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The Down and Dirty Dance Party

10.20.2017

8pm–2am

Spirit Hall

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EVENTS 10.6– 8pm SOUND SERIES: AN EVENING WITH JOAN SHELLEY The Warhol theater Co-presented with Calliope: The Pittsburgh Folk Music Society Tickets $15/$12 members & students

SEE CONTRASTING CULTURES BLENDED ON A SINGLE PALETTE. 10.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ARTO LINDSAY & BEAUTY PILL The Warhol theater Tickets $20/$15 members and students

SEE CONTRASTING CULTURES BLENDED ON A SINGLE PALETTE. 10.21 – 2pm CROSSING THE RED LINE: EXHIBITING IRANIAN ART IN THE US City of Asylum @ Alphabet City Co-presented with City of Asylum, Pittsburgh An afternoon with Dr. Shiva Balaghi, an independent scholar and curator based in Los Angeles. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Farhad Moshiri: Go West. FREE; Registration suggested

10.26 – 4:30pm 2017 TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Our annual open house event just for teachers. Free parking available in The Warhol lot. Tickets: $10

10.28 – 2pm MEMBER TOUR: FARHAD MOSHIRI: GO WEST Free for members; Registration suggested.

Farhad Moshiri, Self Portrait on Flying Carpet, 2009, Courtesy Galerie Perrotin, photo by Guillaume Ziccarelli

OCTOBER 13, 2017 - JANUARY 14, 2018 ONLY AT THE WARHOL Farhad Moshiri: Go West is generously supported by The Fine Foundation, Piaget, Galerie Perrotin, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, The Third Line, Dubai, The Soudavar Memorial Foundation, The Farjam Foundation, The Khazaei Foundation, Maryam and Edward Eisler, Navid Mirtorabi, Ziba Franks, Elie Khouri, Fatima and Essi Maleki, Nazee Moinian, Mahshid and Jamshid Ehsani, and Narmina and Javad Marandi.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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Next time you’re painting the town, take the bus or T. Next time you’re headed to PPG Paints Arena, consider transit. Steel Plaza T Station is a short walk and 61 and 71 routes have stops nearby. Hop on board, we’ll get you there.

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HAS YOUR CAREER STALLED? INTERESTED IN THE MEDICAL FIELD? 10.04/10.11.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 40

Self-Paced Online Training Course Certificate of Training in as little as 60 days! Receive your Cer [EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns HALEY FREDERICK, HANNAH LYNN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, AMANDA REED

www.healthcarescribes.com Advance your Career Today, train to become a Medical Scribe! CENTER FOR IRANIAN MUSIC PRESENTS

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[NEWS]

Last year, Planned Parenthood of Western Pa. provided 2,957 breast exams. PAGE 06

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“I was able to move on with my life, and I’m eternally grateful.” PAGE 24

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Independent Retirement Living Bethel Park, PA | bethel-park.net

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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Murray Avenue Apothecary will Donate 10% of Proceeds from CBD Sales in October to the

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“FOR MANY OF OUR PATIENTS, PLANNED PARENTHOOD IS THE GATEWAY INTO THE HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

The Lynn Cullen Show is back in full swing at www.pghcitypaper.com. She’s got a permanent location, phones that work, and she’s ready to talk to you live at 10 a.m. Mon-Fri. at 412-200-5686.

It was a busy weekend on the Pittsburgh music scene. Highlights included the Steel City’s own Wiz Khalifa headlining the Thrival Festival and alt-metal icon Marilyn Manson, at Stage AE. Check out our photos at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CP recently joined ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project, aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

Planned Parenthood employees and interns stand up for women’s health.

STANDING UP FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

From cancer screenings to reproductive health, Planned Parenthood provides vital services to women, despite constant threats to defund it Our featured photo from last week is by @maryw1909. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

Want to get the freshest content sent right to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletters at pghcitypaper.com/newsletters.

{BY HALEY FREDERICK}

G

INA DEANGELO was a college stu- says. Without insurance, she didn’t know

dent in her early twenties when she noticed a lump on her breast. She instantly had two thoughts. The first was about her grandmother who died of cancer just a few years prior; the second was her lack of health insurance. “I was completely terrified,” DeAngelo

where to turn to get a diagnosis, let alone what she might do if it turned out that she did have breast cancer. “I sat on it for a couple of months, alternating between feeling really stressed out and just pushing it out of my mind.” When she finally faced it, she came

up with one option: Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania. On a Saturday, during walk-in hours, DeAngelo headed to the Planned Parenthood office Downtown, only to encounter a crowd of loud, angry protesters. “They screamed at me on my way in, I was so shaken up,” she says. “It made me CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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Come watch the PROS as they play a series of heads up matches where they each put up $50,000. The champion will be named “King of the Hill” and walk away with $200,000!

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GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be 21 years or older to be on Rivers Casino property. Management reserves all rights.

. Friday, Oct

13

Join Wigle Whiskey and the ghouls from ScareHouse at a chilling Friday the 13th event! Sip spirits, learn the science of fright from the pros, and take your Halloween costume for a test drive.

6–10 pm Boogie to live music, chill at the bar, and celebrate the spooky season with no kids! Cost: $12 register in advance at CarnegieScienceCenter.org.

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STANDING UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

A BRIEF HISTORY OF PLANNED PARENTHOOD AND WOMEN’S REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ISSUES 1916: Nurse and activist Margaret Sanger opens a birth control clinic in Brooklyn, N.Y., with her sister, Ethel Byrne, and activist Fania Mindell. The line of women looking for help and advice stretches down the block. Nine days later, the clinic is raided by police, and the women are arrested for crimes “related to sharing birth-control advice.” Sanger spends 30 days in jail and shares birth-control information with fellow inmates. 1921: Sanger founds the American Birth Control League. It would become officially named Planned Parenthood in 1942. 1930: Sanger opens a clinic in Harlem because black women were denied health and social services. 1939: Dr. Thelma Patton Law becomes one of the first black OB-GYNs in Texas. She would spend 25 years as the head of the Planned Parenthood Houston health center. 1951: Planned Parenthood awards a grant to Gregory CONTINUES ON PG. 10

so mad, because it took me a really long time to get the courage up, figure out where I could go and actually go there.” DeAngelo noticed the strange juxtaposition that a lot of Planned Parenthood clients experience. Inside, “there was a group of extremely helpful people that were the only help that I had; outside, there was this big group trying to make sure that I wasn’t able to have access to that care.” Luckily, DeAngelo did get free access to health care, thanks to Planned Parenthood. After performing a clinical exam, Planned Parenthood decided that she did need further testing and provided her with a prescription for a mammogram and a voucher that

would cover the cost. After the mammogram, a needle biopsy was taken, and the eventual results were negative. DeAngelo gives Planned Parenthood the credit for her peace of mind. Despite the countless times that Planned Parenthood has helped its clients, it has — especially in recent years — faced constant threats of having its federal funding pulled by Congress. Most of that fight is fueled by rhetoric that claims federal dollars are paying for abortions. However, that is simply not true. First, there’s no federal budget line item that “funds” Planned Parenthood. The organization receives its money largely through Medicaid reimbursements after a patient receives

LAST YEAR, PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF WESTERN PA. PROVIDED 2,957 BREAST EXAMS.

health-care services (about $554 million last year). Secondly, there is already a federal law known as the Hyde Amendment (passed in 1976). That law specifically prohibits federal dollars from being spent on abortion services, except in the case of rape or incest or if the mother’s life is in danger. Many women, however, see Planned Parenthood as a lifeline to medical treatment they, perhaps, wouldn’t get otherwise. If Planned Parenthood funding is shut down, the group estimates, about 1.5 million patients would be left without access to women’s health services. Planned Parenthood’s job is to provide health care, and almost all of its clients are women. According to its 20152016 annual report, Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania had 17,325 patient visits that year, 16,274 of them by women. Thirty-six percent of its patients CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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your

HEALTH PLAN matters

Are you eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid? If so, you can get more health care coverage at no additional cost. With UPMC for Life Dual (HMO SNP) you’ll receive medical and prescription drug coverage combined into one easy-to-use plan, with a premium of $0 per month.* Plus, you’ll receive additional coverage for benefits like dental, vision, hearing, and transportation.

Call 1-844-241-9310** today and learn how to get more coverage at no additional cost. TTY users should call 1-866-407-8762.** UPMCHealthPlan.com/medicare

*Your Medicare Part B premium is paid on your behalf by the state’s Medical Assistance program. **Our hours of operation change twice a year. You can call us October 1 through February 14, seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. From February 15 through September 30, you can call us Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Premium and copays may vary based on the level of Extra Help you receive. Please contact the plan for further details. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, premium, and copays may change on January 1 of each year. This plan is available to anyone who has both Medical Assistance from the state and Medicare. UPMC for Life Dual is an HMO SNP plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Pennsylvania Medical Assistance (Medicaid) program. Enrollment in UPMC for Life Dual depends on contract renewal. UPMC for Life Dual is a product of and operated by UPMC for You Inc. UPMC Health Plan1 complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. 1 UPMC Health Plan is the marketing name used to refer to the following companies, which are licensed to issue individual and group health insurance products or which provide third party administration services for group health plans: UPMC Health Network Inc., UPMC Health Options Inc., UPMC Health Coverage Inc., UPMC Health Plan Inc., UPMC Health Benefits Inc., UPMC for You Inc., and/or UPMC Benefit Management Services Inc. ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-866-405-8762 (TTY: 1-866-407-8762). ͩNj쨰ƧưǷ̹ů୑ɄġNJ뼷ǷĻŗы͘ȦīДҶ྽Վ˖Ө뼶ɐٍǖ 1-866-405-8762 TTY : 1-866-407-8762) 뼶 H4279_17_1570 Accepted NEWS

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STANDING UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08 A BRIEF HISTORY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Pincus, John Rock and M.C. Chang to begin developing a birth-control pill. 1965: Birth control is legalized for married couples after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Estelle Griswold, executive director of Planned Parenthood Connecticut, who opened a birth-control clinic in 1961. It would become legalized for all people in 1972. 1968: The Jane Collective, an activist group in Chicago, starts an underground network of volunteers who are trained to perform safe abortions. 1973: Roe v. Wade legalizes abortion across the country. 1976: The Hyde Amendment prohibits any federal funding from being used on abortions. 1979: Planned Parenthood launches a national sexeducation program. 1985: Planned Parenthood facilities and health centers nationwide become targets of bombings, arson and other acts of violence. 2004: Planned Parenthood and its partners stage a “March for Women’s Lives” at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. *Source: www.100years. plannedparenthood.org

accessed their services through Medicaid, and 18 percent paid according to a sliding-fee scale, which charges patients relative to their income. “For many of our patients, Planned Parenthood is the gateway into the health-care system, and we serve some of the most vulnerable populations,” says Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania nurse and midwife Rachel Gallagher. There are many barriers that keep people from accessing the health-care system in the United States. Cost and lack of insurance are the biggest. “People who are uninsured have more difficulty accessing the health-care system, and sometimes even those who are insured, depending on their type of coverage, can [have] a problem,” says Kim Evert, CEO and president of Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania. “We see a lot of plans that have very high deductibles, co-pays, co-insurance, and so it can still be very costly for someone to have a visit at a health-care provider.” While women’s reproductive health is a major component of Planned Parenthood’s services, it also plays a large part

in early detection of breast cancer in lowincome and underserved populations. Last year, Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania provided 2,957 breast exams. When it comes to breast cancer, early detection — and access to healthcare services — is critical. “We look at the five-year mortality rate for breast cancer, and we see that the survival rate is actually rather high as long as people seek care early. The earlier breast cancer is detected and treatment is initiated, their survival rate is higher,” says Gallagher. The Pennsylvania Department of Health estimates that 78,284 new cases of all types of cancer will be diagnosed in Pennsylvania in 2017, 7,934 of those in Allegheny County. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Pennsylvania. The Department of Health projects that by the end of this year, 11,315 women across the state will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 1,825 of them will die

from the disease. Between 2004 and 2014, there was a 24.8 percent decrease in the mortality rate for women in Pennsylvania with breast cancer, largely because of increased emphasis on early detection. In order to improve early detection of health problems like breast cancer, Planned Parenthood has implemented several services, including the slidingfee scale, walk-in hours, and enrolling patients in programs that provide them with vouchers for screenings such as mammograms. One of those programs is called HealthyWoman. HealthyWoman, which is funded by the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, provides free breastand cervical-cancer screenings to women who meet certain requirements. “The whole point of having this program … was to address this whole barrier of early detection in women who were completely uninsured,” says Bonnie

“THE EARLIER BREAST CANCER IS DETECTED AND TREATMENT IS INITIATED, THEIR SURVIVAL RATE IS HIGHER.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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Eat, Drink & be Scary , e r a u q S Market tsburgh it P n w o t n Dow

Saturday, October 28 5:00-10:00pm

Night Market

Live Music Crawl Face Painting

Costume Prizes

Drink Specials

Stay tuned, DowntownPittsburgh.com,

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Cavacini Garden Center

Vast selection of gardening supplies, decorations, and plants, ensure that you’ll find the perfect plant or accent for your yard or garden.

End of Season Sale Now on Shrubs and Trees! Great prices on

PUMPKINS & MUMS Check out our HUGE variety of colors and sizes! Great FALL items in stock! Corn stalks, straw and much more! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

100 51 51st st STREET • LAWRENCEVILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

Keep your car. Trade in your loan. Refinancing with us could save you hundreds*. Brandon Greene, Agent 146 Forest Hills Plaza Pittsburgh Pa 15221 Phone: 412-824-4800

Before high car payments get you down, give us an opportunity to help bring them down – with great rates and no closing costs or hidden fees. GET TO A BETTER STATE®. CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Email: Brandon.Greene.WGI6@statefarm.com

*Hypothetical savings example over life of loan based on reduced interest rate. Actual savings amount will vary depending on your individual circumstances. 1303063 10/13 State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington IL

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omer t s u c - n ew al* -

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Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

10.04/10.11.2017

STANDING UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

DeLozier, the cancer-screening regional program manager of Adagio Health, a nonprofit specializing in gynecological health for women. “If you have to choose between putting food on the table and getting your annual gynecological exam, you’re going to put food on the table.” Women in Pennsylvania over age 21 can have the costs of clinical breast exams, mammograms, pelvic exams and any necessary follow-up diagnostic tests covered under the HealthyWoman program, if they are uninsured or underinsured and have an income of 250 percent or less of the federal poverty level. Many women who are not eligible for Medicaid are eligible for HealthyWoman. “There are 30 sites in Allegheny County alone, and over 55 sites within the 23 counties of Western Pennsylvania, where people can enroll in the program,” DeLozier says. “The Planned Parenthood offices in Pittsburgh, Bridgeville, Moon and Greensburg are all HealthyWoman intake sites.” Even though Planned Parenthood provides access to many different services, the nonprofit organization continues to receive significant attention for

providing abortion services. However, according to the organization’s annual report, abortion services account for only 3 percent of its work. That aspect of Planned Parenthood’s care has made it a target for defunding by conservative members of Congress. A loss of Planned Parenthood would force a lot of women to find another option for their health care. And unfortunately, other options just aren’t available. “Having [women’s health] become a political issue, instead of a health issue, has a huge human cost: It’s women, it’s children, it’s families,” says DeAngelo, who after her experience as a patient at Planned Parenthood was inspired to pursue a career in public health and become a volunteer for the organization. “Right now, approximately 30 to 35 percent of the patients we see receive [Medicaid] for their health-care coverage,” Evert explains, citing her concerns should federal funding be cut. “The big impact,” Evert says, “is on people with lower incomes, who need access to affordable services, [and] who will no longer have that access and whose health and care will suffer because of it.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN


Join Planned Parenthood of Western PA and Pittsburgh City Paper to celebrate what Planned Parenthood means to you!

Crafts! Food Truck! Beer!

Sex

Jeopardy All-Starnds: Ba Female te

Marilet like ld and Chi ss Empre

Thursday, October 12

Glitter Box Theater 460 Melwood Ave.,

Tickets at the door, $10 suggested donation $5 with student ID NEWS

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ACT PINK Turn your breast-cancer awareness into action against at these Pittsburgharea events {BY RYAN DETO} BY THIS POINT, just about every American

recognizes October as a month where people wear pink to bring awareness to efforts to find the cure for breast cancer. But Pittsburgh City Paper wants to encourage our readers to do more than just put on a pink pin and go about their day. Instead, take action. To help you do that, we’ve compiled a list of some events that readers can participate in to help raise money for cancer research, cancer screenings and other services for breast-cancer patients and survivors.

PINK PIANOS PARTY 5 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6

125 Seventh St., Downtown Party-goers can drink pink beer till last call, all in the name of supporting families of breast-cancer patients. Howl at the Moon, a piano bar, will be hosting this event to support Open Arms Breast Cancer Outreach Fund, a charity of a real-estate developer that provides free lodging for medical patients. Donning a pink outfit gets you free admission. www.howlatthemoon.com

{CP PHOTO BY STEPHEN CARUSO}

The fountain at Gateway Center in Downtown Pittsburgh is dyed pink this month for breast cancer awareness.

