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EVENTS 11.10 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MATTHEW SHIPP TRIO WITH SPECIAL GUEST THOTH TRIO The Warhol theater Co-presented with City of Asylum @ Alphabet City Tickets $15/$12 members and students

11.14 – 10am-12pm MEMBERS HALF-PINT PRINTS OUT The Factory SOLD Families work with The Warhol’s artist educators to create silkscreen prints during this members-only drop-in silkscreen printing activity for children ages 1 to 4 years old. Free for members; Registration suggested

SEE CONTRASTING CULTURES BLENDED ON A SINGLE PALETTE. SEE CONTRASTING CULTURES BLENDED ON A SINGLE PALETTE.

11.15 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: LUNA WITH SPECIAL GUEST ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER Carnegie Lecture Hall Co-presented with WYEP Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets $25/$20 members & students

11.25 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY Join artist educators for Dandy Andy, a monthly tour that focuses on Warhol’s queer history. Free with museum admission

11.1 – 7pm DAY WITH(OUT) ART: ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS The Warhol theater Curated by Erin Christovale and Vivian Crockett for Visual AIDS, the video program prioritizes Black narratives within the ongoing AIDS epidemic. Free; Registration suggested

Farhad Moshiri, Self Portrait on Flying Carpet, 2009, Courtesy Galerie Perrotin, photo by Guillaume Ziccarelli

OCTOBER 13, 2017 - JANUARY 14, 2018 ONLY AT THE WARHOL Farhad Moshiri: Go West is generously supported by The Fine Foundation, Piaget, Galerie Perrotin, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, The Third Line, Dubai, The Soudavar Memorial Foundation, The Farjam Foundation, The Khazaei Foundation, Maryam and Edward Eisler, Navid Mirtorabi, Ziba Franks, Elie Khouri, Fatima and Essi Maleki, Nazee Moinian, Mahshid and Jamshid Ehsani, and Narmina and Javad Marandi.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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11.08/11.15.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 45

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns HALEY FREDERICK, HANNAH LYNN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, AMANDA REED

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Donald Trump is unable to handle the job of President of the United States. PAGE 06

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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*Among Individual Marketplace plans available in Allegheny County for 2018. The UPMC Health Plan Marketplace is a shopping site only for UPMC Health Plan products and is not the federal Health Insurance Marketplace. To access, please log in to www. upmchealthplan.com/coverage. To access the federal Health Insurance Marketplace, please visit www.healthcare.gov. Nondiscrimination Statement. UPMC Health Plan complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. UPMC Health Plan is the marketing name used to refer to the following companies, which are licensed to issue individual and group health insurance products or which provide third party administration services for group health plans: UPMC Health Network Inc., UPMC Health Options Inc., UPMC Health Coverage Inc., UPMC Health Plan Inc., UPMC Health Benefits Inc., UPMC for You Inc., and/or UPMC Benefit Management Services Inc. Translation Services. ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-855-489-3494 (TTY: 1-800-361-2629). ͩNj쨰ƧưǷ̹ů୑Ʉ ġNJ뼷ǷĻŗы͘ȦīДҶ྽Վ˖Ө뼶ɐٍǖ 1-855-489-3494 (TTY) 1-800-361-2629.

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

IT’S CLEAR TO A GREAT MANY PEOPLE THAT THE DONALD TRUMP EXPERIMENT IS A COLOSSAL FAILURE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Last week, City Paper hosted Face the Music: A Battle of the Bands at Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. Check out our photos from the event at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Vogue; strike a pose; and then check out the behind-the-scenes video from our cover photoshoot with 12-year-old drag queen E! The Dragnificent at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CP recently reported on a racist video as part of our work with ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

{CP ILLUSTRATION BY JEFF DREW}

INTERACTIVE

IMPEACH TRUMP K

Our featured photo from last week is by @frog_talib. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

Want to get the freshest content sent right to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletters at pghcitypaper.com/newsletters.

NOWLEDGE IS power, at least that’s what the old axiom would have you believe. Between the 24-hour news cycle, indictments of Trump campaign officials, investigations into the President’s son and son-in-law for potentially colluding with Russia, a continuing investigation by special prosecutor Robert Mueller, a daily nuclear standoff with North Korea, and President Trump’s incessant, mostly nonsensical tweeting, we are neck-deep in an ocean of knowledge about what’s going on in Trump’s administration. Yet, somehow, we seem more powerless than ever.

But we don’t have to be. Today, the editorial staff of the Pittsburgh City Paper is joining other alt-weeklies across the country and calling for the impeachment

City Paper editorial team calls for impeachment of Donald Trump {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} of Donald Trump. It’s a long, arduous process that some scholars and pundits say wouldn’t be successful. However, a lot of

those same people said the election of Donald Trump would never happen either. Unfortunately, it did happen, and it’s time to do something about it. But it’s never going to happen without the mobilization of the public [see page 7 for ways to get involved]. It’s clear to a great many people that the Donald Trump experiment is a colossal failure, especially to those outside of Trump’s loyal base. According to a September poll by the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group, a quarter of the voters who voted for and supported Barack Obama, and then voted for Trump a year CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017


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Sign the petition, call your Congressional reps, let’s impeach Donald Trump

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

{BY KELLY KENOYER}

We’re taking a stand:

- A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

It’s time to impeach Donald Trump. There are myriad reasons to do so: the looming threat of nuclear war with North Korea; the embarrassment of having a “tweeter in chief”; the terrible, amoral example he sets for the children of this nation; his numerous allegations of sexual assault; and his unwillingness to denounce white supremacists — thus emboldening the worst elements of our country. Let’s not fail to mention his constant unconstitutional behavior due to his failure to extricate himself from business ventures, meaning he is taking money from foreigners, and possibly violating the emoluments clause of the Constitution. This doesn’t look so good after a series of indictments for charges of money laundering and tax evasion issued in the Mueller investigation for some of shady types involved in his campaign (plus a guilty plea for making false statements for another campaign worker). So, we know why we need to impeach him, but the real question is how? Here’s what you can do. Head over to impeachdonaldtrumpnow.org and sign the petition urging Congress to move toward impeaching Donald Trump. Why impeach? According to the Impeach Trump Now website, “The nation is now witnessing a massive corruption of the presidency, far worse than Watergate.” Impeach Trump Now’s case for impeachment: “President Trump’s personal and business holdings in the United States and abroad present unprecedented conflicts of interest. Indeed, President Trump has admitted he has conflicts of interest in some cases.” You can also call or send a postcard to your local representative demanding action. And use social media to spread the message: #ImpeachWeek and #YoureFired. Pittsburgh City Paper will publish the names and contacts for local legislators online at www.pghcitypaper.com. Take the #YoureFired challenge with the Impeach Donald Trump Now campaign. Film a five-to-45-second video telling Trump “You’re fired,” then share it to social media and tag five friends to challenge them to the #YoureFired challenge. You can also sign an impeachment petition, spearheaded by environmentalist Tom Steyer, at needtoimpeach.com. This is a matter of mass mobilization. Get out on the frontlines. The nightmare won’t end until we wake up. City Paper has joined with other alt-weeklies across the country to call for Trump’s impeachment. Now it’s your turn.

Join us at the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center for ongoing workshops as we continue programming on architecture, history, design, urban planning, and other topics related to how cities function and historic preservation as a tool of community development.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

FILM SCREENING: “PRICED OUT” CORNELIUS SWART WRITER & PRODUCER

Given the ongoing discussion about on Pittsburgh’s real estate and access to quality affordable housing particularly in some of our city’s East End neighborhoods, join us for a timely film screening of “Priced Out,” a documentary that takes a personal look at how skyrocketing house prices are displacing Portland’s black community and reshaping the entire city. What is happening in Portland may well have lessons for us in Pittsburgh. A short question-and-answer session will follow the screening. About the presenter: Cornelius Swart is the project’s director and producer. Swart co-produced the first film, Northeast Passage, with Spencer Wolf. Since then Swart has established himself as a reporter with a deep knowledge of the community. He published a community newspaper and hyperlocal website that covered St. Johns, North, and Northeast Portland, called the The Portland Sentinel, for five years. Since then he has worked on staff at the state’s largest newspaper, The Oregonian, the state’s largest television station, KGW NewsChannel 8, and as Director of Content during the startup of the web-based news platform GoLocalPDX.com. Swart volunteers his time to the project.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Kelly Kenoyer is an investigative reporter at Eugene Weekly. Follow her on Twitter @KenoyerKelly.

THIS SCREENING IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NON-MEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR 412-471-5808 EXT 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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IMPEACH TRUMP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

ago, regret their decision; those are the voters who swung the election. We are not alone in calling for Trump’s impeachment. There has been a groundswell of support for the idea since he took office in January. Calls have come from individuals, groups and media. Dan Savage, editor of Seattle’s The Stranger, started his “Impeach the Mother Fucker Already” campaign on Jan. 24. Most recently, billionaire hedge-fund manager Tom Steyer began an “eightfigure” ad campaign leading the charge for impeachment. Now it’s up to the public to put pressure on their representatives to work toward this goal, especially if Dems take back the House in 2018. Here are the grounds for impeachment as we see them. At the very least, these are grounds to begin the long process. Ties to Russia: Despite the president’s tweets to the contrary, a lot of smoke is filling the air from Mueller’s investigation into connections between the Trump campaign and Russia. Former campaign manager Paul Manafort and his assis-

tant have been indicted on charges related to dealings in the Ukraine. Former foreign-policy adviser George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contact with Russia during the campaign. Beyond that, Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., and son-in-law, Jared Kushner, met with Russians to gain information to use against Hillary Clinton. These days, Trump insists there was no “collusion.” But as far back as a year ago, he claimed there wasn’t even any contact. Now nine members of his inner circle have been linked to Russia. Maladministration: In an Oct. 5 piece written for The Washington Post, author Barbara Radnofsky, who wrote A Citizen’s Guide to Impeachment, explains that a president doesn’t need to have committed a crime to be impeached. Radnofsky quotes James Madison in making the case that the firing of FBI Director James Comey is an impeachable offense. Madison wrote if “the President can displace from office a man whose merits require that he should be continued in it … he will be impeachable … for

HE HAS SURROUNDED HIMSELF WITH A LEAGUE OF INCOMPETENTS, SYCOPHANTS AND FOOLS.

follow general rules of protocol and decorum. Or even national security, like the time he loudly discussed foreign policy in the unsecured dining room of his Mara-Lago resort. Or the numerous times he has publicly provoked and threatened North Korea. He has surrounded himself with a league of incompetents, sycophants and fools, ranging from Steve Bannon to Rick Perry; he doesn’t understand how the judicial branch works; he doesn’t understand the complexities of health care; he doesn’t know that white supremacists should shoulder all the blame when a protester is murdered by a white supremacist; and he is trying to demonize the press. Donald Trump is president because some Americans wanted an outsider, instead of a career politician, leading the country. That may still be a valid plan, but this is not the right man for the job. Donald Trump is unable to handle the job of President of the United States. It’s now up to the public to hold their elected representatives accountable and demand that they begin impeachment proceedings, before things get any worse. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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such an act of mala d m i n i s t r a t i o n .” e Russia But since the ntering probe is centering p camon the Trump trong paign, a strong ould argument could also be made that Trump obstice structed justice mey. by firing Comey. Unfit for Office: rything Forget everything e easiest else, and the st argument and strongest to be made iss that Trump is resident. “The unfit to be president. thers tried to Founding Fathers prepare the country for the possibility of someone not only corrupt and venal … but also from someone simply unable to perform the job, whether through incompetence, ignorance or incapacity,” Radnofsky writes. There is undeniable evidence to support this claim. Donald Trump is a liar; he’s proven time and again that he will spin any fallacy into the “truth” and sell it to the American people. He is a man-child unable to

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017


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PRINCE OF ORANGE A look at the Founding Fathers’ motivation for impeachment and how it could be done today {BY REBECCA ADDISON}

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11/2/17

November 17 Light Up Night

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IN ACCOUNTS OF discussion between the Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin cites a person called the Prince of Orange as an example of why the articles of impeachment in the Constitution are necessary. According to the notes of James Madison, taken at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787, “Doctor. Franklin mentioned the case of the Prince of Orange during the late war [the Eighty Years’ War]. An agreement was made between France & Holland; by which their two fleets were to unite at a certain time & place. The Dutch fleet did not appear. Everybody began to wonder at it. At length it was suspected that the [Prince of Orange] was at the bottom of the matter. This suspicion prevailed more & more. Yet as he could not be impeached and no regular examination took place, he remained in his office, and strength3:56 PM ening his own party, as the party opposed to him became formidable, he gave birth to the most violent animosities & contentions. Had he been impeachable, a regular & peaceable enquiry would have taken place and he would if guilty have been duly punished, if innocent restored to the confidence of the public.” This amusing coincidence should be lost on no one amidst calls for the impeachment of President Donald Trump. We all know that Trump is often the butt of jokes regarding the orange tint of his skin. Also common knowledge is that as Trump continues to court more and more controversy, the calls for his impeachment grow louder and louder. However, many folks are in the dark about the grounds for impeachment and the steps necessary to get it done. According to Wilson Huhn, a visiting professor at the Duquesne University School of Law, Franklin and the Founding Fathers included the articles of impeachment in the Constitution to protect against criminal offenses like treason and bribery. But they also included provisions for “other high crimes and mis-

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Anti-Trump street art in Pittsburgh

demeanors” to guard against corruption. “Then, we were not the most powerful nation in the world,” Huhn says. “We were one of the weakest — a new country with 13 little states along the Atlantic border. Spain wanted to eat them up, France wanted to eat them up, and Britain wanted them back. They just couldn’t risk having a president who was in some way under the influence of another country. “They were really trying to protect the country. They were worried about someone who is under the pay or under the influence of a foreign power. They thought, ‘We have to have one last safety valve of removing someone who is working against the interest of the United States who could undermine this country.’” Huhn says the impeachment process is simpler than some might think. Like most actions taken by the U.S. Congress, it starts with a representative in the House proposing legislation. “The House has the power to impeach by a majority vote,” Huhn says. “They can set their own rules.” If the House approves a bill to impeach the president, the legislation then goes to the Senate. “The Senate was given the power by the Constitution to try all impeachments. The Senate also gets to decide what its procedure will be,” says Huhn. “The House impeaches and the Senate convicts, and conviction is not conviction of a crime. The only consequence of this is removal from office.”

“THEY WERE REALLY TRYING TO PROTECT THE COUNTRY.”

RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017


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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

GARDENING WORKSHOP:

NOVEMBER 14 | 7 P.M.

TERRARIUMS

LECTURE HALL OF THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY IN OAKLAND

MARTHA SWISS GARDEN WRITER & DESIGNER

THIS IS A FREE, TICKETED EVENT. FOR TICKET INFORMATION, VISIT: WIDEMAN.EVENTBRITE.CA

Terrariums are like miniature worlds under glass. They are fun to have on an office desk and are beautiful displayed on a mantel, sideboard, or table. This demonstration provides ideas for easy-care terrariums you can create at home using the latest techniques and materials. Step-by-step guidance is provided, along with aftercare instructions.

A BOOK SIGNING WILL FOLLOW THE EVENT

ABOUT THE PRESENTER:

DOWNLOAD THE BEING HUMAN PODCAST ON ITUNES OR AT HTTPS://SOUNDCLOUD.COM/HUMANITIES-PITT

Martha Swiss is a garden writer, designer, and speaker. She is a regular contributor to Pennsylvania Gardener magazine and the publications editor for the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. Her articles have also appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Fine Gardening. She is a graduate of Chatham University’s landscape design program and a Penn State master gardener.

John Edgar Wideman grew up in Pittsburgh, and has drawn on that experience in a number of critically acclaimed books, including Brothers and Keepers, Fatheralong, Hoop Roots, and many other novels and stories. He is a MacArthur Fellow and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters; he has won the PEN/Faulkner Award twice and has been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award. His newest book is Writing to Save a Life: The Louis Till File, which he published in 2016. SPONSORS: UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH HUMANITIES CENTER, CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH, DIETRICH SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, HEINZ HISTORY CENTER, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK, SOCIOLOGY, UNIVERSITY HONORS COLLEGE, URBAN STUDIES, AND RESEARCH FUNDS FROM: JENNIFER WHITING, PAUL BOVÉ, DAVE BARTHOLOMAE, AND JONATHAN ARAC

THIS WORKSHOP IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NON-MEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG 744 REBECCA AVENUE NEWS

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TURNING TIDE Could Trump’s response to Puerto Rico motivate enough Puerto Ricans in Pennsylvania to help turn the state blue? {BY RYAN DETO} AFTER THE FALLOUT over President Donald

Trump’s response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, Republican politicians hoping to win elections in Pennsylvania might have cause to worry, say advocacy groups and politicians who work with the state’s Puerto Rican population. Of states that voted for Trump in 2016, Pennsylvania is home to the second largest number of people of Puerto Rican descent, about 450,000 people. The hurricane has caused billions of dollars in damage to the U.S. territory; according to CBS News, the majority of people living on the island of Puerto Rico have been without power for more than 46 days, the longest blackout in American history. In response to this disaster, Trump got in a Twitter spat with the mayor of Puerto Rico’s capital city of San Juan, and was videotaped tossing paper towels to Puerto Ricans waiting for relief supplies like he was handing out T-shirts at a baseball game. He even congratulated islanddwelling Puerto Ricans for experiencing a smaller death toll than Hurricane Katrina victims in Louisiana. “The abysmal Trump response to this tragedy has enraged and energized the Puerto Rican community in Reading and Allentown,” wrote Adanjesus Marin of statewide Latino-rights group Make the Road Pennsylvania, in an email to CP. “We are helping to direct this outrage not only into the streets, but into the ballot boxes.” Marin wrote that the number of Puerto Rican volunteers at Make the Road has doubled since the hurricane.

