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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018


FREE GOOD FRIDAYS

EVENTS

Presented by UPMC Health Plan

2.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JENS LEKMAN The Warhol theater Co-presented with WYEP Free parking in The Warhol lot. Tickets $15/$12 members & students

2.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ROSTAM WITH SPECIAL GUEST JOY AGAIN err The Warhol theater o-presented with WYEP Co-presented ee parking in The Warh Wa Free Warhol lot. ckets kets $18/$15 $18/ $18 Tickets members & students

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2.9 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THURSTON MOORE: MUSIC + RADIO RADIEUX: FILM The Warhol theater Co-presented with WYEP Free parking in The Warhol lot. Tickets $25/$20 members & students

2.10 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ROBERT BLACK AND ANDREA PARKINS The Warhol theater Co-presented by the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets $15/$10 students and seniors in advance, $20/$15 students and seniors at the door

2.11 – 1pm VINTAGE VALENTINES WORKSHOP AT ACE HOTEL Ace Hotel Pittsburgh Co-presented with Ace Hotel Pittsburgh Free; Registration is suggested

Each Friday in January – 5-10pm

Enjoy free museum admission, special guest DJs, Gusto & Naeem and a cash bar. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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Port Authority’s Job Perks program now offers

Flexible options for flexible schedules Stored cash value on a ConnectCard is now available through Port Authority’s Job Perks program. In addition to monthly passes, stored cash value may be added incrementally up to $200. It’s a great option if your schedule is flexible or unpredictable and it could save you hundreds of dollars on your taxes. Talk to your employer about signing up today by calling 412.566.5283

Port Authority.org 4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018


01.17/01.24.2018 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 03

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns EMILY BENNETT, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, LAUREN ORTEGO

[ART] Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[ADVERTISING]

{CP COVER ILLUSTRATION BY D.J. COFFMAN}

[MUSIC]

“We’ve got six or seven years until 30, and a lot of bands aren’t even cracking by then.” PAGE 13

Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, ANDREA JAMES, PAUL KLATZKIN, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[MARKETING+PROMOTIONS] Marketing Director BETHANY RUHE Marketing and Sales Assistant CONNOR MARSHMAN

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They’re kinetic and equivocal, their movement and motion shifting as the viewer does.

[ADMINISTRATION]

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Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[PUBLISHER] EAGLE MEDIA CORP. GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2018 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[NEWS]

“I think, in just a couple years, you’re going to see it in every pharmacy.”

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News 06 Weird 12 Music 13 Arts 20 Events 24 Taste 27

Screen 30 Sports 32 Classifieds 35 Crossword 36 Astrology 37 Savage Love 38 NEWS

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“THE PROBLEM LIES IN THE GOVERNMENT LUMPING ALL OF THESE INTO ONE CATEGORY.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

On City Paper’s Politicrap blog, we examine how Donald Trump’s actions in Washington, D.C., impact people here in Pittsburgh. Check it out at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Introducing #PGH360, photo intern Jake Mysliwczyk’s new weekly Instagram feature where he’ll be taking a 360-degree tour of the city skyline. Look for a new photo every Tuesday at Instagram.com/pghcitypaper.

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Susan Merenstein of Murray Avenue Apothecary

CP is part of ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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CASH CROP S

USAN MERENSTEIN’S introduction to

healing came behind the counter of her father’s drugstore in Washington, D.C. At a young age, she watched her father whip up and dole out remedies for the common cold, pain and other ailments. Today, at her own pharmacy, Murray Avenue Apothecary in Greenfield, she’s following in her father’s footsteps. But with a wide range of products that include supplements to treat sexual dysfunction, her shop is a more modern update on the neighborhood drug store. And the ingredients she uses in her products are unique too. Merenstein offers a line of LabNaturals PCR Broad-Spectrum Plant Oil products. In simpler terms, the products are made from industrial hemp, a substance that until last year was illegal to grow in Pennsylvania. She says she turned to industrial hemp as a way of helping those with addiction and

chronic health conditions, including her husband, who has Crohn’s disease. “I was extremely interested in helping with the opioid crisis,” Merenstein says. “As a pharmacist of 37 years, I’m in the trenches. There were people constantly coming in with pain, the kind of pain that just ruins your whole day-to-day life.”

Medical marijuana has been heralded as a savior in Pennsylvania, but advocates say industrial hemp is just as vital {BY REBECCA ADDISON} Merenstein’s interest in hemp is medicinal. Her products are meant to address health issues such as arthritis, inflamma-

tion, nausea, pain and anxiety. But the clinical uses for industrial hemp are just one piece of the picture. Hemp is a variety of cannabis sativa, a plant species which also includes marijuana. Hemp fiber has been used to make rope, clothes, food, paper, textiles, plastics, insulation and biofuel. And hemp oil has been used to manufacture oil-based paints, moisturizers and cooking oil. Last month, Gov. Tom Wolf announced the expansion of hemp in Pennsylvania. Fifty permits are available to growers and institutions of higher education for hemp research projects. And the state predicts next season’s industrial-hemp crop could cover 5,000 acres or more. But response to the expansion of the state program hasn’t been high. As of last week, days before the Jan. 19 application deadline, the state had received few CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018


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CASH CROP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

applications. Advocates say part of the problem could be that little is known about industrial hemp. Like a forgotten middle child, hemp is often overshadowed by marijuana. The recent legalization of medical marijuana, in particular, has drawn a lot of attention. Advocates hope to see industrial hemp edge its way into the spotlight. Being lumped in with marijuana has created a stigma, but advocates say the versatile crop is a proud part of the state’s past and could have a positive impact on its future. “There’s over 25,000 different uses for the hemp plant,” says David Schmitt of Hemp Inc., one of the largest industrialhemp companies in the country. “You stand on the street corner and ask 100 people, ‘What is hemp?’ and probably 98 out of the 100 are going to tell you it’s marijuana. It’s not marijuana. That’s what’s so frustrating.” MERENSTEIN IS legally prohibited from

making claims about the benefits of her LabNaturals line, which includes oils, topical pain balms and capsules containing water-soluble hemp oil. (Under current law, supplement manufacturers and retailers cannot assert that they treat or cure diseases.) But she says doctors refer patients to her for a variety of health reasons. “People are coming to us with Parkinson’s, [multiple sclerosis], people who want to get off their opiods, people who have pain, people who have anxiety,” Merenstein says. To the uninitiated, industrial-hemp products might sound similar to medicalmarijuana products. Both contain cannabidiol, the ingredient believed to have a positive impact on treating certain ailments. But, as mandated by law, Merenstein’s products contain less than .3 percent of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. It’s confusing stuff if you’re not a botanist whose job it is to differentiate between industrial hemp and marijuana, and it’s part of the reason industrial-hemp products are still stigmatized. “The stigma has to do with the cannabis plant itself,” Merenstein says. “The problem lies in the government lumping all of these into one category.” Merenstein hopes expanding research opportunities around industrial hemp will help reduce this stigma and lead to more beneficial products for those in need. “There are so many potential clinical applications for this plant in humans and pets. We need more research,” Merenstein says. “It’s a newer frontier, and we need to be very careful and cautious moving forward. We need to do it right.” Last week, Geoffrey Whaling, chairman

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of the Pennsylvania Hemp Industry Council, was in Lehigh, Pa. for this very reason. He spent his week at the Farm Show there, promoting the state’s recently expanded hemp-permitting program, and he used his extensive knowledge of the plant to generate interest. Hemp has a rich history in Pennsylvania, Whalen says. The Hemp Act, which was among the very first legislation passed in Pennsylvania, encouraged farmers to grow hemp. Between 1720 and 1870, there were more than 100 mills for processing hemp fiber in Lancaster County. And Pennsylvania towns like Hempfield were named for the crop. “Most people don’t think where the origin of the name of their community or school district came from, but it came from the fact that hemp was such an important crop in the community,” says Whalen. Hemp farming dropped off in the United States in favor of easier-to-grow crops like corn. Later, in the 1930s, hemp was banned completely as part of the overall ban on cannabis. But that doesn’t mean hemp and hemp-based products aren’t still used across the United States. “We are the largest importing nation of hemp in the world. We bring in hundreds of millions of dollars of hemp annually — both raw products and finished products,” says Whalen. “But we are the only importing nation that doesn’t have a national policy.” Hemp enjoyed a resurgence over the past few decades, after scientists found a way to differentiate between marijuana plants and similar ones with barely any THC. As a result, the 2014 federal Farm Bill allowed states to reintroduce hemp farming. Since then, 33 states, including Pennsylvania, elected to do so. There are many benefits to the crop, says Whalen: Every part of the plant can be used, it doesn’t require fertilizer or pesticides to cultivate, and it can grow up to 20 feet in 100 days. Additionally, the Rodale Institute, in Kutztown, Pa. — which was one of 16 organizations to receive a permit for hemp research last year — has found hemp is one of the best crops for suppressing weeds in organic farming. The recently expanded state program will mean even more opportunities for discoveries about industrial hemp. Permits to grow hemp are for research only, not for commercial use. They are available for farmers who can grow up to 100 acres, and another tier of permits for higher-learning institutions and research centers to grow unlimited acreage. And while industrialhemp commercialization is still illegal, this

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

year those who acquire permits will be able to sell small quantities of industrial hemp for market research. “What we heard when we were done last year is that participants were looking for the capacity to really look at the marketplace. So we’ve opened it up and are tripling the amount of applicants,” says Fred Strathmeyer, the state’s deputy secretary for plant industry. “Industrial hemp has not been in the marketplace for quite a few years now, so we’re hoping to educate shoppers about the uses of hemp going forward.” Education is key, says Schmitt, of Hemp Inc. Schmitt, who serves as chief operating officer of Industrial Hemp Manufacturing, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Hemp, Inc. recently developed a way to use hemp to create an additive that prevents drilling oil from escaping into the earth. He says uses for the plant are nearly endless. “You’re going to create a lot of jobs,” says Schmitt, who works in Georgia. “You’re going to create a crop for the farmers that allows them to prosper. It’s going to be good

“THERE’S OVER 25,000 DIFFERENT USES FOR THE HEMP PLANT.”

for the economy of Pennsylvania.” Today, car manufacturers like BMW, Mercedes and Ferrari are using hemp fiber for car interiors. The crop is also replacing carbon fiber in car-body construction. But Schmitt says these uses pale in comparison to the health benefits being seen by people using hemp-based products like the ones offered by Merenstein at Murray Avenue Apothecary. And, Schmitt says, the medicinal applications can be more lucrative for farmers. “We can drastically change the quality of a person’s life,” Schmitt says. “Those suffering from epilepsy, we can virtually eliminate their seizures. It can treat young ’uns with autism, people with arthritis, back pain, neck pain, folks with PTSD, and especially veterans who have come back from the Middle East.” In light of these perceived benefits, it might seem strange that so many have pinned their hopes on medical marijuana to cure what ails them. But Whalen says, in light of progress in states around the country, he expects the tide to shift very soon: “I think in just a couple years, you’re going to see it in every pharmacy, every Walmart.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN


THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on January 23, 2018, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for a Service Contract for the following:

PGH. CARRICK HIGH SCHOOL Various Asphalt and Concrete Repairs General Prime

PGH. MILLER, WESTWOOD AND GRANDVIEW Replace EM Generator Systems General and Electrical Primes

PGH. DILWORTH PREK-5 Various Asphalt and Concrete Repairs General Prime

PGH. COLFAX K-8 Heating and Ventilation at Pool Area General, Asbestos, Mechanical and Electrical Primes

PGH. LANGLEY HIGH SCHOOL Various Asphalt and Concrete Repairs General Prime

PGH. SUNNYSIDE PREK-8 Unit Ventilator Replacement Mechanical Prime

PGH. OLIVER CITYWIDE ACADEMY Various Asphalt and Concrete Repairs General Prime.