WINE TASTING Noon, Sun., Oct. 15

974 Freeport Road, Pittsburgh

WESTMORELAND WALKS 11 a.m. Sat., Oct. 7

219 Twin Lakes Road, Hempfield Last year more than 400 participated in the walk at Twin Lakes Park outside of Greensburg, and this year organizers are hoping for more. The money raised goes to the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition, a scholarship fund for Westmoreland County students that have been affected by breast cancer, and a fund to provide money for co-pays and other out-ofpocket expenses for breast-cancer patients. The walk starts at 11 a.m. The deadline for online registration has passed, but participants can register on walk day starting at 9 a.m. for $30. www.westmorelandwalks.org

The Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition is hosting a wine tasting with Terroir Wine Group at the Fine Wine and Good Spirits store, at Waterworks, to raise funds that go to care packages for cancer patients, research and legislative advocacy. Donations will be made by Terroir based on October sales of Lobetia Organic Wines at all state wine stores. www.pabreastcancer.org

SWEAT PINK CARDIO PARTY 5:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 16

551 Fairground Hill Road, Butler Local health club Focused Fitness will be holding a cardio party at Butler Intermediate High School where participants can build up a sweat in the

name of fighting breast cancer. Tickets are $20 and include a bag of pink goodies, a two-hour workout and light refreshments. All proceeds go to Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition. www.facebook.com (search “focused fitness”)

play in the tournament cost $120, and $100 to watch. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served. pittsburgh.corenetglobal.org

PINK PONG PING-PONG TOURNAMENT

Various locations

6: 30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 17

120 Whitfield St., East Liberty Battle breast cancer with a wicked spin serve or spike. CoreNet Global, an association of corporate real-estate professionals, is hosting a ping-pong tournament at the Ace Hotel to raise money for breast-cancer research through the Pittsburgh-based Glimmer of Hope foundation. Players of all skill levels are encouraged to participate, and tutorials will be offered to those unfamiliar with the sport. Tickets to

REAL MEN WEAR PINK EVENTS Oct. 5-23

The American Cancer Association, in collaboration with Real Men Wear Pink, will be hosting several high-end fundraisers for ACA’s programs, which include free rides and lodging for cancer patients and other services. Pittsburgh events include a concert with silent auction, cocktail hours, a fashion show and a Greek festival. In terms of fundraising, Real Men Wear Pink of Pittsburgh is one of the most successful RMWP organizations in the country. www.facebook.com (search “Real Men Wear Pink of Greater Pittsburgh”) RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OCT 17-22 • BENEDUM CENTER BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE • 412-456-4800 GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

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PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER YOUTH COED FLAG FOOTBALL LEAGUE

REGISTER

NOW!

BACKYARD FLAG FOOTBALL 2017 FALL SEASON START DATE: NOVEMBER 19, 2017 VENUE: ROSS ELEMENTARY TURF FIELD AGES: 4-17 Even a small donation can make a big difference

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WWW.BACKYARDFLAGFOOTBALL.ORG

CALL 412.318.4557 FOR DETAILS

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ment-run Puerto Rico Tourism Company, tourism brought in $4 billion dollars in 2016. With the number of experienced and bilingual workers that will be unemployed after the hurricane, Borges thinks the mainland restaurant and hospitality industries can step in and help. At Spoon, Borges intends to employ her friends who lost their boat, which they used to run tours, and encourages other restaurant owners to do the same. In light of the ongoing shortage of labor in the restaurant industry, hiring could be mutually beneficial. “They’re American citizens; [they] have a passport. You don’t have to deal with hidden visas. The majority will be bilingual,” she says. Borges says she’s already received a lot of support. “It’s overwhelming the amount of people that have reached out in Pittsburgh. Every chef, every friend, every bartender, they’re like, ‘How can we help?’” Even with help, the damage wrought by the hurricane won’t fade quickly. “There’s nothing left. My concern is, what happens months from now? What happens a year from now to rebuild the island?” says Borges. She and other chefs will host a series of fundraising dinners over the next month, and Borges encourages donations to organizations that prioritize transparency. She is personally donating to a friend’s organization, ConPRmetidos (www.conprmetidos.org), and believes that at the moment, cash donations will serve the population more than material goods because of the difficulty with transport. Right now, though, Borges’ concerns are immediate. “I just want to hug my mom,” she says. She’ll get her wish. At press time, Borges was in Florida with family and confirmed to CP via text that her mother was able to board a plane and was on her way to reunite with the chef. Hopefully this will be the story of thousands of others as aid continues to reach the island.

PR PROBLEMS Pittsburgh chef making plans to help the people in her home country of Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria {BY CELINE ROBERTS} IN THE ALMOST two weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico — wiping out power grids and massively damaging the island’s infrastructure — aid from the U.S. government has been slow to arrive; the Navy initially deployed only three ships to the island. Twitter acknowledgement of the devastation from President Donald Trump didn’t come until five days after the event and when it did, it seemed to partly blame Puerto Rico for the crisis by noting its “massive debt and broken infrastructure.” During these days, Jamilka Borges, executive chef at Spoon, has been moving through her work in a fog of worry and frustration. Borges is Puerto Rican. She came to Pittsburgh in 2007 for culinary school, and most of her family still lives on the island. When City Paper spoke with her on Sept. 28, she’d still had very little contact with her family, speaking briefly with her mother, who lives in San Juan. “When we saw that [the hurricane] was approaching, my sister and I, our first reaction was that it was going to be fine. I think a lot of the population thought it was going to be fine,” Borges says. “We’re an island. We get hurricanes here and there but I don’t think they understood enough what a Category 4 meant. What it meant was catastrophic conditions.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMILKA BORGES}

Borges (right) with her mother

“At the beginning there was still some [phone] signal, and I would just get videos of roofs flying down. And then it was impossible to get in touch with anyone. Everything is flooded. The neighborhood I grew up in still has water up to your waist. The smell is unbearable.” The extent of the damage to roads and the shortage of truck drivers have made supplies very difficult to distribute. Food, water and gas deliveries have been struggling to make it to the places where it’s needed most. “When I finally talked to my mother yesterday for six minutes, she is reaching the end of her water. She’s drinking a half a bottle of water a day,” says Borges. As of press time, Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló had esti-

“THEY’RE AMERICAN CITIZENS; THEY HAVE A PASSPORT.”

mated that half of the island is still without drinking water. What many Americans don’t realize is that this is a domestic crisis, not a foreign one. According to a recent Morning Consult poll published in The New York Times, only 54 percent of Americans know that Puerto Ricans (who number 3.4 million as of 2016, according to U.S. Census figures) are American citizens. This reflects a long cultural and geographic divide between Puerto Rico and the continental U.S. Many, including Borges, think this is the reason that aid from the U.S. government has been so slow to reach the island. “It shouldn’t matter that they are American citizens, though. These are people,” says Borges. While manufacturing remains Puerto Rico’s top industry, tourism factors largely into the economy. According to the govern-

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ON TWO occasions this year, City Paper first

reported about two incidents involving Allegheny County Common Pleas Senior Judge Lester Nauhaus. We felt both cases were important, and that the public deserved to be aware of the judge’s conduct in these matters. Because of his senior status, meaning he’s technically retired, Nauhaus no longer has to stand up to the scrutiny of voters. He now serves at the pleasure of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. While the first case, unfortunately, received little public outcry, the second, in which Nauhaus wanted to fine a defendant $1 for each of the six times that the student inappropriately and aggressively fondled a classmate, received national attention. So what happened to Judge Nauhaus, you may be asking? Not much; in fact, he still takes the bench in Allegheny County every day. He was removed from hearing summary-appeal cases and transferred to Orphans’ Court. This court handles matters such as adoption, estates, trusts, guardianship and estate-tax matters. So yes, he still puts on a robe every day, takes the bench and deals with the public. Quite frankly, I don’t believe that’s an honor that he deserves. In fact, after our reporting this year, I was confident that he would be removed. He’s still there. Here’s a quick review of those two previous stories, as well as some new information in both cases that City Paper has uncovered. In the first, Nauhaus belittled a female victim who filed charges of harassment and trespass against a business associate. The victim testified in court that she was verbally harassed and “demoralized” by the way the defendant spoke to her. The defendant was convicted of both charges initially and was ordered to stay away from the victim. The defendant appealed his conviction before Nauhaus. Nauhaus told the victim that her charges were “silly,” adding, “If I found people guilty of harassment for inappropriate conversations, I would be here all day.” Since the original case, the victim has entered therapy to deal with the reality that the “secondary trauma of the verdict is actually worse, because I discovered that my society doesn’t protect me and doesn’t care about me and I’m not valued.” At the time, at least, Nauhaus had kept the trespass conviction intact. However, CP has since learned that that is no longer the case. According to the transcript from a Feb. 27 hearing obtained by CP, Nauhaus held a second appeal hearing with the defendant

Judge Lester Nauhaus

but without the assistant district attorney from the case present. In that hearing, Nauhaus dismissed the remaining trespass charge, without anyone from the district attorney’s office there to object. According to the transcript, Nauhaus calls the case and the charges of harassment and trespass before asking his clerk: “Old girlfriend?” The clerk answers: “No, This was the coffee place.” Nauhaus: “Wasn’t he here already? Clerk: “This is a new trial.” Nauhaus: “Oh. All right. This is the new trial?” Clerk: “Yes. The commonwealth cannot proceed.” Nauhaus: “The defendant is found not guilty.” Clerk: “He was found guilty of trespass at the last hearing.” Nauhaus: “He was guilty of … trespass, but not guilty of harassment.” Clerk: “Yes. But now he’s not guilty of anything.” Nauhaus: “He’s not guilty of anything.” Clerk: “Right.” Nauhaus: “Goodbye.” And like that, the charges that Nauhaus called silly 10 days earlier were gone. The victim in this case says she was never informed of a second hearing. Neither, apparently, was the district attorney’s office. CP asked Mike Manko, spokesperson for District Attorney Stephen Zappala, about the second hearing. Manko replied, “The district attorney’s office was not notified a second hearing had been scheduled in the case. Although an assistant district attorney was present in the courtroom handling other matters that day, the ADA was not involved in the second hearing in the case. This matter was subsequently brought to our attention, and we have been reviewing the circumstances.” The district attorney’s office was also investigating the second matter that we reported on May 10. In that case, a student was convicted of charges related to


assault of a female in the hallway of their high school. The defendant was fined $300. On appeal, the district attorney asked for 90 days’ probation. At that point, Nauhaus asked the 16-year-old victim: “How many times did he touch you?” The victim responded: “I’m going to say about six times maybe.” That led Nauhaus to say: “A $6 fine.” Assistant District Attorney Jeff Tisak fired back at Nauhaus, telling him it was “highly inappropriate to tell a young girl that inappropriately touching is worth a dollar a time.” Nauhaus ultimately gave the defendant community service and ordered him to come back to court in 90 days. The victim wrote on social media at the time: “Getting told I’m worth $6? It crushes me. He might as well [have] told me I was worthless.” According to the victim’s mother, that return hearing was held Sept. 27. Only this time, it was before another judge after Nauhaus’ removal from the summary-appeals bench. The defendant, who was shown leniency by Nauhaus, failed to appear and did not complete his community service. The original conviction was reinstated. In addition, the victim’s mother tells CP that she and her daughter filed a complaint with the Pennsylvania Judicial Conduct Board on Sept. 25. Those proceedings are confidential, however, so there is no update on the status of the case. These recent cases involving Nauhaus are just two more in a long line of questionable behavior regarding crime victims. In fact, when we first contacted the district attorney in March, we were told that in the late 1990s, “We dealt with the same type of conduct then as is being exhibited by this particular jurist now.” It’s now the late 2010s, and here we are still dealing with a judge who has shown a lack of respect and compassion for crime victims. He sees these victims at their most vulnerable times and instead of offering them justice, he unleashes a barrage of asinine comments that work to revictimize these people. Since the publication of our stories, we have received correspondence and calls from many folks who work in the courthouse. All say Nauhaus has acted this way and worse over the course of his time on the bench. But there are things you can do. Tell Allegheny County President Judge Jeffrey Manning (412-350-7387) how you feel. Just because Nauhaus is a senior judge doesn’t mean that Manning has to let him serve. To be fair, Nauhaus probably isn’t the only judge who should be removed from the bench (we’ve heard numerous complaints over the years). But voters never got the chance to say whether they wanted Lester Nauhaus to stick around during his “retirement.” Maybe it’s time that they do.

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News of the Weird

S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS I T E M S TO W E I RD N E W S T I P S @ AM UN I V E R S AL . C O M .

{COMPILED BY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUBLISHING}

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Kristi Lyn Goss, 44, former administrative assistant to a Garland County, Ark., judge, went all out when she racked up about $200,000 worth of debt on the county credit card between 2011 and May 2016, according to The Hot Springs (Ark.) Sentinel-Record. Among the many items Goss purchased on the county’s account were tickets to Arkansas Razorbacks games, sequined throw pillows and a tuxedo for her dog. Goss pleaded guilty on Sept. 11 to six felony fraud counts; her sentencing is scheduled for Nov. 22. Garland County Judge Rick Davis issued a statement at Goss’ arrest noting that he had “inherited” her from a former judge.

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As Hurricane Irma bore down on Florida in early September, the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office announced that registered sex offenders, who would not be able to shelter with other citizens, “need someplace to go just like any other citizen.” The Tampa Bay Times reported that sex offenders were directed to Wiregrass Ranch High School in Wesley Chapel. Pasco County Sheriff’s spokesman Kevin Doll noted that offenders found in other shelters where children were present were subject to arrest, but said the predator shelter would welcome offenders from other counties. In nearby Polk County, officials were not so generous, telling sex offenders, “If you are a predator, find somewhere else to go,” and announcing that they would be checking IDs at the door and arresting anyone with an outstanding warrant.

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Incumbent mayoral candidate Charles Pender erected his campaign signs in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada, on Aug. 30, but when he woke up on Aug. 31, he found that they had been vandalized — with hot dogs. CBC News reported that someone had cut round holes in the signs and inserted hot dogs to look as if Pender was smoking a cigar. Pender called it “minor mischief” but noted that the signs are expensive. He called the police, but he feels it’s unlikely the frank bandit will be caught. He hopes to turn the incident into a good laugh with a “bun-raiser” later in the election season.

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Lisa Faye Stout, 53, came up with an unusual scapegoat for the mess police officers found in her room on Sept. 10 at New Castle, Ind.’s Raintree Inn, according to the Muncie Star Press. Vampires had “destroyed everything,” Stout told the officers, who were responding to reports that she had shown up in the hotel bar wearing no pants or undergarments. The front-desk clerk also said Stout spit on her and threatened to kill her. As she was taken into custody, Stout spit some more and threatened to “slice” officers’ throats. Stout was charged in Henry County court with two counts of battery by bodily waste, intimidation and criminal mischief.

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Jerry Sargeant, 39, of Cheltenham in Gloucestershire, England, who claims on his website to be able to cure cancer via Skype, has been convicted in Westminster Magistrate’s Court of violating the U.K.’s 1939 Cancer Act, which prohibits advertising services that “offer

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to treat any person for cancer.” The Daily Mail reports that Sargeant, who calls himself “The Facilitator,” says he discovered his talent for “Star Magic” when he saw a woman’s soul fly out of her body during a car accident in Romania. He also claims to have flown to Alpha Centauri on a spaceship and returned to Earth just minutes later. Sargeant’s healing sessions cost £90 (about $120) for 15 minutes, but he told police that appointments can go up to an hour because “you can’t put a time on magic.” He will be sentenced on Nov. 8.

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Archaeologists in Cambridgeshire, England, have discovered the remains of a nearly 200-year-old colony of utopians espousing “free love and wife-swapping,” according to Metro News. The Manea Fen community, established in 1838 by Methodist minister William Hodson, who championed a community free from marriage, money or monogamy, once numbered 150 members, but lasted only 25 months before succumbing to “personality clashes and objections to the practice of free love.” Lead

researcher Dr. Marcus Brittain believes “they got the wrong people, they had no labor skills and put in no time and effort, they were drunk, they went into local brothels, and thought they could build a utopia without breaking a sweat.”

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Police officers in Surf City, N.C., stopped Zachary Kingsbury, 20, of Lynnwood, Wash., on Aug. 30 and asked him to step out of his car because they had spotted contraband inside. Kingsbury complied, but then took off running, heading toward the beach — and didn’t stop when he hit the ocean. According to the Port City Daily, Kingsbury continued swimming for almost an hour as police tracked him with a drone-mounted camera, which allowed them to also see the shark trailing him in the water. At that point, said Surf City Police Chief Ron Shanadan, the chase “became a rescue operation,” and multiple emergency crews were dispatched to pick up the fugitive. Kingsbury was taken into custody in North Topsail Beach and charged with resisting arrest and possession of marijuana and methamphetamine.

