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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018


Life is better with friends. 01.24/01.31.2018 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 04

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns EMILY BENNETT, SABRINA BODON, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

[ART] Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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[PUBLISHER] EAGLE MEDIA CORP. GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“IT PLAYS REALLY WELL TO STAND UP FOR COAL, THERE IS CULTURAL RESONANCE IN ALL OF APPALACHIA.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Thousands marched through Downtown Pittsburgh over the weekend. Check out our photos from the Women’s March on page 54 and at www.pghcitypaper.com.

On City Paper’s Politicrap blog, we examine how Donald Trump’s actions in Washington, D.C., impact people here in Pittsburgh. Check it out at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CP is part of ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

A coal barge on the Monongahela River in Braddock

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HEN THEN- presidential can-

didate Donald Trump visited the Pittsburgh area during his campaign, he consistently promised that the coal industry would be making a rebound. “Coal — clean coal, clean coal — we’re bringing it back,” Trump said at an April 2016 rally at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Downtown Pittsburgh. In July 2016, in Scranton in northeast Pennsylvania, Trump also promised to take care of coal miners and “put them back to work.” Now, one year since Trump took office, the coal industry in the region has marginally rebounded from a dismal 2016. A few new mines have opened up, the volume of coal mined in the region has grown, and there has been a small

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018

increase in coal employment. Trump has appeared to have kept his promise to Southwest Pennsylvanians.

President Donald Trump said coal miners in Southwestern Pennsylvania would be put back to work. One year later, is that happening? {BY RYAN DETO} But on Jan. 3, Dana Mining Company announced it would close its 4 West Mine in Greene County. By this summer, 370 people will lose their coal-industry jobs. This will easily wipe out the modest gains

in coal jobs Southwestern Pennsylvania experienced in 2017, as well as erase the production gains coal saw here in 2017. Economic experts warn that coal will continue its long-term, steady decline. Pennsylvania coal-industry advocates are optimistic about coal’s future, and say coal production will remain steady and an important part of the area’s energy portfolio. But even with these diverging views of the overall future of coal, everyone seems to be in agreement about one thing: The coal jobs are not coming back. “I suggested that [Trump] temper his expectations. Those are my exact words,” said Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray, the country’s largest coal-mine owner, in a March 2017 article in The Guardian newspaper. “He can’t bring them back.”


Pittsburgh City Paper analyzed U.S. Department of Labor data on jobs at coalproducing sites in Southwestern Pennsylvania, including Allegheny, Butler, Washington, Greene, Fayette, Westmoreland and Armstrong counties. (Beaver County had no coal mines, according to the data.) In 2017, the average number of workers at coal-producing sites, like underground and surface mines, in this region was 2,767, an increase of 26 workers compared to 2016, or a growth rate of less than 1 percent. Nationally, coal jobs ticked up by 771 to 54,819 jobs, an increase of 1.4 percent, according to news organization Reuters. With the projected 370 jobs lost at the 4 West Mine, this means the region will have to add more than 344 coal jobs to have positive job growth in 2018. Seth Feaster, of the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a Cleveland-based group that advocates for a diverse, sustainable and profitable energy economy, says this will be an extremely difficult feat. Feaster says there was a positive jolt to the coal industry with the election of Trump, but adds that enthusiasm for coal has since waned, because the demand hasn’t really recovered. He notes that the fourth quarter of 2017 saw a drop-off in coal-industry hiring compared to early in the year. Feaster also says job numbers over the last several years indicate a bleak future for coal employment. “If you take a slightly longer view of the coal industry, just to 2015, there was still a 13,000-job loss compared to 2017,” says Feaster. “Go back to 2012, you are talking about a loss of 35,000 jobs. Coal is facing a longterm problem.” Greene County had 2,016 coal jobs in 2017, the most of any county in Southwestern Pennsylvania. It also produced the most coal. In 2016, the county voted for Trump with 68 percent of its vote, a 10 percent increase from votes for the previous Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney. And with Greene County only adding 12 coal jobs in 2017, and the announced closure of the 4 West Mine, local pro-coal leaders are blaming Trump. “They voted for Trump because he said he’d bring back coal. It’s not happening,” Blair Zimmerman, a Democratic Greene County Commissioner and former coal miner, told CNN’s business website Money, on Jan. 10. “There’s not been any significant change in the industry since he’s taken over.”

But the Trump administration has made many policy changes to attempt to boost coal. Trump’s administration has rolled back several environmental regulations, many of which were specially requested by Murray and his company. On Jan. 9, The New York Times reported that just weeks before the inauguration, Murray, who owns coal mines in Washington County, provided Trump with a wish-list of environmental regulations he wanted ended. Murray told PBS’s Frontline that Trump has already enacted many of his suggestions. Trump’s Energy Secretary, Rick Perry, proposed a plan to subsidize struggling coal power plants, but the plan was rejected by a mostly Trump-appointed Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. FERC cited that the current tariffs on these coal mines were not unjust or unreasonable. Feaster says that Trump’s attempt to subsidize coal and his acquiescence to a coal CEO’s request shows that coal is facing intense competition in the energy market. “It plays really well to stand up for coal, there is cultural resonance in all of Appalachia,” says Feaster. “But there is a difference in politics and economics, and that is the problem with the coal industry. There are huge coal reserves … you could burn them for the next 150 years. But if it is not [economically viable], it doesn’t matter.” Feaster says that in the Pittsburgh region, coal is getting beat out by natural gas. Drilling for natural gas, particularly through hydrofracturing, experienced huge growth from 2012-2017 in Appalachia, including areas in southwestern and northern Pennsylvania, West Virginia and eastern Ohio. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, natural-gas production in Appalachia increased by more than 14 billion cubic feet per day from 2012 to 2017. Dozens of new fracking wells have been drilled in Southwestern Pennsylvania during this time. “The coal industry has intense competition, and that is not likely to change,” says Feaster. “Its most direct competitor, natural gas, has seen a big growth in production in the Appalachian region.” Rachel Gleason, director of the Pennsylvania Coal Alliance, a pro-coal industry group, admits that natural gas is coal’s biggest competitor and that its growth has hurt the coal industry. Even so, she sees positive signs for coal in the region. She says that coal is a more reliable source of power for the region’s electrical

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grid than natural gas, since coal can be stockpiled at power plants. Gleason adds that it’s important to have coal as a power source so the region maintains a “diverse” energy portfolio. Gleason says coal for power plants will maintain a presence in Southwestern Pennsylvania for this reason. And Gleason also sees growth in metallurgical coal as encouraging. “We did see some rebounding in the metallurgical coal market,” says Gleason. “And that [market] has been holding rather steady.” Metallurgical coal is used in the production of steel and is mostly exported to Asia, says Gleason. It’s different than thermal coal, which is used in power plants to produce electricity. In Cambria County, in Central Pennsylvania, metallurgical coal mines have seen an increase in production compared to 2016 and 2015. In 2017, Cambria County’s producing mines have added 25 jobs. Yet, overall, there are five fewer coal-mine jobs than there were there in 2015. But Gleason admits that coal is not going to rebound at levels that would add a significant amount of jobs. “I would say

we are probably steady at this point,” says Gleason of coal jobs. And even though many recognize that coal jobs are unlikely to return in large numbers, the coal industry is still upping its production and profits. In Southwestern Pennsylvania, mines produced more than 2.1 million tons more in 2017 compared to 2015. However, the region lost 185 coal jobs over that time span. Business-news website Bloomberg reported in October that coal production in the U.S. was up 11 percent in the first nine months of 2017. Some companies like Warrior Met Coal, in Alabama, posted large enough profits in 2017 that it announced plans to pay out hundreds of millions in dividends to shareholders. Feaster says even if coal companies do better in terms of production, thanks to fewer regulations and government agencies helping them, coal-mine owners are still going to focus on profits over hiring more workers. Feaster says this is typical behavior for the coal industry. “As they talk about coal mining, they are also laser-focused on efficiency and cutting jobs. People … are going to focus on the efficiency.” RYA N D E TO@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN


KEEP IT MOVING A few ways to channel momentum from the Women’s March into action {BY REBECCA ADDISON} ON JAN. 21, thousands marched through the streets of Downtown for the Pittsburgh Women’s March on Washington. Now in its second year, the event, which is part of a national movement, was spurred by the election of Donald Trump. The president has frequently made disparaging remarks about women, most notably in a 2005 audio recording that surfaced in 2016 where Trump can be heard saying of women, “grab them by the pussy.” But in the year since Trump took office, women have had to contend with more than his mouth. Around the country, Trump and legislators at the federal and state levels have pushed for laws to restrict women’s rights, roll back environmental protections and discriminate against the LGBTQ community. Some have criticized the Women’s March movement as a flash in the pan or a feel-good measure without any teeth. But organizers say this year’s march was more than just a symbolic gesture. Themed “Power to the Polls,” the main goal of this year’s march was to increase left-leaning voter turnout in the upcoming midterm elections. “The midterms are coming,” said Tracy Baton, director of the Pittsburgh march. But voting isn’t the only way to carry momentum from the march on throughout the year. Whatever your cause, here are a few ways to take action right here in Pittsburgh.

“THE MIDTERMS ARE COMING.”

{CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

If you’re worried about the environment and protesting is your thing, join one of the local groups who hold demonstrations outside the offices of the region’s top polluters. Visit pennenvironment.org for more info.

RAD DI SO N @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Last year, both branches of the Pennsylvania legislature passed legislation to restrict abortion access. (The law was vetoed by Gov. Tom Wolf.) Keep an eye out for future legislation, and call your representatives.

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Put your money where your mouth is and donate to one of the local organizations supporting trans people. Check out SisTers PGH, a shelter for trans/nonbinary people in Western Pennsylvania suffering from discrimination and homelessness.

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Pennsylvania still ranks poorly for the number of women in elected office. In order to ensure women’s rights are protected, getting more women a seat at the table is key. There are several women running in upcoming elections locally. Pick one or a few to campaign for.

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[GREEN LIGHT]

NUKE HORIZONS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} ONE LONG-RUNNING disagreement about the environment isn’t the familiar fight between people who understand that human-caused climate change is real and people who deny it. Rather, it’s between folks who contend that keeping the planet livable requires us to use nuclear energy, and those who say “no way.” Many pro-nukes types are scientists. In 2015, for instance, a group of 65 biologists wrote an open letter to the Brave New Climate blog, encouraging increased reliance on nuclear energy to protect wildlife and the environment. Nuclear power plants, they note, emit no carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gasses, and take up relatively little space for the power they produce. One biologist told England’s The Independent that a commitment to grow nuclear energy needed to be part of “a full, globalscale assault on fossil fuels.” The Union of Concerned Scientists calls nuclear “an important low-carbon energy source,” albeit one that needs to be made safer. Opponents of nuclear energy say it’s still too dangerous. They recall the 2011 disaster in Fukushima, Japan, where an earthquake and tsunami led to a meltdown. Spent uranium, critics add, remains lethal for millennia. “Nuclear is no solution to Climate Change,” argues the Sierra Club on its website, “and every dollar spent on nuclear is one less dollar spent on truly safe, affordable and renewable energy sources.” Still, perhaps paradoxically, the nuclear advocates in this debate are also climate warriors. Most experts agree that to check global warming, we must cut global carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Most green types want to do it by using less energy, and getting what we do need from renewable sources, like sun and wind. But at March 2017’s Pennsylvania Environmental Council conference here called Achieving Deep Carbon Reductions, several speakers argued that decarbonizing the economy that rapidly isn’t possible without nuclear; renewables, they say, can’t be scaled up fast enough. Many speakers advocated preserving generation from existing nuclear plants while exploring the potential for advanced nuclear reactors. Seems doable. France gets 75 percent of its electricity from nuclear, and countries including Belgium and Sweden get onethird or more. The U.S., historically the world leader in nuclear, gets only about 20 percent, a share unchanged in three decades.

However, while China has begun operating more than 30 new reactors since 2002 (according to the World Nuclear Association), in the past 20 years only one new nuclear plant has opened in the U.S., and prospects for adding to the total of 100 are scant. Cranberry-based Westinghouse went bankrupt last year following construction delays and cost overruns at two nuclear plants it was building down South; one project was abandoned. And if new plants are expensive to build, existing plants are threatened by cheap natural gas, a result of the fracking boom. In Illinois and New York, ratepayers are bailing out aging, money-losing nuclear plants. And this month, federal regulators rejected a Trump administration proposal to subsidize coal and nuclear plants. Some say hopes for advanced-design plants — which are safer and cheaper to run — are dim, too. “We’re basically dead in the water with respect to advanced nuclear reactors,” says energy expert M. Granger Morgan, a Carnegie Mellon University engineering professor. The federal government no longer adequately funds the research. “The best we’re likely to do is keep existing plants alive,” says Morgan. “We’re not going to be able to add much.” Maintaining existing plants is important for the climate, says Rob Altenburg, director of environmental group PennFuture’s Energy Center: If those plants were retired, they’d largely be replaced by our present carbon-heavy energy mix of gas and coal. And here’s an irony: The best way to help nuclear compete with gas might be to institute a federal carbon tax — also a favorite environmentalist proposal for boosting renewable energy. But with climate-deniers dominating Congress and the White House, a carbon tax seems unlikely just now. Can we fight climate change without scaling up nuclear power? Looks like we’re going to find out.

“THE BEST WE’RE LIKELY TO DO IS KEEP EXISTING PLANTS ALIVE.”

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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News of the Weird {COMPILED BY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUBLISHING}

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In Lawrence County, Tenn., law-enforcement officials are confronting the fallout from a new drug known as “Wasp” (crystallized wasp repellant mixed with methamphetamine). To wit: On Dec. 18, as the Johnson family baked Christmas cookies in their Lawrenceburg kitchen, Danny Hollis, 35, walked into their home and asked for help. NewsChannel 5 in Nashville reported Hollis poured himself a glass of water from the sink before grabbing a knife and cutting across his throat. Teenage son Canaan Johnson said Hollis then ran up to the second floor, heaved an oak dresser down the stairs, and jumped out a window onto a gazebo below, seriously injuring his neck. The Johnsons, meanwhile, had retreated to their car, where they called 911. Hollis chased the car down the street, but got hung up on a barbed wire fence, then stripped naked to free himself and climbed a nearby tree, where officers found him, according to police reports. Hollis fought them off by allegedly throwing his own feces at them, as they Tased him out of the tree. Hollis was booked into the county jail on numerous charges.

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Khaled A. Shabani, 46, a hairstylist in Madison, Wis., was arrested on a tentative charge of mayhem and disorderly conduct while armed after an altercation with a customer on Dec. 22. Shabani scolded the 22-year-old customer for fidgeting, then taught him a lesson by using the “shortest possible attachment” to “run down the middle of the customer’s head,” reported the Wisconsin State Journal, and “leaving him looking a bit like Larry from The Three Stooges,” police spokesman Joel DeSpain said. Shabani also clipped the customer’s ear with scissors. “While it is not a crime to give someone a bad haircut,” DeSpain noted, “you will get arrested for intentionally snipping their ear with a scissors.” Shabani said the snip was an accident, and his charge was later reduced to a ticket for disorderly conduct.

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Bertha Vickers of Morgantown, Miss., turned 100 on Jan. 9. To celebrate, she bagged a deer. “I was sort of shaking until I got ready to shoot,” Vickers told the Clarion Ledger. “I didn’t think it was all going to go right.” Vickers still lives in her home and mows her own lawn, tends a garden and hunts for squirrels. “I don’t know why everybody is making such a big deal about it,” she said. “It was just a doe. I would love to kill a buck.”

