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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 08.23/08.30.2017 X PGHCITYPAPER XX XX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX PGHCITYPAPER XX PGHCITYPAPER

724-946-7100 | www.westminster.edu | New Wilmington, PA

Come Visit and Experience Westminster SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 19 FOR MORE INFO


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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EVENTS 8.26 – 2pm MEMBER TOUR: STARS OF THE SILVER SCREEN Free for CMP members; registration is suggested

8.26 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY TOUR Free with museum admission

8.29 – 5:30pm STARS OF THE SILVER SCREEN ROOFTOP SHINDIG Rooftop of the Theater Square Garage in Downtown Pittsburgh Rooftop Shindigs are made possible with the support of Alco Parking, The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, WYEP & WESA FM. The Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen exhibition is generously supported by Cadillac. Free

9.15 - 8pm TQ LIVE! A queer evening of dazzling performance, dance, poetry, comedy, music, and more. Please note this performance contains adult subject matter and strong language. Tickets $10/$8 members & students

9.16 - 8pm & 10 pm NIGHT OF 1,000 MARILYNS 8pm VIP & General, 10pm Late Night Tickets $200 VIP; $50 General; $25 Late-nite

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen is generously supported by Cadillac.

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21ST ANNUAL

SHADYSIDE

The Art Festival on Walnut Street Sat., August 26th 10am – 7pm Sun., August 27th 10am – 5pm

Free Admission

On Walnut Street between South Aiken Avenue & South Negley Avenue in Shadyside (Pittsburgh)

ArtFestival.com A Howard Alan Event Information: (561) 746-6615

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 34

Check our our Q&A with this wee cover illustratk’s or at www. pghcitypape r .com

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[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns CARLEY BONK, HALEY FREDERICK, KRISTA JOHNSON, HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN MILLER, JAKE MYSLIWCZYK, MATT PETRAS

WINE

FESTIVAL

[ART] Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER ILLUSTRATION BY CAITLIN ROSE BOYLE}

[COVER STORY]

Our summer interns take control of the presses to present our 2017 College Issue. PAGE 16

[LAST WORD]

“Many of his songs sentimentalize or spoof the lives of enslaved African Americans in imagined dialect that is roundly offensive today.” PAGE 55

[ADVERTISING] Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[MARKETING+PROMOTIONS] Marketing Director LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing Assistant LIZ VENUTO Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN

[ADMINISTRATION] Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[PUBLISHER] EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

[SPORTS]

“I always believed the three rivers were a great place for urban adventure.”

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News 06 Views 14 Weird 15 Music 24 Arts 32 Events 37 Taste 40

Screen 44 Sports 48 Classifieds 51 Crossword 51 Astrology 52 Savage Love 53 The Last Word 55 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

RIDE FREE

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M A I N F E AT U R E

Visit Change.HealthyRidePGH.org

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THIS WEEK

“IF YOU DON’T OWN A BIKE, HEALTHY RIDE, PITTSBURGH’S BIKE SHARE, HAS YOU COVERED.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Hundreds H d d participated ti i t d iin a “Black Brilliance” march in Homewood over the weekend. Read our story about the event at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Last week marked the fifth annual Style Week Pittsburgh. Check out our photo essay from the Designer Fashion Show at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

CP recently joined ProPublica’s Documenting Hate project, aimed at collecting reports of hate crimes and bias incidents. If you’ve been a victim or a witness, tell us your story at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Students get off the 71 bus, a popular student route.

MULTIMODAL TRANSPORT

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Our student travel guide and recommendations for walking, biking, driving, and using public transit and ride-hailing apps {BY RYAN DETO}

G

ETTING AROUND Pittsburgh can be

Our featured photo from last week is by @lewisatlarge. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

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intimidating. Many streets have small road signs, or none at all, and some intersections resemble deformed starfish, instead of modern infrastructure. (And the hills, the never-ending hills.) This can lead college students to avoid venturing beyond their college neighborhoods. Pittsburgh City Paper says, “Screw that”; break out of the bro bars and corporate coffee shops that cater to you. Explore our wonderful city, with its scores of distinct neighborhoods, pleasant public parks and cultural institutions. To take in all these attractions, CP offers you a

handy guide on all the different ways to get around Pittsburgh, with tips, secrets and advice. Onward and up those hills!

PUBLIC TRANSIT If you are a student at University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University or Chatham University, and you aren’t taking the bus or the T (what we call our light-rail system), you’re literally throwing money down the drain. Students and faculty at those universities merely need to tap their school IDs on buses and light-rail cars for free rides. Students at Carlow University, Point Park University and Robert Morris University can

ride for $1 after 7 p.m. on the weekdays, and all day on weekends, as long as they present their IDs and pay in cash. To ride the bus, wait at a designated stop (look for a small blue sign). If there are cars parked near your stop or you are waiting in a shelter, it’s wise to step out to the curb as your bus arrives, so the driver can see you. Track the progress of your route using the TrueTime feature on the Port Authority of Allegheny County website (truetime.portauthority.org). Enter your bus-stop information in the “estimated arrival time” feature and remember to CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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Every story in the rainbow Stirring romances. Inspiring dramas. Uplifting biographies. Pride comes in many stories. Experience the vast collection of LGBTQ movies and shows on XFINITY X1. Explore the LGBTQ Film & TV collection on XFINITY On Demand or just say “Pride” or “LGBTQ” into the X1 Voice Remote to find exciting, new entertainment curated especially for you – all year long.

I am Jazz available at xfinity.com/stream

El Canto Del Colibri available on XFINITY Stream app

Discover more about the LGBTQ Film & TV Collection at xfinity.com/findyourself Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. © 2017 Comcast. All rights reserved.

DIV17-201-A13-V2

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check whether you are heading inbound or outbound. You can also enter your bus route into the “vehicle location map” feature to track the bus’ progress. If you live in Oakland, you might ride the 54, which travels from the North Side to the South Side through Oakland. If you’re on the 54 heading to the North Side, you’re inbound. You’re heading outbound on the 54 if you’re going toward the South Side. For most other routes, inbound is toward Downtown and outbound is away from Downtown. When your bus arrives, enter through the front door and pay by tapping your student ID or ConnectCard (visit www. connectcard.org to find where to purchase a ConnectCard), or pay cash. It’s $2.50 for a one-way trip using a ConnectCard and $2.75 if you’re paying in cash. When your stop is near, pull the cord near the windows or hit the small red button near a rear exit to request a stop. Exit through any door.

CHEERLEADERS PITTSBURGH 3100 LIBERTY AVENUE PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-281-3110

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.

Riding the light rail in Downtown or to the North Side is free. If you continue riding across the Monongahela River and into the South Hills, you have to pay ($2.50 using ConnectCard or $2.75 cash) at the front of the car. Currently, riders from the South Hills heading inbound pay as they enter, and outbound riders pay as they exit. Starting sometime in the fall, light-rail riders will observe an honor system, and will pay by either tapping their cards on receptacles located on the platform or stop, or as they enter the car. Port Authority spokesperson Adam Brandolph says Port Authority will have a booth set up at Pitt’s Arrival Survival, or welcome week, to offer advice to students on how to ride the bus and the T. More information can be found at www.portauthority.org.

BIKING Rejoice Oakland students: Biking just got a lot safer in the heavily trafficked neighborhood. Pittsburgh recently installed more bike lanes in Oakland, on Forbes Avenue and Bigelow Boulevard (and more are on the way for Forbes near CMU). When cycling, remember to follow Pennsylvania state driving rules and learn to use your hand signals when turning and stopping. It’s recommended that you ride in bike lanes and in the righthand section of roads, but this is NOT a requirement. Any time cyclists feel the need (especially if they feel unsafe on the road), they are entitled to take the entire driving lane. Local bike-advocacy organization Bike Pittsburgh recently updated its Biking 101

guide with expert tips; you can pick up a guide for free from your local public library or at the Bike Pittsburgh offices, in Lawrenceville. Bike Pittsburgh also has a list of how-to videos available at www.bikepgh.org. Its website also has a map of the city that provides all the best and safest cycling routes; paper copies of the map are widely available at bike stores. If you don’t own a bike, Healthy Ride, Pittsburgh’s bike share, has you covered. The bike share has 50 stations located throughout the city, and most are in neighborhoods familiar to students (Downtown, Oakland, Shadyside and South Side); a station map and instructions on how to ride are available at www.healthyridepgh.com. Healthy Ride costs $2 for 30 minutes, and bikes can now be returned to any station, regardless of whether docks are available (just insert the bike lock into the front-wheel base and hit the “OK” button on the bike’s keypad). Membership costs $12 a month and includes unlimited 30-minute rides. Riders can try out a Healthy Ride for free; just follow the instructions at change.healthyridepgh.org.

WALKING Pittsburgh is a walking town. According to U.S. Census figures, about 11 percent of residents commute via two feet, one of the highest percentages in the country. Ironically, however, the neighborhoods with high percentages of pedestrians, like Oakland and the South Side, don’t always feel safe for walkers. CP advises walkers to always look both ways, even when given a walk signal, and keep your eyes on cars as much as you can. Intersections on Fifth Avenue in Oakland should be crossed with caution since there’s a counter-flow, bus-only lane, and speeding among drivers is common. This also holds true for intersections on Baum Boulevard in North Oakland, and Boulevard of the Allies, Downtown. Regardless, CP also wants to empower students to walk. Walking is an effective way to get around Pittsburgh, since the city is relatively compact, and driving or taking public transit can sometimes be confusing. Also, the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota says regular, brisk walking comes with many health benefits, including preventing heart disease and high blood pressure, as well as strengthening muscles and improving your mood. And if you live in Oakland and want to walk to South Side, CP suggests taking the trail through Panther Hollow. From Oakland, CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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We’ve made it simple! We’ve now made it even easier to purchase or reload your ConnectCard. Riders can now buy a card, purchase a pass or stored cash value and check their balance at over 150 ConnectCard sites throughout Allegheny County including: Port Authority’s Downtown Service Center, most area Giant Eagle stores, Goodwill stores, independent retailers, dozens of ConnectCard Vending Machines and online. For more information, go to connectcard.org.

...............................………………PortAuthority.org NEWS

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walk down Joncaire Street from Bouquet Street (or take the secret staircase behind Mazerowski Field and the Henry Clay Frick Library Building). Follow Boundary Street until the trailhead appears on your left. Then, just follow trail markers all the way to the Hot Metal Bridge, which crosses the Monongahela River to South Side. This route is about 90 percent car-free and very pleasant.

Uber statement sent to CP reads: “Uber is asking students to doublecheck two important details the app provides — the driver and the vehicle — to make sure the information matches up before starting a trip.” Pittsburgh also has a local, taxi-run ride-hailing app called zTrip. This service allows riders to request a ride in the moment or book ahead, and riders have the option to pay with cash or a credit card. Drivers at zTrip are also required to pass background checks, and rides never have surge pricing. The app can be downloaded at www.ztrip.com. Promo codes are available on each ride-hailing company’s website.

RIDE-HAILING Since college students live in a time of smartphone ubiquity, many are aware of how to use ride-hailing apps, which are pretty self-explanatory. Both Uber and Lyft service Pittsburgh, and apps can be downloaded from each company’s website. Andrew Woolf, general manager of Lyft Pennsylvania, reminds students that Lyft now offers a Round Up and Donate option, where riders can give to charitable causes like the World Wildlife Fund, the USO and the Human Rights Campaign.

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An Uber spokesperson says students should be wary of driver scams, and that rides can be requested only through the app. An

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If you’re a student with a car, CP advises you to study the route before heading out. Driving in Pittsburgh is filled with barely marked intersections and quirky rules. Stay alert for Pittsburgh’s many one-way streets and turn-only lanes. Drive the speed limit, respect bikes on the road, and watch for pedestrians. If we all realize that we have places to be and different methods to get there, our respective journeys will be less stressful and more enjoyable. RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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HIGHERPRICED ED According to a new report, Pennsylvanians graduate with country’s highest studentloan debt {BY REBECCA ADDISON} LAST WEEK, Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro announced a proposed settlement that would provide $6.7 million in debt relief for 1,200 Pennsylvanians who attended for-profit colleges. The proposal is part of a broader settlement worth $192 million in debt relief for former Corinthian Colleges students across the country. The now-defunct Corinthian Colleges operated Everest Institute in Pittsburgh, along with 30 other schools nationwide, before going bankrupt in 2015. According to Shapiro, Corinthian Colleges misrepresented their job-placement rates and career-support services to persuade students to enroll. Corinthian also worked with Aequitas Capital Management, a now-defunct investment firm, to avert federal guidelines that limit the access for-profit schools have to federal education funds.

{CP PHOTO BY STEPHEN CARUSO

In November, hundreds marched as part of a student-debt protest in Oakland.