WAYNOVISION


LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

CHILLER CHILLER II WWW.CHILLERPGH.BANDCAMP.COM

CHILLER II is less than six minutes long, but every minute is packed with crushing riffs, blistering punk beats and gritty vocals. Traditional punk fuses with melodic hardcore to make a distinct, energetic sound. Like any good, true-blue punk release, CHILLER uses every single second of CHILLER II’s brief run time to make a declarative statement that leaves you wanting more. “Sold the Dream” turns from a twostepping crusher to a circle-pit inducing whirlwind in an instant, where “Endgame” drops the frantic beats per minute for a pounding melodic hardcore number. Wailing guitars and the uptempo punk beat of “Showmanship” close out the record, leaving listeners high before dropping them out into the bleak nothingness of silence. FOR FANS OF: EARLY CEREMONY, VANDALISM, SPIN KICKING

SPISH BUILDING A FAMILY SPISH.BANDCAMP.COM

Building a Family by SPISH (formerly Spacefish) is a dark, avant-indie rock record. It twists and turns, oozing the existential dread haunting the parts of your brain you can’t quite reach sober or while awake. From the splashy darkness of “We Love Jesus” to the sad story of “Bodie,” the album sets off on a dark voyage. It eases up with “Intermission With Rosie Rainbow,” a fun interlude about a tadpole becoming a frog. Its sound and lyrics comprise a jingle-esque PSA about the possibility of being something beyond what you already are. The song then sinks back into cynical shadows, as it ends with a soundbite of a butter advertisement from the 1950s, the uneasiness caused by consumerism sneaking its way into your mind. “Lift Off (Reprise)” is a dark, morbid ditty with catchy pop melodies, while “Veins” is an almost Tim-Burton-esque rock jaunt with a carnival feel. Building a Family is not an album about the pretty white-picket-fence, marriedwith-two-and-a-half-kids story. It is about the seedy underbelly of existence, where demons of self-doubt and morbidity thrive. FOR FANS OF: CYNICISM, FREAKY FUN HOUSES, EARLY ARCTIC MONKEYS

NEWS

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

John Dietrich (first on the right) and Deerhoof

COME DOWN HERE AND SAY THAT {BY ALEX GORDON}

S

INCE THE RELEASE of its debut, in 1997, Deerhoof hasn’t gone more than two years without putting out music. There’s something antsy about that schedule, which fits in nicely with the band’s overall vibe of controlled chaos, of being unpredictable but consistent. From its noise-rock roots of the late ’90s to the transcendent, experimental pop of recent albums like 2014’s La Isla Bonita and 2016’s The Magic, Deerhoof has always been surefooted, relentless and open to new things. So, it shouldn’t have surprised anyone when, earlier this year, the band jumped the gun and released its 14th LP, Mountain

Moves, two weeks ahead of schedule, and only 15 months after The Magic. As guitarist John Dietrich explained via email from the road, the quick turnaround

DEERHOOF, SAD13, LILY AND HORN HORSE 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 5. Mr. Smalls Theater, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. All ages. $15. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

and early release stem from the band’s selfimposed hectic schedule and the members’ propensity for grassroots political activism.

In December 2016, the record label Joyful Noise asked Deerhoof to be its 2017 Artist in Residence, an annual series in which one group or artist curates and repackages past works and creates new ones for limited release late in the year. For Deerhoof, the goal was a boxed set of LPs and special releases, a personal signed letter from the group and, finally, the release of Mountain Moves in September. From writing and recording to publication, the album took three months. Many of the songs were already partially written, but still, that’s a pretty remarkable turnaround. CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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COME DOWN HERE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

The album was set for a Sept. 8 release, but the band decided to put it out two weeks prior. Mountain Moves was posted on its Bandcamp on Aug. 28 with a pay-what-you-want price, with all proceeds earned until Sept. 7 going to the Emergent Fund. According to its website, the nonprofit Emergent Fund focuses on “grassroots organizations in communities of color who are facing injustice based on racial, ethnic, religious and other forms of discrimination” and works to “provide resources to defend against what’s coming, and to develop innovative strategies to transform our country.” “You could say we’re giving our Bandcamp proceeds to ‘charity,’ but we don’t really see The Emergent Fund as a charity,” the band posted on Facebook on Sept. 4.

“Isn’t charity another way of maintaining hierarchy, instead of undermining it? The Emergent Fund is a pooling of resources among equals for the purpose of mutual aid. Their mission and reputation impressed us enough to entrust them with deciding where need is greatest at any moment, in this time of ever-shifting threats.” While Mountain Moves has all the joyful erratic charisma of Deerhoof’s earlier albums, something feels different here. It might be the quick turnaround, but there are more concrete changes to point to. With more covers and guest spots than on previous records, and the involvement of the Emergent Fund, this feels like the most direct political statement of the band’s career. On “Come Down Here And Say That” (featuring Stereolab’s Laetitia Sadier), you’ll hear vocalist/bassist Satomi Matsuzaki’s

trademark idiomatic lyricism, but there’s something heavier at play. The title is a reference to a line Bob Dylan used against hecklers during his famous pivot-to-electric tour, though the band flipped it from “come up here” to “come down” as a nod to the power struggles in play at this current political moment. The involvement of politically outspoken artists like Sadier, too, highlights how this record sounds different. That collaboration was born out of a chance meeting when Dietrich’s other band, Powerdove, played a show with Sadier a couple years ago. “I’ve been a Stereolab fan for a long time but wasn’t familiar with [Sadier’s] newer material, so it was somewhat shocking to see in this very stripped-down format,” wrote Dietrich. “When we were discussing possible collaborators for the album, I immediately thought of her as she’s so vocal with her political views, and we thought, ‘What better person to ask to be involved?’” With the covers and handful of collaborators on this record, including Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner and the Argentinian singer Juana Molina, there’s a refreshing feeling of renewed purpose and sense of community on Mountain Moves. It’s likely a product of the times, as the group is often outspoken

in its opposition to the current presidential administration and was an avid supporter of Bernie Sanders’ candidacy. The politics of it makes for a good headline, but the songs on Mountain Moves have all the charming, fun and bizarre characteristics of classic Deerhoof. Deerhoof seems incapable of standing still, but its output remains idiosyncratic and easy to recognize. It does what it does and has no plans to stop. Interviews with the group almost always inquire into the band’s seemingly endless supply of inspiration, and the palpable sense that the members still like each other, and making music together, after all these years. Asked to describe his playing relationship with Deerhoof’s other longestrunning guitarist, Ed Rodriguez, Dietrich wrote, “I strongly dislike Ed, but we manage to work things out in a cordial manner. As for how our styles differ, it’s hard to say as we’ve been playing together for so long. We’ve bled into each other a bit. He’s definitely got more theory and training and stuff than I do and is technically capable of playing faster/better/cooler than I can. I hate him.” That’s Deerhoof: playful, funny, poignant and honest. A L E X G ORD ON @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

SPRING INTERNS WANTED City Paper’s editorial team is seeking several interns for the spring. Please send résumé, cover letter and samples to the appropriate editor listed below by Nov. 21, 2017. Each internship includes a small stipend. No calls, please.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT INTERN

The position is focused on reporting and writing about local people, performances, artworks and events, in fields including but not limited to theater, visual art, literature, dance and comedy. Send a cover letter, résumé and three writing samples to arts editor Bill O’Driscoll, driscoll@pghcitypaper.com.

MUSIC INTERN

The music intern will have a working knowledge of the local music scene and experience writing reviews, previewing shows and interviewing artists. Apply to editor Charlie Deitch, cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com.

NEWS INTERN

The news intern will pitch and write stories for both the print and online editions, as well as assist news reporters with research and factchecking. Basic writing and reporting experience required. Please send résumé, cover letter and samples to news editor Rebecca Addison, raddison@pghcitypaper.com.

PHOTO INTERN

We are looking for a student photojournalist with an artistic eye who can tell a story through images. Editorial work will include shooting assignments to supplement the paper’s news and arts coverage, both in print and online. Weekend availability is required. Send a résumé and a link to an online portfolio to art director Lisa Cunningham, lcunning@pghcitypaper.com.

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PLANNED PARENTHOOD is an essential health service to many. Its accessible cancer screenings, hormone therapy, OB/GYN services, STI testing, sex education and contraceptive resources (just to name a few of PP’s services) are imperative to the survival and autonomy of people across the U.S., including many local musicians right here in Pittsburgh. One of these musicians is The Childlike Empress, a songstress making intimate, dynamic folksy songs with an acoustic guitar and a banjo. In advance of her performance at City Paper’s Planned Parenthood of Western Pa. fundraiser at the Glitter Box Theater on Oct. 12, The Childlike Empress, who is donating her performance fee to PP, shared why Planned Parenthood is important to her: “A couple years back, I was at the lowest point of my life. I fell in love with someone that seemed like a daydream

but turned out to be my worst nightmare. Our relationship was quick, tumultuous and exciting, which was great for a time, but it grew to something much darker. I had finally had enough, but in the midst of a volatile and messy breakup, I discovered I was pregnant. “I remember sitting in my room staring at my reflection, feeling numb and foreign, trying to list off my options, each one bleaker than the next. Having the baby or staying pregnant was never an option. I was embarrassed and terrified and didn’t want anyone to know. I never had the sort of relationship with my parents that made me feel as if I could tell them anything and have them not hold it against me, so that was out of the question. “I’ve never been opposed to abortion or anyone else’s choice to have one, but I was working a job that paid very little, and there was no way I could afford it. I have been suicidal my whole life; if you’re someone that understands what it’s like to live with suicidal ideation in any capacity, you know what it’s like to always have it there in the back of your mind like an emergency-escape button.

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These thoughts were familiar to me, but it felt wrong. “After allowing myself to calm down more, I made the decision to leave for Pittsburgh the next day to visit my best friend. Once I was out here, I felt as if I was able to breathe for the first time in a long time. I went back over my options and decided to call Planned Parenthood. Everyone I spoke to over the phone and in person was tremendously helpful.

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They made me feel comfortable and understood. Not one person cast a sideways glance at me or asked me insulting questions. I explained my situation to them, and they were able to bring down the cost, so that I could afford [the abortion] and helped me prepare for it. “This was the most challenging thing I had ever faced in my life, but I felt more hopeful than I had in a long time. I was able to move on with my life, and I’m eternally grateful.” M E G FA I R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


HYBRID HIP HOP {BY BILL KOPP}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF COLIN BRENNAN}

Black Violin

In a pop-music landscape littered with mashups and collaborations of every kind, one of the most unique and intriguing musical hybrids is Black Violin. The Floridabased duo of Kevin “Kev Marcus” Sylvester and Wilner “Wil B” Baptiste effectively combines classical music and hip hop. And in the process, they entertain, educate and inspire all at once. The two men first stumbled upon the idea years ago when they were classmates in high school. But it wasn’t until several years later — by which time both had graduated college and begun careers as producers — that they refined the concept. “When rappers would come over to listen to our beats, we’d go in another room, pull out the violins and start playing,” says Marcus in a phone interview with CP. And when they launched Black Violin, there was absolutely nothing else like it. “YouTube didn’t exist yet. American Idol, America’s Got Talent, there was none of that,” Marcus says. But he and Wil B knew they were onto something. The hybridization somehow felt natural. “It’s like walking,” Marcus says. “It’s nothing that we even have to think about.” By 2005, the duo was confident enough to take its act to the notoriously tough crowd at Harlem’s Showtime at the Apollo. “We were the fifth act that day, and the first four acts all got booed,” Marcus recalls with a chuckle. But Black Violin won over the audience, winning the competition four times and earning the title of Apollo Legends. “That was a driving force for us,” Marcus says. “Whenever there are plateaus in our career, we just think back to the Apollo.” The style employed by Marcus and Wil B largely avoids jazz and bluegrass, focusing instead on a more classical approach. “I want people to think, ‘Am I really hearing this classical, baroque style of violin on a hip-hop track, hard with sub-woofers?’” When set against hip-hop beats, the resulting sound defies easy categorization. “If record stores still exist,” says Marcus, “I want a whole shelf of just us. Because nothing else really fits next to Black Violin.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BLACK VIOLIN 10:15 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct 13. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-60. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org NEWS

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[CONCERT PHOTOS]

Wiz Khalifa on stage at Thrival Music Festival on Sat., Sept. 30

HOT SPOT Thousands hit Thrival Fest at the Carrie Furnaces for a weekend jammed with great tunes {CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

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Welshly Arms

Echos

MISSIO

Ugly God

Kiiara

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

10.04/10.11.2017


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF TAYLOR BONIN}

Jessica Hernandez and the Deltas

Angeles’ Bleached. HL 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $22. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com Minneapolis duo Now, Now began as an indie-rock trio with pop-punk tendencies [POP] + MON., OCT. 09 (the third member went solo under the name After playing in several indie bands including Tancred, also very good). But the latest singles Dum Dum Girls and Vivian Girls, Frankie Rose off an upcoming album lean deeper into the branched out on her own to make dreamy, pop side of its sound. It’s the kind of genre melancholic, surfer-y pop. You can tell the transition that might have some original fans album was made in her hometown of Los complaining that things aren’t what they used Angeles, from its laid-back beats to the music to be. But poppier music is almost always a video for the track good thing, unless “Love in Rockets,” you’re a curmud{PHOTO COURTESY OF SAM SAN ROMÁN} featuring vintage geon who’s afraid of home videos of change. At Cattivo, the singer’s family Now, Now will be growing up in joined by Flint predominantly Eastwood, hailing Latino East Los from Detroit, and Angeles. She’ll play Dem Yuut, also Now, Club Café, joined from Minneapolis. Now by Philly pop group Hannah Lynn Suburban Living. 146 44th St., HL 8 p.m. 58 S. 12th Lawrenceville. St., South Side. $10. $13-15. All ages. 41221 and older. 412687-2157 or www. 431-4950 or www. cattivopgh.com clubcafelive.com

[INDIE POP] + SAT., OCT. 07

[PUNK] + SUN., OCT. 08 Punk-rock band Against Me! has been around since the late 1990s, when a couple of teenagers came together in Gainesville, Fla., to sing about anarchism and social injustices. The band has chugged along consistently over the years, but made waves, in 2012, when lead singer Laura Jane Grace came out as transgender. Since then, the focus has shifted to include the trials and triumphs of trans stories, among the accounts of social injustices, with 2014’s Transgender Dysphoria Blues. The latest album Shape Shift With Me continues the themes by tackling physically invasive airport security, as well as heartbreak and suicide bombers. Against Me! will be joined at Mr. Smalls by the pop-punk women of Los

NEWS

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[BILINGUAL BOPS] + TUE., OCT. 10 Writing and recording an entire album is an impressive feat, but writing and recording the same album in two different languages is next-level. Jessica Hernandez and the Deltas, who play Smiling Moose tonight, released their sophomore album twice — once in English (Telephone) and once in Spanish (Teléfono). The project stems from Hernandez’s desire to honor Mexican and Cuban family and heritage in her music. The music draws from pop, soul and Latin rhythms, sounding like blend of Amy Winehouse and Siouxsie Sioux and the Banshees. HL 7:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-15. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

PEPPERS N’AT. Lenny Smith & The Instant Gators. 8-11 p.m. Braddock. 412-660-0600. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Gone South. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Ross. 412-364-8166. STAGE AE. The National. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

ROCK/POP THU 05

DIESEL. The Black Dahlia Murder w/ Decreipit Birth, Necrot & Wormwitch. 6:30-11 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. HOWLERS. Chris Cheveyo, Autumn Pool, Amadea & Futurism. 9 p.m.midnight. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS 412-682-0320. THEATER. Against Me! MOONDOG’S. w/ Bleached, California Honeydrops. The Dirty Nil. w. w w 7:30-10:30 p.m. er 7 p.m. Millvale. hcitypap g p Blawnox. 412-828-2040. .com 412-821-4447. MR. SMALLS THEATER. THE R BAR. Billy Deerhoof w/ Sad13, the Kid’s Steel Town Lily & Horn Horse. 7 p.m. All-Stars. 7-10 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. Dormont. 412-942-0882. ROCK ROOM. Glazer, Tanning Machine, Pummeled, Lampshades. 9 p.m.-midnight. CLUB CAFE. Frankie Rose Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. w/ Splashh. 7 p.m. South Side. STAGE AE. Rise Against w/ 412-431-4950. Pierce The Veil, White Lung. 6 p.m. MR. SMALLS THEATER. North Side. 412-229-5483. Andrew W.K.. 7 p.m. Millvale.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 08

MON 09

FRI 06

SUPERMONKEY RECORDING CO. PRESENTS

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CATTIVO. Tim Barry, Gallows Bound & Roger Harvey. 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. HOWLERS. Mike Adams At His Honest Weight, Busman’s Holiday & The Lampshades. 9 p.m.-midnight. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Short Fictions, Surf Bored & Slugss. Speakeasy. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Long Live Woody Guthrie 6 w/ Tim Vitullo, Devin Moses & The Saved, Elkhound. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE LAMP THEATRE. The Everly Brothers Experience. 8 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000. MOONDOG’S. Jimbo and the Soupbones (EP Release). 8:30-11 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Gogol Bordello w/ Lucky Chops. 7:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Fruition. 9 p.m.-midnight. South Side. 412-381-6811.

SAT 07 WARRINGTON BEER

ton·ic n·ic RECORDING ORDING STUD STUDIOS

PITTSBURGH, PA

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Bad Dadz. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Drake & the Chris Taylor Trio, PM Mirror. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE LAMP THEATRE. The Ten Band. 8 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000.

412-821-4447.

TUE 10 CLUB CAFE. Electric Six. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. DIESEL. Metro Station, Assuming We Survive, Avion Roe. 7-10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Clean Bandit. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 11 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Issues w/ Volumes. 6 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

DJS THU 05 BELVEDERE’S. NeoNoir Dark 80s w/ Erica Scary. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

HEAVY ROTATION Here are four songs that CP music writer Meg Fair can’t stop listening to: Lizzo

“Water Me”

Charly Bliss

“Golden Age (Live Audiotree Version)”

Cardi B

“Bodak Yellow”

Pile

“Hissing For Peace”


MP 3 MONDAY

FRI 06

HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. VINOSKI WINERY. Meredith Holliday. 1-4 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

SPISH

WED 11 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. J. GOUGH’S TAVERN. Academy Pickers. 8-10 p.m. Greenfield. 412-315-7029. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7-10 p.m. Thru Dec. 27. Ross. 412-487-8909.

