to now advocating for less legal immigration. Barletta supports the RAISE Act, a bill introduced in U.S. Congress last year that would drastically cut the number of immigrants and refugees coming to America. Barletta also sits on the advisory board of the Federation of American Immigration Reform, a group that is advocating less immigration. FAIR put out immigration-related attack ads against Sen.


Join us

Saturday, March 17th 11th for for

Screenshot of a Feb. 2 article on the Kansas City Star website showing a Lou Barletta ad above a sympathetic story of an undocumented immigrant

Casey shortly after Barletta announced his senate campaign. Since 2008, Barletta has received $8,500 from the U.S. Immigration Reform PAC, which advocates for lowering immigration. The political-action committee was founded by Mary-Lou Tanton, the wife of FAIR founder John Tanton, who opposed immigration as a means of population control and to protect the U.S. ethnic white majority, according to Washington, D.C.-based political newspaper The Hill.

“WE HAVE SEEN HIM DO THIS FOR MORE THAN A DECADE.” Pennsylvania Democratic Party spokesperson Max Steele says Barletta’s campaign and ties to FAIR make him an “extremist” candidate. “While Congressman Barletta’s fearmongering may appeal to the far-right fringe, it won’t save his desperate, struggling campaign,” says Steele. Pitt’s Shuster says Barletta may be highlighting his hard-line immigration stances to gain support of the same Republicans who support President Donald Trump, who is also known for anti-immigrant rhetoric. “He needs the Republican Party to

take notice of him, and he wants to be perceived as the most ardent Trump supporter,” says Shuster. Barletta has already received endorsements from Trump and Pennsylvania’s Republican Party, but Shuster thinks Barletta won’t tone down the anti-immigrant rhetoric. In fact, on March 8, Barletta sent out a campaign-fundraising email claiming undocumented immigrants were partially responsible for the country’s opioid epidemic. “Criminal illegal aliens are … major players in the widespread and deadly opioid crisis” reads a March Barletta campaign email. (A 2017 study in the American Journal of Public Health shows that as undocumented populations rose in the 1990s and 2000s, drug arrests actually went down.) And while Barletta is gaining farright support, Shuster says Pennsylvania is in a different place than it was in 2016, when it fell in love with Trump and his anti-immigrant messaging. He notes how Democrats are energized for the 2018 midterms, and says Barletta’s audacious claims about immigrants may fuel their fire. Shuster also thinks that if Barletta’s immigrant rhetoric becomes too prominent, it will turn off moderate voters. And Shuster says not enough voters in Pennsylvania see immigration as a prominent issue to support Barletta’s hard-line stances. According to a September 2017 poll from Franklin & Marshall College, only 1 percent of Pennsylvania residents say immigration is the state’s biggest problem.

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.POLITICS.

BIRD BRAIN What was going through the Pirate Parrot’s mind during a recent GOP fundraiser? BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM WHEN THE Pittsburgh Pirates traded Gerrit Cole, fans were mad. When they traded Andrew McCutchen, fans were irate. But when Pirates General Manager Frank Coonelly dragged the Pirate Parrot to a GOP event that featured U.S. Congressional candidate Rick Saccone and long-time Trump stooge Kellyanne Conway, fans lost every piece of their damned minds. Coonelly claims he wasn’t endorsing Saccone at the Spirit of Lincoln Dinner, a fundraiser held by the Allegheny County Republican Committee of Allegheny County, but that he was there to talk baseball. Critics are skeptical, however. But through the powers of mind-reading and body-language interpretation, we were able to hear what was going through our favorite mascot’s head.

“Do I look like I want to have the chicken?”

“This is my third political event of the week. Two nights ago, I egged Conor Lamb’s house. But don’t tell Saccone, he’s pro-life.”

“At first I thought this was the Mr. Rogers celebration, but I realized that Kellyanne Conway was not Lady Elaine Fairchilde.”

“Honestly, I’m not a huge Saccone fan. He’s anti-mascot. Last year, he got pissed at Chuck E. Cheese for not allowing customers to pack heat in his restaurant. That place is a madhouse. Has anyone been there and not wanted to shoot someone?”

“Man, this is lame. I had more fun during the 1980s cocaine trials.”

BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

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“I heard Rick Saccone was going to use some of his legislative expense account to help us get a third baseman.”

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LOVE US? HATE US? + RANTS RAVES EMAIL US AT INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM COMMENTS OF THE WEEK

.GUEST OPINION.

JUDGE SENDS WRONG MESSAGE TO ABUSE VICTIMS

“A freshman marketing intern could have told Coonelly this was a bad idea.” “When this so-called Spirit of Lincoln dinner went from whatever it was to a campaign rally for Saccone, Coonelly and the pirates should have removed themselves from the equation. Otherwise it’s seen as an endorsement, no matter what his speech was about. Remember when the Pittsburgh police chief gave a speech at the Democratic national convention and local Republicans lost their shit?”

“As if we need another reason not to buy tickets. He can speak where he likes. But leave the Parrot aht of it.”

“People actually still care about the Pirates?” “Doesn’t matter [which] political side you’re on, shouldn’t use a team mascot like this if the team accepts tax dollars/breaks/subsidies.” COMMENTS ON CITY PAPER ’S FACEBOOK PAGE AND TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM FEEDS ABOUT A STORY DETAILING PIRATES GM FRANK COONELLY SPEAKING AT A POLITICAL EVENT WITH THE PIRATE PARROT

“Cancelled my paper when they wouldn’t endorse Hilary. This explains Saccone’s endorsement and all the future [bull] that will be coming from the @PittsburghPG.”

“[This] critique is on point, labeling the PG’s stance ‘smug, tone-deaf.’” TWITTER POSTS IN RESPONSE TO CP ’S CRITIQUE OF THE PITTSBURGH POSTGAZETTE ’S NEW EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Free Will Astrology BY ROB BREZSNY

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BY SHIRL REGAN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ITH THE recent historic increase in the number of victims reporting past sexual and domestic violence, questions arise as to why victims wait so long before reporting such incidents. If you have been asking yourself such questions, you need look no further than the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas to find some answers. In a case heard by Common Pleas Judge Lester Nauhaus last year [and first reported in City Paper], a female high school student had the courage to report that a male student at her school inappropriately sexually touched her. The perpetrator pled guilty to sexually groping the victim six times and the case ended up before Judge Nauhaus for consideration of an appropriate fine and punishment. In the presence of the victim and the perpetrator, Judge Nauhaus asked how many times the perpetrator had touched the victim. The judge then proposed fining the perpetrator six dollars as a reduced fine … a dollar a touch. In a case from earlier last year, Nauhaus was hearing a separate harassment case. He ended up dropping all charges against the accused and made a reference to the fact that our current president believes that inappropriate sexual touching is not wrong. In both cases, Judge Nauhaus trivialized the sexual violence and harassment for which guilty pleas had already been entered. What is the message to this and other victims? Don’t even bother to report. What is the message to this and other perpetrators? Carry on, no big deal. In Allegheny County, many working in the justice system have worked hard to ensure that sexual- and domestic-violence perpetrators are held accountable for their criminal behavior, and there are guides for model justicesystem response. If a member of the

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

justice system chooses to act contrary to these guides, there must be accountability. Victims will not report if our justice system permits sexual assault and domestic violence to be trivialized and discounted. Formal complaints have been made against Judge Nauhaus for his conduct in these local cases. The response of our court systems to date has been to move Judge Nauhaus to a different

division, but to continue to request his services as a Senior Judge on the bench each and every month since the hearings described took place last year. With that response, don’t be surprised that victims continue to be reluctant to report.

Shirl Regan is the president and CEO of the Women’s Center & Shelter in Pittsburgh.

JENSORENSEN

NOT YOUR SIGN? VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM FOR OUR FULL ASTROLOGICAL FORECAST

Although her work is among the best Russian literature of the 20th century, poet Marina Tsvetayeva lived in poverty. When fellow poet Rainer Maria Rilke asked her to describe the kingdom of heaven, she said, “Never again to sweep floors.” I can relate. To earn a living in my early adulthood, I washed tens of thousands of dishes in restaurant kitchens. Now that I’m grown up, one of my great joys is to avoid washing dishes. I invite you to think along these lines, Pisces. What seemingly minor improvements in your life are actually huge triumphs that evoke profound satisfaction? Take inventory of small pleasures that are really quite miraculous.


.PITTSBURGH LEFT.

CP STATEMENT ABOUT MARCH 7 COVER STORY BY CHARLIE DEITCH // CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

AST WEEK, it came to our attention that one of the subjects of our March 7 cover story about women-owned tattoo parlors was photographed wearing the T-shirt of a white-power band. This was unintended, and City Paper wants to take the time to explain what happened. We immediately removed the story from our website, though the story remained in our print edition. In the story, freelance writer/photographer Kat Rutt (who was working with us for the first time) introduced us to 16 women who were diversifying the region’s tattoo scene. However, shortly after the story was posted on Facebook, we began getting messages that one of the artists, Lettia Suchevich, EDITOR’S NOTE: was wearing the T-shirt of a white-power metal band Parts of this piece ran called Aggravated Assault. online March 7. I’ll admit it: We didn’t catch it. In all my time in the business, I’ve never fact-checked the words on a T-shirt. You can be guaranteed that we will from this day forward. However, our internal investigation has also uncovered other issues, including the fact that Rutt altered one of the photos she gave to us by removing a swastika tattoo from Suchevich’s arm, despite her initial explanation that there was nothing else about Suchevich that indicated she was a supporter of the white-power movement. City Paper was unaware that any photos had been altered. Altering photos without editorial permission (and news photos are never altered) is strictly against CP policy. Also, we believe her decision to remove the swastika in one photo, per her own admission, indicates she knew it was problematic, and thus we believe she should have alerted CP’s editors. Admittedly, Rutt was not made aware of our policy about not altering photos upon her assignment. However, this goes beyond covering up a blemish or other forms of airbrushing that photographers do. By covering up the swastika, an important, contextual fact was omitted, although it was unintended. If we had been aware of this development we would not have run the piece as presented. We originally planned to return an edited copy of the story to our website. However, because of the photo alteration, I lost confidence in the story; it became fruit of the poisonous tree. Rutt, whose full statement can be found online, told me that she removed the swastika because she feared it could have detracted from the purpose of the article — that is, highlighting successful women in a maledominated industry. However, omitting a contextual fact to present a story about women-business owners is not a tradeoff that should have been made. I am responsible for this paper’s content, and I take full responsibility for this error. I apologize to the readers who were rightfully offended, and I also thank them for bringing this to my attention. I also apologize to the fantastic women profiled in this piece. You didn’t deserve to have this moment ruined because of something like this.

