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EVENTS 9.15 - 8pm TQ LIVE! A queer evening of dazzling performance, dance, poetry, comedy, music, and more. Please note this performance contains adult subject matter and strong language. Tickets $10/$8 members & students

9.16 - 8pm & 10pm NIGHT OF 1,000 MARILYNS 8pm VIP & General, 10pm Late Night Tickets $200 VIP; $50 General; $25 Late-nite

9.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SELECTOR DUB NARCOTIC WITH SPECIAL GUEST STRANGEWAYS The Warhol entrance space Free parking is available in The Warhol lot. Tickets $10/$8 members and students

9.26 – 10am-5pm RADICAL DAY 2017, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION Bring the whole family to The Warhol for a unique day of art and fun. Free

9.29 – 8PM ERIN MARKEY: BONER KILLER The Warhol theater Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University School of Art and School of Drama Tickets $15/$12 members & students

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen is generously supported by Cadillac.

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09.13/09.20.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 37

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns HALEY FREDERICK, HANNAH LYNN, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, AMANDA REED

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Summer may be over, but that’s OK because fall is jam-packed with activities to keep you busy. Check out our 2017 Fall Arts Preview to get the lowdown on all the best events. PAGE 25

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[ADVERTISING] Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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“There are people who are here to help them, who are here to build relationships with them.” PAGE 06

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We review some of the two dozen films on tap for the 2017 Silk Screen Asian American Film Festival. PAGE 69

News 06 News of the Weird 14 Music 17 Arts 58 Events 62 Taste 65

Screen 69 Sports 71 Classifieds 74 Crossword 74 Astrology 76 Savage Love 77 The Last Word 78 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“I WORKED WITH INTERPRETERS IN IRAQ WHEN I WAS THERE AND HAVE SEEN THE SACRIFICES THEY MAKE.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Following last week’s Rivalry Issue, Vincent Pugliese headed to Cleveland to shoot the Steelers-Browns game. Check out his photo essay at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Help us decide which neighborhood Instagram collective @SteelCityGrammers shoots next. Vote in our poll on their most recent photo essay at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CP recently joined ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project, aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

No One Left Behind Pittsburgh Director Matt Landis

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EFORE AFGHAN immigrant Noorulhaq Fazly came to Pittsburgh a little more than one year ago, he only knew one other person in the city. So, two months ago, when his wife went into labor at 2 a.m., and he needed someone to watch his other two children, he could’ve panicked. Thankfully, he had the people involved in No One Left Behind to turn to. The national nonprofit organization helps immigrants like Fazly, who have worked with the United States in Iraq and Afghanistan. Fazly reached out to a volunteer with the organization, and the volunteer drove more than an hour to help. “It means a lot to us, and we will never forget what she did for us,” Fazly says. “This is the kind of thing this

organization is providing. We are very grateful for these people.” This summer, No One Left Behind launched a branch in Pittsburgh. The veteran-run organization serves combat

No One Left Behind gets combat interpreters out of harm’s way in the Middle East {BY REBECCA ADDISON} interpreters from Iraq and Afghanistan, who decided to leave their native countries after being threatened for working with the United States.

“I worked with interpreters in Iraq when I was there and have seen the sacrifices they make,” says Matt Landis, director of NOLB’s Pittsburgh chapter. “Outside of what they were doing with us, they were facing an entirely separate danger. At the end of the day, we all went behind guarded walls where we had marines at the gate and barbed-wire fences, and they would leave and go home every night and have to face the enemy.” Interpreters like Fazly and others who have worked with the United States in the Middle East are eligible for special immigrant visas. But the process is long and arduous and applicants are often living under constant threat while they wait. Nationally, NOLB works to make that process run more smoothly, while in branches CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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*Your Medicare Part B premium is paid on your behalf by the state’s Medical Assistance program. **Our hours of operation change twice a year. You can call us October 1 through February 14, seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. From February 15 through September 30, you can call us Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Premium and copays may vary based on the level of Extra Help you receive. Please contact the plan for further details. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, premium, and copays may change on January 1 of each year. This plan is available to anyone who has both Medical Assistance from the state and Medicare. UPMC for Life Dual is an HMO SNP plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Pennsylvania Medical Assistance (Medicaid) program. Enrollment in UPMC for Life Dual depends on contract renewal. UPMC for Life Dual is a product of and operated by UPMC for You Inc. UPMC Health Plan1 complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. 1 UPMC Health Plan is the marketing name used to refer to the following companies, which are licensed to issue individual and group health insurance products or which provide third party administration services for group health plans: UPMC Health Network Inc., UPMC Health Options Inc., UPMC Health Coverage Inc., UPMC Health Plan Inc., UPMC Health Benefits Inc., UPMC for You Inc., and/or UPMC Benefit Management Services Inc. ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-866-405-8762 (TTY: 1-866-407-8762). ͩNj쨰ƧưǷ̹ů୑ɄġNJ뼷ǷĻŗы͘ȦīДҶ྽Վ˖Ө뼶ɐٍǖ 1-866-405-8762 TTY : 1-866-407-8762) 뼶 H4279_17_1570 Accepted NEWS

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WELCOME HOME, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

around the country, it works to ensure these immigrant families feel welcome upon arrival. Prior to launching in August, local NOLB organizers began working with other resettlement agencies in the city to help interpreters and their families acclimate to Pittsburgh. On Sept. 13, the chapter will officially welcome its first family. “We don’t just bring them in, drop them off and say, ‘Thank you, welcome, see ya,’” says Sean Cercone, NOLB’s airport operations coordinator. “We make sure they realize they are friends, they are brothers in arms, and they are now a part of our Pittsburgh community.”

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“WE ARE VERY GRATEFUL FOR THESE PEOPLE.”

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IN 2012, Fazly began working as an interpreter with the United States in Afghanistan. In addition to working as an interpreter, he also provided security analysis, focusing on counter-terrorism efforts. “Most of our job was to interpret, to translate and to act as a culture adviser,” Fazly says. “But we did more than interpretation. Our role was kind of a bridge between community, [local] government, and U.S. government and military. We were in the middle.” But Fazly says early on in his position, part of him regretted his decision to work with the United States. Soon after he began working, he and his family started to receive threats. “People, friends and neighbors stopped seeing me as a friend,” says Fazly. “What I was doing was for the good of the nation and the country. I wanted to help my community by removing the bad guys and bringing peace. But then there were people in the community who didn’t like me anymore. “After one year, I found myself and my family in danger. I continued because I knew I was helping my people and helping

the peace process. We were fighting against corruption, injustice, fighting for women’s rights, children’s rights. I thought, if I want to help my country, this is the best way.” Then the consulate Fazly was working at was attacked, and 12 people were killed. Fazly was on his way to the consulate when it happened. “We couldn’t find their dead bodies,” Fazly says. “They were in pieces. Twelve people disappeared.” In 2013, Fazly began the process of applying for a special immigrant visa. But he and his family remained in danger for an additional three years while the visa was being processed, and he continued working with the U.S. “Unfortunately, there are some people, they are against government, they are against humanity,” Fazly says. “I could not live there anymore. I was too exposed. I received threats, people were following me. A part of me really wanted to stay and work, but my family’s lives were under threat.” And Fazly wasn’t just under threat from terrorist organizations like the Taliban. He and others working with the United States were targeted by thieves, and his car was stolen. “If they knew you were working for the U.S. government, there was a very wrong perspective that you were rich,” Fazly says. “So, they’ll kidnap your son, they’ll steal your car, they’ll break into your house. We were afraid to tell people we were working with the U.S. government. And then you have the other bad guys who are against the presence of the U.S. military in Afghanistan. A lot of people were against us. That’s why I decided to leave.” Fazly says he chose Pittsburgh as his family’s new home based on internet research and advice from a friend who had moved to the city a few years earlier. He was actually attracted to the city because

09.13/09.20.2017


Here’s a deal that’ll Perk your interest. It’s called Job Perks and it offers commuter tax-savings benefits for both employers and employees. Employees can save hundreds of dollars annually on their monthly transit passes since they are paid for through payroll deduction and are exempt from federal income or FICA taxes. Employers also save big by not paying FICA and FUTA unemployment taxes on the amount of the pass for each employee enrolled in the program. Now on a ConnectCard. Job Perks participants now receive Port Authority ConnectCards, a plastic smart card with a computer chip inside that stores the monthly pass. Employers can conveniently manage employee ConnectCards through an online web portal. Employees easily activate their new pass each month by tapping the ConnectCard at any farebox, validator or ConnectCard machine. Additional Perks: • Convenient, user-friendly online card management for workplace administrators. • Improved security. The pass can easily be replaced if ConnectCard is lost or stolen. • FREE one-time supply of ConnectCards ($1 per card fee is waived). How does my company enroll? Call Port Authority’s Marketing Department at 412.566.5283.

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WELCOME HOME, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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JOIN US AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER FOR ONGOING WORKSHOPS AS WE CONTINUE PROGRAMMING ON ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, DESIGN, URBAN PLANNING, AND OTHER TOPICS RELATED TO HOW CITIES FUNCTION AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A TOOL OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

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it doesn’t have a large Afghan community, and he thought it would be easier for his wife and children to assimilate if they weren’t insulated from the larger Pittsburgh community. “I wanted to be in a community with less Afghans because I wanted my wife to learn English and my children,” Fazly says. “I wanted them to learn a new culture.” When Fazly, who has a background in legal and political research analysis, first arrived, he and his family lived in Oakland, and he worked for the University of Pittsburgh. Today the family lives in Squirrel Hill, and Fazly is a manager for American Transportation, which transports students. “My impression of Pittsburgh has been positive. The community is very welcoming,” Fazly says. “One of the things I like about this city is women can do things. They can study, they can do work.” Fazly says NOLB has been an invaluable asset since he and his family arrived. “They provide a lot of support. There are a lot of different organizations around Pittsburgh, but No One Left Behind is different because they know what we did in Afghanistan. They understand us. They re-

ceived help from us. We feel like a family,” Fazly says. “I feel much more comfortable than before. If something happens … you have friends to help you. Anytime, it doesn’t matter when.” NOLB provides a number of services to families like Fazly’s. Together with volunteers, they help get the new immigrant families housing and also furnish the homes. Additionally, they help the families find employment and English classes, enroll children in school, and connect them to medical services. “We welcome them home the same way we welcome our own veterans, because they are our own veterans,” says Landis, a veteran who served from 1999-2009 as a helicopter pilot. “We greet them with a hero’s welcome.” But perhaps most importantly, NOLB also provides each family with a mentor to serve as their “first friend.” “If they’re trying to navigate the public-transportation system, or they need to know where to go to get a driver’s license, or they have questions about legal things, or where’s the best place to find halal food in the city, we have people who will be assigned to them,” says Landis. “What we’ve

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seen in other cities that have done this for a longer time is those first friends end up being friends for a long time.” In addition to the regional services NOLB provides, the national organization also lobbies in Washington, D.C., to help bring more families to the United States. Right now, NOLB is working on a bill that would declare Iraqi and Afghan interpreters as honorary veterans. “It’s the right thing to do,” says Cercone, an aircraft mechanic with the Pennsylvania Air National Guard. “I may never, due to my job in the military, have an interpreter or meet one, but a lot of my friends, my fellow soldiers, who have had interpreters while deployed, I empathize with the experience they’ve had with their interpreters, and I share their frustration in the fact that it seems like we’re forgetting and leaving people behind.” On average, the process of applying for a special immigrant visa takes between three and four years. As of Dec. 31, 2016, 9,562 Afghans and 248 Iraqis had pending applications. But while the lengthy process of applying for a visa has frustrated organizations like NOLB, many see it as a necessity. “It’s an important thing. It’s tough for it to be that long,” Landis says. “That’s a long

time for guys to remain in danger. But at the same time, if we bring one bad apple here, the whole program could go away, so we very badly need to ensure we’re bringing guys who need to be here.” And NOLB’s work has faced additional hurdles in recent months due to confusion around President Donald Trump’s travel ban, which restricted immigration from several countries, including, for a time, Iraq. When the travel ban was first launched in January, a few NOLB families had their travel plans delayed. “It’s scary. I understand the concern the families might have, not being able to speak the language and going into a country where it appears, because of the national rhetoric, that it’s not going to be welcoming to people of their appearance,” Cercone says. “But we want to let them know there are people who are here to help them, who are here to build relationships with them.” But despite the controversy surrounding the ban, Cercone says he doesn’t anticipate any problems when the Pittsburgh NOLB welcomes its first official family this week on Sept. 13. “It hasn’t been as challenging as I first thought, but it has been something to bear in mind,” Cercone says. “We’re ready to welcome them to the city.”

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MOVING LEFT Sen. Pat Toomey’s reluctance to address his protesters appears to be fueling a progressive wave {BY RYAN DETO} ON AUG. 31 in Bethlehem, Pa., U.S. Sen. Pat

Toomey finally held an in-person town hall. Only 54 constituents were granted tickets to attend, but unscreened questions were allowed. However, it didn’t really go the way constituents who oppose the Republican senator’s views might have hoped. Toomey answered questions on tax reform, health care, gun control, the minimum wage and other topics. He provided some answers slightly out of line with some conservative views, including a defense of some LGBTQ rights, but for the most part he emphasized his well-known right-leaning values. One constituent even appealed to Toomey’s record of advocacy for local police when asking him to support police departments who practice so-called “sanctuary city” polices. Toomey didn’t take the bait. He said he “disagreed with the characterization of sanctuary cities,” and then detailed his opposition to them. Unsurpris-

{CP PHOTO BY REBECCA ADDISON}

Pittsburgh Tuesdays With Toomey protesters in February

ingly, no other questions from the town hall appeared to change Toomey’s mind. “In general, Toomey is exactly who he portrays himself to be,” says Hannah Laurison of PA Together and one of the original organizers of Tuesdays With Toomey (TWT) protests in Philadelphia. Laurison says that even with large groups of protesters asking him to reconsider his positions on several issues, Toomey isn’t changing. For exam-

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ple, Toomey voted to confirm Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, even though thousands of calls, and 1,600 faxes, flooded his offices asking him to reject her nomination. But that doesn’t mean organizers are giving up. In fact, Toomey’s reluctance to consider the requests of his protesting constituents is not only energizing opposition to his agenda, it appears to be increasing opposition against other Republicans in Pennsylvania. Mary Dallas, an organizer with TWT in Philadelphia, says rallies will continue outside Toomey’s offices, but protesters are now doing more than just waving signs. “Even if it seems useless to be having these rallies, there are things going on behind the scenes,” says Dallas. “We are getting involved at the local level, even at the ward level.” Dallas says TWT is evolving, and beginning to target efforts to unseat local Republicans in the U.S. House, and even the state house. “To affect changes with Sen. Toomey, we need to weaken his bench and his influence,” says Dallas. Laurison agrees. She says a town hall with Toomey would be good, but “there are other areas where fights need to be raised that will be more effective.” TWT has already inspired groups like Mondays With Murphy, in opposition to U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Upper St. Clair) and Where’s Rothfus Wednesdays, in opposition to U.S. Rep. Keith Rothfus (R-Sewickley). But Laurison says that’s just the start, and she’s begun to organize opposition to other Republican politicians, like state reps Martina White (R-Philadelphia) and Daryl Metcalfe (R-Cranberry), as well as

state Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Marshall). Jill Helbling, of TWT Pittsburgh, says a new focus on Turzai is also growing within his district. In July, TWT joined with another grassroots political group, PA 12 Progressives, to hold two rallies with dozens of constituents and protesters outside of Turzai’s McCandless office. Helbling says the frustration with Toomey is “trickling out to other reps and congresspeople” and bringing the heat to them. And it might be having an effect. A PoliticsPA reader poll taken shortly after the Turzai protests showed that 67 percent of readers blamed Turzai for the state budget stalemate. Additionally, TWT is looking to provide support for interests currently under attack by Republican lawmakers, like health care. On Sept. 4, TWT asked its followers on Facebook to share an open-enrollment ad for the ACA, because President Trump is slashing 90 percent of its advertising budget. The post was shared more than 540 times, and has been viewed about 33,000 times. “Groups like ours will try to do more,” says Helbling. “If the government is not going to help people get health care, then activist groups like ours are going to step in.” Also TWT has joined forces with many longstanding activists, governmentreform organizations and labor unions throughout the state. TWT is currently working with anti-gerrymander group Fair Districts PA, Allentown’s social-justice group POWER Northeast, Reading’s immigrant-rights group Make the Road, Service Employees International Union and others. Helbling says TWT wants to follow these longstanding groups’ lead and provide them support in numbers. Other smaller grassroots groups are following TWT’s lead and lending hands to Pittsburgh groups. Angela Wateska, of South Hills’ 412 Resistance, is holding a fundraising event in October for immigrant-rights group Casa San Jose. In a joint statement with co-founder Lara Huber, Wateska wrote to Pittsburgh City Paper about the importance of evolving past demanding town halls. “Our group recognized early on that we couldn’t solely focus on protesting and resisting,” wrote Huber and Wateska. “412 Resistance also wants to work toward changing the systematic oppression and biases that have led to the current administration. Supporting established organizations that have been doing great work for years and the communities that are most marginalized in our country is at the forefront of all our activism.”

“IN GENERAL, TOOMEY IS EXACTLY WHO HE PORTRAYS HIMSELF TO BE.”

RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Under the direction of Dr. Suzan Obagi, the UPMC COSMETIC SURGERY & SKIN HEALTH CENTER was established as one of the

first academically-based cosmetic surgery centers in the nation, giving patients access to state-of-the-art technology, latest research and unparalleled commitment to patient safety & quality of care. Dr. Obagi’s team of Board Certified cosmetic dermatologists, physician’s assistants and certified laser & aesthetic professionals focuses on treatment for people of all ages and ethnic backgrounds. Dr. Obagi Wexford (724) 940-SKIN is associate professor of dermatology & plastic surgery at UPitt. She Pittsburgh (412) 621-SKIN trains physicians from around the world on the latest in cosmetic & laser surgery. She & her team specialize in minimally invasive cosmetic surgery, liposuction, lasers, Obagi Blue Peel, Fat transfer, PRP for skin rejuvenation & hair loss, Botox/Dysport, and a whole array of dermal fillers. Visit: www.upmc.com/Services/dermatology/cosmetic-skin

PITTSBURGH’S OLDEST INDEPENDENT SCHOOL Since 1838, SEWICKLEY ACADEMY’S teaching and learning practices have been guided by four core values: character, educational vigor, diversity & community. The Academy’s teachers inspire students to reach their full potential. In their dynamic classrooms, experiential learning is the norm. Sewickley Academy encourages all students to embrace a continuous journey of self-discovery by exploring new ideas and opportunities, in their own backyard or around the globe. An invaluable benefit 315 Academy Ave of the Sewickley Academy experience is their single Pre-K through Sewickley Grade 12 campus, where cross-age interactions are intentionally (412) 741-2230 integrated into the fabric of students’ lives. Astronauts, doctors, fashion designers, engineers, filmmakers, zombie experts, world travelers —wherever they go, whatever they do, however they choose to lead their lives — Sewickley Academy alumni are proof that students become determined, courageous, and caring individuals ready to take on life’s challenges. Sewickley Academy. For Who You Are. For Who You Will Become. Visit: www.sewickley.org

CRIMINAL DEFENSE & DUI ATTORNEY LENA BRYAN-HENDERSON has the experience (25 years), background & skill to handle a wide range of criminal defense issues. As a fierce & experienced advocate, she is one of a few area African American attorneys who has dedicated her life & career to fighting for justice and protecting her clients constitutional rights. Lena handles violent crimes, sexual assault, DUI & traffic violations, drug crimes, child abuse & neglect, white-collar crimes, armed robbery & burglary, domestic violence & assault and probation Pittsburgh & parole violations. With the state of PA lowering the standard for (412) 656-8250 intoxification to 0.08 Blood Alcohol Content, it is important now, more than ever, to know your rights in a DUI arrest. Lena concentrates in the area of DUI (as well as search & seizure) and has successfully litigated a high number of these cases. Serving Allegheny & surrounding counties. Email: lbh136@aol.com

A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO FAMILY LAW Whether you are facing the dissolution of a marriage, custody of a child, support issues, or other related matters, at the core of each issue is a relationship in transition. ATTORNEY REBECCA E. PUHAC uses a holistic approach to address family law needs. The goal of her practice is to help you achieve stabilization and promote healing during one of the most difficult times you may face. With 17 years of experience, Rebecca takes the time to discover the core values and priorities of the people she serves and offers alternative solutions, which include family law mediation and divorce litigation. She will assist you in creating a parenting plan, establishing alimony and child support payments, step parent adoption & domestic violence. Visit: www.pittsburghdivorcelaw.net

54 South 12th St 2nd Fl, Pittsburgh (412) 567-6613

ESTATE PLANNING & ELDER LAW EXPERT

285 E Waterfront Dr Homestead (412) 464-2230

CRIMINAL DEFENSE & DUI ATTORNEY CASEY P. MULLEN concentrates primarily in criminal defense and handles cases involving family law, and probate & estates. He knows that being charged with any criminal offense is a frightening experience. Defendants need to know their rights under the law and act to protect them immediately – before memories fade, evidence is lost or witnesses disappear. As a trial lawyer, Casey’s areas of interest include homicide & all violent crimes, sexual assault, DUI & traffic violations, drug crimes, child abuse & neglect, white-collar crimes, armed robbery & burglary, domestic violence & assault and probation & parole violations. He defends both adults & juveniles in state & federal courts at the trial & appellate levels. Visit: www.caseymullenlaw.com

100 Ross St #340, Pittsburgh (412) 403-5691

ELDER LAW & ESTATE PLANNING

436 Blvd of the Allies #500, Pittsburgh (412) 261-6446

DIVORCE & FAMILY LAWYER

106 Arcadia Ct, 9380 McKnight Rd Pittsburgh (412) 366-8980

ATTORNEY GAIL E. SUHR concentrates her practice specifically in

the intricacies of domestic and family law. Her areas of concentration include divorce & separation, parenting plans, visitation & relocation, maintenance/support, pre & postnuptial agreements, domestic violence, equitable asset distribution, private adoption & termination cases and appellate work regarding family matters. Gail has 20 years of experience with local court systems, and has amazing knowledge of PA Family Law. To find resolution to difficult Butler & Saxonburg legal issues, she works closely with her clients, helping them to deter(724) 824-4025 mine which course of action will bring optimal results. Gail is a caring, compassionate professional who works diligently on behalf of her clients. Visit: www.gsuhrlaw.com

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With 36 years of experience, ATTORNEY DAVID M. CHARLES concentrates in the areas of estate planning and administration, elder law, including nursing home planning for Medicaid eligibility and business succession planning. David believes in the teamwork approach and regularly works with clients and their investment advisors, bankers, insurance agents & accountants to ensure the plan meets the client’s long-term objectives. He regularly travels to clients’ homes, businesses and other advisors’ offices for client convenience. He is well versed in estate tax planning, long-term care planning, estate planning issues when disabled children are involved, as well as the unique issues of estate planning for non-traditional families and small business owners.