REGGAE

SAT 07 BELVEDERE’S. Sean MC & Thermos. 90s night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

TUE 10 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SEVICHE. Hot Salsa & Bachata Nights. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Downtown. 843-670-8465.

WED 11 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BLUES THU 05 NEW AMSTERDAM. Jack of Diamonds. 9-11 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8-11 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418.

FRI 06 NIED’S HOTEL. Jack of Diamonds. 8-11:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915.

SAT 07 MOONDOG’S. Nick Moss Band. 8:30-11:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE R BAR. Ron and the Rumpshakers. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 08 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Strange Brew. 1-3 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ THU 05 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB &

NEWS

goes into donor-designated fund, through the Pittsburgh Foundation, to promote community outreach and support of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & its musicians. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

SUN 08

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FORREST KOS}

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DEE’S CAFE. Soul & Rock-n-Roll w/ DJ Ian. 10 p.m.-2:30 a.m. South Side. 412-431-1314. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

THU 05 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m.midnight. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

CLASSICAL Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s a rollicking, menacing, slightly witchy track called “Veins,” from SPISH’s excellent new album Building a Family. Check out the album release show at Glitter Box on Oct. 10, but in the meantime, stream or download “Veins” at FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

SAT 07

SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

SUN 08

FRI 06

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Roger Humphries. MAVUNO Music Series 7-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 07 ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Joe Negri’s Mass of Hope. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. CIOPPINO RESTAURANT & CIGAR BAR. Lucarelli Jazz w/ Peg Wilson. 7-11 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-6593. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5-8 p.m. Jessica Lee 8 p.m. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff & Eric DeFade. 2-5 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

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VINOSKI WINERY. Strumburgh. 1-4 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Joel Pace Organ Trio. 8-10 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7-10 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

SAT 07 CARNEGIE MELLON WIND ENSEMBLE. Igor Stravinsky’s Circus Polka, Philip Sparke’s A Lindisfarne Rhapsody, Reynaldo Hahn’s Le bal de Beatrice d’Este, Gordon Jacob’s Old Wine in New Bottles, Herbert L. Clarke’s Cousins, Ernst Toch’s Spiel fur Blaserochester. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412 268 4921. STARRY STARRY NIGHT. An evening of music from “Baroque to Blues.” 100% of donations

OTHER MUSIC THU 05 LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8-11 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Sydney Hutchko. Levels. 7-10 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 06 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Joan Shelley. 8-10 p.m. North Side. 412-237-8300. LINDEN GROVE. Artistree. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Machine Girl, w00dy, Five Star Hotel, Cloning & Tabitha Burnett. 7-11 p.m. Bloomfield. RIVERS CASINO. American Honey. Levels. 9 p.m.-midnight. Dancing Queen. Drum Bar. 9 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 07 RIVERS CASINO. Darryl & Kim & Friends. Levels. 9 p.m.-midnight. Random Play. Drum Bar. 9 p.m.midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.

PROUDLY TATTOOING PITTSBURGH SINCE 1994!

MON 09

TUE 10 RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

WED 11 RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-5227. WPCA ACADEMY. WPCA Academy Jazz Night presented by WPCA Academy and Reggie Watkins. 7-10 p.m. Verona. 724-816-8662.

tattoo & piercing studio

ACOUSTIC THU 05 ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 7:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

Open Daily, 1pm-8pm walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended!

FRI 06 BEER HEAD BAR. Right TurnClyde. 9 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-322-2337. PARK HOUSE. Todd Knepp. 9:30 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-224-2273. VINOSKI WINERY. The Hitchhikers. 6-9 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

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Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

(412) 683-4320 5240 Butler St.

Pgh, PA • 15201 inkadinkadoo.net +

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What to do IN PITTSBURGH

October 4- 10 WEDNESDAY 4 PIXIES STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Sunflower Bean. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Eddie Izzard BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 5 COIN REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guest Joan. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Corey Harris THE ROOTS CELLAR Shadyside. 412-361-1915. For tickets and more info visit calliopehouse.org.7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 65 Women Rock Pittsburgh!

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. For tickets and more info visit pittsburgh. dressforsuccess.org. 6:30p.m.

Eddie Palmieri: Salsa Orchestra

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 15.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. For tickets and more info visit warhol.org. 8p.m.

Doors Open Pittsburgh MULTIPLE LOCATIONS Pittsburgh. For tickets and more info visit doorsopenpgh.org/ticket -tours. Through Oct. 8.

Chopin & Rachmaninoff

Hometown Homegrown

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org. Through Oct. 8.

HEINZ HISTORY CENTER Downtown. 412-454-6000. For more info visit heinzhist orycenter.org. 10a.m.

Feast: 20/20

SATURDAY 7

visit cmoa.org. 10a.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Tosca

Sound Series: Joan Shelley

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. For tickets and more info visit cmoa.org. 6p.m.

The National

HOMETOWN-HOMEGROWN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER OCTOBER 7

SUNDAY 8

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7p.m.

MONDAY 9 Andrew W.K.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest BARONS. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 10

Hollywood Undead STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Butcher Babies & Demrick. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Wellness Day

Markiplier

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. For tickets and more info

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: livenation.com. 8p.m.

OPEN HOUSE INTERVIEWS IMMEDIATE ONSITE

10AM-6PM • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12

30

12450 Perry Highway, Wexford PA 15090

Applicants must be 18 years of age, have valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle.

• FT Block Shifts • FT Awake Overnight • PT Support Staff • PT Awake Overnight

Call 724-933-5142 for more information To apply go to: www.invisionhs.org/careers/

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

10.04/10.11.2017

EEO EMPLOYER


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

18th Annual!

across the region. Live graffiti, stacks of bass, plus unforgettable graphics and decor throughout the night to ensure a twist on reality! $100 costume contest prize! 1600 Smallman St., Pittsburgh PA 15222

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

10.04/10.11.2017

country for the past 2 years. www.

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DISCOVER MORE HAUNTINGS, PUMPKIN PATCHES + FALL FESTIVALS NEWS

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HE DIDN’T EVEN DRINK TEA, BECAUSE OF THE SLAVE TRADE IN INDIA

[DANCE]

HEAR AND NOW {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ALONZO KING LINES BALLET 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 7. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $10-60. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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[BOOKS]

FEAR

LESS {BY JODY DIPERNA}

Alonzo King LINES Ballet dancers Babatunji and Laura O’Malley in “Biophony” {PHOTO COURTESY OF QUINN B. WHARTON}

Sound was the inspiration for the two works on Alonzo King LINES Ballet’s program that opens Pittsburgh Dance Council’s season at the Byham Theater on Oct. 7. The San Francisco-based company, last here in 2010, will open its program with a 45-minute excerpt from artistic director Alonzo King’s ballet “The Propelled Heart” (2015), danced to the music of Grammywinning vocalist Lisa Fischer. “When you hear the music you will understand what the dancers are really going for,” says James Gowan, a Point Park University graduate who joined LINES Ballet in 2016. “[Fischer] brings such an amazing element to the ballet … [A]longside the choreography, it becomes a beautiful duet of body and voice.” Gowan, talking by phone from San Francisco, says the ballet will be performed by 10 dancers to a recording of Fischer’s music. A review of the ballet on British website Dance Tabs described it as “a mantra on movement, a rhythmic communion between artists and audience, a channel for the energy we summon together in a darkened theater.” While “The Propelled Heart” is driven by the beauty of the human voice, King’s 41-minute “Biophony” (2015) takes its cues from the sounds in nature. “Sound and movement are inextricably linked,” said King in a 2015 interview with San Francisco’s KQED radio. “To make sound, there has to be movement. If I am watching a dancer without sound, I am seeing sound.” The “Biophony” score is a collaboration between King, author and naturalsoundscape artist Bernie Krause, and composer Richard Blackford. It’s a collection of sounds Krause recorded, including wind and rain; animal life, including pigs, frogs, whales, bees and birds; and all the sounds humans make. Those are mixed with original music by Blackford, creating an auditory environment that 10 dancers react to in eight movements. “I try to embody the qualities of what I am hearing in my dancing,” says Gowan. “More than the choreography and the idea behind it, I feel the dancers are able to go to the next level by what animalistic qualities they bring.” In “Biophony,” as with all of his ballets, King steers clear of literal interpretations in his signature contemporary ballet choreography, known for its fluidity and architectural beauty. “I am going for the essence more than the look,” King told KQED’s Scott Shafer.

M

ARCUS REDIKER is a distin-

guished professor of Atlantic history at the University of Pittsburgh who has written multiple books on the slave trade and the pirates of the Atlantic. Now, Rediker has written his first biography, The Fearless Benjamin Lay: The Quaker Dwarf Who Became the First Revolutionary Abolitionist (Beacon Press). Benjamin Lay was a man far ahead of his time, not just in his views on slavery, but in many ways, according to Rediker. “He was a passionate advocate of nonviolence. He wanted to live in a world without violence to animals, without violence to the environment, and especially without violence to human beings,” says Rediker, in a phone interview. “He also had very progressive views on gender. Benjamin Lay was a very conscious person in every respect.” Rediker first crossed paths with Lay when he was researching sailors and the Atlantic slave trade, as well as an early era of anti-slavery activism in the 1730s. There were slave revolts and urban riots; it was also the first era of anti-slavery writing. That research turned into 2013’s The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slave, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic, which he co-authored with Peter Limbaugh. It was more than 20 years ago when Rediker first read Lay’s book All Slave-Keepers That Keep Innocent in Bondage,

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF CURTIS REAVES}

Marcus Rediker

Apostates. But he always believed that the Quaker who battled slavery tirelessly for nearly four decades needed his own book. To be sure, the title of Lay’s book is clunky, reflecting the time and also the fact that Lay was an autodidact who wasn’t much concerned with style or narrative flow. But Lay wasn’t some unpolished rube. He had traveled the world as a sailor, and he drew on his tremendous understanding

of the Bible, as well as ancient Greeks like Diogenes. Even Rediker admits that the prose can be difficult, but Lay’s passion and rigor come through. Lay was born in Essex, England, in 1682, and spent a number of years traveling, working as a sailor. He saw slavery up close in his travels and spoke at length with other sailors about what they had seen working slave ships. The stories they told him led him to denounce the slave trade as nothing more than “organized murder.” Indeed, millions suffered and died in transit. Lay and his wife, Sarah, herself a traveling Quaker minister, married in England


and then lived for a time in Barbados, where they encountered slavery, in all its horror, up close. When they moved to Philadelphia, a city teeming with Quakers, he and Sarah were shocked to find that a large number of Quakers owned slaves. He could not sit by and merely witness the scope and barbarity of American slavery. He called to task Quakers who owned slaves. He raised a ruckus at meetings. He staged guerrilla theater to get the attention of other Friends and spoke out at all times. (It wasn’t until 1776 that the Society of Friends completely banned slave-owning for Quakers, well after Lay’s death in 1759, but the abolitionist movement within the Quaker church was heavily influenced by him. Quakers were among the most outspoken abolitionists.) But during his life, Lay was considered by many to be a man of strife and contention, in the parlance of the time. His opponents tried to silence him through censure; they disparaged his appearance. But Lay was undeterred. He was a man possessed of a radical spirit and great moral clarity.

MARCUS REDIKER BOOK LAUNCH 6 p.m. Tue., Oct. 10. University Club, (third floor), 123 University Place, Oakland. Free. 412-648-7451 or www.history.pitt.edu

And he didn’t merely talk the talk, he walked the walk. As Rediker writes, “Benjamin boycotted all commodities produced by slave labor. He understood the dark secrets of the marketplace: He saw the violent conditions under which the commodity of sugar was produced and the suffering of the producers, all of which he first grasped in Barbados where ‘sugar was made with blood.’” Lay lived simply, in a cave outside of Philadelphia. He was a vegetarian and grew most of his own food. He walked everywhere, miles at a time, as he didn’t believe in harnessing horses to be ridden. He spun fabric out of flax, eschewing wool (animal product) and cotton (picked by slaves.) He didn’t even drink tea, because of the slave trade in India. It’s clear that Rediker himself greatly admires Lay — who, he concedes, must have been a trying, difficult person with whom to be friends. And yet, maybe he is the right person for this moment in American history. “To me, it is just shocking and wrong that one of the most militant opponents of slavery this country ever had is almost entirely unknown. Benjamin Lay represents a higher set of ideals, much more inclusive and democratic, an egalitarian set of ideals with respect for peoples and nations, animals and the environment.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[ART]

LEADING ROLE

Corey Carrington {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHANCELLOR HUMPHREY}

{BY AMANDA REED} Corey Carrington realized he wanted to be an artist in the 10th grade. Becoming a curator took a little longer. Students had been tasked to write a poem about how they are perceived by others. Carrington’s English teacher submitted his piece, “Outside the Box,” to Carnegie Mellon University’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. Writing Awards for local high school and college students. Carrington was asked to read it for an audience on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. “That was really the moment where I was like, ‘Maybe you should this explore a little bit more,’” he says. Fast-forward a few years, and, after earning a communication and creative-writing degree from Slippery Rock University, Carrington was creating poems and visual art while working odd jobs including dishwasher for the Pittsburgh Public Schools, admissions clerk at CCAC, and program assistant at Partner4Work. Carrington stumbled upon the Emerging Black Arts Leader Apprenticeship (EBALA), created by Contemporary Craft in 2016 after an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation survey found that only 4 percent of museum curators, conservators and educators identify as African American. EBALA is funded by the Pittsburgh-based Opportunity Fund. “It became increasingly concerning to me that as a nonprofit arts organization that is interested in building community and sharing cross-cultural perspectives, … we try to find more diverse staff members and also support their entry into the field,“ said Janet McCall, Contemporary Craft executive director. Carrington, who performs as “Grits Capone,” spent a year learning artsadministration skills, like developing educational programs and assisting with exhibit installation and de-installation. Now he’s curating his first art exhibit. Electric Kool-Aid, opening Oct. 5 at the Brew House Association, is an Associated Artists of Pittsburgh group show focusing on surrealist themes. “Some of the pieces are more conceptual, and that stuff kind of speaks to me because it allows your mind to wander and really get into your imagination,” he says. Carrington plans to curate more shows, develop his portfolio to apply for a master’sof-fine-arts program, and learn African drumming and storytelling, thanks to a grant from the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. “I’ve earned the right to be selective about what I do,” he says. “I determine my own destiny.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ELECTRIC KOOL-AID opening reception 6-9 p.m. Thu., Oct. 5. Exhibit continues through Nov. 26. Brew House Association, 711 S. 21st St., South Side. www.brewhousearts.org

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Oct. 20-21 The Lamp Theatre, Irwin

Oct. 27-28 Greensburg Garden & Civic Center

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

Jenni Putney and Tim McGeever in A Funny Thing …, at City Theatre

[PLAY REVIEWS]

BEDSIDE MATTERS {BY TED HOOVER} HALLEY FEIFFER’S greatest achievement

with her play A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York City (now making its local debut at City Theatre) is the title itself. It doesn’t just hint at the plot, it also describes how you’ll react to the play itself: The title starts out moderately funny, gets a little cutesy but finally is so self-aware you’re ready for it to be over. Two people met at the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at the blah, blah, blah because both have mothers dying of cancer. Karla is a young, spikey, New York kinda gal, whose vulgar standup routine (which she rehearses bedside) obviously deflects a lot of personal pain. Don is a beaten, middle-aged sad sack, recently separated from his wife, estranged from his son and hiding from the world at his mother’s deathbed.

Dinner, Show, Overnight Stay and Breakfast for two All for only $199! Add The After Life Party on Oct. 28 for only $30!

Feiffer has written, whether by design or neglect (and it’s difficult to know which), is excessively studied and theatrical. Yes, it’s idiotic to bitch that theater is theatrical — but A Funny Thing is never wholly a black comedy, an intimate character study or kitchen-sink melodrama. Rather, we watch Feiffer aiming at all three. It starts fun, with Feiffer’s purposefully outrageous humor, and gets a little cutesy as the various quirks of these quirky characters are unveiled. But because we’re never emotionally invested in such “written” characters and their troubles, the play wraps up a few scenes before the playwright does. Nonetheless, there are several highly enjoyable performances: Jenni Putney and Tim McGeever are our sickroom love birds, and play the hell out of their roles. Putney does strong work with both the bristling exterior and aching need hidden beneath, while McGeever, remarkably, makes Don’s glum resignation active and compelling. And Helena Ruoti knows how to play all the laughs as Karla’s foul-mouthed mother. Director Joshua Kahan Brody keeps it all moving briskly and, as always, Tony Ferrieri’s set is definite and defining.

Reservations 724-838-8800. Info & Single Tickets Call 724-832-7464

www.stagerightgreensburg.com $39 per additional adult, plus tax. Four max per room. Paid for in part by the Westmoreland County Tourism Grant Program.

THE PLAY WRAPS UP A FEW SCENES BEFORE THE PLAYWRIGHT DOES.

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

A FUNNY THING … continues through Oct. 15. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-61. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

HEATING UP {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

You don’t have to have spent your entire life around heterosexuals to know what comes next. The play’s challenge is that everything

THERE ACTUALLY are sausages called “East Texas hot links,” but Eugene Lee’s eponymous 1994 one-act is at least as savory, and often hotter, at Pittsburgh Playwrights CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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100% Employee Owned

PYRAMID

TATTOO & Body Piercing

Theatre Co. Local-actor-made-good Montae Russell directs a tight cast in a talky play with an explosive climax. The year is 1955 — Jim Crow era, Emmett Till’s death a still-recent memory — in the “coloreds only” Top o’ the Hill Café. That name is a bit of a stretch for a “bar” serving only corn liquor, beer and peanuts. And a long line of troubles for the regulars to chew on.