{IMAGE COURTESY OF MARIA QUINOÑES-SÁNCHEZ}

Flier for PA4PR summit, which seeks to energize Puerto Rican voters in Philadelphia on Nov. 11

Historically, Puerto Rican voters have had little sway in Pennsylvania politics, but things could be changing. Trump won Pennsylvania by only about 44,000 votes. The state’s Puerto Rican population is growing fast, and part of it is concentrated in Republican-held districts. Since 2006, Pennsylvania’s Puerto Rican population has grown by 153,700 residents, according to U.S. Census figures. Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens by birth and can vote in elections, once they move to any U.S. state. And there are reasons for Pennsylvanian Puerto Ricans to be upset with many Republican politicians, not just Trump. Three Pennsylvania representatives, U.S. Rep. Keith Rothfus (R-Sewickley), U.S. Rep. Scott Perry (R-York) and U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Lehigh), voted against the aid package for hurricane relief to Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico. During an October CNN appearance, Perry even claimed that the numbers on the lack of water and

power on the island were fabricated. Of all the Republican-held districts in the U.S., the two with the most Puerto Ricans are in Pennsylvania. Lloyd Smucker’s (R-Lancaster) district is home to 72,500 people of Puerto Rican descent, largely concentrated in Reading. And the state’s 15th Congressional District, currently represented by Charlie Dent (R-Lehigh), who announced he’s not seeking re-election, is home to 70,000, largely concentrated in Allentown. Marin says a large majority of Puerto Ricans in Pennsylvania typically vote Democrat, but voter turnout has been low in the past. According to a 2016 Penn State study, only 74 percent of Pennsylvania Puerto Ricans were registered in 2012, and only 61 percent voted that year. But not only does Marin expect more to vote come 2018 and 2020, he expects there to be more potential Puerto Rican voters, period. “It’s hard to predict how many will eventually move here, but not a day goes

“WE ARE HELPING TO DIRECT THIS OUTRAGE NOT ONLY INTO THE STREETS, BUT INTO THE BALLOT BOXES.”

by that we don’t learn of multiple families arriving in Reading and Allentown,” wrote Marin. “We are expecting the initial flow to be in the [hundreds], but that number will snowball into the thousands.” Western Pennsylvania is home to few Puerto Ricans, but Monica Ruiz, of Latino service organization Casa San Jose, says Puerto Ricans here are getting motivated too. Ruiz, who is half Puerto Rican, says Puerto Rican family members and others she knows were initially supportive of or indifferent to Trump. “People who would send me messages about how wonderful Trump is, they are no longer doing this,” says Ruiz. “Many people that didn’t vote are kicking themselves in the butt. And others that voted for him, they are changing their tune.” And Philadelphia, home to the largest concentration of Puerto Ricans in the state, is already taking advantage of Puerto Ricans’ new energy. Philadelphia City Councilor Maria Quinoñes-Sánchez, who was born in Puerto Rico, says her Puerto Rican constituents have an “incredible amount of frustration and anger” at Trump and other Republicans. “If people feel hopeless in Puerto Rico, they will come to the U.S., and they will vote against those who voted against them,” says Quinoñes-Sánchez. She says a crisis center in Philadelphia has already taken in 600 Puerto Ricans from the island, and she expects thousands more to relocate to Pennsylvania over the next year. Quinoñes-Sánchez says many of her constituents will be attending a PA4PR summit in Philadelphia on Nov. 11 and marching in the Unity March for Puerto Rico, in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 18. She says this is the first time many Puerto Ricans have become politically active. “There are a lot of us who have never been to a march,” says Quinoñes-Sánchez. “[Many politicians] take us for granted in every single election. We have to organize and send a message.” RYA N D E TO@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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and shaking people up and getting them talking about things that might make them uncomfortable,” she says. But liberal movements aren’t the only ones that have ignited a new level of passion on Pitt’s campus. Safi says that when she joined Pitt College Republicans, in 2014, it was lucky to have a handful of students consistently showing up to meetings. Now, the group has 50 students attending on a slow day. Whether they support Trump or not, Safi says, conservative students are interested in activism “now more than ever.” Safi, who is the editor of Pitt’s rightwing online magazine The Maverick, says that many of her conservative peers find themselves keeping their mouths shut to avoid the intimidation they feel from their liberal peers. But in an effort to generate more civil political discussion, Safi says they’re planning a debate between the Republican, Libertarian and Democratic groups on campus. And when the Westboro Baptists came, everyone protested against them together. “When Westboro Baptist came, it was a nice display of solidarity among all different student groups that this was something that we’re all morally opposed to. So, there are things that we are able to come together on,” Safi says. Indeed, not all college campuses have seen increased animosity between groups with opposing political viewpoints. Downtown, says Shivani Gosai, for the most part things haven’t changed at Duquesne University since the election. If anything, says Gosai, the community has become stronger. On the same day that the Westboro Baptists came to the city, Duquesne held an event called DUnited, with handouts of T-shirts that read, “Duquesne doesn’t hate.” Says Gosai, a junior: “I think at Duquesne we’ve been handling everything really well.”

POLITICAL CLIMATE In the year since Trump was elected, Pittsburgh college students have worked to find common ground {BY HALEY FREDERICK} NOV. 9, 2016, was a gloomy, gray day.

The sky was overcast and the ground was wet, as students on Pittsburgh’s college campuses made the usual trek to Wednesday classes, though for many of them, that Wednesday was anything but usual. The night before, as election results flashed across TVs all over Oakland, Aya Shehata didn’t bother watching. She had a big exam the next day, so she figured her time was better spent studying. Besides, Hillary Clinton was going to win. Everyone knew it. Late in the night, as she sat in her bedroom with her Hillary T-shirt still on and her nose in her books, her roommate came in and delivered the news. “We sat on my bed and cried,” says Shehata, a junior at the University of Pittsburgh. On Pitt’s campus, Nov. 9 was a day of mourning for many. Thousands of college students had walked into the polls for the first time the day before, finally old enough to cast their votes for the next president of the United States. Tufts University’s National Study of Learning, Voting and Engagement reported that 48 percent of college students voted in 2016, while 45 percent voted in the 2012 election. “It was like walking into a wake. People were crying and their heads were bowed down while walking the streets,” says Marlo Safi, a senior at Pitt and

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Last year, college students gathered in Oakland for an anti-Trump march.

president of Pitt College Republicans. The devastation on campus was felt so acutely that as a result of a student petition which Shehata helped circulate, many professors — including her own — postponed their exams in the days immediately following the election. But in the year since, students at college campuses around Pittsburgh have adjusted. A new fervor for activism has been ignited, and students are now looking for ways to come together with those with opposing viewpoints. “I think part of it was a lot of people realized that the things our society had gotten over, the hurdles we thought we’d jumped over, we actually hadn’t jumped over. A lot of people didn’t think that racism was still an issue,” Shehata says. “But, I think it also as a result fostered a larger sense of

community than I have ever felt in all of my life.” Shehata is a Muslim woman who wears a hijab, and after the election, she says her peers were voicing their support for her more than ever before. Shehata is president of a group called Female Empowerment Movement, which is just one of several student organizations on Pitt’s campus that has gained momentum since the election. “I do think that we’ve been shaken up a little bit, the pot has been stirred, and people are actually moving now,” she says. Shehata cites new campus initiatives like Women’s Empowerment Week, and Mental Health Awareness Week, as responses to the 2016 election. “A lot of these taboo topics and things that we don’t like to address are being addressed, and I think that that speaks to having a wakeup call

“IT WAS LIKE WALKING INTO A WAKE.”

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SAFETY IN NUMBERS Lay-Day Par-Tay provides music, art, poetry and, most importantly, a safe space for female-identifying individuals {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} IRIS KNOWS the importance of safe spaces.

As a dancer at a Pittsburgh gentleman’s club, “we’re all there for sale,” she says, while admitting that she very much likes the job that she’s been doing for five years. But even in a strip club, she can feel safe, supported and even empowered. “In our dressing room, I experience a level of sisterhood and camaraderie that I don’t always find in real life,” says Iris (who asked that her stage name be used to protect her safety). “It’s a bunch of women who exploit themselves for a living, supporting one another. ... True sisterhood exists there.” Iris wants to bring that feeling of community and sisterhood to the rest of her city. On Sat., Nov. 11, Iris and hip-hop artist Miss Money’s outfit, Rich Chickz,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTINA MYERS}

Brittney Chantele

are holding a “Lay-Day Par-Tay” from 8 p.m.-midnight, at 3101 Penn Ave., in the Strip District. The event, which has a cover charge of $5, is geared toward female-identifying people, but all ages and identities are welcome. There will be a mix of art, poetry, music and dance, all in the name of “celebrating she-power

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For more info visit newhorizontheater.org 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

and lady vibes.” “This is an outlet and safe space for those who identify as ‘she’ to express themselves in any manner they choose,” Iris says. “But it’s not just an event — it’s part of a movement that’s already ongoing. It’s a chance for people to come out and live and experience empowerment; to feel the strength of what we’re all fucking talking about anyway.” While the space will be set up for women, Iris says men are welcome, but they need to realize that “nobody is coming here to participate in their bullshit.” It’s an “all-ages” event, but Iris says that doesn’t mean it’s just for under-21. For example, the artists range in age from the early 20s to 60s, and that’s also how diverse Iris says the crowd should be. “This is a generational celebration,” she says. “I think sometimes youth is put on an unnecessary pedestal, and I want to remind people that the celebration of she-power spans many years and layers of life.” The artists will be displaying and selling their work, and in addition to mu s ic al p er for man c es , there will be a poetry reading from 9-10 p.m. Artists expected to participate include: poet Dani Janae, of Garfield, whose writing deals with “discovery, sex/sexuality, trauma, womanhood and horror”; Josselyn Crane, the creative force behind Falkora Jewlery; DJ Xuliana O, who is also a producer and singer, and who will warm up the crowd

with throwback tunes mixed with new artists; and singer/songwriter, visual artist, poet and activist Brittney Chantele. Chantele, who recently released a new EP, Labels, tells City Paper that as an artist she aspires for her “music and poetry to inspire people emotionally, mentally and physically.” She calls her style of music “movement music,” meaning that “it can begin or carry a social movement.” Her visual art is currently showcased at BOOM Concepts through the end of the month. Other artists include fiber artist and doll-maker Booski Brown, who creates 18-inch cloth dolls in a customer’s image; storyteller and singer Genevieve Houck, who returned to Pittsburgh earlier this year after spending the winter protesting in Standing Rock, S.D., who will sing songs and share stories about that experience; illustrator Xiola Jensen, a media-arts student at Chatham who draws “simple portraits of women and femininity”; photographer Terri San, whose work deals with reflections of light on water and themes of life, death, nature, movement and dance; and Sabine Aston, a painter and environmentalist who makes natural home décor out of dried and pressed wildflowers and other foliage.

LAY-DAY PAR-TAY 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 11. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5. All ages. www.tinyurl.com/ladaypartay

While this event is something new, Iris says it’s just an extension of what she already does as a dancer. Cool, confident and seemingly fearless, Iris uses her job to talk to those who are willing to listen. In most cases, she has no trouble getting people to listen, even if they’re not there to talk about the bullshit facing the world and its people today. “It’s almost a means of seduction,” she says. “I give people a level of comfortability to listen and hear what I have to say, even if I’m only reaching them in their unconscious. You can’t make anyone do anything they don’t want to do, but when you do reach people, it’s a gift; it shows a level of trust. Getting through to people about the issues facing women is why I am here. And I’m able to get people to listen, because I really do give a shit.”

“IT’S A CHANCE FOR PEOPLE TO COME OUT AND LIVE AND EXPERIENCE EMPOWERMENT.”

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News of the Weird

W E I RD N E W S T I P S@ AM UNI V E R S AL . C O M .

{COMPILED BY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUBLISHING}

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Could turkeys be sensing the peril of the season? Police in Bridgewater, Mass., tweeted a warning to the town’s residents on Oct. 15 about aggressive wild turkeys, WBZ-TV reported. As proof, an accompanying video showed four turkeys chasing a Bridgewater police cruiser, but police were not as amused as their Twitter followers. “Aggressive turkeys are a problem in town,” the department tweeted. “State law doesn’t allow the police or (animal control) to remove them.”

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In 1990, Marlene Warren, 40, answered her door in Wellington, Fla., and was shot in the face by a clown bearing flowers and balloons (one of which read “You’re the greatest!”). On Sept. 26, Palm Beach County Sgt. Richard McAfee announced that Warren’s widower’s current wife, Sheila Keen Warren, 54, had been arrested for the murder, 27 years after the fact, and taken into custody in Abingdon, Va. Sheila Keen married Michael Warren in 2002, NBC News reported. (Warren went to prison in 1994 for odometer tampering, grand theft and racketeering in connection with his car-rental agency.) Sheila had worked for him, repossessing cars, and they were reportedly having an affair when the murder took place. While Sheila had always been a suspect, new technology finally allowed prosecutors to retest DNA evidence and build a case against her.

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Zookeepers believe China’s 4-year-old giant panda Meng Meng, currently on loan to the Berlin Zoo, displays her displeasure with her surroundings, food or caretakers by walking backward. “Meng Meng is in puberty,” zoo director Andreas Knieriem explained to the Berliner Zeitung newspaper on Oct. 22. “The reverse walk is a protest.” To address the situation, zookeepers will introduce Meng Meng to Jiao Qing, a male giant panda three years older, who presumably will ease her frustration by engaging in sexual activity with her.

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Kenyans Gilbert Kipleting Chumba and David Kiprono Metto were among the favorites to win the Venice Marathon on Oct. 22. Instead, Eyob Ghebrehiwet Faniel, 25, a local running in only his second marathon, took the prize after the lead runners were led several hundred meters off-course by an errant guide motorcycle. Faniel is the first Italian man to win the Venice Marathon in 22 years. “Today’s race shows that the work is paying off,” Faniel said following his victory. Uh, sure.

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Nelly’s Taqueria in Hicksville, N.Y., suffered a break-in on Oct. 3, but the burglar redefined the term “clean getaway.” Surveillance video showed a man donning food-service gloves and starting a pot of water to boil before hammering open the cash register. He secured $100 in his pockets, leaving a dollar in the tip jar, then started “cooking up a storm,” owner Will Colon told Newsday.

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Cameras recorded as the thief cooked beans, sautéed shrimp and chicken, and helped himself to a cold soda before enjoying his meal standing up. “The way he handled that pan, man, the dude had some skills,” Colon said. Afterward, he carefully stored the leftovers in the refrigerator, cleaned his pans and wiped down all the surfaces he had used. Then he took off through the back window, the same way he had come in.

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Greensburg, Pa., police made a traffic stop on Oct. 19 and found drug paraphernalia in plain sight on the car’s front seat. When police asked where the occupants had obtained the heroin found in the center console, they said they had bought it from someone named Cody in the maternity ward at the Excela Health Westmoreland hospital in Greensburg. Officers arrested Cody R. Hulse, 25, at the hospital after he admitted to possessing and selling heroin just feet away from his newborn daughter. The Tribune-Review reported that police found 34 stamp bags of

heroin, four empty bags and multiple hypodermic needles in Hulse’s possession. “I have an issue myself with drugs ... heroin,” Hulse told them. “I really didn’t want to bring it in.” Hulse’s girlfriend, the mother of the newborn, said she did not know he was selling drugs from the room.

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Coroner’s pathologist Elmo A. Griggs, 75, was arrested Sept. 12 in Morgan County, Ind., for drunken driving, but it was what was rolling around in the back of his pickup truck that caught officers’ attention. Along with a half-empty vodka bottle, Griggs was transporting several labeled totes, according to the Indianapolis Star, containing organic material. Marshal Bradley K. Shaw, of the Brooklyn Police Department, said early investigations showed the totes contained brain and liver samples. Griggs’ wife posted on Facebook that he “had a bad day and had a couple of drinks before driving home,” but court documents revealed he failed all field sobriety tests.

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LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

Murder for Girls ALL THE PRETTY STARS MURDERFORGIRLS.BANDCAMP.COM

Murder for Girls’ distorted guitars and high-energy rock pull you into that world that Republican men find to be the most frightening thing of all: women with autonomy and strength. All the Pretty Stars, the band’s latest, is a catchy grungerock record that’s heavily injected with myriad ’90s-rock influences, ranging from Sleater-Kinney and HUM to Sonic Youth. “Jennifer Lynch” is one of the most enthralling tunes on the record, its spooky bass line driving the song’s 10 p.m. Sat., eerie feel. “Rocker Nov. 11. 115 57th St., Chick Vibe” carries an Lawrenceville. aggressive rock sound, a $5-20. All ages. perfect pairing for lyrical www.aftershock content that reminds theatre.com dudes that it’s pretty apparent when they are into the idea of a woman, instead of who she actually is. “Who did you want to see? Who did you want me to be? Not your fantasy,” declare the vocals that close out the record. All the Pretty Stars’ release will be celebrated after the Nov. 11 performance of Real/Time Interventions’ cabaret-style true-crime stage musical Angelmakers: Songs for Female Serial Killers, which features Michele Dunlap on drums.