THOUGHTFUL, QUALITY FAMILY REPRESENTATION

Attorney Amanda C. Cook at COOK & ASSOCIATES concentrates in matrimonial law & custody and understands the concerns and challenges of family law litigation. Distribution of assets, alimony, child support, parental rights & sustainable child access and property settlement are examined in the context of what is available, negotiable & achievable. Her goal is to achieve a solution that includes a logical division of assets and a stable contractual settlement that maintains and sustains any future relationship between parties. Amanda has 12 years of legal experience and is trained as a mediator. She returns telephone calls and emails promptly, and spells out the conditions of her engagement in a detailed retainer agreement. Visit: www.pittlawyers.com

NEWS

Attorney Philip A. Goldblum at GOLDBLUM SABLOWSKY, LLC tailors legal solutions to the specific needs of older clients and their families. With 28 years of experience, he holds an MBA and is a Certified Medicaid Planner (CMP). He personally develops comprehensive legal and long term care strategies that both preserve family assets and promote an individual’s continued quality of life. Philip’s services include competitive pricing for health & asset analysis, wills & trusts, power of attorney documents, advance directives, assistance with long-term care insurance, Medicaid planning, applications & appeals, disability planning, aid & attendance benefits, crisis intervention, conservatorships and probate litigation. Visit: www.gszmlaw.com

serving 2,400 adults through 28 programs for people with developmental and behavioral health challenges. Based in Wilkinsburg, services include behavioral health therapies, residential locations, vocational skills training, outpatient therapy & multiple rehab services. Milestone was among the first mental health agencies to provide a client drop-in center, the first to provide residential services to clients who are deaf, and the first in Allegheny County to offer a 600 Ross Ave licensed program for seniors who have intellectual/developmental Pittsburgh disabilities. Milestone also pioneered Host Homes, havens for youth (412) 243-3400 who need a dependable environment with adults who support them. They have office locations and service sites in Wilkinsburg, Penn Hills, Monroeville, McKeesport and Lawrenceville. Milestone has earned accreditation from The Sanctuary Institute as a traumainformed organization. More at Facebook.com/MilestonePA and Visit: www.MilestonePA.org +

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News of the Weird

S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS I T E M S TO W E I RD N E W S T I P S @ AM UN I V E R S AL . C O M .

{COMPILED BY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUBLISHING}

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Police in Osnabruck, Germany, stopped a vehicle on Aug. 19 and found an unusual trove of drugs inside: plastic bags filled with about 5,000 ecstasy pills, with a street value of about $46,000 — all in the shape of Donald Trump’s head. The orange tablets depicted Trump’s signature sweep of hair and his rosebud mouth. An unnamed 51-year-old man and his son, 17, also had a large sum of cash and were taken into custody.

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Jeffrey Riegel, 56, of Port Republic, N.J., left ‘em laughing with his obituary’s parting shot at the Philadelphia Eagles. In it, Riegel asked that eight Eagles players act as pallbearers, “so the Eagles can let me down one last time.” Riegel owned season tickets for 30 years, during which the Eagles never won a Super Bowl.

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Sonogram photos are notoriously difficult to decipher, but one couple in Franklin County, Pa., are sure theirs shows a man watching over their unborn daughter. “When they gave it to us ... Umm, to me, it’s Jesus. And it looks like Jesus,” said mom Alicia Zeek. She and father Zac Smith have two older children, both born with birth defects, and the image is putting them at ease about their third child. “Once ... we looked at the picture, I was like — ‘Look, babe, we have nothing to worry about,’” Smith said.

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Tuffy Tuffington, 45, of San Francisco was walking his dogs, Bob and Chuck, when he came up with a way to respond nonviolently to a right-wing rally at Crissy Field on Aug. 26. He launched a Facebook page asking San Franciscans to bring dog poop to spread in the park in advance of the event. “It seemed like a little bit of civil disobedience where we didn’t have to engage with them face to face,” Tuffington said. Contributors to the project also planned to show up on Aug. 27 to “clean up the mess and hug each other.”

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Jordan Wills, 22, of Dover, England, provoked the ire of Judge Simon James of the Canterbury Crown Court in Kent when he appeared before the court. Wills called the judge a prick, and when James asked him to refrain from using obscene language, Wills said, “Who are you to tell

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A police officer on maternity leave was ticketed and fined 110 pounds after she pulled her car into a bus stop in west London to help her newborn baby, who was choking in the back seat. Rebecca Moore, 31, of Aylesbury, said her son, Riley, was “going a deep shade of red in the face, his eyes were bulging and watering, and he was trying to cough but was struggling.” Moore appealed the fine, but the Harrow Council rejected her appeal, as did the London Tribunals. “The law about stopping in bus stops is exactly the same everywhere in London,” a council spokeswoman said. “You can’t do it.”

An Arkansas Highway Patrol officer spotted “an unusual sight” on Aug. 23 on I-30: a black Hummer with a casket strapped to its top. When the officer pulled over Kevin M. Cholousky, 39, of Van Buren, Ark., he took off and led police on a chase along I-530, where his vehicle was eventually stopped by road spikes. Although the casket was empty, Cholousky was charged in Pulaski County with fictitious tags, reckless driving and fleeing.

S H O E S , A P PA R E L , C U LT U R E . STOCKING QUALITY GOODS. V I E W T H E C O L L E C T I O N AT 9 0 1 W E S T E R N AV E N U E .

me what to do?” James replied: “Well, I am the judge ... and I need to make it clear to you and others that such behavior is not going to be tolerated.” Wills was found in contempt of court and sentenced to two weeks in jail.

09.13/09.20.2017

One reveler at an Aug. 19 street festival in Worcester, Mass., caused a

dust-up when he aggressively confronted a police horse. Donald Pagan, 59, was cutting through a column of mounted police when an officer asked him to stop. Instead, Pagan raised his fist “in an attempt to punch the horse in the face,” a police statement said. The horse jumped backward, away from Pagan, which officers noted could have injured Pagan, the horse or the mounted officer. Pagan was charged with assault and battery on a police officer, resisting arrest and interfering with a police horse.

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Epping, N.H., resident Leslie Kahn, 61, found herself trapped in her swimming pool on Aug. 11 after the ladder broke. She was not strong enough to pull herself out of the pool, so she used a pool pole to drag a nearby chair, with her iPad on it, closer. On a community Facebook page, Kahn posted her desperate situation under the heading “911,” and soon police and neighbors showed up to rescue her.

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For information Call: (724) 872-1670 NEWS

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Alisha Wormsley

A COMMUNITY OF ARTISTS IN HOMEWOOD SEPTEMBER 16–OCTOBER 15, 2017

The People Are The Light

Pittsburgh-based artist Alisha B. Wormsley has organized a series of public art installations and workshops in the city's Homewood neighborhood. Centered on healing and cleansing, these events invite you to reflect on Homewood’s past and present and share your vision for its future. The series kicks off with a free public opening on Saturday, September 16 at 2 p.m. at the Fruit Stand (617 N. Homewood Avenue). The celebrations continue at 2:30 p.m. at the House of Manna (7240 Frankstown Avenue) with beats from DJ duo Tracksploitation and sweet bites from Dana's Bakery. For a complete schedule visit cmoa.org/homewood.

A COMMUNITY OF ARTISTS AT THE MUSEUM ON THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

Third Thursday

Ian Cheng Opening Reception and Gallery Talk Thursday, September 21, 7–8 p.m. Free Event

Third Thursday: BOOMiverse Thursday, September 21, 8–11 p.m. $10 ($8 Members, $5 Students)

Meet artist Ian Cheng at this opening celebration. CMOA presents Emissary Sunsets The Self, a digital simulation driven by artificial intelligence on a 17-foot screen! The story unfolds through January 28.

Evolve your view of Pittsburgh’s art universe with the help of BOOM Concepts and their partners across the city! Make and explore with local arts organizations and creatives. It’s a who’s who of Penn Avenue and beyond in Oakland for one night only.

Ian Cheng, Emissary Sunsets The Self, 2017, Courtesy of the artist, Pillar Corrias London, and Standard (Oslo)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.13/09.20.2017

Details and Tickets at CMOA.ORG

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh


LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

S C I D S R O MU WD N A

Zeve ZEVE ZEVE.BANDCAMP.COM

Zeve’s self-titled work is a falsettodrenched venture into the world of catchy indie rock. The 10 songs include instrumentals that are simple but feel spacious, using a few really good ingredients in each track to keep the listener intrigued without feeling overwhelmed. Zeve is, on the whole, dreamy and mellow. But while most of the record feels very gentle, Zeve shows range with “Devil May Care,” an infectious number driven by beefy synth tones and an earworm of a bass line. The airy vocals in its verses give way to a big, jangly chorus amplified by the low-end synth. With subtle range and pleasant tones, Zeve has created a lovely soundtrack for contemplating one’s existence while watching the leaves change color and fall.

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FOR FANS OF: Portugal. The Man, Grizzly Bear, bike rides in the crisp air

CHOIR YOU DO IT TO YOURSELF CHOIRPITTSBURGH.BANDCAMP.COM

CHOIR is one of those bands that juggles the catchy and the caustic. Do you bob around to YOU DO IT TO YOURSELF album-opener “Needs,” or do you thrash your body while laying on the floor and screaming into the void? You can’t go wrong either way, as the closing feedback of “Needs” seamlessly gives way to the tantalizing riffs of “Eyelids.” The cavernous instrumental cave provides space for the vocals to bounce around in and echo, so it’s hard to make out the lyrics. But with such intensity in timbre and strain, it’s not like you need to know what’s being said, so much as you need to give your body over to the headbang. Other highlights of the release include the bass tone on “Blood Vibe,” the sinister riffs of “Pep Rally,” the entirety of “Eat Your Heart Out” and the cacophonous, multi-movement “Sissy,” and the gnarly aggression of “Swallowing Water.” FOR FANS OF: tinnitus, noise rock with direction, the smell of gasoline

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Oliver Lake

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you pay to come out here and do this?’” Lake agreed, and the concert, staged in 2005 in the North Side’s alley-like Sampsonia Way, drew 300 people, twice as many as anticipated. Every year since, Lake has returned in September with groups ranging from his big band to the WSQ,

T ALL STARTED with an idea.

City of Asylum, which houses writers exiled from their home countries, wanted to present Chinese dissident poet Huang Xiang in a performance with jazz music. Henry Reese, co-founder of the organization, reached out to Oliver Lake, the New Jersey-based saxophonist and poet, probably best known for his work with the World Saxophone Quartet. It seemed like a long shot when Reese gave Lake a “full disclosure.” “‘We have a Chinese poet who speaks no English,’” Reese says, recalling the conversation. “‘I want you to do a collaborative act with him, not jazz and poetry, but together. At the same time, he’s also deaf from torture. We’ve never done a concert before, so we have no idea how to produce this. We’re going to set up on the street, because we don’t have a place to do it. And we don’t have any money. So will

JAZZ POETRY MONTH Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free (reservations suggested). 412-435-1110 or www.cityofasylum.org

all working in tandem with exiled poets. When it grew too big for the street, the event moved to a rented tent set up in West Park. The new locale made it more of a community event, and alleviated any complications from bad weather. As last year’s performance came around,

City of Asylum decided expansion was in order. The group was about to open its new headquarters, Alphabet City, in the former Masonic Hall on West North Avenue. The building would house a restaurant, book store and performance space. Rather than limit Jazz Poetry to one evening, the team scheduled a month of performances in the brick-and-mortar space. As fate would have it, Alphabet City wasn’t ready in time, but that wasn’t a deterrent. Tents were set up on Sampsonia, and the music happened; it included what could have been the final Pittsburgh performance by the World Saxophone Quartet’s baritone player Hamiet Bluiett, whose health has since forced him to retire. With Alphabet City now firing on all cylinders, the event promises both a solid location and a diverse set of performers. Lake is reuniting Jump Up, his ’80s jazz-funk group, CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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WORDS AND MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

which performs on Sat., Sept. 16, with poets Kimiko Hahn, Ariana Brown and Mark Doty. (Jump Up guitarists Brandon Ross and Jerome Harris also perform on Thu., Sept. 14, with poets.) The schedule also features some international performers. Clarinetist Waclaw Zimpel has performed with avant-jazz musicians in Chicago, but he hails from Poland. On Fri., Sept. 22, he performs a solo with poets, and the following evening, his trio LAM plays a set. This sort of residency allows performers a chance to work in different contexts. “If they stay multiple days, rather than having the same grouping three nights in a row, they can break up and do different things,” Reese says. “One night, you’re performing the way we identified you; the next night, ‘Can you pair off with people here?’” One distinct quality of City of Asylum’s performances since 2005 is the lack of admission charges. (Jazz Poetry events are free, but online reservations are strongly suggested.) Fundraising and sponsorship helps defray this cost; supporters include the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as both Allegheny General Hospital and UPMC. Keeping events free, Reese says, maintains a goal from the earliest events — making these art forms accessible to the

[LOCAL BEAT]

LOUD AND FUN {BY MEG FAIR}

Tim Berne

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAUNA MILLER}

Bat Zuppel Jump Up

whole community. “At the beginning, we didn’t even think about charging. It wasn’t intended to be that event,” he says. “As it grew, it became obvious that this was attracting people from all walks of life. The audience, in a way, is as important as what was happening onstage.”

TWO OF THE more anticipated performances of Jazz Poetry are schedule for Sat., Sept. 30, and Sun., Oct. 1, as alto saxophonist Tim Berne returns to Pittsburgh for the first time in nearly 20 years. Saturday’s performance features a trio, with pianist Matt Mitchell and drummer Kate Gentile. Berne and Mitchell will play solo sets and collaborate with poets Natalie Diaz and Lynn Emanuel. After studying with the late World Saxophone Quartet founder Julius Hemphill, Berne emerged on the New York scene, playing a unique style of jazz marked by angular phrases, jagged rhythms and unique instrumentation. He notates the music for his band, but “ultimately it’s more about phrasing anyway,” he says. The musicians “have to be able to hear how I phrase them [more] than the accents. The way things land kind of determines, rhythmically, what it sounds like, more so than the bar [lines] and the metric stuff.” Through releases on major labels and his own long-standing imprint Screwgun, he has created a style where soloists might be left to their own devices, while the rest of the band slowly changes the scene behind them, eventually easing into a new theme. Berne’s regular quartet Snake Oil has released four albums on ECM, the prestigious jazz imprint founded in Germany in the 1970s. The instrumentation features Berne, Mitchell, a clarinetist and a drummer, who also incorporates vibes and timpani. “I’m not really into having a rhythm-section situation where the bass player and the drummer kind of hook it up and the other guys solo. I like it when the whole thing is kind of a mess,” Berne says. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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09.13/09.20.2017

In Don DeLillo’s 1985 novel White Noise, Dylar is the name of a drug that is supposed to treat the terror of death, but it comes with dark and twisted side effects. A similar sense of dystopian dread threads its way through the high-energy, fuzzedout garage rock of Bat Zuppel’s latest record, also named Dylar. The psych-tinged record blisters, shreds and wails with purpose. It’s the kind of album that’s meant to be blasted through speakers. The music is controlled madness, a slightly unhinged sound that’s constantly on the edge of spilling over, but always managing to keep it together; it’s delightful mania in a careful package. It’s no surprise that Bat Zuppel is a loud live band. Its performances offer a kind of electricity, which fills the room as the members create a catchy cacophony. “We definitely like to play loud,” says vocalist and guitarist Zach Bronder. “It’s how we started playing when we started the band. I don’t think we could ever play an acoustic set.” Bronder, along with guitarist Spencer Geer, bassist Matt Pena and drummer Gordy Brash, are sitting around a table at Remedy before their set at the Rock All Night Tour, in Lawrenceville, talking to City Paper. “We don’t focus on being heavy, we just write songs that sound good loud,” says Brash. “Our sound has definitely gotten more controlled,” adds Spencer, a statement easily verified when comparing the band’s first EP in 2013 to the current sound of Dylar. The intensity of the early releases is maintained, but the arrangements have become more intentional. The band now heads into recording sessions well rehearsed and ready to go. Thus, the process of laying down tracks becomes relaxed and enjoyable, creating a spark of excitement that you can hear throughout the album. “We had so much fun recording [at Mr. Smalls Studios],” says Spencer. “I hope when people listen, they can tell that it was recorded by a bunch of friends having tons of fun.” MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DYLAR RELEASE SHOW, with Bat Zuppel, Langston Kelly, IT IT 9 p.m. Fri., Sept. 15. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. www.spiritpgh.com


CLUB | LOUNGE

upcoming concerts

René Marie

FROM THE HEART {BY MIKE SHANLEY} RENÉ MARIE is the type of singer who elicits a strong reaction from listeners, and sometimes it’s been controversial. At a civic event in Denver, she was asked to sing the National Anthem. Marie performed a version from her suite “The Voice of My Beautiful Country,” which trades Francis Scott Key’s lyrics for those of “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a song that is often called the “Black American National Anthem.” Then there’s her steamy side. Her salute to Eartha Kitt, I Want to Be Evil, exudes sensuality and power, much like the legendary actress/singer who once played Catwoman on TV’s Batman. Song of Red, Marie’s most recent album, takes things to an even deeper level. Her first all-original set blends jazz melodies with the scope of singer-songwriters, creating stories rich with characters. Songs like “Lost” and “This Is (Not) A Protest Song,” the latter dealing with homelessness, practically ask listeners to treat each other with more understanding. “I like touching people to the point of moving them to action, or to tears, or to laughter,” Marie says by phone. Though Song of Red was released more than a year ago, her words sound especially relevant today. “I can’t help but think of our political environment that we’re living in right now. There’s so much division, assumptions made about people, and very strong emotions,” she says. What’s important is “just having empathy for people and trying to remember that things are never black and white. There are so many shades of gray.”

“Blessings” drives this home, closing the album like a gospel hymn, its lyrics full of benedictions that unite listeners. “When we do that song live, it hits me that everybody in this room doesn’t have the same political viewpoint. So what has brought us together?” Marie asks. “It’s the music. And if something were to happen to one person in the room, if someone were suddenly choking, everybody in the room would be anxious about that person’s well-being. And that’s the real us. That’s what I want to take away with me, and bring with me to the next gig when I first step out on the stage and look into those faces.”

WILL HOGE

LEAV/E/ARTH AWAKE AT LAST

SHOOTER JENNINGS

9/24 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 16. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25. 412-320-4610

Marie utilizes the chops of a jazz singer, but her material reaches beyond the category. Along with clever mash-ups like Ravel’s “Bolero” with Leonard Cohen’s “Suzanne,” she’s also blended the controversial Southern song “Dixie” with Billie Holiday’s intense “Strange Fruit.” If this blend of jazz, pop and activism recall the great Nina Simone, that’s no surprise. Simone’s use of “music as a platform to protest,” inspired Marie, who didn’t begin her professional career until she was in her 40s. But coming into music later in life, Marie understands how her performance can affect listeners. “I think if we put our hearts in our music, then it’s going to do that,” she says. “If we take it out of the head and move it into the heart and give it from there, it’s going to touch people.”

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KID QUILL

9/20 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

PLUS CONFLICT CYCLE & AROSEATHORN

RENÉ MARIE

11/28 - 7:00 PM - ALL AGES

PLUS DAN LAYUS OF AUGUSTANA & NORTHERRN COMFORT 9/19 • 7 PM • 21+

ABK

PLUS RAZAKEL, FRODO THE GHOST, GHOZT THA DMENTED & MORBID SIKOSIS

PLUS IZZY STRANGE & YOUNG NIEK

THE URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT

9/21• 7 PM • 21+

9/23 • 7 PM • 21+

PLUS LIZ ISENBERG

PLUS GREAZY DUZIT

WEDNESDAY 13

PLUS SLANT6 & THE DOPLER AFFECT 9/28 • 7 PM • 21+

PLUS KIRRA & TRANSCENDENCE

EYES SET TO KILL PLUS REPULSAR & ONLY FLESH

10/1 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

10/3 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER

METRO STATION

HED(PE) | DOPE

10/4 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

TAJ WEEKES & ANDOWA

STRUGGLE JENNINGS

PLUS TWO SPECIAL GUESTS 10/19 • 8 PM • 21+

CAMP LO THE HUNTRESS AND HOLDER OF HANDS

SOIL SAVING ABEL

PLUS DECREPIT BIRTH, NECROT, WORMWITCH & GREYWALKER 10/5 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

PLUS TWO SPECIAL GUESTS 10/21 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

PLUS ASSUMING WE SURVIVE, AVION ROE, SECRET EYES & ALBVS

10/10 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

AUSTIN JOHN WINKLER "FORMER VOCALIST OF HINDER" PLUS PLATOON & SWINGERS 11/4 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

PLUS TWO SPECIAL GUESTS

10/16 • 7 PM • ALL AGES

THE MEDITATIONS

PLUS TWO SPECIAL GUESTS 11/9 • 8 PM • 21+

TICKETS AT EVENTBRITE.COM, DIESELPGH.COM & DAVE’S MUSIC MINE (SOUTHSIDE) 1801 E. CARSON ST | PITTSBURGH |412.481.8800

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

NEWS

PLUS UPON A BURNING BODY, SLAUGHTER TO PREVAIL PRISON & SHROUDED IN NEGLECT

PLUS OTHERWISE 10/17 - 7:00 PM - ALL AGES

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TASTE

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CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF POONEH GHANA}

Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears

[F*CK FASCISM] + THU., SEPT. 14

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.13/09.20.2017

It’s not often that public figures say “I love fascism,” but you know, actions speak louder than words. Luckily, there are plenty of artists willing to speak out against fascism, with their actions and their words. Tonight at Mr. Roboto Project, catch Rap Against Fascism, featuring local talent including hip-hop/ alt-rock duo LAZYBLACKMAN, spoken-word artist Brittney Chantele, rapper Yorel Tifsim, the dreamy R&B of Clara Kent and more. All proceeds from the event will benefit Homewood’s Afro-American Music Institute. Hannah Lynn 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. www.the robotoproject.com [FOLK/ETHEREAL MAGIC] + FRI., SEPT 15 It’s hard to forget Valerie June’s voice once you hear it. Clara Kent It’s got a twang and sweetness, but there’s grit in there, too. She has a quality similar to that of Joanna Newsom, which is to simultaneously sound like a child and an old lady. Her latest album, The Order of Time, maintains her Memphis country-andblues roots with a cosmic twist, featuring lyrics like “Dancing on the astral plane / Holy water, cleansing rain / Floating through the stratosphere.” Catch her mesmerizing live performance at Mr. Smalls tonight along with local roots group The Delta

Struts. HL 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[ELECTRONIC] + SAT., SEPT. 16 Sylvan Esso is one of those unifying bands, liked by fans of all genres and ages. If you can’t listen to its music and at least gently bop your head, then you’re probably difficult to get along with. SE’s blend of electronic, folk and dance music makes for a lively sound that would fit in at a party, or in an {PHOTO COURTESY OF elevator. Joining the CATCHREC MEDIA} duo at Stage AE is electronic-music veteran Helado Negro, whose latest album Private Energy is a groovy and bilingual tribute to Latin pride. HL 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.promo westlive.com

[ROCK/SOUL] + MON. SEPT. 18 Austin’s Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears have been making extremely listenable soul music for the past decade. The band could go toe-to-toe with any of its peers, like Alabama Shakes or St. Paul and the Broken Bones, drawing influence from greats like Howlin’ Wolf and James Brown. The group will be joined at the Rex Theater by seasoned Mississippi bluesman Lightnin’ Malcolm. HL 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-20. 18 and older. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.net


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

MR. SMALLS THEATER. MUTEMATH. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

ROCK/POP FRI 15 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. No Bad JuJu Band. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. CRAFTHOUSE STAGE & GRILL. Totally 80s. 9 p.m. Whitehall. 412-653-2695. MOONDOG’S. Augustus. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 16 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Ferris Bueller’s Revenge Band. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. CORAOPOLIS VFW POST 402. The Rockers. 7 p.m. Coraopolis. 412-417-5683. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. 8:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. 9 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. King’s Ransom. 5:30 p.m. Cheswick. 724-265-9950.