“Aequitas and Corinthian Colleges engaged in predatory practices that preyed upon students trying to better themselves through education,” Shapiro said in a statement. “This proposed settlement will provide badly-needed debt relief for 1,200 Pennsylvania students. I will con-

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tinue to protect Pennsylvania college students and their families by holding these for-profit institutions and lenders accountable for their deceptive practices.” Since he took office, Shapiro has taken several actions to protect students. Last month he signed onto a lawsuit filed against Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and the U.S. Department of Education, which had decided to abandon federal rules protecting students from predatory lending practices. But fighting against predatory lending is only a small part of the fight to reduce student-loan debt. Increasing tuition at higher-education institutions around the country are a large part of the problem. This month, national student-loan debt surpassed the $1.3 trillion mark, and more than 25 percent of student-loan borrowers are currently in default. According to a report released this month by LendEdu, a debt-refinancing company, Pennsylvania is the state with the highest average student debt per borrower. And the report found that on average, students graduating from Pittsburgharea institutions have more debt than the $35,185 state average. This data comes from the research group Peterson’s annual financial-aid survey that collected responses from 1,161 institutions. The survey is voluntary, so some schools are not included in LendEdu’s report. According to the report, of the 59 percent of Duquesne University students who leave school with debt, that debt averages $41,272. At Point Park University, 80 percent of students graduate with

debt averaging $26,729. Eighty-two percent of Robert Morris University students graduate with debt averaging $39,431. Chatham University has similar statistics: 83 percent of students average $37,734 in debt. Of all local colleges, fewer students graduate from the University of Pittsburgh with debt, at 65 percent, but their debt averages $38,612. Despite such statistics, in July, the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education board of governors voted to increase tuition at 14 state universities by 3.5 percent. “It’s deeply disappointing that the leadership of Pennsylvania’s public higher-education institutions would place a heavier anchor around the necks of students trying to prepare for tomorrow’s jobs,” Pennsylvania Treasurer Joe Torsella said in a statement. “Pennsylvania’s higher-education system is in desperate need of reform and reinvestment, not further tuition increases.” The increase came in response to a $71.7 million budget gap facing the 14 state universities this fiscal year. But critics say it’s unfair to place the burden of filling that gap onto students. “I see the impacts that the Commonwealth’s higher-education policy has on our state’s families,” Torsella said. “With 95 percent of newly created jobs requiring post-secondary education, we need to have a much bolder conversation about how we are assisting our students to get the education they need. Forcing overburdened families to pay more is not the right path forward.” While at the federal level, Education Secretary DeVos seem to be moving away from protections for students, Pennsylvania legislators are continuing the fight to make higher education more affordable. This year, state Sen. Daylin Leach reintroduced legislation to create a public fund that would allow students to attend a state university “with no money down.” The “loan” would be interest-free and, after graduation, students would pay back a percentage of their monthly salary (4 percent) into the fund. “According to the Institute for College Access & Success, 70 percent of Pennsylvanians who graduated from college in 2011 did so with student debt, the average amount of which was $30,000,” Leach said in a statement. “Both of these numbers are higher than the national average, and I believe it is time for the legislature to act meaningfully to ensure young Pennsylvanians are not overburdened by debt as they begin their professional careers.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

STATUE LIMITATIONS {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} WITHOUT A DOUBT, one of the most unfor-

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gettable moments in contemporary American history is the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas. If you go to Dealey Plaza, where the crime occurred, there are a lot of memorials marking that horrible occasion. You can even visit the Sixth Floor Museum in the former Texas School Book Depository. That’s the spot from which JFK’s killer, Lee Harvey Oswald, fired his rifle at the president, seated in an open-top convertible driving through the plaza. Go to this museum and you can look at the exhibits — photos, films and other collections that detail the tragedy. You’ll even find information about Kennedy’s killer. In the blocks surrounding the museum, there are other memorials to Kennedy, including a bronze statue located outside of the Hilton Hotel where Kennedy had stayed the night before he died. But one thing that you may be surprised isn’t located anywhere in the city is a statue of Lee Harvey Oswald. Not one. Let’s be honest: This moment in U.S. history wouldn’t have been possible without Oswald, yet no one saw fit to erect a statue to commemorate his role. Perhaps a statue of Oswald kneeling, rifle in hand, lining up the shot. Sound ridiculous? Of course, it’s ridiculous. It’s as ridiculous as having a statue of Martin Luther King’s assassin, James Earl Ray, outside the former Lorraine Motel in Memphis (now the National Civil Rights Museum), where King was gunned down. It’s as crazy as putting up a statue of Timothy McVeigh in Oklahoma City. It’s a thought so absurd that it’s not even worth talking about, even as a hypothetical, right? Apparently, though, it is — because when you defend keeping the statues of Confederate “dignitaries” like Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Jefferson Davis, you’re making that argument. Lee was a domestic terrorist. So were Davis, Jackson, P.G.T. Beauregard, Joseph Johnston, Alfred Mouton and the rest of the Confederacy. They weren’t fighting for some now-romanticized Southern way of life, which involved sitting in a rocking chair on the front porches of their plantations, sipping mint juleps and watching the sunset with an old hound dog at their feet. They were fighting to keep the right to continue owning and brutalizing the black slaves working in their fields, so they could maintain their actual way of life and, more importantly, the South’s economy. At this point, we know the reasons why

The Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Va.

the statues were erected decades after the Civil War and well into the 20th century. They were built so the Southern terrorists could save face after their jihad was put down. They were also erected to make sure free black Americans were reminded that they weren’t really free, thanks to Jim Crow. Former Confederate President Jefferson Davis has countless statues in his image. But let’s put him in context: He led a Southern secession from the United States, then launched an attack on this country. He led an uprising so he could keep slavery legal — and he lost. He was charged with treason, but never stood trial; he was pardoned in 1868. A man who once said that blacks were “inferior, fitted expressly for servitude” has his name on many high schools throughout the South, including one in Montgomery, Ala. That school has a student population that is 92 percent African American and they have to sit daily in a building named after a man who believed they were “inferior.” Before secession, Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee did serve the United States faithfully. But I will never be able to put them on a higher plane than terrorists like McVeigh, Eric Rudolph, Dylann Roof or even Osama bin Laden. These men are remembered only for their attacks on this country. But, really, the same holds true for Confederate soldiers. Benedict Arnold was one of the greatest soldiers in this nation’s history but we don’t honor him for that, we rightfully revile him as a traitor. Confederate history shouldn’t be erased, but it certainly shouldn’t be honored. The defense of these statues is often tied to the white supremacists, KKK members and neo-Nazis that we saw in Charlottesville. But our president tells us that there were “very fine people” out there in favor of keeping these statues. And while those people may not have been yelling racial slurs and committing vehicular homicide on innocent counter-protesters, their inability and unwillingness to see why these statues are vile are as big a part of the problem as the people who were. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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News of the Weird

Back to school Book Bag Drive August 23 noon-5pm

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S ITE M S TO WE IR DNE WST IPS@A M U N IVE RS A L . CO M .

{COMPILED BY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUBLISHING}

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Odessa, Texas, resident Ernesto Baeza Acosta, 34, has legally changed his name to Ernesto Trump and declared himself the son of President Trump. His NSFW Facebook page features photographs of Ernesto wearing a Trump-like wig and asks viewers to “Please share this so that my Dad your president can see this and spend time with me.” Ernesto is a fan of President Trump, but his immigrant mother is unamused about his name change.

David Blackmon identified himself as a drug dealer when he called the Okaloosa (Fla.) County Sheriff’s Office on July 16 to report that $50 in cash and a quarterounce of cocaine had been stolen from his car. When officers investigated, they found a baggie with “suspected cocaine,” a crack pipe and a crack rock in the car. Blackmon was charged with possession of cocaine and drug paraphernalia.

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Everett Lee Compton Jr., 49, told Siloam Springs, Ark., police that marijuana “makes him do sick things” after they apprehended him for abusing female donkeys. The donkeys’ owners, Emert and Joyce Whitaker, had set up a surveillance camera and recorded Compton on three occasions putting a bag over a donkey’s head and placing his pelvis against its rear end. “It just made me sick to my stomach,” said Joyce Whitaker. “To know that she couldn’t tell nobody and that she was having to go through this.”

Alana Nicole Donahue, 27, of Springfield, Ore., just wanted to entertain her children and nephew with a joy ride around the neighborhood. But on July 12, as she pulled the kids (ages 2, 4 and 8) behind her Ford Taurus in a plastic red wagon, she was arrested for reckless endangerment. Donahue told police she was just “showing the kids a good time.” However, horrified witnesses saw the car going about 30 mph as the wagon went up on two wheels going around a busy traffic circle at rush hour.

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A security robot named Steve suffered a soggy fatal error on July 17 when it tumbled down several steps and into a fountain in Washington, D.C. New to the job, the robot had been patrolling the Washington Harbour area of Georgetown, mapping out its features in an effort to prevent just such an accident. “He looked so happy and healthy,” an area mourner tweeted after the incident. Another observer was less sympathetic. “Robots: 0; humans: 1,” he tweeted.

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Two AT&T utility workers apparently didn’t work fast enough on lines outside the home of Jorge Jove, 64, of Hialeah, Fla., on July 19. After confronting the workers, Jove went back into his house, came out carrying a gun and began shooting at the AT&T trucks, deflating the tires. Jove reloaded twice and shot at the trucks’ engines before aiming at Gilberto Ramos, a service worker who was up on a utility pole. Jove was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

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Also in China, the Global Harbour mall in Shanghai has introduced husband storage facilities for bored men who have accompanied their wives shopping. The glass pods include a chair, monitor, computer and game pad where parked husbands can play vintage video games while their wives shop. Reaction from pod dwellers has been mixed, with one man saying the lack of ventilation left him “drenched in sweat.”

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About a week after police in Minneapolis killed unarmed Justine Ruszczyk after she called to report an assault, orange signs began popping up on streetside poles depicting a jumping police officer with a gun in each hand and the warning, “Twin Cities Police Officers Easily Startled.” Minneapolis police department spokeswoman Sgt. Catherine Michal said on July 24 that public-works employees were removing the signs, which were made of metal and resembled traffic signs.

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Barbara Rogers, 42, of Coolbaugh Township, Pa., said she was just following directions when she shot her boyfriend, Steven Mineo, 32, in the forehead on July 15. Rogers said Mineo asked her to kill him because he thought a cult they belonged to was led by a reptilian pretending to be a human. Rogers called 911 to report the shooting, after which she was charged with criminal homicide.

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{ILLUSTRATION BY CAITLIN ROSE BOYLE}

COLLEGE GUIDE Here at Pittsburgh City Paper we wanted to give you something different, which is why our College Guide is written by students, for students. Together, as sophomores, juniors and seniors from Point Park, Robert Morris, Duquesne and Pitt, we know a little bit about what it means to be a college student today, and a lot about what it’s like to be a college student in Pittsburgh. College is both a time and a place. It’s a time when you’re learning how to exist independently from your parents and your friends from high school, and a place where there are new people to meet in every class, club and elevator. It’s a time when you’ll make more and bigger decisions than you’ve ever made in your life, and a place where you’ll learn what you want and how to get it. We want to help you make the best of this time and the most of this place. In this guide, you’ll find information about living on and off campus, making money while you’re a student and learning to do things on your own. We’ll show you how to buy your textbooks, what apps you should download, and where to hang out when you’re too young for the bars. We’ll clue you in to how trigger-warnings function on campus, and what it’s like to be a professor right now. Like pretty much everything else in life, you get out of college what you put into it. And we’re here to help, because at the end of the day we’re all under this giant mountain of student-loan debt together, right? BY HALEY FREDERICK

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BROUGHT TO YOU BY OUR SUMMER INTERNS:

Something happens right around the time you turn 18 — every adult you meet starts talking to you about one thing and one thing only: college. Whether they’re asking you what school you’ve chosen or what path of study you’ve picked, whether they’re giving you antiquated advice or telling you their glory-days stories, it all tends to be a little stale.

Name: Carley Bonk

Name: Haley Frederick

Age: 21 Major: Journalism College: Point Park University Graduation Year: 2018

Age: 21 Major: Nonfiction writing College: University of Pittsburgh Graduation Year: 2018


{CP PHOTO BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

PRICE CUT Students are finding ways to reduce textbook costs {BY MATTHEW PETRAS}

A

LOOK AT my Amazon order history

shows that when I was an incoming freshman at Point Park University, in 2014, my family and I spent $254.84 on textbooks. I distinctly remember how proud I was, at the time, of how low I was able to get the price. Not long into my first semester, a variety of factors made me realize I didn’t need to spend even half of that. The rising cost of textbooks and the staggering amounts of money students and their families spend on them every year remains a pertinent issue, but there are ways of reducing that burden. According to the 2016 report Covering the Cost, between 2006 and 2016, textbook costs rose 73 percent, or about four times the rate of inflation. The report, released by the nonprofit Student Public Interest Research Groups, was filled with data

concerning the cost of college textbooks, how students pay for them, and the best solutions to pursue. “The college-textbook industry is a multibillion-dollar market every year,” report co-author Ethan Senack said in a phone interview. “And when you place it in the context of broader education-funding challenges, [it] can be a real barrier to students who are already struggling to pay for college.” A core issue, Senack argues, is the “disassociation between the person who actually pays for the book and who chooses the product.” What he means is that the textbook publishers convince college faculty to assign a book, but then it’s students who must fork over the cash for something they never chose in the first place. “I think that’s why you see so many students choose to not purchase textbooks, or share with a friend, or rent from the library

— to opt out of that system.” said Senack, currently the outreach and policy manager for Creative Commons USA, and formerly a higher-education advocate at US PIRG, an advocacy group focusing on issues like money in politics and health care. Robert Bertha, Point Park University’s United Student Government president, attended both the Community College of Allegheny County and the University of Pittsburgh Johnstown before coming to Point Park. One thing he’s learned since he was an incoming freshman is that sometimes you really don’t need to purchase the textbook the professor assigns. “After the first week, you can get a feel,” he said in a phone interview, adding he’s usually been able to spend under $100 each semester on textbooks. But while Bertha’s expenditure is substantially below average, shopping around for lower prices is a growing trend. Students on average spent $579 on required course materials during the 201617 academic year, which is actually down $23 from the year before, and down $122 from 2007-’08, according to a report from the National Association of College Stores. “They’re not buying less, they’re shopping smarter,” the report says. University book stores do not always offer the lowest prices, but Point Park, Carlow University, Robert Morris University and La Roche College’s bookstores all offer price-matching. The University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University do not, but do display competing prices from other retailers, like Amazon. There are also more ambitious and macro ideas on cutting costs, like open textbooks, something Senack advocates. Open textbooks have an open copyright and can therefore be distributed with little to no costs associated, bypassing the issue of inflated textbook prices. “[Publishers] can raise prices as much as they want, for as long as they want,” Senack says. “And they’ve done so.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

FIVE USEFUL APPS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS {BY CARLEY BONK}

EasyBib Generate citations in multiple styles by scanning the barcode of a book. This app cuts down on the time it takes to type out full citations.