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When Dustin Johnson, 22, of Minot, N.D., tried to steal $4,000 worth of merchandise from a local Hobby Lobby, he failed to take into account that shopping carts don’t have snow tires. The Grand Forks Herald reported that over a seven-hour period on Jan. 3, Johnson filled a cart then fled the store — where the cart became stuck in snow in the parking lot and flipped over. Johnson

fell down, then got up to run, leaving behind his wallet with photo ID matching the shoplifter’s description. Minot police caught up with Johnson at his home.

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It may be cold where you are, but it’s hot in Broadford, a small town about an hour from Melbourne, Australia, where on Jan. 5, the highway began melting. Temperatures of 100 degrees Fahrenheit and higher reactivated an ingredient in the road surface, turning it into a sticky mess on the Hume Freeway, 9News reported. Motorists were warned by Victoria police to avoid the right lane and expect delays over a 10-kilometer stretch. Officials also put in place a fire ban and urged people to stay indoors until the heat abated.

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Christians in a Portuguese village carry on a curious tradition during Epiphany: They encourage their young children to smoke cigarettes. Vale de Salgueiro locals told Fox News that nobody is sure what the smoking symbolizes, but the centuries-old tradition persists. And Portuguese authorities don’t intervene, despite the fact that the legal age to purchase tobacco in Portugal is 18. Writer Jose Ribeirinha researched the tradition and said that since Roman times, villagers in the region have done things that were out of the norm during winter solstice celebrations.

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Siera Strumlauf and Benjamin Robles of California, and Brittany Crittenden of New York, saw their complaints go up in steam on Jan. 5 when U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers dismissed their lawsuit against Starbucks for underfilling its lattes and mochas. According to Reuters, the judge cited lack of evidence brought by the plaintiffs, who accused the coffee chain of fraud by making its cups too small and instructing baristas to skimp on ingredients and adhere to low “fill-to” lines on milk pitchers. The suit also claimed milk foam should not be counted toward advertised volumes, an opinion Rogers said reasonable customers do not hold. Starbucks and the plaintiffs had no comment.

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Researchers have discovered that 99 percent of green sea turtles born in the northern parts of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef are now female. Sea turtles’ gender is determined by the temperature at which the eggs are incubated, and warmer temperatures reduce the number of male hatchlings. The author of a new study, marine biologist Michael Jensen, told The News York Times the shift in gender suggests climate change is having a more dramatic effect on sea turtle populations than scientists realized. “We’re all trying to wrap our heads around how these populations are going to respond to those changes,” he said. Researchers warn that continued global warming will threaten the persistence of these populations.

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LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

The Living Street THE LIVING STREET WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/THELIVINGSTREETMUSIC/

On its self-titled debut, The Living Street presents nine sugary indie-pop songs ready to wiggle their way into your ear and refuse to exit. The pop duo, composed of Nick Guckert and Edward J. Angelo, plays with lyrical tone, from the bittersweet ballad “Not Waiting” to the bouncy, but lovesick, opener “Dying to See You Smile.” Whether a song is about falling in love or out of it, the sound remains poppy and upbeat, with one exception: the belted ballad, “This Time Around.” For fans of the pair’s earlier work, there is a slightly different version of “Some Days,” which was released in 2013 with their former band The Artless. But the version here is better situated alongside the quick poppy bites that make up The Living Street. Some of the most interesting songs on this record are those that lean more into the alt-radio pop vibe, like the album closer, “They Don’t Know Anything,” and the re-imagined “Some Days.” The Living Street is a strong debut for the duo, an album on which they’ve crafted some earworms with tremendous potential. FOR FANS OF: JUKEBOX THE GHOST, SAM SMITH, LOCAL NATIVES

Steve Hackman will lead the Mendelssohn Choir Jan. 25-28 at Mr. Smalls.

This Side of Eve SOLACE THISSIDEOFEVE.BANDCAMP.COM

Solace is a record that feels organic, as if recorded in a familiar space in an intimate place of creation, and that’s because it was. The 10-song album was recorded in This Side of Eve’s home studio dubbed the “Backroom.” As a result, many of the songs feature natural sounds and other ambience granted by the natural world around them. For example, on “Drifted,” the sounds of a rainstorm mingle with gentle finger-picked melodies to create a calming energy, and noises from crickets and other insects sneak their way onto the somber “Haunting.” “Solace in the Land” is one of the few tracks that features any drums, and the percussion here is consistent and simple, providing a foundation upon which airy synths and touches of electric guitar can play. This Side of Eve has created an album ideal for putting on during meditation, morning stretching, a walk home in the gently falling snow, or your gentle drift into slumber at day’s end.

TIMES ARE A-CHANGIN’ {BY MEG FAIR}

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HEN ONE thinks of Pittsburgh’s Mendelssohn Choir, what likely comes to mind is 70 voices joining to create one marvelous voice, replete with harmony and smooth texture. And when one thinks of Bob Dylan, what comes to mind is unconventional vocal work and rhythms bolstered by unbridled emotion and heartfelt poetry. Now imagine the work of Dylan rearranged and reinvented to be performed by the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. At Mr. Smalls Theatre, Steve Hackman and the Mendelssohn Choir will be performing the world premiere of The Times They Are A-Changin’, a re-imagination of Bob Dylan’s work in a choral setting. It’s a mighty challenge to make Dylan’s work compatible with a classically trained

MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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choir, but conductor, composer, arranger and producer Steve Hackman was determined to make it happen. Hackman is known for his arrangements that bring contemporary and classical artists together in one score: Radiohead

THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN’ 6:30 p.m. nightly Thu., Jan. 25-Sun., Jan. 28. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15-40. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

and Brahms; Björk and Bartók; Coldplay and Beethoven; Bon Iver and Copland; and Drake and Tchaikovsky. Each of these unlikely pairings was part of the FUSE

series, in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. But The Times They Are A-Changin’ was a different challenge for Hackman, as the project was brought to Hackman by the Mendelssohn Choir, rather than being a concept he initiated. “With Radiohead and Björk, I know that music cover-to-cover. I could sit down at a piano and play it all right now,” explains Hackman, speaking to City Paper by phone from New York City. “But with Dylan, I only knew the hits every American knows.” “His vocal delivery was a major deterrent for me in the beginning of this project to find an entry point into his music,” Hackman says. “Every time I’d try, I’d be like, ‘I don’t like this.’ It wasn’t until I started to understand the context of the music, his story,


the Village in NYC, the story of our country in those turbulent times, that’s when it all clicked for me.” Once Hackman began to fall in love with Dylan’s work, he focused on translating the music in a way that would be engaging in a choral setting. It was Dylan’s rhythmic delivery that gave him the most trouble in terms of classic translation and notation. “How do I notate ‘Like a Rolling Stone’ to a 70-voice choir in a way that the musicians can understand it, but it’s still emotionally effective?” asks Hackman. “[The Mendelssohn Choir], of course, want it to be polished and well executed and refined, but they want you to feel it, as well.” Hackman continues, “I can guarantee polar reactions, and I hope for that, honestly. I mean, these songs are so powerful and speak in such a true, visceral way about the human condition, so when you multiply that with all these forces and the epic, fantasy-type treatments — it’ll be overwhelming emotionally.” “There are people I’m sure who are not going to prefer that. They’d rather have his lone voice, and his guitar, singing ‘Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall.’ I won’t be the first person to cause uproar with a re-imagination of his music, because he did that his entire career,” says Hackman, with a laugh. The performance, which will feature songs such as “All Along the Watchtower,” “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall,” “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding),” will take place at Mr. Smalls, a refurbished church and a Pittsburgh venue typically reserved for rock and hip-hop concerts. “I think what I want to convey is that the Mendelssohn Choir’s performance needs to be more casual, folk-like, colloquial in tone,” says Hackman. “I think [performing at Mr. Smalls] is going to help the singers get into that vocal mode, as opposed to being in Heinz Hall, given the rock context of the venue.” For Liz Berlin, co-founder of Mr. Smalls and a member of Rusted Root, having the Mendelssohn Choir perform for the first time at the venue will bring her musical life in Pittsburgh full circle. “I first moved here with my family in 1979, and my parents joined the [Mendelssohn] Choir back then. There was no youth choir at all, so my sister and I were founding members of the Children’s Festival Chorus, created to perform with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the Mendelssohn,” explains Berlin. In another happy coincidence, Berlin’s band Rusted Root has also performed on bills with Bob Dylan. “I think the thing I’m most excited about,” she says, “is hearing the choir in the NEWS

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church, hearing the acoustics of the church that are naturally made to carry and accentuate choral music.” Berlin is also excited to have Hackman work his magic in the space. “I’ve got so much admiration for what [Hackman] does as a composer and an artist. By preparing modern-day rock with major composers, I just feel like it’s a cool way to bridge the times,” she says. “He’s creating wormholes between vastly different musical time periods. In doing so, he’s giving recognition to the fact that these composers he’s combining with modern-day artists, they were the rock stars of their day.” The wormhole created in a choral arrangement of Dylan’s work is also strengthened by the relevance of his lyrics in the current political context. “The title ‘The Times They Are A-Changin’’ refers back to the political climate of the ’60s,” says Hackman, “and the current climate now in our country, comparing the two. That particular song acts as a narrator of sorts, and comes back a few times in the work and divides the piece into sections.” Berlin agrees: “Dylan’s words were so timely then, but they are also timely now. It’ll be cool to see new life breathed into them in a totally different way.” MEGFAIR @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

BELVEDERES

ULTRA-DIVE

For subscriptions and tickets call 412-624-4129

THURS JAN 25

COVEN DJ CUTUPS ILLUSIONS/BXC

FRI JAN 26

or visit us online at chambermusicpittsburgh.org.

UPCOMING CONCERTS AT CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL IN OAKLAND

DOWN AND DERBY

SAT JAN 27

RIHANNA NIGHT DJ ADMC

MON YOGA 8PM TUES KARAOKE 9PM WED DUSTY The Díaz Trio Monday, February 5, 2018 7:30 PM

4016 BUTLER STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-687-2555 WWW.BELVEDERESULTRADIVE.COM

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Ebène String Quartet Monday, March 12, 2018 7:30 PM +

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Les Violons du Roy with

Bernard Labadie, conductor, and Isabelle Faust, violin

Monday, April 30 at 7:30 PM CLASSIFIEDS

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CREED THOUGHTS

THE KARMA {BY MEG FAIR}

{BY ALEX GORDON}

WHAT WAS once Devils and Dolls night-

club on East Carson Street is now Karma, on the South Side, a multi-room music venue and art space. Its two rooms will hold 200 and 300-350 people, respectively, which opens up the possibilities for both DJs and full-band shows. City Paper met with Kevin Saftner, the coowner of former James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, and current talent buyer and marketing director for the Stage at Karma. We met in the space to chat about the new venue. WHEN WILL KARMA BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC? We currently are open Thursday through Saturday, but we’re just opening the doors. February 2 will be our first show in here. We’ll be open seven days a week, but won’t have full Monday-throughSunday music programming until March 2, after our grand-opening show featuring Starship Mantis. YOU MENTIONED YOU WANTED TO BRING THE JAMES STREET ENERGY HERE? We’re going to do a lot of the same pro-

Creed Bratton

{CP PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Kevin Saftner, marketing director at Karma nightclub on the South Side, in the ballroom of the former James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy

gramming: a jazz jam on Sundays; Monday karaoke; Tuesday open stage; Wednesday, a funk-and-soul house band; Thursday DJs; Friday and Saturday will be live music and DJs. We’ll be featuring the variety of entertainment like James Street. We want do a lot of charity events and work with non-

This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists.

profits. We want to bring that community vibe over here. WHAT MAKES KARMA SPECIAL? It’s going to be way different from the typical culture that Carson Street has had for a long time. We’re going to focus on local music first and probably forever here. As of right now, we’re almost booked through June, and it’s all local. We’re going to do most of our live shows 8-11 p.m. We’ll team [bands] up with DJs afterward that have a similar vibe, so we can cross-pollinate scenes. Everyone has their niche, but we want this to be the melting pot of all of those niches.

UPCOMING SHOWS: WORKING BREED 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 2, $7;

ED! RECE NTLY POST

BOB MARLEY BIRTHDAY JAM FEAT. TRUTH&RITES 9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 9, $7; and

BB GUNS RECORD RELEASE 9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 16, $10. 1713 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-481-7227

ARMADILLOS Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

WHAT’S YOUR VISION FOR KARMA? I want this to be the weirdest and most diverse place on Carson Street. We want this to be the kind of place where the bouncer will shake your hand and introduce himself, not scare you away. Everyone is welcome: We don’t care what you look like, where you’re from or what you sound like. We want this to be a meltingpot-style community. ME GFAIR @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018

It’s been five long years since we last saw the paper-pushers of Dunder Mifflin on TV’s The Office, but you’ll get a chance to reunite with one of the show’s greatest assets in Pittsburgh this week. Creed Bratton, everyone’s favorite head of quality assurance (or “quabbity assuance,” as Bratton once referred to it), brings an evening of comedy and music to the Rex Theatre. Though his character — also named Creed Bratton — is best known for his eccentricity, low-level criminality and weird charm, Bratton in real life is an accomplished and experienced musician. He grew up playing the trumpet and guitar, and in the 1960s, played guitar and sang in the folk-rock band The Grass Roots. The group toured extensively and netted a few hits, including “Midnight Confessions.” Bratton left the band for a solo career in 1969, but when that didn’t pan out, he began studying acting. In the 1980s, he landed small roles in Heart Like A Wheel and Mask, and took odd jobs behind the scenes as a prop man, boom operator and grip. The road to his role on The Office began when he met director Ken Kwapis, who, it turned out, was a big Grass Roots fan. Kwapis was developing the American version of The Office, (which originated in the U.K.), and though it was already cast, Bratton managed to get on as an extra. Bratton wrote and shot an unsolicited talking-head interview for Creed, which impressed the showrunners so much that they brought him on for a bigger role. Riffing on his own life experiences, The Office’s Bratton was a burnt-out former hippie with a mysterious, meandering past (like Forrest Gump with acid flashbacks). He’d been in cults, as both a leader and a follower. He spoke Mandarin. He commuted to Scranton, Pa., from Toronto. In a show that was sometimes weighed down by unnecessary sentimentality, Bratton was a reliable source of anarchic, charismatic fun. When CP asked Bratton if there was anything he wished he’d done differently over the course of the show’s run, he responded, “Nothing. Then I wouldn’t end up where I am today.” A L E X G ORD ON @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

CREED BRATTON, IAN INSECT, NICK SNYDER 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 24. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20-25. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.net


{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEY WHARTON}

CRITICS’ PICKS Sammi Lanzetta

G et C h ee ky H City Paper A Night Witneh d PGParenthood an Pl d an oof western pa

Be Our Valentine! To celebrate the Love and Sex issue, the Pittsburgh City Paper is hosting a delightful night of fun, games, and prizes.Featuring live music from Pittsburgh City Paper's “Face the Music Battle of the Bands” 1st place winner, Chase and the Barons.