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FOOD+DRINK

MORE FOOD CONTENT ONLINE: CHECK OUT OUR FISH FRY REVIEWS AT WWW.PGH CITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTOS BY VANESSA SONG

Yelena and Michael Barnhouse, of Lola Bistro

.FOOD.

OLD-WORLD CHARM The menu is built around “international comfort cuisine.” BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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L

OLA BISTRO IS nestled among the beautiful 19th-

century homes at the edge of the Mexican War Streets. It occupies the bottom floor of one such house, built in 1889, and at around 30 seats, makes for a very cozy space in which to dine. Since opening in 2012, Lola has been quietly turning out beautiful food, one step back from the limelight that the Pittsburgh restaurant scene has been enjoying. However, it has garnered a cult following, and those who go there return often. Chef Michael Barnhouse and Yelena Barnhouse, partners in life and business, are the owners of Lola, and also its only employees. According to the Barnhouses, the space has hosted restaurants since 1936, and they still cook on the original stove. Often, the upstairs tenant will order food from the back door. They made a decision not to advertise and let the busi-

ness grow organically. “We don’t have a lot of time to mingle with other restaurant owners. I kind of came in through the back door in Pittsburgh,” says Michael. The pair moved here from Seattle in 2008, and decided to open a restaurant of their own. They built their menu around what they call “international comfort cuisine.” For this couple, international is certainly the key word. Michael grew up relatively locally in St. Clairsville, Ohio. He has a bachelor’s of fine arts degree in painting (all the work hung in Lola is his). “Graduating with an art degree, I wasn’t really doing anything with that,” he says. “I felt some pressure to get something under my belt that would mean that I could get a job wherever I would go.” He developed an interest in cooking and holistic health, and eventually set off to New York City


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to attend the Natural Gourmet Institute. He worked lines, in catering and as a private chef throughout the 1990s in California and Seattle, even landing a gig with Wolfgang Puck. He traveled to Indonesia to study the food and culture. “Working in Seattle for as long as I did, about 15 years, my work is very Asian fusion-based,” says Michael. He also cites influences from chefs who cook Mediterranean fusion, as well as classic French technique. Yelena is a Russian immigrant from southern Siberia, where she grew up on a small farm during the Soviet era. Her culinary training happened in the home kitchens of her mother and her grandmothers, and at the farmer’s market with her father. Her family taught her to forage for mushrooms, berries and herbs in the boreal forests of the Taiga and how to preserve foods for the long Siberian winters. “My friends who grew up in the city, they had such bleak Soviet childhoods. They would spend a couple of hours a day standing in line for bread. For me, it was so adventurous living close to nature,” says Yelena. Living in a rural area, she learned these skills as a necessity. “I’ve always cooked, but [in school] I actually studied world history,” she says. In fact, she did her master’s-degree work in it. When she met Barnhouse in Seattle, she was working in advertising for a newspaper. But as their relationship progressed, she started working in restaurants, mostly in the back of house. One night, she subbed in for one of Michael’s cooks who came to work drunk, and that is when the couple began working together.

During business hours, Yelena runs the front of the house. But her influence is also felt in the kitchen, where she prepares special dishes, like borscht, and helps with the heavy prep cooking, an essential part of running a twoperson show. Occasionally, on extra busy nights, Michael will find himself making pasta to order, having run out of prepped dishes. But mostly, the couple credits prepping and planning for their success.

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The two work in tandem on the menus. “It happens like magic,” says Yelena, of their process for menu development. Both have their own strengths from their unique backgrounds. For instance, Michael spent a year perfecting the noodle bowl on the menu, because his customers liked it so much. “My stuff, like the pelmeni [a Russian dumpling], that’s just traditional stuff,” says Yelena. “But you can’t find it [elsewhere in Pittsburgh].” They source their meats from Salem’s Market in the Strip District; some of the produce comes from their own garden, which they keep for the restaurant. Breads, pastas and charcuterie are made in house. The restaurant’s BYOB policy encourages people to come and stay awhile, and every table enjoys a two-hour reservation time. “We’re both stemming from old techniques. I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel,” says Michael.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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.DRINK.

DRINK ME

.DRINK.

SPRING IS FOR LAGERS

BY CELINE ROBERTS CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BY DREW CRANISKY INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

PRING IS NIGH, which

CP PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS

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HOT TAKE: There’s almost nothing like a bracing, classic gin martini to take the edge off any day. Having tasted many around the city, this bar manages to get the right balance of botanicals, salt and vermouth to make it perfect.

means it’s time to return to gardening, baseball and good lager beer. Rich Belgians and boozy imperial stouts are all well and good for the winter hibernation. But when the thermometer starts climbing and the days get longer, I reach for something light, crisp and low in alcohol. And though they may seem simple, crafting a perfect lager is a notoriously difficult task. First, a few beer basics. Broadly speaking, all beer is either an ale or a lager. The difference is determined by the type of yeast. In ales, fermentation happens at higher temperatures (generally above 55° F), with the majority of the fermentation occurring at the top of the liquid (you may hear ales referred to as “top-fermenting”). Ale yeasts produce complex esters that lend fruit and spice notes — think about the banana and clove flavors present in hefeweizens and many Belgian styles. Lagers, on the other hand, ferment at colder temperatures (generally below 55° F), with most activity occurring at the bottom (“bottom-fermenting”). At these temperatures, fermentation occurs more slowly and produces far fewer of those fruity esters. These beers then undergo the additional step of lagering (lager literally means “to store” in German). Lagers are aged for several weeks or months at temperatures just above freezing. This allows any extraneous flavors, aromas and haze to dissipate, resulting in the clean, clear lagers we’ve come to love.

CRAFTING A PERFECT LAGER IS A NOTORIOUSLY DIFFICULT TASK. Though clarity and crispness are characteristic of all lagers, a wide range of styles exists within that broad category. The Pilsner is one of the world’s most popular lagers, and a true German or Czech Pilsner is miles away from the “fine Pilsner beer” advertised on Miller Lite cans. Named after the Czech town of Pilsen, these brilliant golden beers should burst with spicy and floral hop character. Dry and refreshing, they’re the perfect choice for a bright spring afternoon. The world of lagers offers much more than crushable lawnmower beers. Lagers can be quite dark and strong, as is the case with sweet and malty doppelbocks or roasty, toasty schwarzbiers. For springtime, a Maibock is particularly appropriate. Often used interchangeably with helles (pale) bock, the Maibock (“May bock”) is customarily served at spring festivals in Germany. Balancing malty richness with clean drinkability, it’s the perfect lager for the transitioning temperatures of the season. Lagers require plenty of time and space for lagering, and their stripped-down flavor profiles mean there is no room for error in the brewing process. This is why lagers are relatively uncommon among smaller American craft breweries, and why the world’s best examples usually come from well-established European breweries. Nevertheless, we have some fine lagers in the Pittsburgh area. Penn Brewery has snagged numerous awards for its classic lagers, Roundabout often features a Pilsner or an amber lager, and Oakdale’s Helicon Brewing specializes in low-alcohol, German-style lagers.


Piazza Talarico & Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar Rustic Italian food and housemade wine

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piazzatalarico.com 3832 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15201 Valid for dine-in only with $10 minimum food purchase. Valid through April 1, 2018.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK DANIEL’S DISTILLERY

Jack Daniel and his team along with Nearest Green’s son, George Green

.DRINK HISTORY.

OBSCURED HISTORY

Fresh, Seasonal, Local

BY CELINE ROBERTS // CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

YEAR- and-a-half ago, Fawn

Weaver began research that would resurrect the true narrative of Jack Daniel’s whiskey: that Daniel learned to distill from Nathan “Nearest” Green, an African-American slave he met as a child. As a young orphan, Daniel went to work for a preacher who rented Green from his master to distill his whiskey. Green was known in the area for making the finest whiskey, and he took Daniel under his wing. When Daniel grew up and opened his own distillery, he hired Green, who was now a free man, to be his master distiller. Green became the first African-American master distiller in history.

GREEN BECAME THE FIRST AFRICANAMERICAN MASTER DISTILLER IN HISTORY Daniel always gave credit to Green for his mentorship. He’s mentioned 50 times in Daniel’s official biography. But as time went on, Green’s legacy was more or less forgotten outside of Lynchburg, Tenn., where Jack Daniel’s is headquartered. But in 2016, Weaver read a short article in the New York Times and knew she had to continue the search for Nearest Green. Weaver spent time with all of Green’s living relatives (his 107-year-old granddaughter is still alive); hired historians, archivists and genealogists; and gathered African-American elders at the Greens’ family church for meetings and conver-

sation. With the help of these people and of the town of Lynchburg, she was able to gather 10,000 artifacts and original documents related to the Green family. Weaver was shocked at what she heard from older African Americans about their lives during the Jim Crow era. Lynchburg seemed to be exempt from much of the time’s racial strife. Many people could still remember the name of the one openly racist shopkeeper who adhered to Jim Crow laws and gleefully remembered him being chased down the street by a black woman with a broom. “They said, ‘Oh, he deserved it’,” said Weaver, during a recent talk at Pittsburgh’s Threadbare Cider House & Meadery. She felt as though much of what she heard about Lynchburg sounded like an alternate reality, but the town’s attitude was shaped by Nearest Green’s legacy as a respected member of its society. Weaver is now deeply invested ensuring that Green’s legacy lives on. She and her husband recently purchased the original distillery where Jack Daniel and Green worked, and have released a new brand of whiskey — Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Whiskey, as well as a Premium Silver Whiskey. The company has also set up the Nearest Green Foundation to help spread the word about Green’s accomplishments and to support his direct descendents with a scholarship fund.

FOR MORE ON NEAREST GREEN’S LEGACY, keep a lookout for Weaver’s upcoming book, In Search of the Nearest Green.

