Page 1

X PGHCITYPAPER XX XX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX PGHCITYPAPER XX PGHCITYPAPER

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.20/09.27.2017


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


EVENTS 9.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SELECTOR DUB NARCOTIC WITH SPECIAL GUEST STRANGEWAYS The Warhol entrance space Free parking is available in The Warhol lot. Tickets $10/$8 members and students

9.26 – 10am-5pm RADICAL DAY 2017, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION Bring the whole family to The Warhol for a unique day of art and fun. Free

Arto Lindsay & Beauty Pill

9.29 – 8PM ERIN MARKEY: BONER KILLER The Warhol theater Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University School of Art and School of Drama Tickets $15/$12 members & students

10.18 – 8pm The Warhol theater, Tickets $20/$15 members & students

We welcome Arto Lindsay, who has long stood at the intersection of music and art, collaborating with artists such as Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, Animal Collective, 4H[[OL^)HYUL`HUK*HL[HUV=LSVZV(ZHTLTILYVM+5(OLWSH`LKHZPNUPÄJHU[ role in the foundation of the no wave genre in late 1970s in New York City. Current band members include Melvin Gibbs (Rollins Band), Kassa Overall, Paul Wilson, and Patrick Higgins.

9.30 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY Join artist educators for Dandy Andy, a monthly tour that focuses on Warhol’s queer history. Free with museum admission

The band Beauty Pill from Washington, D.C., opens the show.

Matthew Shipp Trio

10.06– 8PM SOUND SERIES: AN EVENING WITH JOAN SHELLEY The Warhol theater Co-presented with Calliope: The Pittsburgh Folk Music Society Tickets $15/$12 members & students

with special guest Thoth Trio 11.10 – 8pm The Warhol theater, Tickets $15/$12 members & students

Co-presented with City of Asylum @ Alphabet City We welcome back the forward-thinking and iconoclastic jazz pianist Matthew Shipp, with his trio featuring Michael Bisio on bass and Newman Taylor Baker on drums. For over three decades, since getting his start in the early 1990s with David S. Ware Quartet, Shipp has been a pioneer in the New York City experimental jazz scene along with composers such as John Zorn and William Parker. NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

3


Turn a ConnectCard double play.

Your Port Authority ConnectCard will not only get you to and from Pirates’ home games this season, now through September 27, it will help you save big on your game tickets. • Up to $10 per ticket on Outfield Box seats (Monday-Thursday only) • $3 per ticket on Grandstand seats (Sundays) Look for the Connect and Save promotion at Pirates.com\ConnectCard or show your ConnectCard at the Pirates box office on game days.

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


09.20/09.27.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 38

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns HALEY FREDERICK, HANNAH LYNN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, AMANDA REED

[ART] Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

[ADVERTISING]

[NEWS]

Pittsburgh’s Democratic Socialists of America is small, but growing. Is there room for them in the region’s economic and political landscape? PAGE 06

Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[MARKETING+PROMOTIONS]

[MUSIC]

Marketing Director LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing Assistant LIZ VENUTO Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN

“I’ve gotten a lot better at figuring out when a song is done.”

[ADMINISTRATION] PAGE 20

Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[PUBLISHER] EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

[LAST PAGE]

“He really was the unofficial mayor of South Side.” PAGE 46

News 06 VIews 14 Weird 16 Music 18 Arts 27 Events 31 Taste 34

Screen 38 Sports 40 Classifieds 43 Crossword 43 Astrology 44 Savage Love 45 The Last Word 46 NEWS

+

MUSIC

The 5th Judicial District of

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

www.pghcitypaper.com PGHCITYPAPER PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER +

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

5


THIS WEEK

“IF PEOPLE LOOK INTO THEIR FAMILY TREES, THEY MIGHT REALIZE THEY HAVE BEEN A SOCIALIST ALL ALONG.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Do nice guys finish last? Last week City Paper staffers did a fantasy football draft picking only “morally upstanding” players. Listen to our podcast at www.pghcitypaper.com for the results.

Listen to Lucy Sheets, Pittsburgh queen of the bahn mi, share her story on this week’s Sound Bite food podcast at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

CP recently joined ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project, aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Our featured photo from last week is by @jdescutner. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

Want to get the freshest content sent right to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletters at pghcitypaper.com/newsletters.

Pittsburgh Democratic Socialists of America co-chairs Arielle Cohen and Adam Shuck holding red roses, the symbols of democratic socialism

SEEING RED O

N A RECENT September evening, 76 comrades of the Pittsburgh chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America joined together to discuss society’s travails, like the disproportionate harm natural disasters cause poor communities, public-education funding shortages, and access to health care. One answer prevailed throughout the evening as the cause for these problems: capitalism. And, if you ask DSA members, all of these problems have one solution: a new American form of socialism. “I joined because capitalism has basically ruined my life since I was born,” says DSA member and Shadyside resident Marlene Noble, who was born in Haiti, but moved to the U.S. at age 3. After Hurricane Gordon struck in 1994, 89,000 Haitians were displaced, and Noble’s family was too poor to fully recover. Noble was placed with Catholic Charities

and eventually adopted by American parents in Pittsburgh. She has had chronic back problems that have required multiple surgeries, and worries her health care will be stripped. She says, as an immigrant and a black woman, she has little faith in capitalism to help her. She joined Pittsburgh’s DSA in August and is part of a growing cohort flocking to

Can socialist ideals gain support in Pittsburgh? {BY RYAN DETO} the political group that was formed in the wake of President Donald Trump’s election. The Democratic Socialists of America is the largest socialist organization in the U.S. They advocate for “democratic socialism,” which emphasizes that all people have a voice in important aspects of their

lives, such as government, workplace and economy. It also seeks to weaken the power of corporations and increase the power of working people. NATIONALLY, THE DSA saw its numbers triple to about 25,000 from 2016 to 2017, likely helped along by former presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont), who champions many socialist policies, like universal health care and free college. Pittsburgh’s DSA co-chair Adam Shuck says the group started with seven people in November 2016 and currently has about 350 dues-paying members. Pittsburgh’s DSA, while growing, is still young and small compared to other leftleaning Pittsburgh political groups. For example, Pittsburgh DSA has a steering committee of 11 elected members, while DJ Ryan, of the Allegheny County Democratic Committee, says the Democrats have CONTINUES ON PG. 08

6

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017










































We have a full house of animals looking for loving homes!

Dog and Cat Adoptions September 15th - 24th at Humane Animal Rescue’s North Side and East End Locations

Humane Animal Rescue

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

North Side 1101 Western Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15233

East End 6926 Hamilton Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15208

humaneanimalrescue.org

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

7


SEEING RED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

about 2,600 elected committee members. Regardless, the DSA already has endorsed candidates and members running for elected positions and is campaigning for policies like universal health care. But the group might run into obstacles, since the region’s perception of socialism isn’t stellar and the structure of Pittsburgh’s economy isn’t quite ready for a big socialist push. But the DSA believes a push toward democratic socialism can help Pittsburghers and to help spread the wealth evenly across the region. The “red scare” of post-WWII America led to the labeling of many pro-workingrights Americans as communists. Over the decades, some socialism-like programs, including Social Security, public transportation and public housing, have received support, but both the Democratic and Republican parties have shied away from the word. The recent presidential campaign of Sanders, who calls himself a “democratic socialist,” and his subsequent popularity have changed things. Pittsburgh DSA cochairs Shuck and Arielle Cohen say their group isn’t advocating for the type of totalitarian socialism often associated with the Soviet Union. Cohen says, “The goal is to have more democratic and just practices in every aspect of our lives, our workplaces, our schools, our communities. We believe the more participation, the more radical democracy. Not just to redistribute wealth, but to redistribute power.” Cohen says the DSA is fighting for things like fair wages, equal access to health care and the possibility of free higher education. Politically in Southwestern Pennsylvania, support for democratic socialism is scattered, but Cohen believes socialism, and the programs it champions, are growing in popularity. According to a June Pew Research poll, 33 percent of Americans favor a “single payer” approach to health insurance, compared to only 21 percent of the public in 2014. “I think the demands of democratic socialism are popular,” says Cohen. “Democratic socialists are not scared of these words, and I think people increasingly are not afraid of these words.” A January 2016 Harper poll shows that 38 percent of Pennsylvanians favor socialism, compared to 35 percent who oppose it. This same poll shows 57 percent of Pennsylvanians favor capitalism, compared to 29 percent who oppose it. Pennsylvania political pollster G. Terry Madonna believes Southwestern Pennsyl-

vanians are not totally opposed to socialistic, government-intervention programs, citing their support, ironically, for Trump. “The blue-collar areas that surround Allegheny County, these blue-collar workers essentially elected Trump,” says Madonna. “They voted for a guy who articulated government intervening in bringing back coal jobs. Having government intervene to help is something they favor.” But Madonna notes many areas in Southwestern Pennsylvania, including Allegheny County, are “socially conservative” and this might be a deterrent in getting voters to back the DSA and its endorsed candidates. DSA strongly supports reproductive rights, prison abolition, disability rights and the Black Lives Matter movement. It also has been a strong presence in supporting the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and other immigrantrights protections. But Shuck still sees some openings for a rise in socialism’s popularity in Pittsburgh. He notes the Community Land Trust in Lawrenceville — an affordable-housing program where a nonprofit ensures low-income purchasers can buy homes — is a form of socialism. The DSA also supports Pittsburgh City Council’s push to raise the realty-transfer tax. Shuck says the tax will fall mostly on wealthy developers, not middle-income home buyers. He believes things like housing, food and health care, should be human rights, not commodities to purchase. “And we have the capacity to provide this for everyone, but the reason we are not doing it right now is because of political will,” says Shuck. The U.S. has the highest Gross Domestic Product of any nation in the world, at about $18 trillion, but according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the U.S. has the fourth most unequal economy of developed nations. The widening gap of inequality appears to be playing out in Pittsburgh, too. According to the Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C. think tank, Pittsburgh saw a 13 percent increase in Gross Metropolitan Product from 2010-2015, which was above the national average. But the region only had a 3 percent increase in jobs, well below the national average. According to a 2016 report from news organization Bloomberg, of cities with populations over 250,000, Pittsburgh was the ninth most unequal city in the country. But converting Pittsburgh to a more socialistic system may not be all that easy.

“I JOINED BECAUSE CAPITALISM HAS BASICALLY RUINED MY LIFE SINCE I WAS BORN.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


Every story in the rainbow Stirring romances. Inspiring dramas. Uplifting biographies. Pride comes in many stories. Experience the vast collection of LGBTQ movies and shows on XFINITY X1. Explore the LGBTQ Film & TV collection on XFINITY On Demand or just say “Pride” or “LGBTQ” into the X1 Voice Remote to find exciting, new entertainment curated especially for you – all year long.

I am Jazz available at xfinity.com/stream

El Canto Del Colibri available on XFINITY Stream app

Discover more about the LGBTQ Film & TV Collection at xfinity.com/findyourself Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. © 2017 Comcast. All rights reserved.

DIV17-201-A13-V2

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

9


SEEING RED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

See why millions trust us for Home & Auto. ™

Brandon Greene, Agent 146 Forest Hills Plaza Pittsburgh Pa 15221

I’m here to help life go right — by saving you time and money when you combine your home and auto insurance. CALL ME TODAY.

Phone: 412-824-4800 Email: Brandon.Greene.WGI6@statefarm.com

State Farm Life Insurance Company (not licensed in MA, NY or WI) State Farm Life and Accident Assurance Company (licensed in NY and WI) Bloomington, IL 1601538

Bruce Katz, an economist with Brookings, recently co-wrote a report on Pittsburgh’s new economic emergence as a tech and health-care hub, where he acknowledged the need for more broad-based growth. The report recommended training programs be established at community colleges, nonprofits and businesses to prepare bluecollar workers for the jobs emerging in advanced manufacturing fields. “What is realistic right now?” says Katz, in an interview with City Paper. “With Donald Trump as president and a divided government in Harrisburg, big government interventions seem difficult.” But Katz’s recommendations aren’t that different from what DSA is initially proposing. Katz says local governments like Pittsburgh should model themselves after governments in northern Europe, which have excelled at capturing the wealth of public goods, like selling of public land, and using those profits to invest in public services. This model also relies heavily on strong labor unions, which Pittsburgh DSA are already supporting, and working to help unions grow. The biggest differences between what Katz is proposing and DSA’s goals are long

term. Northern Europeans support utilizing capitalism to benefit workers and create welfare. Cohen and Shuck want this too, initially, but eventually they want to do away with capitalism entirely. Shuck says this is possible. By getting endorsed candidates running at the local level, he says DSA can build a grassroots movement to push the politics of the region to the left. This year, DSA member Anita Prizio is running for Allegheny County Council as a Democrat and independent candidate Mik Pappas is running for magisterial judge. Both have been endorsed by the Pittsburgh DSA for their “progressive” and “radical” policies. Cohen says Pittsburgh’s DSA is a “big tent” organization, and there are many different roles for potential members, including electoral politics, education advocacy, socialist feminism and even just helping to make memes. She rejects the notion that Pittsburgh is too moderate or conservative to embrace socialism, and notes the robust history of labor organizing in Southwestern Pennsylvania. “If people look into their family trees,” says Cohen, “they might realize they have been a socialist all along.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN

Make coming home the best part of every day. With a Mortgage, Home Equity or Construction Loan* from Northwest. Apply on your time, the way you want: 26 offices to serve you in the Greater Pittsburgh area

Go to northwest.com Visit your local Northwest office Call 1-888-884-4626

*Subject to credit approval. Northwest Bank is Member FDIC.

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


(ADVERTISEMENT)

Pro a c t i ve R e s o u rce s p re s e nt s. . . | Pro m o ti o na l S e ri e s

ELDER LAW, ESTATE PLANNING, ASSET PROTECTION

464 Perry Hwy Pittsburgh (724) 241-8885

E. ROBERT PECORI, a third generation lawyer at PECORI & PECORI, passionately advocates for senior citizens and people with

Concierge or direct primary care practice refers to a growing movement in U.S. healthcare that enables highly trained and respected physicians to transform the manner in which they deliver medical care to their patients. CONNECTEDHEALTH is a proactive, preventive & patient-centered primary practice that surrounds you with a team of people focused on your well-being. The comprehensive care provided reflects the way medicine should be practiced… in a prompt, unhurried fashion, with same-day 12620 Perry Hwy appointments, direct 24/7 access to your physician, extended office Wexford visits, and a strong emphasis on individual health and wellness. At (724) 933-4300 ConnectedHealth, you have access to concierge medicine, medical services, transition of care, a fitness center, personal training, sports-specific training programs, nutritional consulting, a pharmacy and group exercise classes. Visit: www.chforu.com

HELPING INJURED PEOPLE IN PA SINCE 1994 Attorneys Thomas D. Hall & Bill Copetas at THE LAW OFFICES OF THOMAS D. HALL focus in the fields of workers’ compensation and personal injury. Having successfully represented thousands of Workers’ Compensation & personal injury claimants, Tom & Bill are respected as caring and creative fighters for their client’s rights to obtain and maintain compensation for work injuries, as well as to maximize lump sum settlements. Clients have included workers in the healthcare, police & BNY Mellon Tower firefighting, general construction, trucking, manufacturing, asbestos, 500 Grant St, #2900 warehousing, sanitation and entertainment industries. For personPittsburgh, (412) 515-1449 al injury, the firm’s cases include auto, truck & motorcycle wrecks, wrongful death, premises liability, dog attacks, slip & fall, medical malpractice, nursing home neglect and all manner of serious and catastrophic injuries. Visit: www.attorneytomhall.com

SCREEN BY SONOGRAM IN ONE VISIT FOR $150 TOTAL

Beat insurances deductibles. Be proactive. MED HEALTH SERVICES (MHS) from Pittsburgh  offers several sonography medical screenings for only $150.00. This includes: Carotids sonography for arteriosclerosis evaluation; Aorta R/O Aortic Aneurysm; thyroid; urinary bladder & prostate sonography to R/O prostate enlargement and bladder pathologies. All other sonographies are $90.00 each: kidney sonography, legs circulation for plaque, veins to R/O blood clots, thyroid sonogra200 James Place phy screening, liver & gall bladder, and all other modalities of soMonroeville nography. If requested, free phone medical consultation is offered. (412) 373-7125 - Ext 3 Complete testing takes 1½ hours and results are mailed to the patient. Appointment needed. Blood testing done with prescription. MHS accepts most medical insurance plans. Visit: www.medhealthservices.com

ESTATES, TRUSTS & ELDER LAW ATTORNEY JAY HAGERMAN is dedicated to offering clients

GUARDIANSHIP • ESTATE • ELDER LAW

the most effective choices in estate planning, trusts and probate. He recommends plans they believe best suit your personal and professional needs. He believes that whether a person has a large or modest estate, they want to be in control of their finances during their lifetime and then provide for loved ones. Jay limits his practice to drafting wills and trusts of all types, advising individuals on matters concerning Pennsylvania inheritance 4499 Mount Royal Blvd tax, estate tax, federal gift tax and generation skipping tax, probating Allison Park estates, administering trusts, advising individuals on business suc(412) 213-7979 cession planning and wealth preservation, representing parties in probate and trust litigation matters, counseling individuals involved in guardianships and special needs, and advising elder law clients on Medicaid questions and Veteran’s benefits. Visit: www.hagermanlaw.com

ELDER CARE SERVICES, INC is a not-for-profit corporation provid-

ing legal protection and advocacy for elderly & disabled individuals. Principal Lori Capone is experienced in Elder Law & Special Needs Planning. She assists clients with Medicaid eligibility and long-term care planning, special needs & qualified income trusts, guardianships, estate planning, and probate administration. She also works with hospitals & nursing home patients as their health needs change, protecting their personal & financial rights. McKees Rocks Lori favors integrated solutions combining Medicaid, Veterans’ Sewickley benefits, private long-term care insurance and sound estate (412) 310-3555 planning. Lori knows that her work can mean the difference between a life of hardship and one lived with comfort and dignity. It is her goal to help her clients find the best solution for their loved one’s needs. Email: capone.elderlaw@gmail.com

LIFE & EXECUTIVE COACH Many people are struggling with feelings of increased pressure, stress & anxiety, whether it’s because of recent world events or their own life struggles and transitions. Monique DeMonaco, owner of Coach Monique & Associates, can help. COACH MONIQUE & ASSOCIATES offers brain-based and education-driven personal and professional development to help you shift negative thinking and worry to positive and optimistic thinking. As an Emotional Intelligence expert with 15 years of expereince, Monique DeMonaco C.HYP, CPPD, MPMH, CCH 209 Commercial Ave provides life coaching, hypnotherapy and executive coaching. Pittsburgh Coach Monique’s practical and conversational style makes the train(412) 400-2085 ing easy to embrace and easy to apply for your real world situations. Your shift to more positive thoughts will create energy and drive toward desired positive outcomes. Monique’s proven educational techniques and unique skills can make a direct and immediate difference in your life. Visit: www.coachmonique.com

HELP FOR THE DEAF / HARD OF HEARING The WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF (WPSD) is a tuition free school offering academic instruction for any Deaf or Hard of Hearing student from grades K-12 in Pennsylvania. Communication needs are met on an individual basis, with an emphasis on full access to American Sign Language (ASL), sign supported English, and spoken English. Students are offered a challenging academic curriculum including unique opportunities in science, technology, engineering, computer 300 E Swissvale Ave science, robotics, TV production, and performing & visual arts. Pittsburgh Students have the opportunity to participate in afterschool programs, (412) 371-7000 including a variety of clubs and comprehensive sports program. For those living outside the Pittsburgh region, a new student Residence offers students a safe, modern, home-away-from-home during the week. Discover more by Visiting: www.wpsd.org

MULTI-LINGUAL CHILDCARE & PRE-SCHOOL

DON’T STRESS ABOUT THE EVENT!