EAST TEXAS HOT LINKS

5603 Hobart Street

continues through Nov. 5. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $27.50-30. www.pghplaywrights.com

Located in Squirrel Hill

(412) 421-3002 Student/Teacher Discounts MontHly sales and Promos

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East Texas Hot Links refers to the food chain, the hierarchy of “who eats, and who is ate.” Lee, a frequent actor in August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle, took a tip or two from the master in crafting an ensemble with plenty of stories to tell and any number of grievances simmering under the surface. Columbus (a commanding Kevin Brown) has the fewest, with an outlook that counts life’s currency in people, not prices. At the other extreme is hot-blooded XL (Jonathan Berry succeeding against his usual, affable type). He wants More. Fully entitled to her gripes is café owner Charlesetta (Cheryl El-Walker, sassy yet sage), not following her father’s footsteps in working to death for his little business, but with no vision for the future. On the other hand, Roy (the always-dependable Monteze Freeland) has big eyes for Charlesetta, a touch of nostalgia, and a serious pistol. The Wilsonian griot/seer role is shared by Adolph (the loquacious Leslie Howard), a blind World War II veteran who expounds on the food chain, and Boochie (a towering Charles Timbers), a professional gambler who can read palms and see the future. Also key to what plot there is are the youngblood Delmus (an energetic Taylor Martin Moss) and mostly-gentle giant Buckshot (Sam Lothard, explosive in threat mode). Special shout-outs go to fight director Randy Kovitz, costume designer Anthony James Sirk (loooove the shoes) and tech-set director Mark Clayton Southers, company founder and artistic director. There may not be a lot happening in East Texas Hot Links but when it does — wow.

Bugs Bunny, myopia from Mr. Magoo, and Dinah Shore from Beany and Cecil. Those were cartoons of course, and so is Orphie and the Book of Heroes, albeit a live-action one. This “family-friendly” (i.e., children’s) musical, performed by the Red Masquers at Duquesne University, will make kids smile and introduce them to the gods and poets of ancient Greece. And there won’t be a quiz afterward. It’s a tale of imagination and female empowerment that revolves around Orphie (a plucky Samantha Espiritu), who wants her friend Homer (Max Begler) to write a story about the ultimate hero. So she sets out on an adventure to find him, and guess who “he” turns out to be? Meanwhile, Homer falls prey to a gleefully sanguinary Hades, who lives in H-E-double-hockey-sticks with his anhedonic wife, Persephone. Along the way we meet other ancient Greeks, from Cerberus (three actors, of course) to Heracles to Atlas, who’s two hollow cloth legs on giant feet made to dance by on-stage puppeteers (the show uses light, sound and visual effects quite well on an intimate stage). All we’re missing is Sappho of Lesbos, presumably too R-rated for the kids. The songs — music by Michael Kooman, lyrics (and book) by Duquesne alum Christopher Dimond — take cues from Godspell, Superstar, Disney, Sondheim and even a happy half-inch of Hedwig: Two of the three Sirens are men with beards and furry chests in the show’s campiest number (thanks to a playfully flamboyant Vincent Marchi, who butches up as the narcissistic Heracles).

IT’S A TALE OF IMAGINATION AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT.

BROADW WAY’SS Hilarity On Wheeels Opens Next Week! Oct 12 - Dec 17

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Olivia Vadnais | Photo: Archie Carpenter

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MYTH-ING LINKS {BY HARRY KLOMAN} AS A CHILD, I learned about opera from

ORPHIE AND THE BOOK OF HEROES continues through Oct. 15. Red Masquers at Genesius Theater, Duquesne University campus, Uptown, $6.50-16.50. 412-396-3237 or www.duqredmasquers.com

The cast performs with a sort of awkward energy, and while nobody really dances especially well, they all seem be OK with that: Like Orphie, they’re on an odyssey, testing their limits. Director Jill Jeffrey keeps things light, although I can imagine a version that takes its characters and emotions more seriously without losing (or frightening) the youngsters. The classic figures all introduce themselves with a Wikipedia-like sentence, and a few others get mentions. “There are worse things than not having parents,” Hades says to our orphaned heroine. “Ask Oedipus.” In 2017, that randy quip barely rates a PG. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

FreeEvent

10.05-10.12.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

The Mattress Factory museum really was a mattress factory, once. But the building was vacant when, in 1975, an artist, designer and transplant from Michigan named Babara Luderowski turned it into a North Side art haven. The six-story building housed studios, a gallery, theater groups and more. One day, a Carnegie Mellon University graduate named Michael Olijnyk had dinner in the building’s vegetarian co-op restaurant and, in a way, never left. In 1981, co-directors Luderowski and Olijnyk began focusing on commissioning new installation art — a decision that would ultimately turn the Mattress Factory into an internationally known cultural destination.

Along the way, says Olijnyk, have come 800 artists from around the world — with permanent installations by the likes of James Turrell — and memorable moments like a visiting John Cage cooking breakfast. “It’s so great to be around an artist when they’re making decisions,” says Olijnyk. “For us it’s about collecting the people. The museum has also expanded to neighboring buildings, and hosts much-anticpated events like its annual Urban Garden Party.” This year marks the Mattress Factory’s 40th anniversary as a nonprofit. The museum celebrates, naturally, by opening a new show. New Installations: 40th Year features artists from throughout the museum’s history, including sculptor Meg Webster (who first exhibited there in 1984), Cuban-born Yoán Capote, painter David Ellis, artist and designer Allan Wexler, and two Pittsburgh-based artists, Vanessa German and David Pohl. Special attraction: a trove of previously unseen works, papers and personal effects from the archive of the late Greer Lankton, who died in 1996, shortly after the Mattress Factory unveiled the pioneering transgender artist’s striking permanent installation “It’s all about ME not YOU.” Olijnyk says that after 40 years, he and Luderowski don’t feel like they’re slowing down. Constantly re-energized by working with artists, he says, “It feels like we’re starting up again.” BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

Opening reception: 6-8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6 (free). Exhibit continues through July 29. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

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{ART BY KEVIN MACK}

^ Fri., Oct. 6: Unblurred

thursday 10.05 STAGE It’s Thornton Wilder night in Oakland, as two troupes open their seasons with his work. University of Pittsburgh Stages offers Our Town, the classic that explores what it means to be human. Blocks away, Carnegie Mellon Drama presents Wilder’s The Matchmaker — inspiration for the musical Hello, Dolly! — which tells the story of widow Dolly Levi, who brokers marriages in circa-1900 Yonkers while trying to find her own perfect match. Amanda Reed Our Town: 8 p.m. (continues through Oct. 15; Richard E. Rauh Studio Theatre, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland; $1225; 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu). The Matchmaker: 8 p.m. (continues through Oct. 14; Philip Chosky Theater, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland; $10-34; 412-268-2407 or www.drama.cmu.edu)

friday 10.06 ART Monthly gallery crawl Unblurred offers venues up and down Penn Avenue full of art, live music and more. Openings include: Colors, Characters, Light & Shadow, a pop-up exhibit at the Irma Freeman Center, with paintings by Kevin Mack,

Parvaneh Torkman and Patrica Apuzzo; embodiment, a big juried group show of glass wearables, at Pittsburgh Glass Center; and, at Bunker Projects, TEETH DREAMS, an installation and performance work by Pittsburgh-based King Reld blending visual art, music and fashion with “monstrous teeth grills … custom-made with pearls and tusks.” Bill O’Driscoll 6-10 p.m. 4800-5500 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield. Free. www.pennavenue.org

OPERA Murder, love and betrayal ensue in the course of 24 hours in Tosca, Pittsburgh Opera’s 79th season opener. Puccini’s classic is set in Rome, where an artist and his lover work to protect a prisoner from a police chief’s wrath. Soprano Leah Crocetto (Mimi in Pittsburgh Opera’s 2014 La bohème) plays the title role alongside Metropolitan Opera veteran Mark Delavan and tenor Thiago Arancam. The first performance at the Benedum Center is tonight. AR 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 15. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $10-159.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org ^ Fri., Oct. 6: Tosca {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BACHMAN PHOTOGRAPHY}

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^ Sat., Oct. 7: Doors Open Pittsburgh

STAGE “The concept of race is like money, invented by the powerful to control resources,” contends Vatic Kuumba in one of his spoken-word pieces. Tonight, the Providence, R.I.-based National Poetry Slam competitor hits the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s Alloy Theater with a new multidisciplinary stage work, A Furtive Movement. His collaborators are two local luminaries, vocalist Angwenique Wingfield and visual artist and BOOM Concepts co-founder D.S. Kinsel. Together they offer “songs and scenes that explore the challenges of being young, black, ambitious and in love.” BO 8 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Pay what you wish. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

saturday 10.07 TOUR Feed your edifice complex as the greatly expanded Doors Open Pittsburgh returns for its second year. Today and tomorrow, take guided, self-guided or docent-assisted tours of some 70 buildings Downtown, on the North Side and in the Strip District (up from 40 Downtown buildings last year). The Fairmont Pittsburgh hotel, St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, the NRG Energy Center steam plant and dozens of banks, office buildings and artist studios are yours to peruse. ^ Fri., Oct. 6: Vatic Kuumba Also new are special, separately ticketed “insider” tours, with cultural or architectural themes. BO 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 8. $8 (one day), $12 (two days), and free (but ticket required) for under-18s and seniors. www.doorsopenpgh.org

OUTDOORS The South Side Slopes has 5,447 public steps — more than any other neighborhood in Pittsburgh. However, each of the two courses of Pittsburgh StepTrek includes only about half that many, so the South Side Slopes Neighborhood Association is expecting you for the 17th annual version of its self-guided, self-paced tour, featuring spectacular views, lots of history and, along the route, poetry, music, dance and art by Steppin Stanzas. BO 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Meet at 21st and Josephine streets, South Side. $13 in advance (free for kids under 12). www.southsideslopes.org CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

October

11-15 BRICOLAGE’S THEATER 937 LIBERTY AVE. 1ST FLOOR

TS! A C E S D HOU E U C S E RLD REAL R O W S S E GUINN HOLDER! D ND RECOR A B T A ALL C ORLD! Y L N O THE IRE W T N E E IN TH

{ART BY TSUN IP PATRICK CHOW}

^ Tue., Oct. 10: International Photography Exhibit

tuesday 10.10 TALK Not too many accomplished writers are also internationally recognized performance artists. Then there’s Malik Gaines. The professor of performance studies at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts writes about performance theory and practice, black representation, and queer social tactics in works including 2017’s Black Performance on the Outskirts of the Left. He’s also performed around the world with the group My Barbarian. Gaines speaks tonight as part of Carnegie Mellon University School of Art’s Visiting Artist Lecture Series. BO 6:30 p.m. Kresge Theatre, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. www.art.cmu.edu

ART The Photographic Society of America holds its annual conference this week, but bu you don’t have to be a member (or a photographer) to e enjoy the award-winning work in tonight’s International Photography Exhibit. The show, at the Marriott City Center, in includes more than 1,000 images from around the world, and admission is free. The conference includes other free pu public events; see the website for details. BO 7-10:15 p.m. 112 Washington Place, O Exhibit opening: 7 Uptown. www.psa-photo.org www.psa-pho

STAGE YouTube personality M Markiplier — a.k.a. Mark Fischbach — comes to Heinz Hal Hall tonight with his first-ever tour, titled You’re Welcome. With more than 17 million We subscribers and an some six billion video views, his is among th the top 25 channels on YouTube, where he focuses on game-play commentary, animation, animatio sketch comedy and vlogs. Expect improv games, sketches and characters. g YouTubers YouTub LordMinion777, Muyskerm, Tyler Scheid and CrankGameplays join Markiplier on the t road. AR 8 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $29.50-125. 412-392-4900 or Do www.pittsburghsymphony.org w

$23-$38 ONLINE $26-$41 AT THE DOOR

Sponsored By

PART OF THE PROCEEDS BENEFITS

TALK Tonight’s a rare Pittsburgh appearance for Steve “The Woz” Wozniak. The Apple co-founder

ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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< Tue., Oct. 10: Malik Gaines {PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA}


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Gia T. and slowdanger perform Imprints at SPACE Gallery, Downtown CRITIC: Anthony Williams, 30, a dancer and choreographer from the Hill District WHEN: Fri.,

Sept. 29

This event isn’t just a dance performance, because the performers also added elements of voice, sound, action and lighting. I would call it movement or physical theater. I thought the event was entertaining. There was comedy, and there was an array of emotion that the artists executed through a very beautiful collaboration. I came out here tonight because I’m friends with the performers. I thought it had a lot of emotion to it, and I really liked that specific element. I wasn’t surprised since I’m familiar with their work, but I will say that I appreciated the risks they took. In a space that’s concrete, and it’s not a very good space for dance or movement. There’s also a wall dividing the space, and the section where they were performing was really small. I appreciated the risks the performers took, just personally knowing how difficult it can be to perform on concrete. BY AMANDA REED

visits for an on-stage conversation at Carnegie Music Hall with Andrew Moore, Carnegie Mellon University’s dean of computer science. Wozniak, a philanthropist and chief scientist at Primary Data, is also a New York Times best-selling author for his 2006 autobiography, iWoz: From Computer Geek to Cult Icon. In 1985, he received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. The event kicks off the American Middle East Institute’s 10th annual conference. AR 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25-65. 412-622-3131 or www.americanmei.org

wednesday 10.11 MUSIC Award-winning accordionist, contemporary classical composer and Pitt alumnus Guy Klucevsek returns to his alma mater to play original works including “Ratatatatouille” (2009) and “Flying Vegetables of the Apocalypse” (1988), accompanied by the University of Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Klucevsek, known world-wide, has played or recorded with artists including Laurie Anderson, Anthony Braxton, the Kronos Quartet and John Zorn. Also on the program: Stravinsky’s Concerto in D for string orchestra. The orchestra is directed by Roger Zahab. AR 8 p.m. Bellefield Hall Auditorium, 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-624-4126 or www.music.pitt.edu

thursday 10.12 WORDS Journalist Lynda Schuster reads from her new book, Dirty Wars and Polished Silver: The Life and Times {PHOTO COURTESY OF HEIDI L. LEWIS} of a War Correspondent ^ Thu., Oct. 12: Lynda Schuster Turned Ambassatrix, tonight at Alphabet City. The memoir chronicles Schuster’s life abroad as a foreign correspondent and, later, as the wife of a U.S. ambassador. Heartbreaking in some places and humorous in others, it’s a story of self-discovery, loss and keeping one’s limbs intact. Schuster now lives in Pittsburgh. A moderated discussion with Carnegie Mellon University’s Sharon Dilworth and an audience Q&A follow the reading. AR 8 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. 412-435-1110 or www.alphabetcity.org.

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AN APPETIZER OF BUTTERY-SOFT RAW SCALLOPS WAS A TEXTURAL MARVEL

CAFÉ AND STAY {BY AL HOFF} A former motorcycle shop in Lawrenceville has been transformed into a beautiful swan, the recently opened VietnameseAmerican coffee shop Ineffable Cà Phê. “Café” is fair, but one could bump it up to “lounge.” How else to categorize a spot with such an inviting assortment of seating and congregating areas? There are nooks with armchairs; a tiled bar with high stools; booths; small tables for two (these are actually beautifully restored old Singer sewing-machine stands); a home-like coffee-table-and chairs space, near a shelf of board games; a free library; a kids’ play area; and, weather permitting, outside seating near a raised herb garden. There’s even that East End rarity — off-street parking.