WED 20 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Weird Paul Rock Band. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5992. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Ataris, The Queers w/ Latecomer. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

SUN 17 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Seu George Presents: The Life Aquatic, A Tribute to David Bowie. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Billy the Kid’s Steel Town All-Stars. 7 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882. VINOSKI WINERY. Jason Kendall. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

DJS THU 14

BRILLOBOX. Cosmic Fest Kickoff Party. Troxum, Expletive, Ali Berger, Davis Galvin & Nancy Dr0ne 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. www. per pa DIESEL. Caked Up. pghcitym .co 9 p.m. South Side. REX THEATER. 412-431-8800. Black Joe Lewis & the MR. SMALLS THEATER. Honeybears. 8 p.m. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the South Side. 412-381-6811. Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DIESEL. Will Hoge. 7 p.m. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. Downtown. 412-471-2058. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Big Thief.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 18

TUE 19

7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

FRI 15 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REX THEATER. Buku w/ Luzcid. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

MP 3 MONDAY CHOIR

SAT 16 BELVEDERE’S. Sean MC & Thermos. 90s night. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PALACE THEATRE. Tommy Jones & The Shondells. 7:30 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Pittsburgh Algorave. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070.

Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s a new song from CHOIR’s release YOU DO IT TO YOURSELF. Sometimes a band puts out a song that feels like it’s desperately clawing its way into existence, shoving a burning flag into the crumbling ground to claim its space in the void. Aggressive, incendiary riffs join the reverb-drowned screams to make for a sinister sprint. Stream or download “Eyelids” for free on FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

SAT 16

THE PARK HOUSE. SoulfulFella & The Bike Funx. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273.

MIKE’S NEW MOON SALOON. Jack of Diamonds. 9 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-265-8188. SOUTH SIDE WORKS. Jimmy Adler Band. 6 p.m. South Side. 412-370-9621.

TUE 19 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SEVICHE. Hot Salsa & Bachata Nights. 10 p.m. Downtown. 843-670-8465.

SUN 17

WED 20

THU 14

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 16 THE R BAR. Theresa Hawthorne. 9:30 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BLUES THU 14 MOONDOG’S. Albert Castiglia. 7:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 15 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jimmy Adler Band. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

GREENTREE PARK. Jill West. 4 p.m. Green Tree. 412-370-9621.

JAZZ

Brandon Ross. Between solo sets, these musicians will collaborate w/ poet Ladan Osman for a jazz & poetry interlude. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. A Tribute to Chick Corea w/ Tony Campbell, Poogie Bell, Dwayne Dolphin & Max Leak. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

SAT 16

BISTRO 9101. Samantha St. John, Kevin Clark, Tom Battaglia, Sunny Sunseri JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Charlie Becker. 7 p.m. & SPEAKEASY. Roger McCandless. 412-318-4871. Humphries Jam Session. CITY OF ASYLUM @ Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. ALPHABET CITY. Jazz 412-904-3335. Poetry Month: Oliver RILEY’S POUR Lake & Jump Up. HOUSE. Jazz Happy Between sets, these Hour w/ Martin musicians will Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. www. per collaborate w/ writers pa Lucarelli Jazz w/ Andy pghcitym .co Kimiko Hahn & Yalch. 8 p.m. Carnegie. Mark Doty for a jazz 412-279-0770. & poetry interlude. 9 p.m. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. North Side. 412-435-1110. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB Downtown. 412-394-3400. & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5 p.m. Cross ANDORA RESTAURANT Current w/ Steeltown Horns. FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. Cardillo & vocalist Charlie 412-904-3335. Sanders. 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. JOHNNY’S RESTAURANT 412-967-1900. & LOUNGE. The Etta Cox CITY OF ASYLUM @ Trio. 7:30 p.m. Wilmerding. ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry 412-824-6642. Month: Jerome Harris &

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 15

THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

SUN 17 CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry Month: Oliver Lake. Between sets, Oliver will collaborate w/ writer Jericho Brown for a jazz & poetry interlude. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. PRESIDENT’S PUB. DTC Organ Trio. 11:30 a.m. Washington. 724-206-0918. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Quantum Truth feat. DK Anderson. 7 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery w/ Fred Pugh, Patrick Whitehead & Jevon Rushton. 6 p.m. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

Wye Oak Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side [SAT., OCT. 07]

The National, Daughter Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side [SUN., OCT. 15]

PEARS

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Galactic Cowboy Orchestra & Feral Cat. Speakeasy. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. PENN HEBRON GARDEN CLUB. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff. 7 p.m. Penn Hills. 412-247-9066.

VINOSKI WINERY. Rob Roush. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

ACOUSTIC

TUE 19

MJ’S STEEL CITY. The Eclectic Acoustics. 7 p.m. Robinson. 724-227-3051. THE ROOTS CELLAR. Suzzy Roche & Lucy Wainwright Roche. 7:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-1915.

FRI 15 565 LIVE. Right TurnClyde. 9 p.m. Bellevue. 412.301.8623. MJ’S STEEL CITY. The Eclectic Acoustics. 7 p.m. Robinson. 724-227-3051.

SAT 16 ARNOLD’S TEA HOUSE. Deutschtown Summer Series w/ TJ Connolly of Chrome Moses. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-322-2494. PRIMANTI BROTHERS. Eclectic Acoustics. A benefit first responders in the Washington area. 2 p.m. Washington. 724-201-2903. THE HARDWOOD CAFE. The Eclectic Acoustics. 7 p.m. Butler. 724-586-5335.

09.13/09.20.2017

[WED., OCT. 04]

TUE 19

THU 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

PEARS

MON 18

WED 20

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EARLY WARNINGS {PHOTO COURTESY OF GILBERT CISNEROS}

SUN 17

SUN 17 HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Third Sun. of every month, 5 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

CLUB CAFE. Penny & Sparrow. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 20 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Listen Locally Downstairs feat. FerlaMarcinizyn Guitar Duo. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-276-3456x6. J. GOUGH’S TAVERN. Academy Pickers. 8 p.m. Greenfield. 412-315-7029. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

REGGAE THU 14 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

COUNTRY WED 20 BYHAM THEATER. Nathan Carter.

7 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

CLASSICAL SUN 17 SOUTH HILLS ORGANISTS RECITAL. 4 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153.

MON 18 THE ENSO QUARTET. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

OTHER MUSIC THU 14 LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

FRI 15 CATTIVO. Xanopticon, Acrnym, Disheveled, Morgantics, Tall Timber & Arsonist. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. LINDEN GROVE. Move Makers. 9 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

SAT 16 INDIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. River City Brass. Feat. Abhijeet Joshi and Sheena Chopra for an evening of Bollywood & Hollywood Music. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-613-5859. MILLVALE. Jimbo and the Soupbones. On Grant St. Millvale. STAGE AE. Sylvan Esso. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

September 13-19 WEDNESDAY 13 Queens of the Stone Age

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Royal Blood. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Bayside

Not Your Parents’ Garden Party PHIPPS CONSERVATORY Oakland. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit phipps.conservatory.org. 7p.m.

ADAM ANT THE PALACE THEATRE SEPTEMBER 17

Adam Ant THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. With special guest The Glam Skanks. All ages event. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 15 155

The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. For tickets and more info visit warhol.org. 8p.m.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. With special guests Fiveunder, Primer & Greyscale. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

TQ Live!

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest Potty Mouth. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7:30p.m.

Valerie June

Rodriguez CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-462-3444. With special guest Cat Clyde. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 14 Suzzy Roche & Lucy Wainwright Roche

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS Shadyside. For tickets and more info visit calliopehouse.org or 412-361-1915. 7:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest Delta Struts. All ages event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 8p.m.

Conor Oberst CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-462-3444. With special guest Phoebe Bridges. All ages event. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Maker Date ASSEMBLE Bloomfield.

MONDAY 18

Whose Live Anyway? 412-661-6111. For tickets Pittsburgh Renaissance and more info visit tinyurl. Festival com/makerdate2017. 7:30p.m. WEST NEWTON. For tickets and more info visit pittsburgh renfest.com or 724-872-1670. SATURDAY Through Sept. 24. Sylvan Esso

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STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Helado Negro. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Farm Aid 2017 KEYBANK PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guests Willie Nelson, John

Mellencamp, Dave Matthews & more. Tickets: livenation. com. 12p.m.

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. All ages event. Tickets: thepa lacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 19

Pittsburgh Recovery Walk DOWNTOWN Pittsburgh. For more info visit pghrecovery walk.org. 9a.m.

SUNDAY 17

Big Thief

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest Dear Nora. All ages event. Tickets: ticket web.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Each library is more than a building that houses books. In many ways, it’s the heartbeat of your community. All ]b[v|o‹o†uŃ´o1-Ń´Ń´Ń´;]_;m‹o†m|‹Ń´b0u-u‹l-7;|_uo†]_ ";r|;l0;uĆ’Ć?‰bŃ´Ń´0;$ Ä´

Maximize your support by l-hbm]-]b[|o7-‹Ĵ

LOVE YOUR LIBRARY NEWS

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(bvb|‹o†uŃ´b0u-u‹|oCm7‰-‹v|o]bˆ;Äş

-1Ń´-Ń´b0u-ub;vÄşou]ņѴoˆ;‹o†uŃ´b0u-u‹ +o†u7om-࢟om‰bѲѲ_-ˆ;-ruoĹˆu-|;7l-|1_|_-mhv|o];m;uo†v v†rrou|=uol|_;-1h†m1_;u o†m7-࢟omĸ TASTE

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UP NEXT NOV. 11 – DEC. 3, 2017 The Old Man and The Old Moon BY PIGPEN THEATRE CO. / DIRECTED BY PIGPEN THEATRE CO & STUART CARDEN

Who keeps the moon shining bright? A mysterious disappearance sends the Old Man charged with that task on an epic adventure in this swirling tale of memory and love, set to a wildly imaginative indie-folk soundtrack performed live. Hailed by critics as a one-of-a-kind theatrical experience, The Old Man and The Old Moon will enchant audiences of all ages with spellbinding storytelling, ingenious puppetry, and the transformational cast of seven Carnegie Mellon alumni who are PigPen Theatre Co.

UP FIRST SEPT. 23 – OCT. 15, 2017 A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York City BY HALLEY FEIFFER / DIRECTED BY JOSHUA KAHAN BRODY

Sparks fly when struggling stand-up Karla meets super-nerd Don after their mothers are assigned to the same room in the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. A wickedly funny tale of finding love — and lust — in the strangest of places, A Funny Thing Happened… is a meet-cute for the modern era written by red-hot playwright Halley Feiffer. Don’t miss the show The New York Times calls “irresistible.”

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.13/09.20.2017


CHECK INSIDE FOR GREAT EVENTS COMING TO PPG PAINTS ARENA!


SEPTEMBER 16 TOP MIDDLEWEIGHT CONTENDER

LUKE ROCKHOLD VS DAVID BRANCH PLUS: MIKE PERRY vs. THIAGO ALVES HECTOR LOMBARD vs. ANTHONY SMITH TICKETS ON SALE NOW

COLLEGE HOCKEY TOURNAMENT CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

DECEMBER 1, 2017 2

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017

DECEMBER 29 & 30, 2017


TEAM IN THESE EXCITING GAMES!

vs Rider December 6

vs Drexel December 10

vs LIU Brooklyn January 6

vs St. Francis January 11

vs Sacred Heart January 26

vs Wagner January 28

vs Mt. St. Marys February 1

vs Fairleigh Dickenson February 3

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

VS. DECEMBER 8, 2017

PPGPAINTSARENA.COM

Tickets available at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Box Office at ppg paints arena, Ticketmaster.com, or charge by phone at 800-745-3000.

PPGPAINTSARENA PPGPAINTSARENA

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017

3


WE DO PARTIES!

AERIAL SILKS & CIRCUS CLASSES FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS. DISCOUNTS FOR FULL TIME COLLEGE STUDENTS WITH PROPER ID

Locations in Bloomfield, Ben Avon & Washington PA PITTSBURGHAERIALSILKS.COM • 412.681.0111

VISUAL ART 06 STAGE 10 DANCE 12 COMEDY 14 LITERARY 20 FILM 22 MUSIC 26

Make coming home the best part of every day. With a Mortgage, Home Equity or Construction Loan* from Northwest. Apply on your time, the way you want: 26 offices to serve you in the Greater Pittsburgh area

Go to northwest.com Visit your local Northwest office Call 1-888-884-4626 COVER ILLUSTRATION BY SOPHIA PAPPAS

*Subject to credit approval. Northwest Bank is Member FDIC.

4

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017


dee dee bridgewater's memphis

Make a night of it on the north shore.

Join us for a night of great jazz! Plus, we have some great recommendations for dinner & drinks before the shows to make your night pitch perfect. Our music hall has been named one of the best venues in the world by Downbeat Magazine for live jazz.

October 6, 9:30 p.m.

the hot sardines October 19, 9:30 p.m.

31 13

31 YEARS 13 SHOWS 3 FAN PIX 1 GREAT NEW SEASON

For more information call 412.322.0800 or visit us at MCGJazz.org. Follow us @mcgjazz.

Do You Shop at Convenience Stores? Have you ever purchased energy drinks, cookies, or cigarettes from a convenience store? If so you may be eligible for a research study. The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to learn about what ADULTS, ages 18-65, buy at convenience stores. Participation requires completion of a 10 minute phone or internet survey, one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center, and a short follow-up phone call. People who complete the study will be compensated for their time and effort with $75 in gift cards. Parking or bus passes will be provided. If you are interested and want to learn more about the study, please call 412-204-7353, e-mail adult-cstore-study@rand.org or visit us at www.rand.org/storestudy. The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017

5


FALL ARTS PREVIEW

PAUL ANKA Thurs., Sept. 14 7:30 PM

TOMMY JAMES & THE SHONDELLS Sat., Sept. 16 • 7:30 PM

38 SPECIAL

Wed., Oct. 11 • 8 PM

BRAD GARRETT Co-star of Everybody Loves Raymond & RITA RUDNER Oct. 25 • 7:30PM

GARY PUCKETT & THE UNION GAP, THE COWSILLS, CHUCK BLASKO’S VOGUES & THE LATSHAW POPS Sat., Nov 11 - 6:30 PM

OLIVIA NEWTON JOHN Mon., Nov 13 • 7:30PM {IMAGE (DETAIL) COURTESY OF THE CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

Ian Cheng’s Emissary Sunsets the Self, Sept. 22, at the Carnegie Museum of Art

OAK RIDGE BOYS CHRISTMAS SHOW Sat., Nov. 30 • 7:30 PM

JACKIE EVANCHO HITS & CHRISTMAS Fr., Dec. 1 • 8:00 PM

JONATHAN CAINE of Journey Thur., Dec. 14 • 8 PM

LATSHAW POPS CHRISTMAS SHOW Dec. 15 • 7:30 PM

THE SPINNERS & THE MARCELS Feb. 14, 2018 • 8 PM

MASTERS OF ILLUSION Feb. 18, 2018 • 3 PM

FOREIGNER

March 8, 2018 • 8 PM

FOR TICKETS:

724.836.8000 Online at www.thepalacetheatre.org

{BY LISSA BRENNAN} University’s Miller Gallery partners ers visual-arts community finds itself poised with the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation for World to answer a rather unexpected Within (Sept. 22), a twoquestion: How to move forvenue exhibit exploring the ward from what at least one partnership between art observer has designated FALL ARTS and science. “the most important art Looking Downtown, show in America,” the FREE STUFF for the past several Carnegie Museum of RADical Days is the Regional Asset District’s annual offering of months, both floors of Art’s 20/20, a collabofree single-event or -day admission Wood Street Galleries ration with the Studio to dozens of local venues, have been owned by two Museum in Harlem? exhibits and performances, Sept. 22-Oct. 15. diligent robots hard at It’s a hard act to folwww.radworkshere.org work transcribing bibles low, but we’re holding and planets; their work is fiour ground. The CMOA next nally done as the Dutch art colturns focus to Ian Cheng with lective MACULAR brings four light the internationally known artist’s installation Emissary Sunsets the Self, an installations. Wood Street’s is one of sevenormous digital simulation, beginning eral shows opening during the Pittsburgh Sept. 22. And nearby, Carnegie Mellon Cultural Trust’s Sept. 22 Gallery Crawl.

ENTERING THE fall season, Pittsburgh’s

HIGHLIGHT

Opening that night at the Op Trust’s 707 Penn and 709 T Penn galleries is Clickbait: The Expo, in which Ashley Adnrykovitch App Exp Ashley Andrews observe art through and A technology, technology through art, and e all of the above with an uncertainty of where the boundaries lie. And a block away, on Oct. 13, SPACE gallery opens The Long Run, a group show examining “the surface of things.” Across the river, at The Andy Warhol Museum, first up is Lawrence Weiner’s Out Of Sight (Sept. 19), with 2-D graphic text-based structures. Then comes Farhad Moshiri’s Go West (Oct. 13), which views this side of the globe through an Iranian lens. And the Mattress Factory marks a major anniversary with New Installations: 40th Year (Oct. 6), a group show featuring CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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work by Yoán Capote, David Ellis, Vanessa German, David Pohl, Meg Webster, Allan Wexler and the late Greer Lankton. Silver Eye Center For Photography plays home and away with MacArthur genius-grant winner and Braddock native LaToya Ruby Frazier, who receives her first hometown exhibitions. The Notion of Family (Sept. 21) turns a lens to the artist’s hometown of Braddock at Silver Eye’s own new digs, in Bloomfield; and at the August Wilson Center, Frazier and Sandra Gould Ford collaborate on On the Making Of Steel Genesis (Sept. 22), documenting the experience of black women and blue collars. Also at the August Wilson Center starting Sept. 22 is Went Looking for Beauty: Refashioning Self, photographs by Deborah Willis investigating the search for inner identity through outer beautification. Pittsburgh Glass Center teams with 3 Rivers Glass Beadmakers for embodiment (Oct. 6), its first-ever show of jewelry and wearables. Adornments also hold sway at the Frick Art Museum, which takes the momentum of Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe and moves up the body with Undressed: A History of Fashion in Underwear (Oct. 21), ranging from lacing it up tight to letting it all hang. And artist and educator Jo-Anne Bates gets her Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Artist of the Year show

The Notion of Family and On the Making of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford, at Silver Eye Center and August Wilson Center, Sept. 22

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ED JANSEN}

MACULAR at Wood Street Galleries, Sept. 22

(prints and multi-media) on Nov. 17. Among smaller galleries, BoxHeart Gallery’s LOVENEVERENDING showcases the mixed-media works of Ramon Riley starting Oct. 3, and DISTORTION (Kyle Ethan Fischer, Carolyn Pierotti and Caleb Thimell) opens Nov. 21. In Wilkinsburg, Percolate opens Natural Flow (Sept. 20), featuring Natiq Jalil, Danielle Robinson and Marcel Lamont Walker.

While museums and established spaces have the advantage of a set schedule with publishable events, there are plenty of area spaces hosting art shows and events that appear in the blink of an eye and disappear as quickly, from coffeehouses to storefront galleries. They’re worth keeping an eye on. There’s no question that we’ll be cited again for the work we bring into view. We just can’t predict where. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNY ANDERSON}

The Old Man and The Old Moon, Nov. 1 at City Theatre atre

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} L} PITTSBURGH’S theater scene has been un-

premieres in September include two by upusually stable for years, but change is afoot. and-coming American playwrights: MidFor one thing, this fall marks both City The- dletown, a 2010 dark comedy about life in a atre’s first season since 2000 without artis- small town, by Will Eno (Thom Pain (based tic director Tracy Brigden, and Pittsburgh on nothing)), at Little Lake Theater Co. (Sept. Public’s final season under artistic director 21); and the audaciously titled A Funny Ted Pappas, who’ll depart after 18 years. Thing on the Way to the Gynecologic OncolBut the shows, of course, must go on, ogy Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Canand fall theater this year is rich cer Center of New York City, a romanwith plays either brandtic comedy by Halley Feiffer (I’m new or new to Pittsburgh. Gonna Pray for You So Hard), FALL ARTS Starting this week, see Pittsburgh PlayEXHIBIT wrights Theatre Co. We Are Nature: Living founder (and former e in the Anthropocene, an exhibit about humans’ millworker) Mark role in the natural world, Clayton Southers’ opens at The Carnegie The Homestead Strike Museum of Natural History, Oct. 28. of 1892 (opening Sept. www.carnegiemnh.org 15); the world-premiere take on the tragic labor or conflict marking its 125th anniversary is produced d by the Battle of Homestead Foundation (story on page 62). Another highly ghly anticipated world premiere is Dodo; do; Bricolage Productions’ latest immersive, mmersive, site-specific work takess over the Carnegie Museum off Natural History starting Oct. 13. Plays making their Pittsburgh

HIGHLIGHT

Valerie Mudek in The Humans, Nov. 9 at Pittsburgh Public Theater

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about the adult children of two cancer patients, at City Theatre (Sept. 23). September also finds a critically acclaimed play getting its long-overdue Pittsburgh premiere: Actor and playwright Eugene Lee’s East Texas Hot Links, a drama set in a small-town, AfricanAmerican-run café in 1955, touches down Sept. 30 courtesy of Pittsburgh Playwrights. Also receiving their first looks here are The Girls of Summer, Layon Gray’s 2006 play about an African-American women’s baseball team playing a white squad circa 1945, at New Horizon Theater (Oct. 19), and Quantum Theatre’s production of The Hard Problem (Oct. 27), Tom Stoppard’s 2015 play about the mystery of consciousness — and the iconic playwright’s first newly staged work in years. On Nov. 1, the lads of PigPen Theatre Co. — Carnegie Mellon alums who’ve gone on to success in New York — present The Old Man and The Old Moon, “a new musical folk tale” told with live music and puppetry, an adventure featuring the fellow who keeps the moon shining. Pittsburgh Public Theater stages Scranton native Stephen Karam’s New York-set family drama The Humans (Nov. 9), winner of the 2016 Tony for best play. On Nov. 3, courtesy of Prime Stage Theatre, comes the U.S. premiere of Robin Kingsland’s 2006 adaptation of the classic World War I novel All Quiet on the Western Front.