It’s all about our children. La Scuola d’Italia Galileo Galilei, a non-profit Italian Language School & Cultural Association, has expanded by opening L’ASILO - a Multi-Lingual Early  Learning Center, Daycare, and Preschool. Its mission is to educate children (1 to 5 years old) in Italian and other languages in a safe, secure, brand new learning center with highly qualified teachers. All children explore all five learning areas, and all topics of study, including play. Using a mix of the Montessori and Reggio Emilia methods, it offers complete immersion in 401 Shady Ave Italian with the possibility to study one or two other foreign languagG-101, Pittsburgh es throughout the week. English and ESL are also offered daily. (412) 404-7070 L’Asilo is a branch of La Scuola, which offers courses and private lessons to adults and children k-12 afterschool in Italian and many different cultural activities, such as films in Italian, group conversations, story times, lectures, and so much more! Visit: www.asilogalileo.org +

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

SWISHER, BAUER & LUCIANO, PLLC passionately advocates for senior citizens and people with disabilities of all ages. Attorneys David M. Bauer & Philip D. Luciano have extensive knowledge of elder law and years of experience working with clients on estate planning, special needs planning, real estate transactions as they relate to estate planning and Medicaid long-term care asset protection. Dave & Phil assist clients with wills, trusts, estate planning and administration, powers of attorney, health care directives, special needs planning and trusts, guardianship, and Medicaid long-term care eligibility and asset protection. Visit: www.sbllawgroup.com

PERSONALIZED HEALTHCARE

disabilities of all ages. In working with individuals and families on Estate and Asset Protection Plans, he strives to ensure that clients’ wishes are known, honored and respected throughout their lives. Rob has extensive knowledge of Elder Law and years of experience working with clients on Estate Planning, Probate Administration Asset Protection and Medicaid Long-term Care Planning. 7051 Steubenville Pk Rob regularly assists clients with Wills, Trusts, Power of Attorneys, #7, Oakdale Probate Administration, Asset Protection, Medicaid Long-term Care (412) 788-2000 eligibility and Special Needs Planning. He is dedicated to providing clients with the most appropriate Estate or Asset Protection plan, and one that is clear, easy to understand, and will meet his client’s needs for years to come. Visit: www.pecorielderlaw.com

NEWS

PROTECTING YOUR FAMILY’S ASSETS

Planning a special event, corporate meeting or social gathering? Don’t stress for one more minute! Contact FIRST CLASS CATERERS. Owner Kyle Szulborski & his team understand the importance in organizing a special experience for you and your guests. Their personalized catering service will create an exquisite meal for any occasion, whether corporate event, informal buffet, formal dinner party or In-flight catering services. Select from simple Hors D’oeuvres, hot & cold appetizers, as well as a variety of dinner entrees and gourmet 310 Vista Park Dr items. Seafood delicacies, pasta dishes and more are prepared. In Bldg #3, Pittsburgh addition to weddings, anniversaries, confirmations, communions, (412) 494-0555 birthdays & corporate outings, First Class Caterers is proud to be your first choice for holiday celebrations. Their motto is, “Taking Ordinary to Extraordinary.” Visit: www.firstclasscaterers.com +

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

11


UNDER FIRE Proposed legislation could increase protections for victims of domestic violence {BY REBECCA ADDISON} IN 2002, Deborah Murphy was taken hostage by her estranged husband. The man entered her home after shooting through the basement door. Police were called to the scene, and Murphy’s 1-yearold son and 3-year-old daughter were rescued. But Murphy was held captive at gunpoint in the home for five hours. During her captivity, Murphy was raped multiple times. Several negotiation attempts by police failed. And when Murphy’s estranged husband had had enough, he announced he was going to kill her. Moments later, a SWAT team burst into the home and shot him. He’s now serving 20 years in prison. “It was the scariest moment of my life,” Murphy says. “It changed me forever.” At the time of the attack, Murphy had a protection-from-abuse order against her estranged husband. The two were going through divorce proceedings, and he had been physically violent in the past. But Murphy says the PFA order did little to protect her. “I had the PFAs filed, but to me they’re pieces of paper,” says Murphy. “If someone wants to do something, they’re going to do it.” But a recently proposed bill in the Pennsylvania legislature could protect domestic-violence victims like Murphy who file PFA orders against their abusers. Senate Bill 501 would bar gun possession by all domestic abusers subject to PFAs and require them to turn in their guns to licensed dealers or law-enforcement officials. The bill would have done little to help Murphy — her husband was already barred

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

Nicole Molinaro Karaczun, chief program officer at Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh

from possessing firearms because of a prior felony conviction — but for thousands of other victims, it could be lifesaving. “The intent of this change in law is to enhance safety for parties and their children in domestic-violence and PFA situations,” state Sen. Thomas Killion, (R-West Chester), who co-sponsored the bill, said in a statement. “Enhancing their safety during these difficult times helps not only these families but also law enforcement charged with overall public safety.” According to the Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh, firearms account for more than half of all domestic-violencerelated homicides in the state over the last decade. And research indicates the presence of a gun in a domestic-violence situation makes it five times more likely that a woman will be killed. “We see the very real repercussions of gun violence while serving victims of

domestic violence every day at Women’s Center and Shelter,” says Nicole Molinaro Karaczun, chief program officer. “We know that keeping guns out of the hands of domestic abusers is essential to protecting Pennsylvania’s victims of domestic violence.” Under current Pennsylvania laws, only one in seven PFA orders requires firearms to be turned in, which accounts for just 14 percent of all PFA orders issued. According to the journal Injury Prevention, cities see a 25 percent reduction in intimate-partner gun homicides when states pass laws restricting access to firearms by people with an active protection order against them. “We have seen countless women who come to us while actively recovering from being shot by the person who claimed to love them,” says Karaczun. “They are scared. They are scarred. And it’s often difficult for them to determine which is worse

“IT WAS THE SCARIEST MOMENT OF MY LIFE.”

— the emotional pain or the physical pain. They’ve dodged death. Their partner or their ex-partner, typically after years of escalating abuse, has tried to kill them. “If Senate Bill 501 is not passed, those abusers and many like them will continue to have easy access to their guns, to shoot, injure or kill their victims, and as we know sometimes happens, their children. Guns and domestic violence are a deadly combination, and the current law is just not enough.” Senate Bill 501 has received bipartisan support. And Pennsylvanians seem open to it as well, according to the results of a SurveyUSA survey released earlier this month. Eighty-two percent of the 800 people surveyed support prohibiting gun sales to anyone with a PFA order against them. It’s also backed by the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association and the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association, along with gun-violence organizations like CeaseFirePA and the Pennsylvania chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. “We are [for] gun safety, and we believe respecting the Second Amendment goes hand in hand with gun-sense laws,” says Jenna Paulat, volunteer with Moms Demand Action. “We believe in gun sense, the simple idea that we can all do more to keep our loved ones and neighborhoods safe from the ever-present threat of gun violence.” In Pennsylvania in 2016, of the 102 people who died as a result of domestic violence, 56 percent — 57 people — were shot. Two of those victims were police officers who were killed while responding to domestic calls. “Every day, families across our state are forced to live in fear of a domestic abuser returning with a gun to inflict unspeakable violence upon them,” Paulat says. “Something is very wrong in our state when women and children are forced to live in fear of an armed abuser.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

STEELER GAME FEATURES

HERE

DORMONT

WE GO

2

AN OFFICIAL BEER SPONSOR OF THE PITTSBURGH STEELERS.

©2017 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

OAKLAND

3

2

$ 50

$ 50

$ 75

LITE FROZEN MUGS

20 O OZ Z LITE DRAFTS

22 O OZ Z LITE DRAFTS


NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

13


HAS YOUR CAREER STALLED? INTERESTED IN THE MEDICAL FIELD? Self-Paced Online Training Course Certificate of Training in as little as 60 days! Receive your Cer

www.healthcarescribes.com Advance your Career Today, train to become a Medical Scribe!

$88

+tax

omer t s u c - n ew al* -

i - spec

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $88 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

Pittsburgh Magazine Top Dentists, three years in a row

IMPLANTS | INVISALIGN WHITENING | BOTOX NEW PATIENTS WELCOME WE OFFER SEDATION OPTIONS SAME-DAY EMERGENCY VISITS

polisheddentalgroup.com mypittsburghdental.com

CHURCHILL

990 ROLAND RD. 412-823-5252

14

DOWNTOWN

355 FIFTH AVE. SUITE 1500 412-281-3546

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

MORNINGSIDE 1809 JANCEY ST. 412-362-5677

[GREEN LIGHT]

PATHFINDERS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} IN JUNE 2013, Patricia DeMarco joined

1,700 viewers at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall for Gasland 2, filmmaker Josh Fox’s sequel to the documentary that helped launch national opposition to fracking for gas. The new film, about how fossil-fuel money was warping democracy, did its job: After the screening, says DeMarco, “Everybody was angry.” However, she recalls, that was it. “Nobody stood up and said, ‘People, you need to do x, y and z, because it isn’t hopeless.’” Think of DeMarco’s new book, Pathways to Our Sustainable Future: A Global Perspective From Pittsburgh (University of Pittsburgh Press), as her own guidance on the matter. The environmental educator wants a green movement that has spent decades mostly saying “no” to instead start communicating how things like regenerative agriculture and renewable energy can improve not just the environment, but people’s everyday lives. And the Pittsburgh native does it with a couple dozen case studies from her hometown. Examples range from the reclaimed coal mine now known as the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, to an urban farm in the Hill District, and from cuttingedge, nontoxic “green” chemistry, to the restoration of urban creek Nine Mile Run. “Pittsburgh isn’t thought of as a real sustainability place,” says DeMarco, of Forest Hills. “If you can find things that work in a place like this, you can help people see a way forward.” DeMarco grew up in the 1950s and ’60s, in a world of Italian-American backyard gardens in communities including Dormont and Castle Shannon. “I was an environmentalist from I think age 5,” she quips. She earned a Ph.D. in genetics from Pitt and raised two kids while compiling a résumé that includes stints with Connecticut’s Department of Public Utility Control and as a commissioner on the Regulatory Commission of Alaska, overseeing that state’s utilities and pipelines. In 2006, she returned to Pittsburgh, where, after five years as executive director of the Rachel Carson Homestead Association, she’s worked mostly in academia and as an independent researcher, writer and speaker on science, public policy and the environment. She also hosts The New American Economy, a weekly web radio program on The Union Edge Working Families Radio Network that envisions a future that is socially just and environmentally responsible. DeMarco still calls Carson her guiding light. The Springdale native’s mission wasn’t merely to curtail the heedless

Author Patricia DeMarco

spraying of pesticides she critiqued in Silent Spring, but something larger: teaching people about the necessity of protecting fragile ecosystems. Or, as DeMarco puts it, “Every living thing has a right to exist.” Unlike many concerned about global warming, polluted skies and oceans, dwindling farmland and dying species, DeMarco doesn’t forefront technical fixes. We have the technology we need, she says; whether we use it depends on how much we care about future generations. “If you don’t pay attention to keeping the life-support systems of the world intact, all the technology in world won’t save us,” she says. Recovery, DeMarco believes, starts with rediscovering our inborn “biophilia,” or love of nature — and then learning that our very existence depends on the free “services” nature provides, from filtering water to producing oxygen. She finds hope in such examples as Beaver County’s Kretschmann Farm, an organic operation whose practices enrich the soil instead of depleting it, like conventional industrial agriculture does, and Windstax, a Strip District-based company working to make wind power more widely accessible. DeMarco also seeks to resolve the supposed conflict between protecting the earth and providing employment. Because our economy itself ultimately depends on nature, she argues, “Saving the environment is saving jobs.” She also praises Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto for making sustainability a priority in city policies. Whether small-scale (“Bug Camps” for kids) or larger-scale (Sustainable Pittsburgh’s Green Workplace Challenge), the examples she writes about in Pathways to Our Sustainable Future are signposts that announce, “This is what we’re doing and this is how it’s helping,” she says. Building a future, in other words, requires imagining it: “You don’t go to what you don’t know.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Affordable Fun for f Everyone! y

murray avenue

APOTHECARY

Compounding Pharmacy Boutique

LEGAL THC-FREE

& Artisan's Marketplace

Pharmaceutical Grade

CBD

At the Gateway to the Laurel Highlands

Open Now thru Sept. 24

NEW LOWER PRICES!

Weekends & Labor Day 10:30am- 6:30pm

www.MAApgh.com Ask a Pharmacist! Call 412.421.4996

4227 Murray Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217 *Statements about this product have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your physician when changing any recommended treatments or medication dosages.

! d n e k e e W l a Fin citement!

Don't miss the Ex

Discount Coupons Available at all: Medieval Amusement Park Music, Comedy, Jousting, Over 100 Master Artisans Delicious Food & Drink, Games, Rides and More! Open Rain or Shine • FREE Parking • No Pets Please Just Southeast of Pittsburgh, off I-70 exit 51A

Purchase Tickets Now at: or PittsburghRenfest.com

For information Call: (724) 872-1670 NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

15


News of the Weird

S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS I T E M S TO W E I RD N E W S T I P S @ AM UN I V E R S AL . C O M .

{COMPILED BY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUBLISHING}

+ S H O E S , A P PA R E L , C U LT U R E . STOCKING QUALITY GOODS. V I E W T H E C O L L E C T I O N AT 9 0 1 W E S T E R N AV E N U E . M O N D AY - S AT U R D AY O P E N 1 2 - 5

bape | Nike | Air Jordan | Adidias | Tommy Hilfiger Vans | Palace | Supreme | Polo | Ralph Lauren

An anonymous Australian tourist mailed back a small stone he lifted from the Cwmhir Abbey in Wales, a Cistercian monastery founded in 1176, in August. The thief included a note explaining his remorse: “I have been an avid follower of the Welsh kings and their history, and so I took this rock. Ever since, I have had the most awful luck as if Llewellyn (sic) himself was angry with me.” Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last native prince of Wales, was beheaded and buried at the abbey in 1282, and legend says his ghost haunts the abbey. The trust that manages the abbey put the returned stone and the note on display, presumably to deter future sticky-fingered visitors.

+

A Turkish homeless man who was sentenced to house arrest in June has had his sentence altered to better reflect his circumstances. Baris Alkan, 31, had been confined to a specific area, an empty spot enclosed by metal plates, near a bus station after being detained for using and selling drugs. “I don’t have a home address, so I have to stay here,” he said. “Even though I don’t have a house, I’m under house arrest.” The court subsequently lifted the house-arrest order and now requires Alkan to sign in at a nearby police station once a month.

+ PENN HILLS

412.704.7057 - 13040 FRANKSTOWN RD.

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH 412.281.4155 - 1509 5TH AVE

FHEVOLUTIONASALONPGH.COM

PYRAMID

TATTOO & Body Piercing

PYRAMIDTATTOO.COM Bridgeville, Pa 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Steven Gomez-Maya, 20, handed tellers at the TD Bank North in Seymour, Conn., a note on Aug. 19, demanding money. He apparently failed to notice that his note was written on the back of his girlfriend’s pay stub, and when he tried to return to the bank (presumably to retrieve the note), the doors were locked. Seymour police tracked down the owner of the pay stub, and when they arrived at the girlfriend’s home, they caught Gomez-Maya as he was driving away. The hat he wore during the robbery and “a large amount of $10 bills” were found in the car, and he was charged with first-degree robbery.

+

A swan on the grounds of Blarney Castle in Ireland suffered a harrowing experience on Aug. 31 when it landed in a field where cattle were grazing. At first, the cattle just looked the swan over, but when the bird hissed at them, they took off after it. The swan tried to fly away, but the cows butted and stamped on it. Garden manager at the castle Adam Whitbourn was finally able to lean over a fence and drag the swan out of harm’s way. “It was an aggressive attack,” Whitbourn said. “I put [the swan] back in the lake and have checked on him twice. He’s sitting there looking bedraggled so I’m hoping it’s a happy ending.” Rather than a swan song.

09.20/09.27.2017

+

Anthony Wayne Sandusky, 26, of Mascotte, Fla., was welcomed into the home of a Groveland woman on Aug. 22 because he had nowhere else to go. She went to sleep, and when she woke up, her mother said Sandusky had closed all the blinds, locked the doors and was carrying their possessions out the back door. She found two bags of items in a nearby field, including a stamp collection valued at $250,000. When confronted by police, Sandusky said he took the items because the woman was “being mean to him.”

+

Andrew Shaw, 44, of Lancashire, England, appeared before the Blackpool Magistrates Court on Aug. 29, facing three counts of possessing obscene images of children on his computer. Shaw and his wife arrived at the court with their guide dogs, as both are legally blind (Shaw has a small amount of sight in one eye). His attorney explained: “It

may be argued that difficulty with his vision makes it difficult to put an age to images he downloads. He may think he is looking at 16-year-olds.” Shaw was granted bail.