PGH. CHARTIERS, SPRING GARDEN, MONTESSORI AND CRESCENT SCHOOLS Water Cooler Replacement – Phase 2 Plumbing and Electrical Primes

PGH. CAPA 6-12 Basement Water Infiltration General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes

PGH. BRASHEAR HIGH SCHOOL ADA Toiler Room Renovations – Phase 2 General, Asbestos, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes

PGH. CUPPLES STADIUM Concrete Bleachers Repair General Prime

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on January 2, 2018 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us NEWS

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AMERICAN WOMAN: Joy KMT, photographed at Sanctuary Pittsburgh

AMERICAN WOMAN: Alecia Dawn, photographed at August Wilson Center

INVISIBLE WOMEN The AMERICAN WOMAN project seeks to highlight black women, but a similarly titled CNN project could overshadow it {BY MARGARET WELSH} SINCE LAUNCHING her AMERICAN WOMAN

project in July 2016, Sarah Huny Young has interviewed nearly 70 black women in major cities across the country. Each participant in the multimedia photography/documentary series was asked the same six questions, including what came to mind when they heard the term “American Woman.” “And 95 percent of them said ‘a white woman, a blond woman, Jennifer Lawrence … gingham dress, housewife, Donna Reed,’” recalls Young. “Those are the things that come to mind even for black people, who have been in America for centuries.” Those answers, of course, were no surprise to Young. They underscored her reasons for starting the project in the first place. AMERICAN WOMAN — which received a grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation and the Heinz Endowment’s Advancing Black Arts in Pittsburgh Program — is meant to challenge and subvert those ingrained assumptions. It’s a project about visibility, but also, Young says, about black women presented as art, and about taking up much-deserved space in majority-white art spaces. “I wanted to start a dialogue, and I also wanted it to be very visual in that, well, what does America look like? Because all of these women are American.” Many of Young’s stunning AMERICAN WOMAN portraits can be seen online — her subjects include, to name just a few, Pittsburgh-based activist and artist Joy KMT; We Are Never Meeting in Real Life author Samantha Irby; and Charlene

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AMERICAN WOMAN: Breeze Youngblood, photographed at Round Corner Cantina

Carruthers, who is the national director of the Black Youth Project 100. Intersectionality was an important aspect of this project for Young, and she has been intentional about including transgender women and non-binary people, as well as women from a range of age groups (including Young’s own mother). In its final incarnation, the project will feature a full-length documentary and gallery show. Now, however, the visibility of the project itself is being threatened. On Jan. 3, CNN anchor Brooke Baldwin launched the conceptually and aesthetically similar series American Woman With Brooke

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

Baldwin. Citing the Women’s March and the #MeToo movement as inspiration, Baldwin interviewed various celebrity women — including Betty White, Pat Benatar and Ashley Graham — about their experiences as women in America. Baldwin’s project features a wide age range, but aside from director Ava DuVernay and actress/writer Issa Rae, most of the women in eight-part monthly series are white. After being alerted to the CNN project by a friend, Young quote-tweeted Baldwin’s announcement, saying “… my series, AMERICAN WOMAN, which features Black American women exclusively has been

out for about 18 months now.” That was retweeted more than 300 times, and dozens of Young’s supporters sent Baldwin and CNN tweets of their own. If Baldwin didn’t know about Young’s AMERICAN WOMAN before, it’s unlikely her Twitter mentions have allowed her to stay in the dark. It’s not that Young thinks that CNN straight-up stole her idea: “I’m trying to extend the benefit of the doubt,” she says. “My official position is that I don’t think there was malicious intent. … I don’t believe that Brooke Baldwin sat down at her computer a year-and-a-half ago, saw my project and said, ‘I’m going to steal this.’” What Young, an occasional City Paper contributor, does believe is that CNN failed spectacularly to do its due diligence in making sure a project with the same name didn’t already exist. A little Googling would have brought up the project, which was featured, among other places, in The Root, in March 2017. Young (and, by extension, her project) was also featured on that website’s annual Root 100 alongside Beyoncé, Colin Kaepernick and Jessica Williams. Young says she did extensive research before launching the project in order to make sure nothing similar existed. Young believes that Baldwin’s motives with the CNN project are genuine — it makes sense, Young notes, to profile women at this moment in history. But, in addition to creating a potentially expensive marketing issue for Young, preventing CNN’s project from overshadowing her work will cost a lot of extra time and money. It also works against Young’s goal


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of placing black women in the spotlight. “The differences aren’t enough for [Baldwin] to think this wouldn’t be a conflict,” she says. “And there is no doubt in my mind that the brand confusion will be a huge problem for me, not for CNN, because they’re CNN ... It buries my project completely. … It really disrupts not only my marketing efforts but further opportunities that I wanted to take.” For Young, the whole situation recalls issues surrounding the recent #MeToo campaign and activist Tarana Burke (who also happens to be one of the first subjects Young shot for AMERICAN WOMAN). When actress Alyssa Milano began promoting the hashtag in response to allegations surrounding Harvey Weinstein and others, many women of color noted that Burke had launched a Me Too campaign a decade earlier, specifically to protect black women and girls. “So, people were angry,” Young says. “They felt like it was erasure, and that a black woman’s creation and movement had been co-opted for a broader usage without her being credited for it.” Milano was receptive to these concerns and began publicly crediting Burke and involving her in press around #MeToo. (Burke’s most recent high-profile appearance was as actress Michelle Williams’ guest at the Golden Globes.) “I think that was a great move on [Milano’s] part,” Young says. “I think that’s what an ally is supposed to do.” And she’d like to see Baldwin take a page from Milano’s book, using her influence to include Young’s project in the spotlight. At the very least, Young would like to see a

name change for the CNN project — “Even just ‘Brooke Baldwin’s American Women,’” she says. In addition to the branding issue, she says, “That title means a lot to me.” “This isn’t, of course, to say that I’m the only person that gets to celebrate women in the U.S. or that I have ownership of the title or moniker ‘American Woman’ in any way,” Young wrote in her official statement about the issue. “However, that the original AMERICAN WOMAN series is very specifically about black women in America — American for multiple generations, firstgeneration American, or American via naturalization or dual citizenship — is a very important distinction that I intend to protect. … That I named it AMERICAN WOMAN and not BLACK AMERICAN WOMAN is very purposeful.” Young has yet to hear anything from CNN, but she’s not planning to let the issue rest. “I think that if Tarana and her community wouldn’t have advocated for her to be involved in those conversations around #MeToo, I don’t think [she] would have gotten the visibility that she did, which she deserves,” Young says. “I think that would be ideal if I could get some kind of visibility for my project on a platform of that size.” Young says she is frustrated because the experience is like “[b]eing invisible again, which is an ongoing issue with women of color in the world and in this country anyway … just being othered constantly … being pushed to the side when something bigger and flashier comes along.” Considering the project was meant to highlight black women, Young says, “It’s actually hilarious how ironic all of this is.”

“THAT TITLE MEANS A LOT TO ME.”

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Tennis instructor Osmailer Torres, 30, of Miami, was arrested in July 2016 after hitting a 5-year-old with the child’s pintsized tennis racket and causing a bruise on the boy’s arm and a lump on his eyebrow, reports the Miami Herald. But now Torres believes he has a grand-slam defense: Florida’s Stand Your Ground self-defense law. Defense lawyer Eduardo Pereira told the Herald the child was the “initial aggressor” who had participated in “various violent altercations” against other children, and Torres had acted “reasonably in trying to prevent harm” to others. Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Oscar Rodriguez-Fonts will consider the claim in an upcoming hearing.

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Mazen Dayem, 36, of Staten Island, N.Y., obtained a restraining order against his father-in-law, Yunes Doleh, 62, in September after Doleh repeatedly tormented him by waving his hairpiece at Dayem, provoking Dayem’s greatest phobia — the Tasmanian Devil of Looney Tunes fame. Not easily deterred, Doleh was arrested on Nov. 5 for violating the order after he “removed his wig [and] made hand gestures” at a funeral the two attended, Dayem explained to the New York Post. “It’s just a very large fear of mine, his damn wig. ... I have nightmares.” Court papers say Doleh “proceeded to grimace, snarl, gurn and gesticulate.” He was charged with criminal mischief in Staten Island County court, and then sued his son-in-law for defamation after photos from the arrest appeared on social media. Teller County (Colorado) Sheriff Jason Mikesell listed his SUV for sale on Craigslist in November, and he was a little perplexed when he received a response from Shawn Langley, 39, of Vail, offering to trade the SUV for four pounds of marijuana. Langley even provided photos of his black-market booty and boasted about its quality, reported The Colorado Springs Gazette. “I saw that text, and I started giggling,” Mikesell said. Detectives set up a meeting and arrested both Langley and Jane Cravens, 41, after finding the promised four pounds of marijuana in their car. Sheriff Mikesell has removed his SUV from Craigslist.

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On Nov. 27, 27-year-old Corey Hughes, who was due to be released from prison in February after serving most of a weapons charge, walked away from a San Joaquin County sheriff’s work crew in Stockton, Calif., according to the Fresno Bee. It took police almost a month to track him to a home in Stockton, where they surrounded the dwelling and apprehended him without incident — which might not be so remarkable were it not for the distinctive, whole-face tattoo Hughes sports, which makes his face look like a human skull. He was booked into the San Joaquin County Jail.

Malcolm Whitfield, of Rochester, N.Y., was only trying to help when he ordered a Lyft car to deliver a drunk woman home from a bar in November. But when the woman vomited in the car, Whitfield was hit with a $150 fine to cover the damage. “For a second, I was like, ‘Never do anything nice again!’” Whitfield told 13WHAM. Lyft’s terms and conditions include damage fees, which most people don’t see in the fine print. Update: Lyft later refunded Whitfield’s fine and added $100 to his Lyft account for future rides. “Mr. Whitfield absolutely did the right thing by helping someone get home safely,” said Scott Coriell, a Lyft spokesperson. It was just another early December day at the Horsetooth Store, Gas and RV Park outside Fort Collins, Colo., as employee Lori Jones conducted inventory and restocked shelves. Suddenly, she looked up to see “Mama,” a doe deer, inside the store, “looking at the sunglasses. Then she looked at the ice cream and over at the chips,” Jones told CBS Denver. “I kind of did a double take.” When shooing the deer away didn’t work, she broke out a peanut bar and lured the doe into a nearby field. Jones then returned to work, but soon looked up to find Mama was back, this time with her three fawns in tow. It took another peanut bar to draw the family away from the store, and Jones said she has learned her lesson. “You should never feed the deer because they’re going to keep coming back.” A mom in Hillsboro, Ore., came up with the perfect retaliation for a porch pirate who nabbed her baby son’s package of Christmas pajamas off the front porch. Angie Boliek told KATU she wanted to get her own “passive-aggressive revenge,” so she taped up a box full of 10 to 15 dirty diapers with a note reading “Enjoy this you thief!” Boliek left the box on her porch on Dec. 3, and by the evening of Dec. 4 it was gone. Boliek alerted Hillsboro police, but they don’t have any leads in the investigation. “It was fun to come home and see that it was gone,” Boliek said.

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Taisei Corp., a construction company based in Tokyo, announced in December that it will use autonomous drones, taking flight in April, to combat karoshi, or overwork death, reported The Independent. The drones will hover over desks of employees who have stayed at work too long and blast “Auld Lang Syne,” a tune commonly used in Japanese shops getting ready to close. A company statement said: “It will encourage employees who are present at the drone-patrol time to leave, not only to promote employee health but also to conduct internal security management.” Experts are skeptical: Scott North, professor of sociology at Osaka University, told the BBC that “to cut overtime hours, it is necessary to reduce workloads.”

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S ITE M S TO WE I RD N E W S T I P S@ AM UNI V E R S AL . C O M .


LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

Skull Kid MAKE BETTER CHOICES SKULLKIDPA.BANDCAMP.COM

Make Better Choices is the final release of Pittsburgh emo punk band Skull Kid (20132017). The four songs are some of the band’s most realized and crisp recordings to date and are an excellent swan song for a band with a fervent following. The EP begins with “Dark Magician Girl,” a bouncing number with a melancholy undertone. It sets the vibe for a record full of bittersweet energy. “Motion Sickness” is a swirling number that teeters between gentle longing and desperate ache. “I don’t want to think about things that she’ll never say,” is nearly whispered before the singer breaks into a gritty shout. The song balances its moments of softness artfully with its moments of loud, strained hurt, before giving way to “If We Get Cornered,” which becomes completely unhinged. “We Built This Life,” sung by guitarist Chloe Hodgkins, is a tender love song, whether to a self or a partner is not clear. The dreamy, twinkly riffs and heartfelt vocals and lyrics make it the perfect sendoff for a band that’s worn its heart on its sleeve from its first release to the last. FOR FANS OF: THE HOTELIER, MIDWESTERN EMO, SILVERSUN PICKUPS

Shin Guard FIVE SONGS SHINGUARD.BANDCAMP.COM

Shin Guard’s got a sense of humor in spite of being a band that writes mostly sad songs. There are only four songs on its latest EP, Five Songs, but the band is telling the truth that each track is about a break up. Find the one that suits your last ex, and get ready to dig into your emotions. “You Turned Everything to Paper” brings the spoken word of Shin Guard’s style to the fore. On it, the instrumentation provides ambience, rather than the earworm-style verses and choruses of “Bemis Point” and “Corsages.” EP-finisher “Flubline” details a relationship in which the narrator is not fully valued for who he is. The song takes on a more Smiths-y energy in melody, while the instrumentation feels a bit Charmer-era Tigers Jaw. It’s kind of bouncy, but also sad enough to take the pep out of your step.

E G N A R O CODE FOREVER {PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK SEYLER}

{BY MEG FAIR}

Code Orange at the Rex Theater, for Forever release

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017 WAS AN awful year for plenty of people, but for Code Orange, it was a year of victories. The Pittsburgh metalcore band released the critically acclaimed Forever, snagging positive reviews from Rolling Stone and Kerrang!; was the first band to perform live at a WWE NXT event; and has become the first rock band from Pittsburgh to receive a Grammy nomination. On Jan. 28, Code Orange competes for Best Metal Performance of the titular track of Forever. The group headlined tours, dominated arenas and didn’t pause for a single moment to catch its collective breath. “We’ve had more awesome moments this year than any other year combined,” explains drummer and vocalist Jami Morgan, in an interview with City Paper. “In our Code Orange bubble, everything that’s happened since the first thing that happened this year has been the best thing that’s ever happened to us.” “World gets darker, Code gets bigger, I guess,” adds guitarist Reba Meyers with a coy smile.

CODE ORANGE’S music is intense, dark and raw. Each detail — from the electronics to the melodies to the riffs — has been painstakingly arranged to paint a very particular sound and picture. Forever was an all-out audible assault that ignored the rules and bent genres without hesitation. For instance, tracks like “Bleeding in the Blur” and “Ugly” are apt to appeal to a general alternative-rock audience. Guitarists Meyers and Dominic Landolina and bassist Joe Goldman hold down the sinister melodies, and Meyers’ clean vocal work adds an edge absent in much of contemporary metalcore. The work of guitarist/electronics expert Eric Balderose (and the band’s music videos) should resonate with fans of noise and experimental music, and cement the atypical sound of the band, while Morgan’s powerful aggressive percussion finds favor with the hardcore and metalcore crowd. Even if you aren’t a fan of those assorted genres, it’s pretty hard to deny the amount of talent shared by the five members of Code Orange. They’ve har-

nessed those talents, shoving their way to tremendous opportunities. “We’ve been around for awhile, but we’re all very young,” explains Morgan, as all the members of Code Orange lounge around a shared living room. “We have a lot of time. We’ve got six or seven years until 30, and a lot of bands aren’t even cracking by then.” The five members have been in a band together for 10 years, and most have been friends for as long or longer. Thus, they act far more like siblings than bandmates, with bantering, bickering and crosstalk. This kind of interpersonal connection solidifies the backbone of the band, whose intense ambition built upon the knowledge that each member of the band is crucial to its overall success. Code Orange has been hustling in every sense of the word since 2008, and the band hasn’t forgotten all the people who helped them out from the beginning. Many of them still work with and tour with Code Orange on a regular basis.

FOR FANS OF: TIGERS JAW, LA DISPUTE, HELLA FEELINGS

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BELVEDERES

CODE ORANGE FOREVER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

HARDO LIVE {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

ULTRA-DIVE THURS JAN 18

COVEN • DARK THURSDAYS DJS TFS + EZ LOU $1 PBR POUNDER 9:30-11:30

FRI JAN 19

CALIFORNIA LOVE DJ ADMC

SAT JAN 20

90S NIGHT SEAN MC + DJ THERMOS MON JAN 22 YOGA 8PM TUES JAN 23 KARAOKE 10PM

WED JAN 24

DO SOMETHING SPONTANEOUS 4016 BUTLER STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-687-2555 WWW.BELVEDERESULTRADIVE.COM

{CP PHOTO BY MEG FAIR}

Code Orange

“A lot of the local older [punk/hardcore] guys have influenced us. I think the spirit of hard work and diligence and putting a lot of effort into the actual music was inspired by the older hardcore, metal, punk guys. That still drives us,” Goldman points out. Code Orange has stayed true to Pittsburgh — not moving to bigger cities, talking up its hometown — but there’s a sense that the band doesn’t feel Pittsburgh’s reciprocated. “I feel like, since this is a local paper, it’s good to say that the local media needs to get behind stuff that isn’t just the two Pittsburgh rappers [Wiz Khalifa and Mac Miller]. I understand it on one level, because a lot of bands around here pop up and don’t matter

and then disappear. But at the length we’ve been doing it here, they should be playing us on the radio, we should be on the covers of these papers, we should be everywhere,” asserts Morgan. “We’ve proven what we could do, and now [that coverage] is starting to happen,” Morgan continues. “But we’ve always repped Pittsburgh and talked about the city. I’m hoping the city starts to talk about us.” CODE ORANGE is changing the face of metal and it isn’t afraid to come out and say it. Remaining modest doesn’t get you very far, and it’s hard to be humble when you’ve been acknowledged in such mainstream fashion. With the Grammys coming up, CP asked the band members what they thought their chances were against August Burns Red, Body Count, Mastodon and Meshuggah for the Best Metal Performance Grammy. “I am fully expecting to win. We always expect to win, but we never count on anything. And that’s what being from Pittsburgh teaches you,” says Morgan. “I won’t be shocked at all if we win or lose. It’s just two different doors. Winning would be a nice easier door to some more cool shit. Losing would still be cool because we still got nominated.” Beyond the Grammys, the band has no plans to stop its course set on world domination. “We want to push it to another level on hardcore and metal,” explains Morgan. “Most hardcore and metal bands treat the Grammys like they’re worthless, because the Grammys treat them like they’re worthless. “We were just watching the Metallica VHS, and them being [at the Grammys] is a big part of the show. Nobody cares about [metal] now. My goal beyond [winning a Grammy] is putting heavy music back in the actual spotlight, not the minor leagues. But it all takes time. Musically, we keep growing, and people will know and see the growth.” Morgan concludes: “It’s about keeping that upward momentum in whatever way feels good.” MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

{CP PHOTO BY SARAH HUNY YOUNG}

Hardo

When City Paper profiled Wilkinsburgborn Hardo in a 2016 cover story, his career and life were finally getting on the right track. A former drug dealer, he had been in and out of prison between 2011 and 2015 on drug charges and subsequent probation violations. But his rhymes and his self-made YouTube videos went viral while he was in prison. “Here I was getting ready to go upstate, and my video was released. … I grabbed a fan base off of that and kept them because they liked what I was doing lyrically,” he told CP in August 2016. “Also, I think people connected to it because I was writing about and showing them real life.” That fame, however, was just a taste of what was to come. Last fall, Hardo announced he had signed a contract with the Sony Red music label. In October, he released a video for his song, “Today’s a Good Day” featuring Pittsburgh’s Wiz Khalifa and Jimmy Wopo. The song is off the artist’s 2016 mixtape, Trapanese. According to hip-hop website XXL, the video was shot in both Los Angeles and Pittsburgh. “This video was for my city, for the streets in my city, for all my brothers in the Feds, Wiz, Wopo, and I stood united for the city, so today’s a good day,” Hardo told XXL. On Jan. 19, Pittsburgh fans will get a chance to see Hardo live in action at Lawrenceville’s Spirit Hall. Opening will be Trapway Kizzl, ASCO100K, Stunna2Fly, FTR Drama and DJ Spillz. In addition to the concert, there will be a pre-show meet-and-greet. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HARDO 7 p.m. Fri. Jan. 19. Spirit Hall, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $20-$60 (with meet-and-greet). 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN ZIFF}

Walk the Moon

[HXC] + THU., JAN. 18 1980s-inspired hardcore band Het Ward is celebrating the release of its dynamic debut full-length No One Is Ever Going to Tell Us How to Love Again at The Mr. Roboto Project tonight with a host of exceptional guests. The ever powerful Blak Rapp M.A.D.U.S.A., grungy rock bunch Maenads, take-no-shit HXC act Medium Ugly and storyteller/poet Tyler Vile from Baltimore will be supporting. It will be a night that prioritizes the experiences of the oppressed in a time when shit is extra rough out there. Come fuck up the whitesupremacist capitalist patriarchy with your pals. Meg Fair 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7-10. All ages. www. robotoproject.org

[NEWGRASS] + THU., JAN. 18 {PHOTO COURTESY OF JON B. SNOW}

If you don’t hate trucker hats or the way the Avett Brothers have grown slightly less edgy and a smidge more commercialized, don’t miss this Ohio duo known as Caamp. There’s a banjo; there are boys. Caamp will tear you apart with its mad harmonies, acoustic charms and heartrending lyricism, only to piece you back together as gently as possible. And The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls is the place practically designed to share in this kind of warm, communal, bluegrassy happiness. Emily Bennett 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10-12. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www. mrsmalls.com

[LOCAL] + SAT., JAN. 20 There’s something magical about watching incredible performances while surrounded by some of the most beautiful macramé you’ve ever seen in your life, and that’s what the

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Glitter Box Theater will grant you. This all-locals banger features indie-rock/grrrl/garage gang Garter Shake, as well as poet and hip-hop artist Brittney Chantele. The sweet, twinkly alternative-rock folks of Distant Futures round it out. MF 8:30 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5. All ages. www.theglitterboxtheater.com

[INDIE] + TUE., JAN. 23 A compelling combo for the usually more metal-, hard-core- and punk-leaning Black Forge Coffeehouse, bandcamp heroes Toy Cars is teaming up with sticky-sweet-pop gang DRMCTHR to deliver something equal parts dancey and emo. Toy Cars’ new full-length Paint Brain sounds r e t r Ga massive and e Shak decades beyond its past emo/ folk releases. It’s an album that definitely makes you want to remember your ex, squint your eyes like Clint Eastwood, and probably drive into the sun. EB 6 p.m. 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. $10-12. All ages. 412-291-8994 or www.blackforgecoffee.com

HACKMAN’S ONLY PITTSBURGH APPEARANCE THIS YEAR! Matthew Mehaffey, Music Director Tickets at TICKETFLY.COM or call 877-4-FLY-TIX. More info at WWW.THEMENDELSSOHN.ORG

[DANCE ROCK] + TUE., JAN. 23 OK, Walk the Moon is so much more than “Shut Up and Dance.” In fact, the band has built a pop empire for itself by separating its sound from the mindless sea of MIDI and AutoTune that dominates the world of mainstream music; Walk the Moon has concocted its own swirling synth melodies that just won’t quit. Its live show is non-stop energy, so come by Stage AE to dance irreverently for a couple hours on a Tuesday. EB 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $32-99. 412-229-5483 or www.promowestlive.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP

Dave. Levels. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 19

FRI 19

DIESEL. Trapline, The Employers, Catatoneya, Soul Alliance. Winter Rock Challenge - Round 3. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. MOONDOG’S. The Moat Rats. 9 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PALACE THEATRE. Get The Led Out. 8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Gone South. 9 p.m. Ross. 412-364-8166. VINOSKI WINERY. Mark Shuttleworth. 5 p.m. East Pittsburgh. 724-872-3333.

SAT 20

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. DEE’S CAFE. Punk Night w/ DJ Ian. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1314. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Cake. Levels. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 20

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Dancing Queen. 9 p.m. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. Global Dancehall, Cumbia, DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Bhangra, Balkan Bass. The Collisions. 9:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. Robinson. 412-489-5631. 412-621-4900. THE FIREPIT DIESEL. DJ CK. WOOD FIRED 10 p.m. South Side. GRILL. Lenny 412-431-8800. & Ray. 8 p.m. PERLE CHAMPAGNE . w ww per North Huntingdon. BAR. DJ Tenova. a p ty ci h pg 724-515-2903. ladies night. .com HOWLERS. The Cheats, 9 p.m. Downtown. Volcano Dogs, The 412-471-2058. Homisides, Trollkicker. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Benefit for Animal Friends. Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0320. 412-781-6771. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms RIVERS CASINO. DJ Nin. and Hard Rain w/ Soulville Levels 8 p.m. North Side. Horns. 8 p.m. Blawnox. 412-231-7777. 412-828-2040. PALACE THEATRE. Get The Led Out. 8 p.m. Greensburg. THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. 724-836-8000. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. PALISADE PLAYHOUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. Dante Romito. EP release. 7 p.m. THE SUMMIT. Dig Now Greenfield. 412-944-2663. Sounds w/ Hot Honey. 9 p.m. THE OLYMPIC CLUB. Moose Mt. Washington. 412-918-1647. Tracks Band. 8 p.m. West End. 412-921-9633. THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta & Preslav. THE R BAR. Billy the Kid’s Steel Top Dollar Dancehall. 10 p.m. Town All-Stars. 7 p.m. Dormont. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. 412-942-0882. TOM’S DINER/VASTA LOUNGE. RayJack. 10 p.m. Dormont. 412-531-2350.

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 23

WED 24

SUN 21

DJS

THU 18 THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Centrifuge. Non-genre specific electronic music night showcasing aspiring fresh talent to veterans alike. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 19 SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Hardo w/ Trapway Kizzl, ASCO100K, Stunna2Fly, FTR Drama & DJ Spillz. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

WED 24 ROCKS LANDING BAR &

GRILLE. Tony Campbell feat. Teresa Hawthorne. 7:30 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412-875-5809.

BLUES THU 18 O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418.

FRI 19 MIKE’S NEW MOON SALOON. Jack of Diamonds. 9 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-265-8188. NIED’S HOTEL. Still Not Sober. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SAT 20 BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Strange Brew. 8 p.m. Bridgeville. 412-257/9877. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms and Hard Rain. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SAXON INN. Shot O’ Soul. 9 p.m. Natrona Heights. 724-224-4686. TUGBOAT’S. Extreme Winter Blues Bash. 9 p.m. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992. VINOSKI WINERY. Boogie Hustlers. 5 p.m. East Pittsburgh. 724-872-3333.

JAZZ THU 18 CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. TMT Trio. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Roger Humphries & RH Factor. 8 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

SAT 20 THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. WALLACE’S TAP ROOM. Tony Campbell Jazzsurgery. 5 p.m. East Liberty. 412 -665-0555.

SUN 21 ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

MON 22 HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 23 RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Martin Rosenberg. 8 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.


HEAVY ROTATION

WED 24 CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Roger Humphries. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Interval Jazz Night. Feat. house band w/ Howard Alexander, Tony DePaolis & James Johnson III. First half the house band will set the mood. The second half, there will be a curated jam session. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-807-9696.

Here are the songs CP music writer Meg Fair can’t stop listening to: Canker Blossom

“Go Fuck Yourself”

ACOUSTIC THU 18

Snail Mail

HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-726-7912.

“Thinning”

FRI 19 BAR 3 MILLVALE. Todd and Dale. 8:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-408-3870. DOUBLETREE BY HILTON HOTEL PITTSBURGH CRANBERRY. EASE. 6 p.m. Cranberry. 724-778-4177

Great Grandpa

“Teen Challenge”

SAT 20 RIVERS CASINO. Right TurnClyde. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. VINOSKI WINERY. Daryl Shawn. 1 p.m. East Pittsburgh. 724-872-3333.

Rilo Kiley

“Portions For Foxes”

SUN 21 HAMBONE’S. Acoustic Brunch. Acoustic Brunch welcomes all styles of music, poetry, spoken word, comedy in an open mic format.We also have one ‘Feature Artist’ sandwiched in the middle of our show. 10:30 a.m. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. 5 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 24 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE THU 18 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

FRI 19 WALLACE’S TAP ROOM. The Flow Band feat. Finneydredlox, Joe Spliff, Deb Star, Sam Fingers & D Lane. 7 p.m. East Liberty. 412-665-0555.

CLASSICAL

composers. This year’s winners are Ramin Akhavijou, Chatori Shimizu, and Brian Riordan. We will also feature music by Nancy Galbraith, Curtis Rumrill, and NAT 28’s Composer-in-Residence Jean-Patrick Besingrand. 7:30 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SUN 21 CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT FOR STRINGS & ORGAN. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra members Carolyn Edwards (violin) and Alexandra Thompson (cello) join Anne Carper Smith, organist at Bower Hill Community Church, to present a recital featuring duos by Kodaly, Saint-Saens, Rheinberger, and others. 4 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153.

OTHER MUSIC

SAT 20 NAT 28’S PITTSBURGH COMPOSERS PROJECT. NAT 28’s annual Pittsburgh Composers Project features the work of established and emerging composers based in Pittsburgh. The concert includes the winners of NAT 28’s second annual Call for Scores by emerging

NEWS

THU 18 RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. Levels. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 19

MUSIC

SAT 20 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Molly Tuttle Band. 7:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-316-1915. CATTIVO. Evolution. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. REX THEATER. The Grass Is Dead w/ David Gans. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. Jim Donovan & The Sun King Warriors. Drum Bar. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

TUE 23 STAGE AE. WALK THE MOON. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 24 REX THEATER. Creed Bratton. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. Jacob Sartorius. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. U.S. Bombs, The Cheats, Thunder Vest,

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The Homisides. 8 p.m. Millvale. 603-433-7465. RIVERS CASINO. Joel Lindsey. Wheelhouse. 8 p.m. Jeff Jimerson & Airborne. Drum Bar. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. Towne. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Rebelution, Raging Fyah. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

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What to do JANUARY 17-23

IN PITTSBURGH MONDAY 22

WEDNESDAY 17 Black Veil Brides & Asking Alexandria

Silent Disco Yoga

BELVEDERE’S ULTRA-DIVE Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. For more info visit belvederes ultradive.com. 8p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Crown the Empire. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

GRUPO CORPO BYHAM THEATER JANUARY 17

Grupo Corpo BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Cirque Du Soliel: Crystal PPG PAINTS ARENA Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Through Jan. 21.

Spafford MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest Goose. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 8p.m.

© the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust

THURSDAY 18 Fred Moten & LaToya Ruby Frazier Reading

HEINZ MEMORIAL CHAPEL Oakland. Free event. For more info visit caapp.pitt. edu. 7:30p.m.

U.S. Bombs THE FUNHOUSE AT MR. SMALLS Millvale. 412-421-4447. Over 21 event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

21+ Night: Body Art

Rebelution

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit carnegiesciencecenter.org.6p.m

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Raging Fyah. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

Pittsburgh’s Very Own w/ Molly Alphabet, Locks and Dams, Pennsylvania Dirt

FRIDAY 19

Oakland. MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. Tickets: calliopehouse.org or 412-421-4447. All ages event. 412-361-1915. 7:30p.m. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus Lift Every Voice: one. 8p.m.

& Anthony Heubel

SATURDAY 20 Howie Day

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Brian Jarvis. Over 21 event. Tickets: ticket web.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Molly Tuttle CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL

Resonating Music, Words, & Legacy

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org. 8p.m.

The Long Walk CAPA THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Jan. 28.

TUESDAY 23 Walk the Moon

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Company of Thieves. Tickets: ticketmaster .com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Stevee Wellons Band BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free event. 5p.m.

Flobots REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guests McLovins & The SLims. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Introduction to Snowshoeing Half-Price Lift Tickets

Every Wednesday from 3:30-9:30 pm

alleghenycounty.us/winterfun

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We Know Snow

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

Sunday, January 21 Π2:00-4:00 pm Harrison Hills Park

Snowshoe rentals are $10/person for ages 11+ and $5/person for ages 10 & under. Snowshoe rentals are $10/person for ages 11+ and $5/person for ages 10 & under. Pre-registration is required at alleghenycounty.us/parkprograms


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[OPERA]

EACH INDIVIDUAL BRIMS WITH PERSONALITY AFFECTIONATELY RENDERED

WALKING ON Brian Castner called it “the Crazy”: the profound disassociation from everyday life, sometimes including hallucinations, that he felt on returning from duty in Iraq as an Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) captain in the Air Force. Castner recounted his service and its effects in his acclaimed 2012 memoir The Long Walk. In 2015, composer Jeremy Howard Beck and librettist Stephanie Fleischmann debuted their opera adaptation. From Jan. 20-28, courtesy of Pittsburgh Opera, The Long Walk receives just its third production, with four performances at the intimate, 400seat CAPA School Theater. Castner’s “long walk” references both an EOD’s solitary approach to a suspected explosive and, more metaphorically, the struggle to adjust to civilian life. “It’s an extremely lonely experience. No one can help you,” Castner has said — a quote about his battlefield experience that the opera shows can also apply to learning how to relate to one’s family. In an early scene, Castner’s wife argues with the kids about them eating their carrots while his mind replays the time he and his unit encountered an Iraqi boy whose cell phone might have been a detonator. Something as simple as preparing one of his three young sons for hockey practice can summon the Crazy. Beck’s contemporary score suggests these experiences with atonal sounds and instrumentation not often seen in opera. In addition to strings, brass and woodwind, the production’s 17 musicians play two electric guitars, electronic keyboards and heavy percussion, and use their instruments to mimic gunfire and other battle sounds. “There’s a couple of places where [Beck] wants the orchestra to sound like a garage band,” says conductor Glenn Lewis. While the score is atonal (with notes outside the normal tonal range), Lewis emphasizes that the opera employs the familiar forms of arias, duets and ensembles. The 11-member cast features Pittsburgh Opera resident artist Ben Taylor, a baritone who calls Long Walk “by far the most challenging score I’ve ever sung, but it’s absolutely the most rewarding score.” One particular challenge: Because Castner ran long-distance as a coping mechanism, Taylor must do much of his singing in this two-hour-plus opera while running in place. The Opera’s supplementary programming includes a Jan. 21 booksigning by Castner himself. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE LONG WALK Jan. 20-28. Pittsburgh Opera at CAPA School Theater, 111 Ninth St., Downtown. $50 (opening night: $60). 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org

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Ben Taylor as Brian Castner in Pittsburgh Opera’s The Long Walk {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BACHMAN PHOTOGRAPHY}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Art (detail) by Emilie Stark-Menneg

[ART REVIEW]

FRESH PAINT {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

T

HE LONG RUN, currently on view at

SPACE, gathers the works of seven artists in a show the gallery describes, not quite accurately, as consisting solely of paintings. The exhibition has been compiled by guest curator and local artist Brandon Boan, whose own works were recently seen at UnSmoke Systems as part of the 181 Collective. The Long Run is intriguing not only on the basis of individual works, but through the eclecticism of the collection as a whole. Jason LaCroix contributes four largescale pieces, square canvases that bring vitality to geometry. Shapes arranged in patterns are enlivened by color; they’re kinetic and equivocal, their movement and motion shifting as the viewer does, rede-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

fining themselves each time the concentration upon them is altered, their possibility seeming unlimited. LaCroix captivates with mathematical precision and a regulation that provides a playground for commotion.

THE LONG RUN continues through Jan. 29. SPACE, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

Moving through the gallery to the next artist, LaCroix’s sharp edges and rigid order give way to an aesthetic execution nearly their polar opposite. Emilie Stark-Menneg’s softly muted blurs are lines not drawn but blended into hazy oblivion. Portraits of

contemporary Americans engage through the fondness with which they are rendered, be the subjects Rocket Pop-hued patriots, rainbow-striped Pride paraders or Wimbledon champions. Focus is filtered, but not diluted; faces are ingenuous and features indistinct, yet each individual brims with personality affectionately rendered. We experience LaCroix’s pieces as witnesses from outside; we feel Stark-Menneg’s by being pulled within. Commanding their own room within the gallery, and every bit of our attention, are three spectacular pieces by Devan Shimoyama. Glittery and treacherous, these self-portraits are ferocious and fabulous, filled to the top with lots and lots of extra: silk flowers, silver sequins, shimmering CONTINUES ON PG. 22


GALLERY CRAWL in the Cultural District

Winter 2018 Friday, January 26 5:30 – 10 pm

FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENS crawl after dark COVER CHARGES MAY APPLY

20+ events including:

#CrawlPGH

Wood Street Galleries Ryoichi Kurokawa and Novi_Sad Three audiovisual installations explore the aesthetics of data sets representing star formations, synaesthesia, and the economy.

Trust Arts Education Center Track Meet Track Meet is an interactive hip hop experience that combines freestyle rapping, art, dancing and more.

937 Liberty Ave Mingle/Mangle Art can be one large gesture or it can be made of many bits and pieces, a labor of love, an obsessive activity. This group of artists assemble the parts to make a whole that is “greater than the sum of its parts.”

crawl after dark Peirce Studio | Trust Arts Education Center

Sponsors:

DJ Party featuring DJ SMI 10 pm – 12 am

TRUS TARTS.ORG/Crawl NEWS

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FRESH PAINT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Use code CITYCITY to save $5 on single tickets

“UNDENIABLY POWERFUL.” – Living Out Loud L.A.

A RADIANT SMALLTOWN WHODUNIT

by JAMES LECESNE directed by LAURA SAVIA

JAN. 20 – FEB. 18 2018 TICKETS ON SALE NOW BOX OFFICE

412.431.CITY (2489)

WEB

1300 BINGHAM STREET / SOUTH SIDE

CITYTHEATRECOMPANY.ORG

purples and vibrating orange. The subjects are marvelous and full of glory, even with tears (crystalline, of course) falling, or while wrestling with (sparkling) serpents. They are a reminder to claim our space and to refuse smallness and silence when it’s thrust upon us, opting to be big and loud instead. Shimoyama has chosen to shout himself from the rooftops, and we want to raise our voice as well, and it is good. Thad Kellstadt offers whimsical constructions of brightly painted wooden pieces, set upon equally colorful frameworks. They’re evocative of shelves full of unidentifiable yet intriguing toys. Some are clearly figural; others resemble dioramas of theatrical or film sets, plays likely to be absurdist and movies surely arthouse; a few seem to belong to a charmingly abstract dollhouse. The desire to take them down and play is almost irresistible. Paul Mullins brings large collage-like works jumbling isolated snippets of body parts, predominantly facial features and extremities — mouths, noses, arms, hands. Grins often reveal missing or jumbled teeth, fingers may be tattooed; both often hold cigarettes. There are some feminine parts here or there, but most are clearly male, and all are white. There’s also a dog, and he seems to be wearing rabbit ears. It’s a whole lot to look at and a whole lot to take in, and something is clearly being said here, but one can’t quite hear what it is. The overall impression given by this exhibition is that of a fine example of a group show that gathers a few works each from a handful of diverse artists working in directions as distinct as they are satisfying. That’s satisfying in its own right, and pleasing, and quite enough; we can look at this person’s work over here and muse upon it and think our thoughts as we will, then mosey on to the next batch and do the same. We don’t need more. But there’s a description that the gallery gives of this exhibition, uncredited but presumably written by the curator, that attempts to force a connection upon them where one is neither necessary nor desired. It says that these works are purposed “through cultural sampling, mathematical amalgamations, and hybridized abstraction” and that they “present a working duration that attempts to respond to the surface of things.” I have been trying to figure out what the fuck this means for an embarrassingly long time now, and I have to admit, not proudly, that I am at a complete loss. These pieces stand just fine by themselves, thank you very much, and do so without being lumped together under the banner of responding to “the surface of things.” Enjoy them as they are, because they deserve it. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

[BOOK REVIEW]

DAILY LIGHT {BY STUART SHEPPARD} David Adès is a poet who convinces me that the richest poetry comes from the simplest experiences. His second major collection, Afloat in Light (UWAP Publishing, 128 pp., $22.99), with all of its references to distant lands, skies, seas and stars, is really an interior journey, exploring the transcendent possibilities of walking down a street, holding a child, or listening to a parent. These quotidian events pass by most of us unnoticed, but for Adès, they become consecrated moments, and often achieve the sublime. Adès, a native of Australia, recently spent five years in Pittsburgh when his family moved here for work reasons. Already a poet of distinction with an extensive publishing history, he quickly became a significant contributor to the local poetry scene, and has won several awards. (Unfortunately, he and his family had to return home last year.) Afloat in Light is a book that straddles hemispheres, and perspectives. Artfully divided into five sections that focus on particular aspects of Adès’ personal and familial history, they are tied together by the poet’s fascination with the cyclical nature of lightness and darkness, and the corresponding affinity between life and death. In a brilliant poem from the Pittsburgh section entitled “The Last Day of Summer,” Adès turns a simple stroll along local streets — Beechwood, Forbes and Dalzell — into a meditation on mortality, simply by noticing the markings painted by the road crews designating potholes to be filled, “all to be washed away by the first rains of fall.” This poem, like many of his strongest, evolves like a masterful film, as if the words are a montage of images not meant to be told, but seen through a flickering lens. In the powerful “Synopsis of a Story in Three Generations,” Adès writes, “My father fell,” and continues some lines later: I’ve been falling ever since, a rain that doesn’t remember how to stop itself, the idea of falling become the act. He refers to “leaving him before he finished leaving himself.” In the next stanza he synthesizes these two tropes into the stunning conceit of “falling leaves” that he encounters with his daughter on a cobblestone street, years later, merging distant generations and continents into one swirling moment, “where nothing / but the living of lives / can be saved.” This is the most enduring kind of poetry, which not only invites multiple readings, but yields more the deeper it is read. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


{PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER MULL}

Moriah Ella Mason in Sex Werque

[DANCE REVIEW]

POLE POSITION {BY STEVE SUCATO} WELCOME TO the Champagne Room, where sexily-clad women tantalize and tease, where personal connections come at a price, truths hide amidst lies, and where one thing is certain, says dancer and former stripper Moriah Ella Mason: “You are entirely safe from true love.”

MORIAH ELLA MASON PERFORMS

SEX WERQUE Thu., Jan. 18-Sun., Jan. 21. Carnegie Stage, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $10-20. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

This fantasy setting, candidly based in part on Mason’s own real-life experiences, was vividly brought to life in the her riveting one-woman dance-theater piece Sex Werque, staged in July at Carnegie Stage. The production became the first in the theater’s history to sell out all of its performances. Mason reprises Sex Werque for four performances, Jan. 18-21 at the same venue. Written, choreographed and performed by Mason, the brilliantly crafted, 80-minute, intermissionless multimedia production proved groundbreaking and memorable in its world premiere, on July 27. Mason, costumed in a camisole, bodice, stockings, garters and red platform boots, engaged the sold-out audience in a semi-

autobiographical, behind-the-scenes conversation about life as a stripper. It was structured like a cabaret piece set in a strip club (designed by Adrienne Colaruotolo), complete with stripper pole, stage, makeup table and bar cart. Mason, 30, a Trafford native, weaved an utterly engaging and compelling tale mixing dialogue, video interviews with other strippers, and dance that touched on stripping’s allure for her and others — its rewards, sacrifices, compromises in dignity, and its effects on her personal safety and emotional stability. Sex Werque is set to an original soundscape by J.F. Winkles of Pittsburgh band it it, performed live by Winkles and Eric Weidenhof. In the work, Mason dispelled many preconceived and stereotypical notions of strippers. She engaged the audience in conversations, such as by asking which stripper persona they felt best suited her, like Eden, of who she said “when you are with me, you’re in paradise.” She also demonstrated and described, in her disarming elementaryschool-teacher-sounding voice, a litany of stripper moves that she assigned numbers to, such as the butt-cheek-bouncing No. 13 and No. 14. But most captivating were the moments when Mason blurred the lines between her character and her former life in heartbreakingly real conversations about her quest to feel loved and desired. Enlightening, stimulating and poignant, Sex Werque ranks as one of 2017’s best area dance productions, and one you won’t want to miss in this new year.

FEBRUARY 17, 2018 AUGUST WILSON CENTER BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE • 412-456-6666 GROUPS 10+ 412-471-6930 TRUS TARTS. ORG

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.18-01.25.18 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com August Wilson’s plays have inspired many, but Jan. 20 will bring a first: The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s worldpremiere performance of the August Wilson Symphony. Los Angeles-based composer Kathryn Bostic, a longtime fan of the Pulitzer-winning Pittsburgh-born playwright, scored three of Wilson’s plays during his lifetime, and more recently composed the music for the PBS tribute August Wilson — The Ground on Which I Stand. Largely by developing musical cues from the plays, and her themes from the

documentary, she composed a work in five acts for full orchestra, each prefaced by a reading from Wilson’s work. At the world premiere, at Heinz Hall, the play excerpts will be read by host Phylicia Rashad. The director and Tony-winning actress is as acclaimed for her stage work (notably in Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean on Broadway, and for directing productions of several of his plays) as for her TV roles (The Cosby Show, Empire). Wilson himself was deep into blues music; his plays, rich evocations of AfricanAmerican life set mostly in the Hill District, are famously full of song. Bostic, speaking by phone, says the symphony contains “a big flow of blues” setting off readings from Gem, Joe Turner’s Come and Gone and Radio Golf. “The overall tone of the symphony has this sort of earthy, human, bluesy sensibility,” she says, adding that her main influence is “the energy and the musicality of his words.” Grammy-winning conductor Lucas Richman will guide the PSO in the 35-minute symphony. The full PSO program, titled Lift Every Voice: Resonating Music, Words, and Legacy, includes Bostic, also a pianist and vocalist, performing another tribute to Wilson, her song “State of Grace”; a musical tribute to legendary Pittsburgh photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris; and more, including performances by local artists Anqwenique, a percussion ensemble from the Pittsburgh Cultural Arts Collective, and the Hill District Unity Choir.

^ Sat., Jan. 20: Immigration-Emigration-Migration

friday 01.19

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

8 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-65. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

WORDS “The state that you hate is the state in our minds,” says Eleanor Goldfield. “It’s easy to yell at screens, to scream at the actors, but who set the stage?” The Washington, D.C.based performance poet, singer and political activist hosts the Free Speech TV news show Act Out! Her 2017 book Paradigm Lost combines radical verse with visuals from 15 contributing artists, all intended to “manufacture dissent rather than consent.” Lately she’s been hitting venues nationally with a show that combines spoken word with projected visuals. Tonight she’s fighting political apathy at The Big Idea Bookstore. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. 4812 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. www.thebigideapgh.wordpress.com

STAGE Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh works with musical-theater artists to support the creation of new works. An important phase of the process is putting new musicals in development “on their feet” in front of a live audience. Tonight, catch a first-look/listen public reading/singing of composer, lyricist and librettist Matthew Wexler’s Complete. The work delves into the mystery around Abby, a young woman whose pleasant married life is upended when a relative exposes her husband’s

secrets. Laura Barletta, Natalie Hatcher and Chris Morriss star in this free performance tonight at Downtown’s Pittsburgh CLO Academy. BO 7 p.m. 130 Academy Way (8th floor), Downtown. Free. Reservations encouraged at www.mtap.weeblycom.

saturday 01.20 STAGE The Pittsburgh-premiere production of James Lecesne’s 2015 play The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey gets its first performance tonight at City Theatre’s Lester Hamburg Studio. The story follows a gay teenager’s disappearance, the small-town detective who tries to find him, and the colorful community that helps him along the way. Keith Randolph Smith (pictured) stars as Chuck DeSantis, the detective recounting the mysterious case. City Theatre collaborated on the show with Dreams of Hope, recruiting LGBTQA youth to learn behind-the-scenes skills, and the production’s design team is all-female and transgender. Lauren Ortego 5:30 p.m. Show continues through Feb. 18. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-71. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org ^ Fri., Jan. 19: Eleanor Goldfield


{CP PHOTO OF THE 2017 PITTSBURGH WOMEN’S MARCH BY KATEY LADIKA}

^ Sun., Jan. 21: The Women’s March on Washington — Pittsburgh

ART “We all come from somewhere.” A photography exhibition highlighting five Pittsburgh photographers who explore what ties the American identity to immigration opens with a reception tonight at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Immigration-Emigration-Migration features work from noted local shooters Brian Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Nate Guidry, Lynn Johnson and Annie O’Neill. The exhibition looks to open a conversation about how the American experience has been shaped by immigrants and what it means to belong in a society whose cultural thumbprint is ever-changing. LO Reception: 6:30 p.m. ($20). Exhibit continues through April 22. 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. 724-837-1500 or www. thewestmoreland.org

sunday 01.21 EXHIBITS Here’s a for-real bargain: Starting today, the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History ^ Sat., Jan. 20: The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey are offering free admission the third Sunday of every month all year long. Carnegie Museums president and CEO Jo Ellen Parker calls the free admissions “a kind of open house for the Pittsburgh community.” Check out exhibits ranging from William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography (early photography) and Ian Cheng’s infinitely unspooling digital simulation to the provocative We Are Nature: Living in the Anthropocene. And — of course — there are dinosaur skeletons. If you haven’t seen them in a while, they’re still pretty damn big. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org or www.carnegiemnh.org CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOAN MARCUS}

^ Wed., Jan. 24: Wicked

ACTIVISM

EVENT: Second

Annual Poetry Unplugged,

August Wilson Center, Downtown

Milliones,

44, a health-care assistant from East Liberty

WHEN:

Fri., Jan. 12

This poetry slam made me, as a black American — not that I didn’t already — really appreciate who I am, and made me much more aware of my blackness and what I can do to contribute to my community and how I can make it better. It was inspirational, it was motivational, it was a platform for you to speak and not feel judged. All of the poets were excellent, I loved them all. Especially the last one. I didn’t catch his name, but he really gave me something because I love my people. I love seeing all the young [poets]. I love it, I love it. This is what we need, this is what we want. They’re the generation that knows what’s going on out here. Their eyes are wide open to the injustice and inequality that’s still going on 400 years later. This was my first time attending, but I will be back.

Locally based author Niki Kapsambelis had a pretty good 2017 with her first book, The Inheritance (Simon & Schuster), which followed a multigenerational North Dakota family with a rare genetic condition that guarantees early-onset Alzheimer’s. The Inheritance earned national publicity from The Today Show to the New York Times, and Kirkus Reviews named it one of the year’s best in nonfiction. Tonight, Kapsambelis turns up, well, in the town where she lives, for a book discussion at Mount Lebanon Public Library. The event is free. BO 7 p.m. 16 Castle Shannon Road, Mount Lebanon. Free. 412-531-1912 ext. 214 or www.mtlebanonlibrary.org

WORDS

COMEDY

If meeting a best-selling young-adult author who values diversity and whose debut novel has already been made into a motion picture is on your bucket list, prepare to check it off. Drop Everything, Everything and head to the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall for a book-signing and lecture with Nicola Yoon. Today’s program, part of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Words and Pictures series, is followed by a signing. Yoon’s latest book, The Sun Is Also a Star, won honors including the Coretta Scott King New Talent Award. LO 2:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

tuesday 01.23

B Y LAUR E N ORTEGO

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WORDS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

COMEDY Self-styled “Ambassador of Americana” Charles Phoenix has made his name with books and television appearances celebrating the goofy side of our nation’s heritage — from traversing the highways and byways in search of roadside attractions to cooking up alarmingly colored 1960s foodstuffs in his Test Kitchen videos. Now Phoenix brings his stage show, Addicted to Americana, to Mr. Smalls Theatre. It’s an evening of amusing tales from the road, supplemented with a slideshow composed of found vintage Kodachrome images. Mid-century America has never looked so colorful, so kooky, so funny. Al Hoff 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

As both a former rock star and the mysterious, fan-favorite kleptomaniac from a hit comedy show, Creed Bratton is a character on and off screen. Bratton has traveled the world, performed on stages nationally, done nude busracing, and fished for sharks. After the success of his mischievous character on NBC’s The Office, loosely based on himself and even sharing his name, the former guitarist for The Grass Roots is headed to The Rex Theater tonight for an evening full of music and comedy. LO 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20-25. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.net > Tue., Jan. 23: Addicted to Americana

CRITIC: Debra

wednesday 01.24

A year ago, in response to a certain presidential inauguration, the Pittsburgh Women’s March took over Downtown in solidarity with momentous women’s marches in Washington, D.C., and around the country. Today, The Women’s March on Washington – Pittsburgh looks to keep the flames of protest burning. Power to the Polls is the theme for this weekend’s events nationally, which focus on voter participation and registration. The Pittsburgh event, which starts at the City-County Building and proceeds to Market Square, includes training sessions, a march and a rally. BO 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Start at 414 Grant St., Downtown. www.facebook.com (“women’s march on washington pittsburgh”)

STAGE Come defy gravity as a touring Broadway production of the Tony Award-winning hit Wicked opens tonight at the Benedum Center. The musical follows Elphaba, later known as the Wicked Witch of the West, and her journey to becoming “wicked.” The show is a revisionist take on The Wizard of Oz, told from the perspective of Elphaba and Galinda, i.e., “Glinda the Good.” The musical by Stephen Schwartz and Winnie Holzman visits for an extended run here courtesy of PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. LO 7:30 p.m. Show continues through Sun., Feb. 11. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $44-159. 412-456-4800 or www.trustarts.org


DE

SI

the

ON

“I REALIZED THAT IT WAS FOOD AND MOOD AND MOOD AND FOOD.”

COOKIES AND ICE CREAM For the last couple of years, Millie’s Homemade Ice Cream has been tantalizing Pittsburgh with its treats — small-batch ice creams sourced from local ingredients. Now Millie’s has teamed up with Macaron Bar to create ice-cream sandwiches topped and bottomed with the artfully crafted, slightly crispy, slightly chewy French cookie. “[Macaron Bar] approached us. They are a Cleveland-based company, and had recently expanded to the greater Pittsburgh area. They currently operate a kiosk in Ross Park Mall, but are looking for a brick-andmortar location in the city,” writes Melissa Horst, retail operations manager of Millie’s Homemade, via email. “They have a relationship with a gelato company in Ohio, and were searching for a like-minded ice-cream maker based in Pittsburgh.” The result of the partnership is this decadent sandwich, currently available at both of Millie’s shops, as well as at Macaron Bar, in Ross Park Mall. Currently, Millie’s offers two flavors: Best Chocolate and Vietnamese Coffee. And good news for those with gluten sensitivities: Macarons are made with almond flour and are gluten-free. “Macaron Bar currently has more flavor options available than the [ice-cream] shops, but we will continue to experiment with different flavor options,” says Horst. It’s an inspired pairing: The texture of the macaron holds up well to the richness of the ice cream. The temptation is to tear off the wrapper, but patience is advised. “We recommend guests allow them a few minutes to come to temperature before eating as it enhances the flavor and texture of the sandwich,” notes Horst. In addition to serving up macaron sandwiches, winter flavor offerings are in full swing at Millie’s. The roasted-pear almond combines the nutty-buttery taste of almond with crisp fruit flavors, while the black-walnut molasses is a marriage of dark, rich flavors. For a throwback flavor, try tin roof — that classic blend of vanilla, fudge and peanut. And it’s not all about the frozen treats: When’s it chilly outside, consider warming up with a hot chocolate from Millie’s downtown location. MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

246 Forbes Ave., Downtown, and 232 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. www.millieshomemade.com NEWS

Best Chocolate ice-cream sandwich {CP PHOTO BY MEG FAIR}

{BY MEG FAIR}

{CP PHOTOS BY VANESSA SONG}

Lindsey Smith (right) with food stylist Quelcy Kogel (left) at a “Taco Party” held Jan. 11, in celebration of the book launch

EAT YOUR FEELINGS {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

L

OCAL AUTHOR Lindsey Smith wants you to eat your feelings. Smith, also known as the Food Mood Girl, released her third book Eat Your Feelings, The Food Mood Girl’s Guide to Transforming Your Emotional Eating (St. Martin’s Press) in December. She is now laughing, rapping and cooking her way toward teaching people the connection between what they eat and their emotions. At her book release, the spread was all dishes from the book — spicy butternutsquash soup, sweet potato and sage risotto, two quiches (one with a potato crust), almond chia bread, cucumber bites and turmeric lemonade. Clad in a power suit made from a smiling-vegetable print and beaming a thousand-watt smile, Smith projected ease and confidence, but she didn’t always feel so empowered. “When I was a kid and in fourth grade,

I suffered from really bad anxiety,” Smith told City Paper at the Dec. 27 event. “I was hospitalized by the time I was in fifth grade for panic attacks. … I knew that wasn’t a normal way to feel and that I wanted

EAT YOUR FEELINGS BOOK EVENT 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 25 Penguin Bookshop, 417 Beaver St., Sewickley www.penguinbookshop.com

to feel better and healthier.” She begged her parents to get her help, and they sent her to therapy. It set her on a path toward recovery, but fell short of the more comprehensive experience she felt she needed. Over a decade ago, her sister started going to a wellness center in their hometown of Leechburg and was seeing positive

results in weight loss, as well as a boost in confidence and mood. Inspired, Smith decided to go to a naturopath. “It completely changed my life,” she said. “He taught me everything. ... It was the mind, body, spirit, connected.” They exercised together, talked and worked on Smith’s self-confidence. She blossomed under this care and started cooking healthy foods for herself. By ninth grade, she was teaching stress-management workshops to her peers. Since then, Smith has been hungry for knowledge, self-improvement and working to empower others. She continued her education with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and communications at Duquesne University; she later studied online at The Institute for Integrative Nutrition and Rouxbe Online Culinary School. From her time with her childhood neuropath through her education, one CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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foundational idea emerged. “I realized that it was food and mood and mood and food, and so I thought, ‘I’m just going to go for it,’” she said. She started the Food Mood Girl brand in 2010, with a website, speaking engagements, collaborations and a rap or two about health.

design, with food styling by Quelcy Kogel and cute, informational illustrations by Kate Reingold. Illustrations of knife skills show the best way to cut onions and other vegetables and help educate readers on basic cooking skills. Ideally, having better skills can expedite the cooking process for hangry readers and prevent frustration. “I IN HER FIRST book Junk Food and Junk say, ‘you are what you chop.’ Because, most Moods, self-published in 2012, Smith people, when it comes to cooking, it’s not shared her story, plus tips on eating to im- that they don’t like cooking, it’s that they prove mood. She found that her readers don’t like chopping,” said Smith. really identified with the idea of food Since she began her food-mood and mood being linked. This spurred Eat journey, Smith has seen a shift in culYour Feelings in which Smith offers a tural awareness of how people eat and comprehensive guide to food prepara- think about eating. Healthful foods have tion, recipes, and making food become more mainstream. “I’m happy decisions based on improving people are embracing it and loving and balancing mood. it,” she said. “We still have a long For moreit Eat Your Feelings addresses way to go. … The issue we have info, vis. www d five moods: sad, stressed, tired, now is making it more [finano foodmom. bored and hangry (angry from cially] accessible to people.” girl.co being hungry). Simple recipes “It’s a $25 book, not everyone are provided for each mood seccan afford that. ... But what I can tion with explanations of why certain do and other people can do is make a foods were chosen. “Each of the different difference in their own communities,” she dishes represents a different emotion. I said. Smith, who has lived in Hazelwood use ingredients based on that emotion. If since 2013, opens her house up to neighboryou’re sad, the goal is to be happy. If you’re hood children. “I basically run an unofficial stressed, your goal is to be calm. So I use in- after-school program,” she said. She likes gredients in the recipes that help with those to cook with young people and pass on her things,” she said. One of her favorite recipes culinary knowledge. “If you don’t know is for almond chia bread. She posits that how to cut an onion, you aren’t empowered hanger happens because of low blood sugar in the kitchen,” she said. and that foods like chia seeds and almonds, Smith doesn’t forget about mood in which are complex carbohydrates, will give her food-mood pursuits. “You can eat as you a boost without the sugar rush which much kale as you want, you can put as can wear off quickly. Smith also includes many superfoods into your smoothie — it’s chapters about stocking and maintaining not going to make you a better person. It a healthful pantry, cooking basics and some may make you happier, but you really also science on how foods affect us. have to address the emotions behind what The book is a delight in content and you’re doing,” she said. C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK:

MINT JULEP

[ON THE ROCKS]

TODDY TIME {BY DREW CRANISKY} Muddy Waters Oyster Bar 130 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty DRINK: Apple mint julep INGREDIENTS: Brandy, apple-cider reduction, lemon, wormwood bitters, mint sprig OUR TAKE: The notes of apple have a strong presence in this drink and help boost this classic into new territory. The brandy is rich and spiced, while the mint adds a little menthol effect that’s excellent for winter chills.

VS.

“UNDER THE proper circumstances, a Hot Toddy — particularly one constructed upon a foundation of good Highland malt whisky — is one of the clearest signs I know that there is a providential plan to the universe.” So says celebrated drinks writer David Wondrich in his excellent book Imbibe! And it would seem, with the bitter winds howling and the flu bugs flying, that this month has brought us the most proper of circumstances to break out the toddy mugs. As with anything involving centuries-old drinking practices, it’s difficult

to pinpoint the exact origin of the hot toddy. The word “toddy” is derived from a Hindi word for palm sap, though how it came to refer to a warm whiskey cocktail is anyone’s guess. As Wondrich suggests, the hot toddy as we know it today seems to be Scottish in origin. It makes sense: a piping-hot, potent toddy would be the perfect antidote to the damp chill of the Scottish Highlands. Like the old-fashioned, the hot toddy is more of a cocktail template than a strictly defined recipe. It’s a drink that can be prepared at a moment’s notice, and it lends itself to tinkering

A PROPER TODDY COAXES BEAUTY FROM AUSTERITY.

based on personal preference and what you happen to have on hand. It’s a quick fix to any number of wintry problems, from a drafty house or a sore throat to the post-holiday doldrums. That said, there are a few toddy dos and don’ts. Do choose a robust spirit. Since there’s little else going on, you’ll want something with body and character as the base. Single-malt scotch is classic, but dark rum, cognac, apple brandy and cask-strength bourbon also work well. Don’t use a clear spirit, like vodka, or a spineless whiskey like Jack Daniel’s. Do get creative with the sweetener: Try raw sugar, honey or maple syrup. But don’t use too much. The aim is to thicken and round out the drink, not overtake it with sugar. And do feel free to garnish tastefully. A twist of lemon, a cinnamon stick or a bit of fresh nutmeg are lovely additions. You will often see all manner of hot drinks billed as toddies on modern cocktail menus. Perhaps bartenders fear that three ingredients (two, if you don’t count water) would be just too simple for today’s craft-cocktail crowds. And while those tea- and liqueur-spiked drinks may well be delicious, a proper toddy coaxes beauty from austerity. As Wondrich reminds us, “Toddy … is a simple drink in the same way a tripod is a simple device: Remove one leg and it cannot stand, set it up properly and it will hold the whole weight of the world.”

Maggie’s Toddy 2 ounces Maggie’s Farm Dark Rum Bar spoon of honey 4 ounces boiling water

Combine all ingredients in a warmed mug. Garnish with a clove-studded orange slice and serve. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Check out City Paper ’s Blogh for local food news and assorted tidbits. www.pghcitypaper.com

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Domaine Dozon Chinon Cabernet Franc 2015

DRINK: Mint julep INGREDIENTS: Old Grand-Dad Bonded bourbon, fresh mint, Demerara sugar OUR TAKE: Mint hits the nose immediately in this delightfully icy drink. Delicate and herbal, the mint and bourbon combine in this cocktail to dangerous effect. No one would blame you for eating this drink’s crushed ice.

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Domaine Dozon Chinon Cabernet Franc 2015 is available at Andys Wine Bar.

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FRESH ANIMATION

TO LOVE AND BE LOVED IS QUITE WONDERFUL AND AWFUL, AND TRULY VITAL

{BY AL HOFF} This week at Row House Cinema, it’s a slate of recent animated feature films, three of them Pittsburgh premieres. BIRDBOY: THE FORGOTTEN CHILDREN. This Spanish film from Pedro Rivero and Alberto Vázquez should delight those who like their tales dark. The story takes place in a dystopic realm of anthropomorphic animals. Some scavenge for copper in the wasteland, others kill the pain with drugs. But a teenage mouse named Dinky rouses three friends, and they set off to escape their sad homes. Caught in their scheme is Birdboy, a tragic lost soul whom Dinky loves. The images, however grim, are gorgeously rendered, and there is a scintilla of hope to this bleak tale. In Spanish, with subtitles. Jan. 19-21, Jan. 22 and Jan. 24

Daniel Day-Lewis in Phantom Thread (left) and Timothée Chalamet in Call Me By Your Name

AFFAIRS

The Breadwinner

OF THE HEART {BY AL HOFF}

ics’ year-end best-of lists are finally opening in Pittsburgh on Fri., Jan. 19. Both are worthy of the nods; each is a finely crafted probe of the human heart, though each takes a quite different path to a similar conclusion: To love and be loved is quite wonderful and awful, and truly vital.

Phantom Thread. It is fair to say that this is a movie that starts in one place — the realm of the rarefied, coddled male genius that I found to be tiresome — then ever so slowly twists and turns until it is quite a different sort of story that I enjoyed very much. Paul Thomas Anderson’s period drama, set in 1950s London, is a character study by way of a romance on its way to a dark comedy. It introduces us to Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), a fastidious hautecouture designer; his droll sister and manager, Cyril (Leslie Manville); and a young waitress, Alma (Vicky Krieps), whom he brings into his home as his muse.

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Alma is, in the modern parlance, a disruptor. (I’d say a “quiet” one, but there is a delightful bit of arch comedy around her noisy way with toast.) There ensues a three-way power struggle, all while the genteel trappings go on, as they must — from dinner parties to dress-fittings. Anderson’s film is a psychosexual potboiler, with the flame set barely at simmer. Thus does it take some patience to fully realize its exquisitely layered obsessions with beauty, control and unfathomable partnerships. But the viewer is assured a satisfying journey, marked by great performances, beautiful costumes and luxe interiors. Manor, AMC Greensburg, SouthSide Works

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THE BREADWINNER. From director Nora Twomey (who co-directed The Secret of the Kells) comes this tale of perseverance set in the Taliban-controlled city of Kabul, Afghanistan. After her father is wrongfully imprisoned, 11-year-old Parvana must disguise herself as a boy in order to leave the house, earn money doing odd jobs and provide food. These excursions are exhilarating for their freedom, but also fraught with danger. Parvana’s story is intercut with a mythical tale she tells her family of another plucky adventurer, making his way through a fantastical landscape. 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 17 (sneak preview), and Jan. 19-25 MARY AND THE WITCH’S FLOWER. Adapted from Mary Stewart’s classic children’s book The Little Broomstick, this Japanese anime from Hiromasa Yonebayashi takes viewers through young Mary’s crazy adventures after she picks some magical flowers. Soon she is transported by broom to a witch college in the sky, but her amazement soon turns to concern after discovering a nefarious plot. Yonebayashi is a veteran of Studio Ghibli, and the film reflects that style and vibe. Dubbed and subtitled; see www. rowhousecinema.com. Jan. 19-25 COCO. Rounding out the program is this recent critically acclaimed feature from Pixar, directed by Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina. In it, a Mexican boy travels to the Land of the Dead to find his great-greatgrandfather, a legendary singer. It’s a fun story, emphasizing family and heritage, and the digital animation is superb. Jan. 19-25

Call Me By Your Name. The

emotional lives of the well-to-do also feature in Luca Guadagnino’s lush, sun-drenched coming-of-age story, set in the summer of 1983 in a charmingly shabby villa in Northern Italy. It is the summer home of an archaeology professor (Michael Stuhlbarg)

who is hosting Oliver (Armie Hammer), an American graduate student. At once drawn to Oliver — by boredom, if nothing else — is the prof’s 17-year-old son, Elio (Timothée Chalamet), a sensitive, intelligent teen, teetering madly between boy and man. That Oliver and Timothy, over the course of the languid season, develop a romantic relationship barely describes the intimate pleasures of this film. It recalls the enjoyable laziness of having nothing to do (except maybe go swimming or read); the frantic, exhilarating jumble of emotions that must be sorted through, hidden and celebrated; and how certain loves, however fleeting, will leave the players forever changed. There is an air of the impossibly dreamy about the slowly unfolding events — and how the camera adores each man — but beneath its sublime scenery and beautiful people are the recognizable truths of too-real relationships. In English, Italian and French, with subtitles. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Nielsen, play it straight, and mid-air disaster has never been funnier. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 17. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW ANIMATION SHOW OF SHOWS. This curated 90-minute program of 16 animated short films from around the world offers some laughs, some gorgeous visuals and a fair amount of reflection on troubled times and assorted anxieties. Among the distressed are the night-shift workers depicted in “The Burden,” a dizzying work from Sweden that travels from odd to profound, with roots in the Hollywood musical. For laughs, there are the relatable everyday disappointments of “Unsatisfying,” the wry British domestic tableau of “The Alan Dimension,” and the candy-colored, dialoguefree charms of “Gokurosama,” set in a Japanese mall. Basketball fans will note “Dear Basketball,” Kobe Bryant’s ode to the sport that defined his life; and “Domestic Bees,” a clever four-dimensional visual take on intersecting lives. In the midst of the new films, it was a restored short from 50 years ago that felt most relevant: “Hangman,” based on a poem by Maurice Ogden, is a gorgeously depicted version of the “first, they came for the other guy, so I did nothing” warning. Starts Fri., Jan 19. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

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THE COMMUTER. In Jaume Collet-Serra’s absurd but relatively entertaining thriller, Liam Neeson plays an everyman — a financially stressed family man who is just trying to get to his suburban home from Manhattan on the Metro North train. For reasons too dumb and complicated to explain here, he winds up spending the normally uneventful journey variously interrogating, punching and rescuing his fellow passengers. It gives Neeson plenty of time to roam the cars, sorting out red herrings, while also worrying about his wife and his 401(k); first he’s panicked, then he’s out for justice! He may be a mild-mannered insurance man, but don’t count him out when it comes time to jump train cars. The first half of the film is better than the second — it sets up a recognizable character and lets him work through a moral quandary. Then it’s Neeson Action Time, and a series of increasingly ridiculous set-ups and easily guessed plot feints. It’s also about 15 minutes too long, but not bad for a cold winter night, if you like to see Neeson get shit done. (AH) DEN OF THIEVES. Some dudes decide to rob the impossible-to-rob Federal Reserve and wind up matching wits with an elite unit from the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department. Gerard Butler, Pablo Schreiber and O’Shea Jackson star in Christian Gudegast’s actioner. Starts Fri., Jan. 19 FOREVER MY GIRL. A country-music star (Alex Roe) returns home to the girl (Jessica Rothe) he loves. Bethany Ashton Wolf directs. Starts Fri., Jan. 19 FREAK SHOW. Teenager Billy Bloom (Alex Lawther) decides to run for homecoming queen at a conservative high school. Trudy Styler directs this comedy that celebrates those who dare to be different; Abigail Breslin and AnnaSophia Robb also star. Starts Fri., Jan. 19. Harris LOVER FOR A DAY. After a bad break-up, twentysomething Jeanne decamps to Paris to stay with her father. There she finds that his new girlfriend, also in her 20s, has moved in. Philippe Garrel directs. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Jan. 19. Regent Square

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Mom and Dad

THE WORLD’S END. The 2013 conclusion of Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg’s “Cornetto Trilogy” is an ensemble comedy headed by Pegg and Nick Frost, directed by Wright — and doubling as a genre-riffmash-up, combining sci-fi and reunion films. Five pals reunite in their hometown after 20 years apart, and their dissolute leader, Gary (Pegg), insists they re-tackle an unfinished pub crawl — 12 pubs, from The First Post to The World’s End. Turns out things in town are not quite right, and each pub stop brings more disturbing developments. While not as strong as the previous films (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz), there are plenty of laughs, a full complement of 1990s Brit-pop, and a lesson or two about how things change, how they stay the same, and what remains important. Hint: friends. Midnight, Sat., Jan. 20. Row House Cinema HIS GIRL FRIDAY. A newspaper editor juggles his exwife (and former reporter) while prepping to cover an execution in this razor-sharp 1940 comedy from Howard Hawks, adapted from the Ben Hecht-Charles MacArthur play The Front Page. Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell star. 11 a.m. Sun., Jan. 21. Hollywood HIDDEN FORTRESS. Two poor farmers on the run join a general (Toshiro Mifune) who is seeking a cache of gold and also hopes to free a princess, in Akira Kurosawa’s lightly comic samurai action film. The 1960 film has been cited by George Lucas as an inspiration for Star Wars. In Japanese, with subtitles. 6 p.m. Sun., Jan. 21. Regent Square

The Commuter MOM AND DAD. If you’re looking for an unrepentantly dark, bat-shit horror comedy, then writer-director Brian Taylor has got one for you. Its shocking premise is rooted in the tiresome trope of parents complaining about their kids and joking about killing them. Here, for some unexplained reason, on an otherwise normal sunny Southern California day, all the parents murder their kids, often in baroque fashion. You won’t be surprised that Taylor taps noted over-actor Nicolas Cage to star as the dad of the highlighted family — and Cage delivers. But so does Selma Blair as Mom, who suffers the most indignities as a parent, before revving up the electric saw. (“It’s called a Sawzall because it saws all,” she explains, while chasing her kids with it.) If you’re open to it — and OK with a lot violence — it’s an amusing, nasty satire (with some inspired song choices) of those perfect suburban families, and the artificial expectations our culture imposes on mom, dad, the kids and power tools. There is a one-day premiere on Jan. 19, then the film plays the Hollywood, in Dormont, beginning Jan. 26. 1 and 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 19. Chartiers Valley Stadium, Bridgeville 12 STRONG. Nicolai Fuglsig directs this drama, inspired by real events, about the first Special Forces team deployed to Afghanistan after Sept. 11. Chris Hemsworth and Michael Shannon head an ensemble cast. Starts Fri., Jan. 19

REPERTORY HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE AGE OF TRUMP FILM SERIES. Duquesne University is offering a four-film series, featuring recent documentaries that highlight human-rights issues. First up on Wed., Jan. 17, is Ava DuVernay’s 13th, which looks at the uneasy relationship in the U.S. between race, justice and incarceration. On Wed., Jan. 24, it’s An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, in which Al Gore provides an update

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on the health of the planet’s environment and how we’re helping or hurting. Films screen at 7 p.m. Room 105, College Hall, Duquesne campus, Uptown. 412-396-6415. Free AIRPLANE! After more than a decade of overly melodramatic disaster films, America needed a spoof to cleanse its palate. In 1980, filmmakers Jim Abrahams, David Zucker and Jerry Zucker delivered with this non-stop gag-fest about an airborne emergency. The actors, including Leslie

CP

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BODY FARM. Catch the Pittsburgh premiere of this locally produced horror film from Nicholas LaMantia and Brandon Keenan. In it, folks check out a body farm, where decomposition is researched, and discover that something is not going well. 7 p.m. Tue., Jan. 23. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. $10. www.bodyfarmmovie.com SLAPSHOT. Greatest movie ever about hockey. George Roy Hill’s rough-and-tumble 1977 comedy follows the travails of a struggling Western PA minor-league hockey team. The Charlestown Chiefs have got a cranky, profane coach (Paul Newman) and an on-ice assault known as the Hanson brothers. Set amid the gloomy winter of mid-1970s economic malaise, this film should resonate with today’s depressed audiences, yet still provide some much-needed belly laughs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 24. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 (AH)

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NO PLAYER IN HIS RIGHT MIND WOULD WANT TO COME OUT AND WIN ONE FOR STEELY

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} JAN. 18, 1923 Former Pitt standout Jock Sutherland is hired as the team’s head coach, replacing Pop Warner. In 14 seasons with the Panthers, Sutherland would lose just 20 games and win nine consensus national championships, of which Pitt recognizes five today. Following World War II, Sutherland took over as head coach and vice president of the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Jock Sutherland

JAN. 18, 1971 Pittsburgh native and national fan favorite Bruno Sammartino sees his eightyear WWWF championship run come to an end in a loss to “The Russian Bear” Ivan Koloff, at Madison Square Gardens. (Interestingly, Koloff wasn’t Russian, but Canadian. And earlier in his career, before finding fame as Koloff, he wrestled as Irishman Red McNulty, of Dublin.) The match result nearly caused a riot as fans — who believed wrestling results were not predetermined — were crying and screaming because they thought Koloff had damaged Sammartino’s hearing.

JAN. 19, 2013 Baseball legend and Donora native Stan “The Man” Musial dies at the age of 82. Except for a one-year stint in the navy during World War II, Musial played continuously for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1941 to 1963.

{CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

Ben Roethlisberger at Heinz Field on Sun., Jan. 14

FIRE DRILL

JAN. 20, 1980 The Steelers become the first team to win four Super Bowls when they defeat the L.A. Rams 31-19 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.

JAN. 21, 1957 Pittsburgh Mayor David L. Lawrence presents ground-breaking baseball player Jackie Robinson with a key to the city following his retirement from baseball.

JAN. 22, 2007 Mike Tomlin is introduced as new head coach of the Steelers.

JAN. 22, 2012 Long-tenured Penn State football coach Joe Paterno dies. Paterno was coach of the Nittany Lions until he was fired in 2011, at the height of the Jerry Sandusky sexual-abuse scandal.

JAN. 23, 2005 Steelers broadcasting legend Myron Cope calls his last game, a 41-27 loss to New England for the AFC championship.

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

T

HE PITTSBURGH Steelers won’t be winning their seventh Super Bowl this year. And after being pushed around by the Jacksonville Jaguars Jan. 14 at Heinz Field, it’s obvious that there’s plenty of blame to go around, that everybody sucks and some big changes need to happen. How do I know? Twitter told me: __________________________________

most ridiculous plays at the wrong times. Fire them all and bring Bill Cowher back.” __________________________________

“One takeaway from this NFL weekend. after a decade plus as starting QB. Ben Roethlisberger isn’t a leader for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Far from it, tbh.” __________________________________

It’s natural after a big loss like this for folks to take the game way too seriously. But these fans don’t understand the game like I do. Yes, heads need to roll, but most fans are only looking at the surface of things. It’s easy to fire a coach and trade a quarterback, but only a real football visionary knows how to fix the Steelers. With that: Here are the personnel moves that I would make in the offseason:

“Fire Mike Tomlin. ASAP!” __________________________________

“I hope Big Ben hangs it up ... i want a franchise QB who doesn’t act like a drama queen after every loss. Guy doesn’t play with heart. I think we should fire Keith Butler our D coordinator and Mike Tomlin’s job should be on the hot seat. We got embarrassed.” __________________________________

“Other fans can say fire Mike Tomlin, but not me. Believe he will get Steelers #7. Todd Haley will probably go though.”

“Mike Tomlin needs to go, Todd Haley needs to go, Keith Butler needs to go. This coaching staff calls the

“Ben Roethlisberger is so good, he’s only had the greatest running backwide receiver tandem in history and done absolutely nothing with them.” __________________________________

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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“I still can’t believe Haley ran a pitch play on 4th down against the league’s fastest D.” __________________________________

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

Blow up Heinz Field and build a domed stadium. Obviously, the frigid temperatures were the main reason the Steelers lost. Who CONTINUES ON PG. 34


G et C h ee ky H City Paper A Night Witneh d PGParenthood and Plan tern pa oof wes

Be Our Valentine! To celebrate the Love and Sex issue, the Pittsburgh City Paper is hosting a delightful night of fun, games, and prizes.Featuring live music from Pittsburgh City Paper's “Face the Music Battle of the Bands” 1st place winner, Chase and the Barons.

Hosted by Lola LeCroix

Wednesday, February 14 Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square 8-11 pm, 21+ event $5 online / $10 at the door

Tickets available at cooltix.com

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FIRE DRILL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

Steelers coach Mike Tomlin

could possibly play in inhumane temperatures like that. Well, except a team from Jacksonville, Fla.

Fire Steely McBeam. Everyone hates that buffoon in the hard hat with perpetual 5 o’clock shadow. He’s a horrible mascot. No player in his right mind would want to come out and win one for Steely. I think that played a huge role in Sunday’s loss.

Fire Mike Tomlin and rehire Bill Cowher. It makes perfect sense. In 14 seasons, Cowher won eight AFC North Titles and two AFC Championships and was 1-1 in the Super Bowl. Tomlin, on the other hand, has won six AFC North Titles and two AFC Championships and is 1-1 in Super Bowls. Cowher amassed his record in 14 years. Tomlin won the Super Bowl in his second year and made a return trip two seasons later. The thing is, Tomlin has done this all in a much shorter time than Cowher (10 seasons). Mike Tomlin gives Steelers fans the chance to win a Super Bowl every year. Bill Cowher would be a better choice because then we could all lower our expectations and be less disappointed.

Fire offensive coordinator Todd Haley. No sarcastic humor this time. The guy’s got play-calling issues. No quarterback sneak on fourth-and-nothing twice? Time to go, Todd.

Sign Thor to play quarterback. It’s no secret that Thor’s alter ego, Chris Hemsworth was at the game Sunday. The public perception is that he was there promoting a movie. But no, Hemsworth is actually Thor. A Steelers insider tells me that the God of Thunder is being considered because fans want more than a mere mortal under center. I have not been able to confirm rumors that Hulk is being brought in to play defensive end.

Chris Hemsworth takes a selfie with a fan.

Hire a young scientist from CMU who believes in the power of time travel. Let him build a time machine. Take that time machine back to the year 2000 and force Cowher not to draft Tennessee quarterback Tee Martin in the fifth round, and instead take a chance on a young QB out of Michigan named Tom Brady. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ACROSS 1. Mal de ___ 4. He was with Hillary 10. “That’s how it’s done, folks” 14. Game that nobody wins 15. Spain’s home 16. Chills out 17. Tie the knot 18. Stable folks? 20. Drummer Puente 22. Play for the camera 23. One with a raygun 24. Stable words? 28. Thermal opening? 29. Game tally: Abbr. 30. Third class?: Abbr. 33. Painting stands 36. Scheduled to arrive 37. Hand sanitizer alternative 38. Stable breakfast? 41. Game for horses 42. “Only Connect” channel 43. Whined aloud 44. It’s roughly at 1:00: Abbr. 45. “Just like to mention this,” initially 46. Education basics, briefly 47. Stable science? 53. Remove from the package 56. It’s a miner thing

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.17/01.24.2018

57. TV actress ___ Rachel Wood 58. Stable smokes? 62. The night before 63. First subheading 64. Undergarment on the torso 65. “Automatic For The People” band 66. Puts down new turf 67. Iran-___ Affair 68. Subtle

DOWN 1. Weekday letters 2. Library singalong refrain 3. Event when things are priced to move 4. Takeaway game 5. First guest on “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman” 6. Show you’ve seen before 7. Spurs coach Popovich 8. Shoot (for) 9. His 11 was retired by the Rockets 10. Bibliography entry 11. Trendy berry 12. Storychanging word 13. Focused grp. 19. Clothes that need to be replaced 21. 1976 Greatest Hits

album that includes “Evil Woman” 25. Sit around 26. “Superman” catchphrase starter 27. Elite squad 30. Comic who said “Roman Polanski, in college, he didn’t have a major. He only had minors” 31. Alternative to a leafblower 32. Flew through 33. “First Take” channel 34. Many, many 35. Clairvoyant 36. Tom Perez’s org. 37. Hard to find 39. Last story?

40. Sushi veggie 45. Shrewd 47. Drinks at the movies 48. Grieve 49. Young’s partner in consulting 50. Hold back 51. Omphaloskeptic’s concern 52. The other side 53. Some Harpoon beers 54. Spanish boy 55. Ran over, as in publishing 59. Include in an email secretively 60. Bog room 61. Boarding place: Abbr. {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.17-01.24

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “When one door closes, another opens,” said inventor Alexander Graham Bell. “But we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened.” Heed his advice, Aquarius. Take the time you need to mourn the lost opportunity. But don’t take MORE than the time you need. The replacement for or alternative to what’s gone will show up sooner than you think.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gilbert Stuart painted the most famous portrait of America’s first president, George Washington. It’s the image on the U.S. one-dollar bill. And yet Stuart never finished the masterpiece. Begun in 1796, it was still a work-in-progress when Stuart died in 1828. Leonardo da Vinci had a similar type of success. His incomplete painting “The Virgin and Child With St. Anne” hangs in the Louvre in Paris, and his unfinished “The Adoration of the Magi” has been in Florence’s Uffizi Gallery since 1671. I propose that Stuart and da Vinci serve as your role models in the coming weeks. Maybe it’s not merely OK if a certain project of yours remains unfinished; maybe that’s actually the preferred outcome.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Many American women did not have the right to vote until Aug. 18, 1920. On that day, the Tennessee General Assembly became the 36th state legislature to approve the 19th Amendment, thus sealing the legal requirements to change the U.S. Constitution and ensure women’s suffrage. The ballot in Tennessee was close. At the last minute, 24-yearold legislator Harry T. Burns changed his mind from no to yes, thanks to a letter from his mother, who asked him to “be a good boy” and vote in favor. I suspect that in the coming weeks, Aries, you will be in a pivotal position not unlike Burns’. Your decision could affect more people than you know. Be a good boy or good girl.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming weeks, Destiny will be calling you and calling you and calling you, inviting you to answer its summons. If you do indeed answer, it will provide you with clear instructions about what you will need to do to expedite your ass in the direction of the future. If, on the other hand, you refuse to listen to Destiny’s call, or hear it and refuse to respond, then Destiny will take a different tack. It won’t provide any instructions, but will simply yank your ass in the direction of the future.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Looks like the Season of a Thousand and One Emotions hasn’t drained and frazzled you. Yes, there may be a pool of tears next to your bed. Your altar might be filled with heaps of ashes, marking your burnt offerings. But you have somehow managed to extract a host of useful lessons from your tests and trials. You have surprised yourself with the resilience and resourcefulness you’ve been able to summon. And so the energy you’ve gained through these gritty triumphs is well worth the price you’ve had to pay.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Every relationship is unique. The way you connect with another person — whether it’s through friendship, romance, family or collaborative projects — should be free to find the distinctive

identity that best suits its special chemistry. Therefore, it’s a mistake to compare any of your alliances to some supposedly perfect ideal. Luckily, you’re in an astrological period when you have extra savvy about cultivating unique models of togetherness. So I recommend that you devote the coming weeks to deepening and refining your most important bonds.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During recent weeks, your main tasks have centered on themes often associated with strain and struggle: repair, workaround, reassessment, juryrigging, adjustment, compromise. Amazingly, Leo, you have kept your suffering to a minimum as you have smartly done your hard work. In some cases you have even thrived. Congratulations on being so industrious and steadfast! Beginning soon, you will glide into a smoother stage of your cycle. Be alert for the inviting signs. Don’t assume you’ve got to keep grunting and grinding.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) created four versions of his iconic artwork “The Scream.” Each depicts a person who seems terribly upset, holding his head in his hands and opening his mouth wide as if unleashing a loud shriek. In 2012, one of these images of despair was sold for almost $120 million. The money went to the son of a man who had been Munch’s friend and patron. Can you think of a way that you and yours might also be able to extract value or get benefits from a negative emotion or a difficult experience? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to do just that.

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ventional or grotesque fantasy. They may consider you dreamy and eccentric. I hope you won’t allow their misunderstandings to interfere with your playful yet serious work.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Bubble gum is more elastic and less sticky than regular chewing gum. That’s why you can blow bubbles with it. A Capricorn accountant named Walter Diemer invented it in 1928 while working for the Fleer Chewing Gum Company. At the time he finally perfected the recipe, the only food dye he had on hand was pink. His early batches were all that color, and a tradition was born. That’s why even today, most bubble gum is pink. I suspect a similar theme may unfold soon in your life. The conditions present at the beginning of a new project may deeply imprint the future evolution of the project. So try to make sure those are conditions you like!

In 1892, the influential Atlantic Monthly magazine criticized Sagittarian poet Emily Dickinson, saying she “possessed an extremely unconventional and grotesque fancy.” It dismissed her poetry as incoherent, and declared that an “eccentric, dreamy, half-educated recluse” like her “cannot with impunity set at defiance the laws of gravitation and grammar.” This dire dis turned out to be laughably wrong. Dickinson is now regarded as one of the most original American poets. I offer this story up as a pep talk for you, Sagittarius. In the coming months, I suspect you’ll be reinventing yourself. You’ll be researching new approaches to living your life. In the course of these experiments, others may see you as being in the grip of uncon-

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Report your favorite graffiti from a bathroom wall. Go to Freewillastrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”

get your yoga on!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I think I like my brain best in a bar fight with my heart,” says poet Clementine von Radics. While I appreciate that perspective, I advise you to do the opposite in the coming weeks. This will be a phase of your astrological cycle when you should definitely support your heart over your brain in bar fights, wrestling matches, shadow-boxing contests, tugs of war, battles of wits, and messy arguments. Here’s one of the most important reasons why I say this: Your brain would be inclined to keep the conflict going until one party or the other suffers ignominious defeat, whereas your heart is much more likely to work toward a win-win conclusion.

Kino MacGregor Feb 3-4

Teacher Training 2018

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When he was 24 years old, Scorpio-born Zhu Yuanzhang (1328-1398) was a novice monk with little money who had just learned to read and write. He had spent years as a wandering beggar. By the time he was 40 years old, he was the emperor of China and founder of the Ming Dynasty, which ruled for 276 years. What happened in between? That’s a long story. Zhu’s adventurousness was a key asset, and so was his ability as an audacious and crafty tactician. His masterful devotion to

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

NEWS

detailed practical matters was also indispensable. If you are ever in your life going to begin an ascent even remotely comparable to Zhu’s, Scorpio, it will be in the coming 10 months. Being brave and enterprising won’t be enough. You must be disciplined and dogged, as well.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a professional dominatrix, and I thought I’d seen everything in the last five years. But this situation completely baffled the entire dungeon. This middle-aged guy, seemingly in fine health, booked an appointment with me and my colleague for one hour of some very light play and a golden shower to finish off with. We did no CBT, no cock rings, no trauma to the dick area at all, no ass play, no sounding or catheters, no turbulent masturbation, nothing that could have caused this reaction. We brought him into the bathroom, and he laid down on his back, jerking off with a condom on his penis as my buddy was standing over him and peeing and I was saying all kinds of mean/ encouraging sentiments and closely observing his progress. He came and … it was entirely blood. It looked like he shat into his condom, through his penis. He did not seem alarmed or in pain. He took off his condom himself, so he was aware of the situation. He did not remark on it to either of us! He made ZERO effort to prepare either of us, either. And it was not a little blood in his ejaculate — it was entirely blood. He has never returned. Is this person a monster or a vampire? Is he dying? Seriously.

teaches us, not all guys have balls and not all balls have guys. “Also, these glands are lined by smooth muscle that contracts to force out the fluid [during ejaculation],” Dr. King continued. “If the force of contraction is excessive — a fucking great orgasm — this may lead toward rupture of some of the surrounding blood vessels and blood will enter the semen.” Your client’s blasé reaction is a good indication that he’s experienced this previously, ME, because most guys who see blood in their semen — or only blood when they expected to see semen — freak the fuck out. “In my practice, most guys who see blood in their ejaculate the first time are sufficiently freaked out to seek immediate medical attention, and their doctors usually tell them this isn’t something to worry about — unless it persists,” said Dr. King. “In cases where the hematospermia persists, gets worse, or is associated with other symptoms such as pain, difficulty urinating or general health decline, medical attention is definitely recommended.” Back to your client, ME: If blood loads have happened to him before (hence the blasé reaction), proper etiquette dictates that he should have said something to you about it afterward (“I’m fine, no biggie”). If it happens to him regularly, he should have warned you in advance — at least that’s what it says in my imaginary edition of Emily Post’s Etiquette.

JESUS, LADY, LET HIM GO TO THE FUCKING PARTY!

MISTRESS ECHO

P.S. I went back to the bathroom with gloves on and removed the used condom from the trash and took a photo. It’s the only way to communicate just how much blood there was. “You can tell Mistress Echo that her client was not a monster or a vampire, and he is likely not dying anytime soon,” said Dr. Stephen H. King, a board-certified urologist. “What she observed is a person with hematospermia, meaning blood in the semen.” While the sight is alarming — I’ll never be able to scrape that photo off the back of my eyeballs, thanks — Dr. King assures me that it’s nothing to worry about, as hematospermia is almost always benign. And even if you had done ball play or rough CBT (cock-and-ball torture), or if he engaged in solo CBT prior to the session, it’s unlikely that kind of play would result in a condom full of blood. “The vast majority of the semen actually comes from the prostate and the seminal vesicles, which are located deep in the pelvis just behind and below the bladder, respectively,” said Dr. King. “Very little of the ejaculate fluid actually originates from the testicles,” which primarily pump out hormones and sperm cells. “The prostate gland and seminal vesicles (also glands) store up the fluids and can become overdistended with long periods of abstinence and prone toward micro tearing and bleeding in this circumstance.” Blowing regular loads doesn’t just lower your risk for prostate cancer, as multiple studies have shown, it also lowers your risk for filling condoms with blood and alarming your friendly neighborhood pro-Dom. Two good reasons for draining those balls, guys — and other people with balls because, as the Book of Tumblr

My husband has a foot fetish. The feel of his tongue between my toes when he “worships” my feet doesn’t arouse me in the least. Rather, it feels like I’m stepping on slugs in the garden barefoot. Our sex life is fine otherwise. I resolved to grin (or grimace) and bear this odd aspect of his sexuality before we married, but I cannot continue to do so. When I told him this, he asked to be allowed to attend “foot model” parties. There wouldn’t be intercourse, but he would pleasure himself in the presence of these foot models (and other males!). This would, in my opinion, violate our monogamous commitment and our marriage vows. I enjoy your podcast and I know you often advocate for open relationships. But you also emphasize your respect for monogamy and the validity of monogamous commitments. We are at an impasse. Please advise. THROWING OFF EXPECTATIONS

While “love unconditionally” sounds nice, TOE, monogamy was a condition of yours going into this marriage (and a valid one), and being able to express this aspect of his sexuality was a stated or implicit condition of his (and, yes, an equally valid one). If you’re going to unilaterally alter the terms and conditions of your marriage, TOE, then you’ll need to re-open negotiations and come to a new agreement with your husband, one that works for both of you. (Jesus, lady, let him go to the fucking party!) On the Lovecast, Dan chats with Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood: savagelove cast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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HOME We know being home matters. Does someone you love need help to stay at home? UPMC Community HealthChoices can make life easier. We’ll make sure your loved one has continued access to in-home services and supports. We’ll help them get the health care they need from doctors and hospitals they know and trust. That includes the doctors and hospitals of UPMC. So, when it’s time to choose a new Community HealthChoices plan for someone you love, you know what to do.

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Jan. 17, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 3

Jan. 17, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 3