Anti-Flag

PROTEST SONGS

Bjordan

There are very few positives to take away from the year since Donald Trump was elected president, but it has made for a lot of music celebrating defiance.

PETTY HIT MACHINE SOUNDCLOUD.COM/BJORDANTHOMS/

Petty Hit Machine is an electro-pop EP that voyages through sadness and self-doubt, while using tongue-in-cheek humor and sarcasm to lighten the heaviness of the load. Bjordan’s vocals are smooth and easy, pairing well with the ’80s-leaning synth work which provides a backbone for the EP. Much of this album is a balancing act between confessing a deep sadness and presenting a sound that makes you want to dance around your bedroom. Lyrics like, “I wrote it down: ‘Don’t off yourself, and brush your teeth before bed’” (“Million Dollar Moment”) are juxtaposed with lyrics like, “That girl loves Britney Spears, felt well-connected through her tragic years” (“Bad Boy, Sad Boy”). All the while, bright synths illuminate the gloom, and drum machines stir up a frenzy in your feet. FOR FANS OF: DEPECHE MODE, ROBYN, STRANGER THINGS SOUNDTRACK

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Anti-Flag, “When the Wall Falls”

Gospel album, plus “Blind Man,” “Peaceful When You Sleep” and “Border Town,” from Love Wounds & Mars. His latest release is “What Happened to Your Party?”

PITTSBURGH, PA. Anti-Flag has always been a band that prioritizes the political, crafting catchy punk music that rallies the opposition to oppression and bigotry. “When the Wall Falls,” off its latest, American Fall, is just one of 11 songs that urge resistance. “When the Wall Falls” is a reminder that not one American is free as long as anyone is oppressed: “If they come for you in the night, they will come for me in the morning.”

— ERIN O’HARE, C-VILLE WEEKLY

Thunderfist, “Suck It” (demo) SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

— MEG FAIR, PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Keith Morris, “What Happened to Your Party?” CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. Morris has a slew of protest songs, such as “Psychopaths & Sycophants,” “Prejudiced & Blind” and “Brownsville Market,” from his Dirty

Known to at least one of his fellow musicians as “our rockin’ protest grouch in chief,” Keith

Sure, there are more articulate ways to denounce Trump. And revolution by example — countering blustery, bigoted bullshit with artfully composed, well-reasoned takedowns — is how we’ll affect change. That doesn’t mean we can’t occasionally vent our rage by strapping on Les Pauls, cranking up Marshalls, raising middle fingers and offering a blues-based, punk-rock invitation to fellatio. And maybe also, as the final, snarling chord slides into silence, calling him a “fat baby fuckface.” —RANDY HARWARD, FRELANCE WRITER

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BELVEDERES

PROTEST SONGS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Dooley, Lor Roger and TLow, “CIT4DT” BALTIMORE, MD.

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This Boosie-tinged Thee Donald diss from Baltimore that dropped long before inauguration still thrills: “Boy ain’t even white, you yellow / You said you’d date your own daughter you a sicko.” Stakes are high here, too. The mastermind behind it, Dooley, is Muslim, for example. And right-wing, semifascist snowflakes who took the song totally seriously denounced it as a “death threat” — “CIT4DT” stands for “chopper in the trunk for Donald Trump.” They bemoaned its Baltimore origins, where protest morphed into property damage, and as far as a lot of us were concerned, verged gloriously on revolution. Meanwhile, the trio responsible for it thought the shit was hilarious. — BRANDON SODERBERG, BALTIMORE BEAT

Trombone Shorty and Dumpstaphunk, “Justice” NEW ORLEANS, LA. Trombone Shorty and Dumpstaphunk teamed up on a song called “Justice,” which they released on the day Donald Trump was inaugurated. A mélange of funk, jazz and New Orleans brass-band sounds, the video for “Justice” slyly marries footage of Trump against pointed lyrics. “Inauguration day seemed to be an appropriate time to voice the need for equal say and opportunity for all people,” said Dumpstaphunk’s Ivan Neville. “We entered a new year with a lot of unanswered questions on the subject of ‘justice,’ that we all felt a little uneasy about. But there’s only so much we can do, and this track is our way of expressing our worries.” The song is available on most streaming services. — KEVIN ALLMAN, GAMBIT WEEKLY

Lonely Horse, “Devil in the White House” SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

OG Swaggerdick

has made (though not always name-checking Dolt 45 directly). But when it comes to straight-up protesting and verbally impaling the potty-mouthed POTUS, there’s something undeniably satisfying, even admirable about the Hub’s own OG Swaggerdick’s simple and straightforward election anthem, “Fuck Donald Trump.” From the fittingly filthy rhymes — “never give props to a punk-ass trick / motherfuck Donald Trump he can suck my dick” — to the strangers on the street who gladly join along in rapping in the video, these are protest lyrics that you’ll still be able to remember, and perhaps even rap for relief on occasions when the president leaves you otherwise speechless. — CHRIS FARAONE, DIGBOSTON

Lingua Franca, “A Man’s World” ATHENS, GA. Shortly after Inauguration day, two Athens studios invited 19 local bands to commemorate the dawn of the Trump Age, tracking 20 songs in a marathon 48-hour session. While much of the resulting album, Athens Vs. Trump Comp 2017, is suitably bleak, ascendant emcee Lingua Franca’s “A Man’s World” stands out for its sheer defiance. “Frenzied and indiscreet,” it’s a fiery feminist anthem for the resistance. — GABE VODICKA, FLAGPOLE MAGAZINE

Shots fired! Lonely Horse came out guns a-blazing with the track, “Devil in the White House.” Opening with a sludgy cadence that crescendos into a tumultuous rock ’n’ roll explosion, the “desert rock” duo of Nick Long and Travis Hild make very clear their feelings about the 45th POTUS. — CHRIS CONDE, SAN ANTONIO CURRENT

OG Swaggerdick, “Fuck Donald Trump” BOSTON, MASS. Among diehard hip-hop heads as well as artists, Boston’s underground rap scene is renowned as one of the most lyrically elaborate and intellectual anywhere. To that end, over the past year, such acts as STL GLD (Moe Pope + The Arcitype) and, more recently, The Perceptionists (Mr. Lif + Akrobatik) have released their most compelling works to date, largely inspired by the mess that Donald Trump

Priests, “Right Wing” WASHINGTON, D.C. There’s been no shortage of scathing political-protest songs coming out of D.C. since, well, the birth of punk. But in recent years, post-punk quartet Priests have succeeded in reminding the rest of the country that D.C. is, and always has been, pissed the fuck off. “Right Wing,” off the band’s breakthrough EP, Bodies and Control and Money and Power, so perfectly captures the ass-backwardsness of living in a country controlled by capitalists, fascists, racists and war-mongers. “Everything everything / So right wing / Everything everything / So right wing / Purse searches, pep rallies / Purse searches, SUVs,” sings Katie Alice Greer. It reads like a short, poetic treatise on how the toxicity of right-wing ideals infects everyday life. — MATT COHEN, WASHINGTON CITY PAPER

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SLACKER REVOLUTION {BY ELI ENIS} For anyone who was there last September, when Prince Daddy and the Hyena drew over 100 ecstatic kids to their raucous album-release show in Albany, N.Y., it was easy to believe that the quartet was onto something beyond its hometown. So far, 2017 has actually exceeded that suspicion. The band’s been grinding extraordinarily hard — touring the entire country multiple times; popping up on three different splits, with Mom Jeans, Dikembe and Just Friends; joining buzz-worthy emo-punk label Counter Intuitive Records, which reissued its 2015 EP Adult Summers; and playing high-profile sets at both SXSW and FEST, the infamous Gainesville, Fla., punk gathering on Halloween weekend.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DENISE TRUSCELLO}

Olivia Newton-John

ONLY THE HITS {BY BILL KOPP} OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN has been a pop star for more than four decades. She got her professional start on Australian TV and radio, and cut her first single in 1966. Newton-John made a name for herself with the release of her first solo album, 1971’s If Not For You. On that record and several that followed, the singer established herself as a first-rate interpreter of other songwriters’ material. In the mid-1970s, she scored a nearly unprecedented 10 consecutive No. 1 singles on the Adult Contemporary chart. Newton-John would go on to blockbuster success onscreen in 1978’s Grease, and achieved a kind of cult status with her role opposite Gene Kelly in 1980’s Xanadu. Following a bout with cancer in the 1990s, she placed greater emphasis upon recording more of her own songs. Newton-John now ranks as one of the most successful recording artists in history, with more than 100 million records sold. Asked which of her many records is a favorite, Newton-John is initially nonplussed. “I’ve never really thought about it,” she tells CP in a phone interview. “I don’t listen to my music, so I’ve never sat down and listened to a whole album.” But after thinking for a moment about the 30-plus albums she has recorded and released, Newton-John names her 1994 album, Gaia: One Woman’s Journey. “That was the first album that I totally wrote and co-produced myself,” she recalls. “It was right after I had breast cancer for the first time, and it was very, very personal to me.” Last year, Newton-John released Liv On, a collaborative album with Texas-born

Beth Nielsen-Chapman and Toronto-based Amy Sky. Focused on grief and healing, the project was inspired by the death of Newton-John’s sister Rona, who died from a brain tumor. “I wrote a song for her in her memory and sent it around to my friends and family,” Newton-John says. “They came back and said, ‘Oh, that’s lovely. Do you have any more songs like that?’“ Nielsen-Chapman had written a kind of grief anthem, “Sand and Water,” and Sky had recently lost her mother. “We all were in kind of a phase of understanding what this was about. Both wonderful songwriters — who are dear friends of mine — agreed to do it,” Newton-John says. “We recorded the album in Las Vegas when I was between shows.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLIAM BARBROW}

Prince Daddy and the Hyena

“The P-Daddy set at FEST was easily the craziest thing I’ve ever been part of,” says frontman Kory Gregory. “We played a venue that was four times the size of the one we played last year, and we ended up capping it. … As we struck the first chord, we all kinda looked at each other like, ‘OK, we’re fucking doing this for the next half-hour, baby. Here we go.’ Pretty sure there was so many people on stage at one point that someone actually crowd-surfed on stage.” “I’ve never felt more validated in my whole life,” he adds. The ever-goofy Gregory, who writes shreddy, catchy, exhilarating songs that are as much about anxiety and self-doubt as they are about chilling with a blunt, has never been one to brag, but now he has grounds. Last month, the split with Mom Jeans sold out 300 vinyl copies in less than 24 hours. He spoke with CP while the group was en route to the second date of its tour supporting Mom Jeans — one of the biggest names in emo right now. “The shows on this tour have probably been the biggest shows we’ve ever played and the most positive response we’ve ever gotten. I expect to make some people’s ears bleed and make people reconsider their entire lives once our set’s over. … I want to convince everyone who sees us to start a band and have it be a better band than us. That’s my game plan.”

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 13. Palace Theatre, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $48-150. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheatre.org

More recently, Newton-John released Friends for Christmas with Australian pop singer John Farnham; it’s NewtonJohn’s fourth holiday-themed album. “That’s always a fun thing to do; I love collaborating,” she says. “I like doing duets, and I like recording with other people.” Newton-John was forced to suspend her tour earlier this year when she learned that her cancer had returned and spread. But now, after a period of treatment, she’s energized and ready to return to the stage. “I’m really good,” she says. “I love to sing, and I’m very lucky,” Newton-John says. “I’m grateful that people come to see me, and I’m lucky that I have so many hits I have to leave some out!”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MOM JEANS with PRINCE DADDY AND THE HYENA, KISSISSIPPI and LOOMING 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. All ages. $10. www.therobotoproject.com

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Greywalker [SPICY METAL] + FRI., NOV. 10

& Flowers thrive on ocean vibes, as the band leans hard into its dark surf-pop sound. If Is a release party for a new flavor of hot sauce you’re unfamiliar, get started with songs like the correct time and place for a metal show? “Out of Touch,” which has an accompanying It is if the metal band in question teamed up with a hot-sauce brand to make its own flavor. nostalgic video featuring beach frolicking, Local death-metal crew Greywalker partnered and “Subway Surfer,” off the summer EP Drug Tax. Pittsburgh punk kids Silver Car with Allegheny City Farms, best known for Crash and Hearken, which released its slick its hot sauce and other peppery condiments, new single, “Sure Shock,” last month, will to create a new fiery variety: “Melo-death.” join F&F at Mr. Roboto tonight. HL 7 p.m. The release show at Mr. Smalls will feature 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $6. All ages. performances by the band/hot-sauce botoproject.com www.therobotoproject.com entrepreneurs, as well as hard rock from ted grindcore Stone Cold Killer and the distorted of Video Tapes. Hannah Lynn SHYNA} 9 p.m. 400 MARIE MA URTESY OF {PHOTO CO e., Lincoln Ave., 7. Millvale. $7. er. 21 and older. 47 412-821-4447 or www.mr smalls.com

[FOLK HEROES] + SAT., NOV. 11 Pittsburgh sitss close th enough to both d Appalachia and the East Coast that it’s the perfect nd for breeding ground night Americana. Tonight ong at Mr. Smalls, Long White Lines payss tribute to the d great singers and songwriters of story, like Gillian Welch American folk history, and Steve Earle, with local artists interpreting classic tunes from th the A Americana canon. Catch the easy alt-country of Kayla Schureman, the melancholy folk of Paul Luc, Mike Minda of The Commonheart, and WDVE Morning Show host Randy Baumann, plus special guests. HL 9 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $7. 21 and older. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[SURF/PUNK] + SUN., NOV. 12 The colder it gets, the more I think about the beach, which is too easy to take for granted in the summer. Brooklyn indie-rock trio Fruit

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

ureman

Kayla Sch

[FUNK] + WED., NOV. 15 New Orleans-bred ffunk k trio The Nth Power are at once groovy, spiritual and political. The group critiques mass incarceration, croons about divine guidance, and makes an argument for doing it on the table. It’s also worth mentioning that drummer Nikki Glaspie was Beyonce’s touring drummer for five years. The band is joined at Cattivo by Dallas duo Ghost-Note, whose sound falls somewhere between funk and electronica, with fast-paced percussion (including heavy bongo usage), as well as synthetic accompaniment. HL 8 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $15-20. 21 and older. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

CLUB 206. E Z Action. 9 p.m. Braddock. 412-646-1203. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Sound Series: Luna w/ Eleanor The James Claytor Band. 9:30 p.m. Friedberger. 8 p.m. Oakland. Robinson. 412-489-5631. 412-237-8300. THE LAMP THEATRE. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & The Subdudes. 7 p.m. Irwin. SPEAKEASY. The Nth Power & 724-367-4000. Ghost-Note. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-381-6811. REX THEATER. The Werks MR. SMALLS THEATER. Hippo w/ Litz. 9 p.m. South Side. Campus w/ Remo Drive. 412-381-6811. 7 p.m. Millvale. VINOSKI WINERY. 412-821-4447. Terrance Vaughn. REX THEATER. 5 p.m. Greensburg. The Infamous 724-872-3333. www. per Stringdusters. pa pghcitym 8 p.m. South Side. .co 412-381-6811. THE R BAR. Billy the Kid’s Steel Town All-Stars. 7 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Marc Broussard. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. MR. SMALLS THEATER. STAGE AE. Animals As Leaders, Centrifuge Thursdays. At Periphery w/ Car Bomb. 6 p.m. the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. North Side. 412-229-5483. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. HOWLERS. Benni, Ephen Ager, Downtown. 412-471-2058. Stephen Sciulli. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. DEE’S CAFE. Punk Night w/ DJ Ian. South Side. 412-431-1314. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. PLAY: an electronic chill out session. Speakeasy. 10 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

WED 15

ROCK/POP THU 09 CLUB CAFE. The Accidentals. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Metacara, Glo Phase, Amadea & Futurism. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. G Jones B2B Eprom w/ Mad Zach. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Yes Yes A Thousand Time Yes w/ Fits, Yucky Duster & One Hundred Year Ocean. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 12

FRI 10 GOOD TIME BAR. Gone South. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-9968. THE LAMP THEATRE. Live Wire. 8 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000. PARK HOUSE. Ryan Hoffman. 9:30 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 11 AFTERSHOCK THEATRE. Murder for Girls. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Walk of Shame. 9 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

DJS

THU 09

TUE 14

FRI 10

MP 3 MONDAY SLEEP MOVIES

SAT 11 DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. Ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Feeling Without Touching. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771.

TUE 14 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SEVICHE. Hot Salsa & Bachata Nights. 10 p.m. Downtown. 843-670-8465. THE SUMMIT. Dig Now Sounds w/ Hot Honey. 9 p.m. Mt. Washington. 412-918-1647.

Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “Delusion,” by Sleep Movies, an experimental ambient-pop track that feels like the morning haze after a Nyquil-fueled sleep. Stream or download “Delusion” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

WED 15

WED 15

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MOONDOG’S. Tommy Z w/ River City Blues. 7:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

HIP HOP/R&B

JAZZ

FRI 10

THU 09

CRAIG’S BAR. Jason Stabbs. 10 p.m. Sheraden. 412-458-1730. IRISH CENTRE. Jimmy Wopo. 8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-829-9839.

BLUES THU 09 O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418.

FRI 10 MOONDOG’S. Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. 8 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Strange Brew. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 11 THE HOB NOB LOUNGE. Strange Brew. 9 p.m. West Mifflin. 412-461-8541. MOONDOG’S. The Nighthawks. 9 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SUN 12 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Strange Brew. 1 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

FRI 10

CIOPPINO RESTAURANT & CIGAR BAR. Roger Barbour Band. 7 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-6593. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5 p.m. North Side. 412-904 -3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. 8 p.m. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 12

ANDORA RESTAURANT CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry CITY. Tomchess & Bandit Hat. Cardillo & vocalist 6 p.m. North Side. Charlie Sanders. 412-435-1110. 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. CLUB CAFE. Ian Ethan 412-967-1900. Case, Aaron Lefebvre. ANDY WARHOL 8 p.m. South Side. . MUSEUM. Sound w ww per 412-431-4950. a p ty Series: Matthew Shipp ci h pg ROCKS LANDING .com Trio w/ Thoth Trio. BAR & GRILLE. Tony 8 p.m. North Side. Campbell, John Hall, 412-237-8300. Howie Alexander & Dennis CITY OF ASYLUM Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. @ ALPHABET CITY. 412- 875- 5809. Tania Grubbs. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. TABLE 86 BY HINES WARD. HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie RML Jazz. 7:30 p.m. Mars. Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, 412-370-9621. showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 13

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

DOUBLETREE BY HILTON HOTEL PITTSBURGH - CRANBERRY. The Eclectic Acoustics. 6 p.m. Cranberry. 724-766-6900. OAKMONT TAVERN. Right TurnClyde. 10 p.m. Oakmont. 412-828-4155.

SAT 11 DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Right TurnClyde. 9 p.m. Mars. 724-553-5212. THE HARDWOOD CAFE. The Eclectic Acoustics. 7 p.m. Butler. 724-586-5335. VINOSKI WINERY. Tim Baurle. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

SUN 12 CLUB CAFE. Ian Ethan Case. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. VINOSKI WINERY. Trinity Wiseman. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

MISSIO

“I Don’t Even Care About You”

DIESEL. The Meditations. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

Glass Animals

CLASSICAL

“The Other Side of Paradise”

FRI 10 CHATHAM BAROQUE: ART OF THE TRIO. Artistic Directors Andrew Fouts (violin), Patricia Halverson (viola da gamba), and Scott Pauley (theorbo & baroque guitar) present their annual trio concert, showcasing their most adventurous & virtuosic music, tight ensemble playing, & mischievous sense of fun. 7:30 p.m. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 412-687-1788.

Sir Sly

“&Run”

SAT 11

SUN 12

FRI 10

Here are the songs CP photo intern Jake Mysliwczyk can’t stop listening to:

THU 09

ACOUSTIC

CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Etta Cox. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Martin Rosenberg. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

HEAVY ROTATION

REGGAE

KRESGE THEATER, CMU. Carnegie Mellon University Jazz Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-4921.

TUE 14

WED 15

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH: WAR. 8 p.m. Hunt Armory, Shadyside. 412-241-4044. CHATHAM BAROQUE: ART OF THE TRIO. Artistic Directors Andrew Fouts (violin), Patricia Halverson (viola da gamba), and Scott Pauley (theorbo & baroque guitar) present their annual trio concert, showcasing their most adventurous & virtuosic music, tight ensemble playing, & mischievous sense of fun. 8 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-687-1788. THE MUSIC OF GEORGE CRUMB. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970.

SAT 11

1810 TAVERN. RML Jazz. 8-11 p.m. Beaver. 412-370-9621.

WED 15

BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH: WAR. 8 p.m. Hunt Armory, Shadyside. 412-241-4044. CARNEGIE MELLON WIND ENSEMBLE. A diverse program that evokes the music of Scotland and the sound of bagpipes with Malcom Arnold’s Four Scottish Dances, delights in the classical mastery of Richard Strauss’ Suite in B-Flat, Op 4. & closes with David Maslanka’s Symphony No. 5 composed around well-known chorale melodies. 4 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-4921. CHATHAM BAROQUE: ART OF THE TRIO. Artistic Directors Andrew Fouts (violin), Patricia Halverson (viola da gamba), and Scott Pauley (theorbo & baroque guitar) present their annual trio concert, showcasing their most adventurous & virtuosic music, tight ensemble playing, & mischievous sense of fun. 2:30 p.m. Campbell Memorial Chapel, Squirrel Hill. 412-687-1788.

Grace

“Dirty Harry”

CHRISTIN COOPER. 6 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153.

OTHER MUSIC THU 09 LINDEN GROVE. Tony Janflone Trio. 7 p.m. Karaoke. 8 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Cake. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 10 LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. 9 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Nick Fiasco. Levels. 9 p.m.-midnight. Totally 80s. Drum Bar. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. VINOSKI WINERY. Corned Beef and Curry Band. 6 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

SAT 11 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Semer Ensemble Concert. The Semer record label was founded in Berlin in 1932 to record Jewish music. On November 9, 1938, more than 4,500 of the records were destroyed by the Nazis during Kristallnacht. Years of research in the 1990s and early 2000s resulted in many of the previously lost recordings being recovered, and the Semer Ensemble was formed. The Berlin-based Semer Ensemble brings the musicians of 1930s Berlin back to life after years of silence. New Jewish Music Berlin cabaret, Russian folk songs, Yiddish theater

hits, operatic arias, and cantorial music are just a small sample of the group’s remarkable repertoire 7 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-939-7289. PALACE THEATRE. Gary Puckett & The Union Gap, The Cowsills, Chuck Blasko’s The Vogues & The Latshaw Pops. 6:30 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RIVERS CASINO. Etta Cox Trio. Levels. 9 p.m. No Bad JuJu. Drum Bar. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 12 SENTI ITALIAN RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR. An Evening at the Opera. A four-course tasting menu with wine pairing on, to benefit The Ezio Pinza Council for American Singers of Opera. Featuring Kevin Glavin, who will perform arias and songs throughout the evening, followed by a Q & A lead by Samuel Bozzolla. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to The Ezio Pinza Council for American Singers, in honor of the late Claudia Pinza. 5:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4347.

MON 13 PALACE THEATRE. Olivia Newton-John. 7:30 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

WED 15 SNAKE HILL CONCERT VENUE. Bombadil w/ Scott & Rosanna. 7:30 p.m. Polish Hill. 724-880-5819.


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

November 8-14 WEDNESDAY 8

Irma Thomas, The Blind Boys of Alabama & The Preservation Hall Legacy Quintet BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

mewithoutYou MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest Pianos Become the Teeth & Slow Mass. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 7:30p.m.

A Tribute to Thaddeus Mosley FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM Oakland. Free event. For more info visit caapp.pitt.edu. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 9

library.org. 4p.m.

O’REILLY THEATER Downtown. 412-316-1600. Tickets: ppt.org. Through Dec. 10.

glassjAw

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guest Vein. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

FRIDAY 10 105

Sound Series: Matthew Shipp Trio

Italian Wine Pairing

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. With special guest Thoth Trio. For tickets and more info visit warhol.org. 8p.m.

PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Oakland. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse. com. Through Dec. 3.

SATURDAY 11

Chef’s Best Dish CIRCUIT CENTER & BALLROOM South Side. For tickets and more info visit whirlmagazine.com/ chefsbestdish. 5:30p.m.

GALLERIA OF MT. LEBANON. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit humaneanimalrescue.org/ uncorked. 4p.m.

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MUSIC

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EIGHTY ACRES KITCHEN & BAR Plum. 724-519-7304. For more info visit eightyacres kitchen.com. Through Nov. 19.

UNCORKED WINE FESTIVAL GALLERIA OF MT. LEBANON NOVEMBER 11

You on the Moors Now

Uncorked Wine Festival

NEWS

MONDAY 13

The Humans

TUESDAY 14 The Color Purple

412-431-CITY. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through Dec. 3.

Anarbor SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Sundressed, Skyward Story, Milly & Vertigo. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

SUNDAY 12 Animals As Leaders & Periphery STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Car Bomb. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

The Old Man & The Old Moon CITY THEATRE COMPANY South Side.

ARTS

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Lucero MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest Two Cow Garage. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 8p.m.

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL Oakland. Free event. For more info visit carnegie

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SPORTS

Hinder w/ Josh Todd & The Conflict JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. With special guests Adelitas Way & Wayland. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Beyond Big Data: Mona Chalabi

SCREEN

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Nov. 19.

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“IT’S A LITTLE TRICKY FOR ME TO WATCH, IT GETS TO ME TOO MUCH.”

[ART REVIEW]

FAMILY STYLE As residents of this city, we might regard the work of LaToya Ruby Frazier as local. Hailing from Braddock, Frazier utilizes her neighborhood as not only a setting but as a presence, a primary character in the vivid, sometimes stark, always eloquent narratives she documents in precise black and white. But the reality is that the nationally known Frazier — who now splits time between Pittsburgh, New York and Chicago — is one of the most thrilling, emotionally charged photographers not just in Pittsburgh, but in America. In her 2001-14 series The Notion of Family, excerpts of which are now at the Silver Eye Center for Photography, she turned the lens on her grandmother, mother and self. There are appearances by a grandfather, and her mother’s boyfriend, Mister Art. But the women take focus, sometimes literally. In one portrait, Mister Art in front fills the frame, but the clarity is given to the woman behind him. These works tell a story of love, struggle and connection, with honesty, without mawkishness, and emphasize the persistence of humanity in a world often inhumane. In one piece, a young Frazier coyly directs at the camera a Mona Lisa smile; she’s a loose-limbed, coltish adolescent sitting on a pristine carpet with a grandmother who a bit warily eyes the lens. The television behind them is set to A&E, the room adorned with dolls and statues, and it’s a lovely intimate glimpse into warm domesticity. On the gallery wall opposite is a different portrait — Frazier and her mother, with Grandma Ruby in a coffin. While her mother’s gaze hits the ground, Frazier’s look here is guarded, flat and ready; while she is standing straight, she hums with the intensity of grief. In other images, we see the change in her grandmother’s surroundings, the littered carpet and a once cozy room now bare, Frazier shouldering full garbage bags within. The potential decline of the body is juxtaposed with the definite decline of the neighborhood in images of an epilepsy test and a hospital halfway demolished, set side by side; the carcass of UPMC Braddock dominates these landscapes like a wound spreading its infection to the workers who protest its unfairness. But the closeness of these women, and the men who satellite them, transcends the blight. Ultimately love wins. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE NOTION OF FAMILY continues through Nov. 18. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

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LaToya Ruby Frazier’s “Huxtables, mom and me” (2008) {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GAVIN BROWN’S ENTERPRISE, NEW YORK/ROME}

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAREN BRADFORD}

Kyle Abraham/Abraham.In.Motion dancers in Kyle Abraham’s “Absent Matter”

[DANCE]

BACK IN TOWN {BY STEVE SUCATO}

T

HE LAST TIME Kyle Abraham/

Abraham.In.Motion performed in Pittsburgh, in 2013, the troupe sold out the Byham Theater. Since them, company founder and Pittsburgh native Kyle Abraham has premiered more than a dozen new works for his own company, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the Martha Graham Dance Company, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and others. The burning question is, why has it taken four years to bring back one of the city’s most celebrated native sons? It’s a question Abraham himself has pondered. “It’s kind of sad we haven’t performed in Pittsburgh since 2013, especially being from Pittsburgh,” said Abraham recently by phone from his alma mater, the State University of New York at Purchase, where the company was performing. “The work has been received well in the past,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

and there are places like New York and Los Angeles where we perform every year.” Whatever the reasons, Abraham says he is thrilled to be bringing the company back for Nov. 10 and 11 performances at the August Wilson Center. “I wear my Pittsburgh pride on my sleeve in a major way,” says Abraham.

KYLE ABRAHAM/ ABRAHAM.IN.MOTION 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 10, and 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 11. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-60. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org.

It’s perhaps fitting that the performances will take place at the Wilson Center. In some respects, what the late Wilson, a Hill District native, is to the

theater, Abraham, a Lincoln-Larimer native, is to dance. Their works highlighting the challenges of growing up in what was for them a somewhat tarnished Steel City have earned them international fame and, perhaps ironically, made them two of the city’s most notable ambassadors. Abraham left Pittsburgh for New York to pursue a dance education and career; he founded his New York-based company in 2006. He’s since been showered with critical praise and accolades including a 2010 Bessie Award for Outstanding Performance in Dance for his Pittsburgh-themed work The Radio Show; a 2012 Ford Fellowship; a 2013 MacArthur “genius” grant; and a 2016 Doris Duke Artist Award. He will receive yet another accolade this week, when Pittsburgh City Councilor Dan Gilman declares Nov. 10 to be Kyle Abraham Day in the City of Pittsburgh.


MOZART’S THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO ONLY 2 PERFORMANCES LEFT!

NOVEMBER 10 & 12 Disguises, surprises, and compromises Photo: David Bachman ©

At the Wilson Center, Abraham and company will present a program that is especially meaningful to Abraham in that it was the last of the company’s works that his mother, Henrietta (“Jackie”), saw performed before she died, in 2016. The program, presented by the Pittsburgh Dance Council, includes Abraham’s 2011 work “The Quiet Dance,” a 12-minute piece for five dancers, set to jazz pianist/composer Bill Evans’ rendition of the Leonard Bernstein classic “Some Other Time,” from the 1944 musical On the Town. “If we are keeping it real, the work is my favorite on the program,” says Abraham. “It’s a beautiful thing to have an opportunity for this work to have a voice in Pittsburgh, where I grew up and both my parents are buried, but it’s a little tricky for me to watch; it gets to me too much.” Abraham’s 30-minute multimedia work for six dancers, “The Gettin’” (2014), references events from the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil-rights movement to apartheid-era South Africa and the death of Eric Garner. It’s set to music by Grammy-winning jazz artist Robert Glasper and his trio, who reimagined Max Roach’s “We Insist! Freedom Now Suite.” Abraham, who recently turned 40, says he is taking a step back from performing in the company. The lone work on the program in which he will make a cameo appearance is 2015’s “Absent Matter.” Danced to an original jazz composition combined with samples from Common, Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar, the 17-minute multimedia work for five dancers looks at race through the lens of those who feel unacknowledged and unvalued. “This whole program came about as a way to celebrate live jazz and hip-hop music, an urban-American songbook of sorts,” says Abraham. “The goal has always been to perform it live. … It’s unfortunate that isn’t happening.” Even without live music, Abraham feels the program really showcases his current company lineup. “It’s a really dedicated group of artists I am working with,” he says. “The company has had more and more exposure, and younger dancers going to colleges and universities are seeing the company, and we have become their dream company [to work for] and that is really exciting.” Finally, in the wake of that 2013 Byham sell-out, Abraham says, he would love to figure out a way to have the company in Pittsburgh more. “Pittsburgh is a place I want my dancers to know,” says Abraham. “It’s a place I want to stay connected to. I want my reasons to be coming back to Pittsburgh to be something other than funerals.”

Benedum Center pittsburghopera.org/figaro Understand Every Word! English texts projected above the stage. Tickets start at $12 412-456-6666 Season Sponsor

Tuesday Night Sponsor: Ambridge Regional Distribution & Manufacturing Center Photo: David Bachman©, taken at Carnegie Museum of Art

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS....

Arsenic & Old Lace A COMEDY BY JOSEPH KESSELRING

NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19 Thursday, Friday & Saturday performances at 8 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $10.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM TS BU RG H US T AN D PIT CU LT UR AL TR PIT TS BU RG H

EN T WI NE RY PR ES

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES ORR}

Eric Leslie and Kayleigh Peternel in The Crucible at Little Lake Theatre

H OM E S Y A D I L HO FOR THE

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

WAR STORIES {BY STUART SHEPPARD} THE MOST DIFFICULT trope to evoke

artistically is sincerity. Miss by just a little and you slip precipitously into sentimentality. It’s the difference between Shakespeare, and a Subaru commercial. Prime Stage Theatre Company’s production of All Quiet on the Western Front is sincere, and never slips. The show, based on Robin Kingsland’s artful 2006 adaptation of Erich Maria Remarque’s 1929 novel, commemorates the 100th anniversary of America entering World War I, and is part of the company’s Humanity in the Face of Adversity season.

It’s a Hamlet-like role, his character on stage for most of the two-hour run-time — sometimes stepping into things, sometimes stepping back and commenting, and even stepping outside of himself, as in one poignant scene when he tries to comfort a dead soldier’s mother. It’s like seeing a soul exist outside of its body, and director Scott P. Calhoon achieves this and many other brilliant conceits without resorting to the gratuitous clichés so prevalent in theater today. Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of this performance is that virtually all of the effects are produced with technology that existed in 1917. The effects crew is stationed above the stage and executes Foley enhancements like an old-fashioned radio program. This makes the sounds much more vibrant and disturbing than if they were recordings —from thundering bombs to clattering machine guns. Even the popping sizzle of lice being burned over a candle seems real. Johnmichael Bohach’s set and Jason Via’s props offer the kind of thrilling immersion we rarely get to experience, enhanced by J.R. Shaw’s lighting and Angela Baughman’s sound (the descending flares are sublime). “Our life is an endless ending of life,” Paul observes, poetically, as he navigates the war with his young comrades. This is a show the whole family will appreciate. Sincerely.