+

Most news items about sinkholes highlight the large size of the hole. But a man in Brooklyn, N.Y., was trapped by a sinkhole in the middle of the street that was just big enough to swallow his leg. Steven Suarez, 33, was making a delivery with a hand truck on Myrtle Avenue on Aug. 29 when his foot disappeared into the pavement. “I was scared,” Suarez said. “It was my whole entire right leg, up until my tailbone basically.” Suarez was trapped for nearly an hour as bystanders directed traffic around him and rescue workers tried to free him. Co-worker Joe Grunbaum, 32, said Suarez seemed to be in a lot of pain, but the only casualty of the incident turned out to be Suarez’s right sneaker.

WAYNOVISION


NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

17


LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES Aaron Myers-Brooks CONDUITS AARONBROOKS.BANDCAMP.COM

Experimental guitarist Aaron MyersBrooks, on loan from Pittsburgh postmetal outfit Night Vapor, slants toward the “avant” in avant-jazz on Conduits, the third EP he has self-released in the past 14 months. Musical notes seem to trip over their own feet on the three-song recording, where Myers-Brooks’ angular guitar work is pristinely accompanied by piano, bass, synth and prepared percussion. The appropriately titled opener, “Stumbling Through,” and the jittery “Fugue” sound like a frayed nerve with too much caffeine surging through it, while the moody “Liquid” waxes elegiac. Bizarre time signatures abound. Myers-Brooks’ solo work, which is classically tuned and echoes Orthrelm as much as it does Trevor Dunn’s Trio Convulsant, might not always be for mainstream ears, but that doesn’t make it any less enthralling.

DIY EXPERIMENTATION

BY JUSTIN VELLUCCI

{BY MEG FAIR}

Outsideinside SNIFF A HOT ROCK

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JJ MEDINA}

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/OUTSIDEINSIDE1

Sniff a Hot Rock is an old-school rock ’n’ roll record all the way through. Classic crunchy riffs and gritty vocals about loneliness, booze and love, Sniff is for fans of older acts like ZZ Top and Cheap Trick and newer outfits like J. Roddy Walston and the Business. The musicianship is solid and carefully calculated in its solos, melodic riffs and drum features. While the style of music itself isn’t exactly shiny and new, the band does play with popular classic-rock themes and gives them a twist. For example, “Shot Me Down” is a fun flip on the narrative of men in rock bands being objects of desire with women falling at their feet. Instead, the rocker narrator here tells a story in which a young woman tells him to buzz off, because being in a rock band and having a record deal doesn’t make him special or interesting. The album grinds along until its frantic finale: “Say Yeah” is an upbeat jam that sprints before dropping out in a blink, leaving you to consider the album in contemplative silence.

Tei Shi

T

EI SHI IS a pop performer from New York City. Valerie Teicher, an artist who came up in the vibrant, multifaceted Brooklyn DIY scene, is the brains behind Tei Shi. While some may have the idea that DIY scenes are the primarily the stomping grounds of punk and rock acts, Teicher says that’s not the case any longer. “People are straddling genres, making experimental stuff, and DIY can make it more accessible,” said Teicher in a recent phone interview. “The bridge between pop and experimental and alternative, it doesn’t exist anymore. There’s a lot more people in total control of what they are doing, so the divide doesn’t have to exist anymore.” And Teicher does control her music from top to bottom. She self-produces her music and carefully selects collaborators from New York to Los Angeles to help her realize the vision for her songs. “I’m always learning more and more about producing,” she says. “I got much more hands-on with [Crawlspace]. It was super collaborative, and I’m there every

BY MEG FAIR

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

step of the way. I’m learning a ton, and I hope to get to the place where I can [produce] for other people.” Most of the material for this album began with Teicher using just Ableton, a microphone and the occasional Midi keyboard to construct the bones, before working with others on building out beats and detail-oriented production touches.

TEI SHI + LAWRENCE ROTHMAN 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $13-15. www.cattivopgh.com

Crawlspace, Tei Shi’s debut full-length, begins with a tape recording of her father helping her set up a little karaoke machine with tape-recording capabilities. Next comes the tiny voice of a young Valerie Teicher explaining how to record into the microphone. She uses these intimate childhood tapes

as direction on the record. One particularly powerful piece of tape precedes “Justify.” On it, that little voice speaks closely into the microphone with the intensity and attitude that thrives in youth: “I’m a bad singer, I confess it. And I’m a helluva bad girl.” “Justify” is an anthemic track with minimal instrumentation and vocals that show off the intense range of styles Teicher is able to bust out. It dismantles her childhood claim of being a bad singer, while espousing the baddest of cool badgirl vibes in its pounding bass and Princeesque screams. “It’s bare-bones in production and instrumentation. It’s minimalistic, but it hits really hard,” says Teicher. “It’s all about the vocal performance. Performing those screams is out of my norm, so I love doing it live. “It’s just an assertive, powerful, empowering thing to perform.” Those tapes connect the themes of emotional intensity, vulnerability and discovery, things that adults experience through a different lens than their younger selves.


“What struck me about those tapes was this moment of shock. I can’t believe I was thinking, feeling, saying those things, but I was also relating to it,” explains Teicher. “We can relate a lot to our younger versions of ourselves, these unfiltered versions of ourselves when we grow up.” Revealing such intimate peeks into your childhood can be really intimidating, but Teicher wasn’t nervous about sharing. “Once you put something really personal out there, it’s there. You have no choice but to roll with it,” she says. “And a lot of people really related to it, reaching out to me about stuff like those tapes they’d found of themselves as kids, and how it felt to confront that sometimes embarrassing personal history.” The album’s sound ranges from dark dreamy pop (“Your World”) to bouncy dance tunes like “Crawl” and “Say You Do.” Introspective tracks like “Keep Running” call forth feelings like nostalgia, fear of aging and contemplative reflection, while “How Far” and its layers of falsetto confront interpersonal conflicts of changing yourself, or trying to change others in an attempt to make things work. For Teicher, much of the inspiration for the visual elements accompanying the record came from Italian horror director Dario Argento’s films. Argento directed semisurreal films like Inferno and Suspiria, and had a producer credit and did soundtrack work on George Romero’s zombie classic Dawn of the Dead. Argento’s earlier work inspired Teicher to incorporate a retro style of plush textures and colors in her videos. You can see this in the video for “Keep Running,” as bright colors and soft lighting draw the eye, and the silk costuming pairs with imagery of a tarantula gently crawling on Teicher’s face. In the video for “How Far,” a disheveled Teicher crawls out of the trunk of a seemingly abandoned vehicle only to be chased by it. Shots of Teicher taking refuge in an abandoned building, whose concrete yard is surrounded by barbed wire, and bleeding from an unseen injury, give way to shots of her being chased by the car again. It seems like a thriller-movie metaphor for running away from and returning to an unhealthy love. “I love horror films, old ones. I got into this Italian, campy horror stuff,” says Teicher. “It’s the cinematic, visually stunning and psychological-horror stuff I really love. I don’t really care for the modern, gory stuff.” While Teicher works on collaborations and small projects between tours, the release of new visual elements from Crawlspace will keep fans satiated as they wait for new tunes; Teicher confirms a new video is on the way. ME GFA IR @ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

19


0DNHQHZPHPèLHV DW%HëHO3DUN Call today to learn about our all-inclusive lifestyle!

Bethel Park

Independent Retirement Living

Bethel Park, PA | 412-329-6523 ©2017 HARVEST MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL NIC MANAGEMENT LLC.

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

The Me Toos

TWICE THE FUN {BY MIKE SHANLEY} HOME-STUDIO recording has come a long

way since bands like Sebadoh and Guided by Voices started inspiring lo-fi indie rockers in the ’90s. These days it’s possible to make a recording that captures the fidelity of a recording studio without sacrificing the raw immediacy of a DIY set-up. Jesse Baldoni, guitarist/vocalist of Pittsburgh’s The Me Toos, has recorded almost all of that trio’s releases in his Attic Recording Studio (a literal description even without the capitalization). “I don’t think I would do it any other way,” he says. “I have it set up where I can figure out guitar parts on my own and spend as much time as I need to. I’ve gotten a lot better at figuring out when [a song] is done, which can be the biggest pitfall of doing stuff from home. You can also run into the problem of just never being done.” Last April, The Me Toos — which includes bassist Ben Vivio and drummer Kevin Koch — released its solid mod-pop album Ghost Fly By, its fourth release and second full-length. Once that was completed, the band members decided it was time to release some vinyl. Pressing it themselves seemed a bit cost-prohibitive, but a split release seemed like a good idea. The Spectres, who played numerous shows with The Me Toos, including the CD release, were the ideal candidates in spirit and music. “There’s just two of them. Dan [Spagnolo] plays guitar. James [Thompson] plays a kick drum and snare with his feet, and plays guitar,” Baldoni says. “And they trade off lead vocals.” The duo became the first band other

than The Me Toos to record in Baldoni’s studio, and things clicked immediately. “They were pretty adamant about recording everything live and only overdubbing the vocals,” he says. “When they got here, we tinkered around with things here and there. They ran through each song three times, picked the one that they like the most and overdubbed the vocals that same day. We were done tracking their three songs in two or three hours. It was incredible.” Two of those songs, “Goodbye” and “No No No,” appear on the single. While the music is stripped down, the Spectres still get a full sound with just two guitars and a couple drums, creating two catchy tracks in the process. The Me Toos’ contribution — “Everyone and His Goodtime Friends” — is built on a tense riff that gets a boost from dynamic shifts and some snarling guitar parts.

THE ME TOOS/SPECTRES RECORD RELEASE 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 23. James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, 422 Foreland St., North Side. $7. 412-904-3335

In addition to the music, Baldoni is happy with the record’s sleeve, designed by artist Jesse Flati. “It sort of plays off the idea of ‘The Me Toos versus the Spectres.’ So it’s a little comic book-ish,” he says. The evening’s record-release show will be the last The Me Toos show for a few months. Koch, who has a birthday the same night, is becoming a father in a month. But don’t expect the band to be away too long. “We have close to another full-length record’s worth of material written,” Baldoni says. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


LADY PLAYS THE BLUES {BY BILL KOPP}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RUBEN TOMAS}

Ana Popović

Ana Popović is nobody’s idea of a typical blues guitarist. Born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia, she nonetheless grew up immersed in the quintessentially American musical form. “I was inspired as a little girl of 6 or 7 years old,” Popović tells CP in a Skype interview. “My father and his friends would play Albert King, Elmore James, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Jimi Hendrix until late at night.” Popović learned to sing along in English long before she could understand the language. By her teenage years, she had already studied jazz guitar, and would go on to a music conservatory in Utrecht, in the Netherlands. But Popović was so busy playing shows that she missed quite a few exams. Her career took off; she released her first album in 2001, leading a band called Hush. While a female blues guitarist is still relatively uncommon, Popović prefers not to focus on gender; for her, it’s about the music. “I’ve always thought it was important to have your own style and to come out strong with something different,” she says. Over the course of nearly 10 albums, Popović has developed a style all her own, one that features her sizzling guitar work in the context of more than just blues. Her most recent album, 2016’s Trilogy, has strong elements of soul, R&B and funk. “I have a perfect excuse to be different and try myself in different genres,” she says, “because I was not born in the [Mississippi] Delta.” But Popović hasn’t abandoned the blues, and isn’t likely to do so in the future. “I absolutely love to search the new styles,” she acknowledges, “but on every record, there’s always a deep blues cut.” And the guitarist has earned her share of honors and accolades along the way. For four successive years, Popović has been featured in the all-star Experience Hendrix touring concert package, playing live alongside other modern-day blues giants like Buddy Guy, Jonny Lang, Keb’ Mo’ and Kenny Wayne Shepherd. “I think this is where I feel most at home,” she says. “It’s not just a tribute gig — it’s all top-notch guitar-players.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ANA POPOVIĆ and JERICHO RISING 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. $18-20. 724-799-8333 or tickets.jergels.com NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

21


diesel

CRITICS’ PICKS

C LU B | LO U N G E

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

UPCOMING CONCERTS Charly Bliss 9/23 9/2 3 I 7:00 7 00 P M I 21+ 7:

9/24 I 7:00 PM I AA

9/28 | 7:00 P M | 21+

10/ 1 | 7:00 PM | AA

[HONKY TONK] + THU., SEPT. 21 Lucky Tubb shares more than a last name with his great-uncle and honky-tonk legend Ernest Tubb, leader of a band called the Texas Troubadours. Lucky also possesses a sound that is loaded with country-music tradition and even fronts a band called the Modern Day Troubadours. His sound is a homage to the honky-tonk music his uncle pioneered, while sounding fresh and modern. Lucky and the Troubadours hit the Hard Rock Café tonight with Pittsburgh’s own Slim Forsyth & the Parklane Drifters and Devil’s Holler. Charlie Deitch 7:30 p.m. 230 Station {PHOTO COURTESY OF JODY DOMINGUE} Square Drive, South Side. $10-12. 412-481-7625 or www.hardrock.com

10/3 | 7:00 PM | AA

10/4 | 7:00 PM | AA

[R&B] + THU., SEPT. 21 It’s a good time to be a modern R&B artist who taps the traditional. Son Little, like his peers Leon Bridges and Benjamin Booker, makes smooth Paul and soulful music that Cauthen draws from the masters of the genre like Stevie Wonder. Little’s latest album, New Magic, has sweet and pining love songs which croon about being someone’s bread and butter, but also more haunting ones, like a tribute to gospel singer Washington Phillips. Little plays Club Café tonight along with the alt-pop of Doe Paoro. Hannah Lynn 9 p.m. 58 S. 12th St., South Side. $18. 21 and older. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

10/5 I 6 6:30 30 PM I AA

10/ 10 I 7:00 PM I AA

10/ 16 | 7:00 PM | AA

10/ 17 I 7:00 PM I AA

[HIP HOP/JAZZ] + FRI., SEPT. 22

for tickets visit DIESELPGH.COM or Dave’s Music Mine (southside) 1801 e. carson st | pittsburgh |412.481.8800

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

I feel like I’ve heard “Cool Like Dat” (full title: “Rebirth of Slick (Cool like Dat)”) in a dozen different movies and commercials. It’s one of those songs that’s both ubiquitous and a mystery. Where did it come from? What year was it even released? Actually, a lot of people

probably know these answers, but I just learned it came from the ’90s hip-hop/jazz trio Digable Planets. Now reunited after 25 years, the group will play the August Wilson Center, joined by ’90s hip-hop group Black Sheep, whose songs you also probably know. HL 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. All ages. 412-456-6666 or www.culturaldistrict.org

[COUNTRY] + SUN., SEPT. 24 The most distinct feature on Texan Paul Cauthen’s debut album My Gospel is his voice. It hangs in a low register not unlike Johnny Cash. The subject matter, too, is similar to the Man in Black, covering religion, love and youth, with tones of classic and modern country on tracks like “Still Drivin” or “Hanging Out on the Line.” But there are also hints of Bruce Springsteen’s vocal style on tracks like “I’ll Be the One” and “Once You’re Gone.” Cauthen will play Stage AE tonight, along with Kelsey Waldon, who’s like June Carter Cash, but with a little extra snark. HL 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.promowestlive.com

[ROCK] + TUE., SEPT. 26 Brooklyn-bred Charly Bliss can best be described as the music the cool older sister in a ’90s movie would be listening to. The sound has an edge, and the lyrics don’t hold back, but they contrast with lead singer Eva Hendricks’ sweet, upbeat voice. The band is joined at Cattivo by the Toby Goodshank, whose blunt acoustic sound includes tracks like “Baby I Feel Like I Just Got Cut in Half,” and local pop/rock group The Semi-Supervillains. HL 7 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12-14. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com


NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

23


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TUE 26

ROCK/POP

CLUB CAFE. Thieves & Lovers w/ Girls Guns & Glory. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. CATTIVO. Battalion of Saints, MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Nobodys, The Cryptics, Between the Buried and Me Cultivator & Mower. 8 p.m. w/ The Contortionist, Polyphia, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Toothgrinder. 6 p.m. Millvale. CLUB CAFE. Son Little w/ 412-821-4447. Doe Paoro. 8 p.m. South Side. REX THEATER. Mandolin 412-431-4950. Orange. 8 p.m. South Side. DIESEL. The Huntress 412-381-6811. & Holder of Hands. WALLACE’S TAP 7 p.m. South Side. ROOM. Peter King and 412-431-8800. . his Fast Friends Band. www per REX THEATER. Martin a p ty ci 7 p.m. East Liberty. pgh m Sexton Trio. 8 p.m. .co 412-665-0555. South Side. 412-381-6811.

THU 21

FULL LIST ONLINE

CATTIVO. Deceased, Castle, Sloth Herder, Lady Beast & Tartarus. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. VINOSKI WINERY. The Jason Kendall Band. 6 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

SAT 23 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Dancing Queen. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. BUTLER ST., ETNA. Andre Costello and the Cool Minors w/ Essential Machine & The Mondaze. 6 p.m. Etna. 412-781-0569. DIESEL. Camp Lo w/ Urban Renewal Project. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Nicky Mo & The Mamalukes. 9:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE R BAR. Chrome Moses. 9:30 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Tragedy: All Metal Tribute to the Bee Gees & Beyond. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Peter King and his Fast Friends Band. 9 p.m. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Little by Little w/ ‘Southside’ Jerry. 9:30 p.m. Jefferson Boro. 412-233-9800. VINOSKI WINERY. Millgroves Crossing. 6 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

WED 27 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Electric Love Machine w/ Litz. Ballroom. 8 p.m. Midnight North. Speakeasy. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-381-6811.

DJS THU 21 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB &

FRI 22 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. DJ Grover. 7 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REX THEATER. EOTO w/ Broccoli Samurai. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

MP 3 MONDAY GOOD SPORT {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAUNA MILLER}

FRI 22

SPEAKEASY. Tech House & Taco Party. Speakeasy. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

SUN 24 DIESEL. Awake at Last. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE R BAR. Billy the Kid’s Steel Town All-Stars. 7 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

MON 25 HOWLERS. SNST, Honey & Plastic Picnic. 8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

Each week we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week it’s “Somewhere I Should Be,” an indie-tinged electropop bop from Good Sport designed for dancing it out. Stream or download “Somewhere I Should Be” for free on FFW>>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.