Transit Need help finding your way around? This app gives you real-time transit options in more than 125 cities.

Top Hat This is an interactive learning tool for students and professors on the go. Instructors can easily use it to create interactive textbooks, quizzes and homework.

Brainscape Flashcards This is possibly one of the most useful apps students can use to study on the go. You can create, share and find flashcards and audio lessons on a variety of subjects.

Duolingo Name: Krista Johnson

Name: Hannah Lynn

Name: Jordan Miller

Name: Matt Petras

Age: 21 Major: Photography and Journalism College: Robert Morris University Graduation Year: 2018

Age: 22 Majored in: English writing College: University of Pittsburgh Graduated: Spring 2017

Age: 19 Major: Psychology College: Duquesne University Graduation Year: 2019

Age: 21 Major: Journalism College: Point Park University Graduation Year: 2018

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Learning another language has never been easier. This app, created by Pittsburgh developers, makes it simple to practice multiple languages in everyday settings for free.

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COLLEGE GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

TIPS FOR MANAGING STRESS {BY KRISTA JOHNSON}

Relax

HARDLY SUPPLEMENTAL Why your adjunct professors are unionizing

College can be overwhelming. Recognize this, but don’t let it bring you down. Take a deep breath and get ready to tackle all of your tasks. Try meditating.

Prioritize

and what it means for you

Address what tasks are most important and need to be handled ASAP. But don’t let this give you an excuse to procrastinate on other projects; work on them little by little every day.

I

Take a break Often you will get caught up in exams and assignments, but don’t forget to have fun. As cliché as it sounds, college really is one of the best times of your life, so go grab lunch with your friends.

Work out Exercise has been proven to reduce stress. It will get your body moving and your mind off your work for a little while. Take a walk around campus, or try yoga.

Plan Planners and agendas are your best friends. They will help you keep up with your priorities, appointments, work schedules and social functions.

Sleep Take a nap. Sometimes your brain needs a break. When you wake up, you’ll be able to focus better. Studying before sleeping helps you retain more information.

Switch it up Not everyone can focus in a dorm room when studying. Find out in which environment you are most productive. Change locations, clean your room, plug in your headphones, or turn off the TV.

T’S NOT NEWS to anyone that college

tuition continues to increase locally and across the nation. But are those dollars actually making their way into the classroom? Between the years 2001 and 2011, the cost of tuition at public four-year colleges increased by 73 percent, while the compensation of faculty increased by only 6 percent, according to the nonprofit organization College Board. During this time, and since, the growing practice of giving part-time and shortterm contracts to instructors at universities has decreased their job security and wages. This has left many professors feeling inadequately supported to provide students with the kind of education they deserve. “[Students] have a very reasonable expectation, which is that if they’re paying a lot of money for their education, that that money is going to provide a quality education,” says Paul Johnson, an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh. “It’s going to be paying for people who have the time and the resources and the institutional support to be able to get together and work with and teach students with some expectation of consistency, professionalism and certainty.” Part-time instructors, commonly called “adjuncts” — which indicates how often their positions are treated as supplementary rather than essential — are struggling not only to be the kind of teachers they want to be in the classroom, but also to find financial stability. Many instructors are forced

{BY HALEY FREDERICK}

to take on extra work, either by teaching at multiple universities at once, or by finding other jobs altogether. Sarah Leavens, a lecturer at Pitt, used to work late nights at a bakery even though she had to teach in the morning because her income as an adjunct wasn’t enough. “As an adjunct, you don’t know if you’re going to have a job in three months,” Leavens says. “You probably can’t make car payments. You can’t buy a house. So you’re living semester to semester — everything is insecure. You’re housing-insecure; you’re maybe transportation-insecure. So there are all of these life things that you have to worry about regularly, in addition to just not being able to pay your bills or maybe afford food, that take up a lot of time and energy.” Josh Zelesnick, another adjunct professor, says that adjuncts are right to worry. Once, just three weeks before the start of the semester, Zelesnick had both of his classes at Pitt canceled, and another canceled at Duquesne. So while he expecting the income from teaching four classes, he was left with just one. “This happens to [adjunct] professors all the time,” Zelesnick says. Issues like these are why many universities’ faculties, adjuncts and graduate students are seeking to unionize. Adjuncts in the McAnulty College at Duquesne elected to unionize in 2012, but

the university is currently challenging that election in court. Point Park’s faculty elected to unionize over a year ago and is negotiating its first contract. The school’s adjuncts also unionized and signed their first contract in 2015. The adjuncts at Robert Morris University unionized and reached their first contract agreement just this summer. Pitt’s faculty is now attempting to follow suit, organizing across ranks to include all faculty — from adjunct to tenured — in one union. Pitt graduate students are also hoping to form their own union. While this may sound only abstractly related to students, instructors insist that at the core of their unionizing efforts is a desire to bring the focus of their universities back to the classroom. “The faculty working conditions are the student learning conditions,” says Tyler Bickford, an assistant professor at Pitt. “If faculty aren’t being paid enough, and they have to take extra jobs, in a very direct way they don’t have the same amount of time to focus on individual students. But it’s not just salaries, it’s working conditions. As classes are larger, or there are more students in each class, as faculty workloads increase, then teachers don’t have as much time to spend on students, so education becomes more automated and less personal.” Point Park graduates Samey Jay and Ren Finkel advocated for Point Park faculty through the Student Solidarity Organization by handing out pins, circulating petitions and holding protests. “Our money is going to more administrative costs rather than to the professors who are doing the actual work of educating the students,” Jay says. “So many of [our professors] go so above and beyond the basics, and they should be rewarded for that,” Finkel says. “When you’re in a higher-education setting, it’s so much more than having information thrown at you and taking tests. It’s about developing yourself as a person, developing yourself in the field you want to go into, and the professors are the ones that provide that.” If students at other universities feel the same, Jay and Finkel encourage them to stand up in support of their instructors and in support of their own education. “You have to be active and involved in your community, and your community is your campus,” Jay says. “If you want to get the best education that you can for the investment that you’re making, then you need to be invested in that community.”

“AS AN ADJUNCT, YOU DON’T KNOW IF YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE A JOB IN THREE MONTHS.”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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COLLEGE GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

FIVE PERKS YOU CAN GET WITH YOUR STUDENT ID {BY MATTHEW PETRAS}

Tickets for students are just $11.95 at the Carnegie Museum of Art, or free if you go to selected colleges, including Chatham University or Carlow University.

COLLEGE LIVING

Visit the Mattress Factory art museum for just $10, or for free if you go to Point Park University or Carnegie Mellon University.

Students must weigh all residential options in and around campus to determine what will work best for them {BY CARLEY BONK}

Stay informed using student discounts for news outlets like The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

You can get Amazon Prime, which nets you deals and free two-day shipping, free for six months, and then after that, it’s 50 percent off.

Listen to some tunes to help power through studying with a 50 percent student discount on an Apple Music or Spotify subscription — just $4.99 a month.

M

OV I N G AWAY fr o m h ome

for the first time can be an overwhelming experience for many college students. During freshmen year, many consider living on campus; some are required to do so by the university. But your first residential environment will likely influence where you decide to live for the rest of your college experience. Take Jonathon Wishnow. Now a University of Pittsburgh senior, Wishnow lived in Litchfield Tower B during his freshmen year. But due to his experience there, he was eager to find his own place afterward. “My roommate was a self-proclaimed anarchist who showered about once a week. We ended up having cockroaches because of his side of the room,” Wishnow says. Students must weigh all residential options in and around a college campus to determine what will work best for them.

Will it be the dorms, on-campus apartments or a house off-campus? Wishnow moved into Bouquet Gardens his sophomore year. Though still a part of campus, Wishnow found more freedom and comfort in the four-bedroom house with a kitchen that rented for $4,800 a semester. “I found the meal plan on campus kind of restrictive. Many of the restaurants are owned and operated by the campus, so they have the ability to mark up prices,” Wishnow says. “Having a kitchen can really help cut costs.” Wishnow is not alone in his desire to be able to cook his own meals. Faith Thaler, a Pitt senior, lived on campus her first two years, but eventually made the move away as well. “It’s cheaper if you can find a deal, and you definitely have more freedom,” Thaler says. “Grocery shopping and cooking can really help you save money.”

The cost of campus housing for freshmen at Pitt, Duquesne University, Point Park University and Carnegie Mellon University varies. Per-semester rates for standard dorms range from $2,610 at Point Park to $4,030 for the most affordable option at CMU. Though this price may seem cheaper than renting off campus, students must consider the cost of meal plans that can easily add more than $1,000 in expenses per semester. Garrett Mateljan, a Duquesne junior, recognized the benefits of living on campus during his time as a freshman at St. Martin’s residence hall. “There are definitely pros of living on campus: You’re close to classes, there is easy access to food with meal swipes or flex [plans], and it’s easy to stay involved on campus,” Mateljan says. “Now I live in the South Side because it’s cheaper and I have more responsibility. It helps with life lessons like money management.” Wishnow, who currently lives in a two-bedroom house on the South Side Slopes for $350 a month on a subletting agreement, says that because of his type-A personality, off-campus living ultimately suited him best. “It was nice as a freshman not to have as many responsibilities, but it’s so liberating to have your own house,” Wishnow says. “I was able to explore common interests on campus through clubs and mutual friends, which makes finding a good roommate a lot easier later on.” And Pitt’s Thaler says less can be more when it comes to choosing a place and people to share it with. She currently lives in a two-bedroom house in South Oakland for $550 a month plus utilities. “Living g with a lot of other people can be difficult — sharing a small bathroom or one fridge,” Thaler haler says. “If you can find something affordable for two or three people, ople, it is definitely y worth checking out.”

INF O @PGH CI T Y PA P E R. C OM

FIVE WAYS TO MAKE MONEY IN COLLEGEE {BY JORDAN MILLER}

Be a dogwalker

Participate in a medical or research study

Drive for a ride-hailing company or delivery service

<< Jordan stops to take a selfie while walking a dog for dog-walking company Wag!

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Sell your own artwork

Sign up for a work study at your school


WHAT YOUR PARENTS TELL YOU ABOUT COLLEGE VS. WHAT IS ACTUALLY TRUE {BY HALEY FREDERICK}

on’t You d o go t have lass. to c

Don every ’t worry — o to be ne will wa (Or, d your frien nt on d. makin ’t worry — g frie is eas nds y.)

What your parents tell you:

The subject you major in will be the field that you make a career in.

Your fresh man roomma te will be your b est friend for life.

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CLOUD NOTHINGS

What’s true: Back in the day, nobody cared if you showed up to class as long as you passed the tests. These days, attendance is often part of your grade, with only two or three forgiven absences — which you should save for when you’re actually sick. While it’s true that you shouldn’t worry about making friends, you also shouldn’t sit back and wait for people to flock to you. Get out of your room, join clubs that interest you and hang out in the lounge, and you’ll have a group of friends in no time. The statistics vary, but most say that at least half of graduates will work in fields that they didn’t major in. Don’t panic if you’re not sure what to choose, or if what it says on your degree isn’t what you want to do. Currently, work experience tends to matter more than what you studied, so try to land internships in your desired field.

With special guests,

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So your dad’s freshman roommate ended up being the best man at his wedding — that isn’t the norm. Some people will be close with their roommates, but many won’t be. Don’t force a friendship if it’s not there. It’s better to have a roommate you’re casually acquainted with than one that you had a falling-out with.

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First of all, it could take you more than four years. Graduating in five or six years is fairly common these days, because of changing majors, transferring, or taking lighter class loads to keep a job through school. Second, just like every other time of your life, there is a mixture of good and bad. Sure, college is fun and exciting, but it is also a stressful, high-pressure time. Set your expectations realistically so that you don’t feel like the only one who isn’t living a non-stop party, because no one is.

FIVE THINGS TO DO IN PITTSBURGH IF YOU’RE UNDER 21 {BY JORDAN MILLER}

Visit Cruze Club on Thursdays + Listen to live music at the Mr. Roboto Project + Catch a movie on Bargain Mondays at SouthSideWorks Cinema + See a free show or movie in your local parks + Volunteer for a charity NEWS

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COLLEGE GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

university faculty members around the country, 51 percent responded that they had used trigger warnings, while 49 percent responded that they had not. And many say trigger warnings have been unfairly demonized by those critical of political correctness and of the censorship of offensive material. Goodhart believes comparing material that might simply offend someone to material that might traumatize is a false equivalency. “It seems to be the worst kind of denial about the reality of trauma in post-traumatic stress around things like sexual assault, to take one example,” he says. For a university to dismiss trigger warnings can also seem like a dismissal of mental-health issues. “We cannot claim to take mental health seriously, and then use disparaging or dismissive language when talking about the need for care or reasonable accommodation,” says Beaulieu. And contrary to popular belief, trigger warnings did not originate in college classrooms, but on micro-blogging platforms like Tumblr, around 2011. The site functions largely without regulations, and users learned to look out for themselves and each other. Posts with traumatizing content, like a picture of self-inflicted cuts, would be tagged (for example, “TW self-harm”), so users could block the posts. When teens who grew up in this environment started going to college, they brought trigger warnings into academia. “From the opponents, we frequently hear that the young are being coddled, or that certain individuals are restricting rights,” says Beaulieu. “That response seems to misconstrue what people need, which is to be heard, respected and validated when a boundary needs to be set.”