IT’S DEMANDING, IT’S CHAOTIC, AND IT WORKS.

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT continues through Sun., Nov. 12. New Hazlett Theatre, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $12-25. 724-773-0700 or www.primestage.com

This is a tremendous ensemble effort, with most of the actors playing several parts, as well as switching genders. It’s demanding, it’s chaotic, and it works. The drama is narrated in play-by-play style by the young German protagonist Paul (the impressive Connor McNelis), who evolves from naïve, patriotic student to seasoned soldier at the speed of war.

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SOUTHERN COMPOSURE

{BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} THE CRUCIBLE, now playing at Little Lake

{BY SAM LEONARD}

Shane Torres

Theatre Company, is a sight to behold. Although it debuted on Broadway 65 years ago, playwright Arthur Miller’s classic drama deals in themes that are as germane and revealing today as they were in the 1950s under McCarthyism — or in the austere 1690s, during which the play is set. Under director Jena Oberg, the cast is top-notch. As leads, the always spot-on Eric Leslie imbues skeptical farmer John Proctor with equal amounts of feistiness and self-loathing, and the restrained Jennifer Sinatra as his wife, Elizabeth, plays the other half of the doomed couple caught up in the witch-hunt. On the more malevolent side, Elizabeth Bennett is a revelation as the unrepentant Abigail Williams, the once-lover of John Proctor as well as the eventual leader of the girls who freely accuse the Salem locals of colluding with Satan. Jilted prior to the start of the play, Abigail initially turns to witchcraft as a means to be with Proctor. But this scheme quickly gets away from her as old grudges and xenophobic religious fervor in puritanical Massachusetts boil over after the girls are discovered dancing in the forest.

THE CRUCIBLE continues through Nov. 18. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $13.75-21.75. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

In this opening sequence, when the girls gather around the bonfire led by the slave Tituba (the fantastic Fatu Sheriff), Oberg employs choreographer Melissa Tyler to elevate the magic ritual from runof-the-mill into out-of-this-world with a dance that is as beautiful as it is unnerving. This otherworldly routine carries through each of the scene changes, with the girls appearing and disappearing, an omnipresent force in the other characters’ lives. An unusual but stunning choice, the choreography adds a level of bewitching surrealism to a show already brewing with its fair share of sorcery. With Miller’s superb language at the forefront, this story is one that will sadly never lose its relevance. At turns sublime and caustic but always unflinching in its honestly about the horrors lurking in human nature, The Crucible is a classic of 20th-century drama for a reason. And with a cast more than up to the task, this production is one not to be missed. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[COMEDY]

WITCHING HOURS

MUSIC

As temperatures drop and darkness falls earlier, Race to the Coffin Comedy fights seasonal depression by hosting nationally touring comedians Shane Torres and Cliff Cash on back-to-back nights. Torres, who has scored two recent appearances on Conan, spoke recently with CP by phone from New York. Torres first visited Pittsburgh with Duncan Trussell in 2015 and found what he calls “a good beer-drinkin’ town.” When here, he usually hangs out with local comic John Dick Winters. Unlike Anthony Bourdain, the pair are more likely to frequent “dive bars in Troy Hill” than Superior Motors. Coincidentally, Torres’ second Conan appearance went viral for his defense of Guy Fieri and criticism of Bourdain, “who looks like the kind of dude that would be mean to dogs.” Yeah, Torres was roasting Bourdain long before the celebrity chef drew some locals’ ire. Torres is a liberal from Texas, but politics may not even come up at his Nov. 10 show at Club Café. His act, he says, is “not terribly political because there are other comics who can do political comedy better.” But if it’s political comedy you crave, Cliff Cash hits Hambone’s on Nov. 11. Cash is a Southern liberal who enjoys talking politics and culture. He also spoke with CP by phone from New York. I asked Cash if he could pinpoint any environmental factors that caused him to lean liberal. “My mom talks in tongues and my dad was a pharmacist,” he says. “We were raised very conservative Southern Baptists. Sometimes when you shit on your kids, you end up with the oppposite of what you were shooting for.” The liberal comic’s brother authored a novel called A Land More Kind Than Home, and his sister is a lesbian and a holistic nurse. Cash got into comedy after a tough year wherein he lost everything in the subprime-mortgage crisis, his father and his dog passed away, and his wife was unfaithful. But remember, the secret formula to great comedy is tragedy plus time. Whether you want to hear Cliff Cash prove that adage, or have Shane Torres dissect lighter subjects, there’s a show for you this weekend.

This is a free and family-friendly event! Celebrate the season with cookies and pick up unique holiday gifts along the way. Hours for Cookie Stops vary by location. Get all the info about this year’s tour including the map at lvpgh.com/cookietour or call 412.621.1616, ext. 102.

LAWRENCEVILLE

CORPORATION

The Smart Home Builders

Experience an unforgettable evening as emerging and established artists push the boundaries of dance and explore new ideas and new movement. Featuring works by Joshua Manculich, Brice Mousset, Kate Skarpetowska and Dominic Walsh.

CONTEMPORARY CHOREOGRAPHERS NOVEMBER 15–19 GRW PERFORMANCE STUDIO POINT PARK UNIVERSITY

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

SHANE TORRES 10:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 10. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

Ronald Allan-Lindblom ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Kim Martin PRODUCING DIRECTOR

CLIFF CASH 10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 11. Hambone’s, 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-681-4318 or www.racetothecoffin.com +

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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.09-11.16.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com PigPen Theatre Co. was formed 10 years ago by seven Carnegie Mellon University School of Drama students who blended traditional theater with shadow puppetry, physical puppetry and live music. While yet students, they twice played FringeNYC (winning awards both times), and after graduation they moved together to New York. In 2012, with help from FringeNYC festival administrator Britt Lafield, their play The Old Man and the Old Moon debuted off Broadway. The “new musical folktale” (which grew out of a sophomoreyear production at CMU) also had critically acclaimed productions in cities including Chicago, Boston and San Diego. The Boston Herald called PigPen “a phenomenon”; wrote the New York Times, “Their versatility is delightful to watch. Their hard work seems effortless.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNY ANDERSON}

Old Man tells the fable-like story, set in ancient times, of the fellow who keeps the moon filled with light, and who goes on an epic quest to find his missing wife. The performers — Alex Falberg, Ben Ferguson, Custis Gillen, Ryan Melia, Matt Nuernberg, Arya Shahi and Dan Weschler — play multiple roles, work the puppets, and contribute vocals and instrumentation in a neo-Americana style on accordion, guitar, banjo, violin and upright piano. PigPen is also, in fact, a working band, with national tours and two albums (including the recent Whole Sun) to its credit. The band has gigged in Pittsburgh, but City Theatre’s production — co-directed by PigPen and longtime collaborator Stuart Carden — will be the theater troupe’s first real production in the town where it was born. “I feel like there’ll be a little pressure, about old teachers showing up,” quips Nuernberg, reached by phone last week after rehearsal. While it’s kid-friendly, Old Man is not “children’s theater,” but its highly theatrical approach (including live sound effects) is designed to engage the audience in a world that’s largely imagined. “It’s a very inspiring show,” says Nuernberg. “The reason is, you are doing as much of the work as we are.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ALTDORFER}

^ Thu., Nov. 9: You on the Moors Now

thursday 11.09

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

Nov. 11-Dec. 3. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-61. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

STAGE Catherine tells Heathcliff where to shove e it, and Elizabeth ind in Bennett gives Mr. Darcy a piece of her mind king its ts lo llocal ocall You on the Moors Now, a 2015 play making cted d premiere at the Pittsburgh Playhouse. Ass directe directed rsit s y’s y by Sheila McKenna for Point Park University’s ackha kh us’ kha u Conservatory Theatre Company, Jaclyn Bac Backhaus’ mn ovelss ove work re-imagines beloved characters from novels ouisa ou i Ma isa May by Jane Austen, the Brontë sisters and Louisa ejec jectt the the Alcott as contemporary feminists who reject rue ru e iidentity. dentit den tity. y. men in their lives in order to find their true gh Dec. Dec 3. 3 Amanda Reed 8 p.m. Continues through 2-8000 2-8 000 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

STAGE The Humans, Stephen Karam’s 2016 Tony-winner for Best Play, makes its local premiere at Pittsburgh Public Theater. The acclaimed comedic drama follows Brigid and Richard, a young unmarried couple in New York’s Chinatown, as they host her Catholic family from Scranton, Pa., for Thanksgiving. (Karam hails from Scranton.) But the couple and mom, dad, grandma Momo and Brigid’s older

sister are in for an unexpectedly eerie holiday. Arash Mokhtar and Valeri Mudek head the cast, directed by Pamela Berlin. The first longtime Public l favorite Pa performance performan m ce is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 10. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org $15.75-58. 412-316-

friday 11.10 COMEDY D.L. H Hughley ughley y brings his comedy from screen to stage at the Pittsburgh Imp Improv. Ranked alongside the top contemporary comed comedians, Hughley gained famed as the original host of BE BET’s 1992 standup comedy show ComicV ComicView, View, w and currently hosts his own latenight tal nig talk lk show, D.L. Hughley Breaks the News New News, s, o on CNN. He is also the author of two hu hum humor books: I Want You to Shut the F*ck F*c kU Up p and Black Man, White House: An Or Ora Orall H History of the Obama Years. The first of his five shows here is tonight. AR 7:30 a and 9:45 p.m. Continues through Sun., Nov. 12. 166 E. Bridge St., West Hom Homestead. $35-60. 412-462-5233 or www www.pittsburgh.improv.com < Fri., Nov. 10: D.L. Hughley {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHANNON MCCOLLUM}


{ART BY ROBERT VILLAMAGNA}

^ Sat., Nov. 11: Smokestack Dada

STAGE Los Angeles-based musician, actor, poet and educator Dahlak Brathwaite takes the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater stage this weekend with Spiritrials, a personal story turned hip-hop drama. Accompanied by DJ Dion Decibels, Brathwaite chronicles the journey of a nameless narrator facing criminalization and stigmatization in a broken justice system. Brathwaite has performed on the Tavis Smiley radio show and Russell Simmons’ Def Poetry Jam. AR 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 11. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay what you want. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

saturday 11.11 ART Smokestack Dada, we think you’ll agree, is a pretty good name for an art exhibition. And it’s the one attached to Robert Villamagna’s new show at Gallery on 43rd Street. The Wheeling, W. Va.-based artist {ART BY DALE SCHMITT} makes whimsically wry ^ Sat., Nov. 11: Moments and Souls collages and assemblages, often incorporating vintage metal children’s games and toys, product packaging, and commercial signage. “The flea market is my palette,” writes the former steel-mill worker. The exhibit’s opening reception is this afternoon. BO 3-6 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Dec. 31. 187 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488 or www.galleryon43rdstreet.com

ART Moments and Souls celebrates its opening reception tonight at Percolate Art Space, Gallery and Create Laboratory. The exhibition features the works of CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW MURPHY}

^ Tue., Nov. 14: The Color Purple

monday 11.13

TALK

One at Arcade Comedy Theater Grand Opening, Downtown CRITIC: Wendy Kleiber, 36, a Nov. 3

It was a wonderful comedy show that showed off an eclectic kind of comedy. There was standup, musical improv and short-form improv. I’m actually married to the standup comedian in the show [Aaron Kleiber], and I was excited about this since it’s the grand opening of Arcade. I came to be a supportive wife, and to get away from the kids. I enjoyed the different kinds of comedy performed tonight, so there were laughs for everybody. I liked that everyone was participating, and there was just a good energy and atmosphere. My favorite sketch of the night was from the improv group, and they started a scene, and then they performed it backwards and forwards. That one stood out to me because there was a lot of physical humor involved. I thought my husband did great. He’s amazing. I love how he always makes fun of me and the kids.

Internationally famed Slovenian philosopher and social critic Slavoj Žižek and his colleague in philosophy Alenka Zupancic make a rare Pittsburgh appearance to ask, Why Is Sexual Difference Relevant for Philosophy? The event, at Carnegie Lecture Hall, is part of the Carnegie Museums’ cross-disciplinary Nexus initiative; Carnegie Nexus senior manager Edith Doron says the philosophers, both known for their accessibility and engagement with popular culture, will address the surprisingly complicated question posed by the title of Zupancic’s new book, What Is Sex? Expect a lively talk about, as Doron puts it, a notion of a sexuality that doesn’t describe one’s identity, but disrupts it instead. BO 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-10. 412-622-3288 or nexus.carnegiemuseums.org

sunday 11.12

BY AMANDA REED

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TALK Mona Chalabi, a London-born, New York City-based data editor at The Guardian U.S., speaks today at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh in Oakland. Chalabi’s work in data visualization — placing numbers into a visual context — helps people find and analyze the data they need to make informed decisions about their lives. She has written for the BBC, National Geographic, Channel 4 and VICE, and was a news writer for Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight site. Chalabi is also one-half of the team that created the Emmy-nominated video series Vagina Dispatches. AR 4 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3114 or www.carnegielibrary.org

^ Sun., Nov. 12: Mona Chalabi

WHEN: Fri.,

EVENT: Player

STAGE One of the top literary talents Pittsburgh has produced returns for two events this week. John Edgar Wideman, who grew up in Homewood and whose outstanding works include Brothers and Keepers and The Homewood Trilogy, visits the Carnegie Library’s Homewood branch today for A Community Conversation with John Wideman, sponsored by the United Black Book Clubs of Pittsburgh. On Wednesday, Wideman (who’s now based in New York City) is back at the library for a free screening of In Black and White, a two-part film that examines the writer’s legacy alongside that of his contemporary, the late, Pulitzerwinning Pittsburgh-born playwright August Wilson. The event is hosted by the Heinz History Center’s African American Program. BO Community Conversation: 3-5 p.m. (www.carnegielibrary.org). Film: 5:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15 (www.heinzhistorycenter.org). 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood

tuesday 11.14 STAGE

Tue., Nov. 14: Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series >

stay-at-home parent from Munhall

Richard Burke and Dale Schmitt, photographers who met as teacher and student at the Ivy School of Professional Art. Although both take people as their subjects, Burke’s shots are decisive, while Schmitt’s are deliberate. Tonight, you can peruse the artwork, buy the artwork, take advantage of the light refreshments or chat with either artist. AR 6:30 p.m. (free). 317 S. Trenton Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-477-4540 or www.facebook.com (“moments and souls”)

That widely acclaimed, Tony-winning 2015 Broadway revival of The Color Purple is on the road in a touring version hitting the Benedum Center for eight performances. Alice Walker’s novel inspired the 2005 musical about love, suffering and sisterhood among a group of African-American women in the South in the first half of the 20th century. The show, with its book by Marsha Norman and music and lyrics by Stephen Bray, Brenda Russell and Allee Willis, opens tonight courtesy of PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. BO 7:30 p.m. Continues through Nov. 19. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $30-98. www.trustarts.org

WORDS Poets Maggie Anderson and Judith Vollmer read tonight at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium as part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. Anderson, who lives in North Carolina, has earned fellowships including two from the National Endowment for the Arts. She just released her fifth collection, Dear All. Pittsburgh-based Vollmer (pictured) has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and her five books include The Apollonia Poems, winner of the Four Lakes Poetry Prize of the University of Wisconsin Press. AR 8:30 p.m. 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwritersseries.wordpress.com


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IT WAS A RICH, DEEPLY SATISFYING STEW THAT TASTED LIKE AUTUMN IN A BOWL

TURKEY TIME {BY ALEX GORDON} There was a time when the day after Thanksgiving wasn’t known for parkinglot brawls and consumer stampedes, but rather, turkey sandwiches. Whatever leftovers survived the night were assembled on toasted bread, hit with some mayo and enjoyed on a cozy, lazy day off. Things have changed. Black Friday starts on Thursday now. There’s a Cyber Monday. Youths are staging Friendsgivings (and inspiring thinkpieces: “Are millennials killing Thanksgiving?”). But, in an important modern development, there are Thanksgiving burritos. Locally, the O.G. is Mad Mex’s seasonal “Gobblerito,” a heap of turkey, stuffing, potatoes and corn, stuffed in a tortilla, then slathered with gravy and served with cranberry sauce. “You know, it’s really not half bad, in a hilarious sort of trashy way,” reads one consumer review on Mad Mex’s website. If that sounds like your sort of thing, get Gobblerito-ing soon because the season ends Thanksgiving eve. You get a few extra days to get your hands on Steel Cactus’ rendition, available until Dec. 1. “The Bird” features more traditional Mexican flavors, with cranberry guac and gravy queso, though otherwise it’s more or less the same idea: holiday leftovers in a wrap. Giant Eagle’s grab-and-go fast-food outlet/gas station getGo offers “The Pilgrim.” This is a sandwich featuring the supermarket’s “secret-recipe stuffing” bread, white cheddar and all the expected fixin’s. Meanwhile, the local gourmethamburger joint BRGR is toting the “Gobble Gobble” — a turkey burger, with sage stuffing, pickled green beans, cranberry aioli and turkey gravy. So many options. So much to be thankful for. ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Craft beer has gone from maybea-bar-has-some to a bazillion options.. No need to feell overwhelmed — r craft beer pick up City Paper’s Drink Issue next week, and yeah, maybe pick up some beer to go with it.