FALL THEATER IS RICH WITH PLAYS NEW TO PITTSBURGH. Playwright Jaclyn Backhaus takes fan fiction into new terrain with You’re on the Moors Now (Nov. 10); her new play, Pittsburgh-premiering at Point Park Conservatory Theatre Co., asks what would happen if the heroines of literary classics including Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre and Little Women all turned down marriage proposals and went rogue — and their suitors pursued them. Kinetic Theatre Co. offers Love, Love, Love (Nov. 30), a drama following a baby-boomer couple from ages 19 to 64; the 2010 work is by British playwright Mike Bartlett, whose Cock scored at Kinetic last year. Meanwhile, there’s also nothing wrong with plays that aren’t new to Pittsburgh. Indeed, expect good things from classics like Romeo & Juliet, at PICT Classic Theatre (Oct. 20); The Crucible, at Little Lake (Nov. 2); and the Public’s Equus (Sept. 28). It’s a rare local production for Peter Shaffer’s harrowing 1973 drama, which won multiple awards, including a Tony for best play, and is now part of the contemporary canon. D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW

SEASON 23

Some Assembly Required

September 21–23, 2017

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

Point Park Conservatory Dance Company, Oct. 13-15 and Nov. 15-19

The Down and Dirty Dance Party October 20, 2017

{BY STEVE SUCATO} On Sept. 23 and 24 24, global bellydance FROM BALLET and bellydance to Bollywood, the fall dance season is bursting with sensation Sadie Marquardt performs at The Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Muoptions. Here’s a sampling: The fourth Trans-Q Live!, a queer sic Hall, in Carnegie. Texture Contempoevening of dance, poetry, film and music, rary Ballet’s sixth season continues Sept. 29-Oct. 1, at the New Hazlett Theater, visits The Andy Warhol Museum with Boundless; on Nov. 4, at on Sept. 15. Dance performers the Carnegie Stage, Texinclude #kNOwSHADE, Gia ture presents the 10th T. Cacalano and Moriah FALL ARTS Ella Mason. On Sept. 29, installment of its WIP Cacalano joins slowChoreography Project. MUSIC danger for imprints, at Celebrating its 70th Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra SPACE Gallery. anniversary, LADO: serves up Chopin & Rachmaninoff, A t t a c k T h e at r e National Folk Dance with guest conductor opens its 23rd season Ensemble of Croatia Christoph König and guest pianist Yulianna Avdeeva, Oct. 6-8. performs Oct. 5 at the with its recurring prowww.pittsburghsymphony.org Byham. Also at the gram Some Assembly Byham, on Oct. 7, PittsRequired, Sept. 21-22 at B burgh Dance Counc il Contemporary Craft, and d bu opens Sept. 23 at Braddock’s Unopen its season with San Francisco’s Smoke Systems Artspace. On Francisc Fr sco Alonzo King LINES sc Ballet, followed by the Dec. 1-3, at Pittsburgh Opera’s ra’s return of Pittsburgh naGeorge R. White Studio, io, tive and MacArthur gethe company premieres In nius grant-winner Kyle Defense of Gravity, inspired ed Abraham and his comby the poetry of Pittsburgh’s h’s pany Kyle Abraham/ Jimmy Cvetic. Also on Sept. 22: Abraham.In.Motion in a world-touring America’s Got A program of repertory works Talent finalist iLuminate shows hows progr at the August Wilson Center off its fusion of glow-in-the-dark -dark (Nov. 10 and 11). technology and dance at the On Oct. 8, at the New Byham Theater; Beats Antique, tique, Hazlett, Millennium Dance featuring bellydance star Zoe Jakes, Hazle Complex presents Ascendance, a performs at Mr. Small’s; and The p dance showcase featuring local Pillow Project/The Ellipsess Condition show troupes Dance Theatre, presents the third installment ment of The troupe p s fireWALL fire r Exhalations Theatre and more. Invisible Jazz Labs series, blendi blending ding di ng g Ex xha hala la o s Dance lation D dance and physics, at The e Space Ananya Dance Theatre, Oct. 13 and 14 Upstairs (series concludes Oct. t. 27).

HIGHLIGHT

In Defense of Gravity December 1–3, 2017

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The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s season opens Oct. 13 and 14 with Minneapolisbased contemporary Indian-American company Ananya Dance Theatre in Shyamali: Sprouting Words, and continues with “Crutch Master” Bill Shannon’s residency showing (Oct. 23), and Balafon West African Dance’s Black River Dance Festival (Oct. 27 and 28). At KST’s Alloy Studios, on Dec. 1, choreographer Maree ReMalia, New York-based video artist Gigi Gatewood, and Washington, D.C.-based dancer Lillian Cho present a preview of Off the Record; and on Dec. 15 and 16, there’s fôr, a collaboration between slowdanger and NYC’s MICHIYAYA Dance. Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company kicks off its new season Oct. 13-15 with the annual Student Choreography Project. On Nov. 15-19, also at the university’s George Rowland White Performance Studio, the company presents Contemporary Choreographers, featuring rising star Kate Skarpetowska. And Dec. 1-10, the student troupe presents its Winter Dance Concert, featuring works by Adam Hougland and dance legend Lucinda Childs, at the Pittsburgh Playhouse.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLDEN GUN FUSION BELLYDANCE}

Sadie Marquardt, Sept. 23 and 24

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre opens its 48th season Halloween weekend with Dracula (Oct. 27-29), and on Dec. 1-27 reprises The Nutcracker— both at the Benedum Center. And on Oct. 29, Pearl Arts Studios presents slowdanger and New York-based Davalois Fearson. On Nov. 4, at the Byham, ballet and juggling come together in world-touring British troupe Gandini Juggling’s 4 x 4 Ephemeral Architectures. On Nov. 9-12, at Carnegie Stage, Moriah Ella Mason reprises her recent smash hit, Sex Werque. Bodiography opens its new season Nov. 18 at the Byham with The Messiah, in conjunction with La Roche College, and follows on Dec. 1 with Unblemished Disclosure, at The Frick Museum. And on Nov. 18, nationally touring tappers SOLE Defined perform at Shady Side Academy’s Hillman Center. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX SYPHERS}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN}

Point Break Live, Nov. 11 at Unplanned Comedy

Arcade Comedy Theater grand opening, Sept. 29 and 30

D.L. Hughley, Nov. 10-12 at the Improv

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

weekly shows by its Unplanned Comedy Players and, for six weeks starting on Nov. 11, hosts the Pittsburgh premiere of Point Break Live, the touring, audience-participation live spoof of the Keanu Reeves action film. Other indie venues include Club Café, whose fall programming lists nationally touring standup comics Sean Patton (Sept. 25), Ian Abramson (Sept. 30) and Wyatt Cenac (Nov. 3). At Pittsburgh’s biggest comedy club, the Improv, guests include such nationally known standup talents as Joey Diaz (Sept. 28-30), Bob Golub (Oct. 19), D.L. Hughley (Nov. 10-12) and — in his first-ever Pittsburgh shows — a special appearance by French-American comic Gad Elmaleh (Oct. 12-14). Yet for a certain breed of fan, the season’s highlight might just come Sept. 29, with a Heinz Hall screening of Monty Python and the Holy Grail — followed by an evening with Python’s John Cleese himself.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHANNON MCCOLLUM}

THIS FALL, the big news in local comedy is Dinner With the Nolens (Oct. 7, Nov. 4 and Dec. 2) and Knights of the Arcade (Oct. 14). that Arcade Comedy Theater is moving 4). Special events include a return visit from to roomier new digs right up the om original Kids in the Hall member Kevin McDonald street from its original locaFALL ARTS (Nov. 18 and 19). tion Downtown, on LibPittsburgh’s still-growing erty Avenue. Shut down till-growing comedy scene also during the transition, so includes FESTIVAL The touring Wizard U. — at least two other Arcade re-opens with a er indepen“a day of drinking, magic and dent, all-comedy big weekend Sept. 29y venues. mischief” for “adult fans of the Steel City Improv 30, with shows by imv Theater, magical world,” and including curse-casting classes, Wizards’ in Shadyside, offers prov troupes including ffers mulPong and more — hits tiple weekly shows, Player One and Change ws, mostly Mr. Smalls Theatre, Sept. 24. improv (like Swipe Machine, and standup pe Right, www.facebook.com which does improv by Norlex Belma, Sean Colv based (“wizarduofficial”) on Tinder profiles), but lier and more. Into autumn, ut also including Young Guns Stand Arcade resumes its mix of local and Up showcases. Over in Lawrenceville, and touring standup, sketch and imceville, prov comedy, with in-house favorites like Unplanned Comedy Warehouse offers

HIGHLIGHT

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KIRIKO SANO}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LEE TOWNDROW}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PIETER M. VAN HATTEM}

Imbolo Mbue at City of Asylum, Oct. 4

Sherman Alexie at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Oct. 16

Jennifer Egan at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Dec. 4

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} AUTUMN’S LITERARY offerings are already in progress: City of Asylum’s Jazz

and Poetry Month is underway. However, intriguing poets yet to visit the

North Side’s Alphabet City include Mark Black Futures begins Oct. 4, with poetry Doty (Sept. 16), Hungary’s Kinga Tóth by Renee Gladman and John Keene, and and Myanmar-born Maung Day (both sound art by LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs. On Sept. 23, Walt Longmire series auSept. 23), and U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith (Sept. 30). Post-festival, Alpha- thor Craig Johnson visits Mystery Lovbet City’s run of multinational writers ers Bookshop. Penguin Bookshop hosts includes Cameroonian novelist Imbolo environmental journalist Michael Kodas Mbue (Oct. 4), foreign correspondent (Megafire) on Oct. 3, and Francis Moore Lynda Schuster (Oct. 12), and Jonathan Lappé (Diet for a Small Planet) and her Eig (Nov. 16), author of a new Muham- Daring Democracy co-author, Adam Eichen, on Oct. 13. mad Ali bio. The Bridge Series raises funds and Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures kicks off awareness for groups “fighting the good its Ten Evenings season with historian fight”; the Sept. 27 event, at Nancy Isenberg (Sept. 25), and Brillobox, features local pocontinues with novelist ets and benefits PERSAD Sherman Alexie (Oct. 16), FALL ARTS Center. White Whale Hamilton biographer Bookstore hosts tourRon Chernow (Oct. 30), MAGIC ing and local authors, and novelists Isabel Nationally touring Pittsburgh-native including Sept. 29’s Allende (Nov. 13) and magician Lee Terbosic does a visit by Alexandria Jennifer Egan (Dec. month-long residency of intimate Marzano-Lesnevich, 4). Also in Oakland, card-magic shows titled 52 Up Close, at Downtown’s Kimpton author of literary Arts & Lectures’ New Hotel Monaco Pittsburgh, thriller The Fact of and Notable series starting Oct. 13. a Body. continues Oct. 24 with www.52upclose.com Also on Sept. 29, wideacclaimed Irish novelist ly acclaimed local favorite Roddy Doyle (The CommitLori Jakiela marks the release of ments), whose latest is Smile. her latest memoir, Portrait of the Artist Also at the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, MathBabe Cathy O’Neil, author of as a Bingo Worker, at Abandoned PittsWeapons of Math Destruction (about the burgh, in Homestead. Other events include the seventh andangers of Big Data), visits Sept. 25. Nearby, at the Frick Fine Arts Building, nual Pittsburgh Zine Fair, Sept. 24 at the the University of Pittsburgh’s Pittsburgh Union Project, and the brand-new Lebo Contemporary Writers Series features Comics Festival. Speakers at the Oct. 12journalist, novelist and author Jeff Guinn Nov. 18 fest, at Mount Lebanon Public (Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Library, include ToonSeum executive diManson), on Sept. 28, followed by a read- rector John Kelly; Marvel Comics writer ing by Pitt MFA alumni poets including Yona Harvey; and comics scholar Wayne CM Burroughs and Stacey Waite (Oct. 26). Wise, the latter speaking on the history Also at the Frick building, a series titled of Wonder Woman.

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW

3EP!NTJE$UVEKOT"OSTON  WITH+AYLA3CHUREMAN0ITTSBURGH 

6RQJ6SDFH

.OV4HE9OUNG.OVELISTS4ORONTO  WITH4HE3QUIRREL(ILLBILLIES0ITTSBURGH  *AN"URGH3ONG3PACEĂś#HRISTOPHER-ARK *ONES (EATHER+ROPF "EN3HANNON  %MILY0INKERTONAND"RAD9ODER -AR!MYTHYST+IAH*OHNSON#ITY4.  -AY2ACHAEL+ILGOUR-INNESOTA"OSTON  4ICKETSSONGSPACEBROWNPAPERTICKETSCOM ORSONGSPACE SEASONBROWNPAPERTICKETSCOM

DW)LUVW8QLWDULDQ 0RUHZRRG$YH LQ6KDG\VLGH !CELEBRATIONOFFOLK  BLUESANDWORLDMUSICĂś 6RQJ6SDFH #6RQJ6SDFH)LUVW8 XXVRQJVSDFHFRP The Mountain Between Us, Oct. 6

{BY AL HOFF} AND SO WE wrap up a relatively mild

summer, both in weather and box-ofďŹ ce excitement, and head into the season of more serious cinematic fare. Here’s a look at some of the ďŹ lms headed this way. Among the dramas this season is The Mountain Between Us (Oct. 6), in which Idris Elba and Kate Winslet tough it out after a plane crash. In The Snowman (Oct. 20), adapted from the Jo Nesbo novel, Michael Fassbender tracks a cold-case serial killer. On Nov. 10, Kenneth Branagh helms The Shape of Water, Dec. 8 an all-star cast in the Agatha Christie mystery Murder on the Orient Express. Also in November, Richard Linklater’s veter- marriage, in Professor Marston and the ans-meet-up ďŹ lm Last Flag Flying, ďŹ lmed Wonder Women (Oct. 13). FireďŹ ghters face in Pittsburgh; and the Denzel Washing- a deadly ďŹ re in Arizona in 2013, in Only the Brave (Oct. 20). Two wellton legal drama Roman Israel, known politicians hit the big Esq. On Dec. 8, look for Sally screen: Woody Harrelson Hawkins and Octavia SpenFALL ARTS plays Lyndon B. Johnson cer in The Shape of Water, in LBJ (November), and about a secret Cold War Gary Oldman stars as OPERA government project. Pittsburgh Opera opens Winston Churchill in A lot of ďŹ lms draw its season with Puccini’s Darkest Hour (Nov. 22). from real life. On Sept. classic Tosca, with Leah Crocetto From Aaron Sorkin on 29, Battle of the Sexes in the title role and Mark Delavan as Nov. 22, Molly’s Game recounts the Billie Jean Baron Scarpia, Oct. 7-15. is about big-time underKing vs. Bobby Riggs www.pittsburghopera.org ground poker games. On tennis match. In AmeriDec. 8, James Franco’s dramcan Made (Sept. 29), Tom edy The Disaster Artist looks Cruise plays a 1980s airline at the making of Tommy Wiseau’s pilot turned drug smuggler. Out Oct. 13, Marshall depicts the early legal 2003 cult ďŹ lm The Room. Steven Spiellife of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood berg directs The Post (Dec. 22) about The Marshall. The origin story of the Wonder Washington Post’s battles. We’re not yet free of sequels and remakes. Woman comic rests in an unconventional

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FALL ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

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Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star in Blade Runner 2049, a sequel to the 1982 sci-fi actioner, out Oct. 6. The mighty hammer is back, in Thor: Ragnarok (Nov. 3). It’s the return of the not-perfect parents: A Bad Mom’s Christmas (Nov. 3) is a holiday version of the wine-swillingmom comedy; and Daddy’s Home 2 (Nov. 10) adds granddads to the mix. Assorted comic-book warriors headed by Batman and Wonder Woman join forces in Justice League — Part 1 (Nov. 17). The 1970s Charles Bronson classic Death Wish gets a reboot with Bruce Willis on Nov. 22. On Blade Runner 2049, Oct. 6 Dec. 15, Star Wars: The Last Jedi zooms into theaters. In Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (Dec. 20), the game-come-to-life film now And on Dec. 22, in Alexander Payne’s stars Dwayne Johnson. Mark Wahlberg is Downsizing, Matt Damon and Kristen half-man/half-machine in The Six Billion Wiig shrink themselves. Dollar Man. Also that day, the lady a capelThe first of Pittsburgh’s two long-runla singers return in Pitch Perfect 3. (Dec. 22). ning festivals to return is the 32nd annual For the kiddies, a slate of aniPittsburgh International Lesbian mated fare, including: The and Gay Film Festival, now LEGO Ninjago Movie (Sept. called Reel Q (www.reelQ. 22); My Little Pony (Oct. 6), org); the fest runs Oct. 13FALL ARTS for the kids and the bro21. Soon after, the 36th annies; The Star (Nov. 17), nual Three Rivers Film ART a donkey’s POV of the Festival (www.3rff.com) The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Nativity; a trip to the kicks off, with programfree Downtown Gallery Crawl includes dozens of venues Land of the Dead with ming Nov. 3-11. featuring visual art, live music Pixar’s Coco (Nov. 22); The Hollywood Theand more, Sept. 22. and Ferdinand (Dec. 15), ater continues its mix of www.trustarts.org adapted from the popular new films, rep programkids’ book about a bull. ming and special events. In other features: Climate And look for ongoing reperdisasters, satellite meltdowns, globtory and indie-film programming al chaos — Gerard Butler is there to fix it in at Row House Cinema, in Lawrenceville, Geostorm (Oct. 20). George Clooney directs and Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ theaters. In Suburbicon (Oct. 27), a comedy, penned by conjunction with University of Pittsburgh, the Coen brothers, about a “perfect” 1959 Filmmakers will host two nights of 1970s suburb. On Nov. 10, it’s Three Billboards Pittsburgh-produced avant-garde films; Outside Ebbing, Missouri, a dark comedy programs are Oct. 18 and Nov. 14. And good from Martin McDonough in which Fran- news for McKees Rocks: The renovated ces McDormand tries to solve a murder. Parkway Theater has re-opened.

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW The Ensō Quartet Monday, September 18, 7:30 PM Orion Quartet with Tara O’Connor, flute Monday, October 2, 7:30 PM Classical Sean Jones with the Pittsburgh Symphony and Attack Theater Monday, November 27, 7:30 PM The Díaz Trio Monday, February 5, 2018 7:30 PM

2017-2018 Concert Season Subscriptions and tickets 412-624-4129 chambermusicpittsburgh.org

Ebène String Quartet Monday, March 12, 7:30 PM

Les Violons du Roy with Bernard Labadie, conductor, and Isabelle Faust, violin Monday, April 30, 7:30 PM

The laughs are moving down the street.

Digable Planets, Sept. 22

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Cinema Club and hometown hip-hop hero Wiz Khalifa, this year’s Thrival Innovation and Music Festival at the Carrie Furnaces, in Rankin, Sept. 27-30, will feel like a perfect kiss-off or fireworks finale to months of summer lovin’ and festival-goin’. Wiz and Logic at Thrival aren’t the only incredible rappers rolling through the 412 this fall. Iconic Grammy-winning Big Boi (one half of Outkast, if you’re living under a rock) will take over Mr. Smalls on Sept. 14 to celebrate his latest release, Boomi{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL SETHI} Death Grips verse, and master femcee Snow Tha Product will rule over the Rex Theater Oct. 31. Fusing hip hop and If dreamy, folksy tuneage jazz since the early ’90s, with a splash of rock is more FALL ARTS Digable Planets bring the your speed, you absolutely laid-back grooves and cannot miss the mesmerSTAGE bars to the August Wilizing Valerie June (Sept. The musical version of son Center on Sept. 22. 15), nor should you skip Alice Walker’s beloved novel The Color Purple had a Broadway If you’re hoping to Big Thief (Sept. 19), revival and is on tour; have your face melted both at Mr. Smalls. it’s at the Benedum Center off in time for HallowSpeaking of rock, Nov. 14-19. een, seeing legendary www.trustarts.org isn’t it crazy that Pile bapioneers of industrial metal sically invented rock muMinistry with the experisic and also guitar solos? OK, mental hip-hop and professional so maybe I’m being hyperbolic, maniacs Death Grips Oct. 21 at Stage AE but Pile really does fucking rock, and will certainly do the trick. Before that, you can catch the band with local shred Stage AE will play host to original edge- machine edhochuli on Sept. 21, at the master and true freak Marilyn Manson Funhouse at Mr. Smalls. The following on Sept. 29. day, Sept. 22, you can shake off your

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SEPTOBERFEST LIVE MUSIC EVERY NIGHT FOOD SPECIALS CINNAMON GHOUL PUMPKIN ALE RELEASE HOPS 4 HEROES TURTLE SURVIVAL ALLIANCE BENEFIT & TURTLE RECALL IPA RELEASE

DIRTY DOG CIGARS CORNHOLE TOURNEY

TWELVE WHISKEY BBQ BURGER BASH & COCKTAIL COMPETITION

Saturday, October 7th

5981 BAPTIST RD. PGH, PA 15236

Tickets: Twelve Whiskey BBQ on East Carson St. Online: www.the-pittsburgher.com CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017

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FALL ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

LANG LANG PERFORMS

THIS SATURDAY AT 7:00 P.M. HEINZ HALL

Manfred Honeck, conductor Lang Lang, piano

Experience Gershwin’s iconic jazz-concerto – in a special two-player arrangement by Lang Lang himself! Joining Lang Lang will be fourteen year old prodigy Maxim Lando, an alumnus of the Lang Lang International Music Foundation.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

Charly Bliss, Sept. 26

S A I N T- S A Ă‹ N S

THUNDERING

ORGAN SYMPHONY NEXT WEEKEND! FRIDAY, SEPT. 22 AT 8:00 P.M. SATURDAY, SEPT. 23 AT 8:00 P.M. SUNDAY, SEPT. 24 AT 2:30 P.M. HEINZ HALL

Manfred Honeck, conductor Christian Tetzlaff, violin

JOHN ADAMS: Lollapalooza BRAHMS: Violin Concerto PIGOVAT: ...therefore choose life...

Manfred Honeck 10th Anniversary Commission (WORLD PREMIERE)

SAINT-SAĂ‹NS: Symphony No. 3 “Organâ€?

SHOSTAKOVICH

TRIUMPHANT

Snow Tha Product, Oct. 31

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JACOB BLICKENSTAFF}

Valerie June, Sept. 15

bangover and head to the Mr. Roboto Proj- to shred your instruments and transcend ect to catch the crushing, technical emo space and time through performance. Experimental pop outďŹ t Sylvan Esso with hardcore bite that CityCop serves up. And just about a month later, on Oct. brings its unique brand of bright, shiny 22, you can catch more gnarly shreddage electronic magic to Stage AE on Sept. 16. Tei Shi’s daring pop will keep the at Cattivo, this time in the hardcore folks of Cattivo grooving on world with beatdown profesSept. 24, and Spirit pressionals Jesus Piece and FALL ARTS ents an entire evening of bouncy emotive hardcore synth-heavy pop on Oct. outďŹ t Comeback Kid. 15, courtesy of TV Girl Pittsburgh is also FESTIVAL and brothertiger. welcoming inuential The Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh presents Power-pop darlings tenured artists of rock Maker Faire Pittsburgh, Charly Bliss, whose left and right this fall. an annual festival for inventors, album Guppy is my Queens of the Stone engineers, artists and crafters; admission this year is free. current pick for album Age will perform at Oct. 14 and 15. of the year, return for a Stage AE, on Sept. 13, www.makerfaire gig at Cattivo on Sept. 26; to support its seventh pittsburgh.com indie-pop outďŹ t Now, Now album, Villains. Broken makes its triumphant postSocial Scene plays the Byhiatus arrival there on Oct. 7. ham on Oct. 1, and Pixies take Some of the most brilliant songwriters Stage AE just a few days later, on Oct. 4. The next night, on Oct. 5, deerhoof takes will be strolling through the city as the over Mr. Smalls, ensuring a clinic on how leaves begin to change and fall. The

HIGHLIGHT

OCT. 6 & 8 • HEINZ HALL

OCT. 13 & 15 • HEINZ HALL

MUSSORGSKY: -VÂ…iĂ€Ă˘Âœˆ˜ ‡y>ĂŒ CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2 RACHMANINOFF: Symphony No. 2

BEETHOVEN: Overture to Egmont BRUCH: Violin Concerto No. 1 SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5

Christoph KĂśnig, conductor Yulianna Avdeeva, piano

Krzysztof Urbanski, conductor Ray Chen, violin

TICKETS START AT $20! GET YOURS TODAY! *GKP\*CNN$QZ1HĆ‚EG^^RKVVUDWTIJU[ORJQP[QTI BRING YOUR GROUP AND SAVE! 