TRIGGERED Critics of trigger warnings on college campuses often miss the point {BY HANNAH LYNN}

P

ICTURE YOURSELF in a college classroom. While laying out assignments for the week ahead, the professor mentions that an assigned reading contains descriptions of sexual assault. Then a student who has experienced sexual assault expresses gratitude for the heads-up. This is an example of a trigger warning, and while it might seem simple enough, this kind of practice is at the center of a heated debate about college campuses. Professors and students have been widely criticized for embracing the practice, and it’s been added to the growing list of what critics say is wrong with millennials. But some say the controversy has been exaggerated. “As soon as we say ‘trigger warnings,’ we’ve invoked like this whole thing about free speech and academic freedom and coddled students, and all these sort

of tropes that come to mind. It’s become like a meme,” says Michael Goodhart, a professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh. A slew of panicked think-pieces and op-eds about trigger warnings have been produced in the past few years. In 2014, an article in Inside Higher Ed claimed the spread of trigger warnings was having a

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“chilling effect” in classrooms. In 2015, The Atlantic ran a cover story on the topic titled “The Coddling of the American Mind.” And in the fall of 2016, the University of Chicago’s dean of students sent a letter to the entire incoming freshmen class disparaging the use of triggers warnings on campus. One case frequently cited in articles criticizing the practice involves students at Rutgers University who requested trigger warnings on Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway because of the suicidal themes. But just how common are trigger warnings on college campuses? “I think that both the controversy and the assumed prevalence are wildly exaggerated,” says Julie Beaulieu, a gender, sexuality and women’s-studies professor at the University of Pittsburgh. However, in a survey released in 2016 by NPR, of 829 public- and private-

“IT’S BECOME LIKE A MEME.”

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Grocery shopping Cooking

Don’t buy a bunch of junk, but make sure you’re buying stuff you’ll actually have time to make. Grab-and-go snacks are OK, but go for healthier options.

All vegetable plants available for last minute planting!

Thanks to short cooking videos on the internet, it’s easier than ever to learn. If you’re living in a dorm, you likely have access only to a microwave, so check out some videos on mug meals.

Drink responsibly

If you’re going to do it, be smart about it. Don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know, or if you haven’t watched them pour it yourself. Know your limit.

Laundry

Separate white, dark and colored clothing. Follow instructions on tags. Add detergent, select settings and hit start. Throw clothes in the dryer, or hang to dry to save money.

Budgeting

Maybe you have only a certain amount of money on your student meal plan. Maybe you’re trying to juggle expenses living off campus. Creating a budget and sticking to it is key.

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Register to vote in Pittsburgh. Know your representatives and local leaders, and vote in every single election. And yes, you can register to vote at your dorm address.

Read local papers. While it’s important to keep up with the national news, it’s equally, if not more important, to keep up with the city you’re living in, via articles written by the people who live there. Fully commit to one or two student organizations, instead of half-assing five or six. Find a couple that you’re really passionate about. If there aren’t any that tickle your fancy, remember that every current student organization was started by a wayward student like you.

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Go to student-organized marches and rallies. This isn’t a partisan suggestion, and it doesn’t matter what side you’re on — it can even be educational to observe a rally of the opposing side.

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Follow local social-media accounts. In addition to memes about dogs, your social-media feeds should be peppered with accounts pertaining to the city you currently live in. This could be Mayor Bill Peduto, the chancellor of your school, every writer on the City Paper staff, local comedians, your favorite food truck, etc.

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LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES Ompha WHELMED SELF-RELEASED OMPHA.BANDCAMP.COM

Whelmed is a near half-hour of dreamy, reverb-drenched indie pop. The entire project was written, arranged and recorded by John Lora, whose airy tenor vocals join with catchy synths and danceable grooves to make for a unique sound. The EP is an introspective journey through places and people in Lora’s life. Each song scoops you up and places you into the mind and memories of Lora. While there are sparks of joy in certain sounds and movements, Whelmed is a gently sad effort with a wistful sheen to it. Whelmed comes to life with opener “Competitive Nature,” with its lone drum machines steering a bar before the clean guitar riff and layered vocals get to work. The lightness of “Competitive Nature” gives way to the almost-psychedelic grooves of “Fall Down,” a beachy, bass-driven voyage through memory. “Celestia Neglecta” anchors the middle of the EP with the driving, distorted guitars playing with minor keys and twinkling synths, all to espouse nostalgic longing. It’s the kind of song that would drift through your mind as you lay in the yard of your childhood home and stared up at the stars. Spacey triplets push “St. Argo” in a dizzying wave, the simplicity of the piano melody softening the edges. Grizzly Bear vibes abound on this track, its melancholy ambience mirroring that of that band’s 2006 album Yellow House. “Motivation” shuts the door on Whelmed with a floating feeling. The harmonies on this track are mesmerizing, soaring among the shining ambient synth soundscape gently pushing underneath them. It finishes the EP with the final declarative hit of a drum-machine beat left on its own, like the drum-machine beat that began it all. BY MEG FAIR

Are you a Hamilton super-fan? Have what it takes to fill Lin-Manuel Miranda’s boots? Do you have the nerve to lightly sass Mike Pence? You’ll get your chance this Saturday at Mr. Smalls, for a Hamilton soundtrack sing-along. All ages. More info at mrsmalls.com.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MIGUEL ROSARIO}

Downtown Boys

DESCOLONIZAR TU MENTE {BY MEG FAIR}

D

OWNTOWN BOYS make music that is

fully alive. Each chorus of gang vocals, each bright saxophone melody, each catchy bass riff has its own heartbeat. It forms an army of sound that encourages resistance and unapologetic living. The band is based in Providence, R.I. It came out of the What Cheer? Brigade side of the punk scene, but vocalist Victoria Ruiz explains on the phone that the band has never quite been a part of either the punk or indie scene. “We’ve never been part of a scene fully in Providence, but one thing we were able to do was support a lot of upcoming artists, young people, people of color from Providence,” says Ruiz. “We were always intentional of being part of that change, and we got the pressure and the pushback from the men who have been holding on to the industrial-noise and warehouse scene for over a decade. They are afraid to give up space, especially to women and people of color.” The band’s latest effort, Cost of Living,

08.23/08.30.2017

is an honest, vulnerable record. It’s one that leans into the battle for self-love in a systemically hateful world, a work that pushes back against misogyny, bigotry, racism and rampant nationalism. Cost of Living is a rallying cry into battle against the system and the way that system makes you feel.

DOWNTOWN BOYS 7 p.m. Tue., Aug. 29. Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. All ages. $12. www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3002331

It feels especially pertinent right now, as the KKK and neo-Nazis march in the streets, as Donald Trump continues his reign of terror and ignorance, and as immigrants feel less secure. “The songs were all written before the inauguration, before the election. They took about two years to write,” explains Ruiz. In the current political climate, the songs on Cost of Living, which contains

tracks in both English and Spanish, feel even more raw. “The temperature and climate right now, people are in the midst of a storm of everything going on with white supremacy, capitalism and racism,” says Ruiz. “The songs were written throughout the buildup, so it’s very intense to be coming out with this record, and all of the [negative] ways of the world are coming out too.” Downtown Boys is a political band, obviously. But to leave it at that would do a great disservice to a band whose politics are very important in the volatile period we’re living through. “The thing that ends up happening is writers act like we’re obsessed with politics, but they ignore the nuance and don’t dig deep,” explains Ruiz on the phone with CP. “They try to box you in, especially if you’re a person of color or woman.” There are many political bands. When one gets a lot of attention, some major publications have a tendency to push a hero narrative about a particular political


act, or an artist who exists and succeeds outside of the white-males-making-rock sphere. But singling out a particular artist as a leader in a movement, especially without that artist’s consult or approval, has a tendency to erase the larger message and activism an artist stands for. “I’m part of a history,” says Ruiz. “There are always people working on the same political goals in different ways.” Ruiz and guitarist Joey DeFrancesco co-run a website called Spark Mag, an online publication in partnership with Demand Progress. Demand Progress fights for civil liberties, runs anti-surveillance campaigns and advocates for net neutrality. It was started by Aaron Swartz, an activist who ended up taking his own life after he was sentenced to decades in prison for planning to make thousands of academic documents available to the public online for free. Spark Mag’s purpose is simple. It’s an alternate platform for artists whose art is political from the get-go. “It’s not so baseline. It’s not, ‘Are you a political band?’ Spark Mag is actually asking about the politics,” says Ruiz. “Asking if a band is political is such a tired question, and so many artists don’t get asked about their connection to the status quo. It’s a higher baseline and a place to showcase artists who maybe don’t have a platform elsewhere.” On Cost of Living, Ruiz’s lyrics dig deep into complex personal feelings alongside the political. “Instead of picking one emotion to write about, I try holding all the feelings about my personal world and public self, having to be a leader but also be directly affected by the systemic problems while being in the back doing the grunt work,” she says. “It’s a really cathartic process, and a way to process being part of the spectrum of emotions and experiences that don’t always make sense together.” This shines on “Somos Chulas,” a song that radiates intelligence and elegance, a song the band explains is about decolonizing your mind from the effects of white supremacy. “I Am Enough (I Want More)” is about loving yourself at your best and worst, working with what you’ve got, and never being afraid to demand a better world. Although the band is currently signed to Sub Pop, Downtown Boys continues to hustle with the fervor and intensity it did when the acts were signed to Sister Polygon and Don Giovanni. “Anyone who thinks we’re not still constantly grinding? It’s still a constant hustle, and we love it,” says Ruiz. “When we’re in front of a room of people we don’t know, I try subconsciously harder because it’s still about building a meaningful relationship.” ME GFA IR @ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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diesel C LU B | LO U N G E

UPCOMING CONCERTS

FAREWELL TO RACHEL B SHOW 8/25 | 7:00 P M | 21+

9/7 | 7:00 P M | 21+

UPCHURCH THE REDNECK 9/9 | 7:00 PM | AA Soda Club

[LOCAL BEAT]

SODA POP

9/ 1 4 | 9:00 P M | 18+

{BY JUSTIN VELLUCCI}

WILL HOGE

9/ 1 9 | 8:00 P M | 21+

9/20 I 8:00 PM I AA

9/28 | 7:00 PM | AA

“THESE GUYS ARE LIKE TALKING HEADS MEETS I DON’T KNOW WHAT.”

10/ 1 | 7:00 PM | AA

10/4 | 7:00 PM | AA

10/ 16 | 7:00 PM | AA

10/ 17 I 7:00 PM I AA

for tickets visit DIESELPGH.COM or Dave’s Music Mine (southside) 1801 e. carson st | pittsburgh |412.481.8800

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

IT STARTS with the muted, chikka-chikka strum of a Fender Telecaster electric guitar and the clacking metronome of drumsticks, while riffing on a slight, but healthy case of secret identity. “I show up to your Halloween party / without a costume on,” singer/guitarist Shay Park coos, her voice caressing the syllables of each word. “Everyone keeps asking me / who I am supposed to be.” This is the introduction to “Halloween Party,” and it’s the first song Pittsburgh’s Soda Club laid down last week when the band started recording its debut EP, Enjoy, at Broadcast Lane Studios in Homestead. “I think pop is such a misunderstood sound — people associate it with the Top 40 and there’s nothing wrong with that. But I want to reclaim pop,” Park says. “We’ve haven’t pinned [how to label our sound] down. ‘Hard twee’ was my favorite genre, but maybe that’s just because that’s the kind of music I envision making myself.” On this August afternoon, as producer Chris “Lurch” Rudyk set up microphones at his studio overlooking East Eighth Avenue, the members of Soda Club debated just what sound they were trying to capture on the four-song debut the quartet hopes to release this fall. “Lo-fi dream pop? Bedroom pop? Add ‘pop’ to all these words and you’ll get close,” singer/saxophonist Jarrett Krause says with a laugh. “It’s so nice when someone says to us, ‘It doesn’t fit into a niche,’” Park adds.

The music is certainly original. Park eschews distortion on her guitar, lending Soda Club a lot of straight lines and shimmer. Drummer Mason Jaynes provides a funky kind of groove, and Krause and bassist Tosh Chambers give the music, which showcases an inviting naiveté and innocence, its texture and color. “They’re their own thing,” Rudyk says between takes. “These guys are like Talking Heads meets I don’t know what. And Shay’s got this polite, almost British thing. ” The group was listening to playback near an enormous, digital tracking board channeled through vintage analog effects. Park mouthed the words to “Halloween Party,” Jaynes mimicked the drum patter by tapping his legs, and Rudyk offered commentary. “Can it swing?” Rudyk asks. “Really get into the ride [cymbal] there. We can overdub that. I really want to hear you get into a groove.” This was not everyone’s first trip to a studio. Jaynes and Chambers recorded a demo with their previous band, Pawn Scum, in Squirrel Hill in February 2016. That record, unfortunately, never saw the light of day. But it informed their selection of tracks to record. “Inevitably, we just went to the first four songs we wrote and changed a few things to make them feel new,” Krause says. It also informed the members’ sense of determination, which peppered conversation as they prepared to record with Rudyk. “We can’t turn this into the white whale,” says Park, referencing Moby-Dick. “We’ll nail it.” And then, they did.