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Beef tartare: New York strip, duck-liver mousse, chestnut, egg yolk and crostini

UPSCALE BISTRO {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

HEN CHEF Andrew Garbarino opened the Twisted Frenchman on South Highland Avenue a few years ago, there was no mistaking his ambition: In a culture where stuffy French restaurants have been supplanted by cozier, more informal cousins, Twisted Frenchman offered unabashedly fine dining. The twisted part was that Garbarino dared to apply molecular gastronomic techniques to the cuisine of Escoffier and timeless “mother sauces.” Garbarino’s success has taken him, literally, to the next level. This year, he radically rebuilt a building around the corner, adding a second story and a second restaurant. Now upstairs on Baum Boulevard, the Twisted Frenchman offers exclusively chefcurated, multi-course tasting menus, while downstairs, the “upscale bistro” Bar French-

man serves a traditional a la carte menu. Bistros occupy a niche without exact analog in American restaurants, but with plenty of appeal; it’s no surprise we’ve adopted the word to connote simple sophistication. French bistro food may range

BAR FRENCHMAN 5925 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2880 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-11 p.m. PRICES: Starters $12-16; entrees, seafood and steak frites $15-35 Liquor: Full bar

CP APPROVED from humble to exquisite, but the vibe is always comfortable and convivial, never somber. At Bar Frenchman, this translates to a dining room where century-old tile flooring has been preserved with cracks

and pits intact, and a faintly rustic bar dominates one wall, while modernist light fixtures add an element of high design. The menu offers four or five options in each of five categories: hot and cold starters, chilled seafood, steak frites, and entrees. The general approach is luxe preparations of elemental dishes. Thus, onion soup is topped with Bourgogne brie, not gruyere, and grilled prawns are served with a beet-root cocktail sauce. Only entrees are approached as updated versions of classics, like ratatouille, that eschew simplicity as a rule. From the hot-starter menu, potato soup with leeks was superb. The vegetables were pureed to a silken texture and garnished, not mixed, with a small serving of succulent crabmeat and a swirl of fragrant tarragon-chive oil. This allowed the luscious flavors to remain intact, yet mingle, and for CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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UPSCALE BISTRO, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

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the diner to customize each spoonful. Beet salad featured a classic combination of nutty, peppery arugula; savory lardons; and creamy, tangy goat cheese, all highlighted by a dressing made with aged French red-wine vinegar. Unfortunately, the beets were unevenly cooked, some perfectly tender, others borderline crunchy. If this was intentional, it was a poor choice, as the varying textures distracted from the perfection of the flavors. If it was an error, it was a surprising one, as beets are hardly tricky to cook. A grating of cured egg yolk on top was a nice thought, but didn’t have much impact amongst the salad’s other bold components. Smoked-salmon rilette was served with a bit of impressive, yet ultimately disappointing, showmanship. A mound of flaked fish, folded with crème fraîche and shallot, was presented beneath a tumbler which, when removed, released a dramatic puff of smoke. The aroma, as well as the visual effect, were pleasing, but the smoke hadn’t imparted much actual flavor to the fish, and the end result was not far elevated above a good seafood salad. When we’ve had steak frites in Paris, it’s been simply just that: a well-cooked steak, rarely a premium cut, alongside perfect fries. Bar Frenchman upgraded the steak in two ways: five different cuts were available, including venison and Japanese wagyu, and the steak was served atop a wild mushroom blend and wilted Swiss chard. We selected the least expensive cut, flat iron, and it was prepared beautifully — rosy red and lightly but thoroughly seared. The thinly-sliced mushrooms were wonderful, offering a gradient of textures from firm to silken, while the chard provided welcome vegetal notes without being too forward. Bone-marrow powder didn’t make a strong impression, but the demi-glace was a rich delight. Alas, alongside this sublime steak, the frites were merely ordinary, cut into narrow planks rather than batons. This is a technique that we find consistently lacking, for it leaves too many underdone bits and not nearly enough perfect fries. Coq au vin was our best example of a classic French dish, prepared as beautifully as we would expect it to be in France. With the meat of a French rooster — not a supermarket hen — braised to succulence in Burgundy wine with tender root vegetables and served over mashed potatoes, this dish transformed ordinary ingredients into an extraordinarily rich, deeply satisfying stew that tasted like autumn in a bowl. A French autumn. Bar Frenchman reminds that ambition need not be reserved for “fancy” food, but can elevate everyday recipes to memorable meals. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

[PERSONAL CHEF]

BEST-AT-HOME BURRITO {BY KELLY ANDREWS, GREENFIELD}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLY ANDREWS}

NFL Sunday Ticket! WE Show all Games!

I don’t know that I should recommend this recipe, but I eat this about three times a week because it’s fast and filling and I rarely go out after 6 p.m., so I don’t have to worry about eating Brussels sprouts AND refried beans in the same night. Fall is here, and every introvert is already hermiting after a million summer social obligations. While not unhealthy, this is the kind of burrito that I shouldn’t even admit to eating. I feel as sad about it as I do seeing the amount of money withheld from my paycheck for a retirement plan, when — who knows — the world could end in 20 years or days or minutes. INGREDIENTS • Brussels sprouts • refried beans • tortilla or wrap • cheese of your choice • salsa • 1 tbsp. yogurt • 1 tbsp. olive oil • ½ tsp. cayenne pepper INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Chop sprouts and drizzle with oil. I like to season them lightly with cayenne pepper because it’s one of a few seasonings I own. Roast the sprouts for 15-20 minutes. Heat ⅓ of a can of refried beans in a pan with a dash of water. Stir frequently for 3-5 minutes and sprinkle in the cheese. Add roasted Brussels sprouts to the pan and remove from heat. Sometimes I’m too lazy to microwave my tortilla for 15 seconds, but it really is worth the effort. Pile up the sprout-bean concoction, keeping in mind that the portion size will directly influence how many times you have to turn on your electric wax-warmer in your office the next day to eliminate any and all suspicious smells. Add some salsa and a spoonful of yogurt. Some days, I don’t even put this into a burrito shell. I just eat a pile of basic taco fillings off a plate. I’d say enjoy — but this is clearly a recipe for those who don’t like cooking, but kind of sort of care about what they put in their bodies. But also for those who give zero shits about what it tastes like. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Kelly Andrews is a poet who plans to stick around Pittsburgh indefinitely. You can find more sad, healthy (and funny) meals on her blog sadhealthymeals. wordpress.com. WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF PETE SOERGEL}

The vineyard at Lynmar Estate

[ON THE ROCKS]

LOCALLY GROWN A Pittsburgh-native winemaker in California {BY CELINE ROBERTS} SINCE 1850, the Soergels have been a family

in touch with the land in Western Pennsylvania. The family’s German ancestor, John Conrad Soergel, bought property in Wexford that it has since run as a farm, orchard and market, even collaborating with Arsenal Cider on a taproom there. But cider isn’t the only libation the Soergel clan specializes in. Out in Sonoma County, Calif., in the Russian River valley, John Conrad’s direct descendant, Pete Soergel is head wine-maker at Lynmar Estate. When City Paper spoke to him by phone recently, he was just finishing up the harvest for the 2017 vintage. “Growing up in Pittsburgh with my family, we never really drank wine around the table,” says Soergel, who spent his childhood on the family farm. After high school, he went to Virginia Tech, earning a degree in horticulture. Soergel’s aunt, who has contacts in the wine industry, introduced him to the owners of Landmark Vineyards, and with the promise of California sunshine and an interest in viticulture, Soergel packed up his car and headed west. He started as an intern at Landmark in 2006 and from there rose steadily through the ranks. In 2007, he went to Marlborough, New Zealand, for the sauvignon blanc harvest on the northern part of the southern island. After returning to California in the fall of 2007, he became an intern at a prestigious pinot noir and chardonnay producer, Kosta Browne Winery, and was

then hired full time as its cellar master. In 2011, he returned to Landmark as the assistant winemaker for a year-and-half before being hired at Lynmar Estate as an assistant winemaker in 2012. Five years later, Soergel is Lynmar’s head winemaker. “My wine education has been very hands-on,” says Soergel. Throughout our conversation, he often mentions the names and advice of vintners he respected and learned under. Being at Lynmar offers opportunity for Soergel to indulge his agricultural roots and interest in viticulture by working hand-in-hand with the vineyard manager. “We have all these estate vineyards that we farm to really small details. We try to harvest grapes that really reflect the property,” he says. In 2017, Soergel had 85 micro fermentations of wines going. “We’re breaking up parcels [of the vineyard]; picking [grapes] on the top of the slope, the bottom of the slope. We’re picking on soil type. We’re constantly redeveloping parts of the vineyard,” he says. A few months ago, Soergel met Kevin Perez, who has a distributor called Grape to Glass through his friend Duane Rieder, of Pittsburgh-based EngineHouse 25 Wines. Perez helped Soergel put Lynmar Estate wines on the menu at the recently opened Shadyside restaurant, Acorn. Soergel is excited to have Pittsburghers try Lynmar wine. “I would definitely encourage people from Pittsburgh, if they are making their way out here, to come and check it out,” he says.

WE CATER!

“MY WINE EDUCATION HAS BEEN VERY HANDS-ON.”

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: SPOTLIGHT ON VERMOUTH

VS.

Superior Motors

Twisted Frenchman

1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock

5925 Baum Blvd., East Liberty

DRINK: Vermouth INGREDIENTS: Dolin Dry, lemon verbena, Laphroaig, house brine OUR TAKE: Laphroaig and lemon dominant the nose of this drink, while the vermouth is smooth and slightly grassy on the end, with the influence of the lemon verbena. The saltiness of the scotch adds dimension.

DRINK: Blush Lace INGREDIENTS: Gin, blanc vermouth, elderflower, Peychaud’s bitters, grapefruit bitters OUR TAKE: If this super-delicate little cocktail were a person, it would be a smooth talker. Grapefruit perfumes the flavor profile, and notes of rose add a floral side. The vermouth makes for a soft mouthfeel, which is complemented by the botanicals of the gin.

This week on Sound Bite: We join in on the family tradition of winemaking in one Pittsburgh Italian home. www.pghcitypaper.com

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer The Balvenie 17-Year-Old DoubleWood Single Malt Scotch $14/1-ounce pour “ “This scotch from Speyside is aged in both American oak barrels a and European oak sherry casks. Strong aromas of vanilla and rrose permeate this whiskey. Green-apple flavors also make a ssubtle appearance.” RECOMMENDED BY CELINE ROBERTS

The Balvenie 17-Year-Old DoubleWood Single Malt Scotch is available at Mac & Toz, in Bridgeville, and by the bottle at Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores.

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017


HAMMER TIME {BY REBECCA ADDISON}

CHARMS INCLUDE SUCH STYLISTIC FLOURISHES AS A STOP-MOTION-ANIMATION SEQUENCE

Like many of the superhero movies released in theaters in recent years, Thor: Ragnarok begins with an epic fight sequence. It’s been two years since Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and the rest of the Avengers defeated Ultron, and Thor has spent his time since exploring the realms in search of infinity stones. If you haven’t seen the last Avengers movie and/or don’t know anything about infinity stones, that’s fine. Neither of these things is integral to the plot here; they just set up a showdown between Thor and a fire demon named Surtur.

Thor (Chris Hemsworth)

CP APPROVED

It makes for a lively opening sequence that predictably concludes with Thor beating the demon and his fire-based minions. After that, Thor returns to Asgard, but it’s not anywhere near a joyous homecoming. Family secrets are revealed, and the very future of Asgard is at stake. But before Thor can do anything about it, he finds himself transported to the other side of the universe. The latest installment in the Marvel universe is a thrilling ride, jam-packed with action, laughs and superheroes. Trailers have given away most of the film’s big cameos; there are appearances from Dr. Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), but the standout performances come from Jeff Goldblum, as the Grandmaster, and the film’s own director, Taika Waititi, as Korg. In fact, Korg’s lines are so hilarious and heartwarming, it will be a shame if the guy doesn’t make an appearance in upcoming Marvel films. On trend, Thor: Ragnarok plays to 1980s nostalgia. When Thor is thrown to the other end of the universe, he finds himself on Sakaar, a literal garbage planet where wormholes drop trash from the sky. And if the planet’s fashion choices are any indication, one of those wormholes has brought the people of Sakaar plenty of Earth’s ’80s castoffs. Even the soundtrack has retro feel, complete with a track from Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory. This is the best Thor-centric film in the Marvel universe yet, and hopefully it’s a sign of more to come.

Rose (Millicent Simmonds) in the city

TWO TALES OF A CITY {BY AL HOFF}

A

MONG THE pleasures of Todd

Haynes’ films is his obvious love of recreating other time periods; most recently, he invited viewers into the 1950s with Carol. His new film, Wonderstruck, offers twice the pleasure, intercutting two narratives, one from 1927 and the other from 1977. Wonderstruck is adapted from Brian Selznick’s young-adult novel, and is reminiscent of one of those mechanical puzzles, in which pieces are rotated and re-arranged before snapping together into a completed object. The film follows two 12-year-olds who have run away to New York City; both are on quests and wind up at the Natural History Museum. That’s just the start of the parallels between their tales, and as further information is doled out, viewers can speculate how the two stories will snap together to form one. We meet Ben (Oakes Fegley) in his small Minnesota town of Gunflint; it’s 1977, and he’s sad because his single mother has recently died. A bizarre episode during

which he’s rendered deaf provides the jolt he needs: Determined to find his father, he heads for New York City, armed with only a few clues (a book about museums, the name of an Upper West Side bookstore).

WONDERSTRUCK DIRECTED BY: Todd Haynes STARRING: Oakes Fegley, Millicent Simmonds, Julianne Moore Starts Fri., Nov. 10

Meanwhile, in 1927, lonely Rose (Millicent Simmonds), who is also deaf, lives in Hoboken with her wealthy but strict dad. She cuts photos of her favorite actress from magazines, and uses the discarded pages to create fantastic cityscapes made from cardboard. Her journey to New York City includes a visit to the cinema and a journey uptown to the museum. Rose’s story unfolds in black and white, with intertitles, like a silent movie, while Ben’s is set in the grubby, grimy years of the mid-1970s, where Manhattan is all garish

polyester, street crime and the circle of hell that is the Port Authority bus terminal. Both children find refuge — one quite literally — at the museum, a place of genuine wonder filled with magical totems such as taxidermied exotic animals, dinosaur bones and a meteorite. (Wonderstruck is also a valentine to museums, and the unique inspirational role they play.) The film aims for whimsy and wonder, while also setting up an emotional payoff. And the work does have its charms, including such stylistic flourishes as a stop-motion-animation sequence and a meticulously recreated film-within-a-film (a silent melodrama about an imperiled mother). But the unfolding can be clunky, the middle of the film suffers from some plodding pacing, and the wrap-up leans toward cloying, a solution to the puzzle that is perfunctory and strained. But that’s true of many tales — the mystery is simply more enjoyable than the answer. Like Rose and Ben find, with Wonderstruck, the journey is the more engaging aspect.

R AD D I SON@ PGHC ITY PA PE R.CO M

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break. George Kennedy stars. 10 p.m. Fri., Nov. 10. Row House Cinema

FILM CAPSULES NEW

FRITZ THE CAT. The rule-bustin’, sex-obsessed feline from Robert Crumb’s comics is the star of Ralph Bakshi’s animated cult classic. The 1972 film holds the distinction of being the first X-rated cartoon. Midnight, Fri., Nov. 10. Row House Cinema

DADDY’S HOME 2. The comic antics of this blended family continue, but now the granddads are in the mix. Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, John Lithgow and Mel Gibson star; Sean Anders directs. Starts Fri., Nov. 10

SURF NAZIS MUST DIE. Peter George directs this 1987 post-apocalyptic revenge pic from Troma. Cowabunga, dudes. Midnight, Sat., Nov. 11. Row House Cinema

CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS. Kenneth Branagh directs this adaptation of the Agatha Christie classic, in which a homicide on a luxury train casts suspicions on many passengers. Branagh heads up an ensemble cast that also includes Judi Dench, Penelope Cruz and Willem Dafoe. Starts Fri., Nov. 10 POLISH FILM FESTIVAL. Here’s a chance to catch four new films and one recent one from Poland. The mini-fest kicks off with Stars, a bio-pic about Jan Banas, the well-known football player in the early 1970s. He has a confusing upbringing (born in Germany, then relocates to Poland); a confusing love life (he and a buddy vie for the same woman); and a confusing career, bouncing around various teams, on both sides of the Iron Curtain. A shaggy but engaging story; no knowledge of football is necessary, but Cold War knowledge is. Director Jan Kidawa Blonski will present the film at the 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 10, screening and reception ($15); a second screening is 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 13. Lullaby Killer is Krzysztof Lang’s drama inspired by the real-life serial killer who terrorized Krakow in the 1950s; there are two screenings; 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 11 (with director Lang and reception; $15), and 7 p.m. Thu., Nov. 16. Katarzyna Kolenda-Zaleska’s The Strategist is a 2013 portrait of Zbigniew Brzezinski, the Polish-American diplomat and national security advisor under President Carter, which screens 5:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 12. Among the things the state repressed during the Communist era in Poland was any useful publicly available information about human sexuality and family planning. So Michalina Wislocka made it her mission to provide it, eventually publishing a bestselling guide for women (but also good for men). The Art of Loving, directed by Maria Sadowska, recounts Wislocka’s life, from an early polyamorous relationship through her own sexual awakening and her travails getting her work published. Screens 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 14. The fascinating life of Eugeniusz Bodo, the cabaret performer and cinema star of the 1930s, is the subject of Michal Kwiecinski’s biographical feature Bodo, which includes several great song and dance numbers. Bodo rose to glittery heights, with beautiful women in tow, but then came the war. Screens 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. In Polish, and other languages, with subtitles. Nov. 10-16. Regent Square. $10 THE SQUARE. Ruben Östlund directs this satirical drama about the art world and contemporary life. Claes Bang and Elisabeth Moss star. Starts Fri., Nov. 10. Harris

REPERTORY THE WIZARD OF OZ. If your viewings of Victor Fleming’s 1939 musical film have been via TV only, you owe it to yourself to see this beloved family classic on the big screen. Join Dorothy (Judy Garland) and her little dog, too, on their unforgettable journey to the Land of Oz — a wondrous place that, ultimately,

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THE MARK OF ZORRO. Fed Niblo’s rip-roaring 1920 action-comedy classic is packed with swashbuckling, real stuntwork and an inspiring message about defending the poor at the point of sword. Starring cinema’s first action hero, Douglas Fairbanks, as the masked avenger Zorro. The 35 mm film will be accompanied by live organ music from Jay Spencer. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 12. Hollywood

Kedi: The Cats of Istanbul

BEYOND THE WALL. This new film from Jenny Philips follows five formerly incarcerated men who struggle to rebuild their lives after being released. The film documents the challenges they face finding “anchors,” such as housing and employment. To be followed by a Q&A with Philips and one of the men featured in the film. 5:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 13. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free; RSVP at community. pittsburghfoundation.org/beyond-the-wall. PITSTBURGH’S AVANT-GARDE FILM SERIES II. The second installment of this mini-series — titled “Imaging the Flesh: Queer & Feminist Pioneers in Handcrafted Film” — focuses on works exploring gender and sexuality. The screening includes short films from Roger Jacoby (“How to Be a Homosexual Parts I and II”), Peggy Ahwesh (“The Color of Love”), Stephanie Beroes (“Recital’) and Paul Glabicki’s “Under the Sea,” an experimental animated film drawing from five literary classics, such as Madame Bovary and Frankenstein. 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 14. Melwood

Stars, at Polish Film Festival

Film Kitchen

isn’t quite as wonderful as Kansas. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 8 (AMC Loews Waterfront). Also, 7:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 15 (Tull Family Theater, Sewickley)

is known for its large population of stray cats, and in Ceyda Torun’s charming documentary essay, some of those felines — and the humans who care for them — are profiled. A must for fans of cats, cities and city cats. In Turkish, with subtitles. Nov. 10-16. Row House Cinema

KAIROS DIRT AND THE ERRANT VACUUM. Madsen Minax’s new feature film follows a queer middle-school lunch lady through her various encounters with lovers, co-workers, psychics and so on. There are also dreams, alternate space-times and wanton desires, so set your sights accordingly for a film that won Best Feature at the Indie Memphis Film Festival. 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 8. Melwood CHASING TRANE. John Scheinfeld directs this new documentary profiling iconic jazz saxophonist John Coltrane, who died in 1967 at age 40. Among those interviewed: Sonny Rollins, Wynton Marsalis and Bill Clinton. 7 p.m. Thu., Nov. 9. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free; RSVP at www.alphabetcity.org. DOKUMENTARFILM: THE BERLIN CONNECTION. Berlin-based American documentary filmmaker Rick Minnich presents two of his films, both about how contemporary Germany continues to deal with its past. The hour-long “Bombhunters” looks at Oranienburg, a city in which there are many unexploded World War II bombs. The attempts of Minnich to make a coffee-table book about the last remaining statues of Lenin is covered in the 22minute “The Book of Lenins.” 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 10. Melwood. $8 ($4 for Documentary Salon members) KEDI: THE CATS OF ISTANBUL. The Turkish capital

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017

KEANU. An adorable kitten named Keanu is in the middle of Peter Atencio’s 2016 comedy about two cousins (Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele) who get entangled with drug dealers and gangsters. Nov. 10-16. Row House Cinema PITTSBURGH’S PRETTY KITTIES. Don’t miss this brand-new compilation of funny and cute cat videos, submitted by Pittsburghers and starring local cats. Nov. 10-16. Row House Cinema A CAT IN PARIS. Jean-Loup Felicioli and Alain Gagnol’s 2010 animated feature stars a pet cat who, when the sun goes down, works as an assistant to an acrobatic jewel thief. Nov. 10-16. Row House Cinema NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. Some dead creep called Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) is haunting the dreams of teens in Wes Craven’s 1984 scream-fest. A cheapie in its day, Nightmare is now regarded as one of the best of the early-1980s teen-slasher genre. 9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 10. Hollywood UNINVITED. Catch the RiffTrax edition of Greydon Clark’s 1988 schlocker about a mutant killer housecat who winds up on a yacht with coeds on spring

MAJOR! The Just Films monthly series continues with Annalise Ophelian’s 2015 documentary about Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a black transgender activist who has been fighting for the rights of trans women of color for more than four decades. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. Eddy Theater, Chatham University campus, Shadyside. Free. www.justfilmspgh.org FILM KITCHEN. The screening series for local and independent artists highlights the work of local actor Mark Tierno in more than half-a-dozen shorts. Along with his long, lanky silhouette, Tierno might be best known for his role in Chris Preksta’s sciencefiction web serial The Mercury Men, an episode of which will screen. Also screening: “Lift,” by Hugues Dalton and Jeff Garton; “Milkman,” Garrett Kennell’s slick dark comedy set in sunny suburbia; Bailey Donovan’s film-noir spoof “The Big Fold”; and Luke Bruehlman’s dark, theologically themed comedy “As It Is in Heaven.” Curator Matthew R. Day also includes excerpts of Joe Varhola’s feature-length 2016 thriller A Fancy Piece of Homicide. (Note that this month’s Film Kitchen is on a Wednesday, not the usual Tuesday.) 8 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5. www.pfpca.org (Bill O’Driscoll) STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this 1986 coming-of-age dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 15. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 D.O.A.: A RITE OF PASSAGE. Rarely shown in theaters, this 1980 doc from Lech Kowalski chronicles some of the crazy, chaotic early days of punk. Featured performers include: Sex Pistols, XRay Spex, Sham 69 and the Dead Boys. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 16. Hollywood


HISTORY LESSONS

“I WAS CALLING IT AS A PROFESSIONAL, BUT I WAS A FAN THE WHOLE TIME.”

This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} NOV. 9, 1976 The Pitt Panthers improve to 9-0 when the soon-to-be national champions beat Army by 30 points in 15-degree weather. They become No. 1 in the nation for the first time since 1937.

NOV. 9, 2011 In the middle of his 46th year as head coach of the Penn State Nittany Lions football team, Joe Paterno is fired by the board of trustees in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sexual-assault scandal. Also fired were athletic director Tim Curley and vice president of business and finance Gary Schultz. University President Graham Spanier was forced to resign. Paterno died two months later.

NOV. 10, 2002 Steelers QB Tommy Maddox has the game of his life, statistically at least, when he throws for 473 yards (253 of them to Plaxico Burress) and four touchdowns. The game ends, however, in a 34-34 tie with Atlanta.

Pudge Heffelfinger

NOV. 10, 1985 Famed Pittsburgh Steelers kicker Gary Anderson scores half of the team’s 36 points on five field goals and three extra points in a 36-28 game at Kansas City.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SPEEDY’S PRODUCTIONS}

FEST Wrestling commentators Max Greg, of Pittsburgh, and Rich Bocchini

NOV. 12, 1892 The Allegheny Athletic Association became the world’s first professional football team, and Pudge Heffelfinger became the first pro player when AAA paid the Yale grad $500 ($16,000 today) to play a game against rival Pittsburgh Athletic Club at Rec Park, on the North Side. AAA won 4-0 when Heffelfinger scored the game’s lone touchdown. (TDs were worth only four points at the time.)

NOV. 12, 2013 It’s a big day for Western Pa. baseball managers. Pittsburgh Pirates skipper Clint Hurdle wins National League Manager of the Year. In the American League, the winner is Terry Francona, a native of New Brighton.

NOV. 13, 1999 More than 60,000 fans cram into Pitt Stadium for the Panthers’ last game at the Oakland landmark. They would play in Three Rivers Stadium in 2000 before moving into Heinz Field in 2001.

NOV. 14, 1978 Pirates outfielder Dave Parker, a.k.a. the Cobra, wins the NL MVP.

SHOWING COLOR {BY MEG FAIR}

T

HE FEST PUNK festival in Gaines-

ville, Fla., has been around for 16 years. For the last four years, founder Tony Weinbender has incorporated wrestling into the event, starting with Kaiju Big Battel and Lucha Forever. He had been working with the World Wrestling Network (WWN) to coordinate these shows, but in 2016, WWN’s wrestlers were booked that weekend. So Weinbender made the leap and started his own wrestling promotion. FEST Wrestling is a combination of local wrestling talent and traveling independent performers. There’s no barricade, so the crowd is often a part of the match and face-to-face with the action. The masses are noisy, passionate and

all about having fun. You can confirm it for yourself for free; all of FEST Wrestling’s matches are uploaded to YouTube. And when you listen to the match, you’ll hear two commentators: Rich Bocchini and Max Greg.

“AS LONG AS I CAN DO IT, I WILL DO IT.” Greg, the color commentator, is from right here in Pittsburgh. He’s a member of World’s Scariest Police Chases and works for Commonwealth Press. Greg and Weinbender knew each

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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other from World’s Scariest playing FEST for years, but it was at Wrestlemania two years ago that the two spent time together for the first time. Not long after, Greg got a call from Tony while at work. “He calls me and says, ‘Hey, I think I’m going to start a wrestling promotion, and I want you to do commentary at FEST.’ And I was like … ‘I need to call you back,’” laughed Greg. “I had never thought about doing commentary. I always wanted to be involved in wrestling, and I’ve thought about going to wrestling school, but I knew I was realistically not going to do that. “I called him back and was like, ‘I’ll be there anyway, let’s do it.’ I was really bad at it the first two or three shows, I think, CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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SHOWING COLOR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

[laughs], but I think I’m starting to get the hang of it.” As the color commentator, it’s Greg’s job to set the scene and provide background and context to the stories unfolding in the ring. His commentary partner, Bocchini, is known as Rich Brennan on NXT and Smackdown Live. “I’ve got this professional person sitting next to me, giving me advice that he’s gotten from Dusty Rhodes and stuff, so it’s been a big help,” said Greg during FEST weekend. “I’ll get the show notes — where the person is from, their move-set, interesting things about them — and then print it up for us. But Rich is a super pro and great on the fly — he doesn’t need notes.” Greg is humble about being a part of a company with a great deal of hype. What started as a FEST event has become a wrestling promotion that puts on shows year round in Gainesville and soon in St. Augustine. Greg flies down for each show. Of all the matches he’s called, Greg points to a match during a feud between wrestlers Effy and Leon Scott as his favorite. “We do a show every two months, but they’ve had an eight-month feud, [FEST’s] first feud of any length. It ended

in a dog-collar match, but the match before that was a ‘Fans Bring the Party: Weapons’ match, and it was insane. They used every inch of the venue and all these weird weapons,” explained Greg. “I was calling it as a professional, but I was a fan the whole time. What I said into the microphone is what I would have said if I were standing in the crowd. It was great!” The company itself has been growing pretty quickly. FEST Champion Su Yung has defended the belt in the U.K., so the FEST Wrestling Championship is an official world title, not even two years after its creation. With expansion to St. Augustine and plenty of hype, CP asked if Greg would want to make this a fulltime job. “As long as I can do it, I will do it,” Greg said. “Anything I can do to make FEST Wrestling grow, even if it’s sitting at home in Pittsburgh doing the business end of things, I’d do it. There aren’t many wrestling companies that truly feel like a family. We have a pre-meeting show with everyone, and you can always see the excitement. I’m so excited to be a part of it. “If it grows and becomes my full-time job, that would be awesome.” M E G FA I R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

COURT ORDER

2. Jack Twyman

{BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

People are always talking about Twyman. At least, they should be. Besides his selfless devotion to Stokes, Twyman averaged 19.2 points a game in his career. Sure, it was with the now-defunct Cincinnati Royals, but it still counts. He is also responsible for creating 75 wins for his teams in his career, in which stat Twyman ranks higher than anyone else on this list. He is in the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.

PRO BASKETBALL is the only team sport

where citizens of Western Pennsylvania cannot root for the team that plays closest to the house they live in. Technically, we would be Cleveland Cavalier fans, or maybe root for the Philadelphia 76ers or the Washington Wizards. But most sports fans in the area find it genetically impossible to don a jersey with the words “Cleveland,” “Philly” or “D.C.” That would be like asking for Hunt’s ketchup on your burger or arguing that Captain Kangaroo had the best children’s television show. No matter how hilarious Mr. Green Jeans was, we can’t do it. But this disconnect from the current pro game doesn’t mean Western Pa. isn’t a major player in pro-basketball’s legacy. Chuck Cooper, a Duquesne Duke, was the first African American drafted into the NBA. We also gave college basketball its all-time greatest player in Pistol Pete Maravich. So, is the Pistol the best in the pros, too? Here’s a list of the nine best pro ballers from the 412.

9. Danny Fortson The consummate NBA journeyman, Fortson toiled on the hardwood for a decade, playing mostly for Denver, Golden State and the Seattle SuperSonics. The big man played his last two high school seasons at Shaler, and college ball at Cincinnati.

8. DeJuan Blair Imagine what he could’ve done if he had just one good knee. The Schenley High grad dominated at Pitt during Jamie Dixon’s heyday. Blair went to Mark Cuban’s Dallas Mavericks after a couple of productive seasons with the San Antonio Spurs. Unfortunately, he wound up sitting on the Wizards bench for his final season, but still had a respectable run, averaging 6.8 points per game in 424 NBA games.

7. Stu Lantz The Uniontown product played in the NBA during the 1970s and averaged more than 12 points a game over his career. In an era of extreme shorty shorts, Stu wore them with style. Also, we’re taking credit for Stu even though he’s from the 724, not the 412.

1. Pistol Pete Maravich

Pistol Pete Maravich, right, drives to the basket past Philadelphia’s Tom Van Arsdale in 1974.

6. Armen Gilliam He is the second biggest celebrity to come out of Bethel Park, behind Rick Sebak. The Hammer put up good numbers everywhere he went, including stops in New Jersey, Philadelphia and Milwaukee. Gilliam averaged just under 14 points a game in the big time.

time greatest Indiana Pacers. Knight averaged 16.9 points a game and went on to become general manager of the Atlanta Hawks.

Maravich is in both the college and pro basketball halls of fame. They didn’t have the three-pointer in college when he went to Louisiana State University or he would’ve added to his NCAA scoring records, including a career average of 44.2 points per game; in the pros, Maravich averaged 24.2 ppg. He wasn’t as dominant in the NBA as he was in college, but that would have been impossible. The Pistol played in Utah and Atlanta in the pros and is maybe the best athlete to come out of Aliquippa, which is almost a higher honor than the Hall of Fame. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

5. Maurice Stokes The Rankin native and Westinghouse product had the highest player-efficiency rating out of anyone on this list. He played only three years in the pros, though, before a terrible on-court head injury left him paralyzed and ended his career. Stokes threw down more than 16 points a game and averaged more than five assists a game in his brief but spectacular career. Stokes died in 1970 at age 36, 12 years after the accident. His teammate Jack Twyman cared for him from the time of his accident until his death.

4. Maurice Lucas Lucas, who grew up in the Hill, had his number retired by the Portland Trail Blazers and was a five-time All Star. Lucas shot 47 percent from the field and played in more than 1,000 NBA games.

3. Billy Knight The Braddock native is one of the all-time greatest Pitt Panthers and one of the all-

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Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is seeking participants for a three-part research project. To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health, and speak fluent English • Be willing to fill out questionnaires, and to not smoke before two sessions.

Earn up to $150 for completing this study.