[BEST LOCALS] + THU., JAN. 25

Ugly Blondes when I snuck into a Battle of the Bands competition when I was 16 (a time There are days when I am completely when I would tell people I liked “desert rock”). overwhelmed by how many amazing bands A folky pop group won the comp and the Pittsburgh has over such a wide span of genres. Blondes came in second, but in my eyes, they It’s a trial to see all the talent when bands are playing separate shows all over the city; it makes should have taken home the gold. The crew is a Pittsburgh band you wish you could be through and through in two places at once, — you’ll leave Hambone’s like Luke in The Last feeling more yinzer Jedi, but less sweaty. than you have in your Fret not, because entire life, guaranteed. tonight three of PGH’s EB 9 p.m. 4207 Butler absolute finest are St., Lawrenceville. joining forces for www.hambones an evening of pittsburgh.com jaw-dropping local tuneage at Spirit. [DJ] + SAT., Behold: Hearken JAN. 27 (catchy alt-rock All you need to know with mesmerizing about Ardalan is that melodies); Calyx he has an album (mathy power-pop named Thunderdad. with painfully relatable I guess that’s not all lyrics); and late. (bouncy you need to know, riot-grrrl pop and Ardalan but that’s basically the bubblegum drummost important part machine magic). Find of this pick. The word me on the floor, “groovy” should be dancing my aches used in here as well. away, and maybe Honestly, I don’t know how to write about crying, but only a little. Meg Fair 9 p.m. anything other than folk music, but I can at 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441 or least tell you that these beats are sassy as hell. www.spiritpgh.com And they’re happening at Cattivo. EB 7:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2157 or [INDIE ROCK] + FRI., JAN. 26 If I could brand this show as “NPR rock” without www.cattivopgh.com sounding like a jerk, I would do it. Richmond, [ROCK] + WED., JAN. 31 Va.-based Sammi Lanzetta is indie rock incarnate I literally cannot get enough of Looming’s — meaning there’s a femme tenderness and music. The haunting voice and striking lyrics of powerful grittiness to the four-song EP she’s Jessica Knight brings literal chills to my forearms touring on. If you need any prodding, local each time I dive into a listen, and the thoughtful neo-folk coterie String Machine will make your riffs and careful song construction keep me eyeballs start leaking right there in The Mr. wrapped up in a nest of goodness, so comfortable I Roboto Project. Also, Sammi’s EP is less than have no intentions to ever leave. At Black Forge 10 minutes in its entirety, which is pretty punk. Coffee tonight, catch an intimate performance Emily Bennett 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., of Looming as a two-piece, supported by Bloomfield. All ages. $7. www.robotoproject.org Pale Lungs, Captain the Sky, Shin Guard and Foxwell. MF 5:30 p.m. 1206 Arlington Ave., [ROCK] + FRI., JAN. 26 Allentown. All ages. $10-12. 412-291-8994 I first experienced the rock ’n’ roll goodness of

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EVENTS

Hosted by Lola LeCroix

Wednesday, February 14 Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square 8-11 pm, 21+ event $5 online / $10 at the door

Tickets available at cooltix.com

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SUPER MOON PARTY

Blue Moon Specials All Day

Blue Moon $ pints 3 Blue Moon WEDNESDAY by the bone girls 7-9pm JANUARY 31 $1 baby back ribs 1025 Broad St, North Versailles, PA 15137 BroadStBistro.com 412-829-2911

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

PALACE THEATRE. Abba Mania. 7:30 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

ROCK/POP THU 25 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Steve Hackman & the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Playing the music of Bob Dylan. 7:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

FRI 26

DJS THU 25 THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Centrifuge. Non-genre specific electronic music night showcasing aspiring fresh talent to veterans alike. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. . w w w Downtown. paper pghcitym 412-471-2058. .co

DIESEL. Billy Castle, Colourshow, iD, The Bleepy Things. Winter Rock Challenge - Round 4. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE LAMP THEATRE. Hot Blooded: The Foreigner Experience. 8 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000. MOONDOG’S. Jimbo and the Soupbones. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Steve Hackman & the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Playing the music of Bob Dylan. 8 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PARK HOUSE. Sweaty Already String Band. 9:30 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

FRI 26 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. Levels. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night

w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 27 BELVEDERE’S. Rihanna Night w/ DJ ADMC. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CATTIVO. ARDALAN, Alias, CMDR. 7:30 p.m. DJ Titanium. Euro pop dance night. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. S outh Side. 412-431-8800. MIXTAPE. DJ Antithesis. ‘The 1990s (& a bag of chips)’ dance party. 9 p.m. Garfield. 412-661-1727. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

TUE 30 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. THE SUMMIT. Dig Now Sounds w/ Hot Honey. 9 p.m. Mt. Washington. 412-918-1647.

HIP HOP/R&B WED 31 ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell feat.

SAT 27

MP 3 MONDAY BARLOW {PHOTO COURTESY OF STUART LEWIS}

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. InTransit Band. 9 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. RPG’s. 9:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE LAMP THEATRE. Eaglemania. A tribute to The Eagles 7 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Steve Hackman & the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Playing the music of Bob Dylan. 8 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. ROYAL PLACE. The Rockers. 9 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk Night. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-439-5706.

SUN 28 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Steve Hackman & the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Playing the music of Bob Dylan. 3 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 31 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Greensky Bluegrass w/ Billy Strings. 8 p.m. Homestead. 412-381-6811.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018

Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “You Have to See It,” by Barlow, an ethereal indie-rock number that plays with softness and sonic bombast to danceable results. Stream or download “You Have to See It” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.


HEAVY ROTATION Here are the songs CP music intern Emily Bennett can’t stop listening to: Pinegrove

“Intrepid”

Phoebe Bridgers

“Smoke Signals”

Ought

“Men for Miles”

Noah Gundersen

“Heavy Metals”

Teresa Hawthorne. 7:30 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412-875-5809.

BLUES THU 25 O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418.

FRI 26 CIOPPINO RESTAURANT & CIGAR BAR. The Midnight Express Band. 7 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-6593. ELWOOD’S PUB. Jack of Diamonds. 8:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. REVOLVER. Testify-Stevie Ray Vaughan Tribute Band. 8:15 p.m. New Castle. 724-981-1530.

SAT 27 MOONDOG’S. Tinsley Ellis and Albert Castiglia. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ EIGHTY ACRES KITCHEN & BAR. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff. 5:30 p.m. Monroeville. 724-519-7304. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Roger Humphries & RH Factor. 8 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

NEWS

SAT 27

FRI 26

DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER. Right TurnClyde. 12 p.m. Downtown. 412-565-6000. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. BurghSongSpace: Five Pittsburgh Singer-Songwriters. “BurghSongSpace” is a collaboration between two successful grassroots music series in Pittsburgh, BurghSong and SongSpace. Pittsburgh favorites Christopher Mark Jones, Heather Kropf, Ben Shannon, Emily Pinkerton and Brad Yoder will be joining forces to warm a winters eve. 7:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

CARNEGIE MELLON OPERA- IL MATRIMONIO SEGRETO. Music by Domenico Cimarosa. Libretto by Giovanni Bertati. Stephanie Havey, stage director. Brian Garman, conductor. 8 p.m. Chosky Theatre, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921.

ACOUSTIC FRI 26

PEPPERS N’AT. Lucarelli Jazz w/ Andy Yaulch & Johnny Van. 8 p.m. Braddock. 412-660-0600.

DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER. Right TurnClyde. 12 p.m. Downtown. 412-565-6000. HAMBONE’S. Acoustic Brunch. Acoustic Brunch welcomes all styles of music, poetry, spoken word, comedy in an open mic format.We also have one ‘Feature Artist’ sandwiched in the middle of our show. 10:30 a.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 27

WED 31

FRI 26

THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. WALLACE’S TAP ROOM. Tony Campbell Jazzsurgery. 5 p.m. East Liberty. 412-665-0555.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SUN 28

REGGAE

ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

MON 29

COUNTRY

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

“BUT NOT UNTIL.” WOMEN’S VOICES FROM AROUND THE WORLD. Kassia Ensemble presents a program of short works written by female composers representing six different countries. Accompanying the program will be a display of artwork created by young women from La Roche College and Carlow University curated by Fran Flaherty. Guest speakers to include Suzanne Drabkin

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SAT 27

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EVENTS

RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Rambo. Levels. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 26 DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE CAFE. Gypsy Stringz. 6 p.m. Homestead. 412-464-9023. REX THEATER. Rumpke Mountain Boys w/ Brokedown Hustlers. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. The Vagrants. Wheelhouse. 8 p.m. The Delaneys. Drum Bar. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 27 RIVERS CASINO. On The Level. Wheelhouse. 8 p.m. Velveeta. Drum Bar. 9 p.m. VDJ Rambo. Levels. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 28 THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. 40 oz. to Freedom, Blink-180True. Sublime and Blink-182 tribute bands. 8 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 31 REX THEATER. Boombox. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811.

General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at:

PALACE THEATRE. Cash Unchained. 8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

ARTS

CARNEGIE MELLON OPERA- IL MATRIMONIO SEGRETO. Music by Domenico Cimarosa. Libretto by Giovanni Bertati. Stephanie Havey, stage director. Brian Garman, conductor. 2 p.m. Chosky Theatre, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY PHILHARMONIC. Andrés Cárdenes, Music Director Ian Hobson, Guest Conductor and Piano REPERTOIRE: Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op. 15 Rachmaninoff Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-4921.

THU 25

Custodial Small Equipment Custodial Paper Products Custodial Chemicals/Soaps Packaging Materials Printed Forms

http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/default.asp

CARNEGIE MELLON OPERA- IL MATRIMONIO SEGRETO. Music by Domenico Cimarosa. Libretto by Giovanni Bertati. Stephanie Havey, stage director. Brian Garman, conductor. 8 p.m.

CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Tony Campbell. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110.

SUN 28

OTHER MUSIC

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time February 13, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

THU 25

WED 31

from Drusky Entertainment and Fran Flaherty. The program will include works by Leila Adu, Andrea Clearfield, Jessica Meyer, Sungji Hong, Caroline Shaw, Gabriela Frank, Shulamit Ran, and Rebecca Clarke. 7 p.m. PYCO School of Music, Wexford. 724-934-7529. CARNEGIE MELLON OPERA- IL MATRIMONIO SEGRETO. Music by Domenico Cimarosa. Libretto by Giovanni Bertati. Stephanie Havey, stage director. Brian Garman, conductor. 8 p.m. Chosky Theatre, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921.

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

CLASSICAL

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Martin Rosenberg. 7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

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SAT 27

SUN 28

TUE 30

THU 25

BAR 3 MILLVALE. Todd and Dale. 8:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-408-3870. FULL PINT WILD SIDE. Acoustic Happy Hour w/ Jess Klein. 6 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-408-3083.

Chosky Theatre, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921. PSO @ COA. Venezuelan conductor Rafael Payare w/ guest musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, as well as a few notable Venezuelan writers for a program that confronts Venezuela’s artistic culture in its ever-changing political and social landscape. 8 p.m. City of Asylum @ Alphabet City, North Side. 412-435-1110.

RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid. +

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Sponsored by:

What to do JANUARY 24-23 WEDNESDAY 24 CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. Tickets: cmoa.org. Through Feb. 14.

Jacob Sartorius STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Creed Bratton REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guests Ian Insect & Nick Snyder of Ferdinand the Bull. All ages event. Tickets: mrsmalls.com. 8p.m.

Wicked BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Feb. 11.

THURSDAY 25 Whiskey Myers

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. With special guest Scooter

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Steve Hackman & the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh: The Music of Bob Dylan

WICKED BENEDUM CENTER JANUARY 24

Sublime Tribute Band & Blink-182 Tribute © the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Crash Course: Photography – The First 100 Years

Brown Band. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

IN PITTSBURGH

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. All ages event. Tickets: mrsmalls.com. Through Jan. 28.

Up and Away CLO CABARET Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trust arts.org.Through Apr. 15.

FRIDAY 26 Ruth B

Emergency

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. With special guest Hailey Knox. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Rachmaninoff's Second Concerto

WILLIAM PITT UNION University of Pittsburgh. For tickets and more info: blackwomengirlspgh.event brite.com. 11a.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Jan. 28.

Daniel Beaty in

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018

Our Bodies. Our Lives. Our Voices.

Chantae Cann: Wall of Sound Series

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 10p.m.

SATURDAY 27 Satisfaction

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Paula Poundstone CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Homestead. 412-462-3444. All ages event.

Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THE FUNHOUSE AT MR. SMALLS Millvale. 412-421-4447. Over 18 event. Tickets: mrsmalls.com. 9p.m.

MONDAY 28 Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. With special guest James McMurty. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 29 Live Dead and Riders ’69

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH With special guest The Mixus OF PITTSBURGH Shadyside. Brothers. Tickets: ticketfly.com 412-621-8008. With special guests Christopher Mark Jones, or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m. Heather Kropf, Ben Shannon, Emily Pinkerton & Brad Yoder. The Devil Makes Three Tickets: uusongspace.com. MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 7:30p.m. 412-421-4447. With special guest The Huntress & Holder of SUNDAY Hands. All ages event. Tickets: 40 OZ To Freedom: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

BurghSongSpace!

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THIS SERIES FEELS LIKE AN ACT OF EMPOWERMENT

[BOOK REVIEW]

WORK IT OUT {BY FRED SHAW} As a somewhat reluctant member of the gig economy (professor, waiter, writer), I found myself rereading Lori Jakiela’s personal essay “The Union Project” multiple times as it appears in her new memoir collection, Portrait of the Artist as a Bingo Worker (Bottom Dog Press). Perhaps it’s because it’s relatable: that mix of pride and shame she feels as a professor working a catering gig, waiting on former students. Or maybe it’s that her writing is so readably poignant. In 23 essays and 213 pages, Portrait gives Jakiela’s longtime readers updated work while providing newcomers a taste of the topics she has covered in three memoirs and a poetry collection. The University of PittsburghGreensburg writing instructor leans on what she knows best, crafting a world that revolves around work and family to ground readers in the realities of an upbringing in Trafford and the obstacles of adulthood. The book’s backbone, though, is its celebration of labor, the lessons and connections to humanity it creates. Jakiela highlights her writerly influences, including a troika of workingclass favorites, Marge Piercy, Philip Levine and Studs Terkel. As an undergraduate, she once met Terkel at a reading, and characterizes him as “always excited about people, their stories, their hearts. He was excited about the world and everything in it. He was not embarrassed of this … [and] always rode the bus because he wanted to be with people and hear their stories.” It’s an ethos Jakiela takes to heart, and her writing includes a cast skillfully portrayed as mostly sympathetic and human. Jakiela also displays a knack for literary ventriloquism, direct-quoting her subjects in ways that speak insightfully about each of their characters long after events have happened. Her father is a pure realist when he says, “I could wipe my ass with what you know.” Her mother is more practical, pronouncing her disdain of reading by saying, “She’ll ruin her eyes.” However, in the title piece, it’s Jakiela’s grandmother Ethel who takes center stage. As a teen, Jakiela worked with Ethel at the Trafford Polish Club on bingo night, the young writer gaining her first insights into the pettiness of others. Ethel feuds with another woman, Fanny, saying of her nemesis, “Cheap is as cheap does.” Ouch. Overall, Portrait’s power lies in authenticity, summed up in a reflective moment when Jakiela writes, “Empathy, like writing, can be about kindness or it can be an aggressive act, both.”