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I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


NAZI PUNKS FUCK OFF {BY MEG FAIR} If you haven’t been living under the great rock of privilege, you are well aware of the fact that the KKK and neo-Nazis are in the streets, inflicting violence on people of color, Jews, queer folks and pretty much anyone they can get their mayonnaise-coated hands on, all in the name of defending “white culture,” or whatever. Taking to the streets to combat that kind of disgusting, reprehensible behavior requires a good pump-up playlist. Here is just a small playlist of songs that can be your soundtrack to crushing fascism and the whitesupremacist capitalist patriarchy that gives those fascists power. To quote local artist The Childlike Empress, “Fuck a pacifist. Pass a fist!”

+ “Kersed” by Ceremony + “The City” by the Chariot + “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” by Gil Scott-Heron + “Violent Complicity” by Downtown Boys + “My Turn” by SLOUCH + “The Only Good Fascist Is a Very Dead Fascist” by Propaghandi + “Chrome Exposed” by Show Me The Body + “Oh Bondage! Up Yours!” by X-Ray Spex + “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine + “Prison Song” by System of a Down + “I Will Spite Survive” by Deerhoof + “Not Sorry” by PUNCH + “Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck)” by Run the Jewels + “Blue Wall” by Issues + “Give Violence A Chance” by G.L.O.S.S. + “Colombia” by Anti-Diktatur + “We Will Continue to Break the Law and Destroy Property Until We Win” by Appalachian Terror Unit

alleghenycounty.us/summer

August 25 The Commonheart with The Telephone Line (Rock)

August 27 Billy Porter (Pop/Soul/Broadway) All concerts are free and begin at 7:30 p.m.

Food trucks and Hop Farm Brewing Company craft beer at all concerts beginning at 6:00 p.m. 3W S

+ “War Ready” by Vince Staples MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALYSSE GAFKJEN}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Lilly Hiatt

[INSTRUMENTAL] + FRI., AUG. 25 It would be unfair to call Kaki King simply a musician or a guitarist. Her current project, The Neck Is a Bridge to the Body, is a sonic and visual performance, as well suited for an art museum as it is a concert venue. King’s custom white guitar, which also serves as a projection screen, is hooked up to software that analyzes her sound as she’s playing and projects corresponding visuals on King, her guitar and her backdrop. I could keep describing it, but you might as well head over to the August Wilson Center tonight and see for yourself. Hannah Lynn 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25. All ages. 412-4566666 or www. trustarts.org

Swing over to our house!

Our season kicks off Sept. 22 with something for everyone including: • single tickets • season subscribtions • group sales • student discounts Named one of the best venues in the world by Downbeat Magazine for live Jazz. For concert information call 412.322.0800 or visit us at MCGJazz.org.

Follow us @mcgjazz.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

31 13

31 YEARS 13 SHOWS 3 FAN PIX 1 GREAT NEW SEASON

08.23/08.30.2017

[BROADWAY/ R&B] + SUN., AUG. 27 Hometown hero Billy Porter, star of Kinky Boots on Broadway, will return to his Pittsburgh roots with a free show tonight at Hartwood Acres as part of Allegheny County’s Summer Concert Series. Porter’s love of musicals extends to his solo work. His latest album, The Soul of Richard Rodgers, honors the Broadway songwriting legend by infusing classics like “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” and “The Lady Is a Tramp” with R&B beats, while also conveying a post-inauguration sense of resistance. For example, his version of The Sound of Music classic “Edelweiss” includes a contemporary interlude about flourishing despite the dark

times. HL 7:30 p.m. 4070 Middle Road, Allison Park. Free. All ages. www.alleghenycounty.us

[COUNTRY ROCK] + MON., AUG. 28 The music video for “The Night David Bowie Died” features Lilly Hiatt at a laundromat, driving and browsing the aisles of a dollar store, all while sporting Bowie’s signature lightning bolt across her face. It’s a reminder of how weird it feels to learn of a hero’s death while doing everyday activities. On her new album, Trinity Lane, the Nashville singer covers heartbreak and sobriety with her modern country-tinged rock. She plays Club Café tonight, along with Brooklyn singer-songwriter Brian Dunne. HL 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 21 and older. 412-431-4950 or www.club cafelive.com [FOLK] + TUE., AUG. 29 New York-based Wilsen comes to Billy Porter Mr. Smalls today with its dreamy songs that are basically lullabies for adults. This is not music for dancing, or even for walking down the street. This is music for pensively looking out your window at dawn when it’s just you and the birds. The latest album, I Go Missing in My Sleep, is a soft and slow one about heartbreak and hope, with plenty of melancholy guitar and nostalgic whistling. HL 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10-12. 18 and older. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 24 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Grunge Bob. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

FRI 25 DIESEL. Rachel B. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. GOOD TIME BAR. Fool’s Errand & Forever and a Day. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-9968. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Puddle of Mudd. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. After 87, Wait For It, Shin Guard, Horus Maze & Vantage Blue. 6 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Terrapin Flyer & The Clock Reads. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811.

SAT 26

VINOSKI WINERY. Millgroves BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Crossing. 6 p.m. Greensburg. The Weird Paul Rock Band. 10 p.m. 724-872-3333. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. WILKINS COMMUNITY DOWNEY’S HOUSE. CENTER COMPLEX. Uptown Good Guys. 8:30 p.m. Robinson. Rhythm & Brass. 7 p.m. 412-489-5631. Turtle Creek. 412-824-6650. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Velveeta. 9 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB THE LAMP THEATRE. & SPEAKEASY. Daryl Hard Days Night: Beatles Strodes. 8 p.m. North Side. Tribute Band. 7:30 p.m. 412-904-3335. Irwin. 724-367-4000. THE R BAR. Billy MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms the Kid’s Steel & Hard Rain w/ the Town All-Stars. Soulville Horns. 8 p.m. 7 p.m. Dormont. www. per 8th Street Rox. 9 p.m. a p 412-942-0882. pghcitym Blawnox. 412-828-2040. .co SHADYSIDE THE MR. ROBOTO NURSERY. Radio PROJECT. Radon Chong, Jarocho, Afro Yaqui Night Vapor, Nonzoo & Lake Lake. Collective & Gena y Pena. 7 p.m. Bloomfield. 5 p.m. Shadyside. REX THEATER. Billy Strings 412-251-6058. w/ The Hills and the Rivers. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk JAMES STREET GASTROPUB Night. 10 p.m. South Side. & SPEAKEASY. Wild Adriatic. 412-439-5706. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-381-6811.

SUN 27

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 28

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Dancing Queen. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

3603 BUTLER ST

PITTSBURGH, PA 15201

DISAPPEARINGINK.NET

724-972-7734

WED 30

MP 3 MONDAY

CATTIVO. The Grass is Dead. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-381-6811. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 7 Bridges. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

OMAR-ABDUL R. LAWRENCE PHOTO COURTESY OF ERICA BACKBERG}

DJS THU 24 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 25 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BELVEDERE’S. Down N Derby. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “C.I.D.C.,” from local hip-hop producer and artist Omar-Abdul R. Lawrence. (He’s also a community advocate for arts, social innovation and education.) You can find more of his old-school production and positive lyricism on his latest mixtape, Tilt the Axis. But first, stream or download “C.I.D.C.” on FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

SAT 26 DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

MIXTAPE. DJ Antithesis. ‘The 1990s (& a bag of chips)’ dance party. 9 p.m. Garfield. 412-661-1727. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. Ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk Night - Four Year Anniversary! 10 p.m. South Side. 412-600-2328.

MOONDOG’S. Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. 8 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

VINOSKI WINERY. Mike Tomaro & Friends. 6 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

SUN 27

SAT 26

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Ghost Town Blues Band. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

TUE 29

ANDYS WINE BAR. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8800. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Etta Cox. 6:30 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-444-7333. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. TABLE 86 BY HINES WARD. RML Jazz. 6 p.m. Mars. 412-370-9621. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

EDDIE V’S. Roger Barbour Band. 6 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-1714. FRESCO’S. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff. 6 p.m. Wexford. 724-935-7550. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SEVICHE. Hot Salsa & Bachata Nights. 10 p.m. Downtown. 843-670-8465.

WED 30 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BLUES THU 24 NEW AMSTERDAM. Jack of Diamonds w/ Angry Johnny. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Rodef Shalom Garden Party. 6:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-621-6566.

FRI 25 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jack of Diamonds. 8:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

JAZZ THU 24

FRI 25 ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900.

SUN 27 ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412-875-5809.

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side [TUE., SEPT. 18]

The Spits Gooski’s, 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill

TUE 29

[MON., SEPT. 25]

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

X

Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side

WED 30

THU 24 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. 9:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 25 MARKET SQUARE. Music in The Square. Artist include The Sparks House Family Band, Mark Williams, Eddan Sparks and the Fellowship. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-726-42217.

SAT 26 THE SHARP EDGE CREEKHOUSE. Tracy Lee Simmen. 7 p.m. Crafton. 412-922-8118. VINOSKI WINERY. Tom Panei. 1 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

REGGAE

FRI 25

THU 24 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

SAT 26 THE R BAR. The Flow Band. 9:30 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 27

www. per pa pghcitym .co

TUE 29 CLUB CAFE. Adam Torres. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club.

O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418. RIVERS CASINO. Darryl & Kim. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FULL LIST ONLINE

VINOSKI WINERY. Jennifer Drummey. 1 p.m. Rob Roush. 6 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

WED 30

8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Ras Prophet. 2 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

SUN 27

08.23/08.30.2017

with Royal Blood

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. 7 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

ACOUSTIC

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

[WED., SEPT. 13]

Queens of the Stone Age

MON 28

RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

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EARLY WARNINGS

COUNTRY SAT 26

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS. The Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers & Lost, Lonesome & Foggly. 6:30 p.m. Gibsonia. 412-365-1335.

TUE 29 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Township Road. 7:30 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

OTHER MUSIC THU 24 LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. 9 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Etta Cox Trio. 9 p.m.-midnight. Levels. The Lava Game. 9 p.m.-midnight. Drum Bar. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 26 RIVERS CASINO. Donna Groom Duo. 9 p.m. Levels. Justin Fabus Band. 9 p.m. Drum Bar. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 27 BRUSHTON SOCIAL CLUB 30/30. Jazz Returns to the Hood. 5:30 p.m. Homewood. 412 244 6788. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Alpen Schuhplattler. Founded by a group of German immigrants in 1964 to represent German culture at the Pittsburgh Folk Festival. They continue to perform authentic Bavarian Folk dances to the tunes of their live accordionists. Presented by World Kaleidoscope. 2 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3175.

WED 30 BRILLOBOX. Group Doueh. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

August 23-29 WEDNESDAY 23

Station Square. With special guest Totally 80’s. Free show. 7:30p.m.

BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE Allentown. 412-291-8994. With special guests Chase and the Barons & Jack Stauber. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Cloud Nothings

Oak House & Easter Island

Green Market PHIPPS CONSERVATORY Oakland. For more info visit phipps.conservatory.org. 2:30p.m.

THURSDAY 24 No Longer Silenced: Creating & Using Oral Histories

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. Free event. For more info visit cmoa.org. 6p.m.

FRIDAY 25 255

MONDAY 28

SCHENLEY PLAZA Oakland. With special guest Wreck Loose. Free show. For more info visit wyep.org. 7p.m.

Lilly Hiatt

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Brian Dunne. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

After 87, Wait for It, Shin Guard, Horus Maze & Vantage Blue

TUESDAY 29

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticket web.com/opusone. 7p.m.

Kevin Howard

AGNES KATZ PLAZA Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free show. 5p.m.

War of the Rosés

Stars of the Silver Screen Rooftop Shindig

RIVERS CASINO North Side. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit partyatthe pier.com. 7:30p.m.

2017 Wine Festival SEVEN SPRINGS RESORT. 866-437-1300. Over 21 event. Tickets: 7springs.com. Through Aug. 27.

Station Square Summer Jam ft. Broadcast 90!

SATURDAY 26

MAIN STREET STAGE

HARD ROCK CAFE

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Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Amplifiers. & The Art of Burning Bridges. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

Dandy Andy: Warhol’s Queer History Tour ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. Free with museum admission. For more info visit warhol.org. 3p.m.

TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER Downtown.

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THEATER SQUARE GARAGE ROOFTOP Downtown. Free event. For more info visit warhol.org. 5:30p.m.

Shadyside Art Festival

412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 9p.m.

PGH Rewind

Silver Snakes

NEWS

Free event. For more info visit alleghenycounty.us/summer. 7:30p.m.

SHADYSIDE ART FESTIVAL WALNUT STREET AUGUST 26 & 27

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WALNUT STREET Shadyside. Free event. For more info visit art-festival.com. Through Aug. 27.

Adam Torres CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Emily Rodgers & Wayne Beck. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 27 Billy Porter

HARTWOOD ACRES PARK.