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THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time November 14, 2017 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

Interscholastic Athletic Supplies Refuse Container Service General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

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WE HAVE ACHIEVED PEAK PUZZLE {BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. Time in the tub 5. Feel funky 8. Some online admins 14. Double entendre 16. Like some grins 17. Attack verbally 18. Blast onto, as the scene 19. “It takes all ___” 20. Threw a curve 22. Corner key 23. Afterthoughts 24. Equal, to Etienne 26. Brit. title of respect 27. Some grunts 28. Guiding belief 30. Hits gently, as a window 34. Apse spot 37. Hip-hopper’s headgear 38. “Yo, dude,” formally 39. Do another soundtrack 40. Powdercovered footwear 42. Meals where four questions are asked 43. Tigger’s creator 44. Female kid 45. Crematorium holder 46. Get on the list 48. Band whose second letter is usually written backward 52. A-Rod’s babe 53. ___ Duke (Hunter S. Thompson’s alter ego)

54. Saginaw Bay lake 55. “Time to act!” 58. Like some pans 60. ___ Green, Scotland 61. Five-star 62. Glide nonchalantly 63. When Arbor Day is observed: Abbr. 64. Takes in

DOWN 1. Former Alaskan capital 2. “There’s ___ every crowd” 3. Chess champion Viswanathan ___ 4. Middle East people 5. Singer Lee ___ Womack 6. They’re read at carousels 7. “Toora ___...” (Irish lullaby syllables) 8. City grid lines 9. “___ be surprised” 10. “We’re drowning” 11. Rebuttal’s position 12. Jam band from Vermont 13. Match up, as Dropbox files 15. hein cooler 21. Certain in one’s mind 24. “Das Schicksal ist ___ mieser Verrater” (“The Fault in our Stars” in German) 26. Sank, as a putt 27. “Dead Souls”

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novelist Nikolai 29. One picking a new 401(k) plan, likely 30. Bill passing achievements?: Abbr. 31. Just the best 32. Early spring blooms 33. Polio vaccine creator 34. They’ve got double the chances of getting a date on Saturday, briefly 35. Snarling dog 36. Planks work them 38. Court writer 41. With two outs to go 42. Sun 44. Computer programming iteration

MUSIC

45. Michelob brew 47. Half-pints 48. vroom.com stock 49. Scotch-___ (scouring pad) 50. Lawn ball game 51. Egyptian crosses 52. Irish dances 53. Gossipmonger Barrett 54. Evine rival 56. Big degree 59. “The Big Listen” network

PEAK 19. Puzzle 25. Puzzle 52. Puzzle 57. Puzzle {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.08-11.15

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Remember the time, all those years ago, when the angels appeared to you on the playground and showed you how and why to kiss the sky? I predict that a comparable visitation will arrive soon. And do you recall the dreamy sequence in adolescence when you first plumbed the sublime mysteries of sex? You’re as ripe as you were then, primed to unlock more of nature’s wild secrets. Maybe at no other time in many years, in fact, have you been in quite so favorable a position to explore paradise right here on earth.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As a courtesy to your mental health, I minimize your exposure to meaningless trivia. In fact, I generally try to keep you focused instead on enlightening explorations. But in this horoscope, in accordance with astrological omens, I’m giving you a temporary, short-term license to go slumming. What shenanigans is your ex up to lately, anyway? Would your old friend the bankrupt coke addict like to party with you? Just for laughs, should you revisit the dead-end fantasy that always makes you crazy? There is a good possibility that exposing yourself to bad influences like those I just named could have a tonic effect on you, Sagittarius. You might get so thoroughly disgusted by them that you’ll never again allow them to corrupt your devotion to the righteous groove, to the path with heart.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the coming months it will be crucial to carefully monitor the effects you’re having on the world. Your personal actions will rarely be merely personal;

they may have consequences for people you don’t know as well as those you’re close to. The ripples you send out in all directions won’t always look dramatic, but you shouldn’t let that delude you about the influence you’re having. If I had to give 2018 a title with you in mind, it might be “The Year of Maximum Social Impact.” And it all starts soon.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The punk ethic is rebellious. It transgresses conventional wisdom through “a cynical absurdity that’s redeemed by being hilarious.” So says author Brian Doherty. In the hippie approach, on the other hand, the prevailing belief is “love is all you need.” It seeks a “manic togetherness and all-encompassing acceptance that are all sweet and no sour — inspiring but also soft and gelatinous.” Ah, but what happens when punk and hippie merge? Doherty says that each moderates the extreme of the other, yielding a tough-minded lust for life that’s both skeptical and celebratory. I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because the punk-plus-hippie blend is a perfect attitude for you to cultivate in the coming weeks.

get your yoga on!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m falling in love with the way you have been falling in love with exciting possibilities that you once thought were impossible. Oh, baby. Please go further. Thrilling chills surge through me whenever you get that ravenous glint in your mind’s eye. I can almost hear you thinking, “Maybe those dreams aren’t so impossible, after all. Maybe I can heal myself and change myself enough to pursue them in earnest. Maybe I can learn success strategies that were previously beyond my power to imagine.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Adriana Martinez and Octavio Guillen got engaged to be married when they were both 15 years old. But they kept delaying a more complete unification for 67 years. At last, when they were 82, they celebrated their wedding and pledged their vows to each other. Are there comparable situations in your life, Aries? The coming months will be a favorable time to make deeper commitments. At least some of your reasons for harboring ambivalence will become irrelevant. You’ll grow in your ability to thrive on the creative challenges that come from intriguing collaborations and highly focused togetherness.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I had pimples when I was a teenager. They’re gone now, although I still have a few pockmarks on my face as souvenirs. In retrospect, I feel gratitude for them. They ensured that in my early years of dating and seeking romance, I would never be able to attract women solely on the basis of my physical appearance. I was compelled to cultivate a wide variety of masculine wiles. I swear that at least half of my motivation to get smarter and become a good listener came from my desire for love. Do you have comparable stories to tell, Taurus? Now is an excellent time to give thanks for what once may have seemed to be a liability or problem.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVcan be purchased online at

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The next two weeks will be one of the best times ever to ask provocative, probing questions. In fact, I invite you to be as curious and receptive as you’ve been since you were 4 years old. When you talk with people, express curiosity more often than you make assertions. Be focused on finding out what you’ve been missing, what you’ve been numb to. When you wake up each morning, use a felt-tip marker to draw a question mark on your forearm. To get you in the mood for this fun project, here are sample queries from poet Pablo Neruda’s Book of Questions: “Who ordered me to tear down the doors of my own pride? Did I finally find myself in the place where they lost me? Whom can I ask what I came to make happen in this world? Is it true our desires must be watered with dew? What did the rubies say standing before the juice of the pomegranates?”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Things to say when in love,” according to Zimbabwe poet Tapiwa Mugabe: “I will put the galaxy in your hair. Your kisses are a mouthful of firewater. I have never seen a more beautiful horizon than when you close your eyes. I have never seen a more beautiful dawn than when you open your eyes.” I hope these words inspire you to improvise further outpourings of adoration. You’re in a phase when expressing your sweet reverence and tender respect for the people you care about will boost you physical health, your emotional wealth and your spiritual resiience.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are you working on solving the right problem? Or are you being distracted by a lesser dilemma, perhaps consumed in dealing with an issue that’s mostly irrelevant to your longterm goals? I honestly don’t know the answers to those questions, but I am quite sure it’s important that you meditate on them. Everything good that can unfold for you in 2018 will require you to focus on what matters most — and not get sidetracked by peripheral issues or vague wishes. Now is an excellent time to set your unshakable intentions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Every one of us experiences loneliness. We all go through periods when we feel isolated and misunderstood and unappreciated. That’s the bad news, Virgo. The good news is that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to make loneliness less of a problem. I urge you to brainstorm and meditate about how to do that. Here are some crazy ideas to get you started. (1) Nurture ongoing connections with the spirits of beloved people who have died. (2) Imagine having conversations with your guardian angel or spirit guide. (3) Make a deal with a “partner in loneliness”: a person you pray or sing with whenever either of you feels bereft. (4) Write messages to your Future Self or Past Self. (4) Communicate with animals.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The drive for absolute perfection could undermine your ability to create what’s very good and just right. Please don’t make that mistake in the coming weeks. Likewise, refrain from demanding utter purity, pristine precision or immaculate virtue. To learn the lessons you need to know and launch the trends you can capitalize on in 2018, all that’s necessary is to give your best. You don’t have to hit the bull’s eye with every arrow you shoot — or even any arrow you shoot. Simply hitting the target will be fine in the early going. If you could change your astrological sign, what would you change it to and why? Write: FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


’ LET S

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 40-year-old bi man. I’ve been with my 33-year-old bi wife for three years and married for one. When we first met, she made it clear that she was in a long-term (more than three years) “Daddy” relationship with an older man. I figured out six months later that her “Daddy” was her boss and business partner. He is married, and his wife does not know. I struggled with their relationship, since I identify as open but not poly. Eight months later, she ended things with him because it was “logically right” for us (her words). But she cheated with him four times over the course of two years. In all other aspects, our relationship is the greatest one I’ve ever had. I do not doubt her love for me. My wife has met her biological father only a couple of times and her stepfather died when she was 16 — the same year she went to work for her “Daddy.” Their non-work relationship started 10 years later, when she was 26. It’s a complex relationship, and he is not going anywhere, as they now own a business together. While I don’t think cheating has to be a relationship-ender, dishonesty always has been for me. The final complication: I have a cuckold fetish. I believe it might be possible to meet everyone’s needs, so long as everyone is honest. I will admit that, in the heat of passion, my wife and I have talked about her having “two daddies.” Do I consider allowing this, so long as everyone is honest? Is mixing business and personal matters going to blow up in our faces? Do I ignore the part of my brain that wants this guy’s wife to know?

practice might actually work in practice. And I’m thinking, yeah, it probably could.

GET S CIAL

I’m a 31-year-old gay man who looks 45. Most men interested in me are surprisingly upfront about expressing their desire to include a father-son element. Even men older than me call me “daddy” unprompted. I try not to be judgmental, but this repulses me. People who are into other forms of out-of-the-mainstream sex approach their kinks respectfully and establish mutual interest and obtain consent in advance. Why aren’t I given the same consideration when it comes to incest roleplay? And where does this come from? Were all these men molested by their fathers? DESPERATELY AVOIDING DISCUSSING DISGUSTING INCEST

Whoa, DADDI. Just as gay men who call themselves or their partners “boy” don’t mean “minor” and aren’t fantasizing about child rape, gay men who call themselves or their partners “daddy” don’t mean “biological father” and aren’t fantasizing about father-son incest. Daddy is an honorific that eroticizes a perceived age and/or experience gap; it’s about authority and sexual dominance, not paternity and incestuous deviance. If being called “daddy” turns you off, you should say so, and your partners should immediately knock that “daddy” shit off. But you shouldn’t assume every gay guy who calls you “daddy” is into incest and/ or was molested by his bio dad, because 99.999 percent of the time that’s just not going to be true. Think about it this way, DADDI: When a straight woman calls her man “baby,” no one thinks, “OMG! She’s into raping babies!” When a straight guy says he picked up a “hot girl,” no one thinks he’s talking about a sexy fourth-grader. When Vice President Mike Pence calls his wife “mommy,” no one thinks … well, Pence might be a bad example. (That man is clearly a freak.) But my point still stands: Pet names — used casually or during sex — aren’t to be taken literally.

WHILE I DON’T THINK CHEATING HAS TO BE A RELATIONSHIP-ENDER, DISHONESTY ALWAYS HAS BEEN FOR ME.

DISTRESSED ABOUT DECEITFUL DYNAMICS INVOLVING ENTANGLED SPOUSE

You don’t need my permission to consider this arrangement — allowing the wife to have two daddies — because you’re clearly already considering it. (You’ve moved on to the bargaining and/or writing-letters-to-sex-advice-columnists stage of consideration, the final stage before acceptance.) What you want, DADDIES, is my permission to do this, not just to think about it. Permission granted. Could it all come to shit? Anything and everything could come to shit. But your wife has been fucking this guy the entire time you’ve been together, and you nevertheless regard this relationship as the greatest one you’ve ever had. It stands to reason that if things were great when she was honest with you about fucking her boss (at the start) and remained great despite being dishonest with you about fucking her boss (the last two years), you three are in a good position to make this work now that everything is out in the open. As for your other concerns: Most of the poly people I know started out as either monogamous or “open but not poly” (people evolve); we find out about secret workplace romances only when they blow up (skewed samples make for skewed perceptions); and you need more info about the other man’s wife before you issue an ultimatum or pick up the phone yourself (their marriage could be loving but companionate, he could be staying in a loveless marriage for good reasons, they could have agreed to a DADT arrangement regarding affairs). But again, DADDIES, you’re asking if something that seems to be working in

I have a sugar baby who is a mature post-op trans woman. She is very attractive but also very high maintenance. (She has OCD.) I pay her $300 per anal-sex event; I help with bills, food, etc.; and I spend every weekend with her. I probably spend $15,000 a year on her. I’m happy most of the time (the sex is great), but does this arrangement sound fair? DADDY ASKING DAN

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Divide the money you’re spending annually ($15,000) by the number of weeks in the year (52), DAD, and your anal-sex-event-packed weekends are only costing you $288.46 a pop. Seeing as most sex workers charge 10 to 20 times as much for a full weekend, I’d say you aren’t spending too much. (If this arrangement is unfair to anyone, DAD, it’s unfair to your sugar baby.) Now, if you’re only pulling in $30K a year, spending half your pre-tax wages on a sugar baby is unsustainable. But if that $15K represents a small percentage of your annual income, DAD, you should give your sugar baby a raise.

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On the Lovecast, sex and weed with David Schmader!: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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{IMAGE COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY}

BRAIN TRUST {BY ALEX GORDON}

LET’S THINK about hammers.

I’m picturing my current hammer, which I bought on the Fourth of July a couple years ago and is plastered in American flags. I’m thinking about the weight of it in my hand and trying to remember the last time I hammered stuff. I’m thinking about other hammers I’ve owned, and generic hammers I’ve never seen. And subconsciously, in the midst of all this, an “activation pattern” is firing through my brain. Thinking about this concept is producing a pattern in my brain that can be identified using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (or fMRI, which measures brain activity by tracking blood flow and neuronal patterns). And if two people were being monitored by an fMRI machine while both thinking about hammers, their brains would produce similar activation patterns. This field of study is somewhat eerily named “thought identification,” which was developed in the 2000s by Tom Mitchell and Marcel Just, both of Carnegie Mellon University. Not only did they discover that concepts produce similar identifiable patterns across different people, but that deeper, more ephemeral, concepts than hammers could be identified as well.

suicidal tendencies, the researchers could discern, with 94 percent accuracy, between the individuals who’d attempted suicide versus those who’d only thought about it. “We expected that the death-related concepts would be altered [in the subjects with suicidal tendencies],” says Just. “But what was also altered were some of the positive aspects of life, like the concept of ‘carefree.’ I should have known — and maybe my collaborators did know — that the concept of carefree would be different in a person thinking about suicide. It would be maybe the last thing on their mind, almost alien. But ‘carefree’ worked to distinguish people who are suicidal from the healthy controls. I think that reflects my lack of experience in the field of suicide research.” Brent is the suicide researcher of the group. Now the endowed chair in suicide studies and a professor of psychiatry at Pitt, Brent was the one to first question whether “thought identification” could be used to recognize suicidal thoughts, after seeing Just give a speech on his research a few years ago. “[Brent] said, ‘Do you think that this approach could possibly detect altered thoughts in young people who are thinking about suicide?’” Just recalls. “And I said, ‘Well, we can find out.’”

“I WANT TO UNDERSTAND HUMAN THOUGHT, WHAT THE PIECES ARE, HOW YOU COMBINE THEM.” “[Thought identification] extends not just to hammers, it extends to emotions,” says Just, professor of psychology in CMU’s Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. “When you feel anger and I feel anger, similar activation patterns [occur] in our brains.” That concept is at the forefront of Just’s most recent research paper, “Machine learning of neural representations of suicide and emotion concepts identifies suicidal youth,” published last month in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh’s David Brent in the journal Nature Human Behavior. The title’s a little wordy, but essentially they tested whether fMRI monitoring could identify the neural signature of suicidal ideation the same way it could for hammers. Here’s how it worked: The research team assembled 34 test subjects, half of whom had suicidal tendencies and half of whom were described as “neurotypical.” They compiled a list of keywords which the subjects were asked to think about while under fMRI monitoring. The list was then narrowed to the six terms that produced the starkest contrast between the neurotypical subjects and those with suicidal tendencies (death, cruelty, trouble, carefree, good and praise). Based on the brain activity associated with the six concepts, the researchers were able to identify the suicidal ideators with 91 percent accuracy. Furthermore, when focusing solely on the 17 subjects with

While the results of the research are deservedly grabbing headlines in outlets from Wired to NPR, Just acknowledges that these findings are really just the beginning of a long-term process. Thirty-four subjects is a small sample size, and much more research needs to be done. With a study like this, the temptation for sensationalism is tough to stifle. We’re dealing with a form of mind-reading, after all. But Just underlines that this practice would be “complementary to the conventional behaviorally psychiatric diagnostic methods.” He is, at heart, a psychologist first, and a cognitive-neuroscience researcher second. The arc of his career has been spent addressing very human, real-life emotional states with science and technology, identifying aspects of the human mind that previously seemed too ephemeral or enigmatic to study. “I want to understand human thought, what the pieces are, how you combine them, what the limitations are, what the pathologies are,” says Just. The next steps in this research, Just says, are to expand the sample size and find a cheaper technology to do this work (seven-figure price tags aren’t uncommon for fMRIs). And finally and most significantly, if something as abstract and deep as suicidal ideation can be identified using brain scans, what else might we be able to see inside the brain, if we knew how to look? AL E X G ORD ON @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.08/11.15.2017


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November 8, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 45