Tarrah Krajnak’s “Line Up”

[ART REVIEW]

DREAM IMAGERY {BY CARRIE MANNINO}

I

N BOTH exhibitions currently at Silver Eye Center for Photography, photographers create fantasy from bits of reality. Tarrah Krajnak’s Sismos tells the story of returning to her birth country years after her adoption through other people’s photographs and documents. The aptly named Fantasy Life, by Tabitha Soren, depicts minor-league baseball players and explores the realities of the romanticized American dream. Sismos is at once deeply personal and romantically fictitious, blending stories, imagery and cultures. Born in Peru and immediately adopted by a family in Pennsylvania, where she was raised, Krajnak returned to Lima “with no romantic expectations of ‘finding her roots,’” writes Silver Eye executive director David Oresick in the gallery guide. Instead, she used her

experiences in Peru to collect and compile images of other people’s lives, collaging these portraits and histories to create a gritty, fantastical imagining of an alternate life, perhaps of her birth mother, or

SISMOS AND FANTASY LIFE continue through Feb. 17. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

of herself, had she been raised in Lima. Krajnak’s photographs focus not just on the experience of individuals in Peru, but specifically on the experience of women and how they are pressured to fulfill their society’s conception of womanhood. Sismos consists of three distinct series.

The first contains photographed collages of newspaper clippings, books and pictures, overlaid with colored broken glass that subtly refracts and distorts the viewer’s experience. The images themselves speak of exploitation and fear, including headlines about terrorism and imported American pornography, juxtaposed with portraits of Karl Marx. The photographs are disturbing in all the right ways, with aggressive colors and uncomfortable imagery, reflecting the Lima of Krajnak’s birth, which was facing a violent and turbulent political period in a year that Krajnak says “created orphans.” The next series features found photographs of Peruvian women from the 1960s, posed stiffly, mounted on broken shards of marble from a mansion that had been abandoned during this period, representing the changing culture surrounding Lima.

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These images too feel exploitative in that the women are highly posed, and some of the photographs even mimic the male gaze, showing women in pin-up poses. The exhibit’s final series consists of modern portraits of women who were born in the same city and year as Krajnak. She took oral histories of these women, and asked to photograph them in a place of their choosing. The histories she transformed into a series of poems, which she printed on high-contrast black-and-white images, and which are available for visitors to take as a mementos. This series feels like the culmination of the exhibit, and an act of empowerment: After exploring the ways in which the turbulent culture exploited and transformed its people, and its women especially, Krajnak gives these women the chance to tell their own stories and be seen as they wish. The second exhibit at Silver Eye similarly explores the intersection between reality and fantasy, here by following the stories of a minor-league baseball team, and the players’ dreams, successes and losses as they attempt to move into major-league baseball. Soren’s images juxtapose the soaring beauty of the American dream with painful reality. As you move throughout the room, you are always pivoting around the single sculptural piece, “Bone Spurs & Knocked Out Teeth from Draft Class and Others,” which is exactly what its title indicates, and

serves as a gracefully curated representation of the cost of that dream. The photographs on the wall provide similar nuance: One huge print shows a player basking in the sun like a biblical hero, and another captures a baseball stadium lit up in a dreamy, movie-magic light. Alongside these posed shots are photos of these men’s everyday lives, showing their families, their partners, their hope and their exhaustion. The photos handle the men with tenderness, perhaps reflecting Soren’s prolonged relationships with them as she followed their professional and personal lives for about 15 years. (The team is part of the Oakland A’s system; a few of the players, including Nick Swisher, did go on to the majors.) She provides expansive portraits of their lives through fragments, not only of their bones but also through memorabilia: a Little League trading card depicting a player’s childhood dream, and a haunting brain scan that alludes to the danger of losing oneself in pursuit of it. One small print that you must not miss shows a player falling into rippling blue water, mimicking the blurring of fantasy and reality emphasized throughout the exhibition. The photographs portray the mundane and the disappointing with the same empathy and reverence as do the images of players at the plate, and highlight the beauty in each moment of the men’s lives. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018


Did somebody say that this winter’s weather has been abominable? Well, that’s no problem for our cover model — the Abominable Snowman just gets out there and makes his own fun. Follow in his oversized tracks: City Paper offers this handy guide, that lists plenty of things to see and do, from plays and photography exhibits to concerts and tiny trees.

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American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition, Opens Feb. 10

ART AND

EXHIBITIONS In the United States, nearly ly all of us or our forebears came from another country. A new photographic migrationexhibit, Emigration-ImmigrationMigration, highlighting the work raphers, looks of five Pittsburgh photographers, at how immigration and migrants merican have helped form the American il 22. experience. Through April Westmoreland Museum of American Art, 0 or Greensburg. 412-837-1500 org www.thewestmoreland.org

Van Gogh, Monet, Degas: The Mellon Collection of French Art from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Opens March 17

Continuing the Carnegie Museum’s curation and exhibition off Pittsburgh eenie” photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris’ documentation of the AfricanAmerican community is Service and Sacrifice. This collection of photographs onnel — depicts black service personnel ght for a including those who fought ntee their country that didn’t guarantee amilies on own rights — and their families t., Jan. 27. the home front. Starts Sat., Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. moa.org 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

erican The traveling exhibit American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition looks at those few years in American history (19201933) when alcohol was illegal. Marvel at period artifacts such as temperance propaganda,, CONTINUES ON PG. 04

WINTER GUIDE 2018 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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a “rum-runner” boat and flapper dresses. Stop in the “speakeasy” — no password required. Opens Feb. 10. Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

the kids vicariously destroy things. Feb. 9-11. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com Pigeons and buses: two things that already exist near the Children’s Museum. But now, pop inside for

At Silver Eye, catch side-by-side solo photographic exhibitions by Jay Turner Frey Seawell and Allison Beondé. In Roswell, Beondé explores the New Mexico town infamous for a 1947 UFO crash-landing and cover-up. Seawell documents another well-known spot, The Mall, public land that spans from the U.S. Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C. March 2-April 14. Bloomfield. www.silvereye.org

The Pigeon Comes to Pittsburgh, an exhibit celebrating the characters of Mo Willems’ book Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! Lots to play and learn with, including foam hot dogs. Starts Feb. 17. North Side. www.pittsburghkids.org

More than 70 masterpieces from the private collection of Pittsburghborn Paul Mellon comprise Van

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HEINZ HISTORY CENTER}

Gogh, Monet, Degas: The Mellon Collection of French Art from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Included are three

NFL PLAY 60 Training Camp, Jan. 27

KIDS

works by Vincent Van Gogh (boats, daisies, wheat fields), many fine Impressionist paintings, and Degas’ famous “Little Dancer” sculpture. Starts March 17. The Frick Art Museum, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

Kids and sports are a natural fit — and a great way to stay fit. The popular NFL PLAY 60 Training Camp returns to Heinz History Center. The indoor event offers a mini-combine, with speed and agility drills. Wear your favorite jersey and

practice your touchdown dance. Sat., Jan. 27. Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org At Monster Jam, it never ever gets old watching ginormous trucks driving over smaller cars. (We see you, Gravedigger.) And fun for the whole family, since it’s a harmless way to let

Nothing says winter like “Disney on Ice.” Head over to the PPG Paints Arena, in Uptown, to catch Reach for the Stars, in which popular Disney characters such as Mickey, Minnie and Goofy glide and twirl across the frozen stage. Did somebody say “Frozen”?! It’s a good bet Elsa will come by, too. Feb. 22-25. www.ppgpaintsarena.com

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woes? Swing by the Rex Theater for The Moth’s live story-telling event fittingly titled “Love Hurts.” Feb. 6. South Side. www.themoth.org

and was a finalist for the National Book Award. Join the author for a reading at City of Asylum. Feb. 20. North Side. 412-323-0278 or www.alphabetcity.org

Min Jin Lee’s latest novel, Pachinko, tells the multigenerational story of a Korean family living in Japan throughout the 20th century. The book topped many year-end lists for 2017,

“In the summer of 2004 I set out to investigate someone I scarcely knew, my father.” Join Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Susan Faludi, at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. She will discuss her recent book, In the Darkroom, which examines the life and identities of her transgender father. Feb. 26. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org Another Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist comes to town: Margo Jefferson reviewed books and theater for The New York Times. She discusses her work, including 2015’s Negroland: A Memoir, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, as part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. March 22. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. www.pghwriterseries.wordpress.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF TONY LUONG}

Susan Faludi, Feb. 26

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OUTDOORS Is it snowing? Good. Now, go outside and make a snowball. Put the snowball in a safe place in the freezer and wait until June 21, the first day of summer. That’s the day that your snowball gets you pay-what-you-want admission to Carnegie Science Center,

plus a chance to launch it into the by-then-unfrozen Ohio River. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org The cold weather can be invigorating, and look, you need snow to partake in fun winter activities like cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Not sure how CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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to do it, or where to begin? Let the folks at Venture Outdoors get you started with fun classes. Dress warmly! www.ventureoutdoors.org Don’t sleep on Allegheny County’s parks! They’re busy in the winter: You can ski, snowboard and tube at Boyce Park, ice-skate at North and South parks; golf (yes!) at North and South parks; or just stroll around admiring the winter landscape. www.alleghenycounty.us

MUSIC Whenever Adult Mom performs, the band’s gentle, warm indie pop surrounds you like a tender hug. Adult Mom is joined by the evercharismatic, endearingly goofy power-pop artist Chris Farren. Feb. 4. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com The Warhol’s Sound Series brings multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer Rostam to the ‘Burgh. Melt the winter blues away while dancing to a delightful fusion of pop, R&B, world music and a pinch of indie rock. Feb. 8. The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BAO NGO}

Adult Mom, Feb. 4

Macklemore’s “Same Love”). It’ll be a night of queer-friendly pop tunes that’ll stay with you for ages. Feb. 9. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

Take yourself and maybe a classicalmusic newbie to Beethoven’s Fifth!, a rousing Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra program that includes Kabalevsky’s “The Comedians”; Vilde Frang, a young Norwegian violinist making her debut; and, of course, the titular Beethoven work that everybody knows at least the opening notes to. Feb. 9-11. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org Fresh off its tour with the Welcome to Night Vale podcast, Mal Blum will be supporting pop artist Mary Lambert (“She Keeps Me Warm,” as featured in

Make Valentine’s Day smooth with the old-school soul of The Spinners. The vocal group, which includes original member Henry Fambrough, will perform some of its 1970s hits, such as “Rubberband Man,” “I’ll Be Around” and “Could It Be I’m Falling in Love.” Feb. 14. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheatre.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF LOU BANK}

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For another warm-up on Valentine’s Day night, try the eclectic R&B

courtesy of singer and songwriter

Eric Roberson. The New Jerseyborn performer’s music ranges from smooth soul ballads to uptempo numbers, and taps influences ranging from gospel and jazz to hip hop. Feb. 14. August Wilson Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Some artists make music that feels like a massage for your brain, and Philadelphia’s Palm is certainly one of those bands. Surround yourself in the mathy riffs and dreamy tones, and enter another plane of existence. Feb. 18. Club Café, South Side. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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years to release Victory Lap, another record filled with anti-war, anti-fascist, anti-nationalist tracks to fuel your resistance fire. Get in the circle pit and burn off some of your political frustrations in good company. March 5. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.net

Come to Meeting. A unique percussive score, performed live on stage by tiny mechanized instruments, is the setting for two performers in this work by Australian choreographer Antony Hamilton and musician Alisdair Macindoe. Feb. 8. August Wilson Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

Guitar rock isn’t dead or dying. In fact, it’s thriving thanks to bands like Screaming Females, whose raw riffs and punk energy fuse with vocalist and guitarist Marissa Paternoster’s distinct, haunting timbre. March 12. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com Here’s one that the WYEP set won’t want to miss — and that goes for the rest of you as well. A pair of thoughtful and well-matched singer-songwriters — Lyle Lovett and Shawn Colvin — bring their acoustic guitars, extensive song catalogs and dry senses of humor to the Carnegie Music Hall. March 18. Oakland. www.livenation.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER WINTER GUIDE 2018

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FARRAH SKEIKY}

Screaming Females, March 12

movies. It’s the first installment of Pittsburgh Musical Theater’s latenight After Hours series. Feb. 2-10. West End. 412-539-0900 or www.pittsburghmusicals.com In 1962 Alabama, an African-American detective from California tries to solve a small-town murder; Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. stages Matt Pelfrey’s adaptation of John Ball’s novel, In the Heat of the Night,

It’s the Arcade Comedy Theater Fifth Anniversary. The big day at the newly relocated theater includes an cocktail-hour fundraiser, followed by the monthly improv show Arcade Hootenanny (with nationally known special guests Maribeth Monroe and Jaime Moyer) and a late-night standup-comedy gameshow. Feb. 10. Downtown. www.arcadecomedytheater.com Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performs Swan Lake, the all-time classic tale of love and magic, set to Tchaikovsky’s iconic score, played live by the PBT Orchestra. Feb. 16-25. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-281-0360 or www.pbt.org There’s a reason Bollywood cinema is so popular — the exuberant dancing, CONTINUES ON PG. 12


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Orchid and Tropical Bonsai show

the songs, the colorful costumes and often spectacular locales (or at least, extravagant sets). Bollywood

Boulevard: A Journey Through Hindi Cinema is a stage show that provides dance, music and visual imagery to reprise the evolution of Indian’s beloved cinema. Feb 22. Byham, Downtown. www.trustarts.org In the new Quantum Theatre show, Inside Passage, Pittsburgh-based playwright and performer Gab Cody uses documentary film and spoken work to tell a personal story of separated families, Native American children and an attempt “to reknit what had unraveled.” March 2-25. Provident Charter School, Troy Hill. www.quantumtheatre.com Haters are gonna hate, and girrrrl, you don’t want to miss it. The

OTHER FUN EVENTS A fine place to warm up and maybe learn a little something about tropical plants and tiny trees is the Orchid and Tropical Bonsai show at Phipps Conservatory. New this year: 5-footwide hanging orchid spheres. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org The Andy Warhol Museum is hosting a get-together at the Ace Hotel, where folks can make their own vintagestyle Valentine’s Day cards. “Be mine, sweetums, because hubba hubba.” Remember, nothing says love like “made by hand.” Sun., Feb. 11. East Liberty. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Haters Roast: The Shady Tour

Looking for new wheels? Head to the

features drag queens from RuPaul’s Drag Race, including Latrice Royale, Jinkx Monsoon and Trinity Taylor. Good thing this is going down in a library, because there will be reading. March 21. Carnegie Library of Homestead. Munhall. 412-462-3444 or www.librarymusichall.com

Pittsburgh International Auto Show. All the latest models await your

Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer Prizeand Tony Award-winning Rent is back, in a 20th-anniversary touring production. This original rock musical about scrappy artists in New York City during the 1980s was inspired by Puccini’s La Bohème, and remains a popular — and uplifting — production. March 27-April 1. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

perusal. Feb 16-19. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pittautoshow.com Celebrate (and taste) a variety of craft beers at the Pittsburgh Winter Beer Fest. Three sessions to choose from, including a new one on Saturday afternoon. Beers from nearby, beers from around the country — bring your pretzel necklace. Feb. 23-24. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pittsburghbeerfest.com During the cold snap, did you get tired of looking at your home’s interiors? Get good ideas for freshening up the house CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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For Ahkeem at Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival, March 22-April 7

and yard at the annual Pittsburgh Home and Garden Show. It’s got everything from luxury showers to environmentally friendly lighting. March 2-11. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pghhome.com The sign at Workshop PGH says, “Drink beer, make things.” What better way to learn a new handicraft in a social setting, then while away the rest of the dark winter days making things? Classes in woodworking, plants, macramé, leather, dyeing, sewing, pyrography (decorative wood burning), knitting and more. Garfield. www.workshoppgh.com One sign that winter is drawing to a close is March Madness. Get into the college-basketball action at the NCAA

Division 1 Men’s Basketball Championship, first and second

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rounds, at PPG Paints Arena. It’s the Road to the Final Four! March 15-17. Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com The Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival is back, with a program of recent international features and documentaries, guest speakers and related events. This year’s theme is Faces of (In)Equality, and films include Risk, Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story and For Ahkeem. March 22-April 7. Oakland. www.cmu.edu/faces You know who also needs cheering up in the gloomy winter months? Cat, dogs and even bunnies at animal shelters. Take a dog for a walk; cuddle a cat; foster an animal; or do outreach to help pets find new homes. Check with area shelters to see what help they need. www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org or www.humaneanimalrescue.org


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[BOOK REVIEW]

CITIZEN POETS {BY FRED SHAW}

video projection of Gangwani’s smartphone and laptop footage. The 20-minute piece finds an older man counseling Gangwani about airport security: “You shouldn’t have to be checked every time you get on a plane. That’s not random.” Gangwani critiques surveillance culture: As a person who gets profiled, he says, “It doesn’t make me feel safer. It makes me feel the opposite.” About one-third of the piece is devoted to realtime footage of him shaving, the electric razor’s whine filling the gallery. A video piece puckishly called “My Friends” — which the gallery guide describes as Gangwani roaming Pittsburgh streets with a GoPro and audiorecorder strapped to his head, greeting “hardworking security cameras” — sounds like good satirical fun, but wasn’t working when I visited. While watching “Always Watching,” you might feel you are being watched. That’s because the wall projection behind your back is video of a life-sized Gangwani, staring at you. “Staring Contest” finds him sometime scowling, with eyes that seem to follow you around the gallery. The effect is both amusing and unnerving, and emblematic of the way Gangwani uses humor to address issues that should rightly fill us with rage. Become Camera also invoves a durational performance by Gangwani, one in which, according to the guide, he “loudly sneak[s] around the gallery trying to watch the audience while simultaneously attempting to hide from them and the surveillance cameras.” He later blends into the gallery wall, a “stationary camera.” Gangwani will reprise the performance at the Galleries from 2-10 p.m. on Thu., Jan. 25. A closing reception and additional performance follow from 6-9:30 p.m. Fri., Feb. 9.

In his poem, “Advice to Young Black Men Named Cameron, After the Election,” Cameron Barnett writes, “The beginning of anything is always the first heartbreak. / Remember that. / Turn off the news. Turn off the news feed. Feed yourself … / America is going to be great again.” It’s guidance many needed in the aftermath of Donald Trump’s election. It’s also a mood-setter for the recent anthology, Nasty Women & Bad Hombres (Lascaux Editions), edited by localpoets Deena November and Nina Padolf. The title comes from Trump’s campaign rhetoric, which denounced Hillary Clinton and stoked fears about Mexicans pouring across the border. And with 92 poets, including many Pittsburgh favorites, Nasty Women thrives, using 195 pages and a variety of voices, many of whom aim insults at POTUS. It’s also a collection that strives for release and catharsis, while putting its money with its mouth: All proceeds will go back to community nonprofits. The soapbox nature of some poems feels honest and therapeutic, using more exposition than scene. The best allow imagery to take the wheel, leaving overtly political statements for others. For example, in Kristofer Collins’ “Survival,” he writes: “When we talk about money what we are really saying is, / I am so afraid. / The retired ladies at the bar talk about Medicaid / and the election. / There’s been another shooting and that abandoned house / finally burned down for good. / It’s easy to believe that every day death is winning.” These lines capture the mood of a country looking for answers in an implausible candidate. The beauty of the anthology is often in its demonstration of different forms, with Don Wentworth’s haiku-flavored verses featured in “(3 Poems).” In one, he writes, “Outside the polling place / two halves of a worm / wriggling. / shedding / all sallow conviction / we wait / amidst swirling / sycamore leaves.” The concision here points to a feeling of dread, soon realized for many on Nov. 9, 2016. Megan Merchant’s “I Urge My Students” provides an interesting counterpoint to the hand-wringing: “When the country divides / there are two whole-halves / that do not agree. / A Buddhist scholar says / that we become self-righteous / about our points of view, / and have to learn to find / the soft spot, / to return there again / and again, so we don’t / harden.” It’s an outlook to which many readers of Nasty Women & Bad Hombres might aspire. And while poet laureate Stanley Kunitz once said of political poetry, “the feelings are too obvious,” there is a comfort in knowing they’re being written.

DRI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Samir Gangwani in Become Camera

[ART REVIEW]

SEE YA {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} SAMIR GANGWANI describes himself as

“a brown man with a beard.” He also flies a lot. And he gets “randomly checked” at airports — a lot. Once, he sent a selfie to @AskTSA and queried, “Do you recommend shaving before flying? Whenever I have a beard I get checked but I shaved last time and I wasn’t checked.” The artist and Carnegie Mellon student’s interaction with the TSA inspired Become Camera, at Filmmakers Galleries. Though grounded in personal experience, the video-heavy installation also addresses our ubiquitous surveillance technology, from security cameras (on both private and public property), smartphones and laptops to satellite imaging.

“IT DOESN’T MAKE ME FEEL SAFER.”

BECOME CAMERA continues through Feb. 9. Pittsburgh Filmmakers Galleries, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. 412-681-5449 or www.pfpca.org

The exhibit includes images from Gangwani’s ongoing performance “Recording in Progress,” selfies of him peering into various security cams. Nearby, an array of four tiny monitors each displays that familiarly grainy, fish-eyed black-and-white securitycam footage; on one, you can watch yourself, as seen from behind from the gallery’s ceiling. The show’s deceptively low-key centerpiece is “Always Watching Part 1: A Conversation With the TSA.” An entire wall of the gallery serves as the screen for an enormous

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.25-02.01.18 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE REIDER}

First, Cotter Smith was lured to Pittsburgh: When the nationally known stage and film actor came here to shoot hit the Netflix series Mindhunter, he and his wife liked it so much they relocated from New York. Then Smith got drawn into the latest barebones productions show: Rules of Seconds, John Pollono’s new dark comedy about the culture of dueling in 1850s America.

Smith, 68, has Broadway and offBroadway credits, and has shared stages with Sam Waterston and Denzel Washington; in the X-Men movie X2 he played the president, and he was Mindhunter’s Unit Chief Shepard. In Pittsburgh, through mutual friends, he met local director and playwright Melissa Martin, who passed him the Rules script. “I found myself on the train by myself, laughing out loud,” says Smith. “It’s a dark comedy. But it’s a very funny comedy.” Smith (pictured) plays powerful Boston businessman Walter Brown, who when a deal with the Leeds family goes south takes extreme measures to defend his honor. Barebones artistic director Patrick Jordan calls Rules an “unfortunately timely” play about “toxic masculinity.” Martin directs a large cast including Jordan, Pittsburgh favorites Robin Walsh (after a long hiatus from local stages), Wali Jamal and Connor McCanlus, and Smith’s Mindhunter co-star Jack Erdie. The show introduces the company’s newly renovated black-box space in Braddock, where it shares a building with restaurant Superior Motors (which is offering discounts to ticket-buyers). Rules playwright Pollono also wrote Small Engine Repair, which barebones staged in 2015, and the 2017 film Stronger. Smith (who’s now teaching acting in Pittsburgh) calls Rules “a play about male ego and male misbehavior ... a hilarious caricature.” Jordan adds that the play explores “what it means to be a man and in turn what it means to be a woman.” It’s also profane (the Los Angeles Times review of a 2017 production name-checked Tarantino) and, naturally, violent. “There’s a lot of blood in this one,” says Jordan.

{ART BY ANDREW OOI}

^ Sat., Jan. 27: Almost 17 and #werestillhere

thursday 01.25

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

Jan. 26-Feb. 17. Barebones Black Box Theater, 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. $35-40. www.barebonesproductions.com

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STAGE Talk about multiple personalities — in Kevin Hammonds and Kristin Bair’s Up and Away, five actors portray 50 different characters. The show, with book and lyrics by Hammonds and music by Pittsburgh native Bair, gets its world-premiere performance tonight at the Cabaret at Theater Square courtesy of the Pittsburgh CLO. The musical follows Joe Jessup, a small-town zero who becomes a big-city hero once he realizes he has superpowers and leaves his boring hometown behind to become to the world’s first superhero. Lauren Ortego 7:30 p.m. Continues through April 15. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $38.75-59.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.org

STAGE “Something aesthetic, / Something frenetic, / Something for everyone: / A comedy tonight!” Funnymen

Larry Gelbart and Burt Shevelove mined the ancient Roman comedies of Plautus to write the book for the 1962 musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, with its puns, pratfalls, mistaken identities and slamming doors. Their not-so-secret weapon was the music and lyrics of Stephen Sondheim; critic Terry Teachout recently called this frequently revived tale of a slave trying to earn his freedom by helping his master get the girl “the funniest musical ever written.” If a show with characters named Panacea and Erroneous is your cup of wine, Pittsburgh Public Theater’s new production gets its first performance tonight. The Public’s Ted Pappas directs a big cast including Jimmy Kieffer (pictured) as the slave Pseudolus. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 25. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-75. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org ^ Thu., Jan. 25: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum


{PHOTO COURTESY OF HEIDRUN LOHR}

^ Sat., Jan. 27: The 13-Story Treehouse

friday 01.26 ART

> Fri., Jan. 26: Daniel Beaty

A fine excuse to get outside (and then back inside) this time of year is tonight’s winter Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District, an evening-length Pittsburgh Cultural Trust showcase featuring ing dozens of exhibits and performances at Downtown venues. enues. Wood Street Galleries opens two new audiovisual ovisual exhibits by Japanese-born artist Ryoichi Kurokawa: urokawa: Sirens, s a collection of pieces created with th Novi_sad to explore the aesthetics of data from global obal financial markets, and [unfold], an interpretation n of a star formation. Three new exhibits open at the e August Wilson Center, including a showcase by y global fashion initiative Idia’Dega. Elsewhere, check out the crafters and food vendors of The Nightt Market; interactive hip-hop experience Track Meet; t; local short films at the Harris Theater; improv att Arcade Comedy Theater; live music (capped pped by a ticketed Crawl After Dark concert ncert with jazz/soul vocalist Chantae Cann); and much more. BO 5:30-10 p.m. m. Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 6 or www.trustarts.org

COMEDY Starting with his early days on Def Comedy Jam — where he was credited with coining the phrase “booty call” — Bill Bellamy has spent some three decades and counting as a comic star of stage and screen. Good-natured, with rubbery physicality, he charms with bits like one on childhood games: “We use to really believe when we played freeze tag we was frozen. Kids be, ‘What’s wrong with that boy?’ ‘He froze. That’s t’s a deep freeze, he ain’t gonna CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{ART BY RYOICHI KUROKAWA AND NOVI_SAD}

be able to get out of that for two hours!’” Bellamy does standup at the Pittsburgh Improv for five shows starting tonight. BO 7:30 p.m. 166 E. Bridge St., West Homestead. $25. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

EVENT: Lift

Every Voice: Resonating Music, Words, and Legacy,

STAGE Daniel Beaty returns to the August Wilson Center tonight for his new one-man performance. In Emergency, Beaty — known for solo works including Mr. Joy and Breath & Imagination — portrays 40 different characters and their reactions to an event that shakes New York like never before: the appearance of an 18th-century slave ship in front of the Statue of Liberty. Using transformative poetry, song and story-telling, Beaty explores what it means to be free. An audience Q&A with Beaty follows. LO 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25-35. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Heinz Hall, Downtown CRITIC: Anita Perry, 63, a retired teacher from Manchester WHEN: Sat.,

Jan. 20

The performers were fabulous, the symphony was fabulous, the choir was fabulous. This was a tribute. A tribute to August Wilson, in addition to being a tribute to those whose shoulders we stand on, particularly those in Pittsburgh. It was touching, especially the readings, the music, the a capella, and the performance of “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” It brings a lot of memories back — not necessarily things that I’ve experienced, but the history that I’m aware of. It was all truly touching. It was great to see so many people out. I saw a lot of young people, and I think that’s good because there’s too many young people who don’t know anything about our history. It was important that there were so many young women both performing and in the audience. The [tickets] were a birthday gift from my daughter for my husband’s birthday. I hope the symphony continues [doing this], I really do.

saturday 01.27

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STAGE A mermaid, a bowling alley, a secret underground lab, imaginary swordfights, a giant banana and the giant gorilla to go with it — three actors and a truckload of props get into a mess of shenanigans in The 13-Story Treehouse. The show, by Australia’s CDP Theatre Producers, adapts Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton’s popular children’s book with three energetic actors, puppetry, music and animation. The family show receives three performances, today and tomorrow at the August Wilson Center, courtesy of the EQT Bridge Series. BO 2 and 7 p.m. Also 11 a.m. Sun., Jan. 28. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-50-12. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

ART Come celebrate BoxHeart Gallery’s anniversary with the opening reception of its exhibition Almost 17 and #werestillhere. BoxHeart was founded in 1998; its gallery on Liberty Avenue was purchased in 2001, and it’s been hosting artists and their art ever since. Now, co-founders Nicole Capozzi and Joshua Hogan want to mark their nearly17-year anniversary with a three-floor exhibition showcasing

< Fri., Jan. 26: Bill Bellamy

^ Fri., Jan. 26: Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District

more than 60 artists both familiar and new. LO Opening reception: 6 p.m. Exhibit continues through Feb. 23. BoxHeart Gallery, 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

MUSIC Bringing the Elizabethan era to life is the Baltimore Consort, tonight visiting Synod Hall to perform The Food of Love: Songs, Dances and Fancies for Shakespeare. The consort, founded to perform the instrumental music of Shakespeare’s time, features five instrumentalists on period instruments including lute, cittern, viols and flute, accompanied by two vocalists. The troupe will play songs from plays including Hamlet, Twelfth Night, As You Like It and Romeo and Juliet. The event is presented by Renaissance & Baroque. LO 8 p.m. 125 N. Craig St., Oakland. $10-35. 412-361-2048 or www.rbsp.org

SCREEN Tonight only, the Hollywood Theater hosts a rare 35 mm screening of horror classic Suspiria. The 1977 film follows an American ballerina to a German dance academy where gruesome murders occur, and where the occult is practiced. Suspiria launched Italian filmmaker Dario Argento’s reputation as a master of horror. With its vibrant colors, artful compositions and haunting score (by prog rockers Goblin), the film — whose title means “sighs” — continues to win new admirers. BO 9 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $15. 412-563-0368 or www.thehollywooddormont.org

monday 01.29 WORDS What if slavery and legal segregation were suddenly reinstated in a small town just to put it back on the map? That’s what happens in the new satirical novel by Paul Beatty, The Sellout, which earned the Man Booker Prize and which The Wall Street Journal calls “Swiftian satire of the highest order ... giddy, scathing and dazzling.” Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Ten Evenings series hosts Beatty for a talk at Carnegie Music Hall. LO 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org


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“I’M EXCITED ABOUT PEOPLE KNOWING THAT WE’RE STARTING THIS.”