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[DANCE]

SOME DIFFERENCES ARE MORE DIFFERENT THAN OTHERS

BREATHE OUT {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EXHALATIONS DANCE THEATRE presents THE CHOREOGRAPHY PROJECT 2017 8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 26, and 3 p.m. Sun. Aug. 27. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $18. 412-568-3382 or www.exhalations.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

THE

[BOOKS]

Exhalations Dance Theatre in rehearsal {PHOTO COURTESY OF LEA KASIC}

If you are even mildly familiar with Pittsburgh’s professional dance scene, you’ve heard of established companies like Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre and Attack Theatre. But as in most good-sized American cities, there are troupes that largely fly under the radar. Exhalations Dance Theatre is one such troupe. The project-based contemporarydance company was founded in 2009 by Duquesne University graduate Katherine Alexander Mann, who has a background in ballet and folk dance, and who has performed with folk-dance troupes Kyiv Ukrainian Dance Ensemble and Otets Paissii Ensemble. Mann, a long-termcare pharmacist by day, says she wasn’t ready to give up dancing and choreographing in order to have a career. She started Exhalations to provide herself, and others who have day jobs, whether in or outside of dance, with opportunities to perform and choreograph. Led by Mann and artistic director Lea Fosbenner Kasic, who trained at the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School and is a digital-product manager at PNC Bank, the company typically stages two productions a year, rotating dancers with each production. In the latest incarnation of its annual Choreography Project, Aug. 26-27 at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, the nearly two-hour production will feature a dozen short works by a host of choreographers including Mann and Kasic, performed by 25 dancers. Many of the dancers are graduates of area schools, including Point Park University, La Roche College and Slippery Rock University. Works on the program include: Kasic’s “Slip Away,” set to the song of the same name by Seattle-based indie artist Mike Hadreas, a.k.a. Perfume Genius, about the desire to break free from the people or things holding you back; Mann’s solo for Kasic “This Bitter Earth,” to the music of jazz great Dinah Washington; Alyssa McIntyre’s high-energy “Cats Like us,” mixing 1950s-era music with swing dancing; and Ebony Cunningham’s “Ebb & Flow,” about coping with your anxieties, set to music by Steve Reich, Philip Glass and Laurie Anderson. “Until We Bleed,” choreographed by Kasic and sister hip-hop duo Brianna Pato and Meghan Greenwood, of Pittsburgh’s BaM Choreography, begins with a dance battle between hip-hop and contemporary dancers and ends with the rival camps unifying.

FIRE

THIS TIME {PHOTO COURTESY OF ZAIN MUSTAFA}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

A

CCLAIMED Pakistan-born author Kamila Shamsie has lived in England for a decade, and in 2013 became a British citizen. But when she started researching her new novel, Home Fire, she got nervous. She needed to search topics like “ISIS recruitment techniques” online and — well, you know. “It’s actually quite disturbing to think there’s a part of you that’s second-guessing. And you don’t want the Secret Service knocking on your door,” she says. Shamsie’s personal concerns echo key themes in the engrossing Home Fire, published Aug. 15 by Riverhead Books. The plot centers on the relationship between three young-adult siblings — the British-born children of Pakistani immigrants — and the family of a rising British politician also of Pakistani ancestry. In this modern retelling of Sophocles’ Antigone, sisters Aneeka and Isma are horrified when their brother, Parvaiz, attempts to honor their late father’s jihadist legacy. The sisters ultimately clash with Karamat Lone, a political hard-liner who’s the new British Home

08.23/08.30.2017

Author Kamila Shamsie

Secretary, through their association with his privileged son, Eamonn. The timely novel — critically hailed on both sides of the Atlantic, and long-listed for the prestigious Man Booker Prize — engages questions of bigotry, nationalism and national identity.

KAMILA SHAMSIE 4:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 26. City of Asylum @ Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. Reservations at www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

Shamsie says Home Fire was informed by her own lengthy route to British citizenship. “Part of being a newly minted British citizen is you look very closely at what people are saying about British citizenship, and what the laws around British citizenship are,” she says from her home in London, via Skype. People who hold two passports, as she does, are subject to revocation of British citizenship if they are deemed a threat. “[T]he injustice of that two-tiered system,”

she says, helped drive the novel: It’s the same system, for instance, that during an airport interrogation scene makes hijabwearing Isma wonder “how British she really is.” And it’s the system that makes Parvaiz feel so much an outsider that he’s susceptible to the manipulations of an ISIS recruiter. Shamed all his young life by the story of his jihadist father, Parvaiz is ripe for a slick recruiter who tells him, instead, that it would honor him to live up to the old man’s heroic example of fighting oppression. As Shamsie makes clear in the novel, many ISIS recruits are young and extremely impressionable, and not all are lured by the promise of doing violence. Targeting doctors, engineers and even media-makers, jihadists offer paradaisical visions of a unified Muslim community — even though the reality of ISIS, Shamsie says, is “purely horrific.” Shamsie, 44, studied in the 1990s at New York’s Hamilton College and the University of Amherst, in Massachusetts. (Her Aug. 26 reading at Alphabet City is her first public appearance in Pittsburgh.)


DR IS C OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

CORRECTIONS • In the caption for a photo accompanying the Aug. 16 article “Artists and Immigrants,” the birthplace of Pabitra Subedi was incorrectly identified. She was born in Bhutan. • In the photo accompanying the Aug. 16 review of Throughline Theatre Co.’s Cloud 9, the actors and photographer were incorrectly identified. The actors are Malic Williams and Maeve Harten, and the photo is courtesy of Rick Moore and Throughline Theatre.

NEWS

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[ART REVIEW]

Through September

REFRAMING

10

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

Funky Turns 40, at the August Wilson Center, includes cartoon screenings

These days, she feels more “British” — in part, ironically, because of last year’s Brexit vote. “Oh, God, what have we done?” she remembers thinking. As she quips, “It has to be the idea of national calamity to make me feel part of nation.” And these days, the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, and another couple of prominent British political figures are Muslim, she notes, something unthinkable a decade ago. Still, the first of Shamsie’s seven novels to be set in contemporary London emphasizes that to be a Muslim Brit is still to be suspect. Home Fire is structured in five parts, each told from the perspective of a different main character. Particularly provocative is the story of Karamat, who built his career within the Muslim community, only to broaden his base by criticizing Muslims who, as he puts it, “set themselves apart” with traditionally non-British behaviors like wearing the hijab. Born into a Muslim family but determined to defend so-called “British values” as staunchly as any reactionary native Anglo, Karamat seems the ultimate in assimilation. Shamsie, however, likes to paraphrase novelist Hanif Kureishi: “When people talk about assimilating, you never hear of the queen being asked to assimilate.” Some differences, in other words, are more different than others. Karamat himself might seem the novel’s heavy, but he too operates in a culture where Muslims are viewed as either secular or fundamentalists. In fact, Shamsie says, there is a whole spectrum of belief and cultural practice, including culturally Muslim atheists and devout but nonfundamentalist believers. And, Shamsie notes, Karamat genuinely wants to improve the way Muslims are perceived — but to Muslims themselves, his approach can seem to pander to racism and Islamophobia. “He does represent the sort of strange position of being a Muslim in Britain,” she says.

Pamela Thompson and Loreen Williamson have examined their collections of more than 300 items connected to cartoons presenting positive depictions of black people and selected several dozen for Funky Turns 40: Black Character Revolution. This touring exhibition was originally seen online under the auspices of Thompson’s Museum of Uncut Funk. Now, after a 2012 stint at the ToonSeum, it returns to Pittsburgh courtesy of the August Wilson Center. On view are sketches, cels and videos from the animation that finally depicted black people as people, beginning with the Peter Jones character from The Hardy Boys TV series (1969), and Josie and the Pussycats’ Valerie Baum (1970). The Jackson Five (role models whose behavior could not be faulted, at the time) are here as real-life celebrities reinvented as cartoons, as are The Harlem Globetrotters (unsurprisingly), Flip Wilson (same) and Muhammad Ali (maybe not unsurprisingly). Fictional characters in the room include those found in Fang Face, Star Trek and Hong Kong Phooey, as well as black-oriented cartoons like Fat Albert and The Cosby Kids (what up, Mushmouth). The swag that these programs inspired shows up in board games and lunch boxes, and there’s even a comfy couch in a spare recreation of a living room where you can park yourself and watch a cartoon or two. If we look at just what’s shown from the 1970s, it’s a lovefest celebrating Black America through vivid animation, accompanied by a killer soundtrack. But the exhibition also includes a video demonstrating, quite painfully, that this was not always the case. From the earliest days of animated film, just up to when the works in this collection were created, black people were, in some instances, depicted as something barely human; in others, as less than. From identified clowns like the Depression era’s “Bosko” to identical mammies big, brash and belittled, animation was not kind to black Americans. Recently, Jay-Z took us back to this time with “The Story of O.J.,” thoroughly owning that traditional animation style in the most thrillingly incendiary music video since, well, Beyoncé’s “Formation.” But although we can join the shout for glory in the 1970s while considering the earlier racism, figuring out exactly where we are now is not so easy.

A World-Premiere Co-production between

By S E A N CHRISTOPHER LEWIS

and

Directed by

K AT I E P E A R L Pittsburgh 2017

T H E R E C YC L I N G BUILDING

New York 2018

on the corner of 32nd Street and Smallman Street

quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

AUGUST 26

HARD DAYS NIGHT Beatles Tribute Band

SEPTEMBER 8

SALIVA 8PM

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FUNKY TURNS 40: BLACK CHARACTER REVOLUTION continues through Sept. 8. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org

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LET S GET ’

S CIAL {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES ORR}

Allison Cahill and Bracken Burns in The Audience, at Little Lake

[PLAY REVIEWS]

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXWZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER Ř FACEBOOK.COM/PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER

ROYAL TREATMENT {BY TED HOOVER} GOD SAVE the Queen! Coming from a fer-

vid anti-monarchist like me, such sentiments might mean that our idiot president has once again said something so hateful it makes democracy seem like a ridiculous way to name a leader. But maybe it’s because I’ve just seen The Audience, at Little Lake Theatre, and this 2013 play by Peter Morgan, dramatizing Queen Elizabeth’s weekly meetings with her prime ministers, makes having a queen seem infinitely superior. I don’t know whether Morgan’s a monarchist, but he’s certainly pro-Elizabeth Windsor; he renders her an impeccably intelligent woman, slyly amusing, politically savvy and dedicating her entire life to “her people.”

with an opposing objective, and everything must be played as subtext (one does not contradict a queen, at least if one doesn’t wish to lose one’s head). Allison Cahill plays Her Maj and does outstanding work intimating the passion just below the surface. She charts the Queen’s maturation (aging 60 years) from frightened, determined, young woman to the steely, if sad, longestreigning monarch in English history. The Audience, in a surprising way, is also about an unrequited, intangible love between Elizabeth and Harold Wilson (Labor Prime Minister beginning in 1964). Morgan suggests that this brash, liberal “working man” was the Queen’s favorite; Joe Eberle plays the role, and his scenes with Cahill are entertaining and moving. Patricia Cena Fuchel is the evening’s other notable minister, the redoubtable Margaret Thatcher. Morgan has written her as a hard-eyed opportunist, easily calling to mind Glenda Jackson’s famous quote that Thatcher was just “Reagan in a frock.” Fuchel attacks the role guns ablazing, providing plenty of fireworks in the second act. Director Ponny Conomos Jahn could have worked a bit more on the whole “subtext” thing, and I’ll refrain from making cracks about the woeful dialects. But this very large cast — with Madeline

ALLISON CAHILL DOES OUTSTANDING WORK INTIMATING THE PASSION JUST BELOW THE SURFACE.

THE AUDIENCE continues through Sat., Aug. 26. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $13.75-21.75. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelaketheatre.org

Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center Inc. 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

08.23/08.30.2017

412-488-2750

WWW.COTRAIC.ORG

The Little Lake production is a local premiere, but this is a script destined to be revisited many times. In its way, it’s classic Acting 101: Two characters, each


{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA D. SMITH}

Billy Hartung (left) and Mario Williams in Big Fish, at Front Porch Theatricals

Dalesio’s charming turn as Young Elizabeth — all pull together to create a deftly swift and enjoyable production. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

TO SCALE {BY DREW PRASKOVICH} BIG FISH, based on the eponymous book and film, is a musical about the power folklore can have over a family. Will Bloom (Matt Calvert) is desperate to understand the truth about his ailing father, Edward Bloom, after a childhood spent only being told about the man’s fantastical adventures. The show is rife with nostalgia and optimism as it flows through Edward Bloom’s inconceivable life and prophesized death. He encounters witches, giants and even mermaids, and Big Fish finds the humanity in it all. John August, who also penned the screenplay, knows the real soul of the show lies between father and son.

Despite strained vocals in ensemble numbers, they remain buoyant. Andrew Lippa’s music and lyrics are charming but forgettable. Music director and Ringling Brothers vet Melissa Yanchak leads a string-filled orchestra with experience through the show’s circus numbers. Though spirited, Spencer Whale’s direction misses opportunities to create true moments of discovery and awe. The skeletal attic scenic design, by Gianni Downs, provides transparency; props and actors are constantly visible. This effect sometimes dims the strength of Whale’s vision. He needs to trust in the audience’s own imagination. More elements like his romantic reveal at the end of Act I would’ve provided a sense of transformation to bolster the themes of the show. Billy Hartung fully embodies the spirit of Edward Bloom, a traveling salesman. Like Bloom, locally based Broadway veteran Hartung carries a mythical quality that makes his character even more fascinating. After his 12-year stage hiatus, the audience welcomes him with open arms. It’s fulfilling to watch an actor give so much vigor and heart to a role. Kristiann Menotiades is radiant and says it all with her eyes. She loves, she hurts, she hopes. Jason Swauger is distinctive in his roles as lycanthropic ringmaster Amos and concerned Dr. Bennett. The real magic of Front Porch’s Big Fish doesn’t lie within the fantasy, but rather the reality of Hartung’s return to the stage.

IT’S FULFILLING TO WATCH AN ACTOR GIVE SO MUCH VIGOR AND HEART TO A ROLE.

BIG FISH continues through Sun., Aug. 27. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $24-30. www.frontporchpgh.com

Front Porch Theatricals presents a reduced, 12-chair version of the show’s short-lived 2013 Broadway run. The performers are constantly on their feet, making their way through demanding tracks.

Music and Lyrics by John Kander & Fred Ebb Book by David Thompson

Original Direction and Choreography by Susan Stroman

Directed by Tomé Cousin

September 8-24, 2017 Ronald AllAn-Lindblom • Artistic Director

Kim Martin • Producing Director

box office 412.392.8000 or pittsburghplayhouse.com

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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WRAP UP SUMMER WITH

BIG LAUGHS!

summer

blockbuster

Don’t miss your chance to catch the best new talent from the legendary comedy troupe that launched the careers of Stephen Colbert, Tina Fey, Bill Murray, Amy Poehler, Keegan-Michael Key and many more.

THIS WEEKEND!

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 8pm SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 5:30 SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 9pm BEST AVAILABILITY!

KICK OFF FALL WITH GREAT THE THEATRICAL STUNNER

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

ON SALE

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 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

08.23/08.30.2017

ON SALE

SEPT 5!

“makes the stage a place of breathless discovery” —The New York Times

From the football field to the battlefield and back, Rocky tells his own incredible story.

IN BY

BY

PETER SHAFFER

GENE COLLIER

DIRECTED BY

DIRECTED BY

TED PAPPAS

SCOTT C. WISE

September 28– October 29

December 20– January 7

AT THE O’REILLY THEATER 36

BIG EVENTS!

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.24-08.31.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com Even in late August, Pittsburgh these days is full of arts happenings. But few this summer will be as cutting-edge as the annual Performance Art Festival. For its fourth season, PAF moves to Oakland’s Melwood Avenue, where it takes over three venues — Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Glitter Box and Babyland — and nearby outdoor spaces with some two dozen acts, plus continuous video screenings, on Aug. 26 and 27.

Performances range in length from a few minutes to hours-long “roaming” outdoors shows. The performers hail from around the U.S. and from as far away as Austria and Japan. Highlights include Calling All Divas, Los Angeles-based, internationally touring Tyler Matthew Oyer’s “exploration of actual and imagined queer ancestries.” (Expect fabulous costumes.) In “The Struggle,” British performer Riikka Enne addresses labor struggles while wrapped in clear plastic, trying to scale a wall similarly wrapped. Alex D’Agostino (pictured), of Baltimore, employs a tutu, clothespins and audience participation to manifest “an invisible queer rage” in “The Swan.” Japan’s Fumi Amano creates an installation-based performance to examine women’s role in society. Berivian Sayici, of Austria, does a piece “where she is waterboarded by milk,” says PAF founder and organizer Abagail Beddall. Pittsburgh-based performers include Princess Jafar, exploring her identity as a mixed-race trans woman of Arab descent. Other local contributors include Leavitt Summer, slowdanger, Sofia Sandoval, Anna Azizzy, Dave English and Middle Children, Valerie Kuehne, Tara Fay, and Ru Emmons. New this year are screenings of performance films and documentations. But the focus, says Beddall, remains on the corporeal presence of a performer in a given space. “People are really impacted by body,” says Beddall. There’s nothing like it for exploring topics like racism, she says — or for sheer intimacy. The PAF is presented by Bunker Projects. Admission is by donation. BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

^ Sat., Aug. 26: PGH Rewind

thursday 08.25 WORDS Autumn House Press wraps this season’s Pittsburgh Parks Summer Reading Series tonight in Highland Park with readings by four notable local writers. Poet and educator Jan Beatty has been a keystone of the scene for years. University of Pittsburgh professor Dawn Lundy Martin (pictured) is an acclaimed poet, and co-founder of the Pitt-based Center for African American Poetry and Poetics. Marc Nieson is an educator, fiction writer and memoirist. And Deesha Philyaw is an author, blogger and freelance writer with credits including The New York Times and Essence. The reading is free; bring ring a blanket. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. 1024 N. Highland hland Ave., Highland Park. Free. www.facebook.com ok.com (“pittsburgh parks summer”)

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saturday 08.26 ART Probably Pittsburgh’s biggest neighborhood art-and-craft festival returns with the 21st Annual Shadyside ... the Art Festival on Walnut Street. Today and tomorrow, tomorro for several blocks along Walnut, some 150 regional and national artists will personally display their jewelry, hand-crafted apparel hand-c and décor, and artworks, ranging from paintings, p sculpture and photography to ceramics, ceramics glass and mixed-media. The long-running festival festiva is produced by Florida-based Howard Alan Events. BO 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., Aug. 27. 730 73 Bellefonte St., Shadyside. Free. www.artfestival.com

COMEDY You’ve heard of Bill Murray, John Candy and Stephen Colbert, but maybe you ou didn’t know that early in their careers they ey worked with The Second City. This weekend, nd, the venerable improv-comedy troupe’ss touring show makes its annual summer visit, it, as The Second City’s Summer Blockbusterr comes to Pittsburgh Public Theater for three ree shows tonight and tomorrow. Visiting performers rformers

4-11 p.m. Sat., Aug. 26, and 1-9 p.m. Sun., Aug. 27. 400 block of Melwood Avenue, Oakland. Admission by donation. www.pghpaf.com NEWS

include Adam Archer and Alison Gates. Who knows — maybe the folks you’re watching this weekend will be tomorrow’s movie stars or late-night hosts. Matt Petras 8 p.m. Also 5:30 and 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 26. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $35-60. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

M A I N F E AT U R E

TALK You know his work, especially publi public sculptures like “Joy of Life,” on the East Liberty ffountain, and “The Man,” on the University Univers of Pittsburgh Graduate School of P Public Health building. But odds odd are you know little about Virgil Cantini. The Vi late artist worked in many w

>Thu., Aug. 25: Pittsburgh Parks Summer Reading Series

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WILL ZAVALA}

^ Sat., Aug. 26: Virgil Cantini

EVENT:

Little Italy Days,

in Bloomfield CRITIC: Nate

Budziszewski,

31, a high school teacher from Bethel Park WHEN: Fri.,

Aug. 18

media and helped establish the Department of Studio Arts at Pitt, where he taught for four decades. Today, Cantini’s daughter Lisa Cantini-Seguin and special guests lead a tour (starting in Highland Park) highlighting both his public artworks and his studio pieces. The tour, organized by Design Nation and Penhollows, takes place via restored vintage transit bus, and is followed by a reception. BO Tour: 2-4:30 p.m. Reception: 5-7:30 p.m. $30-60 (reception only: $40). www.design-nation.org

ART

We have a friend from out of town, and we always like getting out to see the city. [We] came down to Little Italy Days. [It’s] everything Italian that Pittsburgh has to offer. That’s how I feel about it. Awesome food, amazing food. It’s good to see Bloomfield, that’s my favorite neighborhood. Got to see all the happenings, all the shops, but the food has got to be the main draw. And all the bocce, and all the other cultural things, but to me, it’s the food. There’s everything fried — we’re looking for the rice balls. The stuffed rice balls are down there somewhere, the pizza, the pasta, Italian sausage, stuffed meatballs. For the middle of the day, and a muggy day, it’s really festive and there’s a lot of people out. A lot of people gonna have meat sweats really early on, I suppose. Italian music, good breeze, a lot of red, white and green. B Y M ATT P ETRAS

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BoxHeart Gallery offers another duo of art exhibits, this time William DeBernardi and Dale Huffman and Andrew Ooi: IOI OOI New Primitives. The former show features the work of two artists who are both art professors at Carlow University; DeBernardi is primarily known as an oil painter and Huffman works with ceramics. The latter show features painted and folded paper pieces from Ooi, who is from Toronto. An opening reception with the artists is this evening. MP 5-8 p.m. (free). Exhibits continue through Sept. 22. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

COMEDY

hard days at work and catastrophic political news. Turns out, however, that people liked cute cats even before the days of internet memes. Frank and the Wonder Cat, a documentary about the Oakmont-based performing cat Pudgie Wudgie, from the 1990s, screens tonight at The Oaks Theater. At 7 p.m., Humane Animal Rescue will have cats available for adoption. After the screening, meet Frank Furko, the late Pudgie Wudgie’s owner. MP 8 p.m. 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. $8-10. 412-828-6322 or theoakstheater.com

PARTY Nothing beats the warmth of nostalgia, whether it be eating your favorite childhood snack or rewatching the cartoons you obsessed over. PGH Rewind hopes to kindle those nostalgic feelings of the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s at Downtown’s Trust Arts Education Center. The event, on three floors, includes drag performers dressed as stars like Tina Turner, nostalgic treats, live music, a makeup station and more. Retro outfits and hairstyles are encouraged. Your ticket also nets you a one-year Cultural Trust Partners membership, which gets you access to exclusive events and more. MP 9 p.m.-midnight (VIP 7:30-9 p.m.). 805-807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. (VIP: $75-85). 412-471-6070 or www.trustarts.org

Vickie Shaw, a loud, often exasperated comedian from Texas, brings her comedy tonight to COMEDY Cruze Bar. Shaw draws much of her ^ Mon., Aug. 21: Frank and the Wonder Cat “I don’t like people who wear material from her family, whether community-college sweatshirts,” it’s her partner or her parents. In one says Quincy Jones. “They’re a little too cocky in life, and I bit, seen during a standup routine at the Triple Door in Seattle, don’t know why. Get your bachelor’s and then rock the she is frustrated by her mother’s reluctance to eat unhealthy apparel.” The Los Angeles-based comic with the laid-back foods. “You’re 90!” she screams. “You’re 90 years old! Eat the manner (and publicized for his battle with cancer) headlines cobbler!” Opening for Shaw are local comics Whitley Baker and tonight’s Lexfest II, at Club Café, the latest in former Michael Buzzelli. MP 7 p.m. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. Pittsburgher Norlex Belma’s quarterly comedy show pairing $20-30. 412-471-1400 or www.cruzebar.com local and national talent. Belma, now based in New York, also hosts local comics Ed Bailey and Phil Forrence and visitors SCREEN Eman El Husseini and Jess Salomon. BO 10:30 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., It’s impossible to consider online culture without also considering cute cats, many internet-dwellers’ refuge from South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

08.23/08.30.2017


PROUDLY TATTOOING PITTSBURGH SINCE 1994!

^ Thu., Aug. 25: The Second City’s Summer Blockbuster

tattoo & piercing studio Open Daily, 1pm-8pm

tuesday 08.29

walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended!

SCREEN Among the golden-age Hollywood stars worshipped by the young Andy Warhola, perhaps none shone brighter than Greta Garbo. So it’s only appropriate that tonight’s special Stars of the Silver Screen Rooftop Shindig held in conjunction with a current Andy Warhol Museum exhibition is 1931’s smash hit Mata Hari, with Garbo as the infamous World War I spy. The evening atop the Theater Square Garage — courtesy of the Warhol, Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and Pittsburgh Filmmakers — includes live entertainment by singer Phat Man Dee, food, themed cocktails, and a vintage fashion market by Second Shift Crafters. Bringing your own seating is advised. BO 5:30 p.m. (film at dusk). Rain date is Wed., Aug. 30. 667 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. www.warhol.org

(412) 683-4320 5240 Butler St.

Pgh, PA • 15201 inkadinkadoo.net T ICK E TS NO W O N SA L E !

John Avlon Author Join the author as he discusses his riveting book, Washington’s Farewell: The Founding Father’s Warning to Future Generations. Mr. Avlon is a CNN Political Analyst, Executive Editor of The Daily Beast, and former chief speech writer for New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

thursday 08.31 ART Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for the Arts in Society is wrapping its current three-year {ART BY ANDREW OOI} ^ Sat., Aug. 26: Andrew Ooi: IOI OOI New Primitives CAS Performance Initiative, with three faculty-led projects exploring how people performatively frame their lives to reinterpret history, protest and more. Tonight’s the reception for Causing a Scene, the Miller Gallery exhibition of materials from those projects, including a dot map illustrating sectarian divisions in Belfast (from John Carson and Jennifer Keating’s Performing Peace); augmented-reality events from Pittsburgh history (Larry Shea’s Ghosts in the Machine); and elements of Edda Fields-Black’s Requiem for Rice, which explores the lives of Africans enslaved on low-country rice plantations. BO 4:30-6:30 p.m. (free). Exhibition continues through Sept. 3. CMU campus, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu

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AUGUST 31 A 6PM - Reception 6P with Light Refreshments 7PM - Program Begins 7P $15 MEMBERS | $20 NON-MEMBERS $1 S Books available for sale at the museum store Bo Your purchase helps support the Fort’s education programs Yo

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OF ALL THE BARBECUE WE ORDERED, SMOKED EGGPLANT WAS THE BEST

POP-UP VEGAN On a Sunday, a small crowd gathers around a tent set up outside Cafè d’Amore, in Lawrenceville. The smell of waffles and chocolate, alongside the savory smell of freshly toasted “everything” bagels, wafts down the block. It’s a magnet for hungry passersby. This is a typical pop-up for Relish Co., an all-vegan enterprise owned and operated by Abbigail Hansel. Today there are cinnamon-sugar knots, chocolatechip waffles with melted chocolate and bananas on top, and everything bagels with a delicious creamy herbed spread. By the time I arrive, at 11:30 a.m., just a halfhour after the pop-up began, the doughnuts are gone. “I try to do a pop-up almost every weekend, sometimes even two in a weekend,” says Hansel. “We do wholesale to shops around the city every day, and it gives me an opportunity to test out new things, meet new people and expand our following.” These pop-ups show the range of Relish Co.’s repertoire, which changes each weekend. “We always have doughnuts, bagels, et cetera, but I love to throw in other options, ranging from French toast, waffles, ‘chicken’-and-waffle sandwiches, and even burgers,” explains Hansel. “I switch it up a lot.” Hansel often doesn’t decide the flavors of the doughnuts until the morning of the event. These choices are influenced by seasonal ingredients, customer requests and whatever inspiration strikes. “I could throw entire menu plans out the window, if I find some beautiful produce in the Strip and decide to change things up the night before. It’s all about what feels right,” she says. Hansel plans to open a storefront, but the timeline is still a secret. In the meantime, these pop-ups serve as a fun opportunity to guess what might be on the menu. If you can’t wait for a pop-up, Relish Co. currently delivers its donuts on various days of the week all over Pittsburgh, including to: Black Forge Coffeehouse, in Allentown; Constellation Coffee, in Lawrenceville; Zeke’s, in East Liberty; ADDA Coffee and Tea House, in Shadyside; Artisan Café, in Garfield; and Cafè d’Amore and 52nd St. Market, both in Lawrenceville.

“Everything” bagel {CP PHOTO BY MEG FAIR}

{BY MEG FAIR}

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Smoked ribs with napa cabbage slaw, corn on the cob and mixed-vegetable salad

BBQ AND SIDES {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

“B

LUES. Bourbon. BBQ.” is the motto of Wheelfish in Ross Township. Many have pursued the smoky pleasures of this alliterative trio in locales far more hardscrabble than Pittsburgh’s near North Hills, but we’re open to finding magic in unexpected places. So it was with big appetites and open minds that we drove past tidy suburban houses on rolling green lawns to pull into the gravel parking lot of Wheelfish’s rustic building. Wagon wheels leaned against the unpainted board-and-batten walls, as if a hard day of eking a living off the land was just giving way to the tub-thumping pleasures of a country evening. Inside, a stage was set up at one end of the dining room, with sound equipment ready to go, but on a Tuesday, a leftbehind playlist provided the only blues in

MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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evidence. The stage and rough-hewn ambience of Wheelfish’s barn-wood interior actually date to its predecessor, Frank N Stein’s, but suit the current concept to a T. The rusticity felt more like an identity than a pose; it didn’t need to be propped up with blues posters on the wall or clever names on the menu.

WHEELFISH 635 Sangree Road, Ross Township. 412-487-8909 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: $8-30 LIQUOR: Full bar

The menu hit a sweet spot: The barbecue framework was classic, the details fresh. Alongside pulled-pork nachos and

wings, for instance, were brisket quesadilla and roasted-beet salad. Standard smoked meats were augmented by salmon and smoked eggplant options. Sides included mac-and-cheese and pork and beans, but also napa cabbage slaw. The quesadilla was fantastic. It started with a perfectly flaky-crisp tortilla and incorporated a filling that had a lot going on — meat, peppers sweet and hot, onion, cheddar and BBQ sauce — but still let that excellent tortilla share the spotlight. The sauce flavored the fillings without drowning them, and the meat, while in bite-size pieces, was substantial enough to make its quality clear, complete with luscious fat cap. The best part of the beet salad was the citrus vinaigrette, bright and lightly acidic to balance the sweet components of beets, golden raisins and candied pecans, without


tipping over into puckery sourness. Meanwhile, the greens were spicy enough, and sheep’s-milk feta briny enough, to offset the cumulative effect of three sweet ingredients. Our only complaint was a surprisingly scant portion of actual beets. We really liked Wheelfish’s approach to chicken. Flash-frying the smoked bird created a light, crispy shell that didn’t distract from the meat’s flavor with a heavily seasoned coating. The leg was, for the most part, succulent, but a few bites were dried out, a surprising feat with dark meat. Sadly, this was a harbinger of things to come. We started in on the small end of our half-rack of ribs, pulling off the last bone to reveal plenty of gorgeous, pink flesh. But a mouthful quickly revealed that looks were deceiving: The meat was tough, dry and over-seasoned. A second, smaller bite was more manageable, but still not right. A sample from the other end, the center of the original rack, nailed the texture — moist, tender, still with some chew — but the saltiness remained a problem. Salmon, in sandwich form, suffered from a different kind of overcooking: While the meat was flaky and juicy throughout, there was an undeniable fishiness to it, reminiscent of canned tuna or reheated fish. It was a shame, especially because the other sandwich components — ciabatta roll, arugula, feta and aioli — came together wonderfully to create a combination that could have been a standout. Of all the barbecue we ordered, smoked eggplant was the best: toothsome and meaty, not at all rubbery as poorly cooked eggplant can be; deeply infused with smoky flavor; and sauced with an astringent tomato ragout. Most of our sides were great, too. Pork and beans were close to perfect, with plenty of good meat and scarcely a hint of sugar among the mixed beans, while mac-and-cheese, topped with toasted breadcrumbs, was creamy and simple. Wheelfish switches up its cornbread seasonally, and blueberry was the perfect accent for high summer, the sweet-tart berries popping juicily in the bread’s pleasantly gritty crumb. But fries were disappointing: A heap of what looked like beautiful, deepbrown russets proved dry and tough, again as if reheated or held under heat too long. Lots of places offer regional barbecue sauces these days, but Wheelfish sticks to variations on a classic theme: Blue Collar (regular), Gentleman (sweet), and Cowboy (spicy) sauces. All were well balanced between tomato and vinegar, smoke and pepper. Like the sauces themselves, many of Wheelfish’s preparations were solid. But for a restaurant that puts barbecue front and center, its smoked-meat game was surprisingly uneven. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

CARROT PIEROGI {BY JAMILKA BORGES, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT SPOON} I love this dish because it utilizes the vegetable waste from my juicing habit. It’s simple and delicious and you can also substitute beets or other root veggies for the carrots. Food waste is the hot topic this year. Every conference and chef is talking about it, with reason. Forty percent of the food grown in the U.S. goes to waste. As a restaurant chef, this fact is something I want to change. Utilizing the whole product (animal or vegetable) is a small way to create a big impact. We as chefs and consumers have the power to change the way we buy, consume, recover and redistribute food.

Now Open!

412-252-2877 Check us out @ frontporchgrille.com

INGREDIENTS • 5 carrots, juiced, with juice and pulp saved DOUGH • 4 cups all-purpose flour • ½ cup sour cream • 1 tsp. salt • 2 tbsp. olive oil • 1 cup of saved carrot juice • 2 whole eggs

DINE, RELAX, ENJOY

FILLING • ¼ cup onion, minced • 1 tbsp. garlic, minced • 1 tbsp. ginger, minced • ¼ cup diced bacon • 2 cups ground pork • 2 cups carrot pulp • 2 tsp. fish sauce • 1 tbsp. soy sauce • 1 tsp. sambal • 2 tbsp. scallions, chopped • 1 tbsp. cilantro stems/leaves, chopped • lime

MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

1910 New Texas Road • 724-519-7304

www.eightyacreskitchen.com

WWW WW WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM W S ENY NYAI AIPG PGH CO COM

FOR THE DOUGH: In a stand mixer, on a low setting with the hook attachment, combine all dry ingredients, and then add all wet ingredients. Once the dough forms, remove from bowl and knead by hand on a floured surface. Cover and let rest. FOR THE FILLING: In a big sauté pan, render bacon and set aside the fat. In the fat, sweat the onions and garlic. Once translucent, add ginger and brown the ground pork. Add carrot pulp, and season with fish sauce, soy sauce and sambal. After 10 minutes, when the flavors start to come together, add cilantro and scallions. Season with salt and lime. Roll dough to 1/8-inch thickness, and cut with a pastry cutter. Fold and fill pierogies. I use water and my fingers to form dumplings, but egg wash also works. Boil pierogies for two minutes, then shock in ice water. To serve, heat in brown butter, and garnish with yogurt and cilantro leaves. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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$1 OFF LUNCH OR DINNER BUFFET $2 OFF ANY MENU ENTRÉE PER PERSON WITH STUDENT ID OR MENTION CITY PAPER

MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

OAXACAN CUISINE

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Grapefruit and tequila palomas

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BEYOND MARGARITAS Appreciating real tequila {BY DREW CRANISKY} OPEN LATE 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL 1 AM

315 N. CRAIG STREET OAKLAND 412-681-6600 ALLINDIAPGH.COM

TAJ MAHAL

WE CATER! Authentic traditional handcrafted Hungarian cuisine

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Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine A LEGACY BAR & GRILL

• Award Winner for Best Indian food 2000-2017 • The proud caterer for G20 summit - #1 choice for catering Indian cuisine. All events, weddings, anniversaries, baby showers • Lunch buffet 7 days a week • Dinner buffets Monday, Thursday and Saturday. TAJ MAHAL IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY CHEF/OWNER USHA SETHI SINCE 1996.

7795 McKnight Rd • 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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627 E North Ave

in Pittsburgh’s Northside

412-322-8795 huszarpittsburgh.com

POOR, MISUNDERSTOOD tequila. To many, it’s the stuff of late nights and bad decisions, with little use outside the shot glass or the slushie machine. From rumors of hallucinogenic properties (untrue) to that damn worm in the bottle (a marketing gimmick), myths and misconceptions swirl around Mexico’s best-known spirit. In truth, tequila is actually quite straightforward. Just as champagne is a specific variety of sparkling wine, tequila is a specific type of mezcal, a broader and older category of Mexican agave spirits. In order to be called tequila, it must be produced in designated regions of Mexico (mostly in the state of Jalisco) and made from blue agave. Contrary to popular belief, agave is not a cactus but rather a succulent related to asparagus. Tequila producers cook and mash the hearts of the plants to extract the agave juice, then ferment and distill that liquid to create tequila. The best tequilas (some would say the only ones that can rightfully be called tequila) are made entirely from agave. Look for the “100 percent agave” designation on the label, and don’t buy any bottle without it. Those other tequilas are known as mixtos, meaning they use just 51 percent agave, and make up the difference with corn or sugar cane. Though these tequilas are cheaper, they inevitably leave a bad taste and an even worse hangover. Once you move past Cuervo Gold, a whole world of agave-based possibilities awaits. Unlike Cognac or bourbon, which rely on barrels to develop much of their

flavor, tequila can be enjoyed in its white, unaged state. Many connoisseurs, in fact, prefer this blanco tequila to the aged reposado or añejo versions. Blanco tequilas allow the agricultural nuances of the agave plant to shine, showcasing the distinctive vegetal, mineral and floral notes that set tequila apart. A bright, funky blanco tequila can be every bit as interesting as a 20-year-old scotch. Good tequila should be sipped, not shot, preferably from a snifter or wine glass that helps concentrate its aroma. Chilling the spirit or taking a lick of salt and a bite of lime are tricks to mask off-flavors of lowquality tequila, and will only detract from a well-made spirit. Of course, tequila can also star in some great cocktails. Though the margarita is the best-known tequila cocktail in America, it’s not the only one. The paloma, a simple mixture of tequila and grapefruit soda, is more popular than the margarita in Mexico. Check out my updated version below, which adds some spice and bitterness to the mix.

El Cóndor • 1½ oz. blanco tequila • 1 oz. grapefruit juice • ½ oz. Aperol • ¼ oz. simple syrup • 1 or 2 slices of jalapeño

Muddle jalapeño in a shaker. Add all other ingredients and shake with ice. Fine-strain into a Collins glass filled with ice. Top with soda water and garnish with a lime wedge. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: TEQUILA COCKTAILS

VS.

Altius

Meat & Potatoes

1230 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington

649 Penn Ave., Downtown

DRINK: Antiviral INGREDIENTS: El Tesoro Reposado tequila, ginger, lemon, honey, Montelobos mezcal, Spanish bitters OUR TAKE: Bright citrus flavors balance the smoky, herbal notes of this cocktail. A touch of sweetness from the honey and the bite of the ginger linger, as the mezcal pervades the drink from the first sip to the last.

DRINK: Mexican Honey Bee INGREDIENTS: Espolon tequila, lemon, smoked local honey, orange bitters, mezcal rinse OUR TAKE: Smoked honey and mezcal combine to deepen the flavor profile and add roasted and nutty notes. Citrus and honey keep the drink from being too heavy for summer sipping, while also adding balance.

Learn more about Pittsburgh’s food scene on our podcasts Sound Bite and Five Minutes in Food History online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Oberon Ale, Bell’s Brewery $3.50/can “Oberon has become my iconic beer of summer. This wheat ale is bright with citrus notes and a fruity character. Its cloudiness makes it a smooth beer for drinking on a hot day, but it has a few spicy notes to mix it up.” RECOMMENDED BY CELINE ROBERTS

Oberon Ale is available at D’s SixPax & Dogz.

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A WOMAN’S STORY

THE EARLY SILENT FILMS TRANSCEND THEIR ORIGINAL FUNCTION AS ENTERTAINMENT

{BY AL HOFF} Being a firefighter is tough. Being a trans firefighter seems tougher still, unless you’re Brooke Guinan and are undaunted by the challenge of becoming a pioneer for equal rights and respect. