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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017


EVENTS 11.25 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY Join artist educators for Dandy Andy, a monthly tour that focuses on Warhol’s queer history. Free with museum admission

12.1 – 7pm DAY WITH(OUT) ART: ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS The Warhol theater Curated by Erin Christovale and Vivian Crockett for Visual AIDS, the video program prioritizes Black narratives within the ongoing AIDS epidemic. Free; Registration suggested

SEE CONTRASTING CULTURES BLENDED ON A SINGLE PALETTE. SEE CONTRASTING CULTURES BLENDED ON A SINGLE PALETTE.

12.2 – 10am-12pm HALF-PINT PRINTS The Factory Families work with The Warhol’s artist educators to create silkscreen prints during this members-only drop-in silkscreen printing activity for children ages 1 to 4 years old. Free with museum admission

12.8 – 8pm A JOHN WATERS’ CHRISTMAS: HOLIER & DIRTIER Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art Tickets $30/$25 members & students, VIP $125* (*general admission seating and post-show meet & greet)

12.30 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY Join artist educators for Dandy Andy, a monthly tour that focuses on Warhol’s queer history. Free with museum admission

Farhad Moshiri, Self Portrait on Flying Carpet, 2009, Courtesy Galerie Perrotin, photo by Guillaume Ziccarelli

OCTOBER 13, 2017 - JANUARY 14, 2018 ONLY AT THE WARHOL Farhad Moshiri: Go West is generously supported by The Fine Foundation, Piaget, Galerie Perrotin, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, The Third Line, Dubai, The Soudavar Memorial Foundation, The Farjam Foundation, The Khazaei Foundation, Maryam and Edward Eisler, Navid Mirtorabi, Ziba Franks, Elie Khouri, Fatima and Essi Maleki, Nazee Moinian, Mahshid and Jamshid Ehsani, and Narmina and Javad Marandi.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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MEET

Educational Wildlife Saturday, November 18th Ɣ1:00 - 5:00 pm See and learn with presentations at 1:00, 2:00, 3:00 and 4:00

Galleria of Mt. Lebanon 1500 Washington Road Mt. Lebanon, PA 15228

Humane Animal Rescue

Grab BagƔ Kids Coloring Contest Ɣ Light Refreshments

mane Hu

Animal

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Holiday Gift

Wrapping Fundraiser Robinson Mall Galleria of Mt. Lebanon Shadyside Want to volunteer? All locations need volunteers throughout the holiday season. 7KHKRXUVDUHÀH[LEOHDQG\RXFDQVLJQXS with your family, friends, coworkers, or classmates for a group shift!

Visit www.humaneanimalrescue.org/gift-wrapping to learn more!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017


11.15/11.22.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 46

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns HALEY FREDERICK, HANNAH LYNN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, AMANDA REED

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Craft breweries are popping up like wildflowers around Pittsburgh PAGE 18

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News 06 News of the Weird 16 Music 26 Arts 42 Events 45 Taste 48

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“THERE IS NO REASON WE SHOULDN’T BE IN THE TOP 10 IN THE NATION.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

The annual Veterans’ Day Parade wound its way through Downtown Pittsburgh streets on Saturday. Check out our photos from the event at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Macklemore made a stop in Pittsburgh last week for his Gemini Tour. Check out our photos from the concert at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CP recently reported on a racist video as part of our work with ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

A new report shows Pennsylvania’s African Americans rank 32nd, and Latinos 48th, in terms of child well-being.

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ARDENING SEASON is over, but it’s a gardening analogy that best describes an inadequacy currently facing Pennsylvania. In the spring, seeds are typically planted inside, to ensure they sprout. But after a few weeks, seedlings must be placed outside so they can grow into big, hearty plants. If the seedlings are kept indoors, their growth will be stunted, and it’s unlikely they’ll reach their full potential. Currently, many minority residents of Pennsylvania are like those seedlings kept inside, and their growth could be held back. Pennsylvania, like the U.S. as a whole, is becoming more multicultural every year, but according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a child-welfare organization, the state is falling behind in ensuring its minority residents succeed. “The disparities among racial groups

on indicators of family resources point to the obstacles that families of color face in gaining financial stability,” reads the foundation’s 2017 Race for Results report, which assesses the status of child well-

Pennsylvania’s black and Latino populations are growing yet underserved. What can be done to ensure they succeed? {BY RYAN DETO} being by looking at elementary and middleschool test scores, rates of children in pre-K education, and birth-rate statistics. 2017 Race for Results broke down rankings by state and race, and Pennsylvania

performed poorly across all demographics, but particularly in regard to African Americans and Latinos. Pennsylvania ranked 32nd in how well its African-American children performed, the lowest among states in the Northeast. For Latinos, it was even worse: Pennsylvania ranked 48th. Only Rhode Island’s Latinos fared worse. (Vermont couldn’t be scored.) These results come at a time when minority residents are the only growing racial demographic in the state. In addition to the growing presence of Asians, Latinos and black people in Pennsylvania, other reports show that minority residents are also greatly contributing to the economy. Many of Pennsylvania’s minority and immigrant groups are starting businesses at higher rates than are white residents, and providing jobs to Pennsylvanians. According to proCONTINUES ON PG. 08

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

THE ART OF ARTWORK RESTORATION BORIS BRINDAR A presentation on the basic aspects of artwork restoration including oil paintings, murals icons, art on paper like posters, lithographs, and prints, sculptural pieces and other works of art. Specific attention will be given to the difference between artwork restoration and repair and the proper ways to keep, exhibit, insure, and monitor art collections. ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Boris Brindar, a second-generation art conservator, got his start in the field at a young age, working with his dad, then Head of Conservation Labs at the Russian State Museum in Leningrad. Boris received his degree in conservation and art history from the Academy of Fine arts in Leningrad. At the Academy Boris specialized in oil paintings and religious icons. He has more than 33 years of professional experience, with 25 years in the United States, working on various projects ranging from a renovation/restoration of a cathedral to historic landmarks and private art collections.

THIS WORKSHOP IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NON-MEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

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immigrant and pro-business coalition the New American Economy, 10 percent of Pennsylvania’s workers are employed by immigrant-owned businesses, even though immigrants make up only 6 percent of the state’s population. Basically, minorities in the state are ready to burst out of their planter boxes, and experts agree that Pennsylvania must increase its investment in minorities, so they, and the state, can blossom into their full potential. Joan Benso, president and CEO of childadvocacy group Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, is disappointed by Pennsylvania’s rankings. “There is no reason we shouldn’t be in the top 10 in the nation, for every sub-group,” says Benso. In addition to Pennsylvania’s poor rankings for African Americans and Latinos, the state ranked 20th in terms of white performance and 14th for Asians and Pacific Islanders. Benso says Pennsylvania is underperforming, given its moderate levels of poverty. For example, California has higher poverty and unemployment rates than Pennsylvania, but the Keystone State has lower rankings across all demographics than does California. “Why aren’t we at the top?” asks Benso. “We don’t have deep poverty or high unemployment. I believe we don’t make education a high enough priority.” Benso says a lack of focus on education is most harmful to Latinos. For one, most Latinos in the state grow up in households without a parent who has an American high-school education. Jeimy Sanchez-Ruiz is the youth community-outreach coordinator at Brooklinebased Latino services organization Casa San Jose. She works with Latino students in the Pittsburgh Public School District in the South Hills, and says she has experienced firsthand what Benso is describing. Sanchez-Ruiz believes Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania need to increase services to their growing Latino populations. “Their ESL programs aren’t really equipped for students that only speak a dialect at home and are trying to learn English,” wrote Sanchez-Ruiz in an email to Pittsburgh City Paper. “Most of these kids have never had real schooling. The kids that I work with do say that they struggle in school because they can’t understand. Parents have a difficult time understanding the school system as well because most of them haven’t gone to school.” Benso says other populations in Pennsylvania are also struggling due to lack of services and resources. According to the

Race for Results report, only 8 percent of black eighth-graders in Pennsylvania, and only 14 percent of Latinos, scored at or above proficient on math tests, while 68 percent of white students met or performed better than the same standards. Benso says there’s a huge educationfunding gap for African Americans, and rural whites are also experiencing similar problems. Benso believes state legislators should be allocating more money to education, and should be targeting areas to provide a boost to these disadvantaged communities. And, according to Benso, a huge gap currently exists in an area that could help minority and disadvantaged students: preK education. She believes that universal pre-K in high-poverty areas can be gamechanging for minority and disadvantaged students. But Benso says Pennsylvania is allocating only enough funds to serve one-third of the children eligible for pre-K education. Benso says our minority students’ grades will improve only if the state invests in them adequately, in areas beyond education as well. “We need to put enough money in the school-funding system and expand the funding to pre-K,” says Benso. “We also shouldn’t blow up the [Affordable Care Act] and Medicaid, since [early child health] is linked to early reading proficiency. “Why did New Jersey Latinos and other demographics score better than us? They invest. That is a good reason why we should invest. Other states are just investing faster than we are.” Benso says investing in all of Pennsylvania’s youth isn’t just the right thing to do to help a historically disadvantaged sector; it also helps the economy. “If we don’t invest, we will continue to see our children do not as well as their peers,” says Benso. “Ultimately, it will have a continued negative impact on our workforce. You already hear that now, that employers can’t find workers for their open positions.” Some might make arguments that focusing on providing additional services to people of color would be misplaced, because the vast majority of Pennsylvania is still white (81 percent). But demographic trends suggest that figure will change. Since 2010, Pennsylvania’s non-white population has increased, while the share of white residents has declined. Asians and Pacific Islanders now comprise 3.5 percent of the state’s population, compared to 2.9 percent in 2010. The percentage of black residents has ticked up

“OTHER STATES ARE JUST INVESTING FASTER THAN WE ARE.”

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marginally, to 11 percent from 10.8 percent in 2010. Latinos are the fastest-growing racial demographic in the state, now comprising 7 percent of Pennsylvania’s population, up from 5.7 percent in 2010. All the while, the state’s white population has decreased 2 percent since 2010. Pennsylvania’s population growth isn’t the only reason to focus on minority residents. Kate Brick, of the New American Economy, says it’s good economics to accommodate immigrants and children of immigrants, who primarily hail from Asian and Latin American countries. In August 2016, the New American Economy produced a report showing that immigrants have made oversized contributions to Pennsylvania’s economy, and in October 2017, a report by the group showed that immigrants are also contributing to the Great Lakes Region, including Pittsburgh, even though the area has a small proportion of immigrants. The report states that from 2000-2015, Pittsburgh saw a 91 percent increase in immigrant entrepreneurs and approximately an 11 percent increase in workingclass employment in manufacturing for all demographics.

“We hope this report helps combat the narrative that immigrants are taking jobs,” says Brick. “We wanted to show that immigrants are actually responsible for hundreds of thousands of jobs that were created.” Brick says immigrants and children of immigrants have very high rates of entrepreneurship, and those rates are growing. (A 2015 report from the Minority Business Development Agency confirms these findings, and says that black-owned businesses are also growing.) Brick adds that Pittsburgh and other cities in Pennsylvania, like Lancaster, have been smart in creating programs to boost immigrant and minority businesses. But the state could do more. “I think there is a lot more that all states can do,” says Brick. She references Michigan’s new Office for New Americans, and says Pennsylvania is considering an office to boost immigrant and minority businesses, but no solid plans have emerged. Brick says “it would benefit the state to create this” office. “I think the biggest takeaway from the report,” says Brick, “is in the Great Lakes region and Pennsylvania, the immigrant community is the future of our labor force and the economy and growth.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017


WICKED IS FLYING BACK TO PITTSBURGH

JANUARY 24 – FEBRUARY 11 BENEDUM CENTER

TICKETS ON SALE NOW Box Office at Theater Square • TrustArts.org 412-456-4800 • Groups 15+ 412-471-6930

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JUSTICE DENIED Community activists call on Pittsburgh and Allegheny County officials to address police brutality {BY STEPHEN CARUSO} ON THE FIFTH anniversary of the police

shooting of Leon Ford, and on the heels of a strong progressive election showing, community activist Brandi Fisher put forth a challenge to Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala. Facing a crowd of 60 people at a rally in East Liberty on Nov. 11, Fisher promised that Zappala, a 20-year incumbent, would face a challenger in 2019. “It’s not just about rallying, it’s not just about protesting — it’s about voting, it’s about getting these people out of office who are in control,” said Fisher, director of the Alliance for Police Accountability. The rally was held to highlight police brutality in Allegheny County in recent years and the fight still being waged by Ford, who was paralyzed after being shot during a traffic stop in 2012. Fisher criticized Zappala’s handling of allegations of police brutality, especially those at Woodland Hills High School, as well as the slow progress in cases against other Pittsburgh officers accused of misconduct. These cases include: Christopher Thompkins, a Larimer man shot and killed by Pittsburgh police after calling to report a break-in at his own home; and Nathan Stanley III and Daniel Adelman, who were beaten by Pittsburgh Police officers in separate incidents.

{CP PHOTO BY STEPHEN CARUSO}

Summer Lee, a candidate for the Pennsylvania House 34th District, implores the crowd to be politically active.

At the rally, the crowd heard from another victim, Jessica Short, an East Pittsburgh resident and mother of two, who claims that on Oct. 27, she was Tasered and forced to spend a night in county jail for no reason, after videotaping an East Pittsburgh police officer’s traffic stop of her fiancé. Breaking down in tears as she described the incident to the crowd, Short said the officer threw her to the ground, trapping her son underneath her, and then arrested her for resisting arrest and obstruction of justice. “How could I be resisting arrest when I wasn’t being arrested in the first place?” Short said. The Pittsburgh Bureau of Police and the district attorney’s office said they are reviewing several of the cases

“HOW COULD I BE RESISTING ARREST WHEN I WASN’T BEING ARRESTED IN THE FIRST PLACE?”

referenced at the rally. Sonya Toler, a city police spokesperson, said Adelman’s case was still under internal review. In September, Thompkins’ case sparked a war of words between the district attorney and the city’s Department of Public Safety, when Zappala claimed that the city was not cooperating with his investigation into the shooting. Wade’s case, meanwhile, is part of a larger string of verbal and physical altercations involving former Principal Kevin Murray and Churchill Police Officer Stephen Shaulis, which have come to light at Woodland Hills High School. Wade went to the emergency room for injuries he sustained after allegedly being hit by Shaulis. Wade is currently facing charges as a result of the incident. But Mike Manko, spokesman for the district attorney’s office, declined to comment on the charges because Wade is a juvenile.

Zappala’s office had previously investigated Murray over recordings of the principal threatening a student with physical violence, but declined to press charges. Murray resigned from his position in August, and received $32,000 in severance pay. A federal civil-rights investigation of the school is underway. Besides the Woodland Hills incidents, Fisher pointed to an uptick in police complaints over the past year and under the new Pittsburgh police chief, Scott Shubert. She said that while only one complaint was filed during former chief Cameron McLay’s two-year tenure, 15 complaints had already been lodged in 2017 alone. She said firmer action from the district attorney against police misconduct could solve the problem. “The district attorney is the person who charges people who commit crimes or chooses not to charge them,” Fisher said. “So, in all issues, we are looking for justice. What we are really saying is ‘district attorney, do your job.’” In an email to City Paper, Zappala spokesperson Mike Manko said that Zappala “is proud to serve as District Attorney, and considers it an honor and a privilege that the citizens of Allegheny County have placed their trust in him for the past 20 years.” Also in attendance at the rally were state representatives Ed Gainey and Jake Wheatley. Wheatley, who represents parts of the Hill District, North Side and South Side, noted that police brutality is an everyday reality for his constituents. He said he attended the rally to “make sure innocent folk aren’t being brutalized, and if it happens, it’s being rectified” and added that his constituents can’t afford to wait any longer for the issue to be addressed. “That’s my only interest here,” Wheatley said. “What happens in 2018, 2019, that’s two years away.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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THE BIG BURRITO GIFT CARD EVENT NOVEMBER 13–27

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NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS Purchase $100 worth of big Burrito, Casbah, Eleven, Umi or Mad Mex® gift cards and we’ll reward you with $25 in bonus Holiday Burrito Buck$. For every $50 purchased, you get $10 in Holiday Burrito Buck$. Available at all big Burrito Restaurant Group locations and online at bigburrito.com. Some limitations apply; see website or store for details.

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PYRAMID

News of the Weird

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Three teenagers from Rahway, N.J., who call themselves the Rahway Bushmen, have been discouraged from their signature prank: dressing up as bushes and popping up in Rahway River Park to say “Hi!” to unsuspecting passersby. NJ.com reported in October that the Union County Police Department warned the Bushmen that they would be arrested if caught in action. The high school students started by jumping out to scare people, but decided to soften their approach with a gentler greeting. “We were trying to be harmless,” one of the Bushmen said. “It’s more or less an idea to try to make people smile.” But Union County Public Information Officer (and fun-sucker) Sebastian D’Elia deadpanned: “It’s great until the first person falls and sues the county.” Or puts an eye out.

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Nathan William Parris, 72, met his unfortunate end when a cow he was trying to move turned against him at his farm in Floyd County, Ga., on Oct. 25. Parris was pinned against a fence by the recalcitrant cow, reported the Rome News-Tribune, which caused him severe chest trauma. First responders tried to revive him, but he was pronounced dead at the Redmond Regional Medical Center emergency room.

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Burglary suspect and career criminal Shane Paul Owen, 46, of South Salt Lake, Utah, was on the run from police on Oct. 24 when he dashed into a vacant church. A Salt Lake City SWAT team held a standoff at the church for more than six hours — until Owen called 911 to say that he was locked in the church’s boiler room and couldn’t get out. “Can you hurry?” he asked the dispatcher. “I need to talk to them first so they don’t ... shoot me,” Owen pleaded. The Deseret News reported he was booked on outstanding warrants for retaliation against a witness, drug distribution and identity fraud.

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Two doctors from the University of Florence, in Italy, have documented the case of a woman who has been sweating blood from her face and the palms of her hands for about three years. Roberto Maglie and Marzia Caproni wrote in the Canadian Medical Association Journal that the unnamed Italian woman couldn’t identify a trigger for the bleeding, but said times of stress would intensify it for periods of from one to five minutes. After ruling out the possibility that she was faking it, the doctors diagnosed her with hematohidrosis, a rare disease that causes blood to be excreted through the pores. They were able to treat her, but couldn’t completely stop the bleeding. The cause remains a mystery.

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Katarian Marshall, 24, of New Orleans, La., apparently hit her limit of “fun” at a Chuck E. Cheese in Metairie on Oct. 29 and began “indiscriminately” spraying pepper spray on nearby patrons during an altercation that got out of hand. The Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office told The Times-Picayune that five adults and two children were treated for exposure to the spray at the scene. Marshall was charged with disturbing the peace by fighting.

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Amber L. Schmunk, 28, of Fredonia, Wis., put all her resources to work in concocting a way to get a plastic kiddie pool from one house to another on Sept. 9. Her solution: She had her 9-yearold son climb on top of her minivan and hold down the pool as she drove through Saukville. She must have had second thoughts, though, because according to the Ozaukee Press, she told police the boy was up there for only 20 to 30 seconds

before she pulled over and wedged the pool into the back of the minivan. Schmunk said she thought it would be OK for her son to ride atop the car because her father had allowed her to do similar things when she was a child. But officers disagreed, charging her with second-degree recklessly endangering safety.

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Daren Young, 30, of Kahului, Hawaii, will need a good dictionary and thesaurus for the task ahead of him. On Oct. 27, Second Circuit Judge Rhonda Loo sentenced Young, who violated a protection order taken out by his ex-girlfriend to the tune of 144 calls and texts, to write down 144 nice things about his ex — without repeating any words. “For every nasty thing you said about her, you’re going to say a nice thing,” Loo commanded. The Maui News reported that Loo also meted out two years’ probation, a $2,400 fine and 200 hours of community service.

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Abjuration Brewing Company’s Tom Glover ▲ and Dave Hallam ▼

THE DRINK ISSUE

HOP ON Pittsburgh’s craft-beer industry is booming, but can it find its place in the national beer scene? STORY BY DREW CRANISKY PHOTOS BY XAVIER THOMAS

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It

WAS THE LAST PLACE I’d expect to find a brewery.

On a sunny Thursday afternoon in late October, I found myself staring at the front of a movie theater in McKees Rocks. There was no sweet smell of cooking grain, no truck beds loaded with kegs, no signs at all that there was any brewing (or anything at all, really) going on within. But this was the address I had, so I headed around the back of the building and knocked. Tom Glover greeted me with a broad smile and ushered me in, and there it was: Abjuration Brewing Company. On the former stage of the historic Parkway Theatre, Glover and his partner, Dave Hallam, were brewing up a dry-hopped American blond ale. The beer was one of the earliest batches from their brand-new system, which they will use to brew experimental, open-sourced ales on an extremely small scale. Glover excitedly showed me around, pointing out all the triumphs and quirks of their largely DIY space. What was once a basement hobby is now a buzzing, bubbling brewery. From tiny startups like Abjuration to established, seasoned operations, Pittsburgh is chock-full of breweries. But it wasn’t always that way. Penn Brewery opened the doors to its North Side brewpub in 1989, becoming Pittsburgh’s first true craft


NEXT ROUND Check out these new and “coming soon” breweries in and around the city ABJURATION BREWING COMPANY Abjuration: a repudiation or renouncement of a belief. Familiar with the term thanks to a shared love of Dungeons & Dragons, owners Tom Glover and Dave Hallam thought it a fitting name for their brewery, where they reject traditional beer styles in favor of a more experimental approach. Brewing in the back of the Parkway Theater, Abjuration is the second brewery to come to McKees Rocks (412 Brewery opened earlier this year, though it doesn’t yet have a taproom). Abjuration is still ramping up, so follow it online for information about hours and availability.

East End Brewing Company's Scott Smith ▲

brewery and an early arrival on the national craft-beer scene. After that, however, breweries came in a trickle. Church Brew Works opened in 1996, and for years, “Church and Penn” were about the extent of Pittsburgh craft beer. A handful of other brewpubs came and went in the ’90s and early 2000s, including Valhalla and Foundry Ale Works, both in the Strip. But while craft beer boomed on the West Coast, Pittsburgh’s brewing scene remained relatively quiet. Then all of that changed. About five years ago, breweries started setting up shop in Pittsburgh and they haven’t stopped. What was once a trickle is now a mighty river, with breweries revving up at an unprecedented pace. There are now more than 30 active breweries in Allegheny County alone, with more than a third of those spots opening in the past two years. If you include all of Western Pennsylvania, that number nearly triples. And at least a half-dozen more breweries are preparing to open around the city. Beer makes sense here. Pittsburgh has always been a town of makers, and our ample and relatively affordable real estate makes opening a craft brewery an attainable proposition. And we are certainly a city of drinkers. With a “work hard, play hard” attitude, a lively tailgating culture, and one of the highest numbers of bars per capita in the country, beer has fueled

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS “It was hard to find locally brewed beer for

Pittsburgh for centuries. Breweries are driving tourism, fueling the economy, and shaping our neighborhoods. So, it seems like the right time to step back and survey the state of beer in Pittsburgh. How did we get here? Where are we headed? And could Pittsburgh be America’s next great beer town?

CONNY CREEK BREWING COMPANY Located in Lower Burrell, Conny Creek is one of the newest additions to the area beer scene. Husbandand-wife team Lee and Erin Layton opened the brewery in late October with an eclectic lineup of American and European styles. They opted to start small, just serving flights and pints in the taproom, but plan to add growler options and even a kitchen.

a long time,” says Beth Kurtz Taylor, a food writer, culinary tour guide and Pittsburgh native. In the 1990s, as she and her husband were getting interested in craft beer, it took some serious work to be a beer fan. Taylor still remembers the few bars that might serve a craft draft, and a favorite distributor who would break open a case to let you try a new beer. With so few beer options, some industrious drinkers just started to make it themselves. Scott Smith was one of them. The owner of East End Brewing Company, Smith was a homebrewer for nearly a decade before making beer a career. His story is now a familiar one: an avid homebrewer quits his corporate job and sinks his life savings into kettles and fermenters. But back in 2004, Smith was venturing into uncharted territory. “We kinda came on the scene in a quiet way, because we didn’t have a taproom or any front-of-house presence,” he recalls. As a small, bootstrap operation that wasn’t associated with a restaurant, East End was unique when it opened 13 years ago. Without a template to follow, the build-out was rocky. “I just couldn’t

ELEVENTH HOUR BREWING Matt McMahon knew he wanted to open a brewery before the “eleventh hour” of his life. And earlier this fall, he did just that. After a few previous locations fell through, McMahon found a home in a former school building in Lawrenceville. Eleventh Hour serves a range of styles, from classic brown ales to experimental single-hopped pale ales. Head to the cozy taproom for a pint, grab a 32-ounce crowler to go, or find the brewery’s offerings on draft at a handful of bars around town. CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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HITCHHIKER BREWING COMPANY OK, so Hitchhiker isn’t exactly new. But it did take a huge leap forward this fall with the opening of its new brewery and taproom, in Sharpsburg. With a 15-barrel brewhouse and plenty of room to grow (it occupies part of the old Fort Pitt brewery), expect to see a whole lot more Hitchhiker beer. The quality has jumped as well, as evidenced by excellent new offerings like Nowhere Everywhere Double IPA and Mashmellow Stout. The new brewery also boasts two foeders, large wooden tanks that brewer Andy Kwiatkowski will use for traditional sour beers.

Check out page 50 for our happy hour suggestions for craftbeer lovers

SPRING HILL BREWING Spring Hill Brewing, on the North Side, has been a long time coming, but opening day is nearly in sight. Spring Hill is the dream of Mike Seamans and Greg Kamerdze, two veterans of the Pittsburgh music scene. After years of planning and searching for locations, the pair landed in the old Workingmen’s Beneficial Union Hall, in Spring Hill. The building needed a ton of work, but the space is nearly ready. Spring Hill Brewing will focus on sessionable farmhouse and Belgianstyle ales, along with some ciders and mead. If all goes well, they will be open by the end of the year.

Also Brewing … TRIOS BREWING: Opening in a former hardware store in Homestead, this ambitious brewpub will feature Spanish tapas and a bowling alley. Oh, and beer.

ROGAN BREWING: Also slated for Homestead is Rogan Brewing, which intends to open a taproom on Eighth Avenue. The actual brewery will be located in Duquesne.

CINDERLANDS BEER CO.: Moving into the Butler Street space formerly occupied by Roasted, Cinderlands is a brewery and restaurant expected to open by the end of the year. BY DREW CRANINSKY

Food writer Beth Kurtz Taylor ▲

get contractors to come in,” says Smith. “They’d look at me, they’d look at the building I was in. … They’d be like, ‘He’s out of his gourd.’” But East End did open, of course, in a “shitbox” on Susquehanna Street, in Homewood. At first, it sold only kegs, adding growlers soon after. Yet without the benefit of social media, a slick taproom, or even a proper sign, beer fans from all around the region began to find East End. Thirsty for something besides watery macro-brewed lagers, folks flocked to the fledgling brewery for growlers of Fat Gary and Monkey Boy. East End provided Pittsburgh with local beer, but it also created camaraderie and community. Andrew Witchey recalls standing in line for East End’s annual Gratitude barleywine release years ago. “It was super early in the morning, it was bitter cold out, and there was still a line of people hanging out, drinking beers, talking … that was cool,” says Witchey. Those early memories of Pittsburgh’s small but devoted craft-beer community would shape Witchey, and many others, as he went on to open a brewery of his own.

THE BOOM As the owner of Dancing Gnome, Witchey has gotten well acquainted with

“IT WAS HARD TO FIND LOCALLY BREWED BEER FOR A LONG TIME.” beer lines in the past year. On a recent weekday afternoon, despite the dreary and drizzly weather, I watched dozens of people line up outside Dancing Gnome to grab cans of Etch, the Sharpsburg brewery’s latest juicy, hazy IPA. Hopheads traveled from all around the city to pick up the cans: some to drink, others intended for trading and sharing with fellow beer fanatics around the country. With its sleek socialmedia presence, hop-forward portfolio, and devoted following of beer nerds, Dancing Gnome is a poster child for Pittsburgh’s new wave of breweries. It is one of dozens of small, independent breweries that have opened in the area since East End blazed the trail. The past year has been especially active, with hardly a week going by without news of a brewery opening, moving or expanding. While Pittsburgh has always had brewers, this new boom is different. Unlike the historic pre-Prohibition breweries

(Iron City, Duquesne, Fort Pitt), which made cheap lagers meant for packaging and distribution, today’s breweries are much smaller affairs. They are often family-run, neighborhood joints that make a variety of beer primarily for on-site consumption. And unlike Church Brew Works and Penn Brewery, they are mostly beer-only affairs, rarely attached to restaurants. What caused this spike in breweries? For one, there are now more resources to help start-up breweries than ever before, and city officials and contractors are far more familiar with the needs of a small brewery than they were a decade ago. A 2015 change in Pennsylvania law also helped, making it possible for breweries to sell pints on site without holding a restaurant or brewpub license. But the boom also reflects a larger shift that’s happening across the country. “I feel like beer is part of a bigger trend in our culture,” says Joe McAllister, founder of Brew: The Museum of Beer. “There is a move away from big and national and industrial to local, artisanal and craft … Whether it’s cheese or pickles or beer, whatever you look at, that’s the trend that’s happening.” CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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Tour Five & 20 Spirits & Brewing

Seasonal Entree at 2 Ames

Tour Southern Tier Brewing Company

Local Cheese at Brazil Craft Beer & Wine

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THE BIG BAD BUBBLE Any discussion of local beer inevitably circles back to the question of “the bubble.” Are craft breweries just the latest fro-yo shops, a booming trend that will eventually bust? I’ve heard many drinkers wonder where the ceiling is for Pittsburgh beer: Just how many breweries can one city support? Surprisingly, brewers seem largely unconcerned about the matter. “The bubble makes no sense because there are some 400 breweries in Pennsylvania, but there are like, 11,000 bars,” says Abjuration’s Hallam. “That’s what the local breweries are becoming. They’re becoming the local pub.” Breweries are no longer hulking factories plopped in inaccessible industrial areas. They are instead popping up in neighborhoods, and their taprooms are assuming the role of the classic corner bar. Breweries are increasingly the places where folks congregate to watch a game, catch up with friends, or in Beth Kurtz Taylor’s case, celebrate her niece’s baptism. “It’s that third place,” says Taylor, referring to Ray Oldenburg’s term describing those critical spaces where we spend our time outside of work and home. “It’s a place where people gather, not just to drink, but to commune.” Tom Glover believes mid-sized breweries should actually be the ones worrying. “The whole market is going to nano [a scaled-down microbrewery],” he says. “A bunch of the mid-tier breweries are getting squeezed out by the huge breweries, and the little ones are starting to eat up the crumbs off the table. … Everyone wants to drink in their own backyard.” And most brewers and owners subscribe to the “rising tides lift all boats” mentality. One brewery in a neighborhood, it seems, is a local watering hole. Two or three? Now you have an attraction.

BEER-CATIONS Breweries are driving tourist traffic, both locally and nationally. “People are crossing rivers and going through tunnels to find out what a new brewery is doing,” notes Dyana Sloan, co-owner of Roundabout Brewery, in Lawrenceville. Pittsburghers, famously reluctant to leave their own neighborhoods, are engaging in local beer tourism, venturing to new places to check out craft breweries. Towns like Braddock, Sharpsburg and Millvale are newly alive at night and on weekends

Check out page 62 for a closer look at Black Brew Culture

“YOU HAVE ABOUT TEN BREWERIES THAT ARE REALLY MAKING SOME STAR, OUTSTANDING BEER.” thanks to craft breweries. But is Pittsburgh a true beer destination? Are we the kind of place that beer buffs would plan a trip around, the way they would flock to Asheville, N.C., or Portland, Ore.? “Slowly but surely,” says Mike Potter, founder of the forthcoming online magazine Black Brew Culture. “You have about 10 breweries that are really making some star, outstanding beer.” Potter, an avid beer trader, says that Pittsburgh beers are increasingly sought out by aficionados around the country, who request brews from Spoonwood, Voodoo, Brew Gentlemen and others in the area. It’s a small but important indicator of Pittsburgh’s rising prominence on the national beer radar. Another indicator of Pittsburgh’s growing beer market came this past January, when Southern Tier Brewery, a wellknown large-scale craft brewer, decided to build its first taproom outside of Western New York on Pittsburgh’s North Side. As a sign of its commitment to the city, CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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Mike Potter, founder of Black Brew Culture ▲

TAPPED IN Want to stay up to date on the local beer scene? Here are a few ways to tap into what’s brewin’. MAGAZINES

CRAFT PITTSBURGH Launched in 2010, this bi-monthly print mag exclusively covers craft beer in the Pittsburgh area and keeps its finger on the pulse of the city.

HOP CULTURE A Pittsburgh-based online magazine launched in early 2017 by Kenny Gould that he calls a “lifestyle magazine for the newest generation of drinkers.” It focuses on the local and national beer scene through a millennial lens. www.hopculture.com

BLACK BREW CULTURE Mike Potter’s soon-to-be launched online publication centers on introducing people of color to the depths of craft beer and elevating their voices from inside the industry. www.blackbrewculture.com

PODCASTS

DRINKING PARTNERS Comics Ed Bailey and Day Bracey both love performing standup and drinking beer, so they thought why not combine the two? Their podcasts feature candid and amusing conversations with local brewers and others. Feel free to pop open a beer and follow along. Check out the last page for more. www.epicastnetwork.com/partnerspod CONTINUES ON PG. 24


RELAX.

THERE’S A NEW WAY TO CHOOSE YOUR NEXT DINING SPOT.

SUSTAINABLY HARVESTED SALMON served with mashed sweet potatoes and a green bean shallot mix from Corner Mercantile. PHOTO CREDIT: CORNER MERCANTILE

Put your values where your mouth is by dining at these Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants. DOWNTOWN/ MT WASHINGTON ۸Bae Bae’s Kitchen ۸Bluebird Kitchen ۸Corner Mercantile ۸David L Lawrence Convention Center ۸Family Farm Creameries ۸Fernando’s ۸Franktuary ۸Monterey Bay Fish Grotto ۸Nine on Nine ۸Pizza Parma ۸Shab’s Grill ۸Six Penn Kitchen ۸The Apollo Café ۸The Commoner ۸UPMC MyHealth Café ۸V3

S

ustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants commit to making improvements in the areas of

energy, water, waste, sourcing, people, and nutrition. For example, nearly

of

designated restaurants use renewable energy to reduce carbon emissions. Look for these “plates” at your favorite restaurants to see who’s part of the growing community:

۸52nd Street Market ۸Allegheny Wine Mixer ۸B52 ۸Banh Mi and Ti ۸Burgh’ers ۸Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Cafeteria ۸Franktuary ۸Kickback Pinball Café ۸The Abbey on Butler Street ۸The Pittsburgh Juice Co ۸The Vandal ۸REED&CO ۸Senti ۸Smoke Barbeque Taqueria ۸Spirit

۸Mad Mex (Monroeville)

sustainablePGHrestaurants.org 412-258-6647

ETNA

Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants

۸Quickhatch Coffee+Food

@dine_sustainpgh sustainable_pgh_restaurant

۸Soba ۸Steel Cactus ۸Umi ۸Wm Penn Tavern

OAKLAND

SOUTHERN SUBURBS

REGENT SQUARE/ SQUIRREL HILL ۸Kimberley Ashlee Catering ۸Rita’s Italian Ice ۸Silk Elephant ۸Square Café

۸Burgh’ers ۸Della Terra Italian Bistro ۸Mad Mex (Cranberry and North Hills) ۸UPMC Passavant McCandless Cafeteria

۸Casbah ۸Dinette ۸Great Harvest Bread Company

۸Chateau Café & Cakery ۸Legends Eatery ۸Scratch F&B ۸Café Phipps ۸Fuel and Fuddle ۸Hilton Garden Inn/ RLJ - University Place ۸Mad Mex ۸Magee-Women’s Hospital Cafeteria/ Gardenview Café ۸P&G Pamela’s Diner ۸Peter’s Pub ۸Prince of India ۸Rita’s Italian Ice ۸Sorrento’s Pizza Roma ۸Sushi Fuku (both locations) ۸The Porch at Schenley ۸UPMC Presbyterian Cafeteria

NORTHERN SUBURBS

EAST LIBERTY performance program at

۸Jambo Grill ۸Plated Trade

LAWRENCEVILLE

EASTERN SUBURBS

Learn more about this

HIGHLAND PARK

۸Mad Mex ۸Millie’s Homemade Ice Cream ۸Pizza Parma

۸Arnold’s Tea

STRIP ۸Eleven ۸Kaya ۸Lidia’s

UPTOWN ۸Buford’s Kitchen ۸Café Fifth Avenue ۸Hogan Dining at Duquesne University ۸Legacy Café ۸Pizza Care ۸The Red Ring ۸Souper Bowl ۸Z-Best Chicken & Ribs

WESTERN SUBURBS

SHADYSIDE

NORTHSIDE

۸Bado’s Pizza Grill & Ale House ۸Bella Sera ۸Mad Mex (South Hills and Lakeside) ۸Sunny Bridge Natural Foods

۸Mad Mex (Robinson) Restaurant listing as of 11/6/17

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CRAFT BEER RADIO PODCAST 2005 was early in the age of podcasting, and that’s when CBR got its start. Pittsburghers Greg Weiss and Jeff Bearer evangelize about good beer from their basement studio and joke like the ol’ pals they are. www.craftbeerradio.com

INSTAGRAM ACCOUNTS

BEER IN THE BURGH

@beerintheburgh

This Pittsburgh local has a formula that works. The posts are highly stylized, mostly of large-format bottles or cans, often poured into glasses with short descriptions or the labels prominently displayed. The mystery ’grammer drinks a lot of local brews and limited releases.

MARK BREWER

@markbrewersart

An artist and beer enthusiast, Brewer posts his comics, many of which are beer-centric. He authored Brewology: An Illustrated Dictionary for Beer Lovers and he has an every-other-week column called “What’s Brewing” at Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s TRIBLive site. Pro tip: Following your favorite local breweries on Instagram is always a good way to keep up with new releases and specials.

TWITTER

PITTSBURGH BEER GUY @BurghBeerGuy

This account tweets and retweets local beer news from many different sources, keeping you up to date on anything breaking.

BOB BATZ JR. @bobbatzjr

This Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter brings his keen eye and affable manner to the Pittsburgh craft-beer scene, and often breaks beer news in the city. Follow his twitter to keep up with his coverage. B Y C E LINE R OBERTS

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and probably with a nod to the city’s beer consumers, the taproom has a small brewing operation that works to develop exclusively Pittsburgh-crafted beers. Unlike many other cities, Pittsburgh doesn’t have a large, well-known craft brewery that distributes beyond the state, the way Cleveland has Great Lakes Brewing Company, or Grand Rapids, Mich., has Founders. On the one hand, this means that people outside of Western Pennsylvania are less familiar with the beer scene here. On the other, it means that all of our breweries are on fairly equal ground, not stuck brewing in the shadow of one mammoth operation. As more breweries open, and as those already open start packaging more beer and distributing it farther, Pittsburgh’s profile will undoubtedly grow. But Roundabout’s Dyana Sloan already sees a blossoming outside interest in what’s brewing here. “We ask people in the tasting room all the time, ‘What are you doing here in Pittsburgh?’” she says. “And they’re just here to drink beer. They’re traveling from all

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

“PEOPLE ARE CROSSING RIVERS AND GOING THROUGH TUNNELS TO FIND OUT WHAT A NEW BREWERY IS DOING.” over — from Denver, from Florida. Which is pretty cool.” And unlike some other beer towns, Pittsburgh boasts plenty of other attractions besides drinking. “Grand Rapids, let’s face it. There’s not a whole lot to do in Grand Rapids other than go to breweries,” laughs Steve Sloan, of Roundabout. Pittsburgh, on the other hand, offers great museums, a lively restaurant scene, successful sports teams and more. Whether it’s the focus of a trip or an added bonus, it’s clear that tourists are interested in craft beer. Joe McAllister is fond of quoting a figure from a Travelocity survey that showed that 77 percent of travelers will check out the beer offerings in a city before they go there. “It’s happening, and now we’re learning how to make use of it and promote it,” he explains.

Roundabout Brewery co-owners Dyana and Steve Sloan ▲

GROWING PAINS With the pace of brewery openings, there’s been little time to step back and consider the beer scene as a whole. Now, brewers are finding ways to come together to grow, organize and strengthen their entire community. This is happening through trade organizations like the Brewers of Pennsylvania and the Master Brewers Association of the Americas (an international organization that recently added a Pittsburgh chapter). Local brewers regularly collaborate on projects and share knowledge and resources; new brewers often hone their craft on an established brewery’s system. And efforts are underway to find new avenues to promote Pittsburgh’s beer scene to tourists. A group of local brewers, along with Visit Pittsburgh, is working to establish a clear identity for Pittsburgh’s beer scene. It remains to be seen exactly how that will play out. It may come in the form of a map (like the bygone Allegheny River Libation Trail pamphlets), a passport where drinkers can collect stamps,


BEER BY THE NUMBERS

A BRIGHT FUTURE IS BREWING Allegheny County currently has more breweries than any other county in Pennsylvania, with more on the way. Our brewers continue to find new ways to combine grain, hops, yeast and water. National publications are paying attention to Pittsburgh’s beer scene, and folks are beginning to travel here to try our offerings. So, what now? Everyone I spoke with had something new in the works. Scott Smith is considering adding a kitchen to East End, and is looking for a facility to expand its sour-beer program. Andrew Witchey recently purchased a second fermenter, which will allow Dancing Gnome to increase production and crank out more of those much-coveted cans. Steve and Dyana Sloan are actively looking for a space to start a proper beer garden, so that people can enjoy their beer beyond Roundabout’s tiny Lawrenceville taproom. Joe McAllister is scouring the city for the perfect location for Brew: The Museum of Beer. He hopes the museum, which he compares to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in size and scope, will give people yet another reason to pay attention to Pittsburgh beer. And Mike Potter is continuing to develop Black Brew Culture, an online magazine devoted to telling the untold stories in craft brewing and promoting diversity in the industry. He’s launching a series of tasting parties called “Styles Upon Styles,” geared at educating novice drinkers and introducing them to unfamiliar beer varieties. While the bubble may indeed be real, I don’t see it bursting anytime soon. There is so much excitement among brewers and drinkers alike, and the enthusiasm for local beer is only getting stronger. Everyone I spoke with seemed to feel there’s plenty of room to grow and plenty of territory yet to be explored. Compared to many cities, Pittsburgh’s craft-beer scene is still quite young. This means, perhaps, that we lack the reputation and resources that many other “beer destinations” enjoy. But it also means that we, the beer drinkers, can help shape the scene. We can get to know our neighborhood brewers and tell them what we like. We can request our corner bar to dedicate a tap to local brews. We can tell our friends in other cities and states about what we have brewing here. And we can raise a pint to a future full of possibilities, potential and a whole lot of great local beer.

1765 The year that British soldiers built a brewery at Fort Pitt, the first brewery in Allegheny County 31 Breweries in Allegheny County today

348 Breweries in Pennsylvania, according to the Brewers Association 4,000 Breweries in the U.S. in 1872, before mergers and Prohibition 5,300 Breweries in the U.S. at the end of 2016

“IF YOU’RE NEW, YOU’D BETTER BE GOOD.”

Dancing Gnome owner Andrew Witchey ▲

an app, or something altogether different. But breweries are looking for ways to work together and bring their beer to a wider audience. Though Pittsburgh’s beer scene is largely a friendly one, there will inevitably be more competition as the market grows increasingly crowded. Some breweries will fall by the wayside. “If you’re new, you’d better be good,” says Witchey. “There are so many options that if you’re not … bye.” And in today’s climate, simply making good beer is not enough. Brewery owners have a thousand other tasks before them: creating a brand, maintaining an active social-media presence, coordinating food trucks and events, courting bars to carry their drafts — the list goes on. New breweries must work to set themselves apart, and established ones have to keep up with changing tastes and trends.

“We actually don’t even call [Big Hop] an IPA anymore,” Smith says of East End’s flagship beer. “Calling it an IPA creates an expectation. I think that beer was an IPA 13 years ago, but tastes have shifted.” Veteran brewers like Smith — who in 2015 vacated East End’s original space, and now runs a pair of bigger, slicker taprooms — have to strike a balance between pleasing longtime fans and evolving with the times. Brewers must also navigate the legal, regulatory and financial challenges that come with opening a new brewery. Though things have certainly changed since Smith opened East End, it’s still decidedly difficult to get a brewery off the ground. It’s something the guys at Abjuration know all too well. “They [the government] move at a different speed,” explains Glover. “It’ll be 10 years before the laws are where they need to be. But we have to survive today.”

29,000 Breweries we would have in the U.S. if we had the same ratio of breweries to people as in 1872 29.8 Size, in barrels, of the brew house at Penn Brewery 1 Size, in barrels, of the brew house at Abjuration Brewing Company

35 Varieties of hops Dancing Gnome has used since opening in October 2016

100 Pounds of hops Dancing Gnome uses each week 60,000 Growlers that East End Brewing has “released into the wild” since 2004 195,000 Cans of Big Hop that East End will have filled by the end of this year 1990 Year that Penn Light Lager won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival, the first medal for a Pittsburgh Brewery 4 Medals brought home by Pittsburgh breweries at this year’s GABF, earned by Roundabout, Penn Brewery, Rivertowne and Full Pint

100 Taps at the Urban Tap, in Shadyside 200+ Number of different beers Roundabout has made since opening in 2013 19.9 The amount of beer, in gallons, consumed by the average American each year, according to the most recent data from Kirin Beer University $5.8 billion Economic impact of craft brewing in Pennsylvania, according to the Brewers Association B Y D RE W C RA N I N S K Y

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LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES Donora SUN TO ME ROSTRUM RECORDS WWW.DONORAMUSIC.COM

Sun to Me is an album that exudes bliss. Donora’s fourth album, its first in three years, is 11 songs long, each one bursting with starlight and confetti in a celebration of love. In times as distressing and tumultuous as these, albums like this present an alternative to the darkness, creating a world of light and laughter in which to lose yourself. Sun to Me is full of sparkling synth melodies, grooving bass riffs, and simple, open percussion. It is an ideal base for Casey Hanner’s dynamic voice to play and harmonize upon. Hanner’s the kind of vocalist whose voice is just as much an instrument, whether as a vehicle for lyrical messages or a carriage for melody. The album begins with “Just You and Me My Dear,” a song whose synths have a similar quality to early Dan Deacon — overflowing with a fun, bouncy energy. “Celebrate” carries on this feeling with a beachy vibe and catchy bass riffs. “Do You Hear Me Boy” recalls the butterflies-in-the-stomach feeling of new love, while songs like “Self Destruct” emulate the everchanging feelings of long-term passion. Donora plays with genres on Sun to Me, utilizing an overlying pop theme while incorporating surf elements and hints of indie rock. The titular track has a bluesy rock vibe, its choruses full of saccharine falsetto. The verses utilize warm horn sounds and a heavier bass drum, adding to the dancey quality of the track. Playful deviations from the pop formula keep the album interesting and fresh, while still offering infectious choruses and hooks. The band’s mission with Sun to Me was to encourage listeners to put joy and love first. “We can’t teach what we don’t live,” Casey sings on “Celebrate” and “Celebrate Reprise,” a verbal reminder to live the message that ties the album together. And as a listener, this could be the soundtrack to kickstart your journey of following your bliss. BY MEG FAIR FOR FANS OF: JOSEPH CAMPBELL, HOLDING YOUR LOVER’S HAND AS YOU ICE-SKATE AT PPG PLACE

26

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN RUSSELL}

David Bazan

NO LONGER A CHEERLEADER {BY MARGARET WELSH}

D

AVID BAZAN HAS always written about the hard stuff. With Pedro the Lion, the Seattle-based artist wrote candidly about faith, delving into subjects most people weren’t used to hearing in their Christian rock: doubt, darkness, ethical ambiguity. His moral and spiritual angst hasn’t disappeared, though his more recent releases — this year’s Care and last year’s Blanco — feel like legstretching, both musically and thematically. On both, Bazan fleshes out the warm electronic sound he’s been playing with on and off over the past few years. And, since publicly grieving his lost faith in 2009’s Curse Your Branches, it’s easy to speculate that he’s lately enjoyed a clearer headspace: In other words, he’s made a subtle pivot

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

into something that feels, if not totally contented, at least a little more settled. Bazan — who appears Saturday at Club Café — took some time to talk to City Paper about Tom Petty, the state of Christianity, and exercising his songwriting muscles.

DAVID BAZAN

WITH MICHAEL NAU 9 p.m. Sat., Nov. 18. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

LAST TIME I SAW YOU IN PITTSBURGH, YOU COVERED TOM PETTY’S “CLIMB THAT HILL.” CAN YOU TALK ABOUT HIS INFLUENCE ON YOU? He’s the only person whose work I’ve

known that intimately who’s died. I’m a big Bowie fan and a big Prince fan, but Tom Petty’s catalog I just know more intimately. It was more of a native language for me. And maybe it was because folk music — strumming an acoustic guitar, I know how to do that. … Basically Wildflowers is how I got into it, because I didn’t listen to any secular music when I was a kid. So I didn’t know any of the earlier stuff, even the way that most people do because it’s just in the air. I was in a different air. But when Wildflowers hit me I kind of fell in love with it. … It appealed to me that he took standard — and almost stock — forms and imbued them with his real vibrant personality in a way that transcended the form. And


he was able to take simple phrases and simple ways of doing things, and by being real within those forms was able to convey something totally unique and worthy of study, almost. TOM PETTY’S DEATH FELT EXTRA PAINFUL CONSIDERING HOW AWFUL THE WORLD SEEMS THESE DAYS. HOW ARE YOU HOLDING UP IN GENERAL? Personally, it’s been a good two or three months. My personal relationships and how I relate to my work and stuff have all taken really positive turns, and I’ve figured out some stuff. I know what we’re living through: We’re living though a coup. … It’s just a matter of, are these people going to be allowed to get away with it? Or if they succeed, how quickly are they going to be able to dismantle the country, what’s that going to look like for rank-and-file people? So, for me, I’m just waiting to see if it’s possible that these assholes will be brought to justice. I think it’s possible, I don’t know how probable I feel it is.

standing of the links between Christianity and authoritarianism and fascism, just in terms of how the different ideologies bleed into one another. … The theoretical foundations of all Christianity, in the way that it’s practiced in Protestantism and Evangelicalism specifically, it’s authoritarianism. And it’s scary to me. So, yeah … I’m no longer a cheerleader of the church making progress. I’m interested in seeing the gates opened up and people free to go. … I’m in a different place than I ever was before. I didn’t believe in Christianity, I didn’t think that it was a helpful ideology personally, but now I see little good in it, culturally. WHAT’S YOUR APPROACH TO WRITING THESE DAYS? IT SEEMS LIKE YOU’VE BEEN PRETTY PROLIFIC IN THE PAST FEW YEARS. Yeah, now I have more bandwidth to do it, and I have a different approach to it. I realized I’ve never been a process person or a plan person, I always had this sort of weird assumption or feeling that I wanted it to “be organic,” so I didn’t want to force it or have some ritual. But more and more I realize that some of my instability over the years has been [because of] that … and so I’ve been finding little processes that I like. … I don’t have to get locked into them, but to have some process that I’m doing, like, having a beginning, a middle, and an end in mind. I’ve been trying to make deadlines for myself and then, like … just getting the muscles working. There are other things I can do without thinking about it because I do it all the time, like performing or whatever, so why not have the same rigor to the writing? And I am loving it. It’s really cool. I don’t know why I didn’t do it before.

“I’M NO LONGER A CHEERLEADER OF THE CHURCH MAKING PROGRESS.”

YOU’VE TALKED ABOUT HOLDING SOME HOPE AND AFFECTION FOR THE CHURCH, BUT DID THE FACT THAT AROUND 70 PERCENT OF EVANGELICALS [WHO VOTED] FOR TRUMP CRYSTALLIZE ANY FEELINGS ABOUT THAT FOR YOU? In the past I was a little more hopeful, not in terms of any personal participation in Christianity as a believer, but as a sideliner kind of cheering on Christianity at large to continue to get better. And then the election of Donald Trump, that was sort of when I started getting the sinking feeling of “You misjudged this. You were too hopeful.” So yeah, and also on the heels of it [through reading and conversations with people], I got a deeper under-

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MOVING PICTURES {BY MEGAN FAIR} ON A RAINY DAY, in the cozy air of a quiet

living room, the sweet sounds of Ellen Gozian’s singing and the quiet whisper of paper moving through a wooden box fills the air. She’s performing “Pretty Fair Miss,” a traditional South Carolina folk song, using a crankie box. Crankies are stories illustrated on a scroll, either painted, drawn or cut from the paper. They are pulled through wooden boxes (about the size of bread box), hand-cranked by the performer. Audiences view the moving back-lit images. Traditionally, the stories were hyper-regional. It’s a traditional folk form, a kind of entertainment that could be described as proto-cinema; in the 19th century, larger crankies would travel from town to town with an orchestra. These days, the moving panoramas are an art form that is often performed in homes or small groups. “They’re really nice for house concerts, because the venue is so small and people aren’t expecting it. You’re already in a low-tech setting, so it’s a good

PITTSBURGH CRANKIE FEST 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 18. First Unitarian Church, 605 Morewood Ave., Oakland. $15. All ages. www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3096929

match,” says Gozian, who is a member of The Early Mays, a folk group, and works

is 18. Gozian also teaches workshops on how to create crankies at the Wilkins School Community Center. “Everyone has their own style,” explains Gozian. “That’s what makes it fun.” Although the styles differ, the gear is the same. Most crankie boxes are similarly built — wooden boxes, with scroll rods, mechanical scroll-tighteners and a clamp light. It’s a simple set-up, but can convey a lot visually. “Everybody makes their own crankies,” says Gozian. “My first crankie is my best, so I want to return to that more intricate style.” She’s talking about “Pretty Fair Miss.” In this crankie, the story is depicted in a mosaic assembled from pieces of colored rice paper, one of the more fragile medi{CP PHOTO BY MEG FAIR} Ellen Gozian unrolls a haiku crankie. ums. It took Gozian about 18 months to complete; she’d work on it on a table in her living room every day after coming as a pianist at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. home. She’d hold down the pieces with Crankies are accompanied by sing- coins as she arranged them, and hope ing, poetry or instrumentals. Gozian in- that her cat didn’t mess with them dursists it could be used in contemporary ing the night. “If it wasn’t held down by coins, I’d settings as well. “I gravitate toward the folk songs, breathe on my rice paper and all the pieces would just blow away,” Gozian laughs. but I feel like there’s this great potential The result is a crankie that’s for it not just being traditional about 56 feet long, comprising folk songs,” says Gozian. “BeE SE beautiful, vibrant mosaic-style cause traditional folk songs PHOTOTSTY tableaus. It’s a Civil War-era are great, but it takes a cerE R P OF “ ISS” tale, set in South Carolina, tain kind of person to see M FAIR . at www recalling the Odysseus and their relevance.” r e p a p pghcitym Penelope story of a soldier reGozian is one of the founders .co turning from war and his wife of Pittsburgh Crankie Fest, to be not recognizing him. The colors held on Nov. 18 at the First Unitarian Church of Pittsburgh, in Oakland. It are brilliant and evocative as they move will feature eight crankie artists from through the box, transporting the viewer Western Pennsylvania and Baltimore. from a quiet living room into to a warm, The youngest crankie artist performing long-ago summer. M E G FA I R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017


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OFFICIAL TREE LIGHTINGS AND CEREMONIES

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

11:30 a.m.

Allegheny County Courthouse Tree Lighting

12:00 p.m.

U.S. Steel Tower Dedication of the Crèche

5:00 p.m.

City County Building Tree Lighting

5:30 p.m.

PPG Plaza Tree Lighting

5:45 p.m.

One Oxford Centre Tree Lighting

5:45 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

Santa Lights BNY Mellon Season of Lights in Market Square Highmark Unity Tree Lighting with Rooftop Fireworks

COMCAST MAIN STAGE

TOTAL SPORTS ROCKIN’ BLUES STAGE

FT. DUQUESNE BOULEVARD AT NINTH STREET

STANWIX STREET AT PENN AVENUE

6:00 p.m. | Meeting of Important People 7:00 p.m. | J.D. Eicher 8:30 p.m. | Andy Grammer

6:00 p.m. | Jeff Jimerson & Airborne 7:00 p.m. | Lighting of the Highmark Unity Tree 7:30 p.m. | Joe Grushecky & The Houserockers 8:30 p.m. | Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution

BNY MELLON NEW MUSIC STAGE

EQT JAZZMASTERS STAGE

FT. DUQUESNE BOULEVARD AT SIXTH STREET

6:00 p.m. | Django Festival All Stars

EQT PLAZA, 625 LIBERTY AVENUE

6:00 p.m. | Emerson Jay

7:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. | MCG Jazz All Stars

7:00 p.m. | The Buckle Downs

featuring: Tania Grubbs vocals, Etta Cox vocals,

8:30 p.m. | Maggie Lindemann

Cliff Barnes piano, Paul Thompson bass,

9:38 p.m. | BNY Mellon Fireworks Finale

James Johnson drums, Jared Sims saxophone

November 17 Light Up Night Free Cookies and More!

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER

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FIFTH AVENUE PLACE

Unity Tree Lighting • 7-7:15 PM Join One of Pittsburgh’s Best Known Neighbors ~ Mr. McFeely & Thousands of Pittsburghers for a Majestic Countdown & Splash of Fireworks to Kick Off the Official Lighting of the

Historic UNITY TREE! Presented by

Corner of Penn Avenue & Stanwix Street

Fifth Avenue FREEZE • 5-9 PM Visit Pittsburgh’s Very Own Winter Wonderland! Featuring a Shimmering Display of Arctic Ice Animals Welcoming the Holidays • Take Photos with our Ice Polar Bear, Reindeer, Arctic Dog Sled & more...

• Enjoy Live Ice Carving Shows by Rich Bubin of Ice Creations

Stanwix Street & Liberty Avenue

Family Fun & Festivities • 5-9 PM • Create a Northern Lights Landscape with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh • Delight in Musical Performances, Holiday Airbrush Tattoos & more... Throughout Fifth Avenue Place

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Sat., December 2 • 11 am - 2 pm

• Share your Holiday Wish List with Santa & Receive a Very Special SURPRISE!

• Join Mrs. Claus as she reads Seasonal Classics & Magician Chris Handa for Holiday Magic

• Craft Holiday Leis & Pineapple Pine Cone Ornaments

• Design Holiday Palm Trees & Tropical Wreaths

Sat., December 16 • 11 am - 2 pm

• Create Surfboard Holiday Trees & your own Unique Flip Flop Ornament!

• Make a One-of-a-Kind Flamingo Snow Globe & Finger Puppet!

• Capture Seasonal Spirit with a Keepsake Caricature

• Enjoy Festive Balloon Art & Holiday Face Painting

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FREE FIFTH AVENUE PLACE HOLLY TROLLEY

November 24 - December 23

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Evenings (after 4 PM) & Saturdays

11 AM - 5PM

At the Fifth Avenue Place Garage with any $20 Fifth Avenue Place Purchase

Hosted by Santa’s Little Helpers, Trolleys Circle Downtown Stops every 15 Minutes

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Food Court: M - F • 10 am - 5 pm Sat . • 10 am - 3 pm Join our E-Newsletter!!

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LIGHTS UP FREE CONCERTS PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 7pm, 7:45pm and 8:30pm Join the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra for three 30-minute concerts featuring different selections of holiday-themed classics such as Tchaikovsky’s “Waltz of the Flowers” from The Nutcracker, selections from Handel’s Messiah, and the Overture to Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, among others. Each performance will end with Leroy Anderson’s Sleigh Ride. Audiences are invited to come to Heinz Hall for one concert, or stay for all three. These concerts are free and open to the public. Also save 50% this Friday only on classical and pops tickets.

PEOPLES GAS HOLIDAY MARKET™ MARKET SQUARE through Saturday, December 23 Mondays – Thursdays: 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays: 11 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Sundays: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving

SANTA’S HOUSE MARKET SQUARE Mondays – Fridays: 12 - 3 p.m. & 4 - 7 p.m. Saturdays: 12 - 8 p.m. & Sundays: 12 - 6 p.m.

CITY HALL TOURS 414 GRANT STREET In honor of the building’s 100th Anniversary, the City of Pittsburgh is proud to open the doors of the historic City-County Building to the public, allowing a unique behind the scenes look at the seat of Pittsburgh’s government when decorated in its holiday best! Friday, November 17 from 5 – 9: p.m. and on Saturday, November 18 from 11 a.m. - 5:p.m.

FIFTH AVENUE PLACE LIBERTY AVENUE | 5 - 9 p.m. The Shops and Food Court will be open until 9 p.m. on November 17, with select eateries open later. Catch up with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh and create your own Northern Lights Landscape to illuminate your way throughout downtown. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Show your holiday spirit with a commemorative Airbrush Tattoo and Festive Balloon Art. Musical performances by the Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. and Max Leake Quartet 7 - 9 p.m.

FREE HOLLY TROLLEY Every Saturday thru December 23 & Friday, November 24 | 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Discover all the sights and sounds of the holiday season in downtown Pittsburgh aboard the FREE Fifth Avenue Place Holly Trolley. Hosted by Santa’s little helpers, trolleys circle downtown each weekend picking up at stops approximately every 15 minutes Visit www.downtownpittsburgh.com for a listing of all trolley stop locations.

FIFTH AVENUE FREEZE LIBERTY AVENUE & STANWIX STREET | 5 - 9 p.m. Visit Pittsburgh’s very own Winter Wonderland at the Fifth Avenue FREEZE! Discover a shimmering display featuring Arctic Ice Animals welcoming the Holidays! Get up close and snap photos with our Ice Polar Bear, Reindeer, Arctic Dog Sled and more. And enjoy live ice carving shows by award winning master ice carver Rich Bubin of Ice Creations.

UNITY TREE LIGHTING CORNER OF PENN AVENUE & STANWIX STREET | 7 - 7:15 p.m. Join one of Pittsburgh’s best known neighbors, Mr. McFeely and thousands of Pittsburghers for the traditional countdown & splash of fireworks


to kick off the official lighting of the historic UNITY TREE!

ONE OXFORD CENTRE 5:45 p.m. Annual Tree Lighting & Santa’s Arrival 6 – 9 p.m. Free Horse Drawn Carriage Rides - Take a ride around the block in a beautiful horse drawn carriage. Pick up will be on Fourth Avenue. (Last ride at 8:45 p.m.) 6 – 9 p.m. Santa’s faithful reindeer are ready to greet you in the outdoor plaza. Enjoy FREE indoor activities for children such as face painting, balloon art, sand art and caricatures.

PPG PLACE The MassMutual Pittsburgh Ice Rink is open until midnight on Light Up Night®. 4:45 – 5 p.m. Robert Morris University Island Sports Figure Skating - Kick off the holiday season with an on-ice show. 5– 5:30 p.m. East End Kids - This talented group kicks off the evening’s festivities with a dazzling performance. 5:30 - 6 p.m. American Cancer Society’s Tribute of Light/Plaza Tree Lighting - The Plaza will glow as more than 300 people carry hand-held Tribute of Light memorials, dedicated to someone touched by cancer. The ceremony culminates with the lighting of the Plaza Christmas tree.

WINTERGARDEN PPG PLACE through January 6, 2018 Monday-Thursday 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. 2017 Gingerbread House Display & Competition and “Spirits of Giving From Around the World” exhibit.

“Illuminatin “Illuminating Illuminatinng the tthhe voice vvoooiiice ce of of the thhee true authentic authhentic culture of the Hip Hop generation.”

A ONE MAN PLAY

WRITTEN & PERFORMED BY NATHAN JAMES

DECEMBER 8 & 9, 2017 AUGUST WILSON CENTER

BLAST! PARTY U.S. STEEL TOWER GRANT STREET One way visitors can take their celebration to the next level is to attend Blast! The VIP Party. The event will be held for the first time in the upper lobby of the U.S. Steel Tower. As an added bonus, guests will have the rare opportunity to go on the roof of the Steel Building (weather permitting) for this ticketed event featuring signature cocktails, fine foods, desserts, and entertainment! Also, with ticket purchase, guests will receive special viewing access for the BNY Mellon Firework finale. To learn more about the event and to purchase tickets, visit DowntownPittsburgh.com/Holidays.

BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE • 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 AWC.TRUSTARTS.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


LOCAL AFFAIRS {BY MEG FAIR}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SAM TREBER}

Short Fictions

Short Fictions writes the kind of music that you air-drum to in your bedroom. And when you have a chance to hear it performed live, you can’t help but sing your heart out and pile on the mic with everyone else at the gig. Its latest release, The Heart Is a Kaleidoscope, available now on Pittsburgh-based Crafted Sounds, is a math-pop journey with emo honesty and indie-pop sophistication. Connor Murray, of Crafted Sounds, and Sam Treber, guitarist and vocalist of Short Fictions, met at a house show. Murray was recording the event on a VHS camcorder, and Treber was recording on a cassette tape. “We obviously just clicked,” laughs Treber. Thanks to Crafted Sounds, the album was released on vinyl. Murray put a lot of attention to detail into the packaging: “It’s too legit to quit!” says Treber. The album art features a vibrant view through a wet windshield; it sits proudly on the locals shelf at Juke Records, a record store in Bloomfield. “[Juke has] been really cool about supporting local stuff,” says Treber. “We just played a show there, and it was so cozy.” A passion for supporting the localmusic community is also part of Short Fictions’ DNA. The members of the band are active in the DIY scene, playing and booking shows. The recent EP-release show was an intimate affair, and all the door proceeds went to the Hispanic Federation to aid victims of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. The members of the band give as much love back to the scene, as they receive from others who are a part of it. And the love they receive from the community is palpable. Just watch the way people in the audience sing along to “Ellen (A Song About a Book).” “Whenever people started singing along [at the release show], my heart jumped,” says Treber. “It was really special.” MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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BELVEDERES

CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF DANNY NORTH}

ULTRA-DIVE THURS NOV 16 NEW WAVE 80S NIGHT W/ DJ EAZY LOU

$1 PBR POUNDERS TILL MIDNIGHT AND FREE POOL ALL NIGHT

FRI NOV 17 KANYE NIGHT W DJ ADMC SAT NOV 18 90S NIGHT W DJS SEAN MC + THERMOS EVERY MONDAY YOGA 8PM EVERY TUESDAY KARAOKE 4016 BUTLER STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-687-2555 WWW.BELVEDERESULTRADIVE.COM

Pale Waves

[ALT-POP] + FRI., NOV. 17 British alt-pop/rock band Pale Waves can sound different depending on what kind of mood you’re in. The band has the upbeat goth sound of Strawberry Switchblade, the production expertise from members of The 1975, and the throwback-but-modern vibe of Haim. It’s perfect music for when you feel simultaneously angsty and chill. URTESY While the release {PHOTO CO OTCHER} OF TONI SK of its debut LP is TBD, the group has already garnered a significant following with singles “There’s a Honey” and “Television Romance,” so get ’em while these sounds are freshly hot. Pale Waves plays Cattivo tonight along with Columbus rock band The Candescents. Hannah Lynn 7:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12-14. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

[COVERS] + FRI., NOV. 17 This might be a controversial opinion, but cover bands are underrated. My first-ever concert was a Beatles cover band when I was 12 years old. I was completely out of place in a sea of baby boomers in kitschy apparel, but I had a blast. Tonight at Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, catch Lez Zeppelin, the all-female Led Zeppelin cover band I never knew I wanted. With long curly locks like Page and Plant, and voices all their own, the women cover the band’s classics with heart and enthusiasm. They’re joined by local rock groups Tommy

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

Magik and the Wonderfulls, and Blackbird Bullet. HL 8 p.m. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. $23-40. Under 21 must be accompanied by guardian. 724-799-8333 or www.jergels.com

[PUNK] + SAT., NOV. 18 It’s a stacked lineup at Mr. Roboto Project. New Jersey rocker Mikey Erg has toured in half-a-dozen bands, but will play his own pop-punk creations tonight. Also on the bill is the slightly emo/ Mikey Erg somewhat uplifting Boston punk band Save Ends, along with Pittsburgh’s perfectly noisy two-piece snot-rock group The Lopez. Rounding out the night are some more mellow tunes from local indie-folk crooners Rue. HL 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. www.theroboto project.com {PHOTO COUR OF RETO TOSC TESY ANO}

[POP] + MON., NOV. 20

Even her biggest critics can’t deny that Lady Gaga knows how to put on a damn show. Though her latest album, Joanne, didn’t fully succeed in creating the Americana Cowgirl Popstar persona she lin pe wanted, it has vibrant p e tracks like “John zZ Le Wayne,” “Sinner’s Prayer” and “Diamond Heart.” Like all of Gaga’s performances, this one at PPG Paints Arena will surely feature an elaborate set, confusing/ intriguing costumes and high energy. BYO pink cowboy hat. HL 7:30 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $76-715. All ages. 412-642-1800 or www.ppgpaintsarena.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP

HEAVY ROTATION

FRI 17

Here’s what CP music writer Meg Fair can’t stop listening to:

CATTIVO. Matt Jencik, Vanta Black, Jeremy Boyle, Autumn Pool, Rainsleep. 8 p.m.-midnight. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. David Wilcox. 6 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950.

885 ROADHOUSE. Lenny Smith & The Instant Gators. 8-11 p.m. Clairton. 412-405-8561. CLUB CAFE. David Bazan. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Verdict. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE LAMP THEATRE. Rik Emmett of Triumph. 8 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000. MOONDOG’S. The Relics. 9 p.m.midnight. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. VINOSKI WINERY. Hamilton Avenue. 5-8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333. ZANDERS SPORTS BAR & NIGHT CLUB. Silver Screen. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Monroeville. 724-387-2444.

CATTIVO. Karma to Burn, Doctor Smoke, The Long Hunt. 8-11 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. THE R BAR. Billy the Kid’s Steel Town All-Stars. 7-10 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

Crime in Stereo

Years “XXXX (The First Thousand of Solitude)”

FRI 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 18

CLUB CAFE. PigPen Theatre Co. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. PALACE THEATRE. King Crimson. 7:45 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

TUE 21 HOWLERS. Lizdelise, Laura Wolf, Morgan Erina, Reid Magette. 9 p.m.-midnight. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Children of Bodom. 6 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 22 FAIRWAYS LOUNGE. E Z Action. 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Braddock. 412-271-0506. MOONDOG’S. The Spuds. 7:3010:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

DJS THU 16 BRILLOBOX. LongTurn. 10 p.m.2 a.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

NEWS

BELVEDERE’S. Sean MC & Thermos. 90s night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Push It!. DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771.

SUN 19

TUE 21 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SEVICHE. Hot Salsa & Bachata Nights. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Downtown. 843-670-8465. THE SUMMIT. Dig Now Sounds w/ Hot Honey. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Mt. Washington. 412-918-1647.

WED 22

M A I N F E AT U R E

“Francis Forever”

5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. WALLACE’S TAP ROOM. RML Jazz. 7-9 p.m. East Liberty. 412-370-9621.

OAKS THEATER. Daniel Bennett Jazz Group. 7:30-10 p.m. Oakmont. 412-828-6322.

FRI 17

CAVO. Pittsburgh’s Electro Swing Soireé. 7 p.m. Strip District. 604-366-2046. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin Rosenberg Trio. 7-11 p.m. Rural

ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900.

HIP HOP/R&B

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CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. David Throckmorton & Space Exchange. 6-8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. PRESIDENT’S PUB. Richie Cole. 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Washington. 724-222-6364. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7-10 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809. VINOSKI WINERY. David Gurwin. 1-4 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

Mitski

MON 20 HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Savoy Jazz. 5-10 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

SAT 18

FRI 17

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

RIVERS CASINO. DARRYL & KIM & Friends w/ Southside Jerry. 9 p.m.midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777. STAGE AE. Hoodie Allen w/ Luke Christopher & Myles Parrish. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 22 TWIN OAKS. The Platinum Band w/Darry & Kim and Southside Jerry. 9 p.m.-midnight. White Oak. 412-678-3321.

BLUES

Enjoy

THU 16 O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8-11 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418.

$3.00

FRI 17 KEYSTONE BAR. Strange Brew. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Sewickley. 724-758-4217. MIKE’S NEW MOON SALOON. Jack of Diamonds. 9 p.m.-midnight. Gibsonia. 724-265-8188.

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. The Nieds Hotel Band. 8-11:45 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Shot O’ Soul. 9:30 p.m.-midnight. South Side. 412-431-4090. ROUTE 28 BAR AND GRILL. Strange Brew. 8 p.m.-midnight. Blawnox. 412-794-8456.

COORS LIGHT 20OZ DRAFTS during all the Pens games at your local TGI Fridays

JAZZ

Contact your local TGIF for more details.

THU 16 RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg.

CORAOPOLIS VFW POST

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402. DJ WOZ. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Coraopolis. 412-264-3335. THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta & Preslav. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 18

THE PARK HOUSE. SoulfulFella & The Bike Funx. 6 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SUN 19

“Irrevocable, Motherfucker”

“Know Your Rodent”

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. DJ Grover. 7-11 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. DEE’S CAFE. Soul & Rock-n-Roll w/ DJ Ian. 10 p.m.-2:30 a.m. South Side. 412-431-1314. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. . w w w 9 p.m. South Side. aper p ty ci h g p 412-381-1330. .com

MON 20

Glocca Morra

The Dirty Nil

SAT 18

SUN 19

Ridge. 724-265-1181. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. VINOSKI WINERY. RML Jazz. 1-4 p.m. Casey Deeley Trio. 5-8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

WED 22

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Martin Rosenberg. 5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7-10 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

ACOUSTIC THU 16 HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. 8-11 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-726-7912.

FRI 17 DOUBLETREE BY HILTON HOTEL PITTSBURGH CRANBERRY. EASE. 6-9 p.m. Cranberry. 724-766-6900. RUM RUNNERS SALOON. Right TurnClyde. 6-9 p.m. Ross. 412-847-3300. VINOSKI WINERY. Avi Diamond. 6-9 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

SAT 18 MCGONIGLE THEATRE. 2017 Balmoral Classic. 8-10 p.m. Oakland. 412-323-2707. MIKE’S WIFE’S BAR AND GRILL. Union Jack. 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Oakmont. 412.828.2070. ZENITH. The Ghostwrite + War on Women (acoustic) + Greg Rekus. 8:30-11 p.m. South Side. 412-481-4833.

SUN 19 HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. 5 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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REGGAE THU 16 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m.-midnight. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

MP 3 MONDAY LITTLE GOOD BAD {PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH GULDEN}

TUE 21

COUNTRY WED 22 BEAVER FALLS TURNERS CLUB. The Eldorado Country & Southern Rock Band Turkey Day Eve Bash. 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Beaver Falls. 724-843-7576.

CLASSICAL

Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s little good bad’s “Wide Awake.” It’s a rebellious pop track with a triumphant hook about refusing to bow to society’s expectations. Stream or download “Wide Awake” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

THU 16 CARNEGIE MELLON CHAMBER SERIES: “WONDERFUL WINDS”. Mozart: Piano Quintet in E-Flat Major, K.452, Martinu: Sonata for Flute and Piano, H.306, Galbraith: ”Rhythms and Rituals” for Piano & Woodwind Quintet & Poulenc: Sextet for Piano & Woodwind Quintet, op.100. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

SAT 18

SUN 19

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY CONTEMPORARY ENSEMBLE. Alumni Concert Hall, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921. J.S. BACH & BUXTEHUDE: CANTATAS & ARIAS. St. Bernard Catholic Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7412.

ART SONG RECITAL. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-281-0912. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY BAROQUE ENSEMBLE. Alumni Concert Hall, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-4921. JOSE RAMON MENDEZ: PIANIST. The Steinway Society

presents pianist Jose Ramon Mendez in a recital featuring 6 Preludes of Rachmaninoff and Brahms Sonata No. 3. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-421-6067. MUSIC IN A GREAT SPACE PRESENTS “THE VOYAGE OF LIFE”. The 25th anniversary season of Music in a Great Space, featuring he songs of Henri Duparc, Franz Schubert, & Benjamin Britten. 3 p.m. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition & Borodin’s Polovtsian Dances. 7 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-392-4872. SOUNDS OF DESTINY. 4p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-477-9842. THREE RISING ORGANISTS FROM THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC TO PERFORM AT EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. The Organ Artists Series of Pittsburgh will present organists Ivan Bosnar, Amanda Mole, and Caroline Robinson. 3 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-242-2787.

OTHER MUSIC THU 16 LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8-11 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Rambo.

Levels. 6 p.m.-2 a.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 17 LINDEN GROVE. Steeltown Band. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. PARK HOUSE. Tm Vitullo Band. 9 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-224-2273. RIVERS CASINO. Chris Higbee. Drum Bar. 9 p.m.-midnight. Darryl & Kim & Friends. Levels. 9 p.m.midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 18 PARK HOUSE. Ragtime Piano. 10 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-224-2273. RIVERS CASINO. The Hobbs Sisters. Drum Bar. 9 p.m.-midnight. Stevee Wellons Band. 9 p.m.midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 19 EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Eastman. Feat. organists Ivan Bosnar, Amanda Mole & Caroline Robinson. 3-5 p.m. East Liberty. 412.441.3800. REX THEATER. Bleep Bloop w/ Sayer. 8 p.m.-midnight. South Side. 412-381-2779.

WED 22 RIVERS CASINO. Juan and Erika. Levels. 7-10 p.m. Ferris Bueller’s Revenge. Drum Bar. 9 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.


10% off with coupon code: CPDOG

PHOTOS OF PITTSBURGH MAKE GREAT GIFTS! Calendars, prints, magnets, ornaments & more

Jake Mysliwczyk Photography

jm412photography.com

December 1–3 George R. White Studio, Pittsburgh Opera

www.attacktheatre.com/gravity A dance and live music performance inspired by the gritty and heartfelt poetry of Jimmy Cvetic. Sponsors: Photo Credit: Dr. Robert Kormos NEWS

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IT’S AS IF TO ASK, “WHOSE FLAG?” AND “WHOSE COUNTRY?”

[STAGE]

TAKING A ’BOW {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

RANDY RAINBOW 7 p.m. Thu., Nov. 16. Katz Theatre, 5738 Darlington Road, Squirrel Hill. $50 (VIP: $150-1,000). www.ppwp.org

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[ART REVIEW]

COLOR FIELDS

Randy Rainbow

YouTube star Randy Rainbow — best known for his song-parody-filled takedowns of the Trump administration — wasn’t born addicted to CNN. In his earliest viral videos, dating to his 2010 breakout, “Randy Rainbow Is Dating Mel Gibson,” he focused as much on pop culture as on politics. That changed during the 2016 presidential campaign. “Once the numbers [of views] started increasing with these political videos that I was doing, it kinda became clear that this was going to be my gig for a while,” says Rainbow, by phone from New York City. Ever since, he’s been releasing a video every two weeks or so, from his fake interviews with Trump to “How Do You Solve a Problem Like Korea?” (“Why does your mouth always have diarrhea?” Rainbow inquires of the president). Views occasionally pass 500,000, as with October’s “Desperate Cheeto” (“getting worse with every stupid tweet-o”). Fans including Dan Savage have called Rainbow the best thing to come out of the presidential election. Rainbow, now a confessed “news junkie,” tracks social media to “see the story that everyone’s most up in arms about.” His videos are solo productions, with Rainbow throwing shade as he interacts with news footage while donning various costumes, wigs and cat’seye glasses, and singing in his Broadwayready voice. “I do everything myself. Nobody wants to work with me,” quips Rainbow. “I do them in my little studio apartment in Queens. ... I have a green screen that takes up most of my living room.” Between videos, he’s developing a TV show. “My dream would be to have a variety thing,” he says. “Kind of like Peewee’s Playhouse meets The Daily Show.” Rainbow also performs live. On Nov. 16, he brings to town a solo show he’s been touring nationally since the summer. “I call it like a Barbara Walters special with music,” he says. “I show some of my most popular clips, and I do a lot of the parody songs live. And there’s some audience interaction stuff, and it’s just an evening with … me!” The Pittsburgh show, his first ever, benefits Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania. “I’m not even on birth control; I have nothing to do with Planned Parenthood,” he notes. “But I’m happy to always help out a good cause.”

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY}

Titus Kaphar’s “Jerome IV”

R

ACE IS, RIGHTLY, America’s inevi-

table issue, at or near the center of almost any discussion about almost anything. An art exhibit that advances that discussion more than pulls its weight, and so it is with 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art. It’s an amazingly rich exhibit, imaginatively co-curated by the Studio Museum’s Amanda Hunt and the Carnegie’s Eric Crosby, and including works by 20 artists from each institution. This big show about America features mostly artists who are African-American, and its keynote image is “Abe Lincoln’s First Book,” a 1944 oil painting by Horace Pippin depicting a juvenile Lincoln, abed in a rude log cabin in the dead of night, reaching for a tome by candlelight. The hopefulness embodied in this work made by an African-American veteran of World War I, born 23 years after the Civil War — its faith in humanity, and in learning — is startlingly poignant, all the moreso for its self-taught but careful technique.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

Turn left to find Russian-born Louise Nevelson’s “Homage to Martin Luther King, Jr.” (1974-85), a looming wooden sculpture painted matte black whose disembodied architectural components evoke King’s incompleted work. Lyle Ashton Harris’ photograph “Miss America”

20/20: THE STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM AND CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART continues through Dec. 31. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

(1987/88) depicts a young black woman in whiteface, an American flag draped across her shoulders above her bare breasts. It’s as if to ask, “Whose flag?” and “Whose country?” — even as, nearby, Jasper John’s iconic “Flag I” (1973) asks, existentially, “What is the flag?” and Glenn Ligon’s textbased painting “Prisoner of Love #1” (“We Are the Ink That Gives the White Page Its

Meaning”) asks, “What is the country?” The section of the exhibit titled “Working Thought” provokes trenchantly, with three of Titus Kaphar’s “Jerome” paintings of imprisoned black men, with iconlike gold-leaf backgrounds, their mouths gagged by swatches of tar. Samples from Melvin Edwards’ Lynch Fragments series (first sparked by the death of Emmett Till) are furious — wall-mounted balls of pain welded from railroad spikes, chains, industrial bolts — and so, still, are excerpts from Kara Walker’s now-canonical series “The Emancipation Proclamation,” the silhouetted figures’ cartoonishness ironically contrasting the historic brutality of slavery. A 1984-85 collaboration between Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, an annotated dollar sign, sardonically riffs on divergent attitudes toward capitalism. In the “American Landscape” section, Noah Davis’ 2008 painting “Black Wall Street” memorializes a 1921 race riot that leveled an affluent African-American


DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NEWS

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Use code CITYCITY to save $5 on single tickets

[DANCE]

STEPS AHEAD {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Point Park Conservatory Dance Company dancers {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

community, with muted, dreamlike imagery centered on a forlorn woman in white gloves. The strip of empty turf in the foreground echoes the compositions in Zoe Strauss’ nearby photos of neglected urban neighborhoods (a “Half House,” graffiti reading “If you reading this fuck you”) — moats at once separating viewers from the scenes, and implicating them. Two photos by Braddock-born LaToya Ruby Frazier juxtapose urban disinvestment (not “decay”) with personal trauma. The exhibit’s literal centerpiece pairs, for the first time, photos by storied Harlembased photographer James VanDerZee and Pittsburgh’s legendary Charles “Teenie” Harris. Their 13 images each give us indispensable glimpses of worlds rarely seen in mainstream media: black middle-class life, in VanDerZee’s parlor portraits of individuals and families (1915-37), and mid-century black street life, from Harris’ kids at a swimming pool to a proud woman shop-owner in the Hill District. Pittsburgh is repped too by Thaddeus Mosely’s characteristically elegant sculpture “Georgia Gate,” part of a “Shrine for the Spirit” section that also includes Barbara Chase-Riboud’s stunning “The Cape (La Manteau),” a monumental garment fashioned from small copper plates, and Thornton Dial’s wildly vibrant painting “The Soul of the Tiger.” The final section, “Forms of Resistance,” includes: “Free, White and 21,” Howardena Pindell’s scathing 1980 video in which she recounts experiences with racism, and Eileen Gallagher’s “De Luxe,” an array of 60 prints of spoofishly amended pages from old African-American magazines, with ads for everything from new careers to wigs and skin-lightener. Collier Schorr’s “The First Lady (Diplomat’s Room, Rihanna, 20 Minutes),” based on an arresting fashion-spread shot of Michelle Obama, is meant to interrogate how we repurpose photographs, but might simply remind viewers that people of dignity once inhabited the White House. The punning exhibit title 20/20 suggests hindsight, and much of this show is indeed retrospective, with works spanning nearly a century. But the final image you might see is among the newest. Kerry James Marshall’s “Untitled (Gallery)” (2016) depicts a stylishly dressed, dark-skinned woman standing proudly (and spotlit) by a framed image of a naked woman laughingly sprawled on a fur. She might be the person in the photo; in any case, she owns it, even as rafters reflected in the photo frame’s glass remind us of the bigger institution, one the woman likely doesn’t control. Marshall concisely reminds us of the need to change our ideas about who’s outside a discussion and who’s inside.

With the departure of Point Park University Department of Dance Chair Rubén Graciani, and the appointment of new chair Garfield Lemonius, one might expect changes in productions by the school’s student dance troupe. While that remains to be seen, one thing that hasn’t changed in decades is that Conservatory Dance Company programs consistently showcase some of the finest choreographic talent and works in Pittsburgh. That track record continues in the latest edition of the annual Contemporary Choreographers program, with six performances Nov. 15-19 at the university’s George Rowland White Performance Studio. Lemonius has assembled four notable choreographers, including rising star Katarzyna Skarpetowska. The Polish-born former dancer with Lar Lubovitch Dance Company has created works for Richmond Ballet, Parsons Dance, Big Muddy Dance Company and others. Here, she remounts her 2016 ballet “Snow Playground” on CDC just in time for winter. The 13-minute ballet for 10 dancers is set to music by Bryce Dessner, of indie rock band The National. “It was kind of inspired by a snowball,” says Skarpetowska by phone from New York. The work juxtaposes “peaceful images of swirling snow as it moves across a children’s playground” with the dancers’ movements, which take on the qualities of a snowball rolling downhill, gaining mass, speed and power until it crashes into a tree and disintegrates into puffs of swirling snow. Also on the program is “Stay,” a new 20-minute ballet for 14 dancers by former Houston Ballet principal dancer Dominic Walsh, danced to cello music by composer Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber. Via email, Walsh described the ballet, which also employs mirrors, as exploring “the idea of our personal duality and the curious journey of getting further acquainted with ourselves.” Point Park alum Joshua Manculich’s new 12-minute group work “StandingRoom-Only” is set to music by Norwegian jazz musician Bugge Wesseltoft. Manculich says the work looks at how we unintentionally take the backseat to our own lives, and what it takes to stand up. Rounding out the program is New York-based French choreographer Brice Mousset’s award-winning 2013 ballet “Travailler.” The 15-minute group piece, says Mousset by email, “is a bitter sweet satire of the corporate world directly inspired by the burn out of a family member.”

A New Musical Folktale

“It’s like watching child geniuses at play.” —The New Yorker

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PIGPEN THEATRE CO.

directed by STUART CARDEN & PIGPEN THEATRE CO.

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NOV. 11 – DEC. 3 2017

CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY presents CONTEMPORARY CHOREOGRAPHERS Wed., Nov. 15Sun, Nov. 19. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. $10-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

NOVEL IDEAS {BY TED HOOVER} IT’S EASY TO see why Point Park Conserva-

tory Theatre Company selected Jaclyn Backhaus’ new comedy You on the Moors Now as a vehicle for its students; it’s a large ensemble comedy featuring 16 strong roles. And as a mash-up of Pride and Prejudice, Little Women, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights — four novels written by four women focusing on the pre-20th-century lives of four heroines — there’s a strong emphasis on the distaff side of things, which isn’t always the case in theater. We’re introduced to Eliza (from P&P), Jo (Little Women), Cathy (Wuthering Heights) and Jane immediately after they reject marriage proposals. In Backhaus’ telling, the four flee to the wilderness, relentlessly pursued by their suitors, and this collective struggle ends with a literal battle of the sexes. The story ends a decade later, when everyone meets up at an academic conference celebrating the battle. The jumbled, ramshackle nature of the script gives the company an opportunity to, theatrically speaking, go to town. Fortunately, this Conservatory production is under the direction of Shelia McKenna, who welcomes the challenge with her fiercely intelligent and wonderfully nurturing guidance. Space limitations and cast size preclude individual mention, but that’s probably appropriate because McKenna has forged an iron-clad ensemble and sets them to work inhabiting, exploring and exploding Backhaus’ script. On Tucker Topel’s lovely set and dressed in Terra Skirtich’s colorful costumes, it’s a nearconstant swirl of movement, dance and

From left: Julia Small, Madeline Watkins, Aenya Ulke and Shannon Donovan in You on the Moors Now, at Point Park Conservatory

combat, with each actor a polished part of an entertaining whole. If I’m being completely honest, I should say there’s a chance this company enjoyed working with the script a little more than the audience did watching it. While it’s not a bad play, it can be twee and unfocused, with a didactic finale that’s painfully self-

YOU ON THE MOORS NOW continues through Dec. 3. Point Park Conservatory at the Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

aware. I was confused by Backhaus’ dramaturgy; as a confirmed Jane-ite, I have to say I didn’t recognize the Miss Bennet or Mr. Darcy she’s created, both of whom have nothing in common with the Austen originals except their names. That may be true of the other women as well, but I haven’t read any of those novels, as I’ve been too busy watching plays. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PREJUDICES {BY STUART SHEPPARD} PARADE IS A wonderful play to listen to,

but a tough play to watch. This 1998 mu-

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS....

Arsenic & Old Lace A COMEDY BY JOSEPH KESSELRING

NOVEMBER 16, 17, 18, 19 Thursday, Friday & Saturday performances at 8 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $10.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

sical (book by Alfred Uhry; music and lyrics by Jason Robert Brown) tells the story of the notorious 1913 Leo Frank trial, in which a Jewish factory manager was falsely accused of raping and murdering a 13-year-old girl in Atlanta. The case is credited with the launch of the AntiDefamation League, as well as, paradoxically, the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan. This becomes very weighty material to sing and dance to. Fortunately, University of Pittsburgh Stages does an excellent job of bringing this former Broadway show to life. Directed by Rob Frankenberry, and backed by the superb University Symphony Orchestra led by Roger Zahab, the two-anda-half-hour production exudes energy, tight pacing, and professionalism. Dan Mayhak is brilliantly cast as the doomed Leo, who, in an ironic twist to white privilege, is framed for the murder, as hanging a black man “ain’t enough this time. We gotta do better.” Mayhak’s voice has the sensitivity of a violin played in darkness, and where most performers would be happy to achieve a gray and narrow range of pathos, he evokes a rainbow.

PARADE continues through Nov. 19. University of Pittsburgh Stages at the Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $12-25. 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

Brittany Bara’s portrayal of Leo’s wife, Lucille, grows more subtle as their relationship deepens during the shameful investigation and trial. You can hear the profound love for her husband evolve in her delivery. The large ensemble company is consistently strong. Among the talented vocalists are Alex Knapp, as the corrupt prosecuting attorney Hugh Dorsey; William Banks as suspect Newt Lee; and Tru Verret-Flemming as Jim Conley, the shady janitor whose fabricated testimony ultimately condemns Leo. His rendition of “Blues: Feel the Rain Fall” is a highlight of the show. Gianni Downs’ minimalist set allows the action to progress from dialogue to song to dance with fluidity. KJ Gilmer’s costumes, Megan Bresser’s lighting, and Kate Devlin Metz’s projections are all understated and effective. The wings of the stage are filled with townspeople who look over the events like a complicit Greek chorus. But by the end, they are directly facing the audience. As if Leo’s fate is something even they cannot bear to watch. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FOR THE WEEK OF

11.16-11.23.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH HUNY YOUNG}

Generations of students at Pittsburgh’s High School for the Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA) knew Jo-Anne Bates as a teacher and chair of the school’s art department. But Bates (pictured) is also an accomplished artist, with solo exhibitions at venues from Massachusetts to West Virginia. And this week, she claims another accolade with the opening of her exhibit as Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Artist of the Year. Bates, primarily a printmaker, is active with local arts groups

including the Pittsburgh Print Group, Women of Visions, Inc., and Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Her Artist of the Year show, Exploration of Color, includes 40 new abstract, mixed-media prints of varying sizes that reflect her experiences as a woman, mother, grandmother and educator. Working in her home studio, in Point Breeze, she has used her shredded junk mail to create the colorful works, which often employ text to emphasize themes of social injustice; one is titled “Black Lives Matter 2,” another “Black vs. Blue Don’t Shoot.” The lone installation work, says Bates, incorporates donated footwear to communicate the message “Don’t judge me until you’ve walked in my shoes.” The Nov. 17 opening reception for Bates’ PCA exhibit also fetes two other shows, including the PCA’s Emerging Artist of the Year show, by sculptor Haylee Ebersole. Ebersole is known for employing such unusual materials as Kool-Aid and laundry detergent; New Works is a collection of crystallized gelatin sculptures and prints that evoke an imaginary landscape inspired by the concept of the Anthropocene, a proposed geological era that acknowledges the impact humans have had on the planet. Additionally, one of the organizations with which Bates is associated gets its own show. Women of Vision, which supports and promotes art made by women of the African diaspora, presents a group show titled Sankofa Soul. BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

Opening reception: 5:30-9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 17 (free). Exhibit continues through Feb. 11. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. www.pfpca.org NEWS

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The gray area between the representational and the abstract is explored in a new dual exhibition by Kristen Letts Kovak, opening tonight at 707 and 709 Penn Galleries. In On Looking, Kovak inspects museum artifacts as they appear under spotlights and behind glass, reflections and all. The collection of drawings and installation work titled White Noise, meanwhile, “hovers between objects and atmosphere.” Kovaks, who’s been exhibited nationally, teaches at Carnegie Mellon University. An opening reception takes place Dec. 2. Bill O’Driscoll 5-8 p.m. Exhibits continue through Jan. 28. 707 and 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Open the holiday season tonight at the 57th annual Comcast Light Up Night, presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. Starting at 11:30 a.m., partake in cheery activities like tree lightings and horse-drawn carriage rides. Stop by the Peoples Gas Holiday Market, in Market Square, and catch performances by YouTube pop sensation Maggie Lindemann, Lyndsey Smith and Soul Distribution, and hitmaker Andy Grammer. Amanda Reed 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Various venues and locations Downtown. Free. 412-566-4190 or www.downtown pittsburghholidays.com

SCREEN Explore the intersection of architecture and film tonight and tomorrow at the inaugural Pittsburgh Architecture Movie Festival, at Springboard Design studio. The festival, organized by filmmaker Andres TapiaUrzua and architect Paul Rosenblatt, highlights short films exploring form, movement, architecture’s relationship to nature, and, of course, how people interact with the built environment. AR 7-10 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 18. 1931 Sidney St., South Side. Suggested donation at the door. 412-390-4040 or www.springboarddesign.net

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STAGE The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater presents the first annual Queer Artist Showcase. Part of the theater’s ninth annual My People series, the event explores the life and accomplishments of queer people of color through film, conversation and performances. Tonight’s event includes a screening of acclaimed 2017 James Baldwin documentary I Am Not ^ Fri., Nov. 17: On Looking {ART (DETAIL) BY KRISTEN KOVAK}

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Your Negro. Featured performers include Nick Daniels — The DANA Movement Ensemble; Brittney Chantele; Princess Jafar; Trevor Miles; and Mara Daviis and Tinky Younger. AR 8 p.m. KST Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Pay what you want. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

EVENT: Michael Jackson Laser Show, Carnegie Science Center, North Side

DANCE PittStop Lindy Hop swings into town this weekend for a round-the-clock, multi-venue marathon of dances. Now in its 17th year, PittStop celebrates the Lindy Hop, a 1930s dance craze. Tonight, boogie and shimmy to music by the Boilermaker Jazz Band in the Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall grand ballroom, in Oakland; a late-night session features Chelsea Reed and the Fair Weather Five at Pittsburgh Opera, in the Strip. Two Sunday dances take place at the Carnegie Mellon Rangos Ballroom. AR 8 p.m.midnight (Soldiers & Sailors) and 1-5 a.m. (Pittsburgh Opera). Continues through Sun., Nov. 19. Various venues. $10-20 (seven-dance pass: $80). www.pittstoplindyhop.com

CRITIC: Jack Enterline, 16, a student from Burgettstown WHEN: Sat.,

Nov. 11

It was a show at the Carnegie Science Center planetarium, and there were projectors that shot lasers onto the ceiling to go along with Michael Jackson songs. Me and my family saw an ad for it, and we were like, “Hey, it’s Saturday, we have nothing to do, let’s go see it.” I liked the hypnotizing feeling from the lasers, and I liked how some of the lights went along with the song and kind of told a story. Like in “Thriller,” they were showing stuff that went along with the lyrics of the song. I was surprised that they played “Thriller,” since Halloween is over. I wish there was more extravagance and there were more projections that told a story. And I don’t think they played “Bad.” I would have liked to hear that one.

saturday 11.18

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

ART It might surprise some to learn that photography predates the Civil War by decades. One pioneer included a British “gentleman scientist” who’s credited with inventing paper-based photography — you know, the kind pretty much everyone did until a few years ago — some 175 years ago. Today, get your first look at William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography, a Carnegie Museum of Art exhibition of more than 30 extremely rare (and often quite fragile) works by Talbot and his associates. It’s the largest U.S. exhibition of Talbot’s photography in 15 years. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Feb. 11. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-19.95 (free for kids under 2). 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

< Sat., Nov. 18: Bodiography Contemporary Ballet

^ Fri., Nov. 17: Pittsburgh Architecture Movie Festival

Messiah (2015) tonight at the Byham Theater. Lux Aeterna is set to Morten Lauridsen’s eponymous requiem, and The Messiah uses music from Handel’s famous oratorio. Both dance works investigate movement through song. Caruso chairs LaRoche’s performing arts department and is Bodiography’s artistic director. The two performances today are accompanied by the Pittsburgh Festival Orchestra and the Meastri Singers, under the direction of Thomas Octave. AR 2 and 8 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $35-55. 412-425-3766 or www.company.bodiography.com

SCREEN Future historians of Pittsburgh will do well to consult East of Liberty, Chris Ivey’s epic documentary series about race, class and gentrification here. Produced over a decade, the films — inspired by residents’ mixed emotions over the 2005 demolition of an East Liberty high-rise — chronicle the voices of residents, business owners and others whom sweeping changes displaced from East Liberty and Homewood. Today’s free double-feature, at the Regent Square Theater, includes “In Unlivable Times,” a youth-centered installment, and a condensed hybrid of two other feature-length chapters. A community discussion with stakeholders from the neighborhoods follows each film. BO 4 and 6 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Swissvale. Free. www.pfpca.org

DANCE SOLE Defined performs tonight at Shady Side Academy as part of the Hillman Performing Arts Series. The group’s eight members put an exciting twist on dance and music by turning their bodies into drums, composing a “percusical” with tap and sand dancing and body percussion. Created in 2011 by Ryan Johnson (STOMP, Cirque du Soleil’s The Beatles LOVE) and award-winning performance artist Quynn Johnson, SOLE Defined has performed at venues including the Kennedy Center, The Shakespeare Theater and the Smithsonian. AR 7:30 p.m. 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel. $16-30. 412-968-3040 or www.thehillman.org

DANCE La Roche College and Bodiography Contemporary Ballet present Maria Caruso’s Lux Aeterna (2013) and The

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC ROSÉ}


Southside’s newest bar featuring a great selection of local craft beers and liquors.

^ Sat., Nov. 18: SOLE Defined

TUESDAY NIGHT TRIVIA 8pm Wi Winner ttakes k h home $25 gift certificate!

COMEDY Ensconced in its shiny new two-theater venue, Arcade Comedy Theater welcomes an old favorite from its old space down the street: Kevin McDonald, the Kids in the Hall writer and performer, returns for two shows this weekend. Tonight, McDonald is joined by Arcade regulars for a best-of assortment of sketch comedy from his podcast, Kevin McDonald’s Kevin McDonald Show; tomorrow night, it’s a mix of improv and sketch with students from this weekend’s twoday sketch-writing intensive. BO 9 p.m. ($15). Also 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 19 ($12). 943 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.arcadecomedytheater.com

153 S. 18TH ST. PGH, PA 15203 412.235.7353

sunday 11.19

DEC. 1-3

BENEFIT Puerto Rico will be recovering from Hurricane Maria for years to come. Pittsburgh Artists for Puerto Rico is getting started now. Today’s all-day, all-ages fundraiser, at Spirit Lounge, includes an all-star cast of music and dance talent, including Timbeleza, Liz Berlin, Matthew Tembo, The Turpentiners, Ben Opie, Phat Man Dee, The Hamer Sisters Bellydance and Guaracha Latin Dance Band. The event is produced by locally based, Puerto Rico-born musician Geña, in collaboration with groups including the Latin American Cultural Union and Global Beats. Proceeds benefit Pittsburgh Stands With Puerto Rico. BO 3-9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. www.facebook.com (“pittsburgh artists puerto rico”)

This is a free and family-friendly event! Celebrate the season with cookies and pick up unique holiday gifts along the way. Hours for Cookie Stops vary by location. Get all the info about this year’s tour including the map at lvpgh.com/cookietour or call 412.621.1616, ext. 102.

monday 11.20 TALK Richard Russo is known for his novels about blue-collar folk, like Nobody’s Fool and ^ Sat., Nov. 18: East of Liberty the Pulitzer-winning Empire Falls. He takes a different tack in his latest, Trajectory, a collection of four short fictions including “Intervention,” about a real-estate agent with a worrisome medical prognosis, and “Voice,” about an aging academic who joins his estranged brother at the Venice Biennale. Russo makes a rare local appearance with tonight’s talk at Pittsburgh Arts & Lecture’s Ten Evenings. BO 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

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TAN IZAKAYA’S PRESENTATIONS ARE TOP NOTCH

AN EXPANSION OF TACOS {BY REBECCA ADDISON} For a little over a year, Bull River Taco has been delighting Pittsburghers at its South Hills location on Route 51. But now, residents on the other side of town in Squirrel Hill can partake, too. “We’re filling a gap that was in the area,” says Jeff Horrell, manager of Bull Rivers’ Squirrel Hill location, slinging tacos in the space previously occupied by Waffallonia. “There was no other taco place around here. We’ve heard that since day one. They needed this.” Bull River Taco opened its second location this summer, and the menu features the same favorites offered at the sister establishment: chicken, beef, pork and veggie tacos with Bull River’s signature sauces. The bull’s-eye sauce is made from a combination of mayonnaise, spices and ranch seasoning, while the cholala cream is a mix of sour cream, black pepper and garlic salt. Bull River’s ethos is to offer simple yet high-quality tacos, similar to what you might get at a taco truck or a roadside stand. Tacos come garnished with traditional ingredients like guacamole and pico de gallo; sides include black beans and chips with salsa. Plus, at $3 each, Bull River’s tacos come at prices that let you try several. If tacos aren’t your thing, Bull River also offers nachos and taco salad. And be sure to grab a Mexican soda to wash it down.

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Seared ahi tuna with pistachios

JAPANESE VARIETY

RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

1707 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8226

F

OR DECADES, Japanese restaurants

the

FEED

For the upcoming holiday season, pledge to use only fresh-made salad dressings essings. No special equip equipment pmen e t or skills need. Check online for cipes — many utilize some recipes vinegar combos, but oil-and-vinegar re many variations of there are these base ingredients, plus d add-ins. Experiment myriad at home, before taking our perfect mix to your the potluck: d make “Yes, I did essing.” the dressing.”

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came in two flavors: sushi bars and teppanyaki-style steakhouses, in which knife-wielding chefs mix tabletop grilling with juggling and other aerial stunts involving utensils and ingredients. Both styles of restaurant have their appeal, but have contributed to a narrow, stereoty typed American view of Japanese cuisine. So we’re thrilled that the izakaya co concept has come to Pittsburgh. Not only th that, but it’s proliferating. Somewhere betw tween a bar and a tapas house, izakayas a are focused on sake, much as taverns are fo focused on beer, and serve a variety of hot d dishes to be consumed alongside. Sushi or sa sashimi are sometimes available, too. But a as winter approaches, it’s the hot sake, w warm food and cozy, lantern-lit ambience o of the izakaya that amplify its appeal.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

Marking our fair city’s third version of this Japanese-style tavern is Tan Izakaya, opened by Everyday Noodles owner Mike Chen in a former pizza place in Shadyside. Narrow and deep, it’s flooded with light

TAN IZAKAYA 815 S. Aiken Ave., Shadyside. 412-688-0188 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. lunch 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m., dinner 4:30-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. lunch 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., dinner 4:30 p.m.-midnight; Sun. noon-9 p.m. PRICES: $3-25 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED during the day through the glass garage doors at its storefront, but wonderfully dim and cozy at night, brightened with colorful sake bottles and red lanterns. The menu covers a lot of ground, especially as

concerns yakitori, small skewers offered in more than a dozen styles. Those hungry for more of a meal than a snack can order ramen or donburi, rice bowls topped with meats and vegetables. Sushi is by Mike Lin, who’s helped open a number of local restaurants over the years. For what could be merely a sake bar with snacks, Tan Izakaya’s presentations are top-notch. We ordered multiple skewers, and they arrived stuck into a fat disk of yam with a candle in the middle to keeping them warm. Other dishes were carefully arrayed on platters. A standout, in every sense, was the magnolia-leaf beef, in which sliced meat and shallots, wrapped in a platter-size leaf, were served atop a pipinghot slab of stone upon a heatproof bed of salt. The sauce sizzled as the heat helped conduct a floral, yet slightly bitter, flavor


from the leaf to the meat, which remained hot to the end. This was an extraordinary dish, and even a simpler presentation wouldn’t diminish its power to tantalize. Sprinkling shaved bonito flakes atop hot food is a classic Japanese move: The heat makes the slivers dance hypnotically. Here, they wiggled on tempura-fried Brussels sprouts, which were light, crispy and heavily addictive. The sprouts were wisely sliced, so that no given morsel was too big, but the crust was so airy that it didn’t feel like one of those deep-fried dishes where the vegetable got lost in the batter. A drizzle of aioli-esque, savory-sweet sauce and the briny bonito rounded out a superb flavor profile. Sushi, too, was excellent. Sushi offered as an adjunct to cooked food is often merely a sop, presented in over-elaborate combinations that obscure the elemental ingredients, but here even simple avocado and salmon rolls were exemplary, the avocado smooth and perfectly ripe, the salmon silken and rich. We also had salmon as ceviche, served in broad slices on the sides of a conical dish holding minced vegetables and a tangy, citrusy soy sauce. We rolled the salmon around the veggies, and the flavors melded wonderfully. Spicy octopus salad was another hit. Slender slices of tender tentacle and crunchy daikon radish came in a light, astringent dressing that wasn’t spicy on its own, but dipping in the sriracha drizzled around the edge of the plate could make it so. Our array of yakitori skewers was a bit hit or miss. Quail egg and bacon, with the meat wrapping a tiny hard-boiled egg, was delightful, like a miniature, bite-sized breakfast. Okra took surprisingly well to dry heat. But chicken gizzard and heart were chewy without a lot of flavor to compensate, and lamb was also frankly disappointing, bland and a little tough, with no apparent seasoning at all. After all this, we hardly needed entrees, but the seafood ramen and pork donburi we’d ordered arrived nonetheless. The ramen came in a deep-brown misowine broth, richly studded with scallops, tempura shrimp and snow crab, and flavored, pho-like, with jalapeño, cilantro and scallion; it was delicious. The donburi, like some of the yakitori, could have used more seasoning. The pork cutlet was excellently prepared, moist and succulent with a crispy panko crust, but a little salt would have boosted its flavor. As the local dining scene has split into upscale, high-concept places at one end and gastropubs, most virtually indistinguishable from sports bars, at the other, leave it to the Japanese to show us the middle way. Tan Izakaya is a place that’s perfect for after-work drinks as well. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

ARCHrIsEo’Sn

LAZY DINNER {BY CELINE ROBERTS} Encouraging yourself to cook after a long day can be a little challenging. I came home from a friend’s wedding with a (mostly) empty fridge and not a whole lot of energy. Luckily, I had binged on food-magazine subscriptions, and since they all come with online components, I’m constantly being sent recipes, including lots of emails about “simple dinners.” These are great inspirations when none strikes, and this tuna pasta was born out of tinkering with one such recipe. The measurements and the ingredients can be changed up to fit anyone’s palate and, with the exception of parsley, these are mostly pantry ingredients. The meal was satisfying and provided leftovers for work the next day. While some people cringe at canned tuna, it’s a staple that has long been on my favorite-food list. I have a running scorecard of who makes the best tuna melt in the city (Bryant Street Market, closely followed by Union Grill) and a real Midwestern soft spot for the tuna casserole my sister-in-law made for dinner last Christmas. This is the dressed-up version of such comfort food. INGREDIENTS • ¾ lb. pasta (capellini or angel hair work well) • 10 oz. canned tuna, in water or oil, drained • 1 can white beans • ½ cup olive oil • 4 cloves garlic, minced • zest of 1 lemon • 3 tbsp. lemon juice • 3 tbsp. capers • spinach or whatever greens you have • 1 cup parsley, roughly chopped • salt and pepper, to taste INSTRUCTIONS Open and drain the white beans and tuna, and set aside. Chop garlic and drain capers. In a large heatproof bowl, add garlic, capers, lemon juice, lemon zest, tuna, white beans, salt, pepper and olive oil, and stir gently to combine. Set aside. In a large saucepan, bring salted water to a boil. Place the bowl with the other ingredients over the water so it can heat gently over the steam. Once boiling, remove bowl and add pasta, cooking until al dente. Chop greens and parsley. Drain pasta and combine in the large bowl with other ingredients. Fold in the greens. Top with parsley and serve.

On Ca WING

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WW WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM WWW W W SENY S NY SE Y AIPG A IPGH G H CO M

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{CP PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Happy hours at Spirit (left) and Houghs (right)

[ON THE ROCKS]

HOPPY HOUR Some prime specials for craft-beer lovers {BY CELINE ROBERTS} HAPPY HOUR doesn’t necessarily have to be cocktail hour. With lots of great local

breweries popping up, and wall upon wall of taps to try, it’s easy to get a hankering for a beer to shake off the stress of the day. But where can craft-beer lovers go in Pittsburgh to crack a cold one once the day is done? Here are a couple of suggestions to make you hoppy.

Formerly the

Tin Angel

MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

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OAXACAN CUISINE

HAPPY HOUR

Wednesday - Friday 5PM-7PM

Dining with a

Half Off Appetizers!

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Beerhead Bar Pittsburgh

Independent Brewing

This is one of the longer happy hours on our list. You have three hours to capitalize on getting $1 off of all Pennsylvania drafts, 15 percent off large-format bottles and 25 percent off beer flights. Try a few new beers on the cheap, or that special big bottle you’ve been eyeing. 4-7 p.m. Mon.-Thu., and 5-7 p.m. Friday, North Side

This cozy place, with a frequently rotating draft list, likes to keep it mostly local while throwing the spotlight on two or three “inspirational non-local” brews. Take $2 off all drafts. 5-6 p.m. Mon.-Thu., and 4-6 p.m. Fri.Sun., Squirrel Hill

Butterjoint A seat here snags you $4 craft beers. The draft offerings change frequently and pull unique brews from all over the country, covering multiple styles and ABVs. Grab a snack from the superb Legume kitchen from the comfort of your bar seat. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., Oakland

Full Pint Only a handful of local breweries play the happy-hour game. Full Pint is one of them. Stop in for a half-priced pint or two. 5-6:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., Lawrenceville

Grist House Grab your pooch and head to this Millvale brewery to get $1 off pints. You and Fido can have a blissful few hours of companionship and a few beers. 5-7 p.m. Wed.-Fri., Millvale

Houghs

1200 GRANDVIEW AVENUE • MT. WASHINGTON 412-381-1919 • VUE412.COM

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WE CATER!

It’s Pittsburgh, so we know that potatoes go great with everything. Happy hour at Hough’s means $5 giant spuds (potatoes loaded with things like brisket, pulled pork and veggies) and $4 drafts to wash them down. With 73 taps, you’re sure to find a winner. 4-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., Greenfield

Sharp Edge This bar has long been a haven for Pittsburgh beer drinkers. Swing by for half off Belgian and craft drafts and $1 off imported drafts during happy hour. Look for food specials — Monday night is wing night. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., multiple locations

IT’S EASY TO GET A HANKERING FOR A BEER TO SHAKE OFF THE STRESS OF THE DAY. Smallman Galley This restaurant incubator is a great choice for curious eaters and drinkers. The bar menus always have a fun theme (right now it’s Pulp Novels) and you can snack while taking half off of all beers, cocktails and wines. All the drafts are from Pennsylvania. 5-7 p.m. Tue.-Fri., Strip District

Spirit Find a ton of local beers on the menu, and chow down on some pizza to boot. All of the drafts are half off, and ordering a pizza gets you a bonus salad and garlic knots. 5-8 p.m. Tue.-Fri., Lawrenceville C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: OLD FASHIONEDS

THE GREENFIELD BRIDGE IS BACK AND WE’RE EASIER TO GET TO!

Stop in and say hello, and check out our new MUG CLUB!

VS.

The Abbey on Butler Street

Acorn

4635 Butler St., Lawrenceville

5528 Walnut St., Shadyside

DRINK: Abbey Old Fashioned INGREDIENTS: Bulleit Bourbon, simple syrup, Angostura bitters, cherry and orange-peel garnish OUR TAKE: Bulleit is a sweeter bourbon and makes itself known in this classic preparation of an Old Fashioned. Citrus hints from the orange cut some of the caramel flavor, and ice chips dilute a strong drink. Notes of baking spices and honey add nuance.

DRINK: Sean Connery INGREDIENTS: Bourbon, spice-orange meringue, cherry syrup OUR TAKE: This is a lighter version of a classic Old Fashioned that still pops with flavor. It’s peaty and warm, with notes of wood smoke and cherry on the nose. The slight tartness and the foam of the meringue make for great drinkability.

Learn more about Pittsburgh’s food scene on CP ’s podcasts Sound Bite and Five Minutes in Food History at www.pghcitypaper.com.

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer

Customers will receive the following for their Standard Mug Club Membership of $75 per calendar year: • 20 ounce pours for the price of 16 ounce pours 25% more beer per pour • $4 mug club fills on Wednesday • 20% off appetizers on Wednesday • Specialty Growlers of the Month • FREE mug of beer in your birth month • FREE appetizer in your birth month • Special coupons emailed to members • PRIVATE EVENTS JUST FOR MUG CLUB MEMBERS • And much, much, much more throughout the year.

Customers will receive the following for their VIP Membership of $300

Domaine Maestracci Corse Calvi Clos Reginu Rouge 2015 $10/glass

• All the benefits of the standard mug club • A brew session at the Copper Kettle Brewing Company • Mug Club work shirt

“This Corsican red blend is a little funky. It’s made from a Sangiovese clone. It’s a really fun and different wine that I recommend if you like pinot noir and want to try something else.” RECOMMENDED BY VANESSA COMINSKY, ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER AND SOMMELIER AT THE TWISTED FRENCHMAN

REGISTRATION STARTS BLACK FRIDAY!

Domaine Maestracci Corse Calvi Clos Reginu Rouge 2015 is available at The Twisted Frenchman.

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ART CLASS

“I WANT TO GO WHERE CULTURE IS.”

{BY AL HOFF} Ruben Ostlund’s previous film, 2014’s Force Majeure, zoomed in on how one institution — the family — fell apart when the dad violated a basic tenet of familial relationships. It was a cringey, meditatively paced dark comedy you either dug or found obtuse and boring. In The Square, Ostlund reaches for a similar theme, but widens the lens, incorporating a satire of the modern-art world, with several painful dissections of how fragile society’s veneers are, and how poorly we fare when forced out of our comfort zones.

Elisabeth Moss, in The Square

CP APPROVED

Christian (Claes Bang) is the articulate, handsome and polished curator of a contemporary-art museum in Stockholm (currently exhibiting Mirrors and Piles of Gravel). In a bizarre street encounter, his wallet and phone are stolen, setting off several cascading crises in his otherwise sleek and well-ordered life. He neglects to fully listen to a PR pitch, resulting in an ill-advised viral video campaign; he drunkenly beds a reporter (Elisabeth Moss); and he turns the search of his missing phone into a micro-drama of class warfare, in which he wields, among other tools of privilege, the “Tesla of justice.” It’s a long film, but in its two-andhalf hours it finds plenty to critique: the pretentiousness of the art world (including its ponderous language designed to exclude and conceal); modern lives lived in individual silos illuminated by smartphones; the casual cruelty of the privileged; the fraught communication between the sexes; and the limits of liberal tolerance. In its most talked-about scene, involving a gala dinner at the museum, Ostlund also explores the limits of uncomfortable performance art, vis-à-vis the social order of groups. This unforgettable scene features real-life Swedish art patrons and Terry Notary, a noted motion-capture actor who specializes in apes (Planet of the Apes trilogy, Kong: Skull Island). The Square is not especially subtle or groundbreaking, but its presentation is often quite novel. If you can manage the odd pacing and the loose plot, there is quite a bit of dark humor amid the discomfort. Freedom of expression is, of course, a cherished liberal value, but consider the obfuscation of a press conference, or the “edgy” art star (Dominic West) undone by hurled profanities during his museum Q&A. In English and Swedish, with subtitles. Harris

The waiting is the hardest part: Lady Bird (Saoirse Ronan)

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS {BY AL HOFF}

“I

thing,” pouts Christine, a.k.a. Lady Bird (Saoirse Ronan). Being 17, she’s blissfully unaware that she is currently navigating a life-changing time, the bridge between adolescence and adulthood. For now, she’s trapped in a car with her mom, Marion (Laurie Metcalf), returning to Sacramento from a college road trip. One stray word spirals into an epic argument, complete with a greatest-hits of accusations (“You don’t think of anybody but yourself”), and one of the best “last words” ever. Lady Bird is a marvelously funny and smart coming-of-age story, written by indie actress Greta Gerwig, who also makes her directorial debut. It’s 2002, and Lady Bird is doing OK at a tony Catholic high school (on a scholarship), but her focus is on getting out. “I want to go where culture is,” she bemoans, and for her, this is a financially unattainable college in New York City. Mom is a buzzkill: “My job is to keep you realistic.”

AHOFF@ PGHC ITY PA PE R.CO M

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Over the year depicted, there is the typical retinue of activities: school play, applying for college, parties and proms, the highs and lows of dating, and singing along to bad Dave Matthews songs. Throughout, Lady Bird makes the expected good and bad choices, though this familiarity in no way diminishes the pleasures of seeing them unfold.

LADY BIRD DIRECTED BY: Greta Gerwig STARRING: Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Metcalf Starts Fri., Nov. 17. Manor

CP APPROVED Lady Bird is bursting at her constraints: family, school, the backwater of Sacramento — even as they sustain her. She knows she’s right about everything — and sometimes she is — even when she is unsure; this fierce certainty is her best and worst asset. This is a

film that lets its female protagonists be messy, complex, infuriating characters whom you nonetheless really root for, and Ronan and Metcalfe are fantastic in their roles. The gods have heard my call for more films about the intense and often fraught relationships between mothers and daughters. There are many finely observed moments of this dynamic here, but I loved this scene, in which just a dozen or so exchanged words captures both the longing to connect and the utter failure of communication. In the confessional-like sanctity of the thrift-store dressing room, Lady Bird addresses her mother from behind the door: “I wish that you liked me.” Marion is stung: “Of course, I love you.” “But I want you to like me,” says Lady Bird, defeated. The movie, a tidy 90 minutes that I wanted never to end, follows Lady Bird to college, but I was left wistful, wondering what she’s doing now 15 years later. I bet it’s grand. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM KITCHEN. The screening series for local and independent artists highlights the work of local actor Mark Tierno in more than half-a-dozen shorts. Along with his long, lanky silhouette, Tierno might be best known for his role in Chris Preksta’s science-fiction web serial The Mercury Men, an episode of which will screen. Also screening: “Lift,” by Hugues Dalton and Jeff Garton; “Milkman,” Garrett Kennell’s slick dark comedy set in sunny suburbia; Bailey Donovan’s film-noir spoof “The Big Fold”; and Luke Bruehlman’s dark, theologically themed comedy “As It Is in Heaven.” Curator Matthew R. Day also includes excerpts of Joe Varhola’s feature-length 2016 thriller A Fancy Piece of Homicide. (Note that this month’s Film Kitchen is on a Wednesday, not the usual Tuesday.) 8 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5. www.pfpca.org (Bill O’Driscoll)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW COCO. In this animated adventure comedy from Disney, a young aspiring magician and a trickster named Hector take a crazy journey in the Mexican-inspired Land of the Dead. Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina direct. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Wed., Nov. 22 HUMAN FLOW. This documentary essay, directed by well-known Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, seeks to put a face to the unimaginable scope of refugee populations worldwide. Today, there are more displaced people than at any time since World War II. The film visits a number of ad hoc communities, where refugees have set up encampments in rail yards, or with tents in the desert. Cameras travel along newly erected borders, such as in Macedonia, or examine more established ones, like the walls in Palestine and along the U.S./Mexico border. Various immigrants are interviewed, and their accounts range from hopeful to despairing: “Nobody flees their country lightly,” says one woman. Populations in crisis include Kurds, Syrians, North Africans, Rohingya (fleeing Myanmar) and Afghan refugees in Pakistan, making the trek back to a still-struggling homeland. Much of the footage is heartbreaking — elderly people, families and so many children making do under extreme physical and psychological duress. There are a few lighter moments; noted cat-admirer Ai Weiwei even meets Tabush, a Syrian pet cat now stateless in Europe. And occasionally, the camera finds extraordinarily striking imagery, such as the huddle of North Africans, wrapped in shimmery, crackly cheap foil blankets. It’s visually arresting, like an art installation, but that shiny cheap sheet of plastic is the sole possession of these desperate men. The film is quite long, nearly two-and-half hours, but then again, there is no amount of time to even begin to cover the breadth of this ongoing global crisis. The 4 p.m. Sun., Nov. 19, screening will include a talk-back with City of Asylum and participants familiar with refugees issues. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Nov. 1619; also Nov. 24-26. Melwood (Al Hoff)

CP

JUSTICE LEAGUE: PART ONE. Zack Snyder directs the next installment in the continuing saga of aligned superheroes. This time, Batman and Wonder Woman team up to help save the planet. Starts Fri., Nov. 17 LAST FLAG FLYING. Two Vietnam vets reunite with a third to help with the burial of his son, killed in action in Iraq. Steve Carell, Laurence Fishburne and Bryan Cranston star in Richard Linklater’s dramedy. Starts Wed., Nov. 22 THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS. Dan Stevens and Christopher Plummer star in this tale of how author Charles Dickens was inspired to create the memorable characters for his now-classic novella, A Christmas Carol. Bharat Nalluri directs. Starts Wed., Nov. 22 RANGOS GIANT CINEMA. The Carnegie Science Center re-opens its large-format theater — the Rangos Giant Cinema (previously the Rangos Omnimax) — with three family-friendly documentary films: Amazon Adventure 3-D, Tiny Giants 3-D (about chipmunks, mice and such) and the celebration of animals Animalopolis. Starts Fri., Nov. 17. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

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LULLABY KILLER. Krzysztof Lang’s new drama is inspired by the real-life serial killer who terrorized Krakow in the 1950s. In Polish, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., Nov. 16. Regent Square

Human Flow

D.O.A.: A RITE OF PASSAGE. Rarely shown in theaters, this 1980 doc from Lech Kowalski chronicles some of the crazy, chaotic early days of punk. Featured performers include: Sex Pistols, X-Ray Spex, Sham 69 and the Dead Boys. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 16. Hollywood CLUE. Jonathan Lynn directs this 1985 mystery comedy adapted from the popular board game. Eileen Brennan, Tim Curry and Madeline Kahn head an ensemble cast. Nov. 17, Nov. 19-21, and Nov. 23. Row House Cinema MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS. Sidney Lumet’s 1974 film adapts the whodunit from Agatha Christie concerning a murder on a luxurious overnight train. Albert Finney, Lauren Bacall and a host of other grand Hollywood actors star. Nov. 1723. Row House Cinema THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO. Niels Arden Oplev’s 2009 film adapts the popular Stieg Larsson thriller, featuring a cold-case murder tackled by a journalist and an anti-social hacker. In Swedish, with subtitles. Nov. 17-23. Row House Cinema

Wonder ROMAN J. ISRAEL, ESQ. Denzel Washington stars in this drama about a Los Angeles defense attorney who finds himself scrambling after his boss and mentor, a civil-rights giant, dies. Dan Gilroy (Nightcrawler) directs. Starts Wed., Nov. 22 THE STAR. This animated family movie from Timothy Reckart tells the story of the Nativity, but from the perspective of a donkey. Starts Fri., Nov. 17 THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI. In this dark dramedy from Martin McDonagh (In Bruges), a mother fights with the local police to solve her daughter’s murder. Frances McDormand, Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell star. Starts Wed., Nov. 22 WONDER. This will be the feel-good, take-thewhole-family pick of the Thanksgiving holiday, I reckon. It’s a sweet affirming tale that hits all the expected beats, without being too saccharine. Adapted from R.J. Palacio’s novel, this dramedy from director Stephen Chbosky (Perks of Being a Wallflower), follows one year in the life of Auggie (Jacon Tremblay, from Room), a funny, smart kid who is entering fifth grade. It’s not just that he’s been home-schooled by his caring mom (Julia Roberts); Auggie has severe facial deformities, and, well — fifth grade is brutal. It would be fair to call this film a mini-comingof-age story, in that Auggie has to learn a lot of valuable lessons between September and June, including self-confidence, how to share, and managing friendships. But so does the rest of the fam-

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ily, which also includes his dad (Owen Wilson) and his caring but sort-of-sad sister (Izabela Vidovic). Wonder has a touch of the fabulous about it — everybody is going to want Julia Roberts as their perfect mom, and the family’s Brooklyn brownstone is to die for. But these elements work well with Chbosky’s light touch and Tremblay’s winsome performance. If it’s not 100 percent realistic, well, we could all use a little more glossy feel-good entertainment these days. Starts Fri., Nov. 17 (AH)

WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT. Robert Zemeckis’ 1988 comedy, combining animation and live action, is a clever riff on both mid-century hardboiled-gumshoe movies and vintage cartoons. Nov. 17-23. Row House Cinema THE TOXIC AVENGER. In this 1985 cult-classic update on the age-old myth of the little guy’s revenge, a mild-mannered janitor is transformed by a load of toxic waste into a superhero, albeit a dripping and disgusting-looking one. Midnight, Sat., Nov. 18. Row House Cinema

REPERTORY MAJOR! The Just Films monthly series continues with Annalise Ophelian’s 2015 documentary about Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a black transgender activist who has been fighting for the rights of trans women of color for more than four decades. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. Eddy Theater, Chatham University campus, Shadyside. Free. www.justfilmspgh.org

EAST OF LIBERTY. Over the past decade, local filmmaker Chris Ivey has documented the significant structural, economic and social changes to Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood. The film project began with the demolition of the high-rise towers along Penn Avenue, in 2005. Ivey compiles complex reactions from neighbors, civic activists, community organizers, artists, businesspeople and government officials. Catch a double-feature screening of a condensed version of the first two chapters (“A Story of Good Intentions” and “The Fear of Us”), as well as the youth-oriented “In Unlivable Times.” Screenings to be followed by discussions. 4 and 6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 18. Regent Square. Free

BODO. The fascinating life of Eugeniusz Bodo, a 1930s cabaret performer and cinema star, is the subject of Michal Kwiecinski’s new biographical feature, which includes several great song-anddance numbers. Bodo rose to glittery heights, with beautiful women in tow, but then came the war. In Polish, and other languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. Regent Square

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE. Celebrate the season with Frank Capra’s beloved 1946 holiday classic, in which a harried man (Jimmy Stewart) rediscovers the simple joys of life. 11 a.m. Sun., Nov. 19. Hollywood

STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this 1986 coming-of-age dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5

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HISTORY LESSONS

“HE THOUGHT HE WAS SPECIAL EVEN BEFORE BECOMING INVOLVED IN BOXING.”

This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} NOV. 16, 1909 After a vote of the student body, the University of Pittsburgh begins calling its sports teams the Panthers. It’s the first team in any sport to use that moniker.

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

The Pitt Panther

NOV. 16, 1968 An Ecuadorian-born penguin named “Penguin Pete” makes his last appearance as mascot for the Pittsburgh Penguins in the Civic Arena. Pete was on loan from the Pittsburgh Aquazoo (which predated PPG Aquarium) and had begun performing between periods the preceding February. Pete had a specially made pair of ice skates, and a trainer taught him how to skate, according to an article in the Pittsburgh PostGazette. However, a few days after this appearance, Pete caught pneumonia and died on Nov. 23. NOV. 17, 1886 After 10 years as a franchise, the Pittsburgh Pirates join the National League. NOV. 19, 1985 After a 100-loss season, Pirates GM Syd Thrift fires manager Chuck Tanner and hires Jim Leyland. NOV. 19, 2004 The Pittsburgh Pitbulls make their debut in the minor-league American Basketball Association. The game would be hit with tragedy, however, when coach Tom Washington collapsed in the fourth quarter and died of a heart attack. NOV. 22, 1890 Western University of Pennsylvania, later known as the University of Pittsburgh, wins its first football game on the last day of its first season, 10-4 over Geneva.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL GAFFNEY}

Muhammad Ali in the locker room later in his career

CHASING THE CHAMP {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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ARLY IN HIS research for his great

new biography of Muhammad Ali, author Jonathan Eig interviewed Dick Gregory. The comedian and activist raised the question of Ali’s fearlessness — the unshakable confidence that he’d exhibited since, as 12-year-old Cassius Clay in Jim Crow-era Louisville, Ky., he’d decided he would be world heavyweight champion. “If you’re going to do this book, and it’s going to be worth a damn,” Gregory, who died in August, told Eig, “you have to figure out why he thought he could go around calling himself ‘the greatest.’ Why he thought he could challenge authority, why he thought he could talk back to white people and not get killed for it, the way Emmett Till did.” If you can’t explain that, Gregory concluded, “then don’t bother writing the book.”

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Eig ended up with Ali: A Life (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), the first complete unauthorized biography of the boxer. And he found some answers to Gregory’s questions, along with much else to illuminate one of the 20th century’s most extraordinary lives.

JONATHAN EIG 8 p.m. Thu., Nov. 16. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. www.alphabetcity.org

Cassius Marcellus Clay, fast, brash and gorgeous, first won the heavyweight crown in 1964. Already notorious for his cockiness and verbosity when most people’s idea of a boxing champ was Joe Louis or Rocky Marciano, Clay drew widespread vituperation for embracing the black-separatist Nation of Islam and starting to call himself

Muhammad Ali. Unbeatable in the ring, he was stopped only by boxing itself, whose state licensing bodies kept him from fighting starting in 1967, when he refused induction into the military during the Vietnam War. Ali became possibly the most hated man in America — and, as Eig puts it, “a fist to the white man’s face.” Drawing on hundreds of personal interviews (along with previously unreleased material from Ali’s FBI files, and longunheard audiotapes of the young Ali), Eig paints the champ’s almost unlimited appetite for attention: from boxing fans, the general public, women. Eig thinks that Ali was driven partly by a desire to out-achieve his abusive father. Eig also uncovered evidence that Ali was dyslexic; young Clay’s coping mechanism was to become a life-long entertainer. Then there was boxing itself. “He thought he was special even before


{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID TURNLEY}

Ali in 1998 in Havana, Cuba

becoming involved in boxing,” says Eig, by phone from the road in Indianapolis. “But then when he got involved in boxing, he thought he could be special at a much greater level. That’s when he thought he could be famous and he could be rich and he could change the world. … He realizes if he can be great at boxing, he can do all these things that people say he’s not supposed to do.” Eig grew up in the ’70s and “worshipped” Ali. But in researching the book, the Chicago-based author of acclaimed sports bios Luckiest Man (about Lou Gehrig) and Opening Day (Jackie Robinson) learned things that reframed an idol as human. For instance, though Ali’s refusal of military service ultimately proved him heroic, it was hardly a model of consistency. Ali first said he simply didn’t want to fight, while not objecting to the war itself. Later, he said the war was racist, forcing blacks to fight in disproportionate numbers; only later did he claim that service violated his religion. “I think that’s what makes him a real hero and makes him worth studying,” says Eig. “He’s complex, but at the same time he’s infuriating, because he doesn’t stick to his principles, and he doesn’t always live up to his own values.” In his personal life, Ali seemed to see no contradiction between his endless sleeping around and his professions of love for his wife. (He was married four times.) And the young Ali, especially, treated associates

much as he treated the public: No matter what outrageous thing he said, he wanted to be loved. “He always thinks that his friends will understand when he betrays them or when he treats them callously,” says Eig. “And often he’s right — he gets away with it a lot.” Perhaps most troubling, though, was Ali’s mystifying, late-career decision to train by having sparring partners hit him in the head, hard and often. Eig had CompuBox, Inc., tally the estimated number of punches Ali absorbed in his career: 200,000, far more than necessary, and a likely cause of the Parkinson’s syndrome that might have begun taking its toll on him as early as the 1970s. Ali’s legacy of outspokenness lives on in the contemporary wave of athletes taking stands on political issues. Yet Ali, Eig observes, became a national hero only after Joe Frazier knocked him down in 1971, and he fought his way back to the championship; he became beloved only after we saw him, enfeebled by Parkinson’s, shakily lighting the Olympic torch in Atlanta, in 1996. It’s an ironic denouement to the epic story of the loudmouth kid from Louisville — or, perhaps, not really ironic at all. “The most racist part of it is, we love Ali when he’s harmless. When he’s holding that torch and his hands are shaking and he’s weak,” says Eig. “That’s when we love him, because he’s no threat to us anymore? Well, that’s messsed up.” D RI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

EAT YOUR SPORTS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} FUTURE NFL HALL of Famer Hines Ward

recently had some trouble in his post-gridiron career as a restaurateur. An employee of his Table 86 Restaurant in Seven Fields, east of Cranberry, allegedly ripped off more than $70,000 in two years from the Super Bowl MVP in a gift-card scam. It’s just another great example why the use of gift cards should probably be scaled back. When someone receives a gift card for a restaurant, it means, “I don’t want to take you out to dinner or actually dine with you, but here’s a $25 down payment to the restaurant of my choice.” But other than the scam, Table 86 has been getting rave reviews as it approaches its second anniversary. Ward will probably succeed with his venture because he meets the three criteria for an athlete to have a successful restaurant: Location. Seven Fields is a great spot for Pittsburgh formal dining — wearing the nice Steelers shirt, the one with the collar, like coaches wear, and pairing it with the good jeans. Talent. Ward was an incredible talent. And the fact is, nobody is going to a coffee

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

From wide receiver to restaurateur: Hines Ward

shop owned by John Jaso or ordering a steak from Landry Jones, unless he eventually gets a job at Table 86 as a server. Personality and lack of a major police record. Let’s face it, nobody’s going to buy a pastrami on rye from a deli run by Paul Spadafora. Jerome Bettis’ Grille 36 is another great example of a successful joint that gets high marks on all three of the above criteria. Bettis is a top-five rusher, is enshrined in Canton, and is a very likable person. His place is located right near Heinz Field and is a huge draw on game day.

Still, “restaurateur” is not only a stupid word, but is the chosen post-career endeavor for a lot of pro athletes who have too much money sitting around. The restaurant world is hyper-competitive, and many places don’t make it past the first year. A player’s personality is as important as talent when it comes to whether you want to buy a bacon cheeseburger from him. James Harrison has had a great career as a Steeler, but probably doesn’t have the personality to greet customers at the door of an eatery. If a customer’s order was wrong, she might be reluctant to send it back beneath the menacing glare of Harrison. On the baseball side of things, former Pirates Brian Giles and Jason Kendall were huge stars, but their previous histories as clubhouse ballbreakers might not fit in well in a consumer-driven industry. When fans enter a restaurant, they don’t want to hear Kendall scream, “Welcome to hell,” a phrase he reportedly yelled at new players. On the other hand, former Bucco and World Series champion Manny Sanguillen is perfect in this role. Manny’s BBQ is in the best location; it’s behind the centerfield bleachers at PNC Park. Manny is usually there with his gleaming personality, signing autographs and dishing out good food at reasonable prices, especially by ballpark standards. It doesn’t always work out for athletes. Former Steelers cornerback Rod Woodson is a Hall of Famer who seems very friendly and approachable. Unfortunately, Rod Woodson’s All Star Grill went belly up after

just a short run; location was his downfall. What is now a Station Square parking lot was once the site of Woodson’s, and a revolving door of businesses that didn’t make it — The Pittsburgh Sports Garden, Margarita Mama’s and, yes, Philthy McNasty’s. I still can’t believe Philthy McNasty’s folded. A restaurant that sounded like a deviant Irish brothel should’ve been a smash. The best athlete-owned joint in this city’s history has to be Willie Stargell’s Chicken on the Hill. There’s a chicken-finger stand with the same name at PNC. But the original was in the Hill District, and customers got free chicken, real fried chicken, every time Captain Willie took one deep. Joe Morgan once said of Stargell, “When I played there were 600 ballplayers, and 599 of them loved Willie Stargell.” I suspect the one that didn’t was Keith Hernandez, but that can’t be verified. Dan Marino and Mike Ditka both have successful restaurants here as well. Marino is an owner of Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza, with multiple locations across the country. Marino is a good Pittsburgher, a likable guy and an unquestioned great of the game. Ditka is rough around the edges and often says some pretty stupid things when he’s discussing politics. But right or wrong, a lot of Pittsburghers like the guy. The bottom line is, Pittsburghers love sports so much that they like to be ensconced in it even while they’re eating. So get out and grab a bite, and think about sports while you are eating. It’s a very Pittsburgh thing to do.

WHEN FANS ENTER A RESTAURANT, THEY DON’T WANT TO HEAR JASON KENDALL SCREAM, “WELCOME TO HELL.”

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THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on November 28, 2017, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for a Service Contract for the following:

Asbestos, Lead, Mold Abatement Services Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on October 30, 2017 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us NEWS

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WORST. PUZZLE. EVER.

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. Model Upton 5. Yokohama product 11. “Nothing’s going right today,” briefly 14. Travel route with no other points 15. Rods 16. Catalan gold 17. Pig’s request 18. He played Emiliano in “Viva Zapata!” 19. Mini thing 20. Brief openings 22. The Wildcats of the Big 12 Conf. 23. Twitter CEO Dorsey 24. Political commentator Olbermann 25. Ties 27. Philadelphia Soul league: Abbr. 28. Mouse drawn by Lucy Cousins 30. Computercode abbr. 31. Émile who was nominated for the first and second Nobel Prizes for Literature 33. Turn bad 34. Without a trace 35. Quick temper 38. Scooped (out) 41. With a bug 42. Biotech company’s product

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46. Actress Barrymore 47. Silvery fish 49. Line test?: Abbr. 50. Forestalled 52. Amherst college, briefly 54. String instrument played sitting down 55. Web portal with a period in their logo 56. Big bet 57. One card 58. Ironclad 60. IM initialism that probably isn’t what’s happening because then you’d be away from the keyboard 61. Bring in 62. Pelicans group 63. “There’s an ___” 64. Glazed chicken general 65. Look over carefully 66. Plant-to-be

DOWN 1. Suicide bomber 2. Express regret over 3. Burrito ingredient 4. “A film is a terrible thing to waste” writer 5. Turntable specs 6. “Duh, shoulda thought of that” 7. Worst possible existence, in a meme, and a hint to six squares in this puzzle 8. “And how”

9. Spoken 10. “Hamilton” genius ___ -Manuel Miranda 11. Bread made with olive oil 12. Purpose of a FedEx number 13. Office, e.g. 21. Omega, in physics 23. Teased 25. Christian in clothing 26. Myanmar’s neighbor 29. “Shark Tank” shark, for short 32. Under the covers 34. Legally invalid 36. Captain’s wheel

37. Got out of town 38. GOP symbol 39. Daily grinds 40. Stick with 43. Parenthetical figure 44. Airbnb charge 45. Lunch heavy on the mayo 47. Packs away 48. Prom rental 51. Labyrinth solutions 53. Niles’s off-screen wife on “Frasier” 56. Arr. projections 58. BART stop 59. “Young Sheldon” network {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.15-11.22

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Everything that can be invented has been invented.” — Charles H. Duell, director of the U.S. Patent Office, 1899. “Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible.” — Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895. “All the music that can be written has already been written. We’re just repeating the past.” — 19th-century composer Tschaikovsky. “Video won’t be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months. People will soon get tired of staring at a box every night.” — filmmaker Darryl F. Zanuck, commenting on television in 1946. I hope I’ve provided enough evidence to convince you to be faithful to your innovative ideas, Scorpio. Don’t let skeptics or conventional thinkers waylay you.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Sagittarians are most likely to buy a lottery ticket that has the winning numbers. But you’re also more likely than everyone else to throw the ticket in a drawer and forget about it, or else leave it in your jeans when you do the laundry, rendering the ticket unreadable. Please don’t be like that in the coming weeks. Make sure you do what’s necessary to fully cash in on the good fortune that life will be making available.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the game of basketball, if a player is fouled by a member of the opposing team, he is given a “free throw.” While standing 15 feet away, he takes a leisurely shot at the basket without having to deal with any defenders. Studies show that a player is most likely to succeed at this task if he shoots the ball underhanded. Yet virtually no professionals ever do this. Why? Because it doesn’t look cool. Everyone opts to shoot free throws overhand, even though it’s not as effective a technique. Weird! Let’s invoke this as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks, Capricorn. In my astrological opinion, you’ll be more likely to accomplish good and useful things if you’re willing to look uncool.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1991, Aquarius rock star Axl Rose recorded the song “November Rain” with his band Guns N’ Roses. It had taken him eight years to compose it. Before it was finally ready for prime time, he had to whittle it down from an 18-minutelong epic to a more succint nine-minute ballad. I see the coming weeks as a time when you should strive to complete work on your personal equivalent of Axl’s opus.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Thomas Edison was a prolific inventor whose work led to the creation of electric lights, recorded music, movies and much more. When he was 49 years old, he met Henry Ford, a younger innovator who was at the beginning of his illustrious career. Ford told Edison about his hopes to develop and manufacture low-cost automobiles, and the older man responded with an emphatic endorsement. Ford later said this was the first time anyone had given him any encouragement. Edison’s approval “was worth worlds” to him. I predict, Pisces, that you will receive comparable inspiration from a mentor or guide or teacher in the next nine months. Be on the lookout for that person.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Many people go fishing all their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after,” observed Henry David Thoreau. The spirit of Thoreau’s observation is true about every one of

us to some extent. From time to time, we all try to satisfy our desires in the wrong location, with the wrong tools, and with the wrong people. But I’m happy to announce that his epigram is less true for you now than it has ever been. In the coming months, you will have an unusually good chance to know exactly what you want, be in the right place at the right time to get it, and still want it after you get it. And it all starts now.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I predict that during the next 10 months, you will generate personal power and good fortune as you ripen your skills at creating interesting forms of intimacy. Get started! Here are some tips to keep in mind. 1. All relationships have problems. Every single one, no exceptions! So you should cultivate relationships that bring you useful and educational problems. 2. Be very clear about the qualities you do and don’t want at the core of your most important alliances. 3. Were there past events that still obstruct you from weaving the kind of togetherness that’s really good for you? Use your imagination to put those events behind you forever.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You may be entertaining an internal dialog that sounds something like this: “I need a clear yes or a definitive no ... a tender revelation or a radical revolution ... a lesson in love or a cleansing sex marathon — but I’m not sure which! Should I descend or ascend? Plunge deeper down, all the way to the bottom? Or zip higher up, in a heedless flight into the wide-open spaces? Would I be happier in the poignant embrace of an intense commitment or in the wild frontier where none of the old rules can follow me? I can’t decide! I don’t know which part of my mind I should trust!” If you do hear those thoughts in your brain, Gemini, here’s my advice: There’s no rush to decide. What’s healthiest for your soul is to bask in the uncertainty for a while.

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I predict that starting today and during the next 10 months, you will learn more about treating yourself kindly and making yourself happy than you have in years. You will mostly steer clear of the mindset that regards life as a numbing struggle for mere survival. You will regularly dream up creative ideas about how to have more fun while attending to the mundane tasks in your daily rhythm. Here’s the question I hope you will ask yourself every morning for the next 299 days: “How can I love myself wth devotion and ingenuity?”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This may be the most miscellaneous horoscope I’ve ever created for you. That’s apropos, given the fact that you’re a multifaceted quick-change artist these days. Here’s your sweet mess of oracles. 1. If the triumph you seek isn’t humbling, it’s not the right triumph. 2. You may have an odd impulse to reclaim or recoup something that you have not in fact lost. 3. Before transmuta-

tion is possible, you must pay a debt. 4. Don’t be held captive by your beliefs. 5. If you’re given a choice between profane and sacred love, choose sacred.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The next 10 months will be an ideal time to revise and revamp your approach to education. To take maximum advantage of the potentials, create a master plan to get the training and knowledge you’ll need to thrive for years to come. At first, it may be a challenge to acknowledge that you have a lot more to learn. The comfort-loving part of your nature may be resistant to contemplating the hard work it will require to expand your worldview and enhance your skills. But once you get started, you’ll quickly find the process becoming easier and more pleasurable. Is there a belief you know you should live without, but don’t yet have the courage to leave behind? FreeWillAstrology.com

get your yoga on!

CANCER (June 21-July 22): According to storyteller Michael Meade, ancient Celtic culture believed that “a person was born through three forces: the coming together of the mother and father, an ancestral spirit’s wish to be reborn, and the involvement of a god or goddess.” Even if you don’t think that’s literally true, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to have fun fantasizing it is. That’s because you’re in a phase when contemplating your origins can invigorate your spiritual health and attract good fortune into your life. So start with the Celtic theory, and go on from there. Which of your ancestors may have sought to live again through you? Which deity might have had a vested interest in you being born? What did you come to this earth to accomplish? Which of your innate potentials have you yet to fully develop, and what can you do to further develop them?

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

NEWS

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

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’ LET S

GET S CIAL

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I was honored to appear with Esther Perel at the Orpheum Theater in Vancouver, B.C., a few weeks ago to discuss her new book, The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity. Questions were submitted on cards before the show — some for me, some for Esther, some for both of us — and we got to as many as we could during the event. Here are some of the questions (mostly for me) that we didn’t get to. I’ve never slept with anyone. My current boyfriend has had sex with many, many partners. He knows I’m a virgin, but I’m worried. Any tips on how I can avoid performing like the amateur gay man that I am? Give yourself permission to be bad at it — awful at it, inept and halting and awkward. And remind yourself going in (and out and in and out) that whatever happens, this isn’t the last time you’ll ever have sex. Some people are good at sex right out of the gate, but most people need a little practice before they catch a groove. But nothing guarantees a bad first experience (or bad millionth experience) quite as effectively as faking it. Faking is always a bad idea — faking orgasms, faking interest, faking confidence — so don’t fake. Just be. How would you help a woman who has never experienced an orgasm? I would gift her a mild pot edible and a powerful vibrator.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017

I’m a 34-year-old gay man. I’ve never had a long-term relationship. Are long-term relationships even necessary nowadays? Long-term relationships are nice — I’m happy with mine — but not strictly necessary. They’re not oxygen, iodine or cannabinoids. The pressure to pair off can make LTRs feel not just necessary but compulsory, and the negative cultural messaging around being single and/ or enjoying a series of successful short-term relationships (single people are losers, serial daters “just can’t commit” or are losers) certainly doesn’t help. Is there a way to compromise if one partner wants kids and the other does not? There’s no such thing as half a kid — at least a live one — so there’s no room for compromise here. Someone has to give, or someone has to go. I’m in a relationship that involves BDSM and Japanese-style bondage. I often have marks left on my body: bruising, scratches, rope marks, etc. I am afraid my children and friends will notice. Any suggestions for how to explain this to people? I don’t want to wear long-sleeve shirts for the rest of my life. Wear long-sleeve shirts and lie to your kids — you’re taking a martial-arts class while they’re at school, you fell into a blackberry bramble — but tell your friends the truth, lest they think you’re in an abusive relationship.

“BUT I WOULD NO MORE RECOMMEND HAVING AN AFFAIR THAN I WOULD RECOMMEND GETTING CANCER.”

I’m a woman in my mid30s. Sometimes I want to bang it out in 30 seconds but my husband wants 45 minutes. What do we do? Your husband has a nice solo stroke session for 44 and a half minutes, and then you climb on top or slide underneath for the last 30 seconds.

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ

thing she fears might happen if you open the relationship up is definitely going to happen if you don’t.

I’m a 34-year-old woman. My 40-yearold boyfriend used to date his sister-in-law. One time he said he thought it would be funny if I asked her who was better in bed: him or his brother. Is this weird or is it just a man thing? It could be both — a weird man thing — but seeing as your boyfriend asked only once, he’s clearly not obsessed. The question presumably made you uncomfortable (which is why you’re asking me about it), and here’s how you shut it down if he ever asks again: “I could ask her who’s better in bed, or I could go fuck your brother myself and report back.” What do I do if my wife doesn’t want an open relationship and I do? We haven’t had sex in 11 years, but we are still in love and have two young children. I don’t understand monogamous but sexless marriages. Because if your relationship is monogamously sexless … wouldn’t that mean you don’t have sex only with each other? Setting that aside aside … Your wife probably and perhaps reasonably fears that opening up your marriage could result in you leaving her for some woman you’re fucking. But if you’re unwilling to go without sex for the rest of your life, you’re going to wind up leaving your wife in order to meet some woman you can fuck. So the

What’s the best-case scenario in the wake of an affair? “People often see an affair as a trauma from which there is no return. And indeed, some affairs deliver a fatal blow to a relationship,” Esther Perel writes in The State of Affairs. “But others may inspire change that was sorely needed. Betrayal cuts to the bone, but the wound can be healed. Affairs can even become generative for a couple.” So best-case scenario? Needed change and a regenerated connection. And since some relationships need to end, an affair that leads to a breakup — the affair that delivers the fatal blow — can also be regarded as a best-case outcome. Back to Esther: “Because I believe that some good may come out of the crisis of infidelity, I have often been asked, ‘So would you recommend having an affair to a struggling couple?’ My response? A lot of people have positive, life-affirming experiences that come along with terminal illness. But I would no more recommend having an affair than I would recommend getting cancer.” The State of Affairs is required reading for all couples, not just couples struggling with the fallout from an affair. A relationship that should survive an affair is likelier to survive — and regenerate — if you’ve given the subject some thought before it’s a crisis. Order a copy today. On the Lovecast, trans talk with Buck Angel: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM


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CREATING SPACE

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

IN MANY WAYS, the U.S. remians a segregated nation. Racism is system-

atic and it bleeds into every part of the culture. The craft-beer industry, liberal-leaning though it may be, isn’t immune, but there is a movement developing to help broaden the field. “In any other subject there’s always that: the history of the nation. We gotta deal with it, and we gotta work at trying to change it,” says Mike Potter, creator and editor-in-chief of Black Brew Culture, an online publication about the craft-beer industry that will launch in mid-November. “One of the biggest components of what we try to focus on is recognition: exposure of people of color who are doing it [participating in beer culture], whether that’s aficionados, beer drinkers, brewers, owners — all of that is going to need some type of exposure and some type of voice in order for people to understand that that’s there.” Potter first tapped into local craft beer in the mid-2000s, when he stumbled upon the East End Brewing Company when it was headquartered in a barebones space on Susquehanna Street, in Homewood that had the feel of an underground club. “It was strictly aficionados and craft-beer people,” he says fondly. His curiosity led him into conversation with owner Scott Smith and the other patrons; his interest began to ignite. Now he travels to breweries out of state to find and drink new brews, and particularly to support black-owned breweries. He’s found several, including White Lion Brewery in Springfield, Mass.; Harlem Brewery, in New York; Union Craft Brewing, in Baltimore; Black Frog Brewery, in Toledo, Ohio; and Island to Island, in Brooklyn.

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

Day Bracey

ery week and share.” A friend who is a traveling photographer for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review was really into craft beer and helped stoke Bracey’s interest by bringing back brews from other cities. Bracey and his friend and fellow comedian Ed Bailey started hanging out after sets in bars, drinking beer and discussing things, and were surprised when people gathered around to listen. They launched their podcast, Drinking Partners, in 2014. “We wanted to make people feel like they were having a drink with us,” says Bracey. They started doing interviews with brewers and exploring brewery culture, and found that the people they were talking to in the industry

“IT’S ALWAYS GOOD TO SEE PEOPLE LIKE YOURSELF DOING THE SAME THING.” “That’s the handful we know of; there’s more, but those are the main ones. There’s not a lot, unfortunately,” says Potter. “It’s always good to see people like yourself doing the same thing. The more support you get, the better products you can make.” The lack of people of color in all sides of the industry is what Potter is hoping to address. On his journey, he’s had what he describes as “a balance that I’m seeing with support and obstacles” in the larger beer community. One obstacle has been local staffing for BBC. A few people from Pittsburgh are on board, as well as writers from New York, Los Angeles and Atlanta. “The scene here is not as wealthy, when you’re talking about people of color,” says Potter. “It’s just not here as much. This is a national publication, so we have to go where the information and people are.” In creating this space specifically for people of color, Potter is aiming to increase interest in those communities, and in doing so pay respect to what those points of view can bring. “With new ideas, comes flavor. To me, that can only help the industry,” he says Day Bracey is a Pittsburgh comedian and beer lover who decided to combine the two. “I got interested in craft beer before I got into comedy,” he says. “There was a beer distributor down the street. We had this thing where we would each buy a different case of something ev-

often collaborated and supported each other. “They had this mentality in the community, which isn’t as prevalent in all artistic communities, that ‘all ships rise,’” he says. Bracey also noticed something else during their visits. “Typically, Ed and I are the only black people in any brewery we go to. We’ve been to a lot of breweries. We don’t see our people there,” he says. “I think there is a real effort in the community to be inclusive, but it is a little tougher to reach out to newer breweries, being a black man reaching out to unfamiliar white entities, to get a foot in the door.” Bracey has also met resistance to craft beer inside the black community, which he mostly attributes to unfamiliarity. “We’re in such a weird cross-section of the city that’s dominated by white people, we don’t see a lot of black people in what we do outside of craft beer in general, in comedy, podcasting etc.,” he says. “Pittsburgh doesn’t have a strong black middle class.” Bracey believes that having capital, familiarity and knowledge would help get more people of color into the craft-beer scene. “A lot of black people don’t want to go to a venue they aren’t comfortable in or where they will be a minority. It’s really tough,” he says. “Even me being welcomed into places and being in these [podcasts] all the time, it’s still intimidating being the only one there.” C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.15/11.22.2017


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The Drink Issue - Pittsburgh City Paper  

November 15, 2016 Volume 27 Issue 46