TASTE OF THE TROPICS {BY AL HOFF} As we slog through winter, our spirits long for lazy days in tropical climes … or even Florida (if it’s stopped snowing there, too). But in lieu of actually picking up and going — the prolonged chill is enervating, after all — perhaps just a vicarious trip via the region’s signature dessert, the key lime pie. It sounds exotic, but it’s simple to make. This is a good time of year to find fresh key limes. They are smaller than a standard lime, and have a distinctly different taste. It’s admittedly a pain to juice them, but the effort is worth it, taste-wise. The next best option is bottled key lime juice. You can use juice from ordinary limes, but this is not a key lime pie. Under no circumstances use any recipe that calls for Jell-O. A related note: Key lime pie has a pale yellow filling; anything bright green should be rejected. Make or buy a graham-cracker crust. Round up the other ingredients: 3 egg yolks, 14-ounce can of sweetened condensed milk, 2/3 cup key lime juice and 1½ teaspoons lime zest (to avoid shredding my knuckles, I use a standard lime for the zest). Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Using a mixer, beat yolks and zest at high speed until fluffy, about five minutes. Add milk and beat another four minutes. Add lime juice and mix only until combined. Pour into crust and bake for 10 minutes, or until set. Cool, then refrigerate. Before serving, top with sweetened whipped cream. See you at the “beach.”

{CP PHOTOS BY KATE HAGERTY}

Instructor Shauna Kearns leads a Sourdough Bread Baking Basics class on Sat., Jan. 20.

CRAFTING FOOD HISTORIES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L the

FEED

The latest fast-casual eatery

Choolaah Indian BBQ opens in East Liberty on Fri., Jan. 26. Super-fans of Indian food can make plans to line up beginning Thu., Jan. 25, because the first 100 guests win a year of free food (52 meals). 6114 Centre Ave. www.choolaah.com

AST FALL, Chatham University

launched The Center for Regional Agriculture, Food and Transformation known as CRAFT, at its Eden Hall campus, in Gibsonia. Connected with the Master of Arts Food Studies program and the Falk School of Sustainability, the center hopes to provide the community with research and information on food systems. “We’ve conceptualized it as an outreach, research and education center that’s a hub for information about regional food systems,” says Cynthia Caul, the outreach and research coordinator. Caul, along with director Alice Julier, project manager Cassandra Malis, and a number of

consultants, part-time employees and students, is working to bring attention to the nascent project. “I’m excited about people knowing that we’re starting this,” says Malis. “While this exists in a lot of other regions, there’s not an oral-history archive focused on food and art in this area.” CRAFT’s approach to gathering and disseminating information will focus on a few different areas and projects. Currently, the center is offering workshops; developing a Western Pennsylvania Foodways Archive; conducting oral histories; and starting to work on food-product development and recipe testing. The center will

be collecting data and conducting its own research, but is also aggregating other research and data on the local food system. “There’s no real home for that right now in this area. We envision ourselves evolving into that,” says Caul. The Grains Project is one of the two focuses, and is now collecting oral histories, historical documents and hosting workshops. Oral-history coordinator Emeran Irby has completed interviews with purveyors like Frankferd Farms and BreadWorks, and workshops like “Sourdough Bread Baking Basics” and “Cooking With Ancient Grains” are quickly selling out. Proceeds from the sourdough classes CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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chefs, students, other researchers and historians. “We’re hoping to have a massive audience,” says Malis. CRAFT hopes workshops, like sourdough-bread baking, will increase community involvement and jumpstart the information exchange between the center and the community. With the growing interest in cooking and foods grown and processed at home, the workshops, taught THE GRAINS PROJECT is already having an by local pros like Kearns, have already impact locally. A group of students, facili- been well received. tated by CRAFT, did product-development Maya Lantigos, a student in the Food research for Tom & Eddie’s, an Oakland Studies Program, who is a butcher by trade, pizza joint. The group worked with the is teaching workshops on sausage-making shop to develop a locally sourced pizza and cutting whole fish. Lantigos, who is crust. “They worked with Weaththe first female fish-cutter trained at erbury Farm to do recipe testing Wholey’s, will teach “Techniques and created a local pizza crust, in Trout.” The workshop will For moreon ti informaRAFT, and now we have a class that’s cover filleting and cooking a about C aft. developing the rest of the whole fish, as part of her thesis visit cr m. pizza,” says Malis. work. Her other workshop “Sauchatha edu. Another ongoing project is sage From Start to Finish” disthe Western Pennsylvania Foodcusses topics, such as meat selecways Archive, which exists to coltion and appropriate grinds, as well lect information about the region’s his- as nutritional information. tory and foodways into a comprehensive In all of its projects, the center’s staff tool. Foodways are the ways in which and volunteers are mindful of how they food intersects with cultural, social and expand. “We haven’t specifically defined economic practices. our region in any concrete terms, because The archive will compile materials what we view as our region changes and such as oral histories, maps and historical shifts based on the project,” says Malis. documents, especially the histories of unCurrently, projects are studying Alderrepresented demographics like wom- legheny County and the 10 surrounding en and ethnic minorities. The archive will counties. Because Western Pennsylvania be open source and publicly accessible to is uniquely positioned to draw from Appathe community. Ideally, this accessibil- lachia, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic, ity can provide information in ways that the region can be varied in its influences aren’t solely academic, making it useful and innovations. “We see our work being to people interested in food and food sys- nationally recognized and being useful tems in the Western Pennsylvania, such as nationally, and yet some projects could be farmers, consumers, food entrepreneurs, close to home as well,” says Malis. C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK:

The planned labels for the distillery’s Parking Chair Vodka (above) and Emeraude Green Absinthe (below)

[ON THE ROCKS]

LAWRENCEVILLE GETS A DISTILLERY

DARK & STORMY

{BY CELINE ROBERTS} AS WE TRUDGE through this cold weather, er,

The Independent Brewing Company 1704 Shady Ave., Squirrel Hill DRINK: Indian-spiced Dark & Stormy INGREDIENTS: Masala-infused Indian rum, Bermuda rum, lime, house-made ginger beer OUR TAKE: Masala adds a nice depth and lingering heat to the already spicy ginger beer. The combination of rums adds a molasses-like sweetness to the drink, while the citrus notes from the lime help to lighten and balance.

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eit’s nice to think ahead to what new dele lights await later in 2018. Lawrenceville ne Distilling Co., set to open this fall, is one such bright light in the distance. The future distillery is the result of a odeep affection for absinthe held by coot founders Dave Harmon and Joe DeGroot ad (who is also the distiller). “I think I had ve my first bottle in 2010. Joe and I have ds, always enjoyed hunting down new brands, at and there’s so much misinformation that ch exists around that product. The research of it and learning about it — because we h both appreciate it — led us down the path e,” of distilling and discovering our recipe,” says Harmon. e, Absinthe is a spirit flavored with anise, efennel, wormwood and other herbs. Beed cause of a compound in wormwood called n thujone, which is classified as a poison in ihigh doses, absinthe has enjoyed a notorious reputation for causing hallucinations, since it became popular in the late-19th and early 20th century. However, absinthe contains very small amounts of thujone,

d such hh ll i ti h i b and hallucinations have since been attributed to alcohol poisoning from over-consumption. Harmon and DeGroot are confident

about their own recipe, and want to educate drinkers and debunk myths about absinthe by making a high quality product. “It’s really good. It’s classic, bright and herbaceous; all of the things green absinthe should be,” says Harmon. The pair intends to teach people the appropriate way to drink absinthe, which involves mixing it with water and sugar in a process called “louching.” The oils emulsify with the water and create a cloudy texture. “Drinking it straight is like drinking lighter fluid,” says Harmon, laughing. In the former machine shop at 5410 Harrison Ave., in Upper Lawrenceville where the distillery will set up, Harmon and D DeGroot have plans for a tasting room and a an herb garden. “We started with the idea o of beginning with absinthe,” says Harmon. B But after more thought, they knew they w would need to start with something that w would help pay for development. Thus, th they chose to make a vodka they’ve dubbed “P “Parking Chair Vodka” in an homage to th that Pittsburgh tradition. Parking Chair V Vodka is made from French winter wheat th that Harmon and DeGroot selected beca cause they feel it makes for vodka with the so softest texture. They are also planning on re releasing a gin. Ultimately though, Harm mon and DeGroot want to be absinthe guys a and are looking forward to serving theirs to the community. The pair is also excited to join the ra ranks of other local distillers whom they a admire. “There’s an allure to being part o of the Pittsburgh craft-distillation scene, b because so much of it is amazing and aw award-winning,” says Harmon. “Pittsb burgh is generally very supportive of loca cal product, and we felt very supported by bartenders here and the USBG [United States Bartenders Guild] community.” www.lawrencevilledistilling.com CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Check out City Paper ’s Blogh for local food news and assorted tidbits. www.pghcitypaper.com Maggie’s Farm Rum Distillery

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer

3212A Smallman St., Strip District

Shiner Bock, Spoetzl Brewery

DRINK: Smooth Sailing INGREDIENTS: Maggie’s Farm white rum, house-made ginger beer, lime cordial OUR TAKE: It lives up to its name by being smooth and slightly sweet. Lime cordial amps up the citrus flavors, and ginger adds a little bit of zing.

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$6.50/16 oz. “It’s a Texas-style lager. It’s like their Yuengling. It’s a staple beer that’s not too heavy and goes great with barbecue. The hops are earthy and traditional. The salt of the barbecue would bring out the flavor in the beer.” RECOMMENDED BY MATT MEYERS, BARTENDER AT PORK & BEANS

Shiner Bock is available at Pork & Beans, Downtown.

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BANK STATEMENT

THE FIRST BATTLE WAS A SUCCESS, BUT THE WAR — NOT SUCH AN EASY STORY TO TELL

{BY AL HOFF} Christian Gudegast’s cops-and-robbers actioner Den of Thieves takes place in Los Angeles, which, according to a title card, is the “bank robbery capital of the world.” No surprise then when the opening scene is an armored bank van getting taken in a hail of gunfire. But wait: The van is empty!

Action man: Gerard Butler

It’s pretty easy to guess why some criminals are stealing an armored truck. It’s also obvious that the disheveled, wise-cracking crew from the Sheriffs’ Department, headed up by Big Nick (Gerard Butler), is gonna break a lot of rules to solve whatever the bad guys are up to. And if you’re paying attention, you can even spot the Giant Clue in the first reel that sets up the film’s final scenes. Before that, gang leader Merrimen (Pablo Schreiber) lays out a plan, which will sound familiar to fans of heist movies: to hit the “bank for banks … the only bank that’s never been robbed,” or as most people call it, the Federal Reserve. It’s heavily guarded and fortified, but for the right group of never-saydie masterminds, it will be a cakewalk. Meanwhile, Nick has recruited Donnie (O’Shea Jackson Jr.), a driver for Merrimen’s gang, to act as a mole. The takedown of the Federal Reserve is the film’s best part, as the crew deploys its various disguises, feints and trickery. It’s more entertaining than the lengthy set-up — essentially a clichéd pissing match between the two alpha males — or the never-ending, deafening gun battle that dominates the film’s back third. As befitting Southern California, there is a racially diverse collection of cops and robbers, but this is an all-male affair: The few women barely function as second-tier plot devices. Even more hyper-masculinity is established by the gigantic cartoon-sized muscles many of the men lug around, as well as a steady stream of gay-panic jokes. Bulked-up men firing automatic weapons at each other will always appeal to some viewers, but Den’s running time of two hours and 20 minutes is way too long. Why, you could slip out and rob a bank yourself, and still have two hours of film to get through.

Chris Hemsworth dodges an explosion.

DUSTY HISTORY {BY AL HOFF}

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HATEVER HAS been going on in

Afghanistan is now the United States’ longest war, but the conflict hasn’t generated many related movies. The best of them were grim documentaries, and the oddest was about a dog. Chalk it up to public disengagement, an unclear purpose or, most likely, a lack of easily encapsulated victories. So the revelation of a previously classified mission that was tailor-made for Hollywood — manly men go into danger zone and make quick work of bad guys, then leave — surely held appeal. But it’s 2018, and 12 Strong, based on Doug Stanton’s book, Horse Soldiers, about events of 16 years ago, feels too-little-toolate for the rah-rah crowd. And, as directed by Nicolai Fuglsig, too uninspired for fans of war movies, wherever they’re set. There’s quite a long set-up, including a good 15 minutes about Sept. 11. (They told us to never forget, and we haven’t.) Then, in October 2001, military personnel set up on the Uzbekistan/Afghanistan border, and prepare to take out Taliban strongholds. A

AHOFF@ PGHC ITY PA PE R.CO M

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dozen Army Special Forces are assigned to clear out the town of Mazar-e-Sharif, in the mountains … on horseback. The plot is basically a budget Western, in which the bad guys are trapped in a canyon, then attacked from above. Here, the villains are black-clad Taliban, and the white hats are Army guys, loaded up with 100 pounds of high-tech gear and plopped on horses.

12 STRONG DIRECTED BY: Nicolai Fuglsig STARRING: Chris Hemsworth, Michael Shannon, Michael Peña

The dialogue is turgid hero-speak — “There’s no playbook for this mission, we’re gonna have to write it ourselves” — broken up by the sort of joshing that is movie shorthand for male bonding. Not that you’ll really care — not even the stars get any character development, and the cast breaks down like so: Thor-in-fatigues (Chris Hemsworth), Michael Shannon (in save-

power mode), a Latino guy (Michael Peña), a black guy (Trevante Rhodes), the guy with the pretty hair, the guy with weird glasses, seven other he-men and winsome native child. 12 Strong sets up “tense” situations — high-altitude helicopter ride, arduous landscape, impending winter weather — that wind up not being so. Sure, there’s some noisy gun battles with the enthusiastic, well-armed Taliban, but our side also has a B-52 dropping bombs. (Jerry Bruckheimer is a producer, and unsurprisingly, there are scenes where things just explode because it looks cool.) After the mythic good-vs.-bad narrative is exhausted, the film includes this signpost to reality, delivered by a battleweary Afghan commander: “There are no right choices here — this is Afghanistan, graveyard of empires … so Americans will become just another tribe here: Cowards if you leave, enemies if you stay.” So, the first battle was a success, but the war — not such an easy story to tell. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


in their mayhem, but it’s the long stretches of inaction — when the gangs have retreated to re-group — that are most creepy. A solid cast of low-key actors and a weird electronic score (composed by Carpenter) make this low-budget work watchable. The re-casting of the Western isolation ethos to the inner city requires some contorted plot devices, but overall it’s effective. That the protagonists are alone and under siege in a big hostile American city seems real, at least in perception. Jan. 26-28 and Jan. 30-Feb. 1. Row House Cinema (AH)

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NEW FREAK SHOW. After his beloved (but boozy) mom (Bette Midler) goes to rehab, teenager Billy Bloom (Alex Lawther) relocates to his estranged dad’s mansion, located somewhere in the South. There, Billy attends a fancy high school (curiously named for Ulysses S. Grant), where conformity and football reign. Undaunted, Billy, who loves glam and crossdressing, arrives for his first day of school dressed as Boy George, circa 1984. Unsurprisingly, he is tormented and bullied — badly, enough to end up in the hospital. Still, he makes a couple of friends, and somehow, in the face of so many obstacles and broken body parts, decides to take a new, and grander, stand: running for homecoming queen. Most of this coming-of-age film, directed by Trudie Styler, is played for gentle laughs, though there are the expected after-schoolspecial messages about being kind, and being true to yourself, and so on. Lawther, who you might have seen in Black Mirror (“Shut Up and Dance”) or the recent Netflix series The End of the F***ing World, is truly the bright spot in this work. Harris (Al Hoff)