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Pork with dashi potato and trout roe

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

Inside Ineffable Cà Phê

The food menu is brief — some pastries, and a selection of báhn mi sandwiches, available with roasted pork belly, grilled marinated pork, grilled lemongrass chicken or fried tofu. Served warm on French bread, each sandwich is dressed with cucumber, cilantro, shredded pickled carrot and daikon radish, jalapeno slices and house-made butter. From 7-10 a.m., early birds can take advantage of a breakfast menu — egg-bacon-cheese sandwich, avocado toast, granola, or a báhn mi bo duong (warm baguette with butter and sugar). But one need only stop by for a hot or cold drink to take advantage of the aforementioned lounging and socializing areas. There is a selection of bubble teas, as well as the standard selection of coffee preparations, such as espresso, cold brew, latte and cappuccino. For a more authentic Vietnamese take on coffee, try cà phê sua/da. Here, the coffee drips very slowly through a filter into a glass prepared with sweetened condensed milk. The result is an intense dark coffee, balanced by the sweet milk. Enjoy hot (sua), or served over ice (da). AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3920 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. www.ineffablecaphe.com

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UP AND RUNNING {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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T’S ALMOST impossible to talk about Superior Motors without acknowledging the hype. A new restaurant from chef Kevin Sousa would have been exciting enough. Add politically ascendant Braddock Mayor John Fetterman, Sousa’s supporter and landlord — then a recordsetting Kickstarter campaign; factor in the inevitable delays in opening, and rumors were bound to fly. Even if you tuned out the speculation and chatter, Sousa’s stated goal to provide training and jobs for residents of one of the region’s poorest boroughs makes Superior Motors a story about more than dining out. Sousa is best known for his influential Garfield-based restaurant Salt of the Earth. We did our best to avoid the gossip, the website and even early reports about the food. We could guess at the general ap-

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proach: modern, local, seasonal, and eclectically comfortable with the humble and the haute. When our night arrived, we found the former Chevy dealership (source of the name) lightly updated on the exterior, with

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. 412-271-1022 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-11 p.m.; Sun. 5-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $7-16; entrees $16-32 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED slatted screens breaking up the plate-glass façade to echo the rhythm of the Edgar Thomson Works building across the street. There was no sign; none was necessary. The interior blended industrial and

modern without veering into steampunk clichés. The exposed-brick walls’ warmth and texture counterbalanced cool pouredconcrete elements that formed booths and defined the lounge-like, L-shaped banquette seating at the windows. The semi-open kitchen conveyed the process of our meal’s preparation without creating a theater. A smaller second dining room was more classically intimate. The menu was both brief and wideranging; for instance, without focusing on seafood per se, there were two fish entrees and three seafood appetizers. The titles of dishes were deceptively minimal, simply naming their central ingredient: skate, rigatoni, brassicas. Cuts of meat were rarely named, and if you don’t know what nixtamal is, well, you’ll have to ask. Fortunately, attentive service provides


plenty of opportunity. In a sense, choices weren’t so much about the ingredients themselves as they are about the flavor profiles created by their combinations. While some, like rice cakes with gochujang and cilantro, were clearly inspired by international cuisines, what distinguished most dishes was the kinds of flavors being combined. Thus, sous vide chicken with cabbage and blackberry offered something utterly other as did panzanella with stone fruit, ricotta, sourdough, and whey vinaigrette. A hallmark was the often-ingenious combinations of unusual or foreign ingredients with local ones obtained through the restaurant’s partnerships with Grow Pittsburgh and Braddock Farms. An appetizer of buttery-soft raw scallops was a textural marvel, with gently crunchy sorrel, firm quinoa, slivers of tomatillo and creme fraiche. But the array of flavors, delicious as it was, hid the simple sweetness of the scallops. Tomato and sweet-pepper soup, blended with sherry and sourdough, offered another nearly perfect texture, this one creamy and supple, and an exceptionally sophisticated flavor. Superior Motors’ first hot soup since it opened this summer, this was a brilliant transition to fall, taking peak-season tomatoes and turning them in a warming, not refreshing, direction. A tentacle of octopus looked like a fiddlehead fern and tasted of the vibrant Mexican flavors of nixtamal — lime-slaked corn — and jalapeño, which combined unexpectedly fluently with the oceanic brine of Japanese katsuobushi. Its texture was exquisitely soft. Thick slices of hanger steak, gorgeous red with gently browned edges, were tender and beefy, but the brilliance of this dish was how the accompanying corn purée, chèvre and thin-sliced, foraged mushrooms, augmented with wilted greens, imparted varying notes of sweet earthiness, tangy creaminess and silky umami. It evoked a classic steakhouse platter without duplicating it in the slightest. If this embodied one side of Sousa’s talents — perfecting traditional dishes and then adding a sideways element of surprise and delight — his pork entrée represented a more adventurous borrowing from multiple traditions to create a wholly original dish. Lean pork loin and fatty pork belly were served together with gribiche (hard-boiled egg-yolk emulsion), reggiano cheese, briny trout roe and potato boiled in dashi. The lusciously tender textures and harmony of rich, savory flavors were, in a word, amazing. The time for hype is over. Now that Superior Motors is up and running, it will quickly earn the superlative reputation it deserves. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

BANANAFLAVORED CHOCOLATE BREAD (IN BED) {BY KELLY ANDREWS, GREENFIELD} The key to really good banana bread is the amount of chocolate morsels you drop into the batter before sticking it in the oven. There are plenty of recipes out there that include substitutions to cut calories, like oil for butter, or applesauce for oil, and you can always lower the amount of sugar added. But when I eat banana bread, I like it to be basically banana-flavored chocolate bread. This bread tastes best when eaten warm from the oven while in bed, book or Netflix show optional. One of my favorite things about being a very single adult is that I can eat whatever I want in bed at any time of the day, and I’m the only one who needs to guess what kind of crumb is stuck to my cheek the next morning. Pita chip, or time to wash my sheets? Only I have to decide.

1910 New Texas Road • 724-519-7304

www.eightyacreskitchen.com

MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM WWW S NYA PGH SENYAIPG G H COM NFL Sunday Ticket! WE Show all Games!

ARCHrIsEo’Sn On Ca WING

NIGHT! 50 ¢ wings Mon-Th urs 23 flavors!

INGREDIENTS • ¾ cup sugar (negotiable) • ¼ cup plant-based oil (safflower, sunflower, etc.) • 1 egg • 3 medium-sized ripe bananas • ¼ cup milk • 1 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon • 1¼ tsp. vanilla extract • 1¼ cup flour • ½ tsp. baking soda • ½ tsp. salt • ½ bag of dark-chocolate morsels

2328 32 28 EAST 28 E EA Carson C STREET 412.481.0852 • archiesoncarson.com

The Downtown lunch café you’ve been waiting for…

PHONE IN YOUR LUNCH ORDER OF $30 OR MORE BY 11:30AM AND

INSTRUCTIONS For the prep, mix all the dry ingredients together in one bowl. Cream the sugar, oil, milk, vanilla extract, lemon and egg in a separate bowl. Mash your bananas, and add it to the wet mixture. Combine the dry and wet ingredients, and stir together well. Then add the chocolate morsels. Like, as much chocolate as you want. I used half a bag of dark chocolate, but no judgment here if you want to go full-bag. Grease a bread pan, and pour the mixture in. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour, or the amount of time it takes to get the “no one new around you” message on Tinder and decide you don’t ever want to be naked in front of anyone ever again anyways, or when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

SAVE 10% *Does not apply to catering, grubhub, postmates, or Eat24 orders.

SANDWICHES WRAPS SALADS SOUPS CATERING COFFEE 808 PPenn A Avenue - In I The Th Cultural C lt l District Di t i t HOURS: HOURS 412-745-2233 WWW.CAFE808PGH.COM 7 AM to 2 PM Mon. - Fri.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Kelly Andrews is a poet who plans to stick around Pittsburgh indefinitely. You can find more sad, healthy (and funny) meals on her blog sadhealthymeals.wordpress.com. WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

OAXACAN CUISINE

FRIDAY, OCT. 6TH LIVE MUSIC LATIN GUITAR

HAPPY HOUR

s Wednesday - Friday 5PM-7PM Half Off Appetizers!

[ON THE ROCKS]

YOUR ULTIMATE DRINKING PLAYLIST Music shapes the way we imbibe {BY DREW CRANISKY}

WE CATER!

GREAT DRINKING requires a great soundtrack. Whether drowning your sorrows to country classics or getting turnt to ’90s alternative, music shapes the way we imbibe. To assemble the ultimate drinking playlist, we asked Pittsburgh’s premier booze afficionados and songsmiths for their favorite songs to sip to.

“Debra,” Beck. “If it’s on in a bar and people aren’t paying attention to it, it’s just a song. But once someone hears a little bit, they tell their friends, and pretty soon everybody is standing around wondering what’s up with this song. It brings people together like that.” — Will Groves, Maggie’s Farm Rum “Don’t Stop Me Now,” Queen. “Mercurial Freddie will not let you be stopped by your inhibitions. Neither will alcohol. The two pair perfectly.” — Danielle Skapura, Acacia

“Chug-a-Lug,” Roger Miller.

“The driving guitar stabs propel you forward. You take a sip every time he says ‘chug-a-lug.’ Just when you think it can’t get any worse, the song modulates, and you’re drinking even faster. A second key change. You do a double back-flip.” —Jonathan Chamberlain, lead singer of Delicious Pastries

“I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight,” Richard and Linda Thompson. “I love the universal theme of ‘I’ve been working my ass off and now I need to get crazy.’ It has a very celebratory sound, the way you feel when you finally have a night off and you can’t wait to go out and let off steam.” — Jamie Patten, Allegheny Wine Mixer

“I Am a Tree,” Guided by Voices. “It’s on the jukebox at Gooski’s. Every time it comes on I get

a huge smile on my face, the sudden urge to buy a shot, and a jolt of energy.” — Lauren DeLorenze, lead singer of The Red Western

“El Scorcho,” Weezer. “It’s a simple but catchy song, with silly lyrics that contain allusions to Madama Butterfly, that generally sums up how absolutely inept I was at courting women. It’s great drunken fun for nerds.” — Pete Kurzweg, Independent Brewing Company “Young New England,” Transit. “It’s got everything. Good times, love, heartbreak, friendship, being young but growing up … all with a really solid vibe that’s not depressing or too poppy.” — Andrew Witchey, Dancing Gnome “Lonesome, On’ry and Mean,” Waylon Jennings. “I love the raw sound of this song and ALWAYS love to belt out his lyrics whilst buzzed. Just the way I imagine he intended.” — Greta Harmon, Bar Frenchman

“Sweet Caroline,” Neil Diamond. “When I think of drinking songs, I go back to my days in college at Penn State. You would have the whole bar singing together: ‘So good! So good!’” — Cecil Usher, Richard DeShantz Restaurant Group

“My Old Drunk Friend,” Freakwater. “When I want to dwell in the bittersweet, Freakwater nearly always takes me there. Although their songs are originals, they sound like old country tunes. They’re fierce and broken and basically make me want to drink whiskey and play music with my own friends.” — Sherrie Flick, author of Whiskey, Etc. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXWZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER Ř FACEBOOK.COM/PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: BLOOD AND SAND

VS.

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive. 50

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Butterjoint

Soba

214 N. Craig St., Oakland

5847 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside

DRINK: Blood and Sand INGREDIENTS: Dewar’s scotch, sweet vermouth, Cherry Heering, orange OUR TAKE: The Cherry Heering mellows out the bite of the scotch, allowing its caramel and brown-butter notes to shine through. A hint of smoke and a luxardo cherry to enjoy at the end add some depth and texture.

DRINK: Blood and Sand INGREDIENTS: Famous Grouse scotch, Cherry Heering, Dolin Rouge vermouth, cherry OUR TAKE: Because it’s served on the rocks, this is the lighter, friendlier version of the original and sometimes detested Blood and Sand. The Famous Grouse is a subtle choice for the scotch, and the overall effect is pleasant drink with just a little bit of smoke to it. The ever-present luxardo cherry sweetens the pot.

This week on Sound Bite: We take a road trip to Youngstown, Ohio, to Avant Gardens Farm & Mushroomery. www.pghcitypaper.com

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Gramona Gessamí Blanco Penedes 2016 $12/glass “I really like Spanish whites, and you don’t see too many here. This is a of sauvignon blanc, gewurztraminer and muscat. I think it goes blend o with our food. It’s organic, and we aim to have a wine list of almost well wit exclusively female winemakers. There are a lot of great wines being exclusiv by women. ” made b RECOMMENDED BY CHASE JOHNSON, BAR SUPERVISOR, ACE HOTEL

Gramona Gessamí Blanco Penedes 2016 is available at the Ace Hotel bar in East Liberty.


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SNOW JOB {BY AL HOFF}

STEVE CARELL FINDS THE NOTE OF PATHOS BENEATH RIGGS’ BRAYING GOOFBALL

If you know your 1980s geopolitical history, at some point during Doug Liman’s preposterous but entertaining American Made you will have to just let go of reality. Sure, the clandestine circumstances in which the U.S. government interfered with Latin American countries, made sketchy weapons trades and who knows what else (we sort of see you, CIA …) were not good; the resulting scandal gave us the 1987 Iran-Contra hearings. But, bygones! This comedy is set in the belly of that beast, and there are no laughs if you get bogged down in ugly truths. The film, after all, states that it is “based on a true lie.”

Flying high: Barry Seal (Tom Cruise)

Tom Cruise, in full brio mode, portrays Barry Seal, an airline pilot who, in the late 1970s, gets recruited by a CIA agent (Domhnall Gleeson) and given a nifty private plane. First, it’s taking messages to Nicaragua’s Manuel Noriega, then it’s some deals with the Medellin cartel in Colombia. And why fly an empty plane back to the U.S. when it can be filled with cocaine instead? Soon, Seal is swimming in cash — an actual 1980s drug-running problem was storing so many $100 bills — and enjoying a wild life, full of amusing danger and colorful characters. Liman, who also helmed the preposterous but entertaining Edge of Tomorrow (2014), which also starred Cruise, makes this a kicky ride for viewers, too. All this international turmoil is just a largely consequence-free hoot; Pablo Escobar is the hombre with the great parties; and Cruise’s Seal might as well be the same sun-glassed, fast-talking charmer we loved in Risky Business. It winds up being a lot of surface flash, with a sprinkling of knowing cynicism — of course, our government is up to no good, but so is everybody else, and they’re worse, right? Despite the title, the film doesn’t even bother to interrogate the particular twisted version of American success, the win-at-anycost mentality that sustains the whole international criminal operation. It’s easy to root for Seal, because it seems like he’s just along for the ride because it’s more fun than flying short hops for TWA. And we’re along for the ride, because this is a way better Tom Cruise movie than The Mummy.

Armed forces: Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) and Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell)

GAME TIME {BY AL HOFF}

I

T WAS ONLY an exhibition, but the 1973 “Battle of the Sexes” tennis match, pitting Bobby Riggs against Billie Jean King, remains a defining event of professional tennis. Now Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (Little Miss Sunshine) lob their Battle of the Sexes into theaters; their film combines a straightforward recounting of how the infamous match transpired with a coming-out romance and a light treatise on equal rights. It begins about a year before, when tennis champ Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) tires of being treated unfairly by the governing league. Ssshhh, says Big Tennis: The men are stronger, more competitive, more exciting to watch, and thus should get paid more. So the female players start their own league. They’ve even got a big corporate sponsor: Virginia Slims. (In the complicated world of the 1970s, these cigarettes were pitched using feminist images and slogans — “You’ve come a long way, baby” — so a good fit for a start-up women’s league.) As King builds up the league — and starts an on-tour affair with a hairdresser (Andrea Riseborough) — former tennis

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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champ Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) hustles for promotional matches. A self-professed “male chauvinist pig,” Riggs offers to cheerfully beat the reigning women’s tennis champ in a televised match, proving that men are better athletes than women.

BATTLE OF THE SEXES DIRECTED BY: Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris STARRING: Emma Stone, Steve Carell

CP APPROVED It’s mostly lighthearted fun. The two leads exhibit familiar character beats: Stone is sweet, toggling between tentative and quietly determined, while Carell finds the note of pathos beneath Riggs’ braying goofball. There’s a slew of other recognizable actors in smaller roles, including Sarah Silverman, as King’s tart-tongued manager; Alan Cumming, as the bitchy costumer; Bill Pullman, as the piggish pro-tennis honcho; and Elisabeth Shue, as the weary Mrs. Riggs. The climactic match, as depicted here in wide shots, isn’t very exciting, but for-

tunately, the time expended on it is quite brief. Through the magic of digital filmmaking, Battle retains the event’s original commentator, well-known sports commentator Howard Cosell, who, as the match nears its inevitable conclusion, delivers the coup de grace: “The comedy has gone out of Bobby Riggs.” Early on, King had turned down Riggs’ offer — “It’s not a match, it’s a show.” In the end, it’s both, and more. Riggs and King compete as athletes on the court, surrounded by silly pageantry, while spectators take sides in a televised proxy war between the male-dominated status quo and liberated women demanding equality. But there’s no need for younger viewers to blow the dust off history books. Plenty of the film’s themes and critiques about sexism in athletics and the sports-media industrial complex remain applicable today. And as recent events, such as Kaepernick’s knee, have proved, sports and larger issues are forever getting entangled, and media loves nothing more than blowing it up into a “defining” us-vs.-them battle. Play on. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


gender firefighter in New York City, through her journey. 7:15 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6, and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 8. Row House Cinema

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

MANIFESTO. In Julian Rosefeldt’s recent film, Cate Blanchett portrays more than a dozen characters, each of whom recites a famous manifesto about art, politics and more. Oct. 6-12. Row House Cinema

NEW BETTER WATCH OUT. Chris Peckover’s darkly comedic horror thriller begins with the classic set-up: A pretty young woman settles in for a night of baby-sitting in a nice suburban home. As Christmas carols play, the signs of menace begin to unfold — shadows at the window, hangup phone calls, vague references to a not-great ex-boyfriend. It turns into a night of terror and survival, but perhaps not quite in the way you’d expect. Previous knowledge of Home Alone is not necessary, but it’s useful. Starts Fri., Oct. 6. Parkway, McKees Rocks (Al Hoff)

HANNA. In Joe Wright’s 2011 film, a teenage assassin (Saorise Ronan) catches the interest of a CIA agent (Cate Blanchett). In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Fri., Oct. 6-12. Row House Cinema I’M NOT THERE. Cate Blanchett and Richard Gere are among the six actors who portray Bob Dylan, at various career stages, in Todd Haynes 2007 film. Oct. 6-7 and Oct. 9-12. Row House Cinema CAROL. Two women (Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara) have a secret affair in the 1950s. Todd Hayes’ 2015 drama is adapted from Patricia Highsmith’s novel The Price of Salt. Fri., Oct. 6-12. Row House Cinema

BLADE RUNNER 2049. Denis Villeneuve’s dystopic actioner takes place 30 years after the events of Blade Runner (1982). In 2049, a young blade runner (Ryan Gosling), trying to sort out a mystery, tracks down a former blade runner (Harrison Ford, reprising his role from the original film). Starts Fri., Oct. 6