HEAVY ROTATION

University of Iowa’s International Writers Program for a jazz & poetry interlude. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. John Gresh’s Gris-Gris. Speakeasy. 6:30 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

Four songs that CP music writer Meg Fair can’t stop listening to:

The Postal Service

“Brand New Colony”

Crystal Castles

“Magic Spells”

Chris Farren

“Human Being”

DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825.

TUE 26 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

WED 27 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta & Preslav. Top Dollar Dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BLUES THU 21 O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418.

FRI 22 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jack of Diamonds. 8:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. MOONDOG’S. Ron Yarosz & the Vehicle. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 23 565 LIVE. The Monday Blues Revue. 8 p.m. Bellevue. 412-522-7556.

NEWS

THE HOP HOUSE. Jill West. 9 p.m. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Me Toos w/ The Spectres, The Park Plan. Ballroom. 8:30 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. MOONDOG’S. Nied’s Hotel Band, the Bo’Hog Brothers, Ric Proudfoot, Spectrum, Six Demon Bags. Benefit for the victims of Hurricanes Harvey & Irma. 8 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. WHEELFISH. Strange Brew. 8 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

JAZZ THU 21 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

SUN 24 RUMFISH GRILLE. Eclectic Acoustics. 5 p.m. Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. VINOSKI WINERY. Mike Medved. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

WED 27 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

REGGAE

FRI 22 HARD ROCK CAFE. It’s a 70’s Thang. 7 p.m. Station Square. 412-805-4600. LINDEN GROVE. Uptown Rhythm & Brass. 9 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. PARK HOUSE. Funky Miracle. 9:30 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. RIVERS CASINO. Hewlett Anderson Duo. 9 p.m. Jeff Jimerson & Airborne. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

tattoo & piercing studio Open Daily, 1pm-8pm

SAT 23 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. BeauSoleil w/ Michael Doucet. 7:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-361-1915. RIVERS CASINO. The Bill Henry Band. 9 p.m. Darryl & Kim & Friends. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. VINOSKI WINERY. Ferrante & Leonard. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended!

(412) 683-4320 5240 Butler St.

Pgh, PA • 15201 inkadinkadoo.net

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 26 RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

WED 27 RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

+

PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Selector Dub Narcotic w/ Strangeways. 8 p.m. North Side. 412.237.8300. LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Scott & Rosanna. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

PROUDLY TATTOOING PITTSBURGH SINCE 1994!

MON 25

ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry Month: Wacław Zimpel. Between sets, Wacław will also collaborate w/ exiled writer-in-residence Osama Alomar & Maung Day from the

MUSIC

THU 21

BRUSHTON SOCIAL CLUB 30/30. Jazz Returns to the Hood. 5:30 p.m. Homewood. 412 244 6788. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry Month: Hubert Zemler & Krzysztof Dys. Between solo sets, these musicians will also collaborate w/ National Medal of the Arts winner Sandra Cisneros & Matjaž Pikalo from the University of Iowa’s International Writers Program for a jazz and poetry interlude. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Paul Keys Band. Speakeasy. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

FRI 22

+

THU 21

DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Right TurnClyde. 9 p.m. Mars. 724-553-5212. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Antje Duvekot w/ Kayla Schureman. 7:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. FOURTY BAR & GRILLE. The Eclectic Acoustics. 9 p.m. Washington. 724-470-9703.

SUN 24 SAT 23

FRI 22

SAT 23

ARNOLD’S TEA HOUSE. Lee Robinson and ISKA. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-231-1275. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Samantha St. John, Nick Scanga, Tom Battaglia, Sunny Sunseri & Charlie Becker. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry Month: LAM. Between sets, the musicians of LAM will also collaborate w/ Kinga Tóth from the University of Iowa’s International Writers Program for a jazz & poetry interlude. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT SAND HILL. RML Jazz. 1 p.m. Sand Hill. 412-370-9621. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5 p.m. Reggie Watkins. Speakeasy. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

“Cool Slut”

OTHER MUSIC

SCHENLEY PARK. Buffalo Rose w/ Morgan Erina & The Hills and Rivers. 6 p.m. Oakland. 540-383-5752.

SAT 23

Chastity Belt

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Parachute. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

ACOUSTIC THU 21 HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-726-7912.

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

25


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

September 20-26 The Get Up Kids

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guest Pet Symmetry. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 21 Parachute

MR. SMALLS THEATRE MILLVALE. 412-421-4447. With special guest Johnny Balik. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Sound Series: Selector Dub Narcotic ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. With special guest Strangeways. For tickets and more info visit warhol.org. 8p.m.

Some Assembly Required ATTACK THEATRE Strip District. 412-281-3305. Tickets: attacktheatre.com. Through Sept. 23.

The Hobbs Sisters & No Bad JuJu. All ages event. 7p.m.

MONDAY 25

Joan Osborne

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guest Walker & The Rebellion. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 22 225

39th Annual Pow Wow

GALLERY CRAWL

CULTURAL DISTRICT. For more info visit trustarts.org. 5:30p.m.

Digable Planets

SINGING WINDS Dorseyville. 412-782-4457. For more info visit cotraic.org. Through Sept. 24.

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Mt. Lebanon Artists Market

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast

WASHINGTON ROAD & ACADEMY AVE. For more info visit mtlebanonartistsmarket. com. Through Sept. 24.

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. Through Sept. 24.

Third Thursday: BOOMiverse

SATURDAY 23

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. For tickets and more info visit cmoa.org. 8p.m.

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. With special guests

Jam on Walnut

© THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

WEDNESDAY 20

SUNDAY 24 Paul Cauthen JOAN OSBORNE BYHAM THEATER SEPTEMBER 23

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Kelsey Waldon. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

The Dead South

TUESDAY 26

Between The Buried And Me MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guests The Contortionist, Polyphia & Toothgrinder. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

Radical Day: Free Admission ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. For more info visit warhol.org. 10a.m.

Septoberfest SPOONWOOD BREWING Bethel Park. For more info visit spoonwoodbrewing.com. Through Oct. 1.

OPEN HOUSE INTERVIEWS IMMEDIATE ONSITE

10AM-6PM • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12

26

12450 Perry Highway, Wexford PA 15090

Applicants must be 18 years of age, have valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle.

• FT Block Shifts • FT Awake Overnight • PT Support Staff • PT Awake Overnight

Call 724-933-5142 for more information To apply go to: www.invisionhs.org/careers/

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

EEO EMPLOYER


[STAGE]

“YOU NEED TO EXPLAIN IT TO YOURSELF.”

GHOST WORLD Personal stories of life’s trials and triumphs are the foundation for In the Company of Ghosts, a new stage show by Pittsburghbased multidisciplinary artists Adrienne Wehr and Frank Ferraro, Sept. 22-24 at the New Hazlett Theater. Ferraro, whose paintings and sculptures have appeared in galleries and publications nationally and internationally, conceived of the work in response to living for the past 15 years with Parkinson’s disease. He says the title “was about walking in the shadow of others because I have no control over what happens with my physical being. Even though I am the same person inside, I find that these ghosts take over and represent me in a new identity in the world.” In the Company of Ghosts is a 70minute multimedia production that uses spoken word, singing, original music and soundscapes, movement, installation art and video. Ferraro wrote, produced and performed the show with Wehr, lately best known as producer and actor for the web series Dog Bytes, named one of the “Best Web Series of 2015” at Cannes. The show is broken into 10 vignettes in which the pair alternates as performers. The idea, says Wehr, is to view personal experiences through a universal lens. “Beneath the divisiveness in the world, there are stories and experiences that bind us all together as human beings that are the great levelers,” says Wehr. “Sickness is going to hit, death is going to happen, partings take place, triumphs occur, and we all meet these things in different ways.” Other themes include grief and loss, the healing power of forgiveness, and enslavement to pharmaceuticals. Ferraro has created numerous stage works over the years, but In the Company of Ghosts marks first time since the onset of his disease that he will perform live. In the past, he has used surrogates to represent him. “It will be sort of crapshoot,” says Ferraro. “It’s an unpredictable disease, so every performance should be different because of fatigue, my ability to speak and dyskinesia [impairment of voluntary movement]. … You get to see me for who I am.” A YouTube video on its making suggests that In the Company of Ghosts is an early must-see in Pittsburgh’s fall performance season. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

IN THE COMPANY OF GHOSTS 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 22; 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 23; and 2 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25-30. 412-320-4610 or www.inthecompanyofghosts.com NEWS

+

Adrienne Wehr in In The Company of Ghosts {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER LOPES}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

[BOOKS]

OPEN TEXTS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

{BY STUART SHEPPARD}

O

depressing period of his life. He had little time to write, but still collaborated with his translator, C.J. Collins, who sat next to him in the cab, translating, as he drove. Alomar’s works are mostly very short stories, some of them parable-like; his first full-length work to be translated into English was the collection Fullblood Arabian, in 2014. The book drew national media attention, and praise from admirers including the writer Lydia Davis. Osama, now 49, applied to City of Asylum in Pittsburgh, and in Februrary was awarded a one-year residency, on the North Side. He loves to write at Starbucks, and composes with pen and paper, not a computer. His latest book is The Teeth of the Comb and Other Stories (New Directions Press).

SAMA ALOMAR is the kind of per-

son who speaks softly, but leans forward so you can hear him clearly. Raised in Syria by a book-loving family — his father taught philosophy and his mother, elementary school — he started writing when he was 13, inspired by the works of Kahlil Gibran, who “was the writer who made me decide to become a writer.” Alomar wanted to come to America around the age of 18, but had to finish college first. After several years, he started writing full time, focusing on short stories, poetry and essays. Alomar’s early work was published in newspapers, and the BBC Arabic Service. At 30, he published his first book, O Human, in Arabic. [Editor’s note: While censorship is common in Syria, Aloman does not cite it as a major factor in his writing.] Eventually, Alomar moved to Chicago, where he drove a cab for eight years, as he couldn’t get any other job. He logged 11hour shifts, seven days a week. This was a

THE STYLE OF YOUR NEW BOOK COULD BE CALLED APHORISTIC. WHY THIS STYLE? The style chose me. I don’t care about genre. The most important thing for me is to put

Author Osama Alomar

my heart and soul on paper. To be honest with myself and with my readers. I always try to make my stories open texts. I want to make my readers think a lot about my texts because I respect my readers. I want them to use their minds. DO PEOPLE EVER MISUNDERSTAND YOUR STORIES? Sometimes they say, “What do you mean? Your writing is very mysterious.” I say, “I cannot explain it to you. You need to explain it to yourself.” My stories are not beach books. WHICH WRITERS HAVE INFLUENCED YOU? The philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. Edgar Allan Poe was a genius in my opinion. Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea influenced me a lot. Herman Melville was a great novelist. John Steinbeck. Several French writers: Rousseau, Sartre, Camus — especially The Stranger. And Nietzsche, Kafka. CONTINUES ON PG. 28

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

27


OPEN TEXTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

PRESENTS... ...

WRITTEN BY LESLIE BRICUSSE & FRANK WILDHORN

SEPT 21, 22, 23, 24 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $12.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM C O H E N

&

G R I G S B Y

T R U S T

on SALE now

P R E S E N T S

S E R I E S

HOW ABOUT ARABIC WRITERS? We have a great poet, Muhammad al-Maghout, who passed away a few years ago. He was Syrian. Also, the Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz, who won the Nobel Prize. And the Syrian poet Adonis. [Editor’s note: “Adonis” is the pen name of Ali Ahmad Said Esber.]

WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON NOW? A novel about the Syrian war. It’s taking a while. I’m in no rush because I want to make it a good story.

SO WHICH AUDIENCE IS MORE UNDERSTANDING? Actually, young people. Young people like my writings a lot. I’m happy for that. WHAT’S IT LIKE LIVING IN PITTSBURGH? It’s a wonderful place. I’m happy here because it was a tipping point in my life. I went back to my soul. To my real life, writing, reading. It’s a quiet city and I’m a quiet person. ANY FINAL THOUGHTS? In my writing, I want to create more awareness of the Syrian disaster. There are victims every day. Innocent people. Women and children. It’s hell. As you know there’s Syrian refugees everywhere now, maybe even in outer space. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

+

DID COMING HERE CHANGE THE WAY YOU WRITE? No.

ARE YOU BETTER UNDERSTOOD HERE, OR IN ARABIC COUNTRIES? Very good question. Many people told me, “Even in Syria, your style is very strange.” Whether in Syria, or here. I always hear that.

28

STAGE BRIEFS

DID YOU LEAVE SYRIA BECAUSE OF THE WAR? I left before the war, in 2008. I came to the U.S. to establish my name as a writer, and to establish my freedom, too. As a writer, I can do nothing without freedom. Freedom is creativity. Creativity is freedom. That’s why I publish my books in Lebanon, because there’s no censorship there.

YOU WRITE IN ARABIC, THEN WORK WITH YOUR COLLABORATOR TO TRANSLATE INTO ENGLISH. DESCRIBE THIS PROCESS. If you want to translate a creative work, you need to be creative, too. When Baudelaire translated Poe into French, the translation was better than the original text. Why? Because Baudelaire himself was a great artist. C.J. and I spend many, many days on translating: revising, revising. It’s a very long process and not easy at all. But it’s very exciting.

TRUSTARTS.ORG

[STAGE]

Tim McGeever in A Funny Thing …, at City Theatre

MC K KEESPORT EESPORT SPORT LITTLE THEAT THEATER

City Theatre was founded 42 years ago, and for the past 16, Tracy Brigden was its artistic director. City specializes in local premieres of new plays, and Brigden’s track record of smart, sometimes edgy work ranged from Hedwig and the Angry Inch and Topdog/Underdog (starring a young Billy Porter) to Tarrell Alvin McCraney’s The Brothers Size, Madeleine George’s Precious Little and Robert Askins’ puppet-enabled Hand to God. But City’s managing director, James McNeel, says the company is coping well with Brigden’s abrupt departure this past June. After all, Brigden had already chosen the new season, which starts Sept. 23 with rising-star playwright Halley Feiffer’s dark comedy A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York City. Reginald Douglas, City’s artistic producer, and Clare Drobot, director of new play development, were merely left to do what they’ve always done: Get the shows on stage, with much of the same design talent familiar to City patrons. Brigden typically directed three shows a year, so City will use more outside directors than usual this season, starting with Joshua Kahan Brady on A Funny Thing. And longer-term issues remain, including whether and how the company will hire a new artistic director. McNeel says that City has retained a consultant to evaluate its operations and answer the question, “How do we ensure a long-term sustainable future for the organization in every respect?” But first comes A Funny Thing. Feiffer (I’m Gonna Pray For You So Hard) offers a romantic comedy where the couple, aspiring stand-up comic Karla (Jenni Putney) and nerdy Don (Tim McGeever), meet in a cancer ward where their mothers are both being treated. Dark, yes, but McNeel says, “At its core, it’s this play about people coming together.” Sept. 23-Oct. 15. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-61. 412-431-2489 or www. citytheatrecompany.org (Bill O’Driscoll)

+

The New York Times has called Will Eno’s 2010 play Middletown “delicate, moving, piercing, tart, funny, [and] gorgeous.” Little Lake Theatre Company stages the Pittsburgh premiere of this Off-Broadway work under the direction of Ponny Conomos Jahn. Taking place in a small American town, Middletown centers on the burgeoning friendship between longtime resident John Dodge (Eric Leslie) and newcomer Mary Swanson (Mary Meyer). From the local library to outer space and everywhere in between, the lives of its residents intersect poignantly. Sept. 22-Oct. 7. 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org (Amanda Reed)


Use code CITYCITY to save $5 on single tickets

“IRRESISTIBLE!” – The New York Times

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSEMARY TRUMP}

Jonathan Visser, Susan McGregor-Laine and Paul Guggenheimer in The Homestead Strike of 1892

[PLAY REVIEW]

BATTLEGROUND {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} AFTER 125 YEARS, the indignation has not

waned. The play The Homestead Strike of 1892 is misnamed, although the event it depicts is usually called a strike by historians. This decisive and divisive clash between management and labor was, strictly speaking, a lockout of the employees, not their refusal to work. What happened next is better captured by the name of the co-producer, the Battle of Homestead Foundation. Homestead’s writer and director Mark Clayton Southers, founding artistic director of the Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. (the other collaborator in this world premiere) faced some huge challenges. The Homestead Massacre (the name it’s best known by in the Steel Valley) involved hundreds of people, huge spaces and several days — not counting the run-up and the aftermath. The solution: more narrative than stage “business,” and actors multi-cast in many roles on various sides of the conflict. The only two people who stay themselves are the villains of the piece, Henry Clay Frick and Andrew Carnegie. Contemporary critics crowned the former “the most hated man in America” and mocked the latter’s philanthropy as “fire insurance” against his judgment in the hereafter. Michael Lane Sullivan and Mel Packer do justice to the steel magnates. Though central to the action, Homestead isn’t about them. The fast pace of this one-act means that actors morph very quickly from one character into another who’s almost the complete opposite. Consider Jonathan Visser, as an unctuous lieutenant to Carnegie, a scared and very human Pinkerton who dies, and the upright John McLuckie, Homestead burgess (equivalent of mayor),

plus unnamed folks. Also convincing in “changing sides” is David Crawford as an unnamed but very informative puddler and as Mr. Pinkerton himself, a lesser villain. Matt Henderson is impressive both as a dedicated union organizer and a nameless Frick friend who ends a discussion of fishing with a flippant reference to the then-recent Johnstown Flood. Yes, Frick, Carnegie and their buddies were indeed involved in one of the biggest man-made disasters in U.S. history, but succeeded in dodging all legal and financial liability. Homestead’s conversation is unabashedly ahistorical and admitted as such by the Narrator (Paul Guggenheimer), who provides third-person observation. The inimitable Wali Jamal portrays the contemporary first-person point-of-view. Sara Fisher-Ventura adds another outsider’s view as activist Emma Goldman, conveys the agonizingly intimate pain of a steelworker’s widow, and provides a fine voice for the finale’s song.

THE HOMESTEAD STRIKE OF 1892 continues 1 and 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 22, and 2 and 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 23. Battle of Homestead Foundation at the Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront St., Munhall. Sold out. www.battleofhomestead.org

by HALLEY FEIFFER directed by JOSHUA KAHAN

If I quibble with Homestead, it’s in Southers’ omitting the final clause of the famous last message from Frick to Carnegie: “Tell him I’ll see him in Hell, where we both are going.” It’s important that before you take your seat that you peruse the historical displays outside the Pump House (the only survivor of the Massacre) that will introduce you to some of the stories and people you will soon encounter.