TRENCH 11. Leo Scherman’s new horror thriller takes place during the final days of World War II, in which a small group of Allied forces tunnel their way to a secret bunker where disturbing biochemical experiments are occurring. 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 26, and 7 p.m. Tue., Jan. 30. Hollywood THE GATE. A couple of boys (Stephen Dorff and Louis Tripp), playing in the backyard, unleash a mess of demons in this 1987 film from Tibor Takacs. 2 p.m. Sat., Jan. 27. Hollywood

Freak Show

HOSTILES. In 1892, an Army captain agrees to escort a Cheyenne chief and his family through dangerous territory back to Montana. Christian Bale, Rosamund Pike and Wes Studi star. Starts Fri., Jan. 26 MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE. The adventures of these teenagers trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world wraps up with this actioner. Wes Ball directs. Starts Fri., Jan. 26 MOM AND DAD. If you’re looking for an unrepentantly dark, bat-shit horror comedy, then writer-director Brian Taylor has got one for you. Its shocking premise is rooted in the tiresome trope of parents complaining about their kids and joking about killing them. Here, for some unexplained reason, on an otherwise normal sunny Southern California day, all the parents murder their kids, often in baroque fashion. You won’t be surprised that Taylor taps noted over-actor Nicolas Cage to star as the dad of the highlighted family — and Cage delivers. But so does Selma Blair as Mom, who suffers the most indignities as a parent, before revving up the electric saw. (“It’s called a Sawzall because it saws all,” she explains, while chasing her kids with it.) If you’re open to it — and OK with a lot of violence — it’s an amusing, nasty satire (with some inspired song choices) of those perfect suburban families, and the artificial expectations our culture imposes on mom, dad, the kids and power tools. Starts Fri., Jan. 26. Hollywood (AH)

ONGOING ANIMATION SHOW OF SHOWS. This curated 90-minute program of 16 animated short films from around the world offers some laughs, some gorgeous visuals and a fair amount of reflection on troubled times and assorted anxieties. Among the distressed are the night-shift workers depicted in “The Burden,” a dizzying work from Sweden that travels from odd to profound, with roots in the Hollywood musical. For laughs, there are the relatable everyday disappointments of “Unsatisfying,” the wry British domestic tableau of “The Alan Dimension,” and the candycolored, dialogue-free charms of “Gokuro-

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Black Girl

Hostiles

sama,” set in a Japanese mall. Basketball fans will note “Dear Basketball,” Kobe Bryant’s ode to the sport that defined his life; and “Domestic Bees,” a clever four-dimensional visual take on intersecting lives. In the midst of the new films, it was a restored short from 50 years ago that felt most relevant: “Hangman,” based on a poem by Maurice Ogden, is a gorgeously depicted version of the “first, they came for the other guy, so I did nothing” warning. Through Thu., Jan. 25. Hollywood (AH)

PA minor-league hockey team. The Charlestown Chiefs have got a cranky, profane coach (Paul Newman) and an on-ice assault known as the Hanson brothers. Set amid the gloomy winter of mid-1970s economic malaise, this film should resonate with today’s depressed audiences, yet still provide some much-needed belly laughs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 24. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 (AH)

THE COMMUTER. In Jaume Collet-Serra’s absurd but relatively entertaining thriller, Liam Neeson plays an everyman — a financially stressed family man who is just trying to get to his suburban home from Manhattan on the Metro North train. For reasons too dumb and complicated to explain here, he winds up spending the normally uneventful journey variously interrogating, punching and rescuing his fellow passengers. It gives Neeson plenty of time to roam the cars, sorting out red herrings, while also worrying about his wife and his 401(k); first he’s panicked, then he’s out for justice! He may be a mildmannered insurance man, but don’t count him out when it comes time to jump train cars. The first half of the film is better than the second — it sets up a recognizable character and lets him work through a moral quandary. Then it’s Neeson Action Time, and a series of increasingly ridiculous set-ups and easily guessed plot feints. It’s also about 15 minutes too long, but not bad for a cold winter night, if you like to see Neeson get shit done. (AH)

REPERTORY SLAPSHOT. Greatest movie ever about hockey. George Roy Hill’s rough-and-tumble 1977 comedy follows the travails of a struggling Western

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CHRISTINE. It’s always a risk when you get a used car, but this one — an evil Plymouth Fury with a mind of its own — is a real “buyer beware.” John Carpenter directs this 1983 adaptation of Stephen King’s horror story. Jan. 26-Feb. 1. Row House Cinema THE THING. A bunch of feckless pot-smokers holed up in some Antarctic “research” facility are visited by a bad alien. John Carpenter’s 1982 remake of the 1951 sci-fi classic lacks much of the earlier film’s subtlety; here, gross-out effects mute any horror. This Thing is like a multi-headed demented slug. The scenes where the men — unsure which of them has morphed into the Thing — freak out on each other are better. Jan. 26-Feb. 1. Row House Cinema (AH) BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA. A truck driver (Kurt Russell) gets drawn into a centuries-old war in San Francisco’s Chinatown, in this 1986 actioner from John Carpenter. Jan. 26-Feb. 1. Row House Cinema ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13. Johns Carpenter’s 1976 drama is a contemporary update on the old Western Rio Bravo. A couple of convicts, cops and one unlucky citizen are held hostage overnight in an abandoned central Los Angeles police station by violent gangs. The gang members are ruthless

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SUSPIRIA. For positively grotesque ballet, Dario Argento’s 1977 shock-horror classic is the ticket. An American student (Jessica Harper) at a German dance academy finds mysterious and bloody goings-on. After an opening bang with the brutal murder of a student, the freak-outs just keep coming: a maggot attack, a weird indoor camp-out, a blind man attacked, footsteps in the hallway. Colored lights, bizarre theatrical sets, one of the creepiest movie scores ever and a pervasive sense of the hallucinatory keep Suspiria compelling even as some of its fabled gore scenes have paled with time — though the falling-into-a-pit-of-concertinawire scene has few equals. In various languages, with subtitles. To be screened in 35 mm. 9 p.m. Sat., Jan. 27. Hollywood (AH) THE MIDNIGHT MAN. Never ever play that mysterious game found in the attic. Travis Zariwny directs this 2016 horror thriller which features Robert Englund and Louise Linton (now the infamous designer-clad wife of U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin). 6 p.m. Sun., Jan. 28, and 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 31. Hollywood HIDDEN FORTRESS. Two poor farmers on the run join a general (Toshiro Mifune) who is seeking a cache of gold and also hopes to free a princess, in Akira Kurosawa’s lightly comic samurai action film. The 1960 film has been cited by George Lucas as an inspiration for Star Wars. In Japanese, with subtitles. 6 p.m. Sun., Jan. 28. Regent Square VIDAR THE VAMPIRE. In this recent Norwegian comedy from Thomas Aske Berg and Fredrik Waldeland, a Christian farmer is transformed into a bloodsucker. In Norwegian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Mon., Jan. 29, and 7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 1. Hollywood BLACK GIRL. Ousmane Sembène’s terse and pointed 1966 portrait of a young black African working as a maid for a French family is widely considered an historical landmark: the Senegalese filmmaker’s first feature was also the first indigenous production in sub-Saharan Africa. Its French-language title, La Noire de …, pungently suggests the film’s anti-colonial critique, but while it’s a raw work from a still-emerging talent, it’s too sharp to be considered a tract. In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Mon., Jan. 29. Alphabet City, 40 W. North St., North Side. Free. www.alphabetcity.org (Bill O’Driscoll) CONSTRUCTING THE TERRORIST THREAT. Deepa Kumar’s hour-long film examines how Muslims have become the predominant face of terror in U.S. news, even as more terror attacks are carried out by white extremists. Screens as part of Duquesne University’s series of recent documentaries that highlight human-rights issues. 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 31. Room 105, College Hall, Duquesne campus, Uptown. 412-396-6415. Free

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THEY LIE, CHEAT STEAL AND WIN. YEP, THAT PRETTY MUCH SUMS IT UP.

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY ALEX GORDON}

JAN. 24, 1963 Muhammad Ali faces Charles Powell at the Civic Arena in a televised 10round boxing match. Ali predicted a knockout in the fifth round, but would only need three to take Powell down. While maybe not a household name like “The People’s Champ,” Powell was no small fry, with a career boxing record of 25-11-3, as well as professional runs in both the MLB and NFL.

JAN. 26, 2006 AND JAN. 25, 2009 It’s a big week in Franco Harris statue history. The 1972 “immaculate reception” — in which the Steelers halfback scooped up a deflected QB Terry Bradshaw pass for a game-winning touchdown — is immortalized with statues erected at the Pittsburgh International Airport in 2006 and the Heinz History Center in 2009.

Right-fielder Dave Parker, a.k.a. “The Cobra,” signs a $5 million/five-year contract with the Pirates. While paltry by today’s standards, it’s the first-ever $1-million-per-year contract in any professional sport. In the first season of that contract, the Pirates win the World Series.

Dave Parker

JAN. 26, 1979

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

The Cleveland Browns at Heinz Field in 2017

JAN. 26, 1997

[THE CHEAP SEATS]

Penguins center Mario Lemieux scores four goals in one period against the Montreal Canadiens. It’s the 42nd hat trick for Mr. 66, the penultimate in his 17-year career.

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JAN. 27, 1955 Mount Washington native Johnny Unitas is drafted by his hometown Steelers. Armed with a “haircut you can set your watch to,” as Grandpa Simpson once said, Unitas goes on to a prolific career, including three MVPs and a Super Bowl win with the Baltimore Colts.

JAN. 30, 1980 The Penguins switch its official team colors from blue and white to black and gold. The Boston Bruins are not thrilled.

JAN. 31, 2013 Homestead native and unofficial nicest man in Pittsburgh, Steelers quarterback Charlie Batch, wins the Whizzer White award. The designation highlights NFL players committed to humanitarian and community philanthropy. Other Steelers who have won the award include Andy Russell, Rocky Bleier and Franco Harris. ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

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VERY WEEK during the NFL season, power rankings are released. Pointless arguments ensue over whether an 8-4 team is really better than one that’s 9-3. These rankings are fleeting and only a small picture of how a team is performing. But I’ve always believed that if you’re going to do something pointless, do it right. So now, after days of extensive research, I’m proud to present the Cheap Seats 21st-Century Power Rankings. That’s right, we traveled all the way back to the year 2000, a time when you could *69 a

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018

Chi Chi’s for directions to one of its notyet-to-be-destroyed-by-an-e-coli-outbreak establishments. Or, you could fire up your computer and wait seven minutes through a series of buzzes and pings until CompuServe got you online. This list isn’t made up of fake news or speculation; these rankings are based solely on numbers. Each team is listed with the number of regular-season wins followed by playoff victories in parentheses. The top team and bottom team are pretty easy to guess, but you will see a few surprises in between.

32. Cleveland Browns: 83 (0). They had the same number of wins going into this season. They’ve had just one playoff appearance this century, and the Steelers had the honor of knocking them out. 31. Detroit Lions: 105 (0). Nobody is more grateful for the Browns than the Lions. Unlike the Browns, they have a decent quarterback in Matt Stafford; like Cleveland, however, they’ve also suffered a winless season. 30. Houston Texans: 110 (3). If the rankings were for dumbest name, they would probably just edge out the Browns.


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The Jacksonville Jaguars at Heinz Field early this month

Give them credit though for three playoff wins and the fact that there are two teams with fewer wins, even though the Texans didn’t exist until 2002. 29. Oakland Raiders: 114 (4). Just lose, baby. The once-proud franchise has been deteriorating along with the worst stadium in football. The next stop for this traveling circus will be Las Vegas. 28. Jacksonville Jaguars: 116 (2). The Jags were arguably better in the ’90s when they were just babies. But things are looking up. They almost made it to the Super Bowl a year after going 3-13. 27. Washington: 117 (1). The NFL’s worst owner, combined with the most offensive team name, accounts for the karma this junk organization receives. Just like the other people in Washington, they throw a lot of money at problems to try and fix them. They do have one playoff win, but they’ve spent more than $1 billion to get it. 26. Buffalo Bills: 121 (0). Still no playoff wins, but the future looks mediocre, and they’ll take it. A playoff loss to Jacksonville was the most exciting thing to happen in Buffalo since they lost all those Super Bowls. 25. St. Louis/L.A. Rams: 122 (3). They won it all in 1999, so they got the shaft a little bit in these rankings. But, so did fans in St. Louis who saw their semi-beloved team head back to California. 24. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: 126 (3). The best one-hit-wonders since Dexy’s Midnight Runners. Their Super Bowl win in 2002 was the last time they won any playoff game. 23. Arizona Cardinals: 129 (5). One of the all-time worst franchises in any sport is turning the corner. They went from 1948 to 1998 without a playoff appearance. “Pittsburgh West” is now

churning out respectable teams and even reached the Super Bowl, only to have Santonio Holmes’ touchdown catch in the corner of the end zone squash their impossible dream. 22. San Francisco 49ers: 131 (6). They haven’t fallen as far as Washington or Oakland but the best team of the 1980s has been struggling, except for a 2012 Super Bowl appearance. 21. San Diego/L.A. Chargers: 136 (4). Good players haven’t been a problem for the team. LaDainian Tomlinson, Drew Brees and Philip Rivers have all put on the uniform. However, putting together good teams has been more of a problem. 20. Cincinnati Bengals: 137 (0). Ohio’s best team is in a four-way tie for most regular-season wins with the next three teams. But, of course, the Bungles are ranked lower because they have zero playoff wins despite winning four conference championships. 19. Miami Dolphins: 137 (1). The fish are just slightly better than the Bengals with that one playoff win. On the plus side, they are the best team in Florida. They never really recovered from Dan Marino’s retirement. 18. Chicago Bears: 137 (3). Da Bears’ only highlight of the new century was Rex Grossman leading them to a Super Bowl loss against the Indy Colts. 17. NY Jets: 137 (6). It’s surprising that the Jets have won that many playoff games, more than 17 other teams. In New York, though, they’re still Garfunkel to the Giants’ Simon. 16. Tennessee Titans: 142 (3). Stuck in the middle despite playing in one of the greatest Super Bowls of all time. The Music City Miracle is their Immaculate Reception. Well, except for all of the success that followed. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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NFL POWER RANKINGS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

The Kansas City Chiefs at Heinz Field in 2016

15. Kansas City Chiefs: 142 (1). It was another one-and-done for the Chiefs this season. Their only playoff win was against Houston in Texas. Their last home playoff win was orchestrated by Joe Montana in 1993. Great googly-moogly. 14. Carolina Panthers: 145 (8). The Panthers have seven more playoff wins than the Chiefs and two conference titles. Unfortunately for them, they ran into Peyton Manning and Tom Brady when they finally made it to the big game. 13. Minnesota Vikings: 147 (3). They go berserk in the regular season and run out of steam in the playoffs. In fact, it was like they didn’t even show up for the Jan. 21 NFC Championship against Philadelphia. The ghost of that missed Gary Anderson field goal still curses them. 12. Atlanta Falcons: 149 (6). The new Kings of Choke will always be remembered for their Super Bowl collapse last year. 11. New York Giants: 149 (10). When they go to the playoffs, they make the most of it. Every football fan that hates the Patriots so much must give some love for the men in blue. Without the Giants, New England would obnoxiously be bragging about their seven Lombardi trophies, while preparing to go for their eighth. 10. Dallas Cowboys: 150 (2). When they go to the playoffs, they make the least of it. They are in the top 10 in regular-season wins this century, which is surprising. Conversely, they have as many playoff wins as the Jaguars, which is hilarious. 9. New Orleans Saints: 157 (8). Drew Brees doesn’t get enough credit as he climbs and climbs the NFL record book.