GOODNIGHT MOMMY. In this 2014 German psychological thriller, two twin boys start to question the identity of their mother, who has returned home from plastic surgery with her face bandaged. Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz direct. In German, with subtitles. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 7. Row House Cinema

COLUMBUS. The lives of three people intersect in Columbus, Ind.: a Korean man tending to his architect father, who is in a coma, and a young woman who wants to stay with her mother, a recovering addict. Kogonada directs this drama starring John Cho, Haley Lu Richardson and Parker Posey. Starts Fri., Oct. 6. Harris

Film Kitchen

CROWN HEIGHTS. This docudrama from Matt Ruskin depicts the case of Colin Warner (Lakeith Stanfield), a young man from Brooklyn, who was wrongly sentenced for a murder, and his friend (Nnamdi Asomugha), who fought to prove his innocence. Starts Fri., Oct. 6. Melwood THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US. After their flight is cancelled, two strangers — a doctor (Idris Elba) and a photojournalist (Kate Winslet) — book a tiny plane to travel home. Alas, the plane crashes in the vast and undeveloped High Uintas in northern Utah. In winter — brrr. So, the two — plus a dog — have to survive, get to know each other and decide how risky it is to leave the shelter of the wrecked plane and set off in search of civilization. Hany Abu-Assad directs this dramedy, which is primarily a two-hander featuring two actors who are compelling to watch, even when the script forces them to say and do some very silly things. In that respect, the film is very old-fashioned — and I don’t necessarily mean that in a bad way. The odd profanity aside, Mountain, with its mix of sincerity, romance and hokey plot pivots, could have been a midcentury Hollywood melodrama starring a steely actress like Joan Crawford or Bette Davis. The last reel suggests a better film that might have been — an examination of the psychology of surviving — before wrapping up in a gloriously unearned conclusion, pages of which could have fluttered out of a 1952 script meeting. Starts Fri., Oct. 6 (AH) MY LITTLE PONY. There’s trouble in Ponyville, and the Mane 6 are on it. If you understand what that means, you might be ready for Jayson Thiessen’s animated adventure. Starts Fri., Oct. 6 TROPHY. This new documentary from Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz examines big-game hunting and animal conservation, and how each group complicates and informs the other. Starts Fri., Oct. 6. Parkway, McKees Rocks VICTORIA & ABDUL. Judi Dench returns to the throne, reprising her role as the imperious British monarch Queen Victoria. Stephen Frears’ dram-

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The Mountain Between Us

Victoria & Abdul

edy is inspired (somewhat) by real events, and finds the quite old queen in 1887, snoring away. Through a series of mildly comic scenes, we see that she is bored, weary and quite lonely (her beloved husband long dead). Relief comes in the bizarrely costumed form of Abdul (Ali Fazal), one of the queen’s subjects from Agra, India, who has been chosen to come to England to present a commemorative medal. As things happen in such films, the two strike up an unlikely friendship, with the seemingly guileless Abdul teaching the queen Urdu and tenets of Islam, and the queen gobbling it up, like she’d never once thought about any other culture. Naturally, this relationship causes great comedic consternation among the queen’s retinue, portrayed by a slew of notable British character actors. Also put out: the queen’s self-important pouty son Bertie, brought to life by comedian Eddie Izzard. This is a film that is best enjoyed not thinking about actual British history, with all its complications with colonialism, race and class, nor any of its pesky facts. Instead, it should be measured against similarly BBC-produced period pieces, resplendent with gorgeous costumes, exquisite sets and parlor-room drollery. Dench is marvelous, of course. And if watching her stomp around demanding this and that because she is “the Empress of India” is wrong, well, surely most of her fans don’t want to be right. Starts Fri., Oct. 6 (AH)

now — the year 2019 — on the near future that Ridley Scott’s noirish 1982 sci-fi feature, full of pollution, neon, overcrowded cities and ’bots, eerily predicted. Harrison Ford, Daryl Hannah, Rutger Hauer and Edward James Olmos star. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 4. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5

REPERTORY BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT. We’re closing in

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CANADA’S TOXIC CHEMICAL VALLEY. This 30-minute 2013 documentary from Patrick McGuire looks at the region of Ontario where nearly half of Canada’s petrochemical industry is located, and the health and environmental concerns that affect the First Nations people of Aamjiwnaang living nearby. 5 p.m. Thu., Oct. 5. SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www.spacepittsburgh.org ADDICTED TO PLASTIC. Filmmaker Ian Connacher traveled to 12 countries on five continents to document planet’s use (and over-use) of plastic. This feature-length 2008 documentary also proffers solutions, such as plastics made from plants. 5 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6. SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www.spacepittsburgh.org EFFECTS. Production folks working on a horror movie start to get the idea that the fake killings they’re filming might be real. Dusty Nelson directs this 1980 horror thriller, to be screened in a new 4K digital transfer. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6; 7 and 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 7; and 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 8. Hollywood WOMAN ON FIRE. Julie Sokolow’s recent documentary profiles Brooke Guinan, the first openly trans-

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VICTOR CROWLEY. A new installment in the swampy Hatchet horror series finds the mass-murdering local legend Victor Crowley resurrected and causing new trouble. Director Adam Green will attend the screening. 8 p.m. Mon., Oct. 9. Hollywood FILM KITCHEN. The monthly series for local and independent film offers a Halloween-themed show. Highlights among these short films include “Spooky Nights in October,” Pat Francart’s stylish and well-acted little 2016 creeper about a guy who gets more than he bargains for at a Halloween party. The Oct. 10 program, curated by Matthew R. Day, also includes Day’s own “Spooky Walk,” a 10-minute 2005 docu-comedy about some drunk friends taking a nighttime hike in the woods to find ghosts; some of the laughs are supplied via wry subtitles. Other featured shorts include Ivette Spradlin’s cute silent-film-style comedy “Isobel Gowdie Is My Roommate” (2011); tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE’s “Seriousness Is Death,” documenting masked and naked hijinks (and graffiti-making) in early-1980s Baltimore; and “Dr. Delusia Operations,” Brandon McMillan’s comedy-horror photo roman set in an OR. Note the earlier starting time for this installment of Film Kitchen. 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 10 (6:30 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room. $5. (Bill O’Driscoll) DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE. In this 1920 adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella, John Barrymore performs both roles: the well-respected London physician Dr. Jekyll, and his dark alter ego, Mr. Hyde, who is summoned by a formula. The potion is a cheat, as the text explores the well-established duality of man. John S. Robertson’s silent classic will be accompanied by a live score performed by The Invincible Czars from Austin, Texas. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 10. Hollywood DRUID UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL. This traveling film festival, now in its 10th year, presents an evening of provocative underground film hosted by Billy Burgess. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 11. Melwood WORKING. Check out this filmed 1982 adaptation of the stage musical, which drew its material from Studs Terkel’s oral history of an assortment of American jobs. Continues a monthly series of films about labor and social justice. To be followed by a discussion. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 12. Pump House, Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomestead.org

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“THEY EMBRACED THE IDEA AND THE NEXT THING I KNOW, IT’S IN THE CATALOG.”

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} OCT. 5, 1948 The Homestead Grays win their third Negro League World Series, defeating the Birmingham Black Barons. The Barons featured a 17-year-old rookie outfielder named Willie Mays.

OCT. 5, 2005 Rookie Sidney Crosby laces up his skates for the first time as an NHL pro. The Penguins would lose the game, though, 5-1 to New Jersey.

Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder Chief Wilson hits his 36th triple, setting the single-season record for three-baggers. The record still stands today.

OCT. 7, 1985

Chief Wilson

OCT. 6, 1912

After nine years and a World Series win, the Pittsburgh Pirates fire New Castle’s Chuck Tanner as manager.

OCT. 8, 1921

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HOWARD KERNATZ}

Pittsburgh wrestling icons Dominic Denucci, right, and Shane Douglas

For the first time in the history of radio, KDKA broadcasts a college football game. Pitt beats West Virginia, 21-13

NOW, WE GO TO SCHOOL

OCT. 9, 1976 Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Bob Moose is killed in a car accident near Martin’s Ferry, Ohio. He and two passengers were on their way to a party hosted at a golf course owned by Pirates legend Bill Mazeroski. It was Moose’s 29th birthday.

OCT. 10, 1915 Pop Warner begins his eight-year run as head coach of the Pitt Panthers football program with a 32-0 shutout of Westminster College.

OCT. 10, 1972 Bill Mazeroski plays his final baseball game, a 7-1 loss to Cincinnati in the National League Championship Series. Oddly enough, it was also the last time that Roberto Clemente would hit a home run. Clemente went 1-3 the next day, and the Pirates were eliminated from the postseason. Clemente would die later that year on New Year’s Eve, in a plane crash, while ferrying supplies to earthquake victims in Nicaragua.

A

CONVERSATION about Pittsburgh’s

professional-wrestling history usually starts with one of two topics: Bruno Sammartino or Channel 11’s Studio Wrestling show, hosted by local TV legend “Chilly” Billy Cardille. It’s hard to argue those two starting points, but Pittsburgh’s pro-wrestling legacy goes much deeper. That’s why local wrestling journalist Thomas Leturgey decided to teach a class on the subject. Starting Oct. 11, Leturgey will begin his two-session course entitled “The History of Professional Wrestling in Pittsburgh.” The second session is a week later, on Oct. 18.

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Leturgey, who has written about wrestling for years and is the longtime ring announcer for the Keystone State Wrestling Alliance, got the idea

CCAC course will examine the history of pro wrestling in Pittsburgh {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} for the class this past spring. Former World Championship Wrestling announcer Chris Cruise taught a class

at Community College of Allegheny County on Sammartino’s decorated career. Leturgey attended the class and spoke with Cruise. “We thought another class in the fall would be a good idea, maybe something that addressed the region’s pro-wrestling history and traditions,” Leturgey says. “I talked to the folks at CCAC, they embraced the idea and the next thing I know, it’s in the catalog.” The class, which costs just $49, is part of CCAC’s Community Education program. Information on signing up for the class, which will be held at CCAC’s North Campus, in McCandless, can be found at www.ccac.edu.


Thomas Leturgey and Dominic Denucci

Leturgey became interested in wrestling’s history as he began to write about it. He wanted to cover it just as you would any sport and to do that, you need to know your history. Luckily, his job with KSWA enabled him to meet a whole slew of Pittsburgh’s greatest grapplers, from Sammartino and Dominic Denucci to former wrestlers who turned to politics: original Allegheny County Councilors “Jumpin’” Johnnie DeFazio and “Cannonball” Chuck Martoni. “It fascinated me how guys like DeFazio and Martoni transcended the sport of wrestling and moved into public service,” Leturgey says. “Then you have Bruno. He is such an endearing character. To this day, I believe that he is the most popular athlete to ever come out of this region.” Then there’s Denucci, the big affable character with a still-thick Italian accent. Denucci was a big deal when he started out in the late 1950s. He worked programs with some of wrestling’s best at the time. And in Australia, he was as popular as Hulk Hogan was in the 1980s. Leturgey says he has formed a friendship with Denucci over the years and says the former grappler is probably the second-best early prospect to come

out of the region after Sammartino. Denucci would go on to mold the future of professional wrestling as a trainer. Two of his top students were Mick Foley and Shane Douglas. Foley, be it as Mankind, Cactus Jack or any of his other personas, is one of the most well-known performers in the world. For years he sacrificed his body to entertain crowds. As for Douglas, he nearly single-handedly raised the profile in the 1990s of an upstart Philadelphia company called Extreme Championship Wrestling. Leturgey says he’ll also not only examine the impact that Channel 11’s Studio Wrestling had on the sport’s formation, but he’ll also delve into other wrestling shows and venues in the area that some people may have never heard of. “There was a lot of wrestling in this area prior to Studio Wrestling in 1958,” Leturgey says. “There were matches at the Islam Grotto on the North Side and at the Duquesne Gardens. “We also had plenty of big talent come through this area, from Ed ‘Strangler’ Lewis to Gorgeous George to Maurice Tillet [a particularly odd-looking Frenchman known as The French Angel]. Pittsburgh has a rich wrestling history that really is worth exploring deeper.”

“BRUNO SAMMARTINO IS THE MOST POPULAR ATHLETE TO EVER COME OUT OF THIS REGION.”

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PROTEST SONG {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} WHEN YOU TAKE the time and drill down

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into the protests of the national anthem, there’s really only one thing behind the anger directed at the athletes: self-entitlement. This all started when then-San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick got fed up with the ever-growing number of unarmed black men being killed by police. First he sat for the anthem and no one noticed. However, after talking to a friend and U.S. military veteran, Kaepernick decided to kneel because he told him it was more respectful. Now, here we are a year later. Kaepernick is out of a job, and more and more players have been protesting by taking a knee. Then, Donald Trump got into the fray by saying players should be fired for kneeling; he called them sons of bitches and complained that the game isn’t violent enough anymore. This led to more players taking knees, and that fired up the various rubes, racists and wingnuts (a.k.a. Trump’s main base of support), who began booing and burning their jerseys, hats and season tickets. I spent a lot of time watching these protest videos. They involved a lot of white folks wearing camouflage burning their clothes in metal drums and old Weber grills. They all said they were protesting because of the lack of respect that players, coaches and owners who knelt were showing the country, the flag and the veterans who fought for the Stars and Stripes. They threw around a lot of “ain’ts” and misplaced “thems” in explaining that NFL players were a bunch of traitors. Two Sundays ago, the Steelers couldn’t decide what to do in protest, so they decided to stay in the locker room. Not surprisingly, Steelers fans made up a great number of these clips, including the fan in the above screenshot. After burning his merchandise, he looks at the camera and says “This is what your black lifes (sic) matters get for ya. Thanks, Mike Tomlin.” Follow that up with now former Muse Township Fire Chief Paul Smith taking to Facebook after that game to call Mike Tomlin the racial slur starting with the letter “n,” and it doesn’t take long to really see why these protests are happening. The whole “disrespect the flag” nonsense here is nothing but a red herring. We all know why the players are protesting, because they have clearly said so. They are protesting a country that does not treat all of its citizens fairly. Or, as Kaepernick said way back at the beginning of this: “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and

A screencap from a YouTube video of a Steelers fan burning his clothes

people of color. To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way.” If you’ve never experienced the kind of inequality that African Americans deal with, it’s easy to not listen to the whys and wherefores of this issue and just label these players traitors and whatever else. But if you listen and pay attention and do your own research and look at the issue outside of your own identity, it’s also pretty easy to see what’s going on in this country. If you honestly do that, you may still not agree with these protests, but you’ll have to respect them. It’s not about the flag or veterans or a song penned by a slave-owning lawyer (no time to get into that one now). This is about equality and justice. But people don’t want to hear that because they don’t want to deal with it. We all have different levels of love and respect for this country. This county and that flag means something different to everyone. That means there is no right or wrong level of reverence for a piece of red, white and blue cloth. If someone doesn’t want to stand for the anthem or the flag because their take on America is different from yours, that doesn’t make it a disrespectful act. Your act of booing is actually disrespectful not only to the players, but also, by your logic, to the National Anthem and the flag. Just because you’re standing doesn’t make it any less so. You’re entitled to say that you think kneeling before the anthem is wrong, and you are entitled to boo. And with those gestures, you’re engaging in the same right to protest as the players. So ideally, by your logic, there should be another group of people standing behind you, booing you for booing them. We’ll get to the point where everyone is booing, and if everyone is booing, then no one is listening. And that’s what got us to this point in the first place. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

BOOM OR BUST? {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} PENN STATE’S Saquon Barkley is quickly emerging as the frontrunner for the 2017 Heisman Trophy — a trophy that hasn’t made its way to State College since John Cappelletti struck the famous pose during the Nixon administration. Pitt got a firsthand glimpse of the standout running back when the Panthers lost to Penn State earlier this season for the first time since 1999 (they’ve played only three times since then, but still). The explosive running back has NFL scouts drooling over his potential. But if history is any indication, the buyer better beware. Of the top 50 running backs in NFL history, only one was a Nittany Lion. Former Steeler Franco Harris (ranked 14th) is the most recent PSU running back to make a major impact in the NFL. That’s an astonishing fact for a perennially top-ranked program that emphasizes the run. Compton Junior College has as many rushers in the top 50 (Joe Perry) as Penn State does. East Carolina has twice as many, with Earnest Byner and Chris Johnson. Pitt has three: Tony Dorsett (ninth), Curtis Martin (fourth) and LeSean McCoy (38th and climbing). So, if an NFL team is looking to draft Saquon Barkley, don’t draft him in the first round. Also, Barkley had better hope that he is not signed by the Philadelphia Eagles. The Eagles have drafted or signed two Penn State backs who are on PSU’s top-20 rushing list. Tony Hunt, the Nittany Lions’ third all-time leading rusher, played for the Philly Birds after being taken in the third round in 2007. Hunt finished his career with 25 yards rushing. Eric McCoo, 13th on Penn State’s list, earned slightly better numbers for the Eagles. McCoo ran for 54 yards in his professional career. Both of those players actually ran for more yards at Penn State than did Franco, PSU’s 18th leading rusher. Barkley is currently seventh on Penn State’s rushing list and rising. Like the curse of Seinfeld, Penn State backs just aren’t successful in the next stage of their careers. Penn State has produced far more Georges (Jason Alexander) and Kramers (Michael Richards) than Elaines (Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who has won 10 Emmy Awards since leaving Seinfeld). Of

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CAMILLE STEFANI/THE DAILY COLLEGIAN}

Saquon Barkley tries to break a tackle Sept. 30 against Indiana at Penn State’s Beaver Stadium.