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17


DINING OUT

CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

SENYAI THAI KITCHEN 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE., SHADYSIDE 412-441-4141 SENYAIPGH.COM

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Immersed in authenticity, Senyai Thai Kitchen creates an intricate fusion of food and design, where every detail transports you to a faraway place. Traditional favorites and new creations like jumbo lump crab curry make Senyai a destination.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA

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5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh, PA. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

CASA REYNA 2031 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT CASAREYNAPGH.COM Find our Mexican hideaway just downstairs from Reyna Foods in the heart of the Strip District. Fresh tortillas come off the line and onto your plate, as you watch through the window. The menu is exciting; the dishes are fresh, local and delicious. The staff are friendly and knowledgeable, and the atmosphere inviting. Come for the tortillas, stay for the extensive tequila list and homemade artisan Mexican chocolate ice cream.

PIAZZA TALARICO 3832 PENN AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-652-9426 PIAZZATALARICO.COM Piazza Talarico and Papa Joe’s Wine Cellar is a small, family-owned restaurant and winery in Western Pennsylvania serving authentic Italian peasant food. Enjoy the fresh food on site or take out. Specializes in “Baked Maccheron”, an al forno dish of rigatoni, Grandma’s sauce, cheese, pepperoni and boiled eggs.

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EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-to-table products.

FULL PINT WILD SIDE TAP ROOM 5310 BUTLER ST., LAWRENCEVILLE 412-408-3083 FULLPINTBREWING.COM Full Pint Wild Side Taproom is Full Pint Brewing company’s Lawrenceville location and features a full service bar, huge sandwiches and half-priced happy hour. Open 4 p.m.-midnight, Mon.-Fri., and noon –midnight on Saturday. Check us out on Facebook for upcoming shows and events.

SAGA HIBACHI 201 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE MALL, BETHEL PARK 412-835-8888 SAGAHIBACHI.COM Saga in the South Hills is now under new management. Stop in for exciting table-side preparations and the famous shrimp sauce. Or sit in the sushi-bar area for the freshest sushi experience, with both traditional preparations and contemporary variations.

BROAD STREET BISTRO 1025 BROAD ST., NORTH VERSAILLES 412-829-2911 BROADSTBISTRO.COM Broad Street Bistro is a neighborhood restaurant offering daily specials. ALL food is prepared fresh and made to order. It is family friendly with a special kids’ menu.


ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

Clarion Quartet (left to right): Jennifer Orchard, Bronwyn Banerdt, Tatjana Mead Chamis, Marta Kerchovsky

.MUSIC.

SILENT NO MORE “I think there’s an assumption in classical music, that if something is good, it will be known. ... Question those assumptions.” BY MEG FAIR // MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HERESIENSTADT looked like a normal Czech village

when the Red Cross visited it for inspection in June 1944. There was a bank, a bakery and children singing and performing. But beneath the surface, a sinister truth lurked. Theresienstadt was a transitional concentration camp used by the Nazis during World War II. Many artists lived there, and in this strange set up, there was some freedom to create. Composers and musicians wrote and collaborated in spite of the awful conditions. It was the Red Cross visit, however, that made the prisoners realize the camp’s leniency wasn’t permanent, nor was their time there. “But they still continued to create, that’s what is so amazing to us,” says Clarion Quartet violist Tatjana Mead Chamis.

According to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 90,000 Jews from Theresienstadt were deported further east, certainly to die, and about 33,000 perished within the camp itself. Although the history of Theresienstadt, as a complicated creative hub in spite of the horrors of WWII, is fairly well known, the music that was created there is less so. That is the mission of the Clarion Quartet: to perform the music stifled by Nazi Germany and bring it to the fore. This includes work by Erwin Schulhoff, Viktor Ullmann and and Erich Wolfgang Korngold. On Breaking the Silence, the quartet’s first release, the musicians take on 11 incredibly challenging pieces by these three composers. “I think there’s an assumption in classical music, and probably elsewhere, that if something is good, it will be CONTINUES ON PG. 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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SILENT NO MORE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

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known. And that’s what I’ve really taken the most out of this project is to question those assumptions. It’s not the case,” says Clarion Quartet cellist Bronwyn Banerdt. “The suppression has come all the way to this century, and it continues,” adds Chamis. “So, it’s really our duty as musicians, we feel, to bring it out. If we’re not playing it, who is going to know about it?” All four members of the Clarion Quartet are full-time employees of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. The group began working in January 2017, getting together to rehearse in whatever spare time could be carved out around PSO rehearsals. “We were brand new to each other, and it was kind of shocking that we wanted to rehearse so much. And we were moonlighting!” says violinist Jennifer Orchard. A major moment for the group was its performance, during the PSO’s European tour, of pieces from Theresienstadt. That meant that during an extremely busy work tour, the quartet was rushing to pull instruments out of cargo and practice during any free moment, filling breakfast rooms in hotels with the brilliant sounds of Ullmann, Korngold and Schulhoff. The Theresienstadt performance was filmed by a German videographer who was deeply moved by it, and told the quartet that he and his brother wanted to record its music. The quartet members were flattered, but could not foresee it becoming reality: The funds did not exist; the women were full time at the PSO; and the two German men were literally across the ocean. But the brothers later received a grant, which they used to travel to the United

States for two-and-a-half days of intense recording. This work would become the recently released Breaking the Silence. For the Clarion Quartet, the work doesn’t stop at performing and releasing albums. Outreach to music schools is another area in which the women invest energy and time. The Quartet will be closing out a university-wide weekend later in March at the University of Utah in which each school — those of music, art, architecture, literature and beyond — will be examining how Nazi suppression changed what culture we consume today.

CLARION QUARTET AT SHIM HOLOCAUST OBSERVANCE 7 p.m. Sun., April 15. Temple Emanuel, 1250 Bower Hill Road, South Hills. www.templeemanuelpgh.org

The Quartet is grateful that audience members and others are beginning to catch on to the mission as well. “Things are working out for this project because they have to. There’s something about great art — it just has to be heard,” says Chamis. “We’re all part of this, and [the audience] has the same mindframe that they want to do something about the social injustice of [the musical repression], and cultural injustice. It spans over all the arts, because all of culture had the same repression.” “It’s not just the people who were in the camps who were affected by all of this, and that’s what I want us to understand as humans,” says Banerdt. “Every time we disenfranchise other humans, all of society suffers.”

.MUSIC.

MP 3 MONDAY >> RAVE AMI Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “Blue Narcissus,” by Rave Ami, formerly Honey. The new track is a bouncy, fuzzy rock track, with catchy melodies and melancholy lyrics — just the warped juxtaposition that makes Rave Ami shine. Stream or download “Blue Narcissus” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

21


MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

Leading adies L A COMEDY BY

Ken Ludwig

MARCH 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25, 2018 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15, $10 ON THURSDAYS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100

PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA SLOVESKO

The two Mayas: Kendall Arin Claxton and Linda Kanyarusoke in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

.PLAY REVIEW.

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AVING NOT read Maya Angelou’s memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings for many years, the humor and charisma of the stage performance surprised me. All of the disturbing storylines from the book are there on stage — racism, sexism, sexual abuse, the dreary loneliness of teenage life — but the acting, staging and delivery bring an unexpected levity and charm to the story. It’s still upsetting at times, but there’s a lot more going on in Prime Stage’s production at New Hazlett Theater. Caged Bird recounts Angelou’s childhood in the 1930s and ’40s, living with different relatives of varying degrees of kindness, cruelty and indifference. Most of the story takes place in her hometown of Stamps, Ark., living with her brother, Bailey (Malic Williams), Uncle Willie (Sam Lothard) and grandmother (Denise SheffeyPowell), who goes by “Momma.” An adult Angelou (Linda Kanyarusoke) narrates the goings-on on stage, but young Maya (a stellar Kendall Arin Claxton) bears the burden of the most challenging scenes. It’s a tough part, but she fills it deftly and empathetically, without going overboard on the sweetness of the character.

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS Continues through Sun., March 18. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25. 412-267-4245 or www.primestage.com

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There are explosive, troubling moments throughout, but as you might expect from an autobiography, some of the most affecting moments are small, intimate and mundane. Playing with friends. Listening to the radio. Reading alone. This is a story about childhood, and it’s these scenes when the naiveté, hope and humor of adolescence shine through. According to the origin story behind Caged Bird, in 1968, Angelou’s friend and mentor, James Baldwin, brought her to a dinner party at the home of cartoonist Jules Feiffer, where she captivated guests with stories of her childhood. The next day, Feiffer’s wife called the publisher Robert Loomis to recommend he sign Angelou to a book deal. Angelou declined. Loomis responded, “It’s just as well, because to write an autobiography as literature is just about impossible.” Angelou accepted the tacit challenge, and Caged Bird was published in 1969. As it happens, the “autobiography as literature” works on the stage as well as it does in the book. Most of the non-character narration is carried by the adult Maya, who sweeps in and out of scenes and can often be seen in the background laughing, cringing and grimacing at the events at center stage. But the characters also break out of dialogue to narrate, creating an engaging ensemble of storytellers delivering Angelou’s lyrical prose. It’s a clever and innovative way to bring a difficult story to life, and director Monteze Freeman deserves credit. And like I said, it’s pretty funny too.


NEXT WEEK, MARCH 18-24 PITTSBURGH BECOMES PIZZABURGH PIZZA PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATE HAGERTY

We asked. You delivered. Here are some of the most unique pizzas Pittsburgh has to offer for one week only.