His Super Bowl win in the ’09 season ensures he will never have to pay for a drink on Bourbon Street as long as he lives. 8. Seattle Seahawks: 161 (13). They’ve scored Super Bowl appearances from both conferences, winning one. This organization has gone from nobodies to somebodies this century. Only three teams have won more playoff games this century. 7. Baltimore Ravens: 166 (15). We hate them, but 15 playoff wins and two Super Bowls this century means we also have to respect them. 6. Denver Broncos: 169 (7). Fewest playoff wins of the top nine teams. But they have a Super Bowl and did use Tim Tebow to knock us out of the playoffs one year. 5. Green Bay Packers: 178 (12). Greenfield’s own Mike McCarthy has a lot to do with the constant success of this proud organization. Going from Brett Favre to Aaron Rodgers helped a little too. 4. Indianapolis Colts: 180 (12). The Manning/Dungy years were very kind to Indy. Lots of playoff games and lots of playoff losses, but they did win it once. 3. Philadelphia Eagles: 182 (11). They are the least successful successful team. They are third in regular-season wins; they have 11 playoff wins, but no rings. They get another shot at it on Feb. 4. 2. Pittsburgh Steelers: 188 (15). Three head coaches in 49 years is still one of the most incredible stats in sports. Your Steelers know how to draft great players almost every single year. 1. New England Patriots: 224 (26). They lie, cheat, steal and win. Yep, that pretty much sums it up. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR The Westmoreland Museum of American Art is seeking a part time Public Programs Coordinator to implement programs that enrich the museum’s mission, permanent collection, exhibitions and American Art. Programs would include lectures, special events, public and group tours and community outreach. For more details, visit thewestmoreland.org/ opportunities. To apply, please send letter of interest and resume to: careers@ thewestmoreland.org. The Westmoreland is an EOE.

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ACROSS 1. NSFW material, slangily 5. Counter money 8. Size up 14. “Ulysses” setting 15. Measurement of arm strength 16. “That’s enough outta you” 17. “Frozen” food #1 19. She plays Joyce on “Stranger Things” 20. Food drive donation 21. Appear as 23. One in a litter or one who uses litter 24. “Frozen” food #2 (okay, a drink) 28. Babe 29. “We’re just talking about technology” document, briefly 30. The Queen of Scat 31. Poems about ancient warriors 33. Singular figure 35. Open up the toothpaste tube 39. “Frozen” food #3 43. ESPN news 44. Truckload 45. Skechers rival 46. Nights before 49. Olympics powerhouse 51. Uses Slack, maybe

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018

52. “Frozen” food #4 57. First NHL player to record 100 assists in a season 58. Unengaging way to teach 59. Author McEwan 60. Opening notice 62. “Frozen” food #5 67. Exact payment for 68. Smack 69. Kylo Ren’s mom 70. Fit (inside of) 71. Raised RRs 72. Looked over

DOWN 1. Nighttime cover 2. Seek office 3. Maker of the Fluxus film “Eyeblink” (sure beats another John Lennon-related clue) 4. Latest release for someone doesn’t stream or have a turntable 5. Katy Perry or Taylor Swift, say 6. Account that earned me 21.3% last year: Abbr. 7. Old hat 8. In addition to 9. It can get you up 10. Father-___ talk 11. Period part 12. Ten Commandments site 13. Washington, e.g.

18. He might become a queen 22. Vane dir. 24. Meteorological tool 25. Kagan of the court 26. PopPop’s partner 27. Noted holiday cookie eater 28. Deep State machinery: Abbr. 32. Flip tune 34. Amphibian 36. Honda compact 37. “Naruto Shippuden” genre 38. Vijay Singh won two of them, briefly 40. Bargaining chip

41. Hedonistic man 42. Walking tall? 47. Worn down 48. Hulka’s rank in “Stripes”: Abbr. 50. Somewhat 52. Cedar Rapids resident 53. Have a jones for 54. Piscivorous birds 55. Queso base 56. “Quit hitting me!” 61. “The Librarians” channel 63. Stuff to dip bread in 64. Driving reversal 65. Knot up 66. Bummed {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.24-01.31

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The pawpaw is a tasty fruit that blends the flavors of mango, banana and melon. But you rarely find it in grocery stores. One reason is that the fruit ripens very fast after being picked. Another is that the pollination process is complicated. In response to these issues, a plant scientist named Neal Peterson has been trying to breed the pawpaw to be more commercially viable. Because of his work, cultivated crops have finally begun showing up at some farmers’ markets. I’d like to see you undertake metaphorically similar labors in 2018, Aquarius. I think you’ll have good luck at developing rough potentials into more mature forms of expression. You’ll have skill at turning unruly raw materials into more useful resources. Now is a great time to begin.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): An iceberg is a huge chunk of ice that has cracked away from a glacier and drifted off into the open sea. Only 9 percent of it is visible above the waterline. The underwater part, which is most of the iceberg, is basically invisible. You can’t know much about it just by looking at the top. This is an apt metaphor for life itself. Most everyone and everything we encounter is 91 percent mysterious or hidden or inaccessible to our conscious understanding. That’s the weird news, Pisces. The good news is that during the next three weeks you will have an unprecedented ability to get better acquainted with the other 91 percent of anything or anyone you choose to explore.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Anders Haugen competed for the U.S. as a ski jumper in the 1924 Winter Olympics. Although he was an accomplished athlete who had previously set a world record for distance, he won no medals at the games. But wait! Fifty years later, a sports historian discovered that there had been a scoring mistake back in 1924. In fact, Haugen had done well enough to win the bronze medal. The mistake was rectified, and he finally got his long-postponed award. I foresee a comparable development happening in your life, Aries. Recognition or appreciation you deserved to have received some time ago will finally come your way.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1899, Sobhuza II became King of Swaziland even though he was less than five months old. He kept his job for the next 82 years, and along the way managed to play an important role when his nation gained independence from the colonial rule of the United Kingdom. These days you may feel a bit like Sobhuza did when he was still in diapers, Taurus: not sufficiently prepared or mature for the greater responsibilities that are coming your way. But just as he received competent help in his early years from his uncle and grandmother, I suspect you’ll receive the support you’ll need to ripen.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In my ideal world, dancing and singing wouldn’t be luxuries practiced primarily by professionals. They would be regular occurrences in our daily routines. We’d dance and sing whenever we needed a break from the numbing trance. We’d whirl and hum to pass the time. We would greet each other with an interpretative movement and a little tune. In schools, dance and song would be a standard part of the curriculum — as important as math and history. That’s my utopian dream, Gemini. What’s yours? In accordance with the astrological omens, I urge you to identify the soul medicine you’d love to incorporate into your

everyday regimen. Then go ahead and incorporate it! It’s time for you to get more aggressive about creating the world you want to live in.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Psychology pioneer Carl Jung believed that most of our big problems can never be fully solved. And that’s actually a good thing. Working on them keeps us lively, in a state of constant transformation. It ensures we don’t stagnate. I generally agree with Jung’s high opinion of our problems. We should indeed be grateful for the way they impel us to grow. However, I think that’s irrelevant for you right now. Why? Because you have an unprecedented opportunity to solve and graduate from a major longrunning problem. So no, don’t be grateful for it. Get rid of it. Say goodbye to it forever.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Between now and March 21, you will be invited, encouraged and pushed to deepen your understanding of intimate relationships. You will have the chance to learn much, much more about how to create the kind of togetherness that both comforts and inspires you. Will you take advantage of this eight-week opportunity? I hope so. You may imagine that you have more pressing matters to attend to. But the fact is that cultivating your relationship skills would transform you in ways that would best serve those other pressing matters.

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The giant panda is a bear native to China. In the wild, its diet is 99 percent bamboo. But bamboo is not an energy-rich food, which means the creature has to compensate by consuming 20 to 30 pounds of the stuff every day. Because it’s so busy gathering its sustenance, the panda doesn’t have time to do much socializing. I mention this, Scorpio, because I want to offer up the panda as your anti-power animal for the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you should have a diversified approach to getting your needs met — not just in regards to food, but in every other way as well. Variety is not just the spice of life; it’s the essence.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re the star of the “movie” that endlessly unfolds in your imagination. There may be a number of other lead actors and actresses, but few if any have your luster and stature. You also have a supporting cast, as well as a full comple-

ment of extras. To generate all the adventure you need, your story needs a lot of dramatis personae. In the coming weeks, I suggest that you be alert for certain minor characters who are primed to start playing a bigger role in your narrative. Consider the possibility of inviting them to say and do more to advance the plot.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Thirty-five miles per hour is typically the highest speed attained by the U.S. Navy’s Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. That’s not very fast. On the other hand, each ship’s engine generates 190 megawatts, enough to provide the energy needs of 140,000 houses, and can go more than 20 years without refueling. If you don’t mind, I’m going to compare you to one of those aircraft carriers during the next four weeks. You may not be moving fast, but you will have maximum stamina and power. Imagine that you’re still alive in 2090. What’s your life like? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

get your yoga on!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In December, mass protests broke out in Mashhad, Iran’s second-largest city. Why? The economy had been gradually worsening. Inflation was slowly but surely exacting a toll. Unemployment was increasing. But one of the immediate triggers for the uprising was a 40 percent hike in the price of eggs. It focused the Iranian people’s collective angst and galvanized a dramatic response. I’m predicting a comparable sequence in your personal future, Virgo. A specific irritant will emerge, motivating you to stop putting up with trends that have been subtly bothering you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the late 1980s, Budweiser used a bull terrier to promote its Bud Light beer in commercials. The dog, who became mega-famous, was presented as a rich macho party animal named Spuds MacKenzie. The ad campaign was successful, boosting sales 20 percent. But the truth was that the actor playing Spuds was a female dog whose owners called her Evie. To earn money, the poor creature, who was born under the sign of Libra, was forced to assume a false identity. To honor Evie’s memory, and in alignment with current astrological omens, I urge you human Libras to strip away any layers of false identity you’ve been pressured to acquire. Be your Real Self — to the max.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My father left my mother abruptly when I was 14 years old, and he hasn’t contacted either of us since. It was a crushing blow for her, and she retreated from the world. She was never bitter about it, but it was devastating. She lost the love of her life for no apparent reason and was left completely alone, except for me. We have both done our best to forget about him. We were extremely close for the next four years and actually slept in the same bed every night. Eventually, we began doing something that most people would consider evil but neither of us has ever regretted. It was just something that happened. And it wasn’t something that just happened once — it went on for two years and ended only when I left to go to university. I haven’t thought about this for years, and it is something my mother and I have never discussed. She has since remarried and seems perfectly fine. But even today, we sometimes send each other friendly messages that are vaguely suggestive. The problem is I mentioned it to my wife recently and she went ballistic. She called me and my mother sick and moved into another bedroom and refuses to have sex with me. I wish I had never mentioned it, but it was part of a truth-or-dare session we were having. This has been the situation for the last three months. I have finally lost my patience and I am thinking of leaving. I have never cheated on my wife or hurt her, either physically or emotionally, and I have supported her financially while she studies at university. I have mentioned going to a counselor, but she refuses and claims that she is married to a monster and that no woman would want me. We don’t have any children — so if I were to leave, I wouldn’t be disrupting an innocent’s life. Do you have any advice?

— the son begins to feel responsible for his mother’s well-being and emotional support. The son becomes ‘parentified’ and is treated by his mother as a substitute husband. Occasionally, this close relationship between a mother and her son evolves into a sexual relationship, and the substitute husband becomes her lover as well. The situation described in this letter sounds exactly like that. And while I’m glad this man believes he has not been affected by this boundary violation, [the fact that he and his mother are] sending suggestive messages to each other may suggest otherwise.” Dr. Miletski prefers not to use terms like “abuse” or “trauma” unless the person involved uses those terms themselves — which you didn’t, TRUTHS, but I’m going to go ahead and use them. Here goes: You say you have no regrets, and you don’t mention feeling traumatized by the experience, but the absence of trauma doesn’t confer some sort of retroactive, after-the-fact immunity on your mother. She is responsible for her actions — actions that were abusive and highly likely to leave you traumatized. “In the mental-health field, we have a growing body of work showing that not everyone who is abused is necessarily traumatized,” said Dr. Kort. “I have seen countless men who have been sexually abused by their mothers who do not label it as abuse because they were not traumatized. But his mother seduced him, dismissing the sexual and emotional needs of a teenage boy. There is no other way to describe this other than abuse, however consensual he may have perceived it to be at the time.” But that was then, TRUTHS. What do you do about your situation now? “Unfortunately, I don’t think his wife will ever be able to put this revelation behind her,” said Dr. Miletski. “I think his best bet is to leave her, move on, and seek therapy. A therapist will help him deal with the emotional upset of the breakup with his wife, as well as process what happened with his mother.” Dr. Kort sees some hope — albeit slim — for your marriage. “To gain empathy and compassion from his wife, TRUTHS should be willing to listen to her concerns, fear and anger,” said Dr. Kort. “He also needs to invite her to have compassion and empathy for the vulnerable position he was in — but he cannot do that until he has some compassion for himself. Untreated, the abuse he suffered from his mother, as well as the loss and grief over his father, could be troubling to his wife and their relationship. Perhaps if he ever has children, the reality of the abuse will hit him. Parents don’t have children to turn them into lovers.” And, once again, people probably shouldn’t reveal incestuous relationships to their current partner during a game of truth-or-dare. You can find Dr. Miletski’s books and learn more about her work at DrMiletski.com. You can find Dr. Kort’s books and learn more about his work at JoeKort.com and on Twitter @drjoekort.

“THERE’S NO WONDER HIS WIFE IS SO UPSET.”

TRUTHFUL REVELATION UNMAKES TWO HAPPY SPOUSES

I’m not a professional counselor, TRUTHS, but I’m gonna climb out on a limb and say that a game of truth-or-dare isn’t the right time to reveal an incestuous sexual relationship with a parent. Dr. Hani Miletski and Dr. Joe Kort, on the other hand, are professionals: Dr. Miletski is a psychotherapist and a sex therapist, and Dr. Kort is a sex and relationship therapist. Both are certified by the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists, and both are authors — Dr. Miletski literally wrote the book on the subject of mother-son incest: Mother-Son Incest: The Unthinkable Broken Taboo Persists. “There’s no wonder his wife is so upset,” said Dr. Miletski. “Sexual relations between mother and son are considered the most taboo form of incest.” Dr. Miletski told me it isn’t uncommon for a woman who has been abandoned by her husband to turn to an adolescent son for emotional comfort. “These women are often very insecure and needy,” said Dr. Miletski. “Unbeknownst to the son — and sometimes to the mother

No way! On the Lovecast, it’s Sarah Silverman!: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018


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POWER TO THE PEOPLE Thousands flood Downtown Pittsburgh for Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s March {CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.24/01.31.2018


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Jan. 24, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 4

Jan. 24, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 4