RATED R FOR DARK HUMOR & DIRTY MOUTHS

BRODY

SEPT. 23 – OCT. 15 2017 TICKETS ON SALE NOW BOX OFFICE

412.431.CITY (2489)

WEB

CITYTHEATRECOMPANY.ORG

1300 BINGHAM STREET / SOUTH SIDE

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

29


[BOOK REVIEW]

’RAT TALES {BY FRED SHAW} The title poem of Scott Silsbe’s third full-length collection, Muskrat Friday Dinner (White Gorilla Press), clarifies that the rodent mentioned isn’t so much a metaphor as a regional dish in Silsbe’s native Michigan. As he writes, “In Downriver, Detroit, they are a delicacy of sorts — / those odd river rats you see in marshes and boat harbors / and in all the swampy regions along the Detroit River.” This quirky tradition gets thoroughly explained, though his speaker doesn’t find it appealing in the same way he might a Primanti’s cap ’n egg washed down with a cold Yuengling. Indeed, poems focusing on life in Downriver make for nice connections and change of pace, contrasting the adulthood Silsbee has embraced in his writing since moving to Pittsburgh. The local bookseller and musician doesn’t strive for elegant language or figurative wordplay here. Instead, readers get something more prosaic, as he makes up for a lack of interest in craft by focusing on heartfelt camaraderie and observational moments that comprise the bulk of the subject matter. A favorite, “Blue Light Special,” has the speaker and his girl visiting another couple on Xmas night. They share drinks and good tunes on vinyl; later, the men go outside to a deck, where the friend gets existential, asking “What am I / gonna do with my life?” Zen-like, Silbe’s speaker answers, “You’re / lookin’ at it. I’m doin’ it.” It’s a beautiful response to a world that never allows us to be satisfied living in the moment, especially on a holiday that brings out the worst impulses in people. Many of the poems in the 104page collection take place in bars or are drinking-centric, with East End haunts mentioned throughout. When Silsbe drops names of local writers, it’s reminiscent of the Beats, though less fleshed-out in the humanizing style Kerouac employed. The booziness feels cultivated as carefree philosophical stance, nodding to the wild exuberance of youth that left this reader wistful. Ultimately, Muskrat … shines brightest in shorter poems such as “Searchlight,” displaying keen bursts of imagery when Silsbe writes, “Those things that sustained me / all those years — the names of the clouds, / the vesper sparrows lined up on a branch, / the bedroom light on behind a red curtain.” It’s a lovely moment that speaks to the big-hearted ethos summed up elsewhere when Silsbe says of literary triumph, “Success is continuing to write the poem.” Cheers to that. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


FOR THE WEEK OF

FreeEvent

09.21-09.28.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

Sandra Gould Ford is an artist, educator and award-winning writer. But from 1977 to 1985, while studying writing at the University of Pittsburgh, she was a clerk and secretary at Jones & Laughlin Steel, on the South Side and in Hazelwood. Cameras were prohibited there, but Ford, enamored of the massive complex, began secretively photographing still lifes of blast furnaces and coke ovens. “It was its own world,” she says. She also collected documents —

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GAVIN BROWN’S ENTERPRISE, NEW YORK/ROME}

Art by LaToya Ruby Frazier

and stories from men who’d worked there as far back as the 1950s. When the plant closed, in the mid-’80s, she had built the substantial archive that forms the basis for On the Making of Steel Genesis, an exhibit opening Sept. 22 at the August Wilson Center. The show is a collaboration with Braddock native and internationally exhibited MacArthur “genius”-grant photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier, and also features Frazier’s new portraits of Ford (including the accompanying image, taken in her home studio, in Homewood, holding her J&L hardhat). The exhibit is actually half of a twin bill with Frazier’s own first show in Pittsburgh, opening Sept. 21 at Silver Eye Gallery: the nowiconic The Notion of Family, her 2001-2014 series exploring the painful effects of de-industrialization, poverty and systemic racism in Braddock, largely as reflected in images of her mother, her grandmother, and Frazier herself. Ford met Frazier a few years back, and they bonded over photography and their shared Braddock roots (they had both lived in the Talbot Towers complex). Ford says the title of Steel Genesis reflects how the creation of steel is a metaphor for how people make their own lives out of the raw materials they are given.

^ Thu., Sept. 21: Third Thursdays

thursday 09.21 DANCE Make dance by talking about art, as Attack Theatre revisits its long-running Some Assembly Required. Four dancers, accompanied by live musicians, improvise a new work based on audience discussion about two art exhibits. Today and tomorrow, Some Assembly works it out with Shelter, a group show at Contemporary Craft. Tomorrow, for two shows, the inspiration is Chicago-based Liz Ensz’s The Industrial Sublime, at UnSmoke Systems Artspace. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 22 (2100 Smallman St., Strip District), and 2 and 6 p.m. Sat., Sept. 23 (1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock). dock). Pay what you wish. www.attacktheatre.com attacktheatre.com

COMEDY MEDY Dana Goldberg brings her unapologetic ologetic comedy to Cruze Bar. She he has performed for President ent Barack Obama, Jennifer fer Lopez and Shonda Rhimes, es, and was one of CURVE Magazine’s zine’s “five funniest lesbians in America.” merica.” Goldberg has also graced raced the stage at the San Francisco rancisco International

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

THE NOTION OF FAMILY Sept. 21Dec. 31 (reception: 6-9 p.m. Thu., Sept. 21; free). 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield ON THE MAKING OF STEEL GENESIS Sept. 22-Dec. 31 (reception: 5:30-10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 22; free). 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org NEWS

+

Comedy Competition and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Local comedians Chrissy Costa and Helen Wildy open. Amanda Reed 7 p.m. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $15-20 (VIP: $25). 18 and over. www.facebook.com (“comedian Dana Goldberg”).

EVENT Using the venerable Carnegie Museum of Art in new ways is what Third Thursdays is all about. For its BOOMiverse event, BOOM Concepts — the art collective that curated the first Third Thursday, ne nearly two years ago — recruits innovative local outfits for an evening of fun. Make a wearable circuit with Assem Assemble; learn the evolution of hip-hop dance with Level UP; create crea floral-assemblage adornments with FlowerHouse; FlowerHouse and do a recording session with Tribe Eternal/Flow Lounge. Also, preview Ian Cheng’s new Lou installation, Emis Emissary Sunsets the Self (see item following). BO O 8-11 p.m. 4400 44 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-10. 412-622-3131 o or www.cmoa.org

friday 09.22 ART Mille Millennia in the future, a volcanic island is “now “no under the control of MotherAI, who begins to provide radical mutations in be the th landscape that threatens the region’s ecological stability,” while inhabitants e attempt to protect their world. It’s science a

> Thu., Sept. t. 21: Dana a Goldberg

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

31


SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

^ Sun., Sept. 24: Wizard U

saturday 09.23 fiction, but it’s not a movie or novel. Internationally exhibited, Los Angeles-based Ian Cheng’s Emissary Sunsets the Self is a large-scale digital simulation of “infinite duration” that uses the language of video games to explore evolution and human behavior. It opens today on a 13-foot LED screen in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s Forum Gallery. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.9519.95. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

EVENT:

The Beauty Box Homewood

CRITIC:

Rebecca Carter, 12, student from Squirrel Hill WHEN:

Sat., Sept. 16

ART

The installation’s purpose is to give back to the people who live here, because they didn’t have a space where you could go and have murals or music or other kinds of art. Robert Hodge, the artist, took an old lot that no one was using and transformed it into a place that anybody that wanted to use it could. My mom brought me out here because she wanted to show us what’s going on and happening in the city. I like the idea and the concept, and how they were creating something new out of something old. It was really bright and friendly. It surprised me that no one thought of this before, and that it was now being done. There was nothing I didn’t like. I think the artist’s interpretation was really good and original. BY AMANDA REED

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Downtown lights up for art, live music and more at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s free quarterly Gallery Crawl. Openings include Macular, a Wood Street Galleries exhibit of kinetic light installations by the eponymous Dutch art collective. The August Wilson Center has new shows by both acclaimed photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier (see “Free Event”) and the fashion-themed Went Looking for Beauty, by internationally known photographer Deborah Willis (who lectures tonight). Also catch Clickbait: The App Expo, a multidisciplinary project exploring technology by Ashley Andrews and Ashley Andrykovitch, at 707-709 Penn galleries, and a new group show at 937 Liberty. And visit the crafty folks at The Night Market, in Market Square, and the pop-up CSA PGH Small Mall, at SPACE. BO 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

FREE STUFF You know the drill with RADical Days. The annual multiweek festival of free events and admissions courtesy of the Allegheny Regional Asset District (collectors of a 1 percent sales tax) continues with today’s free admittance to the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History. Other highlights this week include: on Sept. 24, the Sen. John Heinz History Center and Western PA Sports Museum, and the National Aviary; on Sept. 25, Phipps Conservatory; and on Sept. 26, The Andy Warhol Museum and tours of Heinz Field. BO RADical Days continues through Oct. 15. Complete schedule at www.radworkshere.org

FESTIVAL Likely this year’s biggest showcase of Native American culture is the 39th Annual Pow Wow. Singing, drumming, dancing, costumed performers, arts and crafts, and native foods are among the highlights of this Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center event in Dorseyville, just northeast of Hartwood Acres Park. BO Noon-7 p.m. Also noon-7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. 120 Charles St., Dorseyville. $4-6. 412-782-4457 or www.cotraic.org

sunday 09.24 ZINES

ART Three new exhibits open with receptions tonight at Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery. Designing the Computational Image/Imagining Computational Design looks at the formative years of computer-aided design. Worlds Within (organized with the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation) explores the hidden worlds of the internal architecture, textures and more of plants. And Hadi Tabatabai: Transitional Spaces showcases the abstract work of this internationally known Iranian-born artist. BO Reception: 6-8 p.m. Exhibits continue through Nov. 12. CMU campus, Oakland. Free. www.millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu

09.20/09.27.2017

The Pittsburgh Zine Fair returns for the seventh year at the Union Project to honor the zine, that symbol of DIY spirit and individualism. And, with more than 75 vendors — the fair’s biggest lot yet — there’s one for you. WRCT DJs provide the tunes, and local eateries bring the grub. On Sept. 23, from 4-7 p.m. at Bloomfield’s Bunker Projects, there’s a Zine Fair Mixer, where attendees can crack open a cold one and get a preview of the next day’s ware. AR 2-8 p.m. 801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. Free. www.facebook.com (“Pittsburgh Zine Fair”) ^ Fri., Sept. 22: Designing the Computational Image {ART BY ROB KESSELER}


{PHOTO COURTESY OF ATTACK THEATRE}

^ Thu., Sept. 21: Some Assembly Required

FESTIVAL Never received your acceptance letter to Hogwarts? Well, grab your invisibility cloak and your Thunderbird tail feather wand for Wizard U., a nationally touring event that’s “the world’s premiere institution for late blooming witches, wizards, and magical creatures,” at Mr. Smalls Theatre. Learn how to cast curses, brew potions, compete in game like Wizards’ Pong, and participate in other boozy, daytime magical activities. Also come for the specialty cocktails and the costume contest. AR 2-8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18 (18 and older). 412-821-4447 or www.wizarduofficial.com

FOOD, DRINKS & MUSIC SHADYSIDE 7-11PM

monday 09.25 TALK Join PublicSource, a local online media organization, for a talk with New York Times bestselling author Cathy O’Neil at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Lecture Hall. O’Neil launched the Lede Program in Data Journalism at Columbia University, and her 2016 book, Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequity and Threatens Democracy, was long-listed for a National Book Award. A Q&A follows the lecture. Proceeds benefit PublicSource. AR 7-9 p.m. (6 p.m. ticketed reception). 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $8-40 ($75 for private reception). www.publicsource.org

WALNUT STREET WILL SHUT DOWN AT 5PM (ALL CARS MUST BE OFF THE ROAD OR THEY WILL BE TOWED)

SEP THE HOBBS SISTERS

23

OCT THE BRIGHTON BOYS

thursday 09.28

21

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL SIMMS}

WORDS

^ Sat., Sept. 23: 39th Annual Pow Wow

Last season’s Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, sponsored by University of Pittsburgh’s Department of English, featured authors like National Book Award-winner Ta-Nehisi Coates and MacArthur fellow Maggie Nelson. The new season begins tonight at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium with Jeff Guinn, an award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author who has written about everything, from Bonnie and Clyde to Charles Manson. Guinn is the former books editor at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. AR 8:30 p.m. 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwriterseries.wordpress.com

NEWS

+

MUSIC

NO BAD JUJU

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

BASTARD BEARDED IRISHMEN

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

33


DE

SI

the

ON

CHICKEN WINGS WERE SERVED WHOLE AND THEY WERE GREAT

SAVING FOOD {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Good ideas spread quickly. In 2015, the nonprofit 412 Food Rescue began connecting food destined for landfills with people who go hungry. Hundreds of active volunteers to date have diverted nearly two million tons of fresh produce, baked goods and more from landfills to tables in Allegheny County. Then, says, co-founder Leah Lizarondo, the growing network began fielding requests from both potential donors and groups serving the needy in surrounding counties. So here comes 724 Food Rescue. The fledgling group seeks donors, recipients and volunteer drivers in Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Westmoreland and Washington counties. Appropriately, 724 Food Rescue launched Sept. 16 at the Farm Aid concert at KeyBank Pavilion, in Washington County. Teaming with the nonprofit American HealthCare Group, volunteers shuttled unused food from catering services for performers and crew to the nearby Burgettstown Apartments. Most of 412’s donated food (from sources including Giant Eagles and distributors like Aldo Foods) is distributed the same day in the same community, at places like public housing, day-cares and after-school programs. Typically, a volunteer (summoned via app) might transport four boxes of too-ripe or otherwise cosmetically imperfect produce and day-old baked goods from a market to a distribution site. Trips average five miles, though that figure might rise in more sparsely populated areas. 412 Food Rescue is supported by foundations and individual donors, but Lizarondo says scaling operations up is relatively cheap. And the need is substantial: Together, the five 724 Food Rescue counties have nearly as many people living in poverty as does Allegheny. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.412foodrescue.org

the

FEED

Celebrate the city’s favorite ite dough pocket at the Pittsburgh Pierogi Festival, held this year at Kennywood Park. On hand will be two dozen purveyors of pierogi — from savory to dessert — and vendors of T-shirts, keepsakes and jewelry, plus some classic rides will be open. 1-6 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. Tickets (which do not include food) are $24 in advance; $28 at door; kids $12. www.pittsburghpierogifestival.com

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Oyster po’ boy with fries and cole slaw

WINGS AND THINGS {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

L

AST YEAR, East Liberty lost an important mural of African-American children, riding their bikes and blowing bubbles, on the side of a building whose tenants wanted windows. This year, the balance tipped in favor of Wilkinsburg, which gained a mural of Flyboy, Chicago artist Hebru Brantley’s iconic superhero. A be-goggled brownskinned boy, Flyboy soars, larger than life, across a formerly blank brick wall near the East Busway. His youth and powerfulness transcend cartoonishness; Wilkinsburg’s Flyboy is magnificent to behold. Directly in front of Flyboy is the sign for Liam’s Fish, Wings & Things. Liam’s represents Wilkinsburg in a way that is less fantastical, but equally heroic in the way of small-business entrepreneurs everywhere, who combine idea, skill, hard

09.20/09.27.2017

work and capital to provide for a family and contribute to a community. Liam himself is not the owner, but rather the owner’s small son, as well as the playful name for a little frog sculpture

LIAM’S FISH, WINGS & THINGS 501 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-243-5426 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. PRICES: $5-15 LIQUOR: Beer and alcoholic slushies

that greets customers at the counter. A former Popeye’s, the restaurant has been considerably spruced up, yet retains the layout of a fast-food place, with a counter for ordering and booths and tables

for eating in. There’s also still a drivethrough, and take-out must be common, since all food is served in clamshells and other to-go containers with disposable cutlery. But eat-in diners receive table service by Liam’s friendly staff. The impression we got was very much of a family affair; Liam’s baby sister even accompanied the owner when he stopped by to check on us. Liam’s menu is simple, but not ordinary. In the fish category are perch, whiting and Asian catfish, or swai. Wings speak for themselves. The “Things” category was most interesting, including fried oysters, shrimp and frog legs. Sides ranged from the most familiar Southern soul-food classics, like green beans and macaroni salad, to those less frequently seen in the North, such as fried okra, hush puppies and, the


+

ARCHrIsEo’Sn

SAZERAC {BY SEAN ENRIGHT}

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

NFL Sunday Ticket! WE Show all Games!

[PERSONAL CHEF]

The Sazerac {PHOTO COURTESY OF SEAN ENRIGHT}

night we visited, fried green tomatoes. Liam’s also has a liquor license and offers not only beer but alcoholic slushies, one rarer than the other at most Southernfried restaurants around here. Speaking of rare: frog legs! Rarer still to find them outside of the context of French cuisine, at least in these parts. We had to try them (avoiding the eyes of Liam, the metal frog mascot, as we ordered). Prepared like chicken wings, they were more than a novelty, but a delicacy all their own, thanks to a light, crisp coating; meaty, juicy texture; and slightly fishy flavor. This was not off-putting, but reminded us that we were eating the meat of a creature that lived occasionally in the water. Chicken wings were served whole and they were great: deep goldenbrown, well-seasoned, moist and meaty. By default they come simply fried with a few sauce options, including garlicbutter and a sort of buffalo-barbecue hybrid that pleasingly combined smoke and spice. The wings were so good themselves, though, that we mostly ate them straight. We love perch, but it wasn’t available the night we dined. Swai had the paler, less hearty coating of the frog legs, which suited the mild yet meaty fish. Fried oysters were juicy enough, but their coating was bland, crying out for salt, pepper and vinegar (all of which were on hand to doctor up their flavor). A side of green beans had all the bright color and snappy texture cooked out of them (although we have family members who like them this way, so maybe that’s just us), while fried okra suffered from almost the opposite problem, the vegetable bright green within a coating too heavy and tough to allow it to shine. In all of these cases, some seasoning would have boosted flavor, if not texture. Seasoning certainly enhanced the hush puppies, whose exteriors were deeply browned, interiors were moist and tender, and flavor peppered, literally and figuratively, with lively spices. Fried green tomatoes, too, were very good: thin-sliced, tart and juicy within their crispy sleeves. Hand-cut fries lived up to their name, their wide range of shapes betraying actual knife-work, not a prefab grid cutter, in the kitchen. This could work well, creating a range from fat and fluffy to thin and crispy fries, but in practice the variety was too wide, and a large portion of them were all crunch with no contrasting interior. In Wilkinsburg, Flyboy soars, and next door, Liam’s is down-to-earth, serving local variations on the theme of Southern fried food in a friendly, comfortable setting.