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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100% Employee Owned

PAUL ANKA

THU • 9/14 • 7:30PM

TOMMY JAMES & THE SHONDELLS SAT • 9/16 • 7:30PM

ADAM ANT

THE ANTHEMS TOUR SUN • 9/17 • 7:30PM

WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY?

MON • 9/18 • 7:30PM

STAGE RIGHT! - DISNEY’S

BEAUTY & THE BEAST

OLATE DOGS

FRI, SAT & SUN • 9/22, 23 & 24

FRI • 9/29 • 7:30PM

THE CLARKS

FASHIONFUSION WCT’S RUNWAY SHOW

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RUSSIAN GRAND BALLET

SWAN LAKE

TUE • 10/3 • 7PM

ARLO GUTHRIE RE:GENERATION TOUR FRI • 10/20 • 8PM

REGINA SPEKTOR

A SPECIAL SOLO PERFORMANCE

TUE • 11/7 • 8PM

Pittsburgh City Paper and Lynn Cullen are joining forces with TribLive Radio to bring you

BEATRIX POTTER’S CHRISTMAS

THE TAILOR OF GLOUCESTER

RIVER CITY BRASS

38 SPECIAL

BLOCKBUSTERS

WED • 10/11 • 8PM

SAT • 10/7 • 7:30PM

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

BRUCH & BRAHMS

BRAD GARRETT & RITA RUDNER

SAT • 10/21 • 7:30PM

WED • 10/25 • 7:30PM

AN EVENING WITH

THE UNION GAP, THE COWSILLS, CHUCK BLASKO’S VOGUES & THE LATSHAW POPS

DREAM THEATER WED • 11/8 • 7:45PM

WED • 11/1 • 7:30PM

GARY PUCKETT & SAT • 11/11 • 6:30PM

BRANSON ON THE ROAD THE OAK RIDGE BOYS CHRISTMAS STYLE

ZZ TOP

CHRISTMAS SHOW

FRI • 11/24 • 11AM

SAT • 11/25 • 2PM

THU • 11/30 • 7:30PM

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

JONATHAN CAIN

THE LATSHAW POPS

THU • 12/14 • 8PM

FRI • 12/15 • 7:30PM

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN MON • 11/13 • 7:30PM

JACKIE EVANCHO CHRISTMAS & HITS

FRI • 12/1 • 8PM

SUN • 10/14 • 7PM

KIDZ BOP KIDS BEST TIME EVER TOUR FRI • 11/3 • 7PM

WED • 10/18 • 7PM

RIVER CITY BRASS

AMERICANA

SAT • 11/4 • 7:30PM

STAGE RIGHT!

KING CRIMSON

FRI, SAT & SUN • 11/17, 18 & 19

MON • 11/20 • 7:45PM

RIVER CITY BRASS

MICHAEL BOLTON

ANNIE

CHRISTMAS BRASSTACULAR SAT • 12/2 • 7:30PM

RADICAL ACTION 2017

HITS & CHRISTMAS FAVORITES

TUE • 12/5 • 7:30PM

Lynn Cullen Live every weekday at 10 a.m. beginning Sept. 13.

Tune in at

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET SAT & SUN • 12/9 & 10

CHRISTMAS JOURNEY

www.pghcitypaper.com

THE SPINNERS

MASTERS OF ILLUSION

WED • 2/14 • 8PM

SUN • 2/18 • 3PM

W/GUESTS THE MARCELS

BELIEVE THE IMPOSSIBLE

CHRISTMAS SHOW

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS SAT • 12/16 • 7:30PM

For a complete list of updated events and to purchase tickets, visit our website at thepalacetheatre.org

GET THE LED OUT

FRI & SAT • 1/19 & 1/20 • 8PM

RAIN

A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES

WED • 2/28 • 7:30PM

ABBA MANIA

WED • 1/31 • 7:30PM

FOREIGNER

THU • 3/8 • 8PM

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017

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FALL ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

Looming, Oct. 17

infinitely gifted singer/songwriter Julien Baker is joined by the sublime, otherworldly pop of Half Waif at Mr. Smalls on Oct. 18. Heartwrenching songstress Waxahatchee performs at Spirit Hall with infectious, Talking Heads-tinged rock act Ought on Nov. 8. If you’re craving some spoken word instead that same night, Listener brings its truly unique brand of moving poetry over ambient rockscapes and tumultuous compositions to the Smiling Moose. Speaking of talented songwriters, nearly Pittsburgh-based band Looming celebrates the release of its second album, Seed, at the Funhouse at Mr. Smalls {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ} Regina Spektor, Nov. 7 on Oct. 17, and it’s sure to be an absolutely captivating night of intricate rock. Regina Spektor brings her power- punk rock at Club Café on Oct. 14. Speaking ful storytelling and incredible skills as a of twangy rock, add some bitter venom pianist to the Palace Theater, in Greens- and burning cynicism to that recipe, and you’ll have AJJ, performing at Spirit burg, on Nov. 7. Her presence is very on Nov. 4 in celebration of moving, so bring some tissues. People Who Can Eat People’s I’m not saying that the first FALL ARTS 10-year anniversary. time I saw her I cried from Punk fans can rethe time she stepped joice at the absolutely onto the stage until 20 MARKETPLACE insane lineup on Oct. 8 minutes after the show In time for the holidays, at Mr. Smalls featuring ended, but I’m just indie craft fair Handmade Arcade returns to the David L. the iconic Against Me! saying it’s possible. Lawrence Convention Center, with the shredding Speaking of crying, Dec. 2. rock of Bleached and The National is playing www.handmade arcade.com The Dirty Nil. On Oct. 15, at Mr. Smalls on Oct. 7, if the amplitude stays high you’re trying to get all up in at Howlers for PEARS and your feelings to really beautiBig Ups. ful indie rock. If you’re not trying Your entire fall will be a giant waste, to cry, but you are trying to party, you could head to Mr. Smalls on Oct. 9 instead however, if you don’t get your butt to PPG Paints Arena to see the living legend to see the king of party, Andrew W.K. Jessica Lea Mayfield’s country-tinged Janet Jackson on Nov. 29. It’s Ms. Jackson, rock will be joined by Mal Blum’s twangy if you’re nasty.

HIGHLIGHT

Even a small donation can make a big difference

HurricaneHarveyAid.org

M E G FA I R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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The Calliope Concerts 2017/18 September 14 (Thursday)

SUZZY ROCHE & LUCY WAINWRIGHT ROCHE Special Concert at the Calliope Roots Cellar at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts

September 23

BEUSOLEIL AVEC MICHAEL DOUCET “The best Cajun band in the world”— Garrison Keillor

October 14

THE WEIGHT BAND Featuring members of The Band, the Levon Helm Band, and the Rick Danko Group performing songs of The Band

November 18

SUSAN WERNER TRIO with very special guest James Maddock “Susan Werner, a clever songwriter and an engaging performer, brings literacy and wit back to popular song.”— The New Yorker

December 9

LÙNASA with Ashley Davis Internationally acknowledged as being the finest traditional Irish instrumental outfit of recent times

January 20

MOLLY TUTTLE BAND A virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and award-winning songwriter with a distinctive voice

February 10

HARPETH RISING with Ryanhood A chamberfolk trio playing original music, as intricately arranged as a string quartet, lyrically rooted in the singer-songwriter tradition

April 14

PHIL WIGGINS HOUSE PARTY An all-star blues and dance performance by Phil Wiggins and Friends

May 2 (Wednesday)

BRUCE COCKBURN The award-winning singer songwriter and 2017 Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame Inductee

Carnegie Lecture Hall/Oakland Saturdays (except September 14 and May 2) at 7:30 pm calliopehouse.org or 412-361-1915

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2017

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Mozart’s Masterful Romantic Comedy.

Photo: David Bachman ©

She lived for art. She died for love.

pyUUalaÛvwmvUQ

imƒQswÛv

OCTOBER 7-15

Benedum Center Tickets start at $12

w_YiQǓaQ]Y m[[a]Qsm

NOVEMBER 4-12

pittsburghopera.org 412-456-6666

Understand Every Word! English texts projected above the stage.


MAR. 3 – 25, 2018

JAN. 20 – FEB. 18, 2018

MAY 12 – JUNE 3, 2018

Citizens Market

Nomad Motel

BY CORI THOMAS / DIRECTED BY REGINALD L. DOUGLAS

BY CARLA CHING / DIRECTED BY BART DELORENZO

A good New York City supermarket has everything its neighborhood needs, including a charming cast of characters behind the counter. Citizens Market, the latest from City Theatre favorite Cori Thomas (When January Feels Like Summer), follows a hopeful group of immigrants as they form an unlikely family, working together to master the ups and downs of language, love, and staying afloat in the city that never sleeps. Full of laughter and life, this world premiere celebrates an evershifting and eclectic America.

The not-so-sunny side of California is nothing new to Alix: she’s bouncing between motel rooms taking care of her twin brothers for her mostly MIA mother. Her classmate Mason is a budding songwriter trying to steer clear of his absent father’s Hong Kong mafia friends. Together, the savvy teens must learn to scrape by without giving up their dreams. This world premiere play by newcomer Carla Ching (Fear the Walking Dead, Amazon’s I Love Dick) is a coming-ofage tale about making something out of nothing in the land of plenty.

APR. 7 – MAY 6, 2018

The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey

The White Chip BY SEAN DANIELS / DIRECTED BY SHERYL KALLER

BY JAMES LECESNE / DIRECTED BY LAURA SAVIA

Sean is on top of the world: he’s married, has good friends, and is steps away from his dream job running one of the hottest theaters in the country. He also happens to be an alcoholic spinning out of control. The White Chip follows his life from first sip to first love, critical hit to critical care, all the way to rock bottom where he carves an unusual path to sobriety. This highly entertaining autobiographical tale from Sean Daniels (director of The Lion), is a wry and wild theatrical journey to recovery.

Leonard Pelkey is a fourteen-year-old intent on living life out loud while marooned in a sleepy Jersey shore town. When Leonard suddenly vanishes, a hardboiled detective takes the case, unraveling the mystery with the help of a colorful band of locals. Written by Academy Award-winner James Lecesne, this hilarious and heartwarming one-man show celebrates the power of a single person to uplift an entire community.

Bold New Plays 2017–2018 SEASON

Subscriptions start at just $99 / SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE NOW 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org / 1300 Bingham Street / South Side

NEWS

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MUSIC

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ARTS

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EVENTS

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TASTE

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SCREEN

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SPORTS

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CLASSIFIEDS

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“IF YOU’RE TRYING THINGS FOR THE FIRST TIME, YOU CAN ACTUALLY FAIL HERE.”

[STAGE]

RIGHT ON Q Local artists will dominate the fourth edition of Trans-Q Live!, a queer evening of dance, poetry, music and film/video on Fri., Sept. 15, at The Andy Warhol Museum. Hosted once again by Joseph Hall, this 90-minute pop cabaret/variety show at the 100-seat Warhol Theater will have more of an emphasis than previously on movement and video, says Scott Andrew, who produced the show along with Hall and Suzie Silver. Each of the program’s artists will receive five to 10 minutes on stage. The lineup of local performers includes awardwinning poet Jenny Johnson; hip-hop/ soul artist Blak Rapp M.A.D.U.S.A., who will perform a music set; and Carnegie Mellon University graduate student Gray Swartzel, presenting a film and live-action work with collaborator Veronica Vega. In dance, True T Entertainment’s vogue performance ensemble #kNOwSHADE will present “TechnAfrika,” a seven-minute theatrical dance work pairing African dance styles with underground ballroom vogue dancing; dancer/choreographer Moriah Ella Mason will perform excerpts from her recent hit Sex Werque, about life as a stripper; and Gia T. Cacalano will perform alongside a film from Pittsburgh-based visual artist Jennifer Meridian’s Wild Clarity series. Cacalano says her 10-minute dance improvisation, “no edges,” is a response to Meridian’s film and to current global environmental and social issues. Other screenings include “In the Tree,” by Los Angeles sound, video and performance artist Anna Luisa Petrisko, a.k.a. Jeepney. The video follows an anonymous figure through what she calls “fresh mythological landscapes” and features Petrisko’s trademark hand-painted bodysuits. Also being shown are several of internet sensation Norman Freeman’s prank and parodies videos; an excerpt from a work by Brooklyn-based Peter Clough, whose bio says he “uses video, photography, sculpture and projection to create hybrid spaces”; and Bellingham, Wash.-based Chris E. Vargas’ “Have You Ever Seen a Transsexual Before?” (2010). Vargas tackles issues of gender self-determination by going to a series of mostly outdoor spaces in the U.S., including Death Valley and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints headquarters, in Salt Lake City, and flashing them while calling out, “Have you ever seen a transsexual before?” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TRANS-Q LIVE! 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 15. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $8-10. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Blak Rapp M.A.D.U.S.A. {PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAH JOHNS}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

At home in Pittsburgh: sculptor Bowen Schmitt in his home studio, in Highland Park

[ARTS]

MAKING ART HERE {BY TYLER DAGUE}

B

OWEN SCHMITT didn’t recognize Pittsburgh. “I feel like I came back to a new city,” says Schmitt, who moved back to his hometown after five-and-a-half years as a student at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art and founding director of the Great Far Beyond art gallery, in Philadelphia. Schmitt was impressed by the wealth returning to Pittsburgh, and by the surge in young people making art rather than “buying fancy cars.” Schmitt said he saw Pittsburgh’s smaller yet vibrant arts community as a way to be heard sooner, reaching in years levels that elsewhere would take decades. The sculptor, 23, rented a two-bedroom house in Highland Park and used the second bedroom as a studio, for the same rent that he paid on a one-floor apartment in Philadelphia. And that place didn’t

09.13/09.20.2017

have a decent backyard. Schmitt is not the only young artist moving to Pittsburgh. In the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council’s 2016 survey of artists and arts administrators, 34 percent of the 187 respondents were 20-35 years old, the largest age group. And several artscommunity leaders have noticed more young artists moving to Pittsburgh for its affordability and collaborative community. Likewise, in its 2015 American Community Survey, the U.S. Census found that 18- to 34-year-olds are the largest age group, comprising 37 percent of the city’s population. “I think younger people are coming here or are more likely to return here because they’re seeing that this area has changed,” says GPAC CEO Mitch Swain. “I’m hearing that from my own kids that are 24, 23

and 21. They refer to Pittsburgh differently than they used to.” Swain cites Pittsburgh’s concentration of colleges and universities for providing contacts and projects for young artists, and the prevalence of foundations that support the arts. For instance, the Heinz Endowments’ Small Arts Initiative provides grants for small professional arts organizations. In 2015, the median Small Arts Initiative grant was $14,000. A donation announced in July by the Hillman Foundation — $580,000 over two years — will further aid GPAC’s grantmaking efforts. “There [are] certainly more funding options here than in many cities of our size and even larger,” Swain said. Esther Michaels, 26, also recently moved to Highland Park from New York City. She had initially come to Pittsburgh to study


photography at Carnegie Mellon University, but a dearth of options convinced her to return to her hometown. However, after graduate studies at New York University, she decided Pittsburgh’s affordability was worth another shot. “It was a leap of faith for me because I did not have a job lined up, and I’m still working on a job, trying to make rent,” Michaels says. Although she wishes there were more gallery openings here, Michaels knows others her age who share her desire to stay in Pittsburgh. “In New York if I was going to be making art, you end up being someone’s studio assistant or manufacturing their work to get by,” she explains. “Here … [y]ou can make your own work in your spare time and still live your life comfortably as someone who’s not well known as an artist.” GPAC artist-relations manager Christiane Leach says she knows of numerous young artists who have moved to the region in the past year. “Some people strike it rich,” Leach says. “But if you’re going to struggle, you should choose the place that’s relatively easy to struggle, where you are able to connect with the community and still make work.” She recalls meeting several artists who moved recently to Westmoreland County. One had a 4,000-square-foot studio for a fraction of the costs elsewhere in the region. Affordable studio space in the city is a perennial issue. Among those attempting to provide it is Ryan Lammie. Lammie is founder and executive director of Radiant Hall, a nonprofit that manages a wide selection of affordable workspaces for artists, with locations in Lawrenceville, Homestead and the North Side. Lammie grew up in Gibsonia, Pa., and pursued his art degree at the Pratt Institute, in Brooklyn. But he describes New York as “a terrible place for making art” — too expensive, uncooperative and opaque. Back in Pittsburgh, Lammie found a huge former social hall in Lawrenceville and moved in with an artist friend. Before long, he had several artists renting out studios. Several years later, Radiant Hall is a thriving part of Pittsburgh’s art ecosystem, with 69 studios, most of them rented out. Full private studios rent for $350 a month, with half studios for as little as $135. “If you’re trying things for the first time, you can actually fail here,” says Lammie, 29. “People will understand that you’re just learning and going through a process,

MC K KEESPORT EESPORT SPORT LITTLE THEAT THEATER

whereas in other cities, they’d just kick you out on the street and say, ‘You’re never going to work in this town again.’” “Within the last year, there has been a large number of artists who have emailed us to say, ‘Hey, I’m relocating to Pittsburgh. I’m trying to scope out the arts scene and figure out what’s available in the area,’” Lammie said. “It hasn’t really been until last year that artists have really begun to consider Pittsburgh as an option.” Pittsburgh isn’t for every artist. Take Ben Quint-Glick, who at one time was both artist-in-residence at Bunker Projects, an art gallery in Bloomfield, and an intern at Renaissance 3 Architects, on the South Side. Quint-Glick quickly built connections with the arts community and lived with artist friends. But then he approached a wall. “I think in the arts you can find yourself always in the same circles, always doing the same thing, pretty quickly,” he said. “To really support yourself only making art in Pittsburgh can be difficult. There’s a very clear limit to how high most people can go.” Last year, Quint-Glick left to pursue graduate studies in architecture at Parsons School of Design, in New York. “I could see myself in the future maybe coming back to Pittsburgh, but it’s not where I am in my life right now,” says Quint-Glick. Still, both Schmitt and Michaels say they know of emerging artists who were either moving to, or back to, Pittsburgh. Schmitt, a graduate of Pittsburgh High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, cites “three or four” classmates who also had moved to Philadelphia but, like him, returned. “I think a lot of it had to do with having more opportunity and room to expand an idea, in combination with the fact that you can save money while doing it,” he says. Conversely, Michaels says some loved ones back in New York City were skeptical about Pittsburgh. “They have this vision of Pittsburgh that’s way different than what it is now, and over the past few years has become,” Michaels said. “I think that a lot of people thought that I was making a mistake.” Schmitt and his Far Beyond Gallery associates hope to open a new venue or satellite gallery here, and he remains confident that he can push forward with his art. “I just hope it continues in a positive way,” Schmitt said, “and we’re able to grow our community with everything else that’s growing in Pittsburgh.”

WRITTEN BY LESLIE BRICUSSE & FRANK WILDHORN

SEPT 15, 16, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $12.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

“IT HASN’T REALLY BEEN UNTIL LAST YEAR THAT ARTISTS HAVE REALLY BEGUN TO CONSIDER PITTSBURGH AS AN OPTION.”

Revel in 90 minutes of hilarious improvised comedy and song all based on audience suggestions. Cast members Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops, Jeff B. Davis, and Joel Murray from the Emmynominated TV show Whose Line Is It Anyway? will leave you gasping with the very witty scenes they invent before your eyes.

MONDAY SEPT. 18 . 7:30PM $38, $44, $50

THE PALACE THEATRE

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[PLAY REVIEW]

[ART REVIEW]

TRIALS

STILL BREWING

{BY TED HOOVER}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS will probably be best

Homecoming: Artists and Adaptation is one show where reading the artist-written walltext feels nearly as important as seeing the art. The group exhibit marks the return of a gallery space to the South Side’s historic-landmark Brew House, an earthy artists’ co-op reborn as a sleek multi-unit residence. The show features recent work by 12 artists who lived or worked there dating to the 1980s. The Brew House Association gallery itself, though still pretty raw, has been opened up from its old Space 101 configuration, with more daylight. It’s a fit setting for works including Aimee Manion’s elegant mixedmedia pieces; whimsical neo-dadaist works by Renée Zettle-Sterling (like a pair of silver lips clamped to the head of a toothbrush); and Keny Marshall’s found-poetry grid of photos of sidewalk utility plates the world over. Some works explicitly reprise Brew House history. Tim Kaulen’s “C-horse Clamp,” an abstract iron butterfly, incorporates a battered Brew House vent-pipe. Chris Craychee offers a burnt-carpet portrait of late Brew House denizen David L. Smith, while Bill Miller’s linoleum collage “Space Monkey Installation” honors an iconic work by the Brew House-centric Industrial Arts Co-Op, a guerilla outfit that brought scrap art to literally new heights. In wall-text, Miller notes that it was at the Brew House some 25 years ago that he began creating his linoleum collages (which are now exhibited internationally). In her statement, Carin Mincemoyer writes: “My time at the Brew House was a rare opportunity to live in a neighborhood of artists, which supported creative problemsolving and a DIY ethos. The affordability of living there allowed me to pursue artistic opportunities that otherwise would not have been possible.” The written testimonies to living and working at the Brew House add real resonance. Also important to read is the text accompanying “She was found ….” Christiane Dolores writes that her sprawled and frayed human form, in textile, was made to condemn our collective silence about endemic violence against black and brown women and girls. Other socially conscious offerings include Wendy Osher’s embroidery illustrating the appalling U.S. record on gun homicides, and Bob Bingham’s “Living Waters of Larimer,” an augmented map created as part of a community-development process. It’s good to see these Brew House artists still in action, making art and saying what needs to be said.

LIVE AT THE CARRIE FURNACE

16 SEPT

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DOORS OPEN AT 3PM & LIVE MUSIC UNTIL 10PM

Billy Price | Pillow Project Rankin Jr. Tamburitzans Gathering Field | Velcro Shoes Employees of Funk Brownie Mary | House of Soul ———— All Proceeds benefit ————

Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area Regional Chamber Alliance Foundation Mon Yough Community Services Rainbow Kitchen Community Services Mifflin Township Historical Society McKeesport Hospital Foundation Carnegie of Homestead

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ALTDORFER}

The cast of The Scottsboro Boys, at the Playhouse REP

The Playhouse REP presents the local premiere of this extraordinary musical which, it must be said, is not for the faint-hearted. It’s not just that the story is so horrific (with recent events only ripping at the wound). It’s that Kander & Ebb have chosen to tell a ferocious story in an even more ferocious manner. The duo have often used period entertainment forms to tell their story: Chicago is made up of the songs and “turns” of a typical 1920s vaudeville. Cabaret recreates the music and atmosphere of a Weimar-era nightclub. Kiss of the Spider Woman drives its tale of a South American dictatorship with spoofed vignettes of Hollywood movies. So it’s not surprising that Scottsboro Boys is presented as a minstrel show … but a minstrel show dipped in acid and dripping with the blood of innocent men. It’s an evening of brutal satire and irony. The REP’s director/choreographer, Tomé Cousin, along with music director Douglas Levine, appropriately pull out all the show-biz stops — these men continually drive home the point that American

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS continues through Sept. 24. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

If you’re of the opinion that shows like Legally Blonde and/or Mamma Mia! are a good night out, you’d do well to stay away. But if you believe entertainment can also be scary, intelligent, ruthless and infinitely sad, then the REP’s production of The Scottsboro Boys is for you. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

LATASHA N. NEVADA

BLACK FUTURES

DIGGS GLADMAN JEANTY KEENE

RENEE VAL

JOHN

monvalleysizzles.com

justice is, and probably has always been, not about the truth but about the theatricality of “truth.” People want to be comforted, not challenged. Taking this scalding journey with Cousin and Levine is an exemplary cast: Steven Etienne, Joseph Fedore, Jonathan Blake Flemings, Ivy Fox, Scott Kelley, Tony Lorrich II, Marc Moritz, LaTrea Rembert, Jared Smith and Lamont Walker II. They’re led by Tru Verret-Fleming as Haywood Patterson, with Billy Mason and J.R. Whittington as Mr. Bones and Mr. Tambo.

09.13/09.20.2017

THE CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY AND POETICS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH PRESENTS

OCTOBER 4TH, 7:30 PM Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Pittsburgh PA Reading, conversation, and sound art: LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs, Renee Gladman, Val Jeanty, and John Keene

OCTOBER 3RD, 7:30 PM (Doors 7:00 PM) Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh PA Interactive community workshop FREE AND with LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs OPEN TO www.kelly-strayhorn.org

www.caapp.pitt.edu

THE PUBLIC

Tim Kaulen’s “C-horse Clamp” {CP PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

remembered as the final “Kander & Ebb” musical – lyricist Fred Ebb died during the writing process, and composer John Kander finished the lyrics for the 2010 New York opening. But ultimately that’s a tiny part of The Scottsboro Boys. In 1931, nine black boys were pulled from a train in Alabama and charged with raping two white women. In a series of patched-together trials, they were convicted and sentenced to electrocution (although the braying crowds outside would have been even happier with a lynching). In spite of a national wave of attention, a couple of landmark Supreme Court rulings, and one of the women recanting her testimony, these innocent men still spent between six and 19 years in jail. Ruined by the inhuman treatment they’d received in prison, and victimized by a racist judicial system, none of the men (who were teenagers — or younger — when they were charged) went on to happy lives. And yet some people feel their Constitutional rights are abused when a statue gets taken down!

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HOMECOMING: ARTISTS AND ADAPTATION continues through Sept. 16. Brew House Association, 711 S. 21st St., South Side. www.brewhousearts.org


Richard E. Rauh

Conservatory

Presents

October 26 - 29 Byham Theater

“Kitty Riot,” by Seth Storck

[ART REVIEW]

UNCONTAINABLE {BY LISSA BRENNAN} SCAVENGERS: NEW Paintings by Seth Storck,

at The Gallery 4, combines many things at once in a pulsing display of vivid singularity. A kaleidoscopic mash-up of makeshift roadside temples honoring Indian gods and goddesses; the palettes of the pioneers of the Japanese superflat movement that crossed from fine art to street fashion; South American jaguar deities and the blood sacrifices to appease them; early newspaper comics trapping primary tones in rigorous borders; and — in the very best of ways — color bursting in fluorescent spurts from the luxurious density of black velvet. It all comes together as something rich, lush, slightly dangerous, fully engaging attention.

SCAVENGERS continues through Sept. 30. The Gallery 4, 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

Most of these works, which range from wee 8-by-8-inch canvases to a few commanding larger pieces, are portraits. Much of it is seething, not necessarily in a negative sense, not necessarily in anger, but with an energy that defies containment, a

412.456.6666

life force barely subject to restraint. Few works depict human subjects, or at least subjects still alive, in the traditional sense; more frequently, we show up as skulls. The absence of skin or a heartbeat seems not to quiet us any: These craniums are at least as animated as their vital counterparts, fierce and dynamic and quick. Steam and smoke surge between clenched teeth, flames erupt like lava out of eye sockets, and vacant holes provide ground in which spiky grass can grow. While we appear as bones, other beings more resemble rocks — craggy amalgamations of cobblestoned surfaces, nothing smooth or even. A brilliant creature appearing to have risen from a lagoon not black but emerald is embraced by a blue alligator in “Bayou,” the latter directing a side-eye full of stink to the viewer in warning. “The First of Us” features an imperial monkey grinning cockily; “Forest Dweller” is a woody tree spirit, not as kind as Groot, not as malevolent as the weedy invader of The Evil Dead. There are cats jungle and domestic, both hissing, heroes, and demons. The remains of an astronaut, still suited, bring in a little bit of feels in the showstopper, “Did We Make It Home.” This is Pittsburgh-based Storck’s first solo presentation; his work has previously been seen locally in group exhibitions including Gallery 4’s annual salon show. We’re sure to see more of him, and the fantastical citizens of the world he created.

pittsburghmusicals.com

LET S GET ’

S CIAL

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXWZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER Ř FACEBOOK.COM/PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.14-09.21.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com The Battle of Homestead was a pivotal episode in U.S. labor history, but not everyone knows the story. Until recently, you could have counted among that number Mark Clayton Southers, who spent 18 years as a steel-mill worker before becoming a full-time theater artist, but learned of the tragic struggle only after the Battle of Homestead Foundation commissioned him to write a play marking its 125th anniversary. The Homestead Strike of 1892 tells what happened when industrialist Henry Clay Frick and Andrew Carnegie hired an armed security force called the Pinkertons to face thousands of locked-out steelworkers and townspeople.

The result, in the era before workers’ right to organize unions was recognized, was 16 deaths and decades of depressed wages and longer hours. The evening-length oneact play receives six performances Sept. 15-23 at Homestead’s historic Pump House, site of the battle’s fiercest fighting. Nationally known playwright and director Southers, who’s artistic director of Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., guides a cast of 12, including local favorites Wali Jamal, Susan McGregor-Laine and David Crawford. Michael Sullivan plays Frick, and, in a neat bit of reverse type-casting, Carnegie is played by noted local lefty activist Mel Packer (who in his youth studied acting at Carnegie Tech). Other characters include labor leader Hugh O’Donnell and Homestead’s burgess, or mayor, John McLuckie. Radio personality Paul Guggenheimer narrates. The play is structured in 50 fast-paced scenes; Southers says he strove for historical accuracy. “It deserves to be told in a way that people understand the totality of what happened,” he says. “It’s a humongous story.” He adds that while his own experience laboring at U.S. Steel’s Edgar Thompson Works and Irvin Works informed his writing, the historical research affected him, too. “It made me more prideful of what I’ve done” as a mill worker, he says. “I was part of a legacy, part of a heritage. There were people who died to give me those opportunities.” BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

Sept. 15-23. Pump House, West Homestead. $20. www.battleofhomestead.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

^ Fri., Sept. 15: ScareHouse

thursday 09.14 EXHIBIT The Tough Art exhibit at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh marks its 11th year, featuring original, interactive artwork for the little ones to get their hands on. They can build a nest for a mythical creature that resides within the museum; hear and feel a coral reef; orchestrate booming sounds from tiny metal beads; or create a digital Etch-a-Sketch with a partner. Featured artists include Arvid Tomayko and Hannah Gene Thompson, Megan Flod Johnson, Shohei Katayama and Robert Zacharias. Amanda Reed 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through January. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-16. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

WORDS The Moth in Pittsburgh’s annual main-stage show is a highlight of the local storytelling calendar. This year’s event at the Byham Theater, organized by Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures and hosted by Moth luminary Kate Tellers (pictured), features notable locally talents. Tonight’s Pittsburgh-based tellers of their own true stories include filmmaker Tony Buba, known for his iconic documentaries about Braddock; Mexican-Colombian author, critic and performance poet Adriana E. Ramirez; and Mexican-born violinist Maureen

09.13/09.20.2017

Conlon Gutiérrez. Also performing: Sarah Shourd, an Oakland, Calif.-based author and journalist; Jason Trieu, a Vietnam-born software engineer from Washington state; and Pittsburgh-born, Brooklyn-based theater artist Morgan Zipf-Meister. BO 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-45. www.pittsburghlectures.org

friday 09.15 FESTIVAL Practical skills for more self-sufficient living is the theme of the annual touring Mother Earth News Fair, which stops for three days starting today, at Seven Springs Mountain Resort. The more than 100 hands-on workshops cover everything from growing microgreens and making your own sourdough starter to building your own wood-fired pizza oven, and going mushroomhunting with mycologist Tradd Cotter (pictured). Also, hear talks from nationally known experts like organic farmer Joel Salatin and fermentation authority Sandor Katz. BO Noon-6 p.m. Also 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., Sept. 16, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., Sept. 17. 777 Waterwheel Drive, Seven Springs. $15-35 (free for children under 17). www.motherearthnews.com ^ Thu., Sept. 14: The Moth in Pittsburgh


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(412) 683-4320

^ Thu., Sept. 14: Tough Art

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WORDS “My wife / is pulling / spots / into our boat / faster than / I can bait lines / her rod bends / over and over again / in the shallow water / a quick glimmer / in the tide’s circle / and these fish / want us / to eat them / in pancake batter / per the local custom / not like / some stranger.” John Stupp might well be Pittsburgh’s poet laureate of fishing. Join Stupp tonight at White Whale Bookstore for the launch of his third collection, Pawley’s Island (Finishing Line Press), whose other topics include jazz and the American West. Other poets reading include Jan Beatty and Michael Wurster. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. whitewhale bookstore.com

HAUNTS ScareHouse, ranked by the Travel Channel as one of America’s best haunted houses, returns tonight — now “with up to 30 percent more murder clowns.” ^ Fri., Sept. 15: Mother Earth News Fair There’s a fright for everyone: Explore the notorious Basement for an upclose experience, or the new Sunset Lodge, where guests can check into a hotel full of serial killers. “Turn Out the Lights,” which ended in 2014, returns Nov. 3 and 4, with a single glow stick as your group’s only light source. AR 7-11:30 p.m. Continues on select dates through Oct. 29. 118 Locust St., Etna. $15.99-46.99. 412-781-5885 or www.scarehouse.com

COMEDY The Others: An Inclusive Comedy Tour is comedian Gab Bonesso’s project to bring more diverse voices to comedy. Tonight’s lineup includes local comics Cassi Bruno, Howard Lester, Aarik Nesby and Bonesso herself. The Others, which is making the rounds locally before hitting the road, plays Bloomfield’s Lot 17 tonight. BO 8 p.m. 4617 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. www.facebook.com (“others comedy”) CONTINUES ON PG. 64

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 63

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{ART (DETAIL) BY JOHN KANE}

ART

arts fair, Mellon Park, Shadyside

CRITIC:

Amanda Stone, 26, a nurse from Shaler Township

WHEN:

Sat., Sept. 09 JoAnn Portnoy does watercolors of pretty flowers, and it may be very simplistic but she’s talented. I really like paintings of flowers, and they’re really bright and pretty. I think it looks realistic. I’m looking for artwork to put in my house. I moved there last year, and it’s my first adult purchase. It’s a real house house. I like that there’s a lot of different artists and food trucks [here]. I’m actually waiting for mac-and-cheese from Mac & Gold. Looking at other art is to be determined. There are lots of dogs here, and I have my own dog, so I kind of just stare at everybody else’s dog, and think about how cute they are. I’m not someone who goes up to random dogs and pets them, so that’s also to be determined. BY AMANDA REED

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Homewood gets some new public art starting today thanks to a project curated by artist Alisha B. Wormsley for the Carnegie Museum of Art. The People Are the Light is a series of installations and workshops with 12 artist-collaborators. It starts today with food, music by Tracksploitation, and other activities celebrating two month-long installations: Houstonbased Robert Hodge’s The Beauty Box, which re-animates an old-school fruit stand on North Homewood Avenue, and Pittsburgh-based Ricardo Robinson’s Morrow’s Hush, a sound installation with its own private listening chamber, on Frankstown Avenue. The installations will be open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays. A series of additional performances, installations and events through the neighborhood follows through Oct. 15. BO Opening activities: 2-4 p.m. 617 N. Homewood Ave., and 7240 Frankstown Ave., Homewood. Free. www.cmoa.org

Point Park University launches its Talk Back Series with a special dual appearance by Jasiri X and Yusef Salaam. Jasiri X, the founder of 1Hood Media, is a nationally recognized, Pittsburghbased hip-hop artist and activist; Salaam is one of the Central Park Five, a group of African-American and Latino youths wrongly convicted of a rape and assault in 1990. Salaam spent 12 years in prison; after the Five’s convictions were vacated, in 2002, he became a widely sought public speaker on criminal-justice issues. The pair speaks at the Pittsburgh Playhouse tonight; discussion follows. BO 7:30 p.m. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $50 (50 percent off with promo code “JASIRI”). www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

sunday 09.17 TALK Presented by Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Dav Pilkey, author of the Captain Underpants series and The Paperboy, a 1997 Caldecott Honor Book, brings his silliness to the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall for a live drawing demo and signing of his newest graphic novel for children, Dog Man: A Tale of Two Kitties. The event includes prizes, giveaways, and photo ops with Captain Underpants and Dog Man. Books will be available for purchase before and after the lecture. AR 2:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org.

tuesday 09.19 ART How’s this for synchronicity: Robert Qualters was born the year John Kane died. That two of Pittsburgh’s most iconic painters should share a year (1934) this way is only the icing

09.13/09.20.2017

on KANE/QUALTERS: MY PITTSBURGH. The Carlow University Art Gallery exhibit is the first to explore the two men’s works together. Kane, a Scottish immigrant and manual laborer, became a pioneering outsider artist — and a big influence on Qualters, whose public murals and other scenes of Pittsburgh represent the city to itself. Qualters speaks at the gallery today. BO 4 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 10. 3333 Fifth Ave., Oakland. www.carlow.edu

TALK

WORDS

Tue., Sept. 19: Yusef Salaam >

A Fair in the Park

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GONI RISKIN}

saturday 09.16 EVENT:

< Tue., Sept. 19: Nicole Krauss

^ Tue., Sept. 19: KANE/QUALTERS: MY PITTSBURGH

Nicole Krauss — called “one of America’s most important novelists” by The New York Times — reads from her new work, Forest Dark, at Carnegie Lecture Hall courtesy of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. It’s the story of Jules Epstein, a retired New York philanthropist who disappears to Israel, and Nicole, an American novelist suffering from writer’s block. Both are on a journey of self-discovery at the Tel Aviv Hilton. After a reading and conversation with former WESA host Josh Raulerson, the author will take audience questions. AR 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $33 (includes hardcover copy of Forest Dark; students: $10 without book). 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org


DE

SI

the

ON

TOFU CROQUETTES WERE PERFECTLY FRIED AND FLAVORED WITH LEMONGRASS AND GINGER

FRESH COFFEE It took more than two years, but Millvale finally has its first coffee shop, and it’s smack-dab on the busiest intersection in town. Tazza D’Oro, whose other locations are in Highland Park and at Carnegie Mellon University, opened its doors on the corner of Grant and North avenues in Millvale last week, and the community appeared just as giddy as the owners. Pittsburgh City Paper stopped by on the morning of Tazza D’Oro’s opening day, Sept. 7. Several passersby entered the new venue with enthusiasm. One man said he had been waiting for this for years. Manager Zachary Selekman said there was even a rush when the doors first opened, at 7 a.m. He was in awe of the excitement surrounding the opening. “I am really impressed by the energy in Millvale,” said Selekman. “A lot of people want to see this town grow.” The 36-seat coffee shop is bright and airy, and has several garage-doorstyle glass windows that can be opened on warm days. Selekman says the new Millvale location will offer all of the usual specialty coffee drinks, such as cappuccinos, pour-over coffees and matcha lattes. Five Points Bakery provides the pastries, and Pigeon supplies the bagels. In the near future, Selekman says, the shop will install a cooler, which will let Tazza D’Oro offer fresh-made salads and sandwiches. And he said he expects the space to hold coffee tastings and artistic latte competitions. Tazza D’Oro owner Amy Enrico used to live in Millvale, and says she always wanted to open a coffee shop in the small Allegheny River town. The Millvale Community Development Corp. reached out to Enrico a couple of years ago, and after a long remodel of a former furniture store, the coffee shop is now a reality. “We want this to be a really awesome community gathering place centered around coffee,” says Enrico. “And we are hoping to pull in all cyclists from the nearby trail, too.” Tazza D’oro is open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.tazzadoro.net

Tazza D’Oro’s new Millvale location {CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

{BY RYAN DETO}

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Graves at Sea: Tater tots with house kimchi, soy caramel, nori, togarashi and scallions

VEGAN DELIGHT {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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AME A RESTAURANT that someone

hasn’t heard of, and a likely response will be, naturally enough, “What kind of restaurant is it?” Usually, the answer is straightforward: Italian, Ethiopian, seafood, diner. Even “fancy,” while not really descriptive of food, gets at something essential about the dining experience. But to say a restaurant is vegetarian or vegan is hardly descriptive at all, defining it only by what it doesn’t serve. And then, some restaurants defy easy description. Even after dining at Onion Maiden in Allentown, we’re hard-pressed to categorize it. That’s a good thing; Onion Maiden’s quirky singularity of vision is one of its most appealing traits. Yes, it’s a vegan restaurant, but both its ambience and menu defy the sanctimonious stereotype of earthy-crunchy,

hippie food. Nor is this a virtual tour of meat-and-dairy-free cuisines of the world. Onion Maiden’s first unexpected move is its punked-out, plant-based vibe, in which heavy-metal-concert posters coexist with

ONION MAIDEN 639 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown. 412-586-7347 HOURS: Wed.-Fri. 5-10 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 5-10 p.m. PRICES: $3-11 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED pretty little pots of succulents arrayed just so on salvaged wood shelves. Its second is its mash-up of veganized American finger foods like hot dogs, tater tots and nachos, with trendy, often Asian-inflected, dishes such as dumplings, tacos and noodles.

Music, played at a volume that barely qualified as “background,” bounced from Motörhead to The Who to the Sex Pistols, and dish names are witty references to the music at the center of Onion Maiden’s heavy-metal-inspired concept. For example, Aqua Poutine Hunger Force was a bowl of crisp-fried tater tots tossed with cashew cheese curds, draped with gravy, and sprinkled with zingy fresh chives. The tots had a slightly lumpy (in a good way) texture that reminded us they were home-made from real mashed potatoes, not unfrozen clumps of processed potato flakes from a 1950s supermarket, and a deliciously craggy coating that caught and held the gravy. Cashew cheese is no replacement for the fresh, tangy curds in traditional poutine, but the savory, light-brown gravy was better than what you’d get at most non-vegan

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taverns and made every bite delicious. Chivelords — crispy dumplings with Chinese chives — were flat patties, resembling croquettes more than traditional dumplings, with a filling that split the difference between onion and braised greens. A drizzle of both sesame and soy gave them a distinctively Asian flavor profile. The Roots, a nice-sized salad, augmented big, beautiful leaves of mixed greens with earthy chick peas and batons of roasted carrot and beet, making for an attractively colorful presentation. The roots themselves were perfectly cooked, sweet and firm without a hint of rawness, and played well against a tangy miso-ginger dressing that was one of the better exemplars of its type: thin, smooth, and balanced between pungent ginger and mellow miso. The Trooper Dawg is Onion Maiden’s version of a chili-cheese dog, a veggie wiener smothered in lentil chili and cashew cheese. The lentils, hearty and deeply seasoned, and the good crusty Breadworks bun were the stars of this show. The “dawg” was different not only in flavor, but in texture than a traditional frank, lacking ballpark snap and resilience. In our opinion, most vegan meat and dairy substitutes are not an automatic demerit, but require an adjustment of expectations. That is, one who expects a faithful imitation of an all-beef hot dog will not have that expectation met. However, one who is open to a different sort of tubular protein in a bun might very well be pleased. Coffins — scallion pancake tacos with jackfruit, enoki, cabbage, jalapeño, kale, soy sauce and Chinese five spice — were an even more liberal interpretation of the original, inspirational dish. Spiky southeast Asian jackfruit has recently exploded in popularity as a meat substitute; it shreds up beautifully and easily takes on flavors the way chicken does, offering just a hint of fruity sweetness of its own. At the heart of these tacos, enfolded by flaky-chewy scallion pancakes along with an exciting combination of textures and flavors, jackfruit made for an utterly original, absolutely delicious dish, reminiscent of a great banh mi. Headbangers Balls was another extraordinary innovation: Superball-size tofu croquettes, perfectly fried and flavored with lemongrass and ginger, on twin beds of black rice and cabbage slaw with cilantro chutney and peanuts. Sturdy textures and fresh flavors mixed with aromatic seasonings and spices for an Asian dish to rival — if not utterly outshine — any made with chicken, fish or pork. There are good restaurants, and there are great restaurants of all types, but seldom is there something as delectably original as Onion Maiden. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

SWEET GREENS {BY CELINE ROBERTS} I have always loved steamed green beans. They were a staple of childhood meals at my house, and I loved their snap and distinct flavor, as well as the time I spent cleaning them on our back porch. I avoided them when my mom wasn’t the one dishing them up because they never looked as vibrant or tasty; at school, at least, they took on the gray hue of something that’s been in a can for too long. When I went to college and got my first apartment, I developed a craving for them. I steamed up a batch, and with the anticipation of something comforting, I put a helping on my plate with a little salt. But when I took a bite, something was wrong — the beans were just off. I figured I must have prepared them wrong, or maybe I over-steamed them. I called home and quizzed my mother about her recipe, and I learned that she had always used a secret ingredient which I had thought was part of the inherent flavor of green beans: sesame oil. Since then I’ve tried a few variations of dressings for green beans, and this is one of my favorites. The honey and mustard are a perfect complement to the earthiness of the beans.

INGREDIENTS • ½ pound green beans • 1 tbsp. good-quality whole-grain mustard • 1 tbsp. favorite honey (I like local producer BEEBOY honey) • salt, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS IN Rinse green beans in Rin cool water, and clean co them by snapping th off o the ends. In a saucepan, steam s green beans over g high heat until h bright green and just b done. Meanwhile, do prepare an ice bath. pre Shock Sh k tthe beans in the ice bath, so they stop cooking and maintain their vibrant color. (Trust me, this step, while seemingly trivial, changes the whole game.) Drain beans and toss in a large bowl with mustard and honey. Salt to taste. Taste and adjust amounts of honey, mustard and salt, if desired. Serve. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.


REYNA FOODS

INVITES EVERYONE

TO THE FARM!

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN RESTAURANT

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine

SUNDAY, SEPT. 24 10 AM - 8PM {CP PHOTO BY KATE HAGERTY}

Olive Beals and Michael Anderson behind the bar at Evangeline

[ON THE ROCKS]

SEASIDE ATTRACTION {BY CELINE ROBERTS} CHEF DENNIS MARRON’S new restaurant

Or, the Whale has raised its flag in the harbor of Downtown’s former Salvation Army building. Built in 1920, it served as the group’s Western Pennsylvania headquarters until 2008. Now it’s the Distrikt Hotel, and inside awaits seaside dining. The restaurant bar embraces the maritime theme with ships’ lines looping from the ceiling and a sort of captain’s-chair view of the dining room and open kitchen below. The restaurant is focused on operating sustainably, and the bartop is no exception. “It’s made from old construction waste — busted-up pieces of concrete and copper fleck,” says Marron. Hidden TVs are tucked behind it for major sporting events and the morning news. A drink rail lines the back wall for those who enjoy a casual lean. Peek over the railing to glimpse the glassed-in wine cellar that doubles as a private dining room for small parties, where you can snag the attentions of one of the two sommeliers, Eric Moorer and Kelly Peterson Bates. (Bates also manages.) The two have compiled a unique but approachable list that focuses on complementing Marron’s food. “I thought it was really important that everything would pair, and make wine an important part of the meal,” says Moorer. “There’s a small part of me that just wants to do weird things all the time with wine. You’ll see a lot of really strange indigenous varietals,” he says, chuckling. Patrons can expect domestic rieslings that pair nicely with many of the fish dishes. On the mezzanine, you’ll find Evangeline, a spacious, airy bar, and its accompanying oyster and conservas bar. Evan-

geline is named for the Salvation Army’s professional-women’s residence. The architectural details have been restored and enhanced, from the original stage backed with a living wall at the base of the stairs to the beautiful flowers in the plaster of the arcing ceiling supports (complete with tiny pineapples, a traditional symbol of hospitality). Semicircles of couches and chairs with low-slung tables provide intimate spaces, while seats at the bar offer a chance to rub shoulders with bar patrons and watch the bartenders at work.