Penn State’s top 10 rushers, six of them have been drafted in the first round of the NFL draft. Curt Warner is the closest to being an Elaine. Warner churned out a respectable NFL career, finishing with 6,844 yards with the Seahawks and Rams. Sounds like a lot, but Antowain Smith, Rodney Hampton and Charlie Garner all are ahead of him in yards rushing. Larry Johnson would be the second biggest success story, because he had two really good years for the Kansas City Chiefs. L.J. accumulated 6,223 yards but was pushed out of the NFL because he was, well, an abusive jerk. It seems like Johnson spent more time at the courthouse than in the film room. He also fought constantly with coaches and management. Three of the biggest busts in NFL history are also Penn State running backs. Curtis Enis (who was probably never made fun of for his name) was selected fifth overall in the 1998 draft, ahead of Randy Moss and Alan Faneca. Enis reached an NFL end zone four times in his career and amassed slightly under 1,500 yards rushing. He ignobly finished his once-promising career with Cleveland. Ki-Jana Carter was chosen No. 1 overall by the Cincinnati Bengals, which was the equivalent of two curses working together to form a nuclear bust. Sure, Cincinnati could’ve cho-

THREE OF THE BIGGEST BUSTS IN NFL HISTORY WERE ALSO PENN STATE RUNNING BACKS.

sen Steve McNair, Warren Sapp or even Kerry Collins that year, but the Bengals like to bungle. Carter rushed for 1,114 yards in his lackluster career, hampered by some serious injuries. Both Ki-Jana Carter and Curtis Enis are Ohio natives,

so that may have something to do with it also. Finally, D.J. Dozier, whom Barkley will pass next on the PSU list, ran for just 691 yards after being drafted 14th in the first round in 1987. He parlayed an unaccomplished NFL career into a pitiful MLB career. Dozier played with the New York Mets, where he batted .191 and drove in two runs. But give him lots of credit for making it to the pros in two sports. He is the poor man’s Bo Jackson. Although many of them were great at Beaver Stadium, Nittany Lions backs can’t excel in the NFL. The university’s all-time leading rusher is … you guessed it, Evan Royster. Royster was better than any of the aforementioned backs during his time at Penn State. Royster went to the pros and rushed for even fewer yards than Dozier: 416 NFL yards with the politically incorrect Washington football team. He latched onto the Atlanta Falcons practice squad two years ago and is now out of the league. There are so many cautionary tales for Saquon Barkley to heed. Barkley, talented as he may be, is hoping not only to win the Heisman, but go to the NFL and succeed. We will soon find out if he is an Elaine or a Kramer. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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POT HOLDERS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. La ___ (Milan opera house) 6. Rooftop spinners 11. Acapulco approval 14. Call to a waitress 16. On “E” 17. Films 18. Region where Watts is, commonly 20. Salamander 21. Feel malaise 22. French cabbage 23. State tree of Maine 25. Put on the line? 27. Kentucky tourist spot 32. Flower’s support 34. First name in feminist folk-rock 35. Hershiser on the hill 36. Previously named 38. Sign on a staff 39. “Untouchables” head 40. One might be needed to get a passport 45. Many months 46. Pink-slips 47. Julie or Marie: Abbr. 48. Kind of wrestler 49. Comprehended 50. 5:2, e.g. 53. Places to work out 58. Archer with wings

60. Winter blanket 61. Columbus ship 63. Accelerando’s opp. 64. Mindinfluencing drug 65. Teens’s lifestyles 70. “___ no hooks” 71. Largest privately owned Hawaiian island 72. Knitted baby shoe 73. Neptune or Pluto 74. Devoured voraciously 75. Clear blue sky

DOWN 1. “Alas!” 2. Sunday singers 3. Mojo or juju 4. Struck a match 5. Court icon Arthur 6. The bite stuff? 7. Cash reg. display 8. “A Way With Words” airer 9. Cockpit announcement 10. Graceful woman 11. Clearing 12. Safety item for boaters 13. In-house # 15. Bathtub dirt 19. Timeline part 24. Words to a winner 26. Left the group, maybe 28. Shakes’ peers?

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29. “You’re the only ___ can trust” 30. Little disagreements 31. Other than what was listed 33. “Whatever” reaction 37. Bitcoin, e.g. 38. Item for an angler 40. Speak harshly of 41. “Uh, probably” 42. Sent back to a lower court 43. Organizational chart topper, for short 44. Suffix that means “little”

MUSIC

in Spanish 51. Sex authority Westheimer 52. Social event 54. Tharp of choreography 55. Not at all with it 56. Lighter option 57. Rebuff an offer 59. Take the driver’s seat 62. Lotion base 64. Pull laboriously 66. Feed bag nibble 67. Article in France-Soir 68. 19th in a Greek series 69. Crib kid {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.04-10.11

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’re a good candidate for the following roles: 1. a skeptical optimist who is both discerning and open-minded; 2. a robust truth-teller who specializes in interesting truths; 3. a charming extremist who’s capable of solving stubborn riddles; 4. a smooth operator who keeps everyone calm even as you initiate big changes; 5. an enlightened game-player who reforms or avoids games that abuse beauty’s power.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Actress and author Carrie Fisher wrote three autobiographies. Speed-skating Olympics star Apolo Anton Ono published his autobiography at age 20. The rascal occultist Aleister Crowley produced an “autohagiography.” To understand that odd term, keep in mind that a “hagiography” is an account of the life of a saint, so adding “auto” means it’s the biography of a saint penned by the saint himself. I’m bringing up these fun facts in hope of encouraging you to ruminate at length on your life story. If you don’t have time to write a whole book, please take a few hours to remember in detail the gloriously twisty path you have trod from birth until now. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the best way to heal what needs to be healed is to steep yourself in a detailed meditation on the history of your mysterious destiny.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you go to the Historical Museum of the Palatinate in Germany, you will see a jug of wine that was bottled in 1687. In accordance with astro-

logical omens, Sagittarius, I suggest that you find a metaphorical version of this vintage beverage — and then metaphorically drink it! In my opinion, it’s time for you to partake of a pleasure that has been patiently waiting for you to enjoy it. The moment is ripe for you to try an experience you’ve postponed, to call in favors that have been owed to you, to finally do fun things you’ve been saving for the right occasion.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If a late-night TV talk show called and asked me to be a guest, I’d say no. If People magazine wanted to do a story on me, I’d decline. What good is fame like that? It might briefly puff up my ego, but it wouldn’t enhance my ability to create useful oracles for you. The notoriety that would come my way might even distract me from doing what I love to do. So I prefer to remain an anonymous celebrity, as I am now, addressing your deep self with my deep self. My messages are more valuable to you if I remain an enigmatic ally instead of just another cartoony media personality. By the way,

get your yoga on!

I suspect you’ll soon face a comparable question. Your choice will be between what’s flashy and what’s authentic; between feeding your ego and feeding your soul.

you can. It’s high time for you to be a genius of relaxation, attending tenderly to all the little details that make you feel at ease and in love with the world.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

A Canadian guy named Harold Hackett likes to put messages in bottles that he throws out into the Atlantic Ocean from his home on Prince Edward Island. Since he started in 1996, he has dispatched over 5,000 missives into the unknown, asking the strangers who might find them to write back to him. To his delight, he has received more than 3,000 responses from as far away as Russia, Scotland and West Africa. I suspect that if you launch a comparable mission sometime soon, Aquarius, your success rate wouldn’t be quite that high, but still good. What long-range inquiries or invitations might you send out in the direction of the frontier?

“If an angel were to tell us something of his philosophies, I do believe some of his propositions would sound like 2 x 2 = 13.” So said the German scientist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1742-1799). Now maybe you don’t believe in the existence of angels, and so you imagine his idea doesn’t apply to you. But I’m here to tell you that an influence equivalent to an angel will soon appear in your vicinity. Maybe it’ll be a numinous figure in your dreams, or a charismatic person you admire, or a vivid memory resurrected in an unexpected form, or a bright fantasy springing to life. And that “angel” will present a proposition that sounds like 2 x 2 = 13.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

“Intensify” is one of your words of power these days. So are “fortify,” “reinforce” and “buttress.” Anything you do to intensify your devotion and focus will be rewarded by an intensification of life’s gifts to you. As you take steps to fortify your sense of security and stability, you will activate dormant reserves of resilience. If you reinforce your connections with reliable allies, you will set in motion forces that will ultimately bring you help you didn’t even know you needed. If you buttress the bridge that links your past and future, you will ensure that your old way of making magic will energize your new way.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

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You wouldn’t expect a 5-year-old child to paint a facsimile of Picasso’s “Guernica” or sing Puccini’s opera, La Boheme. Similarly, you shouldn’t fault your companions and you for not being perfect masters of the art of intimate relationships. In fact, most of us are amateurs. We may have taken countless classes in math, science, literature and history, but never had a single lesson from teachers whose area of expertise is the hard work required to create a healthy partnership. I mention this, Aries, because the next seven weeks will be an excellent time for you to remedy this deficiency. Homework assignments: What can you do to build your emotional intelligence? How can you learn more about the art of creating vigorous togetherness?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to slow down and create a wealth of spacious serenity. Use an unhurried, step-by-step approach to soothe yourself. With a glint in your eye and a lilt in your voice, say sweet things to yourself. In a spirit of play and amusement, pet and pamper yourself as you would a beloved animal. Can you handle that much self-love, Taurus? I think

Unless you have an off-road vehicle, you can’t drive directly from North America to South America. The Pan-American Highway stretches from Prudhoe Bay in northern Alaska to Ushuaia, Argentina — a distance of about 19,000 miles — except for a 100mile patch of swampy rainforest in Panama. I’d like to call your attention to a comparable break in continuity that affects your own inner terrain, Cancerian — a grey area where two important areas of your life remain unlinked. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to close the gap. Based in Korea, Samsung is a world leader in selling smartphones and other information technology. But it didn’t start out that way. In its original form, back in 1938, it primarily sold noodles and dried fish. By 1954, it had expanded into wool manufacturing. More than three decades after its launch as a company, it further diversified, adding electronics to its repertoire. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the next 10 months should be an excellent time for you to do the equivalent of branching out from noodles and dried fish to electronics. And the coming six weeks will be quite favorable for formulating your plans and planting your seeds.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In my opinion, you’re not quite ready to launch full-tilt into the rebuilding phase. You still have a bit more work to do on tearing down the old stuff that’s in the way of where the new stuff will go. So I recommend that you put an “Under Construction” sign outside your door, preferably with flashing yellow lights. This should provide you with protection from those who don’t understand the complexity of the process you’re engaged in. Want to enjoy my books, music, and videos without spending any money? http://bit.ly/LiberatedGifts.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 22-year-old straight male dating a 23-year-old woman. This is by far the most sexual relationship I’ve been in, which is great, except one part is freaking me out: I recently “caught” my girlfriend masturbating with her roommate’s panties. (She knew I was coming over and wanted me to catch her.) It turns out she has a habit of sneaking her roommate’s worn underwear, masturbating while smelling them (or putting them in her mouth), and then sneaking them back into her roommate’s laundry basket. She has also used her roommate’s vibrator and dry-humped her pillow to orgasm. I got turned on hearing about all this, and she jerked me off with her roommate’s panties. My girlfriend says she gets turned on being “naughty,” and most of her fantasies involve being her roommate’s sex slave, me fucking the roommate while my GF is tied up, etc. Our sex life now revolves around the roommate — my GF has stolen a few more pairs of panties and even worn them while I fucked her, and her dirty talk is now almost entirely about her roommate. This turns me on, so I don’t really want it to stop, but my questions are: 1. Is this bad? 2. Is this normal? We’re conditioned to believe women are less kinky and less sexual than men, and I don’t want to buy into that. My girlfriend says she isn’t “that weird.” I don’t know what to think.

I’m a six-months-pregnant woman in a wonderful relationship. My sex drive has skyrocketed, and I get uncomfortably horny at random times. I work at a preschool and have gone into the one-person locked bathroom during my break for a quick rubout. Is this wrong? It takes me one minute to come, and I’m totally silent. But I’m at a preschool, and there are little kids on the other side of that door. Thoughts? KNOCKED UP AND HORNY

You’re doing nothing wrong — and pretty soon you’ll be having sex in your home while your kid sleeps or plays on the other side of your bedroom door, KUAH, so you might as well get some practice in. And if you don’t want a kid walking in on you at home, either (and you definitely don’t), put a lock on your bedroom door. I am a 29-year-old woman and getting married to my boyfriend of four years, “Adam,” in a few months. Relationship is great, sex is fantastic, no complaints. So why am I writing? Adam’s best friend, “Steve,” was his roommate in college, and Adam recently revealed that he and Steve used to masturbate together. I have no idea what to make of this. I don’t think Adam is gay, and I don’t think Steve is either. Maybe they’re heteroflexible? But is it common for straight guys to masturbate together? Also, why is he just telling me this now, after we’ve been together for four years? I’m not sure how I should act around Steve. He hangs out with us a lot. Help!

FREAKINESS/ NAUGHTINESS/ KINKINESS IS NORMAL, SCIENCE BACKS ME UP ON THIS.

THERE’S NO ACRONYM FOR THIS

1. It’s bad. 2. When it comes to human sexuality, TNAFT, variance is the norm. Which means freakiness/ naughtiness/kinkiness is normal — science backs me up on this — and, yes, lots of women have high libidos, and lots are kinky. But “variance is the norm” doesn’t get your girlfriend off the hook — or you, TNAFT. You and your girlfriend are both violating this poor woman’s privacy, potentially her health (unless your girlfriend is sterilizing her roommate’s vibrator after using it), and — perhaps most importantly — her trust. Honoring each other’s privacy and showing mutual respect for each other’s belongings are the social norms that make it possible for unrelated/unfucking adults to share a living space. We trust our roommates not to steal money out of our purses, eat our peanut butter, use our toothbrushes, etc. And even if your roommate never catches you, it’s still not OK to use their fucking toothbrush. It should go without saying that we trust our roommates not to shove our dirty panties into their mouths, use our sex toys, hump our pillows, etc. We can’t control who fantasizes about us — people can fantasize about whomever they care to — but we have an absolute right to control who handles our dirty underpants. (My God, think of all the times you’ve run out of clean underwear and fished a dirty pair out of the laundry!) Your girlfriend should make an honest, respectful, naughty pass at her roommate. And who knows? Maybe her roommate is just as pervy as you two are and would jump at the chance to have a sex slave and full use of her roommate/sex slave’s boyfriend in exchange for a few dirty panties. Or maybe she’d like to move.

SEEKING TO EVALUATE VERY EXPLOSIVE DISCLOSURE

“Buddy-bating among straight guys is more common than people may think,” said Trey Lyon of Fuck Yeah! Friendly Fire, the “definitive source for straightish porn.” Lyon’s website — FYFriendlyFire.com — features porn of the “heteroflexible/ almost bi” variety, i.e., two guys who aren’t afraid they’ll melt if their dicks touch while they’re having sex with the same woman. Lyon’s website has more than 200,000 followers, and he’s heard from lots of straight/straightish guys who masturbate with — read: beside — their straight/straightish male buddies. Lyon doesn’t have hard data for you, STEVED, only anecdote, but it’s safe to say your fiancé isn’t the only straight/straightish guy out there who’s done a little “buddy-bating.” So why do straight/straightish guys do this? “A lot of the straight guys who reach out to me mention that they enjoy bonding in a masculine albeit sexual way with another guy, while also still only being responsible for getting themselves off,” said Lyon. “And sharing a moment of vulnerability in this way with another guy strengthens their friendship. STEVED’s boyfriend may be mentioning this now because it’s not something he feels he should be ashamed of, it’s something well-integrated into his sexuality and orientation, and he feels it is important to be open with his fiancée. Wait, what’s the problem again?” On the Lovecast, sex-toy review with Erika Moen: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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SQUARE PEG INTO A ROUND HOLE OR A LETTER TO GOD

I listened to tthe war stories over a beer, and then it hit me in the chest like a bullet fired from a sniper {BY JIMMY CVETIC}

Pounding a square peg into a round hole smashing the peg smashing pounding the peg pounding till it almost fits or writing a love letter in the sand like an old Pat Boone song. That’s exactly like trying to force a poem like sitting on the pot unable to shit. It’s the same thing and Buk was right, Don’t Try … Going back to 1969 Bien Hoa sitting at a card table with a soldier from the 1st Cav, he told me, “We captured a gook And he didn’t want to talk. So, we tied him to the front of an APC and broke brush with him till he was dead. Broke every bone in his body and then it didn’t matter if he talked. We were just getting even when they buried our soldiers up to their necks and let the Two Step Killers bite their necks. They put the snakes in a cage and released taunting the snakes taunting and taunting till the snake bit and killed our guys.” I listened to the war stories over a beer and then it hit me in the chest like a bullet fired from a sniper. I knew war was wrong. I hated the sound of madness what the fires of hell turned us into and there was nothing that I could do we were no longer men. All wars are wrong. Men no longer can see nor hear nor feel they can only taste the blood of anger. I folded my cards and left the table. I walked away sick and looked into the vast sky of war … wanting only God. I wish that I could put God into the chest of mankind like a sniper’s bullet. I wish that I could make them kneel in thanks for the gift of life. I picked up the hammer and pounded the square peg and wrote a love letter in the sand to God. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Jimmy Cvetic is a poet, artist, activist and former Allegheny County police detective.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

10.04/10.11.2017


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October 4, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27, Issue 40

October 4, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27, Issue 40