#PGHPIZZAWEEK PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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PITTSBURGH PIZZA WEEK / 9 PIZZAS / 7 DAYS / MARCH 18-24

ADRIAN’S PIZZA –––––– MCKNIGHT –––––

BADAMO’S PIZZA ––– NORTH SIDE/SOUTH HILLS –––

CITY OVEN –––––– DOWNTOWN ––––––

JAMAICAN JERK PIZZA Pulled pork, Jamaican sauce, jerk-seasoned ranch, onions, roasted red peppers, provolone and mozzarella

THE SICILIAN : ++ ÈÊÉÊÊ cÈ +ÊÉÊ$ Èł $ with cheese and followed by red sauce and łÊ$ È( É$ Ê%+ É$ÉÊÈ +ÉÊ+

CHICKEN PESTO PIZZA ;+É$ÈÇÉ   +"++Ê+**É Éł c roasted chicken, roasted tomatoes, pesto and parmesan

PIAZZA TALARICO ––––– LAWRENCEVILLE –––––

SLICE ON BROADWAY ––––– VARIOUS LOCATIONS –––––

THE UPPER CRUST ––––– FOX CHAPEL –––––

THE PIG AND THE GOAT Olive oil, mozzarella, tomato, prosciutto, goat cheese, arugula and balsamic glaze

SANTINO Pepperoni, hot Italian sausage, meatball, and ricotta cheese with red sauce and house-blend cheese

GYRO PIZZA Tzatziki sauce, provolone, mozzarella, gyro meat, tomato and onion

FIND MORE INFO AT PGHPIZZAWEEK.COM 24

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PITTSBURGH PIZZA WEEK / 9 PIZZAS / 7 DAYS / MARCH 18-24

DEMORE’S PIZZERIA –––––– MIL LLVALE –––––

MICHIGAN & TRUMBULL ––––– NORTH SIDE –––––

THE BEE’S KNEES PIZZA Garlic-butter base, gorgonzola, mozzarella, provolone, dried bing cherries, prosciutto, and a local orange honey drizzle from Huckle Bee Farms

CHRIS’ BICYCLE CRASH Mozzarella, gorgonzola,

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PROVOLA Smoked buffalo mozzarella, fresh basil and extra virgin olive oil

About our sponsor

ISTITUTO MONDO ITALIANO Centro di Cultura Italiana was founded in 2003 with the goal of welcoming and assisting the Italian community in Pittsburgh. Mondo Italiano has become the point of reference for anyone passionate about Italy and Italian culture. Mondo Italiano organizes a variety of programs, such as Italian-language classes, art exhibits, concerts, intercultural exchanges, cooking demonstrations, trips to Italy, summer camps, travel presentations and a library full of materials in Italian. The Istituto is open seven days a week! FLIP THE PAGE TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN WIN A FRESH MOZZARELLA AND PIZZA DOUGH CLASS AT ISTITUTO MONDO ITALIANO!

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“You can do it.” Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey) coaches Meg (Storm Reid)

.FILM REVIEW.

ANOTHER TIME BY AL HOFF // AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

help save him. So off they all go on their quest into the assorted spaces and times of the universe. At its heart, Wrinkle offers a good vs. evil, light vs. dark set-up, and the usual messages about how when you believe in yourself, you can accomplish anything. (When such affirmations come from Winfrey’s character, the film is like a very special inter-dimensional Oprah show.) It’s a bright film, with some lovely digitally enhanced scenery, showy set pieces and some fabulous costumes. A WRINKLE IN TIME (Winfrey should just walk around DIRECTED BY: Ava DuVernay Chicago dressed like Mrs. Which: “Yes, In 3-D, in select theaters I’m wearing a blonde hooker wig, with a line of jewels across my forehead, and a gilded cage for a dress. I’m Oprah.”) It We first meet the wonderfully nerdy, has engaging actors, an empowering loving Murry family — scientist dad message and deserves extra points for a (Chris Pine), who is working on traveling diverse cast. There is a flying cabbage (I the universe with his mind, with his think), which I loved, and a pop-in from scientist wife (Gugu Mbatha-Raw); tween the sad/sweet Zach Galifianakis, daughter, Meg (Storm Reid); and as the Happy Medium. her super-brainy kid brother, But it never quite hangs Charles Wallace (Deric McMORE MOVIE S together right, stumbling Cabe). Then dad disappears, REVIEWE through scenes that mashand the family suffers; Meg, IN ONLw . up after-school special with especially, grows withdrawn at w wp r a e pghcityp the fantastical. Some scenes and angry. .com are too long, particularly in the But then the kids, plus a life-on-earth set-up, while others, schoolmate (Levi Miller), come out in the more confusing wrinkly uniunder the tutelage of three mysterious verse, could have used better transiwomen, from somewhere out in the tions. I have never read the book, and universe — there’s chatty Mrs. Whatsit book-readers will likely weather such (Reese Witherspoon), the quotationmoments without trouble. I’ll also leave spouting Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling) and it to the book-readers to sort out whether the larger-than-life counselor, Mrs. the film meets their expectations, but I Which (Oprah Winfrey). The three assuspect that most kids will nonetheless sure Meg that her dad is still alive, but in enjoy the outing. danger in the beyond, and that she can

IT’S TRICKY business, taking a beloved

classic children’s book — which finds its real power inside the reader’s mind — and translating that wonder to a box-office-friendly Disney film. Ava DuVernay (Selma) makes a go of it with A Wrinkle in Time, an adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s 1962 novel. She makes a big-hearted and sincere effort, but the results are more pedestrian than magical and transforming.

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Jonathan Finlayson

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OME TRUMPET players might pur-

sue a career after hearing legendary players like Clifford Brown or Dizzy Gillespie, or iconoclasts like Lester Bowie, of the Art Ensemble of Chicago. Jonathan Finlayson found his inspiration closer to home. “The thing that sealed it for me was being around other kids that were, at the time, a lot better than me,” Finlayson says, on the phone from New York. “It was inspiring and challenging. Some kids a few years older than me were proficient at improvising, with great control or command over their instruments. And I was like, ‘Wow, I want to do that.’”

JONATHAN FINLAYSON & SICILIAN DEFENSE 8 p.m. Tue., March 20. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free, but reservations are required at www.alphabetcity.org.

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Finlayson has gone on to become an in-demand trumpeter, playing with some of the most adventurous jazz musicians and composers, such as guitarist Mary Halvorson, and saxophonists Steve Lehman and Steve Coleman. His ability to look beyond the conventional has also inspired his own work with Sicilian Defense, an intriguing quintet which comes to town this week. The trumpeter’s ongoing affiliation with Coleman began when Finlayson was fresh out of high school. Coleman — whose music combines multiple rhythms, and manages to groove despite its complexity — had a profound impact on Finlayson. “I remember the first time being introduced

to things that have different rhythmic relationships. I was immediately wondering why we started together and why we all were all of a sudden out of sync,” Finlayson says. He asked the saxophonist, “‘How do I know if I’m right?’ [Coleman] said, ‘Your timing’s got to be strong. You’ve got to have a good rhythmic pulse.’ And I thought, ‘Oh geez, these are things that I need to work on. Immediately!’” Sicilian Defense, which has released two albums, is inspired by Coleman’s unique vision, but Finlayson reveals plenty of his own ideas. His bright tone adds a lyrical quality to the often complex time signatures, driven with ease by bassist John Hébert and drummer Craig Weinrib. Guitarist Miles Okazaki acts as both a frontline foil to the trumpet and, much like pianist Matt Mitchell, he quickly pulls back to provide grounding with his chordal playing. Finlayson named the group for an opening countermove in chess, and that game has also inspired a few compositions. “Ruy Lopez” transposes a series of moves into music. “I figured out my own way to, more or less, have the movement of a piece in the game attached to a harmonic motion. Every change is related to a certain piece moving,” he says. The idea was expanded on the group’s second album with “Cap vs. Nim,” inspired by a game between champion players José Raúl Capablanca and Aron Nimzowitsch. Finlayson’s vision uses his subject matter skillfully. “I like to think of making an arc to a composition — balancing out certain elements like complexity versus groove,” he says.


Humane Animal Rescue

WILDLIFE BABY SHOWER FUNDRAISER March 24 • 12 - 4pm Raise funds & supplies for the coming animal babies!

Drop Off Location:

.STAGE. .ST

LOVING THE HATE

Thorgy Thor

Wild Birds Unlimited 3848 William Penn Hwy. Monroeville, PA 15146

Meet Marth

www.humaneanimalrescue.org

a!

BY AL HOFF // AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM AHOF

I

F YOU’RE attending the Haters Roast — The

HATERS ROAST OAST — THE SHADY TOUR 8 p.m. Wed., March 21. Carnegie negie of Homestead Music Hall, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $22-52 (VIP: $152). www.ticketfly.com

Shady Tour, a tour touring stage show featuring drag queens from th the hit TV show RuPaul’s Drag Race, be forewarned. It It’s a triple dose of hilarious insult-filled comedy: It’s going to be hater-y, roast-y and shady. Good thing this th event is held in a library, because there is going to be plenty of reading. Scheduled to grace the Mon Valley with their glittery, fabulous selves are Latrice Royale (season 4), William (season 4), Jinkx Monsoon (season 5) and Trinity Taylor (seas (season 9), plus three queens — Trixie Matte t l (season 7), Thorgy Thor (season 8) and Mattel Aja (season 9) — who have ha just enjoyed their second chances at legacy on th the third season of RuPaul’s Drag g Race: Al All-Stars. The event is hosted by the tart-ton tart-tongued Ginger Minj (seas son 7). (season It’s an all-ages show, but the poster warns “adult comedy,” so judge jud the tolerance of your friends and family accordingly. The qu queens will no doubt have plenty y tto say about each other, but if y you want to risk getting burn burned yourself, pony up for th the VIP ticket which in includes a pre-show m meet-and-greet.

Trinity Taylor Latrice Royale

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Humane Animal Rescue

WILDLIFE BABY SHOWER FUNDRAISER March 24 • 12 - 4pm Raise funds & supplies for the coming animal babies! Drop Off Location:

The Mall at Robinson 100 Robinson Centre Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15205

Meet Peach!

www.humaneanimalrescue.org CP PHOTO BY JOHN ALTDORFER

Dancers from the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre rehearse New Works.

.DANCE.

DANCERS MAKING DANCES BY STEVE SUCATO // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HILE THERE have been many notable examples of dancers launching their choreographic careers while still members of ballet companies — Justin Peck and Christopher Wheeldon, at New York City Ballet; Crystal Pite, at Ballett Frankfurt; and Matthew Neenan, at Pennsylvania Ballet to name a few — putting the works of essentially novice choreographers on stage as part of a mainstage production can be a risky endeavor for a professional ballet company. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre has embraced that risk and taken things a step further by presenting an entire program of ballets created by its dancers. Principal dancers Amanda Cochrane, Julia Erickson and Yoshiaki Nakano, along with corps de ballet members Jessica McCann, William Moore, JoAnna Schmidt and

Cooper Verona, have each created new ballets for PBT’s New Works program, March 16-25 at the August Wilson Center. A milestone for the company, the New Works program is the culmination of several past trial balloons floated by artistic director Terrence Orr, designed to inspire dancer-choreographed works from within the company’s ranks. Most recently, Nakano choreographed the neoclassical ballet “A Fellow Feeling,” for PBT’s March 2016 program at the Byham Theater, and Nakano, Erickson, Moore and Verona also created works for PBT productions at Seton Hill University and Hartwood Acres. “New voices and fresh ideas are incredibly important to the progression and vitality of our art form,” says Orr. “I see the talent within our own ranks and think it deserves a platform. It’s impor-

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE PERFORMS NEW WORKS Program I: 8 p.m. Fri., March 16; 2 p.m. Sun., March 18; and 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., March 24. Program II: 8 p.m. Sat., March 17; 8 p.m. Fri., March 23; and 2 p.m. Sun., March 25. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $28-109. www.pbt.org

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tant to the creative energy of our company — both from the perspective of the choreographers and the dancers being choreographed on — to create these kinds of opportunities. “For our audiences, it’s a chance to experience ballet through fresh eyes, to see new ideas, and to connect, in this different way, with our dancers. In the process, we want to add to the voices in our field, supporting and encouraging emerging talents with important things to say.” That encouragment has even extended to PBT’s costume shop, where four emerging costume designers were commissioned to create the looks for four of the choreographers’ ballets. Divided into two separate mixed-repertory programs — Program I is scheduled for March 16, 18 and 24, and Program II for March 17, 23 and 25 — area audiences will have seven opportunities to see the works of these young artists over New Works’ two-week run. Program I will feature four premieres, including Cochrane’s latest “Interlaced Motifs.” Set to music by Claude Debussy,


Cochrane says her 23-minute multimedia ballet in six movements was inspired by impressionist paintings of Monet, Van Gogh and Whistler. This gave the Spokane, Wash.-native the idea of turning the stage into an impressionist painting, she says. “Each different piece of [Debussy’s] music will have a painting to go with it. The choreography, inspired by each painting, has a spiraling movement quality that I envisioned as paint strokes,” Cochrane says. The ballet will also feature costumes that have been dyed to mimic an impressionist painting. “I’m hoping to create the illusion that the dancers are a part of each painting,” says Cochrane. The most well-received of PBT’s young choreographers has been Nakano, whose new ballet “Infusion” will test his and the ballet’s dancers’ ability to switch stylistic gears within his 19-minute ballet. The Osaka, Japan-native says the ballet’s four sections will utilize four different types of music and, correspondingly, four differing movement languages. Hailing from Eustis, Fla., Schmidt’s “Lightworks” will be her first commissioned work for PBT. The 20-minute contemporary dance work set to an eclectic mix of music by various composers, Schmidt says, was “motivated to depict ways that relationships can go terribly wrong, but with a touch of humor.” Schmidt describes the movement for the ballet as “weird, sometimes groovy, and sometimes intentionally unattractive.” Rounding out Program I will be Ipswich, England-native Moore’s third ballet for PBT, “Weighted Affair.” The 24-minute neoclassical ballet danced to music by Mozart, Beethoven and others is set during a dinner party and tells two stories, says Moore. “One of which is five friends attending

the party, while the other is the simultaneous story of all five’s differing thoughts and emotions during the party,” he says. Program II will feature three new ballets, including retiring company star Erickson’s “i.” In describing her contemporary dance work, the Seattle native says, “The initial kernel for the piece came from the evocative, spare poems of Nayyirah Waheed. They expose a rawness and vulnerability that we can all ultimately relate to, if we let ourselves go there.”

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO THE CREATIVE ENERGY OF OUR COMPANY.” For her first choreographic effort for PBT, McCann’s 20-minute contemporary ballet “the silver line” examines life choices. “My ballet is about how the choices you make create who you are, and how no matter how much you try to find the good, or how much you keep thinking about the bad … there’s always a middle ground people tend to overlook,” says the Los Angeles native. Danced to music by Maya Beiser, Ryuichi Sakamoto and Anna Meredith, the ballet will have its female dancers covered in chalk powder and sporting transparent, oval-shaped tutus. Closing out Program II’s offerings will be Lebanon, Conn.-native Cooper Verona’s “Thick White Sheets.” Having been commissioned by PBT, its school and Point Park University, Verona may be the most experienced of the young choreographers presenting works. His ballet for eight dancers is set to music by Colin Stetson and others, and “sheds light on the role of circumstance in people’s lives.”

.FILM.

OVERHEARD

AT AMC LOEWS WATERFRONT, TUE., MARCH 6

“It was so accurate! It was so accurate! I’m so happy!” FAN OF YA NOVEL SIMON VS. THE HOMO SAPIENS AGENDA, AFTER SEEING A PREVIEW OF THE FILM ADAPTATION, LOVE, SIMON PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

31


.BOOK REVIEW.

ON OUR SHELF BY REBECCA ADDISON RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VOICES OF HOPE >> BY KRISTINE IRWIN INCREDIBLE MESSAGES PRESS WWW.VOICES-OF-HOPE.ORG

Humane Animal Rescue

WILDLIFE BABY SHOWER FUNDRAISER March 24 • 12 - 4pm Raise funds & supplies for the coming animal babies!

Drop Off Location:

Wild Birds Unlimited 12019 Perry Hwy. Wexford, PA 15090

www.humaneanimalrescue.org

Meet Herme

LIKE US ON ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK

@PittsburghCityPaper Keep up to date on the latest news and events in the city.

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s!

Debby in Israel in the 1990s

.PODCAST .

GET OUT

BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

AURA AND Debby are sticking with first names for this story. They’re the hosts and creators of the Pittsburgh-based podcast I Got the Hell Out, which recounts Debby’s 10 years living as a member of an “Old Testament, polygamous, doomsday cult.” She got the hell out in October 2003 and has no interest in being found or going back, hence the first-name basis. Still, it’s a story she thinks is worth telling. The podcast debuted last December. Debby had been cleaning for Laura for seven years, and eventually the women forged a friendship and spent a good amount of their time together just sitting around and “bullshitting.” Last year, Debby had an idea for a podcast about her professional experiences (“The Cleaning Lady Chronicles”), which Laura said was too similar to other shows already in existence. “Well, you remember I was in a cult, right? Is that worth anything?” Debby responded. The episodes, recorded in Laura’s home office over drinks (alcoholic “KoolAid,” fittingly), cover both the micro and macro aspects of cult life. The early shows cover the basics of Debby’s story, but the show is at its best when she talks about daily life inside the cult. A personal favorite covers the rules about clothing; other episodes are titled “Satan Is a Woman” and “The Sabbath Is a Pain in the Ass.” It may sound heavy topic-wise, but IGTHO works so well because it’s like eavesdropping on a couple friends getting tipsy while they tell fascinating stories. Debby is forthcoming, funny and

occasionally brash; Laura works as a proxy for the audience, for whom stories about animal sacrifice, gas masks and polygamy require some elaboration. While the cult is never named and Debby keeps some details at arm’s length, she says it’s possible to discover which it is if you pay attention to clues included in the show. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t spend the better part of an afternoon last week researching cults that fit her description, and I’m pretty sure I found it.

The show’s logo

Twelve years ago, Kristine Irwin was raped and dumped on the side of the road. In her debut memoir, Voices of Hope, released this month, she recounts her experience and how it affected not just her life, but also the lives of her friends and family. Irwin was in her first year of university at Point Park College when she was sexually assaulted by someone she knew — the friend of another man she had been dating. This book tells of the events that lead to her assault and the harrowing details of the night that changed her life forever, but it spends more time delving far deeper into the aftermath. Irwin was a decade into her recovery, when she realized how much the trauma she experienced continued to weigh on her. In the book, she writes it was because she hadn’t talked enough about the trauma. “Currently, we have a culture of silence surrounding this topic,” writes Irwin. “The silence has multiple consequences.” Stories like these are undoubtedly hard to get through, but each person who does, lifts the voices of sexual-assault victims a little higher. •

The show is focused exclusively on Debby’s story, but in the future, they hope to use IGTHO as a platform to provide resources for other people who want to “get out” of a situation, whether cults, religions or abusive relationships. But for now, there’s plenty of doomsday polygamy to sift through. Episode 12 debuts Sun., March 18, and includes an interview between Laura and one of Debby’s children, who recently left the cult. www.igotthehellout.com


TOP 5

PITTSBURGH ARTISTS TO FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM BY LISA CUNNINGHAM LCUNNING@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MOBY-DICK A tale of obsession and madness

“Stunning new production” -The Salt Lake Tribune “Undeniably compelling” -Limelight Magazine

PHOTO COURTESY OF INSTAGRAM.COM/CALDWELLBEADS

A beaded self-portrait by Caldwell Linker

@caldwellbeads

@danielgurwin Graphic-design nerds, take note: If vintage signs make you drool, Daniel’s hand-lettering will be right up your alley. His process sketches are a personal favorite.

Photo: David Bachman ©

Prepare to be blown away by Caldwell Linker’s artwork made out of tiny beads. Gems include portraits, words, jewelry and yes, even vaginas.

@xiolathefairy Xiola Jensen’s whimsical illustrations of sad women and cats, full of emotion with a killer color palette, are super rad. Teardrops are a common theme.

@johnpenastudio Follow along with the adventures of John and his partner (fellow artist @jessheberle) in his illustrated panels. The drawings are raw, and he thankfully doesn’t hold back — a recent post shows him sitting on the toilet.

@jennavandenbrink The clean lines and pretty flowers carved into Jenna Vanden Brink’s ceramics make me wish I could throw away all my dishes and replace them immediately with her entire collection.

MARCH 17, 20, 23, 25 • Benedum Center • Tickets $12+; Kid’s Tickets $6+ • 412-456-6666 • pittsburghopera.org/Moby-Dick UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD: Sung in English with English supertitles Tuesday Night Sponsor: Ambridge Regional Distribution & Manufacturing Center

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.CD REVIEW.

LOCAL BEAT BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SEMI-HOLLOW REVIEW >> BY ASTROLOGY NOW SELF-RELEASED WWW.ASTROLOGYNOW. BANDCAMP.COM

In just 10 songs, Astrology Now’s debut, Semi-Hollow Review, proves it’s a band whose music is worth sinking into. The initial singles on the record — “A Loud Sound for the Future” and “Is It Real” — each serve as their own immersive universes for listeners to lose themselves in. The album is cohesive, but shows songwriter Greg Mastrean’s range as a composer and performer. “Real Culture” is a spacey number, driven by the grooving low end, while “Do You Dream Vividly” is a crunchier, fuzzed-out trip that bleeds into “The Only One,” a more experimental haze laced with tambourine. Each of the album’s swirling psychedelic numbers were initially recorded with Mastrean playing every instrument. But at the urging of producer Nate Campisi, early this month at Spirit, Astrology Now performed songs from the album with a full band, with Mastrean on vocals and guitars, accompanied by Gordy Brash on drums, Zach Bronder and Matt Turcsanyi on guitar and vocals, and Campisi on bass. The band brings to life the record’s energy, creating an experience as immersive and colorful as the album itself. •

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CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK

The city wants to bring more public art to Uptown, like this mural on Fifth Avenue near PPG Paints Arena, featuring the Pittsburgh Penguins and highlighting autism awareness

.ART.

UPTOWN ART

BY REBECCA ADDISON // RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

ALLING ALL artists. The city is currently seeking proposals for a public-art project in Uptown. The new projects will be the first in a series of art installations in the Uptown Eco-Innovation District. Launched in fall 2015, the Eco-Innovation District is a city program encouraging environmentally friendly and sustainable development in the neighborhood. As part of the program, the city worked with members of the community and Uptown stakeholders to develop a plan for the Uptown district. During the process to develop this plan, the community identified priorities, such as access to public transit, economic opportunity and investment in publicart projects. The latest call for submissions will be the first step in bringing the art portion of the community plan to life. So far, the city plans to create three permanent art installations in the district as part of the Uptown Art Program. Uptown is already home to a vibrant art community. There are several murals dotted around the neighborhood, in an effort to beautify vacant buildings and blight. And on Gist Street, which has become home to several artists, there is an outdoor gallery of mixed media. According to the request for proposals submitted by the city on March 2, with the new art installations, the city

and members of the community are hoping to see the addition of “artistic interventions ranging from experiential objects to interactive experiences.” The first public-art site will be located in Tustin Park, at 2028 Tustin St. The deadline for submissions is March 30. Proposals can be submitted by an artist, artist collective, arts institution, educational institution or designers. The budget for the project is $24,500. Artists are asked to propose a concept for the project that will ultimately be finalized through community input. Proposals must be submitted at pittsburgh pa.gov/beacon/bid-opportunities.html. The deadline is 4 p.m. Fri., March 30.

The process is being spearheaded by Pittsburgh’s Public Art and Civic Design Division which is tasked with ensuring “quality design of city-owned architecture, infrastructure, and landscape in order to create and enhance place-making by the inclusion of art and arts programming to reflect the city’s history, diversity and culture.” In addition to its work on new public-art installations like those slated for Uptown, the division currently oversees the city’s Art Commission, as well as the conservation and maintenance of the city’s collection of public artwork, monuments and memorials.


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EARLY WARNINGS SPONSORED UPCOMING EVENTS FROM CITY PAPER’S FINE ADVERTISERS

WED., MARCH 28 EAST OF ELI 8 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFÉ, STATION SQUARE. $13-113. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com. With special guest ALBVS.

THU., MARCH 29 WALKER MCGUIRE & DREW BALDRIDGE 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE, WARRENDALE. $15-25. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

THU., MARCH 29 RUSKO 8 P.M. REX THEATER, SOUTH SIDE. OVER-21 EVENT. $25. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

PHOTO CREDIT: Matthew Correia

SUN., APRIL 1 CURTIS HARDING

FRI., MARCH 30 PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO 8 P.M. THE PALACE THEATRE, GREENSBURG. $59-350. 724-836-8000 or thepalacetheatre.org.

FRI., MARCH 30 LIONIZE 6:30 P.M. SMILING MOOSE, SOUTH SIDE. $10-12. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com. With special guests Tomato Dodgers, Old Man Rob & Jakethehawk.

FRI., MARCH 30 STEVE MOAKLER 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE, WARRENDALE. $18.50-28. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com. With special guest Corey Kent White.

FRI., MARCH 30 COAST MODERN DOORS OPEN AT 7 P.M. STAGE AE, NORTH SIDE. $15. 412-229-5483 or ticketmaster.com. With special guest Late Night Episode.

FRI., MARCH 30 SUNSQUABI 9 P.M. REX THEATER, SOUTH SIDE. OVER-21 EVENT. $15-18. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com. With special guest Exmag.

FRI., MARCH 30 VINYL THEATRE 7 P.M. FRI., CATTIVO, LAWRENCEVILLE.

REX THEATER

$12-14. 412-687-2157 or mrsmalls.com. With special guests Dylan Rockoff & Kahone Concept.

FRI., MARCH 30 GATHERING FIELD

MON., APRIL 2 TIMEFLIES DOORS OPEN AT 7 P.M. STAGE AE, NORTH SIDE. $27. 412-229-5483 or ticketweb.com/opusone.

8 P.M. GATEWAY CLIPPER, STATION SQUARE. OVER-21 EVENT. $27-30. 412-355-7980 or gatewayclipper.com.

MON., APRIL 2 THE NEIGHBORHOOD BARBERSHOP

SAT., MARCH 31 J. RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS

7:30 P.M. BENEDUM CENTER, DOWNTOWN. $49.50-79.50. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

DOORS OPEN AT 7 P.M. STAGE AE, NORTH SIDE. $18. 412-229-5483 or ticketmaster.com.

SAT., MARCH 31 ANTHONY JESELNIK

TUE., APRIL 3 SEAN JONES WITH STRINGS 8 P.M. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE, DOWNTOWN. $30.75-39.75. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

7 P.M. BYHAM THEATER, DOWNTOWN. $39.25. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

TUE., APRIL 3 RED CITY RADIO

SUN., APRIL 1 CURTIS HARDING

8 P.M. SMILING MOOSE, SOUTH SIDE. $12-15. 412-431-4668 or mrsmalls.com. With special guests Worlds Scariest Police Chases & Plasmid & Swiss Army.

8 P.M. SUN., REX THEATER, SOUTH SIDE. ALL-AGES EVENT. $15-18. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

MON., APRIL 2 CHRISTOPHER CROSS 8 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE, WARRENDALE. $39-75. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

TUE., APRIL 3 OUGHT 8 P.M. MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE, MILLVALE. $12-14. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com. With special guests Flasher & Silver Car Crash.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYCOUNTY.US PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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CALENDAR MARCH 15-21

BOWLS MADE BY NORTH HILLS HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI AND FRIENDS // PHOTO COURTESY OF KEITH TOD HERCHENROETHER

^ Sun., March 18: Empty Bowls 2018

THURSDAY MARCH 15 ART With the opening reception tonight, Contemporary Craft’s exhibition, Visual Voices: Truth Narratives begins its five-month showcase. The exhibit uses ceramic work that seeks to tell the artists’ personal stories of racism, sexism and classism, by using visual imagery and narratives. The 37 nationally and internationally recognized artists include Syd Carpenter, a Pittsburgh native

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whose work has been featured in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The work featured is inspired both by the human experience of the artists, and the media they’re influenced by, creating a sense of a global community, interconnected by universal stories. Lauren Ortego 6 p.m. Exhibit continues through Aug. 18. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. www.contemporarycraft.org

TALK “Nightmares, Dreams and Moral Imagination” is the title of Rev. Cornell Brooks’ talk tonight at Temple Sinai. While that may sound trippy and a

little vague, the message behind the talk is simple: to challenge “people of faith to commit to creating a more tolerant and just society.” Brooks, an accomplished civil-rights lawyer, ordained minister, and CEO and president of the NAACP from 2014-17, will focus on ways that people of all backgrounds can set aside differences to work toward a common goal. Alex Gordon Welcome reception at 6:15 p.m. Talk at 7 p.m. 5505 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. www.templesinaipgh.org

MUSIC If you’re looking to enjoy a lineup of

heavy bands on a Thursday, you’re covered. Tonight, experimental doommetal band Ether, of Florida, will be bringing its sludge-laden riffs and deep, throaty vocals to the ’Burgh. Let yourself be drowned in sound waves, under the venue’s twinkling Christmas lights, as the headbang consumes. Local support comes in a delightfully varied set of bands sporting different brands of hard and heavy tuneage: horror-tinged, drone-soaked doom-metal act Mires; aggressive grungy trio Pummeled; and sinister-sounding grunge-rock duo Hearken. Meg Fair 7 p.m. Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. www.therobotoproject.com


WE BUY RECORDS & CDS

TOP PRICES PAID FOR QUALITY COLLECTIONS TI

Humane Animal Rescue

WILDLIFE BABY SHOWER FUNDRAISER March 24 • 12 - 4pm Raise funds & supplies for the coming animal babies! Drop Off Location:

Penn Hills Lawn & Garden 200 Jefferson Road Penn Hills, PA 15235

Meet Bruce! SINCE 1980 MON-FRI 9AM-6PM SAT 10AM-5PM 513 GRANT AVENUE • MILLVALE Questions? Call Us 412-821-8484

www.humaneanimalrescue.org

ATTICRECORDS@VERIZON.NET

Compassionate Certification Centers Presents the 2018

SHARIF BEY’S CEREMONIAL VESSEL II // PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARIF BEY

Co-hosted by

^ Thu., March 15: Visual Voices: Truth Narratives

FRIDAY

MARCH 16 ART Tonight marks the start of The Andy Warhol Museum’s Youth Art Exhibition: Stay Woke,, which features work by y young artists sts from different schools, chools, backgrounds nds and age groups. s. The phrase “Stay ay woke” has recently ly gained popularity in popular culture. ulture. It means “to to be continually y aware of the issues es concerning g social justice,” and nd that’s exactly tly what the art will reflect.. > Thu., March 15: Rev. Cornell Brooks

In conjunction with Youth Invasion 2018, where teens present their personal takes on Warhol’s artwork, the exhibition will feature the young artists’ perspectives and responses to the current political and social climate. LO 5 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free with admission ($20; $10 students and children 3-18). www.warhol.org

MEDICAL CANNABIS

The Intersection of Cannabis Culture EVENT HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: • On-site • Cannabis Career Fair with local and national companies

ART This week is the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts conference in Pittsburgh, and the exhibits are in full swing. Just be careful not to break them. Tonight is the reception for Touching Earth: Women Creating Communities, at the Carnegie Coffee Company. Conveniently located on the NCECA shuttle-bus route, the exhibit follows the conference theme of “CrossCurrents: Clay and Culture.” Featuring artists with a variety of personal identities and connections to Pittsburgh and the ceramic arts, Touching Earth aims to set aside difference in ideologies, backgrounds and religion, and unite through the empowerment that comes with being female artists. LO 6 p.m. 132 E. Main St., Carnegie. Free. www.touchingearth.weebly.com CONTINUES ON PG. 38

• Campaign For Compassion on-stage fundraiser • 4.2 Mile Run/Walk in partnership with the 420 Games • Riverboat cruise and fundraiser for the Disabled American Veterans and Make a Wish Foundations.

Nearly 6,000 attendees are expected to attend the second-annual event, including hundreds of exhibitors.

April 12-14, 2018 David L. Lawrence Convention Center | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

www.cccregister.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SETH ROSENBERG

^ Sat., March 17: TheatriQ’s Youth Ensemble’s Hearts on Hold

MUSIC

MARCH 17

and one of Pittsburgh’s favorite parades. Today is the annual Pittsburgh St. Patrick’s Day Parade, with longtime ongtime friend rish community, of the Pittsburgh Irish n as the grand Margaret Cloonan ar, the parade marshal. This year, is dedicated to the late Dan ers owner and Rooney, Steelers ssador to former ambassador Ireland. This St. Pat’s Day ne of parade is one nd the oldest and he largest in the tting country, putting Pittsburgh on the 0 cities list of top 10 oing where it’s worth going th as many to the event annually. With as 350,000 attendees, this parade, like the people of Pittsburgh, will be on its way down Grant Street rain or shine. LO 10 a.m. Grant Street and Boulevard of the Allies, Downtown. Free. www.pittsburghirish.org/parade

EVENT

OUTDOORS

It’s every Irish-American’s favorite holiday,

Maybe you’d rather not spend St. Patrick’s

Tonight marks the first Girls Rock! camp benefit show of the year. Girls Rock! Pittsburgh is a nonprofit organization that seeks to empower female youth through music. In addition to events throughout the year, each summer, Girls Rock! holds a camp where self-identified girls ages 8-18 can explore their passion for music. Over the course of the one-week program, participants learn an instrument, form a band, write an original song, attend workshops, and perform before a live audience. The lineup for the benefit show at Howlers includes local acts Bitter Whiskers, Aloe, Murder for Girls and Garter Shake. Rebecca Addison 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $7-10 suggested donation. www.girlsrockpittsburgh.org

SATURDAY

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Day getting blotto. Why not head for the invigorating wooded outdoors and pursue anoth another popular Irish activity — searching for the leprec leprechaun’s fabled pot of gold. Venture Outdo Outdoors will be leading a family-friendly Pot o’ Gold geocaching expedition in Schenley Park to find just such a treasure (or reasonable reasonab facsimile). It’s a perfect perfe outing for newbies, w who will learn all about doing doin fun searches using hand-held GPS hand devices. T The fee includes device rental; you bring decent dece walking shoes and hope for a rainbow. Al Hoff 2 p.m. Schenley Park, $5-12. Register at P k Oakland. Oakland $5-1 www.ventureoutdoors.org

STAGE What do you get when you mix themes of gentrification, community and two rivals coming together for the sake of their town? TheatriQ’s Youth Ensemble’s Hearts

on Hold, which premieres this afternoon, as part of Dream of Hope’s annual queer youth project. Now in its 15th season, the play seeks to reflect on the lives of young queer people, in both the past and the present, and how connectivity can create solidarity and a sense of belonging. LO 2 and 8 p.m. Also Sun., March 18, and 10 p.m. Mon., March 19. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay what makes you happy. www.dreamsofhope.org

SPORTS The year is 2018. In the world of wrestling, women are taking their rightful place at center stage, smashing stereotypes about how women behave and how women fight. Thanks to wrestling promotions Fight Society and PWX, Angel Gate will showcase more than a dozen women wrestlers from across the country who perform on the independent circuit. One is Su Yung, former FEST Wrestling champion who strikes fear and adoration into the hearts of all who witness her power and presence. Other wrestlers on


deck: Allie Kat, Holidead, Ray Lyn, Joseline and many more hellions. Also, there’s free beer. MF 7 p.m. Fight Society, 2125 Beacon St., McKeesport. $15. www.facebook.com/pwxpittsburgh

STAGE “Call me Ishmael.” Tonight, the Pittsburgh Opera premieres the critically acclaimed opera, Moby Dick, inspired by Herman Melville’s well-known eponymous novel. Created by composer Jake Heggie and librettist Gene Scheer, the work follows the journey of Captain Ahab, and his ship, the Pequod, as he pursues the legendary white whale. The show, at the Benedum Center, is being co-produced with Opera Utah and will feature dancers from Pittsburgh’s Attack Theatre. The cast will include Canadian tenor Roger Honeywell, former Pittsburgh Opera resident artist Sean Panikkar, Texas baritone Michael Mayes and South African bass-baritone Musa Ngqungwana. Antony Walker conducts and Kristine McIntyre directs. RA 8 p.m. Show continues through March 25. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $6.75-159.75. www.pittsburghopera.org

7 DAYS

OF CONCERTS BY MEG FAIR MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SUMMER PHOTO INTERN WANTED We are looking for a student photojournalist with an artistic eye. Editorial work will include shooting for news, music and arts, both in print and online. Weekend availability is required. Prior student newspaper work and an outgoing personality a plus.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHLEY LABLONDE AT WIDE EYED STUDIOS

Matador! Soul Sounds

THURSDAY Matador! Soul Sounds 7 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. www.rextheater.net

FRIDAY Rakim 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Send a résumé and a link to an online portfolio to art director Lisa Cunningham, lcunning@ pghcitypaper. com, by March 23, 2018.

Humane Animal Rescue

WILDLIFE BABY SHOWER FUNDRAISER March 24 • 12 - 4pm Raise funds & supplies for the coming animal babies! Drop Off Location:

Galleria of Mt. Lebanon 1500 Washington Road Pittsburgh, PA 15228

Meet Clover!

The internship includes a small weekly stipend. No calls, please.

www.humaneanimalrescue.org

SATURDAY Bastard Bearded Irishmen 7 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. www.rextheater.net

Snackable content to read on the go.

SUNDAY Icon for Hire 7 p.m. The Club at Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com ^ Sun., March 18: A Song of Thrones

DANCE

MONDAY

Break out your dancing shoes and check out the Steel City Blues Festival starting tonight. For more than a decade, the annual weekend of blues dancing has brought out amateurs and veterans alike. This year’s blues tunes will be provided by a musical lineup, which includes the Jimmy Adler Band, the Billy Price Band and Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. Purchase a full weekend pass or tickets to individual dances. Show up tonight for a free beginner’s lesson starting at 8 p.m. RA 8 p.m. Continues through March 17. Various locations. $10-149. www.steelcitybluesfestival.com

Crowbar, Hatebreed, Acacia Strain, Twitching Tongues

MUSIC

7 p.m. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

TUESDAY Closure in Moscow 7 p.m. The Club at Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

WEDNESDAY You Bred Raptors?

Tonight, when the headliners hit the stage, Howlers will feel more like CBGB in the late ’70s than Pittsburgh 2018. Tiger Sex,

8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. www.cattivopgh.com

Served fresh from CP Marketing

Read it now!

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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of Cincinnati, makes animalistic rock ’n’ roll music that possesses the raw energy of proto-punk, with the appropriate aggressive, high-energy stage presence and endless attitude. The entertainment and absurdity continues with two of Pittsburgh’s committed gimmick bands— Porno Tongue, a self-described “trailerpark jam band,” and the dinosaur-themed punk band FY!D. Grab an Iron City, toss on your most beat-up denim jacket, and give yourself over to the grimy fun. MF 9 p.m. Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $6. www.howlerspittsburgh.com

SUNDAY

MARCH 18 KIDS In celebration of everyone’s favorite neighbor, Fred Rogers, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh is hosting a series of events for the 16th year in a row. Rogers remains a beloved icon of Pittsburgh; his children’s TV show, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, was not only groundbreaking, but resonated throughout multiple generations. To celebrate what would’ve been Rogers’ 90th birthday, the museum will be offering free admission. Daniel Tiger, one of the beloved characters from the show, will be around for photos all throughout the afternoon, and WQED will be there to sponsor some neighborlythemed activities for kids of all ages. LO 10 a.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. Free. www.pittsburghkids.org

FOOD Join Just Harvest and the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank for their 23rd annual Empty Bowls 2018, at Rodef Shalom. Those in attendance will receive a simple bowl of soup and

PHOTO COURTESY OF SPEEDY’S PRODUCTIONS

^ Sat., March 17: Su Yung at Angel Gate

bread, a meal to remind the community that one out of eight Allegheny County residents are faced with hunger on a daily basis. There will also be a silent auction of ceramic art pieces and bowls signed by celebrities; activities for all ages; local personalities; and live music. At the end of the afternoon, ticket-holders will be given handmade bowls to take home. Seating times are 1 and 3:30 p.m. LO 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $20 ($25 at the door). www.justharvest.org

FASHION Winter is coming … to an end. But you can still check out this Game of Thronesthemed Pittsburgh fashion event, A Song of Thrones, from the Pittsburgh Opera, based on the popular medieval fantasy epic. The evening will spotlight costuming and music from Pittsburgh Opera, as well as designs by Diana Misetic, of the Shadyside fashion studio and boutique Little Black Dress. Mirroring the book series

and show’s frequent clashes between warring factions, the show will “feature a clash between simple, neutral pieces and colorful, dramatic ensembles to illustrate the everyday struggle between fantasy and reality.” RA 6:30 p.m. 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. $55-150. www.pittsburghopera.org

MUSIC What better way to celebrate Women’s History Month than by enjoying the CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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^ Wed., March 21: The Revival: Women and the World

LET S GET ’

S CIAL

sounds of women composers, brought to life by Kamraton and Kassia Ensemble for She Scores II. Both of these chamber groups aim to push boundaries in chamber performance and elevate women as leaders in the art community. The works will be conducted by Daniel Curtis, and the works to be performed include Kaija Saariaho’s “Miranda’s Lament,” Julia Wolfe’s “Cruel Sister,” and premieres by Nancy Galbraith and Laura Schwartz. The performances will be accented by animation by Shayna Schwartz, making for a fully immersive experience for your eyes and ears. MF 7 p.m. The Glitter Box Theater, 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10. All ages. www.theglitterboxtheater.com

WORD Tonight, award-winning author Shobha Rao visits City of Asylum. In her debut novel, Girls Burn Brighter, Rao details the bond between two girls separated by circumstances beyond their control and their subsequent journey to reunite with one another. Their journey crosses continents, taking place in India’s underworld and an apartment complex in Seattle, Wash. The novel explores the themes of what it means be both poor and female in contemporary society. RA 8 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. www.alphabetcity.org

WEDNESDAY MARCH 21 )ROORZXVWRƓQGRXWZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER Ř FACEBOOK.COM/PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

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FILM The monthly Just Films series, highlighting recent films that deal with gender and offer intersectional

^ Sun., March 18: Shobha Rao

perspectives, continues with Sekiya Dorsett’s The Revival: Women and the World. The 2016 documentary chronicles the salon-style tour of a group of black lesbian poets and writers, as they seek to build community among queer women of color. The tour was organized by Jade Foster who was frustrated by the lack of outlets for poets, who didn’t fit into “traditional” slots, and sought more engaging and inclusive forums. Among those interviewed in the film are Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Nikky Finney and Alexis De Veaux. The screening will be followed by a discussion. AH 6:30 p.m. Eddy Theater, Chatham University campus, Shadyside. Free. www.justfilmspgh.org •


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

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HEALTH SERVICES MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855732-4139 (AAN CAN)

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Uber Technologies, Inc. has MULTIPLE POSITIONS open in Pittsburgh, PA for the following:

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on April 10, 2018, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for a Service Contract for

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on March 27, 2018, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for a Service Contract for the following:

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ART Department

the following:

• PPS Administration Building Upgrade Electrical System General, Mechanical and Electrical Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on March 5, 2018 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

• Pgh. Colfax K-8 Heating and Ventilation at Pool Area Asbestos Prime • Pgh. Various School Locations PPS Exterior Envelopes Bid Package 3 General and Asbestos Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on March 5, 2018 for Pgh. Colfax K-8 and March 9, 2018 for Various School Locations at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

Pittsburgh City Paper is seeking a Graphic Designer to join its Art Department. Qualified candidate must possess: • Strong communication and organizational skills. • Strong design skills with extensive knowledge of InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator. • Ability to work in a fast-paced, deadline oriented atmosphere. City Paper offers paid vacation, medical benefits and 401K. Applicants should send resume and design samples to: Kevin Shepherd Pittsburgh City Paper 650 Smithfield St. Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Or via e-mail to: kshep@pghcitypaper.com No phone calls please. • Pittsburgh City Paper is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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ARE YOU AMUSED?

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS 1. Begin to swarm 6. Stale 9. Awkward shiver 14. Noah’s great-grandfather 15. Spot for current events? 16. Muppet in a striped shirt 17. Shabbiness 19. British film icon Michael 20. Important and often arrogant person 22. “___ have to?” 23. Comparative words 24. Ending for Senegal 25. One of the golfers in the Big Five Era 28. Rapper born Park Jae-sang 30. Territory split up during perestroika: Abbr. 32. Qatar’s capital 34. Problems with the ticker 40. Batshit 42. Dana Loesch is its spokesperson 43. “Let’s move!” 44. Jimmy Carter’s secretary of state 47. “Jane the Virgin” star Rodriguez 48. Superlative ending 49. Weight lifter’s nos.

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51. Blue overhead 52. QB Prescott 54. Duet number 57. Sci-fi regulars, briefly 59. Rome’s founders 63. Stares at 64. One who always comes clean 67. Promotional piece 68. Water holder 69. Legal 70. Humana rival 71. Goose Island drink 72. Stocking material

DOWN 1. Embarrassed 2. Singular opening? 3. Have a quick bite 4. Somewhat bitter 5. House party? 6. “Astro Boy” creator Tezuka 7. Fancy lens 8. Laundry load 9. Religious subgroup 10. Mecca-facer’s spot 11. Ill feeling 12. From that time 13. Mousy 18. “Billy Breathes” jam band 21. The Orient 25. Head start, say 26. Deafening 27. Entertainer who makes a big splash? 29. Urges 31. Pleased with oneself

33. Big name in women’s sportswear 35. Ham’s boat 36. Fence post part 37. Some city bonds, briefly 38. Place to see camels 39. “Take your coat off” 41. Some Narcan cases, briefly 45. Pooches 46. Film critic who was the subject of the documentary “Life Itself” 50. Bill Hader “SNL” role 52. Animal that “gits along”

53. Charm 55. Comedian Sykes 56. NBA legend who released $500 in cash attached to balloons for his 46th birthday 58. How you might feel if you see Gargamel slip and fall in a big mud puddle 59. “The Godfather” composer Nino 60. Annapolis coll. 61. Titled British woman 62. Close up 65. Back in the day 66. Boy toy? LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


Female Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is seeking participants for a three-part research project.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 33-year-old woman from Melbourne, Australia, dating a 24-year-old man. We’ve been dating for about eight months; it is exclusive and official. He’s kind and sweet, caring and giving. The thing is, he confessed to me recently that he doesn’t really “feel.” The way he explained it is, the only emotions he feels are fear and anxiousness that he’ll disappoint the people he cares about. He says he’s never been in love. He said his dad is the same way. The only time I see him really “feel” are when he’s high, which he is semi-frequently. He uses MDMA and he comes alive. He seems the way a “normal” person does when they’re in love, but when he’s sober, it’s like he’s trying to mimic the things a person in love would say or do. I confessed I am falling in love with him recently and told him I wasn’t saying this with any expectation of him feeling the same; I just wanted him to know. He responded that he cares for me a lot — but that’s it. I’m now worried that he’ll never love me. I don’t want kids, so time isn’t critical for me, but I don’t want to be with someone who won’t ever love me. LACKING ONE VAUNTED EMOTION

You didn’t use the P-word (psychopath) or the S-word (sociopath), LOVE, but both came to mind as I was reading your letter. Someone who isn’t capable of feeling? Isn’t that textbook P-word/ S-word stuff? “The fear with someone who doesn’t ‘feel’ is that they may be a psychopath or a sociopath, terms that are used interchangeably,” said Jon Ronson, author of The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry. “And lots of the items on the psychopath checklist relate to an inability to experience deep emotions — like Shallow Affect, Lack of Empathy and Lack of Remorse. However, I have good news for LOVE! This line: ‘The only emotions he really feels are fear and anxiousness that he’ll disappoint the people he cares about’ is the critical one. Psychopaths do not feel anxiety. In fact, my favorite thing a psychologist said to me about this was: ‘If you’re worried you may be psychopath, that means you aren’t one.’ Also, psychopaths don’t care about

disappointing loved ones! All those emotions that relate to an overactive amygdale — fear, remorse, guilt, regret, empathy — psychopaths don’t feel them.” So, your boyfriend’s not a psychopath. Not that you asked. But, you know, just in case you were worried. Anyway … My hunch is that your boyfriend’s problem isn’t an inability to feel love, LOVE, but an inability to recognize the feelings he’s having as love. (Or potentially love, as it’s only been eight months.) What is romantic love but a strong desire to be with someone? The urge to be sweet to them, to take care of them, to do for them? Maybe he’s just going through the motions with you — a conscious mimic-it-till-you-make-it strategy — or maybe the double whammy of a damaged dad and that toxic masculinity stuff sloshing around out there left him blocked, LOVE, or emotionally constipated. And while MDMA can definitely be abused — moderation in all things, kids, including moderation — the effect it has on him is a hopeful sign. MDMA is not an emotional hallucinogen; the drug has been used in couples counseling and to treat PTSD, not because it makes us feel things that aren’t, but because it allows genuine feelings to surface and, to be felt intensely. So, he can feel love — he just has to learn how to tap into those feelings and/or recognize them without an assist from MDMA.

talks about the idea of someone else being around. This does turn me on, and I like thinking about it when we are messing around. But I don’t want to have any other partners. I’m like a mashup of Jessica Day, Leslie Knope and Liz Lemon, if that gives you an idea of how not-for-me this all is. When I say no to one idea, he comes up with another one. I would truly appreciate some advice. BOYFRIEND INTO GROUP SEX I’M NOT

Short answer: Sexual compatibility is important. It’s particularly important in a sexually-exclusive relationship. You want a sexually-exclusive relationship; your boyfriend doesn’t want a sexuallyexclusive relationship — so you two aren’t sexually compatible, BIGSIN, and you should break up. Slightly longer answer: Your boyfriend did the right thing by laying his kink cards on the table early in the relationship — he’s into threesomes, group sex and public sex — and you copped to having fantasies about threesomes, BIGSIN, but not a desire to experience one. He took that as an opening: maybe if he could find the right person/couple/scenario/club, you would change your mind. Further fueling his false hopes: You get turned on when he talks about having “someone else around” when you two have sex. Now lots of people who very much enjoy threesomes and/or group sex were unsure or hesitant at first, but gave in to please (or shut up) a partner and wound up being glad they did. If you’re certain you could never be one of those people — reluctant at first, but happy your partner pressed the issue — you need to shut this shit down, Liz Lemon style. Tell him no more dirty talking about this shit during sex, no more entertaining the idea at all. Being with you means giving up this fantasy, BIGSIN, and if he’s not willing to give it up — and to shut up about it — then you’ll have to break up.

SO, YOUR BOYFRIEND’S NOT A PSYCHOPATH.

My boyfriend of one-and-a-half years shared (several months into dating) that he has a fantasy of having a threesome. I shared that I had also fantasized about this, but I never took my fantasies seriously. Right away, he started sending me Craigslist posts from women and couples looking for casual-sex partners. I told him I wasn’t interested in doing anything for real. A few months later, we went on vacation and I said I wanted to get a massage. He found a place that did “sensual” couples massage. I wanted nothing to do with this. During sex, he

On the Lovecast — A sexy toy review that will send you packing: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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March 14, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 11

March 14, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 11