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WHITE OAK FARM 3314 WAGNER RD ALLISON PARK

TAJ MAHAL IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY CHEF/OWNER USHA SETHI SINCE 1996.

7795 McKnight Rd • 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com

Authentic traditional handcrafted Hungarian cuisine

Formerly the

Tin Angel

OR, THE WHALE 463 Boulevard of the Allies, Downtown. 412-632-0002

A LEGACY BAR & GRILL

A gentle nod to continental dining permeates the bar service, with à la minute juicing and a full absinthe fountain service. Perhaps the drink with the most flair is the Smoke Show, the house cocktail styled on a Manhattan. Available at both bars, it’s smoked tableside under a large glass bell to infuse it with cherry-wood flavor. The oyster bar and seafood guide the beverage program for Michael Anderson, lead bartender for both Evangeline and Or, the Whale. “It gives us a chance to explore some Mediterranean, mainly Portuguese and Spanish cocktail ideas,” he says. Take a quick look at the cocktail list at either bar, and it’s easy to see the trinity that informs them: sparkling wine, absinthe and sherry. Evangeline also hosts a large collection of gins and scotch, mostly Japanese and single malt that focus on salinity. CELI NE @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOOD VENDORS DEMONSTRATIONS BEER • WINE • LIVE MUSIC ART/CRAFT/CLOTHIER VENDORS FARM TOUR • KIDS ZONE • WALKING TRAILS • FREE PARKING CONTESTS & MUCH MORE

• Award Winner for Best Indian food 2000-2017 • The proud caterer for G20 summit - #1 choice for catering Indian cuisine. All events, weddings, anniversaries, baby showers • Lunch buffet 7 days a week • Dinner buffets Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

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627 E North Ave

in Pittsburgh’s Northside

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: BLACKBERRY BERRY BRAMBLE BRAMBLE

VS.

Evangeline 453 Boulevard of the Allies, Downtown DRINK: Scarlet Hourglass INGREDIENTS: Sauza Blue bianco tequila, blackberry, sweet basil, lime, sugar, Angostura bitters OUR TAKE: Earthy notes, reminiscent of black tea, are the first elements of this cocktail. Very smooth and sweet from fruit and basil, this is an ideal drink for back-porch drinking during the last days of summer.

Yuzu Kitchen Ramen & Robata Grill Downtown DRINK: Purple Haze INGREDIENTS: Faber vodka, blackberry, mint, lemon OUR TAKE: This cocktail is very berry-heavy and coats the mouth with the summer fruit. Sweet and satisfying. Mint wafts through on the nose, and the flavor profile is lightened with the acidity of the lemon.

Learn more about Pittsburgh’s food scene on our podcasts Sound Bite and Five Minutes in Food History online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

O Bordeaux, One One Scotch, One Beer O Chappellet Mountain Cuvée Napa Valley 2015 $22/glass “ “This is a blend between merlot, cabernet and malbec. It’s got fruity tones and isn’t too dry, with a very smooth finish. It’s a little fr pricier, but worth it.” p RECOMMENDED BY KADE GARDENER, BARTENDER AT POROS, DOWNTOWN

Chappellet Mountain Cuvée Napa Valley 2015 is available at Poros.

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09.13/09.20.2017


CLOWN CONTROL

A SLATE OF MORE THAN TWO DOZEN RECENT ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN FILMS

{BY AL HOFF} A component of being successfully scared at the movies is the anticipation of it. But perhaps the hyped run-up to It — and all its attendant history of Stephen King’s 1986 novel, the 1990 TV mini-series and the now-clichéd “killer clown” trope — has expended all that keyed-up energy. Andy Muschietti’s film has an assortment of entertaining features, but it’s not likely to scare many viewers.

SILK SCREEN {BY AL HOFF}

Send in the clown

In a small Maine town in the late 1980s, children are disappearing. We see that a creepy clown who lives in the sewer is taking them, but the townsfolk remain clueless. Pursuing the mystery is a self-described group of tween “losers” who uncover the town’s dark secrets and take on the clown. What transpires is a mash-up of a 1980s-style kiddie-quest film with a standard spooker. No trope of either genre has been left behind, whether it’s the goofy nerd kid on a bike, or the spooky paintings that move. I liked the look of the clown, but on screen, he seemed more ridiculous than scary. A preview audience responded favorably to expected jump-out scares and, most vociferously, to an imperiled house cat. (You can depict kids getting brutalized and nobody blinks, but aim just one gun at a cat …) The kids generated some laughs, though you couldn’t ask for a more stereotypical bunch: fat kid, Jewish kid, African-American orphan, nervous kid, stuttering kid, and a girl. (The girl is supposed to be weird, but she’s beautiful, centered, brave, kind and comfortable hanging out in her underwear, and thus is simply a fantasy projection. Real weird girls need to demand equal time in these movies.) Sometimes It works as a comingof-age movie, if you can forgive the familiarity, and it stretches tenuously to marry the supernatural horror to the reality of a difficult adolescence. But wait — the clown isn’t a manifestation of freefloating fears, but rather an actual killer that turns up every 27 years, because …? Note: This film is only Part 1; presumably Part 2 will mirror the book, in which the now-grown-up kids reunite 27 years later to deal with this mess again.

Top, Harmonium; bottom, Lipstick Under My Burkha (left) and Inversion

P

Silk Screen Asian American Film Festival returns for its 12th year, beginning Sat., Sept. 16, and running for nine days. The festival will present more than two dozen films, recent features from Asia and the Middle East, at several area venues. Below are reviews of some of the festival’s offerings.

religious mother and their 10-year-old daughter — causes catastrophic results. The work is a slow-burner, in which Fukada gradually reveals information, some of it shocking. Besides the disruption of the family unit, the work also explores loyalty, honor, perseverance and revenge. In Japanese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 17 (Melwood) and 8 p.m. Thu., Sept. 21 (Frick)

LIPSTICK UNDER MY BURKHA. Four women — a teen, a widow, a bride-to-be and a working mom — in Bhopal, India, push back against an assortment of strictures placed on them by a male-dominated society. In Alankrita Shrivastava’s dramedy, the women find breaking norms, taboos and even laws to be empowering, even if some victories are pyrrhic. An entertaining work that pulls no punches, and was controversial in India for its sexually explicit material. In Hindi, with subtitles. Noon, Sun., Sept. 17 (Harris); 8:30 p.m. Tue., Sept. 19 (Waterworks); and 4:15 p.m. Sun., Sept. 24 (Harris)

SILK SCREEN ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL

ITTSBURGH’S

HARMONIUM. Koji Fukada’s drama recounts how the inclusion of a relative stranger into a family — a dad who runs a small metal shop, a

the right thing, finds himself both a man out of time, and alone. In Mandarin, with subtitles. 6 p.m. Tue., Sept. 19 (Harris) and 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 23 (Frick)

Sat., Sept. 16-Sun., Sept. 24 Various venues www.silkscreenfestival.org

INVERSION. A medical situation proves to be the catalyst for one Iranian family’s tensions to erupt. When an elderly woman must leave Tehran because of its dangerous air pollution, her three adult children squabble over who will move to the country with her and have their lives disrupted. Unsurprisingly, the two men choose their sister, but she fights back. Behnam Behzadi’s drama illuminates this traditional domestic tension, which plays out even in a modern city of professional women. In Farsi, with subtitles. 8:45 p.m. Tue., Sept. 19, and 6:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 23. Melwood

OLD STONE. A taxi driver assumes the medical debts of the man he inadvertently hit, and the financial burden causes his life to collapse. Johnny Ma’s quiet but searing drama is clearly an allegory for how the director sees modern China, a place where abandoning community standards and disregarding the law in the pursuit of individual gain is paramount. The cabbie, who does

Films screen at Frick Fine Arts, Pitt campus, Oakland; Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland; Waterworks Cinema, Aspinwall; Cranberry Cinemas; Harris Theater, Downtown; and Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. Tickets for most screenings are $10, and there are discount passes for multiple screenings. For more information and the complete schedule, see www.silkscreenfestival.org.

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RAGING BULL. Robert DeNiro stars in Martin Scorsese’s 1980 bio-pic about boxer Jake LaMotta, as his life takes a complicated path: The bullheadness and anger that serve LaMotta well in the ring prove destructive in his personal life. Beautifully shot in black and white, and filled with raw energy and great performances, this film has held up as one of the best for both Scorsese and DeNiro. Sept. 15-21. Row House Cinema

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW AMERICAN ASSASSIN. Dylan O’Brien and Michael Keaton star in this actioner about a young man who is trained to be a black-ops assassin for the CIA. Michael Cuesta directs. Starts Fri., Sept. 15

CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS. Woody Allen’s 1989 comedy-drama finds its cast of Manhattanites struggling with profound moral and ethical issues. There’s a good doctor (Martin Landau) who is hiding an affair; a vapid actor (Alan Alda); and Allen himself, as a filmmaker forced to compromise his art for commerce. Angelica Houston, Jerry Orbach, Martin Bergmann and Mia Farrow also star. Sept. 15-21. Row House Cinema

MOTHER! Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem star in Darren Aronofsky’s drama about a couple whose relationship is tested by arrival of unexpected guests. Starts Fri., Sept. 15 SIDEMEN: LONG ROAD TO GLORY. Hopefully, even the most casual fan of 1960s and ’70s rock ’n’ roll knows how much that music owes to its antecedents in American blues. If not, consider Scott D. Rosenbaum’s new documentary a primer. But even for well-informed fans of rock and/ or the blues, this shaggy but affectionate film should be a treat — and perhaps even unearth a new nugget or two. In the same vein as Standing in the Shadows of Motown and 20 Feet From Stardom, Rosenbaum’s film focuses not on the big stars, but on their sidemen. Here, it’s the last of the Chicago-based Delta bluesmen — pianist Pinetop Perkins, drummer Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and guitarist Hubert Sumlin, who for decades played alongside Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters. The film makes a fair case that besides being worthy sidemen — and there’s no need to knock a steady gig — each of these men truly excelled at his instrument. Rosenbaum was fortunate to travel with the three men in their later years (all died in 2011); they prove to be lively raconteurs and energetic performers. (In the film, Perkins is 96, still smoking and “addicted” to McDonald’s.) Naturally, Rosenbaum checks in with musicians influenced by these men, such as Gregg Allman, Bonnie Raitt, Johnny Winter and Derek Trucks. The film doesn’t delve too deeply into the often-troubled history of white bands achieving far more success with bluesy material than the original black bluesmen themselves. (And celebrating The Blues Brothers without comment seems like a misstep: Sure, that film gave these guys a late-inlife gig, but it’s a movie with wealthy white guys play-acting as bluesmen for laughs.) But after a lifetime of standing on the side of the stage, these three fantastic musicians do get the spotlight here — and in the contemporary concert clips, it’s a joy to see them hold it. Starts Thu., Sept. 14. Hollywood (Al Hoff) VENGEANCE: A LOVE STORY. With a lowbudget crime film starring Nicolas Cage, there’s at least a chance that the actor delivers one of his unhinged or otherwise inscrutable performances, thus shifting the hackneyed material to a different level of entertainment. Alas, Johnny Martin’s crime potboiler, set in Niagara Falls, doesn’t offer that. (The film was adapted from Joyce Carol Oates’ 2003 novel Rape: A Love Story.) Cage plays a police detective of some renown, though he mostly seems poorly groomed and moody, the kind of guy who ignores a vibrant young woman at the bar. But on the Fourth of July, he comes across a terrible crime scene — that same woman from the bar, who has been brutally raped by four men, all while her 12-year-old daughter is forced to watch. This horrific case goes before a smalltown judge who instantly tosses it out. Despite the woman still displaying facial injuries. Despite a cop at the scene who quips, “DNA, fingerprints … they left everything except their wallets.” And despite an eyewitness. (Look,

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DO THE RIGHT THING. Spike Lee’s 1989 dramedy explores various tensions — racial, social, generational, economic — playing out on one Brooklyn street on a hot summer’s day. Sept. 15-21. Row House Cinema

The Young Karl Marx

KOYAANIQATSI. Godfrey Reggio’s wordless 1982 film essay, with a score by Philip Glass, combines images of nature and the man-made environment to illustrate the changes wrought on the planet. The title comes from the Hopi Indian language and means “life out of balance.” 2:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 16; 6 p.m. Sun., Sept. 17; 7:30 p.m. Tue., Sept. 19; and 3 p.m. Wed., Sept. 20. Row House Cinema NO MAP ON MY TAPS and ABOUT TAP. It’s a double-feature of short documentary films by George T. Nierenberg about tap dancing. The hour-long No Maps on Taps (1979) focuses on the dance’s history, particularly its role accompanying live jazz music in the 1930s. In “About Tap” (1985, 28 min.), Gregory Hines introduces those who influenced him, such as Steve Condos, Jimmy Slyde and Chuck Green. 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 16. Hollywood MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL. Join King Arthur and the Knights of Camelot on their fruitless, but hilarious search for the Holy Grail in Monty Python’s 1974 cult hit. Pythons Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones co-direct. Midnight, Sat., Sept. 16. Row House Cinema

American Assassin

I’m not saying that plenty of worthy cases don’t get tossed for various outrageous reasons, but this particular story makes no sense at all.) You can write the rest yourself, as Cage’s character decides to mete out justice himself, though this also makes very little sense. The justice system in this particular version of Niagara Falls is so inept, it fails to note even the sudden disappearances of four — four — defendants in one high-profile case. Vengeance doesn’t deliver even the fun of a nutty Cage performance, so viewers are stuck with a predictable plot, terrible dialogue and flat acting. I will note only that two other washed-up ’80s stars turn up in slightly livelier roles: Don Johnson plays a slimy defense attorney, and Dallas’ Charlene Tilton is the blowsy mom to a couple of the rapists. Starts Fri., Sept. 15. Parkway, McKees Rocks (AH)

REPERTORY AUDRIE & DAISY. Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk’s new documentary looks at online bullying, in particular what can happen to teenage girls who are victims of sexual assault and who suffer subsequent harassment online. The film kicks off a second season of Just Films!, a series of new documentaries about gender and intersectional social-justice issues. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 13. Eddy Theater, Chatham University, Shadyside. www.justfilmspgh.org. Free TWISTER. Get your high-velocity funnel-shaped thrills on with this 1996 actioner from Jan de Bont, about

09.13/09.20.2017

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEROME BRUNET}

Sidemen: Long Road to Glory scientists who chase tornadoes. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 13. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 THE YOUNG KARL MARX. Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck (who made the great James Baldwin doc I Am Not Your Negro) responded to the recent world financial crises with this handsome if fairly conventional new biopic. The film covers Marx’s intellectually formative years, as he and his wife and young family move about politically unstable 1840s Europe and England, and Marx (August Diehl) begins the fateful association with radical author and mill-owner’s son Friedrich Engels (Stefan Konarske) that will lead to the epochal Communist Manifesto. The penniless if intellectually rigorous Marx’s relationship with his wife, Jenny (Vicky Krieps), is generally overshadowed by his bromance with fiery, wealthy Engels. Peck emphasizes emerging industry’s treatment of workers as disposable commodities, and the risks of being a 19th-century radical (deportation, etc.). The film is well acted, but hindered by its insistence on detailing philosophical nuances and labor-movement infighting which, though crucial to Marx’s development, don’t inevitably result in engrossing cinema. The film screens as part of Marx@200, a series of events leading to Marx’s 200th birthday organized by Carnegie Mellon University’s Humanities Center. A panel discussion follows the screening. English, French and German, with subtitles. 6:45 p.m. Thu., Sept. 14 (6 p.m. reception). McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus. Pay what you wish. www.cmu.edu/ faces (Bill O’Driscoll)

THE PHILADELPHIA STORY. The witty words simply fly in this 1940 drawing-room comedy set amongst the wealthy of Philly’s Main Line. George Cukor adapts Phillip Barry’s stage play, with the dream cast of Katharine Hepburn, Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant. 11 a.m. Sun., Sept. 17. Hollywood RENOIR: REVERED AND REVILED. The works of the French impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir form the heart of Phil Grabsky’s recent documentary. Using some of the nearly 200 Renoirs at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, the film argues for Renoir’s place as a link between 19th- and 20th-century painters. 2 p.m. Sat., Sept. 16, and 4:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 17. Hollywood THE GREAT GATSBY. Catch Baz Luhrmann’s colorful 2013 adaptation of the classic F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, starring Leonard DiCaprio as the titular striver Jay Gatsby. Admission is free with a library card (which is also free, at libraries). 5 p.m. Mon., Sept. 18. Tull Family Theater, Sewickley DOCUMENTARY SALON. You be the judge. Watch some short films submitted for consideration to the Three Rivers Film Festival, then debate their merits and whether they should be included. 7 p.m. (6:30 p.m. food). Mon., Sept. 18. Melwood BRAVEHEART. Mel Gibson won an Academy Award for directing this 1995 epic about the medieval Scottish patriot William Wallace. Swordplay, mud, kilts, fair maidens — and Gibson as the titular warrior. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 20. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5


“THIS IS SIX WEEKS OF PEOPLE NOT HAVING TO THINK ABOUT THEIR HEALTH AND FITNESS.”

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

SEPT. 15, 1938

Burleigh Grimes

SEPT. 14, 1916 Pitcher Burleigh Grimes, who would go on to a Hall of Fame career, makes his first professional start, as a Pittsburgh Pirate, losing to the Brooklyn Robins, 3-2, at Ebbets Field. Grimes was best known for his spitball — it’s exactly what it sounds like. According to the Society for Baseball Research, Grimes chewed elm bark and used the spit it created to load up the ball, making it move erratically. The spitter was outlawed in 1920, except for 17 pitchers who were using it at the time, including Grimes. When Grimes retired in 1934, the pitch was completely banned.

Pittsburgh’s Paul and Lloyd Waner become the first brothers in major-league history to nail back-to-back home runs. They would be the only pair to do so until B.J. and Justin Upton did in 2013. In 2009, the Pirates’ Adam and Andy LaRoche homered in the same game, but most fans would rather forget that those two siblings ever played here.

{CP PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Lifting at Arsenal Strength

SEPT. 17, 1917 Legendary Pirates shortstop Honus Wagner plays in his final game. Wagner had originally retired after the 1916 season, but returned in June. On this day, he played second base late in the game and never received an at-bat.

SEPT. 18, 1947 “The Hebrew Hammer,” Hank Greenberg, plays his final game, as a Pirate, at Forbes Field. Greenberg played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers until the Pirates purchased his contract after the 1946 season. A lifetime .313 hitter, Greenberg hit just .249, but still managed 25 home runs.

SEPT. 19, 1982 In his final major-league season, 38-yearold Pittsburgh Pirates captain Willie Stargell attempts to steal second base against the Chicago Cubs. Stargell slides several feet short of the bag and when he stands up, he attempts to call timeout before being tagged.

SEPT. 20, 1933 The Pittsburgh Steelers (then known as the Pirates) play the first game in franchise history. The team fell to the New York Giants at Forbes Field, 23-2.

HIGH INTENSITY A

SK PEOPLE what they know about

the fitness regimen known as .CrossFit, and many will offer some variation of, “I’ve heard it’s really hard,” or “CrossFit is scary.” In the 17 years since its creation, the program has developed a reputation for being brutally tough due to its reputed intensity; CrossFitters practice some of the same lifts as Olympic weightlifters. But several studies have demonstrated there are real health benefits associated with the practice. According to a study published in the American Journal of PhysiologyEndocrinology and Metabolism in May, CrossFit can be beneficial for people with diabetes. Researchers followed 12 people with Type 2 diabetes who did CrossFit three days a week, to see what effect the exercise would have on insulin

production. At the end of six weeks, insulin production and liver function were significantly improved. CrossFit combines high-intensity interval and strength training. In addition to cardio activities, such as running and

Many are intimidated by CrossFit, but Arsenal Strength is trying to change that perception {BY REBECCA ADDISON} rowing, exercises often involve the use of barbells, dumbbells, medicine balls, kettlebells and gymnastic rings. CrossFit gyms emphasize competition within group classes, and there are CrossFit competitions around the globe.

And it’s this competitive aspect of the fitness regime that has led many to be wary of it. “It’s an intimidating thing,” says Brooks DiFiore, owner and head coach at Arsenal Strength, a CrossFit gym in Lawrenceville. DiFiore and his colleagues are aware of the sport’s reputation. In order to break down some of that intimidation factor, they launched the New You challenge in August. For six weeks, participants were tasked with attending one-hour group classes at the gym three days a week. The program was designed to take the guess work out of exercising. “This is six weeks of people not having to think about their health and fitness,” says DiFiore. “We’ve created a whole plan for you to follow, including a meal plan.”

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The challenge is geared toward beginners who haven’t tried CrossFit before, which includes this reporter. Joining the challenge would be a great way to demystify an exercise routine that frightens so many. Arsenal’s staff recommends pairing the exercise regimen with a paleo diet and provides participants with a nutrition guide. Paleo is a mostly low-carb diet that emphasizes eating meat, seafood, eggs, fruits and vegetables. (Full disclosure: I had a hard time following the meal plan.) On day one of the challenge, participants completed a routine combining cardio and strength training. On their last day of class, they’ll complete that same routine to check their progress. Each session starts with a warm-up, usually consisting of running or rowing. After that, classes went in a variety of directions — no two classes were ever the same — but during each class, participants either learned a new lift or built on one they had learned previously. Weightlifting is a major component of CrossFit, but at Arsenal you don’t start learning lifts with a barbell stacked with weights. Instead, instructors teach each lift using PVC pipes meant to simulate barbells. Form is important, so lifts are taught in steps. Only when your form has been perfected do you move on to a barbell with actual weights. This kind of gradual instruction makes weightlifting less intimidating. Each class usually concluded with the

high-intensity interval-training portion of the workout. Occasionally, this took the form of a competition, with teams racing to complete exercises. For example: 20 air squats, 500 meters of rowing, 20 sit-ups, followed by 10 pull-ups on the gymnastic rings. Other times, participants were given a routine to complete and told to see how many times they can complete the routine in a certain amount of time. While the competitive aspect of these classes might seem daunting, it actually reinforces teamwork. Teammates often cheered each other on during workouts, and everyone pitched in to help clean up when the workout was completed. To further put participants at ease, instructors at Arsenal don’t pressure you into lifting more weight than you and they think you can handle, and they’ll tell you to lower your weight if they see you straining too much. Each class lets you see how you’re progressing. For instance, you’ll find that those warm-up runs have been getting easier as the weeks progress. And each time you practice a lift, you’ll find you can add more weight to the barbell. But if you aren’t seeing such marked improvements, that’s OK, too. After the six weeks are over, DiFiore hopes challenge graduates will continue to take classes and keep exercising at Arsenal. “What makes people stick around,” he says, “is the community you build.”

“WHAT MAKES PEOPLE STICK AROUND IS THE COMMUNITY YOU BUILD.”

RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


[THE CHEAP SEATS]

BREEDING GROUND {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} WHEN IT COMES to creating great NFL

players, the University of Pittsburgh is toward the top of the heap. Five players from the Pitt Panthers were taken in the 2017 NFL draft. James Conner made the Steelers, Ejuan Price is on the Los Angeles Rams roster, and Nate Peterman is backup quarterback for the Buffalo Bills. Adam Bisnowaty and Dorian Johnson made the practice squads for the Giants and Cardinals, respectively. That loss of talent will have to be overcome as the Panthers take on the Oklahoma State Cowboys this weekend. Oklahoma State has a proud runningback tradition, including Hall of Famers Barry Sanders and Thurman Thomas. But that’s it, in terms of real impact on the NFL’s legacy. Pitt has put eight players into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Out of hundreds of universities with football programs, only three have sent more players to Canton. Sure, Pitt is tied with three other schools with eight, but the Panthers might have the most impressive roster among that group. Notre Dame is king, with 13 players or contributors enshrined in Canton. Former Steeler Jerome Bettis is one of them, and another is Washington County native Joe Montana, so we can even take a little credit for them. University of Southern California is next on the list with 12 — Lynn Swann is one, and Troy Polamalu will eventually join him. But at least Pitt doesn’t have any convicted felons like O.J. Simpson on its list. Ohio State (sorry, The Ohio State) is next on the list, with 10. Besides those three establishments of higher learning, nobody can talk trash on the Panthers’ ability to make and nurture gridiron legends. The three schools that are Pitt’s peers are Michigan, Syracuse and Alabama. Michigan has four Hall of Famers who went to other schools: George Allen, Elroy “Crazy Legs” Hirsch, Lew Ford and Ralph Wilson Jr. I’m not sure whether any of them besides Hirsch even played football. The other four are Dan Dierdorf, Benny Friedman, Bill Hewitt and Tom Mack. Not a great list at all. Sure Golden Boy Tom Brady and Charles Woodson will eventually make that line-up a little stronger. But it’s not even close to Pitt’s contributions of Mike Ditka, Joe Schmidt, Tony Dorsett, Russ Grimm, Chris Doleman, Ricky Jackson, Curtis Martin and Dan Marino.

{OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO}

Former Chicago Bears coach and Pitt tight end Mike Ditka visits the White House in 2011.

Syracuse has Jim Brown, Larry Csonka, Al Davis, Marvin Harrison, Floyd Little, John Mackey, Art Monk and Jim Ringo. That is comparable to Pitt. But while Jim Brown’s legend can’t be denied, Martin and Dorsett were pretty good too, and the Orangemen’s slate of legends isn’t better than Pitt’s. That leaves only one university with as many Hall of Famers as the Pitt Panthers: Alabama. The Crimson Tide has John Hannah, Don Hutson, Joe Namath, Bart Starr, Ozzie Newsome, Ken Stabler, Dwight Stephenson and Derrick Thomas. OK, so that’s a pretty good list. And with Alabama currently flooding the NFL draft board every year, it might eventually take over the No. 1 spot. Looking into the future, Aaron Donald is off to a Hall of Fame type start. The former Panther just ended a holdout for more money in Los Angeles, but he’s certainly begun his career the way Hall of Famers do. LeSean McCoy is a possibility also. “Shady” is already the Philadelphia Eagles’ all-time leading rusher and should continue to get a lot of carries in Buffalo. Darelle Revis has a pretty strong shot at Canton as well. Then there’s Larry Fitzgerald, a lock for the Hall of Fame. Fitzgerald could very well be the best player in the history of the St. Louis/Arizona franchise. It was no coincidence that he was the star of its one and only Super Bowl team. So, as you watch the Panthers this year, it’s OK to have lowered expectations. After barely surviving against Youngstown State during in week one, Pitt lost to Penn State on Sept. 9. Look for the Panthers to win a few games in row, even score a big

Check out photographer Vincent Pugliese’s top 10 photos from the Pittsburgh Steelers’ win over the Cleveland Browns in this year’s season opener

upset to get into a mediocre bowl game that’s played before Christmas. You’ll likely experience moments of deep disappointment, but keep your head up. The player you watch now just might be a future Hall of Famer.

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THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time September 19, 2017 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies:

XEROGRAPHIC PAPER General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid.

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CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

ENGINEERING team members. Target is an iconic brand, a Fortune 50 company and one of America’s leading retailers. We’re hiring team members and can’t wait to meet you. to apply: Visit ¬.com/careers, select store hourly positions, the state of Pennsylvania and the Pittsburgh location.

Uber Technologies, Inc. has multiple positions open in Pittsburgh, PA for the following: Engineer (Ref#AA4UJH) Dvlp real-tme contrllers & obsrvrs for sfety-crtical embedded apps. Autonomy Engineer (Ref#ABBSJL) Dvlp & implmnt new SW algrthms, features, & systms. Refer to Ref# & mail resume to Uber Technologies, Inc, Attn: S. Tateno, 685 Market St, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94105.

Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is seeking participants for a three-part research project. To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health, and speak fluent English

work somewhere you apply online at .com/careers or in store.

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Earn up to $150 for completing this study.

For more information, call (412) 624-8975 *Our laboratory is also seeking couples, where one or both people smoke.

© 2017 Target Brands, Inc. The Bullseye Design and Target are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc.

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ACROSS 1. Bridge to Notre Dame 5. Bubble up? 11. QB play 15. “We’re in trouble” 16. Like humor that’s not humor 17. Their website says “The Fight Is On” 18. Mystical kneecap? 21. Kitchen drawers? 22. Music your grandparents like 23. Taqueria honorific 24. Art Spiegelman masterwork 28. Clergy counterpart 29. With 35-Across, drinker’s periodical? 32. Org. that recruits at the start of the school year 35. See 29-Across 36. See 33-Down 39. Most ready for picking 41. Super Bowl III winning coach Weeb 43. Continuously 44. Uses a Norelco 49. Talented 50. Totally not good for you 52. Utah city 53. Times when action is required

54. Drink made by steeping Indian bread? 57. Eat up 60. Renaissance man Machiavelli 64. Axiom that emphasizes your male friends over pity? 67. Designer Saarinen 68. “Modern Family” actor Gould and namesakes 69. Masseuse’s stuff 70. Brownish horse 71. Not airtight 72. Caramel candy

DOWN 1. Insects in their cocoons 2. Its website can be reached on flychicago.com 3. Off 4. They off 5. Has a cold 6. Chris Sale’s stat. 7. Spreadable eggs 8. ___ Arbor, Michigan 9. Uncomfortable movement 10. Chorus-like effect 11. Bamboo eaters 12. When the office scenes of “Glengarry Glen Ross” occur 13. Hard rain 14. Like faulty beer taps 19. Team that plays

in the Coliseum 20. Never before seen 24. Stat on car stickers 25. Grp. that can lower your Sprint bill 26. Cheese ball brand 27. ___ Lanka 30. Vermin 31. Tip jar bills 32. ___a manger (“ready to eat”) 33. With 36-Across, showstopper? 34. The tops 36. Rumsoaked treat 37. No more than 38. Some Jaguars 40. Telecom

from Stockholm 42. Lousy ham 45. Desire 46. Astral altar 47. Pointer’s pro? 48. Of note 51. Carp cousin 53. Ten: Pref. 55. Fiddle with 56. Kinda drunken 57. One with a handle on the road? 58. Wonderfilled cookie 59. “A Doll’s House” mother 61. The Buckeye state 62. Lie about 63. ___ buco 65. Rio hello 66. Berlin Airlift grp. {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.13-09.20

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Filmmakers often have test audiences evaluate their products before releasing them to the masses. If a lot of viewers express a particular critique, the filmmaker may make changes, even cutting out certain scenes or altering the ending. You might want to try a similar tack in the coming weeks, Virgo. Solicit feedback on the new projects and trends you’ve been working on — not just from anyone, of course, but rather from smart people who respect you. And be sure they’re not inclined to tell you only what you want to hear. Get yourself in the mood to treasure honesty and objectivity.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The poet e.e. cummings said, “To be nobody-butyourself — in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.” On the other hand, naturalist and writer Henry David Thoreau declared that “We are constantly invited to be who we are,” to become “something worthy and noble.” So which of these two views is correct? Is fate aligned against us, working hard to prevent us from knowing and showing our authentic self? Or is fate forever conspiring in our behalf, seducing us to master our fullest expression? I’m not sure if there’s a final, definitive answer, but I can tell you this, Libra: In the coming months, Thoreau’s view will be your predominant truth.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “When you do your best, you’re depending to a large extent on your unconscious, because you’re waiting for the thing you can’t think of.” So said Scorpio director Mike Nichols in describing his

process of making films. Now I’m conveying this idea to you just in time for the beginning of a phase I call “Eruptions From Your Unconscious.” In the coming weeks, you will be ripe to receive and make good use of messages from the depths of your psyche. At any other time, these simmering bits of brilliance might remain below the threshold of your awareness, but for the foreseeable future they’ll be bursting through and making themselves available to be plucked.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Author Barbara Ehrenreich has done extensive research on the annals of partying. She says modern historians are astounded by the prodigious amount of time that medieval Europeans spent having fun together. “People feasted, drank and danced for days on end,” she writes. Seventeenth-century Spaniards celebrated festivals five months of each year. In 16th-century France, peasants devoted an average of one day out of every four to “carnival revelry.” In accordance with current astrological omens, you Sagittarians

get your yoga on!

are authorized to match those levels of conviviality in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Kittens made French Emperor Napoleon III lose his composure. He shook and screamed around them. Butterflies scare actress Nicole Kidman. My friend Allie is frightened by photos of Donald Trump. As for me, I have an unnatural fear of watching reality TV. What about you, Capricorn? Are you susceptible to any odd anxieties or nervous fantasies that provoke agitation? If so, the coming weeks will be a perfect time to overcome them. Why? Because you’ll be host to an unprecedented slow-motion outbreak of courage that you can use to free yourself from long-standing worries.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The brain is wider than the sky,” wrote Emily Dickinson. “The brain is deeper than the sea.” I hope you cultivate a vivid awareness of those truths in the coming days, Aquarius. In order to accomplish the improbable tasks you have ahead of you, you’ve got to unleash your imagination, allowing it to bloom to its full power so it can encompass vast expanses and delve down into hidden abysses. Try this visualization exercise: Picture yourself bigger than the planet Earth, holding it tenderly in your hands.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

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I got an email from a fan of Piscean singer Rihanna. He complained that my horoscopes rarely mention celebrities. “People love astrological predictions about big stars,” he wrote. “So what’s your problem? Are you too ‘cultured’ to give us what we the people really want? Get off your high horse and ‘lower’ yourself to writing about our heroes. You could start with the lovely, talented and very rich Rihanna.” I told Rihanna’s fan that my advice for mega-stars is sometimes different from what it is for average folks. For Piscean mega-stars like Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Ellen Page and Bryan Cranston, for example, the coming weeks will be a time to lay low, chill out and recharge. But non-famous Pisceans will have prime opportunities to boost their reputation, expand their reach, and wield a stronger-thanusual influence in the domains they frequent.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Psychologists say most people need a scapegoat — a personification of wickedness and ignorance onto which they can project the unacknowledged darkness in their own hearts. That’s the bad news. Here’s the good news: The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to neutralize that reflex and at least partially divest yourself of the need for scapegoats. How? The first thing to do is identify your own darkness with courageous clarity. Get to know it better. Converse with it. Negoti-

ate with it. The more conscientiously you deal with that shadowy stuff within you, the less likely you’ll be to demonize other people.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If the weather turns bad or your allies get sad or the news of the world grows even crazier, you will thrive. I’m not exaggerating or flattering you. It’s exactly when events threaten to demoralize you that you’ll have maximum power to redouble your fortitude and effectiveness. Developments that other people regard as daunting will trigger breakthroughs for you. Your allies’ confusion will mobilize you to manifest your unique visions of what it takes to live a good life.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “If at first you don’t succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.” declared comedian Steven Wright. My Great Uncle Ned had a different perspective. “If at first you don’t succeed,” he told me, “redefine the meaning of success.” I’m not a fan of Wright’s advice, but Ned’s counsel has served me well. I recommend you try it out, Gemini. Here’s another bit of folk wisdom that might be helpful. Psychotherapist Dick Olney said that what a good therapist does is help her clients wake up from the delusion that they are the image they have of themselves.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What is home? The poet Elizabeth Corn pondered that question. She then told her lover that home was “the stars on the tip of your tongue, the flowers sprouting from your mouth, the roots entwined in the gaps between your fingers, the ocean echoing inside of your ribcage.” I offer this as inspiration, Cancerian, since now is a perfect time to dream up your own poetic testimonial about home. What experiences make you love yourself best? What situations bring out your most natural exuberance? What influences feel like gifts and blessings? Those are all clues to the beloved riddle “What is home?”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’re most likely to thrive if you weave together a variety of styles and methods. The coming weeks will be a highly miscellaneous time, and you can’t afford to get stuck in any single persona or approach. As an example of how to proceed, I invite you to borrow from both the thoughtful wisdom of the ancient Greek poet Homer and the silly wisdom of the cartoon character Homer Simpson. First, the poet: “As we learn, we must daily unlearn something which it has cost us no small labor and anxiety to acquire.” Now here’s Homer Simpson: “Every time I learn something new, it pushes out something old.” Imagine what your life would be like if you licked your worst fear. Describe this new world to me. Truthrooster@gmail.com

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My teenage daughter just came out to us as gay. We told her we love her and support her. As a heterosexual, cisgender mother, how do I make sure she gets good advice about sex? I don’t want her learning from other kids or porn. Do you know of any good, sex-positive advice books for lesbian teens? MY INSPIRING DAUGHTER DESERVES LESBIAN EDUCATION

“I wish every parent felt this way about their child’s sexual development, regardless of the child’s gender identity or sexual orientation,” said Peggy Orenstein, author of Girls & Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape. “All young people — girls especially — need open, honest discussions about sexual ethics, including talking about pleasure, respect, decision-making, and reciprocity, or we are leaving them at the mercy of the messages they get from both the mainstream and ‘adult’ entertainment industries.” Orenstein’s book — required reading for parents of girls and boys — drives home the need for comprehensive sex-education programs emphasizing the giving and receiving of pleasure. In the absence of sex-ed programs that empower girls to see themselves not just as instruments of another’s pleasure but as autonomous individuals with a right to experience sexual pleasure — with a partner or on their own — girls wind up having a lot of consensual but crappy sex. That said, MIDDLE, one big takeaway from Orenstein’s research should come as a comfort to you: Bi and lesbian girls enjoy an advantage over their heterosexual peers. “In some ways, MIDDLE can feel more confident about her daughter as a gay girl,” said Orenstein. “Lesbian and bisexual girls I spoke to for Girls & Sex would talk about feeling liberated to go ‘off the script’ — by which they meant the script that leads lockstep to intercourse — and create encounters that truly worked for them. I ended up feeling that hetero girls — and boys, too — could learn a lot from their gay and bisexual female peers. And I don’t mean by watching otherwise straight girls make out on the dance floor for the benefit of guys.” Since gay and bisexual girls can’t default to PIV intercourse, and since there’s not a boy in the room whose needs/dick/ego they’ve been socialized to prioritize, queer girls have more egalitarian and, not coincidentally, more satisfying sexual encounters. “Young women are more likely to measure their own satisfaction by the yardstick of their partner’s pleasure,” said Orenstein. “So heterosexual girls will say things such as, ‘If he’s sexually satisfied, then I’m sexually satisfied.’ Men, by contrast, are more likely to measure satisfaction by their own orgasm. But the investment girls express in their partner’s pleasure remains true regardless of that person’s gender. So the orgasm gap we see among heterosexuals (75 percent of men report they come regularly in sexual encounters versus 29 percent of women) disappears in same-sex encounters. Young women with same-sex partners climax at the same rate as heterosexual men.” As for good, sex-positive resources for teens of all identities and orientations, Orenstein had

some great recommendations. “I’m a big fan of Heather Corinna’s S.E.X.: The All-You-Need-to-Know Sexuality Guide to Get You Through Your Teens and Twenties,” said Orenstein. “She also produces the Scarleteen. com website, which is fabulous. Other inclusive, sex-positive, medically accurate websites include Sexetc.org and Goaskalice.columbia.edu. And MIDDLE could think about giving her daughter a subscription to OMGYes.com, an explicit (but not tawdry) site that educates about the science of female pleasure. And finally, I think everyone who is a woman — or has had sex with a woman or ever hopes to — should read Emily Nagoski’s book Come As You Are. Even if you think you know it all, Nagoski’s book will transform your sex life.” Follow Orenstein on Twitter @peggyorenstein. I’m a 32-year-old straight male. Back in April, I met this girl. She seemed interested, but before we went out, she told me that she is a demisexual. (I had to Google it.) After a few dates, she had me over to her place, we watched a movie and started making out. But when I started to put my hand between her legs, she calmly said, “Let’s not get ahead of ourselves.” No problem, I told her, I wasn’t trying to rush her. Fast-forward a couple months. We’re still going on dates, we hug and kiss, we hold hands, we cuddle on the couch and watch movies — but still no sex. Is demisexuality real? Should I keep pursuing her?

“MEN, BY CONTRAST, ARE MORE LIKELY TO MEASURE SATISFACTION BY THEIR OWN ORGASM.”

IS SHE INTERESTED TOTALLY OR NOT?

Demisexuals are real people who “do not experience sexual attraction unless they form a strong emotional bond,” according to the definition at Asexuality.org. We used to call people who needed to feel a strong emotional bond before wanting to fuck someone people who, you know, needed to feel a strong emotional bond before wanting to fuck someone. But a seven-syllable, clinical-sounding term that prospective partners need to Google — demisexuality — is obviously far superior to a short, explanatory sentence that doesn’t require internet access to understand. You’ve shown respect for this woman’s sexual orientation, ISITON, now it’s her turn to show some respect for yours. I don’t mean by putting out if she’s not ready or not interested, but by offering you some clarity about when or whether she’ll ever be interested. You’re seeking a romantic relationship that includes sex — which is not unreasonable — and you’ve demonstrated a willingness to make an emotional investment before a relationship becomes sexual. You don’t (or shouldn’t) want her to consent to sex under duress — you don’t (or shouldn’t) want her to have sex just to keep you coming over for cuddles — but if she doesn’t see you as a prospective romantic and sexual partner, ISITON, she should tell you that. If this relationship isn’t on track to become sexual, tell her you’re open to being friends — truly intimate friends — but you’ll have to direct your romantic attentions (and more of your time) elsewhere. On the Lovecast, comedian Amy Miller. Listen up at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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COLORED VISION {BY ALEX GORDON}

EARLIER THIS YEAR, a research scientist named Janelle Shane designed an experiment to see whether a robot could generate believable names for different colors of paint. Shane fed the artificial neural network more than 7,000 paint names by Sherwin Williams, from which it identified patterns and produced new colors and short names for them, based on the makeup of the inputted colors and the language used to describe them. The results were interesting. Given that even “official” paint names can be silly and excessively poetic, the robot’s “Naval Tan” and “Ghastly Pink” actually seem fairly believable. There were misfires — “Ice Gray” is the mustard yellow of a Dwight Schrute shirt; the inexplicable “Gray Pubic” is the sea blue of an island-resort ad — but the overall project brings up some intriguing ideas about all the baggage that arises when we use words to describe colors. #ColorPoll2017, a new collaboration between Pittsburgh-based artist D.S. Kinsel and Providence, R.I.-based conceptual artist Benjamin Lundberg Torres Sanchez, addresses that baggage head on. The multi-faceted art piece asks participants to come up with new names for existing paint colors. Nine swatches, identified only by their Sherwin Williams four-digit code, are posted on #ColorPoll’s Instagram account, shared via a Twitter account, and displayed in physical form at an installation on Penn Avenue, in Garfield. The text is simple: “Pick a color; give it a name.”

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

A close-up look at the #ColorPoll2017 installation in Garfield

like “salted caramel,” “cinnamon pop tart” and “almond milk.” But, maybe predictably, ideas about race and culture run throughout. Kinsel points out that the two darkest tones, SW 6991 and SW 6097, have generated the most feedback, which he sees as a reflection of the deep-set cultural comfort in identifying, naming and owning blackness and brownness. That pattern also shows another deeply ingrained American concept of race, the idea of whiteness as a neutral, blank, default setting, and blackness as the other, as a departure from the norm. Lundberg Torres Sanchez references the standard of painting gallery walls some form of white, which creates a sense of ubiquity and neutrality for the artworks to contrast with. SW 6049, a dull pinkish white, generated responses like “privilege,”

THE PROCESS OF NAMING COLORS INEVITABLY REFLECTS DEEPER IDEAS ABOUT CULTURE AND RACE. The colors are all on the spectrum of human skin tones. SW 7553, for example, is a dull beige, the color of caulk or drywall. Its official Sherwin Williams handle is “Fragile Beauty,” whereas Shane’s A.I. experiment called it “Rose Hork.” On #ColorPoll2017, suggestions for SW 7553 include “sofa in the dentist’s office,” “Kanye sunk,” “cream,” “melanin lacked” and “baby vomit.” (Just a side-note here: “Hork” has no dictionary definition, but according to a quick internet search, it can be used to mean to vomit or burp.) The hashtag #ColorPoll2017 launched in late August — Kinsel explains the “2017” part is necessary because #colorpoll is a popular hashtag for teenagers asking for fashion advice online — but it dates back to May of this year, with Lundberg Torres Sanchez’s solo show Adaptive Shade at AS220, in Providence. It’s existed in several iterations since then, most recently at the DownStreet Art festival in North Adams, Mass., but the collaboration with Kinsel marks new ground. “The project gets to have a life outside of the institutional restrictions of a gallery. The digital space works in a similar way to the unsanctioned street installation: creating a way to engage for people who can’t interact with the project in physical spaces,” Lundberg Torres Sanchez wrote in a press release. In the weeks since the hashtag launched, patterns have emerged. For one, food seems to be a popular reference point, with suggestions

“Baby Spice” and “vice principal.” The first comment on SW 6097, the second darkest hue in the project, says “Mr. Hankey,” a reference to the sentient piece of poop from South Park. Kinsel says feces-related suggestions are common for the darker colors. By contrast, the official Sherwin Williams handle for “privilege” is “Gorgeous White”; “Mr. Hankey” is “Sturdy Brown.” While Lundberg Torres Sanchez and Kinsel wanted ColorPoll2017 to focus on skin tones, they explain that many colors and their names are embedded with subtle cultural signals. Lundberg Torres Sanchez cites Benjamin Moore’s “Confederate Red,” which was renamed “Patriot Red” but kept the description “rich, refined red is a timeless and enduring classic.” It may not be obvious on the surface, but the process of naming colors inevitably reflects deeper ideas about culture and race. Even if we’re not aware of the name of a given paint, we’re still receiving subtle message from the thousands of colors we interact with daily. In asking us to put words to something as ethereal and nonverbal as color, Lundberg Torres Sanchez and Kinsel are challenging the public to address signals that otherwise go unnoticed. You can check out the physical installment of ColorPoll2017 at Penn Avenue and Winebiddle Street, in Garfield. Follow @ColorPoll2017 on Instagram and Twitter, and use the hashtag #ColorPoll2017 to submit your own suggestions. AL E X GORD ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

09.13/09.20.2017


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路 FREE Pumpkin Patch

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1-5pm in Town Center

路 Live music by House of Soul 路 8th Annual Running of the Wieners dog race 路 FREE activities & more

#waterfrontpgh

September 13, 2017 - Fall Arts Preview  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 27

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