MUSIC

On Ca WING

Louisiana’s official state beverage, the Sazerac, embodies the essence of “craft cocktail” — for both the bartender who prepares it properly and the guest who ultimately reaps the benefits. Strong rye, sugar and bitters are complemented with subtle hints of anise and lemon aromatics. It is as easy to perfect as it is to spoliate with a clumsy hand and a hurried technique. If the individual preparing this historic libation takes his or her time, and respects every step of the process, it is a cocktail of immeasurable beauty.

NIGHT! 50 ¢ wings Mon-Th urs

DINE, RELAX, ENJOY 1910 New Texas Road • 724-519-7304

www.eightyacreskitchen.com

23 flavors!

2328 32 28 EAST 28 E EA Carson C STREET 412.481.0852 • archiesoncarson.com

INGREDIENTS • 2 oz. rye whiskey • 1 sugar cube • 6 dashes Peychaud’s bitters • ½ oz. absinthe • Lemon peel

INSTRUCTIONS To start, you’ll need two glasses; one for service and the second for mixing your cocktail. The first should be a rocks glass, the second a taller mixing glass such as a pint glass. Fill the rocks glass with crushed ice, and pour ½ ounce of absinthe over the ice. Set aside, letting the molecules in the absinthe expand, enabling it to stick to the sides of the glass. This is your service glass. In a separate mixing glass, add sugar cube, six dashes of bitters and a splash of water. Muddle until you have created a slushy mixture in the bottom of the glass. Add two ounces of rye whiskey, plus ice up to the halfway mark on your mixing glass. Because this cocktail is served “up” (without ice), it requires a long stir with a bar spoon to acquire the proper chill and a good amount of dilution from the melted ice Pto create a balanced drink; SEE STE BY-STEPS this can be 50 to 75 stirs. O T O H P ww. Returning your attention at w paper to the service glass, dump pghcitym .co the crushed ice, trying to keep a substantial rinse of absinthe in the glass. Strain the ingredients from the mixing glass into the service glass. Express lemon oil by holding the peel six inches away from the rim of the glass at a 45 degree angle. Squeeze the edge of the peel until a fine mist sprays and lightly floats over the top of your finished cocktail. Add this peel into the glass for a classic presentation of the Sazerac.

MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM WWW S NYAIPG SE NYA PGH G H CO COM M

The Downtown lunch café you’ve been waiting for…

PHONE IN YOUR LUNCH ORDER OF $30 OR MORE BY 11:30AM AND

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SAVE 10%

Sean Enright is general manager at Spork and co-author of Pittsburgh Drinks.

*Does not apply to catering, grubhub, postmates, or Eat24 orders.

SANDWICHES WRAPS SALADS SOUPS CATERING COFFEE HOURS 808 PPenn A Avenue - In I The Th Cultural C lt l District Di t i t HOURS: 412-745-2233 WWW.CAFE808PGH.COM 7 AM to 2 PM Mon. - Fri.

WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TA S T E

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

35


{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Matt McMahon behind the bar at Eleventh Hour Brewing

[ON THE ROCKS]

GOES TO 11 Eleventh Hour Brewing realizes a homebrewer’s dream {BY DREW CRANISKY} SINCE THE DAY he was born, the number 11

has had an almost mystical significance for Matt McMahon. Starting with his birthday (Nov. 11), the number has followed him, from his baseball-jersey number as a kid to the fact that his wife’s birthday comes 11 days after his. Now, McMahon hopes the number continues to bring him luck with Eleventh Hour Brewing, the brewery and taproom he opened earlier this month. As the name suggests, Eleventh Hour Brewing has been a long time coming. An avid homebrewer for more than a decade, McMahon, 37, began to plan the brewery back in 2013. After a number of challenges, including two locations that fell through at the last minute, Eleventh Hour found a home in a former schoolhouse in Lower Lawrenceville. With the help of an array of family and friends, including wife Keana and stepson/ assistant brewer Justin Strzelczyk Jr., McMahon transformed the historic building into the brewpub of his dreams. (Strzelczyk Jr. is the son of former Steeler Justin Strzelczyk, and Keana McMahon is Strzelczyk’s widow.) The bar faces the shiny new 20-barrel brewhouse, so guests can see where the magic happens. The space is filled with natural wood and an array of clocks (all set to 11), and garage doors let the breeze into the cozy taproom. But the real focus is the beer. “I brew what I like to drink — which is pretty much everything,” explains McMahon. “My goal is to have something that everybody’s going to enjoy.” The brewery opened with a half-dozen beers on tap, a small selection ranging from a Belgian

blond and an oatmeal stout to a pale ale hopped entirely with citrusy Equinox hops. McMahon dubs these initial brews the “Beta Series,” as he will continue to experiment and perfect the recipes. The lineup will eventually expand to fill all 12 taps (a traditional Oktoberfest beer is waiting in the fermenters). Arsenal Cider House cider, Apis mead and craft sodas are available for non-beer drinkers.

ELEVENTH HOUR BREWING 3711 Charlotte St., Lawrenceville. www.11thhourbrews.com

Expect more as Eleventh Hour settles into its spacious digs. Its products are already on tap at a handful of area bars and restaurants, and McMahon — who continues to work as a business consultant — plans to increase distribution as production ramps up. He also intends to replicate some favorite recipes from his homebrewing days, including a hoppy, juicy red ale and a Russian imperial stout aged in Wigle barrels. For now, stop by the taproom Thursday through Sunday for tasters, pints, crowlers (32-ounce cans) and growlers. Though Eleventh Hour doesn’t serve food, it features a rotating lineup of food trucks parked out front. Ultimately, Eleventh Hour aims to serve approachable brews in a friendly, neighborhood taproom. And for Matt McMahon, the brewery finally realizes a long-time dream. As McMahon says, “This is something I wanted to do before the eleventh hour of my life.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


REYNA FOODS

BOOZE BATTLES

Authentic traditional handcrafted Hungarian cuisine

INVITES EVERYONE

TO THE FARM!

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: THE BAMBOO

A LEGACY BAR & GRILL

SUNDAY, SEPT. 24 10 AM - 8PM

VS.

FOOD VENDORS DEMONSTRATIONS BEER • WINE • LIVE MUSIC ART/CRAFT/CLOTHIER VENDORS FARM TOUR • KIDS ZONE WALKING TRAILS • FREE PARKING CONTESTS & MUCH MORE

Cure

Umami

5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville

202 38th St., Lawrenceville

DRINK: Bamboo INGREDIENTS: Fino sherry, vermouth, orange bitters, angostura bitters OUR TAKE: Cherry notes lilt through this cocktail, while accents of minerality, bolstered by citrus, add complexity. It’s a nod to the dry martini, and its smooth mouthfeel makes this little cocktail shine in its simplicity.

627 E North Ave

WHITE OAK FARM 3314 WAGNER RD ALLISON PARK

DRINK: Bamboo INGREDIENTS: Fino sherry, Noilly Prat dry vermouth, aromatic and orange bitters, sea salt, nori OUR TAKE: Rose and cherry notes are strong on the nose of this cocktail, while a sip brings a hit of salinity. The vermouth gives a bit of a bite to the silky mouthfeel and the subtle flavors of tropical fruits.

in Pittsburgh’s Northside

412-322-8795 huszarpittsburgh.com

This week on Sound Bite: Pittsburgh queen of the bahn mi, Lucy Sheets shares her story from the streets of Vietnam to the Strip District. www.pghcitypaper.com

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Sparkling Traditional Mead, Laurel Highlands Meadery $15/750ml “ “This mead is lighter than its non-sparkling cousins because of its effervescence. Laurel Highlands Meadery uses Pennsylvania it wildflower honey and doesn’t add sugar, making for a lightly w ssweet and floral flavor that has some white-wine qualities to it.” RECOMMENDED BY CELINE ROBERTS

Sparkling Traditional Mead from Laurel Highlands Meadery is available for sale in its tap room, in Irwin, or by order at www.vinoshipper.com.

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TA S T E

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

37


DON’T EXPECT EVERYTHING TO BE EXPLAINED OR TO MAKE SENSE

AFTER EFFECTS {BY AL HOFF} Jeff Bauman was watching the 2013 Boston Marathon when a bomb exploded near him. He had both legs amputated above the knee, and while fighting through subsequent physical and emotional challenges, the 27-year-old working-class guy became the public face of the city’s perseverance following the terrorist attack.

Tatiana Maslany and Jake Gyllenhaal

CP APPROVED

David Gordon Green’s bio-pic Stronger retells this story, and its title, poster and trailer suggest a standard inspirational genre pic, complete with music cues, one-the-nose dialogue and glossied-up characters. Instead, the film is a quieter, moodier character study that downplays the headline events and the gym training montage in favor of small scenes that examine how a traumatic event emotionally rips through individuals and families with no less impact than a nail bomb. Stronger is really about PTSD, and even more so, about not having the skills to even know how to cope with it. Pre-bomb, Jeff (Jake Gyllenhaal) is an immature goofball, living with his overbearing, boozy mom (Miranda Richardson) and failing to commit to his off-and-on girlfriend (Tatiana Maslany). All three sides of this triangle need to line up right for Jeff to heal. Yet, in one scene after another, Jeff and his family can’t articulate their pain, anger and fear. The unsaid is frantically covered up with noise, as they hurl jokey insults at each other and get another round of drinks. The film also interrogates our collective demand, post-9/11, to make heroes of anybody upon whom headline-grabbing misfortune falls. “I’m not a hero,” Jeff protests. “I was just standing there.” Nonetheless, the jittery town pours its anxiety into Jeff as its totem of reassurance. To us, being asked to wave a ceremonial flag before the Bruins’ Stanley Cup game seems like fun. But here, Green shoots it like a nightmare, with close-ups of Jeff’s haunted, frightened face and hunched shoulders intercut with the braying maw of the crowd demanding “Boston strong.” Stronger is Jeff’s specific story, but it could be anybody else’s who’s working through a trauma. It’s still inspirational, but does a better job than most Hollywood bio-pics of depicting the smaller, but no less difficult, emotional steps that make up a comeback. Starts Fri., Sept. 22

Working the walls: Jennifer Lawrence

SURREAL HOUSEWIFE {BY AL HOFF}

D

ARREN ARONOFSKY’S mother! is one of those polarizing movies. For real: The dude sitting next to me at the screening stomped out, loudly declaring, “Well, that was a terrible movie.” And if you were hoping for a standard spooky thriller with a tidy plot, this would be a fair, if perhaps overly harsh, critique. I liked it, but I’m OK with a hothouse of a psychological horror film that is both spare (with a fair amount of not-muchhappens scenes) and over-stuffed and frantic. I’m along for a ride that has elliptical dialogue, nonsensical characters, grisly and disturbing imagery, and mystifying throwaways (hey, a frog!). Plus moments of pitch-black humor and Michelle Pfeiffer in her best role in years. Somewhere in the country, a couple is living in a big octagonal Victorian house. He (Javier Bardem) is a poet with writer’s block; his much-younger wife (Jennifer Lawrence) devotes herself to restoring the home, which has suffered a catastrophic fire. Both appear to be hiding high-strung

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

natures beneath stilted polite conversation. Things begin to unravel when the doorbell rings — a man (Ed Harris) has mistaken the house for a B&B, and is invited to stay the night. Everything else you should just see yourself.

MOTHER! DIRECTED BY: Darren Aronofsky STARRING: Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris, Michelle Pfeiffer

CP APPROVED Folks with a shelf of Criterion DVDs will nod at allusions to Roman Polanski’s Compulsion and Rosemary’s Baby; Luis Buñuel (particularly his dinner-party-from-hell, The Exterminating Angel); who knows how many other arthouse classics; and even those junky my-beautiful-house-is-asource-of-terror faves, like Pacific Heights. This movie gave me some serious FOMO about what allegories I was neglecting to process — every scene seems pregnant, up

to and including an actual pregnancy. (This is a movie that opens with a shot of Jennifer Lawrence placidly burning to death — that’s got to mean something!) By the last scene, some of the extra-narrative material is obvious — it’s working through creation, destruction, re-birth, gender roles, fandom and religion. But don’t expect everything to be explained or to make sense. The actors are all good — it feels like a cinematic in-joke to have noted intense actor Ed Harris ring a doorbell late at night; that can’t end well. Lawrence has the trickiest role, as her character is an enigmatic emotional cipher with a suggested affinity for the supernatural (she can “feel” walls), and a normal person trying to corral the craziness that nobody else but she (and we) are seeing. mother! begins rather slowly, but by the end it’s a swirly, surreal, shockingly disgusting head trip that is pelting you with allegories and freakiness. You may find it “terrible.” Or thrilling. Or pretentious. But it’s a good bet you’ll leave with an opinion. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


borders, is basic humanity. In French and various languages, with subtitles. Sept. 22-28. Row House Cinema

FILM CAPSULES CP

O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU?. Joel and Ethan Coen’s 2000 quirky road comedy is a stylized riff on The Odyssey, re-set in Depression-era Mississippi. Three escaped bumbling cons (George Clooney, John Turturro, Tim Blake Nelson) in search of buried treasure are beset along their journey by the law, oracles, politicians, other criminals and most bizarrely, a hillbilly music recording contract. Sept. 22-28. Row House Cinema

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BRAD’S STATUS. Brad (Ben Stiller) is broody because he is suffering from a very mild mid-life crisis. On the upside, he’s a happily married, financially secure white guy, with a well-behaved smart kid. On the downside, his college buddies — portrayed in extended cameos by Luke Wilson, Michael Sheen, Jemaine Clement and Mike White — have become wildly successful, and Brad is bummed. He takes his prickly resentment and his son (Austin Abrams) on a tour of Boston colleges, and learns to sort out his feelings. This low-key comedy, written and directed by White (School of Rock), is amusing enough, if you need another go-round with self-absorbed, mildly neurotic middle-aged men. (It’s as if all those younger navel-gazers Stiller has played have grown up and now have dad, not dating, problems.) But even though it’s meant to function on one level as a critique of Brad’s myopia, it indulges it far more; Brad is not even an interesting specimen of middle-aged, privileged white guy. And speaking of mostly of men’s troubles: Jenna Fischer has the ever-thankless role of wifeat-home-on-the-phone; the only other female character is an attractive Asian-American student whose purpose is to help Brad evolve, while also being the object of his romantic reveries. So sad in the year 2017 that women get written into these reductive support roles. Would it have been so hard to make one of Brad’s successful college buddies a woman? Or — dare to dream — transpose the entire plot of a middleaged person mulling over life’s compromises to a female character? Professional women, such as Brad’s wife, who are also mothers, have likely trod a much more complicated and rocky path than Brad, who is just sort of sulky about not being more conventionally “better,” i.e., rich, sexy, famous. It’s doubly disappointing coming from White, who gave us Enlightened, a rare piece of prestige TV that let a flawed middle-aged woman mull over how her life was off-track. Starts Fri., Sept. 22 (Al Hoff) ENDLESS POETRY. This new work continues Chilean-born filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowky’s autobiographical-ish films, begun in 2013’s The Dance of Reality. In this chapter, the 20-year-old Jodorowsky leaves home for Santiago, where he chases his dream of becoming a poet, and meets many influential artists and bohemians. Expect plenty of visual flair. In Spanish, with subtitles. Thu., Sept. 28-Sun., Oct 1, at Melwood; also Sept. 29-Oct.5, at Harris FRIEND REQUEST. Do not accept that friend request from that weird person, or you may be pursued by a demon. Simon Verhoeven directs this latest your-tech-is-trying-to-kill-you horror film. Starts Fri., Sept. 24 THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE. Those little plastic people are back, in Charlie Bean’s digitally animated comedy “made” from LEGO bricks. In it, six ordinary teenagers become ninjas at night, tasked with defending their island. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., Sept. 22 KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE. Those well-tailored spies have returned, wielding clever weapons and devilish wit. And they’ll need it after British Kingsman HQ is destroyed, and an American counterpart — the Statesman — is discovered. Taron Egerton, Colin Firth and Mark Strong star in Matthew Vaughn’s comedy. Starts Fri., Sept. 22

NEWS

+

ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ. Clint Eastwood stars in this 1979 thriller about a prisoner who works to escape from San Francisco’s legendary lockdown. Don Siegel directs. Sept. 22-28. Row House Cinema LE TROU. In Jacques Becker’s 1960 French drama, the plans of four prison cellmates to escape are complicated by the arrival of fifth new cellmate. In French, with subtitles. Sept. 22-28. Row House Cinema AWESOME; I F*&#IN’ SHOT THAT. Fifty fans, each armed with a hi-def video camera, shoot what they want at a 2004 Beastie Boys concert. This 2006 doc is the result. Midnight, Sat., Sept. 23. Row House Cinema {PHOTO BY MURRAY BOWLES}

Turn It Around

SPIES. Fritz Lang’s 1928 silent film tells the tale of criminal masterminds, German undercover agents, beautiful Russian operatives and critical Japanese documents. This German Expressionist classic sets up many of the tropes of spy thrillers to come. The film will be accompanied with a live electronic-music score provided by Life Size Replica. To be screened in a newly restored version that is 50 minutes longer than earlier releases. 2 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. Hollywood LUCKY. For Art House Theater Day, catch this sneak peek of John Carroll Lynch’s drama about the spiritual journey of 90-year-old atheist who has outlived his contemporaries. The film stars Harry Dean Stanton, who died last week at 91, so let it serve as a memorial. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24. Hollywood THE GREAT GATSBY. Robert Redford and Mia Farrow star in Jack Clayton’s 1974 adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel about the rich and the careless in the 1920s. 5 p.m. Mon., Sept. 25. Tull Family Theater, Sewickley. Screens for free for RADical Days

The Lego Ninjago Movie

Brad’s Status

SILK SCREEN ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. The 12th annual festival offering recent releases from Asia and the Middle East continue through Sun., Sept. 24, at various venues. See www.silkscreenfestival.org for the complete schedule.

like Lookout Records’ Larry Livermore; folks from dozens of bands, large and small; and community members who helped Gilman function. The scene was well documented with DIY media, so there is plenty of archival audio, video and photos. Despite the grubbiness of the scene, the film has a rosy nostalgia that is an inevitable by-product of middle-aged people looking back at their hilariously awesome weirdo salad days. But there’s a solid case for respect: Not only did Gilman help birth a couple of big bands, but even more importantly, it codified and maintained for decades what we now take for granted as DIY safe spaces for folks to find artistic expression and community. Back in the day, Gilman was nicknamed “the church of punk,” and this is its testament. Starts Fri., Sept. 22. Hollywood (AH)

TURN IT AROUND: THE STORY OF EAST BAY PUNK. Sure, San Francisco had an early and notable punk scene, with “star” bands like the Dead Kennedys and Flipper, but across the water in the East Bay was another, scrappier scene. Geographically, it ran from Oakland through Berkeley and north to the smaller hamlets like El Sobrante, Pinole and Rodeo. And while the East Bay didn’t have the flash of a big city like San Fran, it did have cheaper real estate and bored teenagers eager to move their backyard bands into any venue. It also had an influential punk zine, Maximumrockandroll. All this came together in the late 1980s to form, among many other things, two lasting entities: 924 Gilman Street, an all-ages, straight-edge cooperative music venue; and the mega-selling band Green Day. (Members of Green Day produced this film, but they also share footage and tales of their earliest incarnations as teenage punk musicians.) Corbett Redford’s documentary lays out the narrative of the scene in a two-and-a-half-hour documentary that takes a number of detours into assorted side stories, including zines, legal battles, skinheads, Miranda July, tape comps, girl bands, booking woes and record labels. Plenty of scenesters share stories,

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

REPERTORY BRAVEHEART. Mel Gibson won an Academy Award for directing this 1995 epic about the medieval Scottish patriot William Wallace. Swordplay, mud, kilts, fair maidens — and Gibson as the titular warrior. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 20. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 THE GRAND ILLUSION. Jean Renoir’s masterful 1937 film set in two German POW camps during World War I deconstructs with wit and poignancy several grand illusions, including the war, nationalism and class. War is absurd, but what survives, interwoven through scenes of everyday life and dramatic escapes across invisible

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

BIRTHRIGHT: A WAR STORY. This new documentary from Civia Tamarkin looks at the ongoing political and legal struggles around reproductive health care in the United States, many of which severely limit women’s access to health care. The film is presented by Planned Parenthood. 7 p.m. Tue., Sept. 26. Melwood JODOROWSKY’S DUNE. This entertaining and fascinating 2013 documentary from Frank Pavich is about “the greatest movie never made,” Alejandro Jodorowsky’s mid-1970s adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune. But because it was a film that got planned — and a project full of ambitious ideas and images that lived on in other films — there’s a valid argument for one participant’s claim that “It was the greatest movie ever made … even though it was never made.” Pavich’s documentary takes us through the planning stages — the visions, fortuitous encounters and mad obsessions that gave shape to Jodorowsky’s film. Today, studying the artifacts of pre-production and getting swept up in Jodorowsky’s enthusiasm, this Dune looks fantastic — full of grand ideas and even grander visuals. But in mid-1970s Hollywood, there was no market for an expensive sci-fi head-trip, though it’s clear that Jodorowsky’s evocative storyboards made the rounds and were noted: Explicit scenes and visual themes from Dune would surface in the next three decades of sci-fi films, starting with Star Wars. Jodorwosky (El Topo) is generous and phlegmatic about the outcome of his never-to-be masterwork. “From this supposed failure came a lot of creation,” he says, referring to the team he assembled who went on to other projects. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Thu., Sept. 28-Sun., Oct. 1. Melwood (AH)

CP

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

39


HEAR OUR FIRST FANTASY DRAFT FEATURING ONLY ‘MORALLY UPSTANDING’ PLAYERS ON WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} SEPT. 21, 1947 The Pittsburgh Pirates welcome the people of Cincinnati to the world of televised baseball, beating the Reds 11-7 in the first game on WLWT, which would broadcast the Reds for the next 48 years.

SEPT. 21, 1963 In 1961, Gene Baker became the first African American to coach a team affiliated with major-league baseball when he was named skipper of the Batavia Pirates farm team. On this day, he becomes the first black man to manage a major-league team when he fills in for Pirates manager Danny Murtaugh after Murtaugh is tossed from the game for arguing a call with an umpire.

The Pittsburgh Steelers and Denver Broncos play the first overtime game in NFL history. The game ends in a 35-35 tie.

SEPT. 22, 1990 Locals get to mix horses and booze when the Miller High Life Rodeo hits the Pittsburgh Civic Arena.

Connie Mack

SEPT. 22, 1974

{CP PHOTO BY TEVIN DANDRIDGE}

SEPT. 23, 1990 Paul Albrecht, a 35-year-old former Pittsburgh resident living in Tucson, is beaten nearly to death while attending a Steelers game against the Los Angeles Raiders at the L.A. Coliseum. Albrecht was walking through the stands wearing a Steelers shirt when 19-year-old Shane Geringer jumped out of a crowd of Raiders fans and began punching and kicking the victim in the head. Albrecht sustained brain injuries that impaired his memory and motor skills, and he became deaf in one ear. Geringer faced four years in prison after pleading guilty to felony assault, but his attorney, celebrity lawyer Leslie Abramson, called Geringer a “good kid with a good heart and a big problem,” saying her client had an alcohol issue. The judge sentenced Geringer to 83 days in jail and three years of probation. Albrecht would eventually settle a lawsuit with the team, Geringer and the stadium’s owners.

SEPT. 26, 1896 Pirates manager Connie Mack ends his three-year stint with a loss at St. Louis. But this was just the beginning for the Hall of Fame manager. In 1901, he would begin coaching the Philadelphia Athletics, a job he would hold until 1950.

Pittsburgh wide receiver Martavis Bryant

REALITY FOOTBALL {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

I

LOVE FANTASY sports. Since I started playing in the early 1990s, I’ve been involved in fantasy football, baseball, basketball, NASCAR, college football and golf. But football was, and is for most people, the gateway game into fantasy sports. Fantasy players used to hold drafts in private; now you can go onto mainstream sites, like NFL.com, and play in the open. But I pay much less attention to the game than I used to, and what attention I do give the sport is because of fantasy football. Why? Mainly because football — and I do love to watch the games — has become a shit show. I discovered fantasy football is much easier to handle than reality football. I started looking at football a bit differently after Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger was investigated for sexual as-

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

sault in Georgia in 2010. That year seemed to be a jumping-off point for high-profile incidents of NFL players getting into both major and minor off-field legal trouble.

I LOVE THE GAME OF FOOTBALL, I’M JUST NOT CRAZY ABOUT THE NFL OR SOME OF THE PEOPLE PLAYING IT. According to a database of NFL-player arrests compiled by USA Today, there have been 869 player arrests since 2000. Since 2010, that number is 359. And that doesn’t even include cases, like Roethlisberger’s, or

Kansas City’s Javon Belcher — who killed his girlfriend in December 2012 and then himself in front of team officials — because charges were never filed. Belcher’s actions bring up another issue, that of CTE, a degenerative brain disease linked to repeated concussions, such as those that can occur in football. CTE causes erratic behavior, as well as memory problems and depression. The condition can only be diagnosed post-mortem, but it has been found in dozens of former NFL players, including Pittsburgh’s Mike Webster, San Diego legend Junior Seau and Chicago’s Dave Duerson. By 2010, I had had enough. Especially in the ongoing case of Roethlisberger. He had already been sued in 2008 by a woman in Lake Tahoe, Nev., accusing him of sexual


{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

Ben Roethlisberger

assault. In that case, the victim was put on trial publicly. Every quirk she displayed was blown up to the point where the public did not believe her. Besides, if she was telling the truth, people asked, why weren’t there criminal charges? It was all the usual bullshit excuses we employ to let a popular public figure off the hook. Once the Georgia case surfaced in 2010, though, the first lawsuit was quietly settled. Since then there has been a steady stream of horrible incidents involving NFL players mistreating women, including the 2014 incident in which then-Baltimore Raven Ray Rice knocked his girlfriend out with a single punch before dragging her out of an Atlantic City hotel elevator. For its part, the NFL has handled everything badly and continues to do so. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell bungled the Rice case, ignoring the seriousness of it until went public. Meanwhile, the league has taken a hard-nosed stance against players who recreationally use marijuana. Take Steelers wide receiver Martavis Bryant. Bryant missed all of the 2016 season after a second suspension for marijuana use. Yes, weed is

banned by the NFL (it shouldn’t be, but it is a condition of employment), but an entire season? Really? Bryant is now back, off weed and ready to beat the world (he dominated Minnesota’s secondary on Sept. 17). But if he slips and smokes again, he receives an indefinite suspension. Meanwhile, games are filled every week with guys fresh off the pages of the police blotter. The website NFLarrests.com tracks player arrests. According to the site, domestic-violence cases result in the third-highest numbers of player arrests, behind DUI cases and drug-related arrests, respectively. While it’s still a popular game, professional football’s reputation has taken a hit and lost fans. Honestly, though, I don’t know if I’ll ever completely stop watching. I love the game of football. I’m just not crazy about the NFL, or some of the people playing it. I believe a game that protects its players’ safety and a league that doesn’t tolerate aberrant behavior by its personnel can become a reality. But that can never happen until fans demand a better product and stop buying into the fantasy. CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

41


ADVERTISEMENT

Couples Are Raving Over New Sex Cream Find out why couples across the country are raving about a new invention called Sensum

Meet the Doctor that’s fixing sexual problems in whole new way. Specialist, Dr. James L. Yeager’s new cream triples men’s penile sensitivity while stimulating their partner like nothing we’ve seen before. By Steven Wuzubia Health Correspondent Clearwater, Florida – If you are a man, over the age of 40, who struggles with achieving and maintaining a mrm erection or has difmculty reaching climax - then you may be in luck! For a limited time, a breakthrough new invention is being made available to a lucky few who want to experience what’s it’s like to have double, even triple the penile sensitivity. Meet Specialist, Dr. James L. Yeager. He is changing sexual medicine as we know it.

AMERICA’S “SEX DOCTOR” TO THE RESCUE According to Dr. Yeager, you may suffer from Reduced Penile Sensitivity (RPS). This can cause loss of conmdence, frustration, even depression and anxiety. “Many men do not feel comfortable telling even their doctor about trouble with erections, and a lack of feeling and pleasure during intercourse.” After all, the formula for great sex is simple... The more penile feeling you have, the more aroused you get, which provokes a mrm and lasting erection and a full and satisfying orgasm whenever you want. Bottom line: if you don’t have enough “feeling” in your penis, it’s impossible to get an erection. You’re not alone. Reduced Penile Sensitivity (RPS) is estimated to strike over 500 million men on a worldwide basis. The condition is commonly associated with aging, diabetes, circumcision, certain surgeries and prescription drugs. ED pills like Viagra, Cialis and natural pills work for many, but men with RPS often end

up taking more than directed in the hope of increasing their penile sensitivity, and even then they don’t work well enough. Let’s face it. The inability or long wait to reach orgasm is bad enough. But failure to achieve a mrm erection is devastating! It’s one of the leading causes of relationship problems. And avoiding sex often leads to failed marriage. It’s a horrible problem.

RESTORE SENSITIVITY, ENJOY SEX AGAIN

your overall penile sensitivity. It’s like removing your leather gloves -- and feeling your lover with your bare mngers again! So even men who’ve had little feeling in their penis are suddenly able to exercise sexual power over women again. Without worry... anxiety... or a second of doubt. The word is getting out. “Even men without E.D. problems are buying up more than we can produce”, says Dr. Yeager.

CLINICALLY PROVEN

The clinically-proven nutrients in Dr. James Yeager saw mrsthand the SENSUM+® help you get and keep a suffering of his patients. “It’s not their fault. hard erection very easily, and also let you They’ve done nothing wrong. And they are climax when you want to. not any less of a man.” Yet he wondered why Dr. Yeager’s SENSUM+® triples sexual satisfaction For example, Joe Romas, 52, from for men by increasing “penile sensitivity” modern medicine was failing in its mission to Oakland, was frustrated he had little provide these men lasting relief. penile sensation during sex. This made it As a result, he spent long sleepless nights PRIVACY GUARANTEED take too long to ejaculate. He had nearly given locked up in his lab ... researching every SENSUM+® is patent-pending and is up until he discovered SENSUM+® cream. study he could get his hands on regarding equally effective for both circumcised and Within one week of starting he reported, “I penis sensitivity and came up with a cream non-circumcised men. No side effects or now have my old feeling and pleasure back. that changed sexual medicine as we know it. medicine interactions have been reported. Sex is fun again and feels great. My wife and His biggest discovery? A super-nutrient The sooner you start using this cream, the I are much happier now.” called Cinnamaldehyde. This special ingredient sooner you can have more feeling in your activates the TRPA1 receptor (IC50= 9.5ýM) in 100 penis again to get and keep a hard erection COUPLES ARE RAVING your body. It increases the reaction of sensory and enjoy sex more than ever. neurons to stimuli such as warmth, cold and SENSUM+® is NOT sold in stores. No touch. This activation results in more sensitivity 80 prescription or doctor visit is required. Your of the penis and a more pleasurable sensation. product will be delivered discretely in a Dr. Yeager made this super-nutrient the plain unmarked package so your privacy and 60 WITH core of a revolutionary new cream called conmdentiality is assured. SENSUM+ SENSUM+® which promises to give you SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER what no pill can... incredible, long- lasting 40 This is the mrst ofmcial public release WITH sensation, even from the slightest touch. SENSUM+ of SENSUM+® in Pennsylvania. Only a limited supply of SENSUM+® is currently 20 Baseline available in your region. The manufacturer, “Like Teenagers Again!” Baseline Innovus Pharmaceuticals, is offering a “This has caused our special introductory discount to the mrst 100 0 sex life to be like we PENILE PARTNER’S Pennsylvania residents who place an order SENSITIVITY SATISFACTION are teenagers again! today. My wife and I are both SENSITIVITY AND SATISFACTION This special discount will be available starting much happier and more DOUBLED, TRIPLED today at 7:00am. First come, mrst served. A satisfied. A real life-changer! I am so SENSUM+® is clinically proven to end special phone hotline has been set up to take glad for Dr. Yeager’s invention to fix this the most common male sexual problems fast advantage of this ordering opportunity. The and effectively. The result of two clinical problem without dangerous prescription Special TOLL-FREE Hotline number is 1-800studies on men, both circumcised and not, drugs.” 957-9567 and will be open 24-hours a day. show SENSUM+® more than doubled penis Consumers who miss out on this exclusive - Robert H., West Palm Beach, FL sensitivity and more than tripled sexual opportunity will be added to our wait list. satisfaction. And what’s more is that their However, you may need to wait for weeks HOW IT WORKS partners enjoyed sex so much more when until more SENSUM+® is available. The SENSUM+® is a blend of essential oils and they used the cream - nearly 300% increase maker advises your best chance is to call natural botanicals that can double, even triple in sexual satisfaction. Couples are raving. 1-800-957-9567 immediately.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THESE PRODUCTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS BASED UPON AVERAGES. MODELS ARE USED IN ALL PHOTOS TO PROTECT PRIVACY. 300803_10_x_10.indd 1

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

9/14/17 12:08 PM

09.20/09.27.2017


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

HEALTHCARE/MEDICAL Has your career stalled? Interested in the medical field? Advance your career today, train to become a medical scribe! Self paced online training course. Receive your certificate in as little as 60 days. Healthcarescribes.com

HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

CLASSES

ADOPTION

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Rehearsal Space

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7.

412-403-6069

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

HEALTH SERVICES

PAID IN ADVANCE

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS?

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

SALES REPRESENTATIVES Pittsburgh Area 3 In-home sales experience is a plus. 3 Customer service skills, compassion confidence and professionalism

3 A competitive spirit, drive and self-motivation 3 Valid driver’s license and reliable transportation. 3 Ability to work evening and weekend hours In addition to unlimited income potential, we also offer Paid Training, Medical, Dental, 401k, Life, ST & LT Disability, Tuition Reimbursement & more. Forward resumes to smcareers@stonemor.com or call 412-375-2222 for more information.

TALK TO SOMEONE WHO CARES. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-978-6674 (AAN CAN)

EMPLOYMENT

ROOMMATES

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self-publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 888-231-5904 (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS Free Roommate Service @ RentMates.com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! (AAN CAN)

MASSAGE

MASSAGE $40/hr. 24 hrs 412-401-4110 2 Locations

Xin Sui Bodyworks

412-335-6111

ACROSS 1. Some soccer shoes 6. “Too bad” 10. “The Gang” leader 14. Sharp, narrow ridge 15. Sticky crap 16. Website with a “Shop by category” search query 17. Start of a quote by John Oliver 20. Beginning 21. Drug runners 22. Perfect, as a craft over time 24. For little cost 27. Torts master: Abbr. 28. Quote, part 2 32. Like some rush hour traffic 34. “Phish Food,” e.g. 35. Some grocery stores 36. Canker ___ 37. Quote, part 3 38. Brief ads 39. Ford of hair metal 40. Market index name 41. Detest badly 42. Quote, part 4 45. Aloo gobi bread 46. Toss to the side 47. No longer here

Near Rivers Casino & Downtown 1106 Reedsdale St. 322 Fourth Ave.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza

HEALTH SERVICES MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855732-4139 (AAN CAN)

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

877-362-2401

Make $1000 a Week Mailing Brochures FromHome! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start immediately! www.MailingPros.net (AAN CAN)

when necessary.

NO GREAT SHAKES

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

48. “Taps” instrument 50. Attacked 52. End of the quote 57. European smoker 58. Prefix for everything? 59. French wine region 60. 2015 American Dialect Society’s word of the year 61. Singer with the Velvet Underground 62. Dadaist Max

DOWN 1. Here today, maybe not tomorrow thing 2. Reason to fume 3. Tangy sweetand-sour dessert 4. Make good (for) 5. Ticks on the clock 6. Hercule’s creator 7. Director Besson 8. “___ Way You Want It” 9. Be stingy with 10. Ryan Seacrest’s co-host 11. Big Apple award 12. Beech family trees 13. Caustic cleaner 18. Table of contents page, e.g. 19. Cho’s “Trek” character

SCREEN

+

22. Major bother 23. Holy Roman Emperor between Henry VI and Frederick II 25. Give authority to 26. Sit next to 28. Sessions and Lynch, e.g. 29. “Beats me” 30. TV actor Fillion 31. Hebrew ascetic 33. Color similar to ash 37. Squat 38. Mama’s boy? 40. Loves to death 41. Show that aired the first lesbian kiss on American TV

SPORTS

43. China border river 44. Elliptical event 47. Florida jock 48. Mowins who was the first female announcer for the “NFL on CBS” 49. Progressive magazine 51. “Aida” river 52. Put money down 53. “Just. Stop. Talking.,” initially 54. Check in the mail?: Abbr. 55. Its website has a “Get Refund Status” page 56. Hanoi holiday {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

+

CLASSIFIEDS

43


Free Will Astrology {BY ROB BREZSNY}

EDITOR’S NOTE: Unfortunately, an editor’s error — this editor to be precise — resulted in the Sept. 20 installment of Free Will Astrology being printed last week. So, this week, at the risk of upsetting the cosmos, we’ve decided to run the original Sept. 13 astrology forecast. Apologies for the error. — Charlie Deitch

FOR THE WEEK OF

09.20-09.27

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the coming weeks, you might want to read the last few pages of a book before you decide to actually dive in and devour the whole thing. I also suggest you take what I just said as a useful metaphor to apply in other areas. In general, it might be wise to surmise the probable outcomes of games, adventures and experiments before you get totally involved. Try this fun exercise: Imagine you are a psychic prophet as you evaluate the long-range prospects of any influences that are vying to play a role in your future.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Dear Dr. Astrology: I’m feeling lost, but am also feeling very close to finding my new direction. It hurts! It would be so helpful if I could just catch a glimpse of that new direction. I’d be able to better endure the pain and confusion if I could get a tangible sense of the future happiness that my pain and confusion are preparing me for. Can you offer me any free advice? — Lost Libra.” Dear Libra: The pain and confusion come from the dying of the old ways. They need to die a bit more before the new direction will reveal itself clearly. I predict that will happen soon — no later than Oct. 1.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Welcome to “Compose Your Own Oracle,” a special edition of Free Will Astrology. Departing from tradition, I’m temporarily stepping aside so you can have the freedom to write the exact horoscope you want. Normally, you might be in danger of falling victim to presumptuous arrogance if you imagined you could wield complete control over how your destiny unfolds. But in the days ahead,

that rule won’t be as unyielding, because cosmic forces will be giving you more slack than usual. Fate and karma, which frequently impel you to act according to patterns that were set in place long ago, are giving you at least a partial respite. To get the maximum benefit out of “Compose Your Own Oracle,” identify three plot developments you’d like to weave into a self-fulfilling prophecy for your immediate future. Then start weaving.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Almost two-thirds of us confess that if we are alone, we might sip milk directly from the carton rather than first pouring it into a glass. Fourteen percent of us have used milk as part of our sexual activities. One out of every five of us admit that we have “borrowed” someone else’s milk from the fridge at work. Most shockingly, 4 percent of us brag that we have blown milk out our noses on purpose. I expect that in the next two weeks, you Sagittarians will exceed all these norms. Not just because you’ll be in the mood to engage in mischievous experiments and playful adventures with

get your yoga on!

milk, but because you’re likely to have a looseygoosey relationship with almost everything.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The coming weeks will an excellent time for you to raise funds in support of political prisoners, or to volunteer at a soup kitchen, or to donate blood at a blood bank. In fact, any charitable service you perform for people you don’t know will be excellent for your physical and mental health. You can also generate vivid blessings for yourself by being extra thoughtful, kind and generous toward people you care for. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when unselfish acts will yield maximum selfish benefits.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In his novel The Jungle, muckraker Upton Sinclair (1878-1968) exposed the abominable hygiene and working conditions of the meat-packing industry. The uproar that followed led to corrective legislation by the U.S. Congress. Sinclair remained devoted to serving the public good throughout his career. He liked to say that the term “social justice” was inscribed on his heart. Drawing from his inspiration, Aquarius, I suggest you decide what your soul’s main motto is — and imagine that it is written on your heart. Now is a perfect moment time to clarify your life’s purpose, and intensify your commitment to it; to devote even more practical, tender zeal to fulfilling the reason you were born.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You know that “patch of bothersome weeds” growing right in the middle of your life? Is it really a patch of bothersome weeds? Or is it perhaps a plot of cultivated blooms that once pleased you but has now turned into a puzzling irrelevancy? Or how about this possibility: Is it a chunk of languishing beauty that might flourish and please you again if it were cared for better? Those are excellent questions for you to pose in the coming days, Pisces. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, it’s time for you to decide on the future of this quizzical presence.

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yin yoga ÁRZ\RJD meditation

teacher training ashtanga yoga prenatal yoga family yoga

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Two animals are pictured prominently on Australia’s coat of arms: the kangaroo and the large flightless bird known as the emu. One of the reasons they were chosen is that both creatures rarely walk backward. They move forward or not at all. Australia’s founders wanted this to symbolize the nation’s pledge to never look back, to remain focused on advancing toward the future. The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to make a similar commitment, Aries. Is there a new symbol you might adopt to inspire your intention?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Simpsons is an animated sitcom that will soon

east liberty squirrel hill north hills

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017

begin its 29th consecutive year on TV. During its run, it has told over 600 stories. The creators of another animated sitcom, South Park, once did an episode entitled “Simpsons Already Did It,” which referenced their feelings that it was hard to come up with new tales because their rival had already used so many good ones. I bring this up, Taurus, because I suspect your life story will soon be spinning out novel plots that have never before been seen, not even on The Simpsons or South Park. You could and should be the Best Storyteller of the Month.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Love won’t exactly be free in the coming weeks, but there should be some good deals. And I’m not referring to risky black-market stuff obtained in back alleys, either. I mean straightforward liaisons and intriguing intimacy at a reasonable cost. So, if you’re comfortably mated, I suggest you invest in a campaign to bring more comedy and adventure into your collaborative efforts. If you’re single, wipe that love-starved look off your face and do some exuberant window-shopping. If you’re neither comfortably mated nor single, money may temporarily be able to buy you a bit more happiness.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The current state of your fate reminds me of the sweet confusion alluded to in Octavio Paz’s poem “Between Going and Staying”: “All is visible and elusive, all is near and can’t be touched.” For another clue to the raw truth of your life right now, I’ll quote the poet William Wordsworth. He spoke of “fleeting moods of shadowy exultation.” Is the aura described by Paz and Wordsworth a problem that you should try to fix? Is it detrimental to your heroic quest? I don’t think do. Just the opposite, really: I hope you can hang out for a while in this pregnant mystery — between the yes and the no, between the dark and the light, between the dream and the reality. It will help you learn what you’ve been too restless to tune in to in the past.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The imminent future will be a favorable time for refurbished models and revived originals. They are likely to be more fun and interesting the second time around. I suspect that this will also be an auspicious phase for substitutes and alternatives. They may even turn out to be better than the so-called real things they replace. So be artful in formulating Plan B and Plan C, Leo. Switching over to backups may ultimately bring out more of the best in you and whisk you toward your ultimate goal in unexpected ways. Are you ready for an orgy of gratitude? Identify ten of your best blessings. Tell me all about it at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


’ LET S

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 35-year-old straight guy. I met a nice lady through the normal methods, and we hit it off and have grown closer. I think we are both considering “taking it to the next level.” We are on the same intellectual wavelength, enjoy the same social experiences, and have a lot of fun together. So what could be the problem? My friend decided it was the time to inform me that she is transgender, pre-op, and will not be having gender-reassignment surgery. This was quite a shock to me. I’m not homophobic, though I’ve never had a gay experience. I’m openminded, yet there is a mental block. I like this person, I like our relationship thus far, and I want to continue this relationship. But I’m in a state of confusion. CONFUSED OVER COMPLICATING KNOWLEDGE

Lemme get this out of way first, COCK: The nice lady isn’t a man, so sex with her wouldn’t be a “gay experience” and homophobia isn’t the relevant term. Moving on … You’re a straight guy, you’re attracted to women, and some women — as you now know — have dicks. Are you into dick? Could you develop a taste for dick? Could you see yourself making an exception for her dick? It’s fine if “no” is the answer to one or all of these questions, COCK, and not being into dick doesn’t make you transphobic. Evan Urquhart, who writes about trans issues for Slate, argues that in addition to being gay, straight, bi, pan, demi, etc., some people are phallophiles and some are vaginophiles — that is, some people (perhaps most) have a strong preference for either partners with dicks or partners with vaginas. And some people — most people — want their dicks on men and their labia on/vaginas in women. “There’s no shame in it, as long as it doesn’t come from a place of ignorance or hate,” Urquhart writes. “Mature adults should be able to talk plainly about their sexuality, particularly with prospective partners, in a way that doesn’t objectify or shame anyone who happens to be packing the non-preferred equipment.” Some straight guys are really into dick (trans women with male partners usually aren’t partnered with gay men, and trans women who do sex work typically don’t have any gay male clients). Some straight guys are willing to make an exception for a particular dick (after falling in love with a woman who has one). But most straight guys aren’t into dick (other than their own). Since you’re confused about what to do, COCK, I would encourage you to continue dating this woman, keep an open mind and keep taking things slow. You’ve got new information to process, and some things — or one thing — to think about before taking this relationship to the next level. But don’t drag it out. If you conclude that the dick is a deal-breaker, end this relationship with compassion and alacrity. You don’t want to keep seeing her “to be nice” if you know a relationship isn’t possible.

Because letting someone live in false hope is always a dick move.

GET S CIAL

My relationship with my husband is bad. We have been together for 12 years, and we were married for eight years before getting divorced last year. We have small kids. We reconciled four months after the divorce, despite the affair I had. I have a history of self-sabotage, but in my relationship with him, it has become near constant. Everyone thinks I’m a smart and kind person that occasionally makes mistakes, but I’m not that person with him. With him, I’m awful. I make promises I don’t keep, and I don’t do the right things to make him feel loved even though I do loving things. We have been in couples therapy a number of times, but I always derail the process. I have been in therapy solo a number of times with similar results. I always get the therapists on my side and no real change happens. I want to change but I haven’t. I want to stop hurting him but I keep doing it. He doesn’t feel like I have ever really fought for him or the relationship. Why can’t I change? MY ENRAGING SELF-SABOTAGING YEARNINGS

It’s unlikely I’ll be able to do for you in print what three couples counselors and all those therapists couldn’t do for you in person, i.e., help you change your ways — if, indeed, it’s your ways that require changing. Have you ever entertained the thought that maybe there’s a reason every counselor or therapist you see winds up taking your side? Is it possible that you’re not the problem? Are you truly awful, MESSY, or has your husband convinced you that you’re awful in order to have the upper hand in your relationship? (Yeah, yeah, you had an affair. Lots of people do, and lots of marriages survive them.) If you’re not being manipulated — if you’re not the victim of an expert gaslighter — and you’re awful and all your efforts to change have been in vain, MESSY, perhaps you should stop trying. You are who you are, your husband knows who you are, and if he wants to be with you, as awful as you are (or as awful as he’s managed to convince you that you are), that’s his choice and he needs to take some responsibility for it. By “stop trying” I don’t mean you should stop making an effort to be a better person or a more loving partner — we should all constantly strive to be better people and more loving partners — but you can’t spend the rest of your life on a therapist’s couch. Or the rack. If you truly make your husband miserable, he should leave you. If your marriage makes you miserable (or if he does), you should leave him. But if neither of you is going anywhere, MESSY, then you’ll both just have to make the best of your messy selves and your messy marriage.

IF YOU TRULY MAKE YOUR HUSBAND MISERABLE, HE SHOULD LEAVE YOU.

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXW ZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER FACEBOOK.COM/ PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with Slate writer Mark Joseph Stern about left-wing antiSemitism: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

45


SAMAHA’S

SOUTH SIDE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

FIFTY YEARS AGO, the South Side was an old mill neighborhood with a dwindling population. Its main drag, East Carson Street, was cavitated by vacant storefronts. Few people saw its potential to be something else. But one of them was Charlie Samaha, and that was no small thing. Samaha moved to Pittsburgh from New York in 1966; he fell in love with the South Side and spent some two decades working hard, and loudly, to make it better. He was a millworker, a landlord, a merchant, an actor, a gadfly and a busybody. Today, Samaha is remembered mostly by South Siders of a certain age, who call him a peerless local character — and perhaps the key force behind the revitalization that eventually turned the South Side into one of the city’s busiest neighborhoods. Those long-timers turned out in force on the evening of Sept. 13, in the grassy parklet at 11th and East Carson streets, to rededicate a memorial to Samaha, who died in 1991 at age 68. About 50 celebrants convened by the South Side Community Council recalled Samaha’s legacy and feted the return of a gravestone-like marker to a space like the ones Samaha so often cleaned up, right around the corner from an antique store he ran. The granite stone was heedlessly discarded four years ago by young volunteers renovating the parklet; it was salvaged by architect Jerry Morosco, who met Samaha when he moved to the South Side in 1986.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FRED FLUGGER}

Charlie Samaha (seated) with his friend Fred Flugger on the South Side in this circa-1970s photo

councilor who is now a city magistrate, says Samaha’s vision of redeveloping around artists and architecture was then unique. As Samaha told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 1973, “The South-side [sic] is artistic and old, the buildings are available at a reasonable price, and this part of town is handy to every place else in the city.” But Samaha wasn’t quite a proto-Richard Florida: It’s hard to imagine the “creative-class” theorist pulling the stunts that made Samaha so aggravating to some. “He was a no-BS guy,” says Ricciardi. Many, for instance, recall Samaha sweeping sidewalks and presenting the trash (or even a bill) to the owners of adjacent storefronts. “He didn’t do that to be

“HE REALLY WAS THE UNOFFICIAL MAYOR OF SOUTH SIDE.” Speakers at the brief gathering included Kathleen Zimbicki, one of the numerous artists, gallerists and antique-sellers whom Samaha lured to the South Side, often promising free or low rent in one of his several buildings. “There was only one Charlie,” said Zimbicki, whose Studio Z art gallery lasted until 2003. “He really was the unofficial mayor of South Side,” said Keith Attwood, who traces the South Side location of his goldsmithery, established in 1976, directly to Samaha’s powers of persuasion. Arthur Ziegler, the influential co-founder and president of Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, recalled Samaha’s eagerness to include buildings he owned in PHLF’s pioneering program to renovate Victorian façades on East Carson. Samaha, a Louisiana native of Lebanese descent, worked here at mills including J&L Steel, where he did maintenance work, according to his long-time friend and business partner Fred Flugger. Samaha’s best-known creation was the South Side Antiques, Arts & Crafts Association (SACA). The group dated to the early ’70s; its 1989 brochure lists 50 businesses, all but a few gone now, lost to time or rising rents. But starting a decade before community-development groups like the better-known South Side Local Development Corp. and South Side Community Council even existed — and long before outsiders came there to party — these businesses and SACA’s marketing made South Side a regional destination. Gene Ricciardi, a former South Side community activist and city

mean-spirited,” says Ricciardi. “He was trying to build community spirit and community pride.” Samaha had many sides. To beautify vacant lots, he drew in the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy (which co-owns the 11th Street parklet with Lamar Advertising); he also did some acting, notably playing a store-owner in the Pittsburgh-shot 1986 comedy Gung Ho. While some old-timers lament how by the late ’90s the bar scene had eclipsed the South Side’s arts-and-culture community, it’s unclear how Samaha would have felt. After all, he was the guy who in the ’80s defended Mario’s South Side Saloon — the community’s first “fern bar” — from neighbors who said it brought trouble. Others note wryly that Samaha’s stated goal of remaking the South Side into the French Quarter North has in some ways come true. Samaha’s best-known bit of theater involved a coffin. Back when East Carson’s blacktop was moribund, he procured a man-sized wooden box, set it in a huge pothole and laid down inside. He invited press, and the resulting publicity quickly got the thoroughfare repaved. At last Wednesday’s gathering, longtime South Sider and local poetry eminence Michael Wurster read his poem “A Pothole Big Enough for a Coffin,” in which he recalled the coffined Samaha — “a man you couldn’t push over” — clutching an American flag and brazenly pulling off the feat “at rush hour on a Friday afternoon.” “That’s Charlie,” said someone in the crowd. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.20/09.27.2017


Treatment for Opiate Addiction Methadone/Suboxone

JADE Wellness Center

NOW OPEN IN SOUTH SIDE Locations in Monroeville, Wexford and South Side, PA

It’s the season for a change

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Premiere, Family Owned and Operated Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment:

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

• Group and Individualized Therapy

Pregnant? We can treat you!

NO WAIT LIST

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh • South Hills

Beaver County

Methadone • 412-255-8717 NOW ACCEPTING MEDICAID Suboxone • 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Methadone 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Methadone • 724-857-9640 Suboxone • 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

THERE ARE MANY PATHS TO RECOVERY NEED HELP? CALL TODAY INSURANCES ACCEPTED

NEWS

+

MUSIC

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

412-221-1091

Now open in Ellwood City info@freedomtreatment.com

Magnolia a Networkss

SUBOXONE Vivitrol Available

Pain Killer and Heroin Addiction Treatment WWW.MAGNOLIANETWORKS.NET

SUBOXONE TREATMENT 412-291-8039

451 WASHINGTON AVE. BRIDGEVILLE, PA

409 DINWIDDLE STREET PGH., PA 15219 WWW.RECOVERYUNITEDPITTSBURGH.COM

MEDICAID | MEDICARE | UPMC HIGHMARK BCBS

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

412-914-8484

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

47


$5 CRAPS, BLACKJACK & ROULETTE THURSDAYS | 6PM–2AM YOU COULD WIN HOMETOWN FOOTBALL TICKETS! Hit a lucky hand and earn entries for our 9PM drawing on September 28.

HOT SEAT DRAWINGS FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $100 CASH! SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be 21 years or older to be on Rivers Casino Property. Complete set of rules available at the Rush Rewards Players Club.

September 20, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 38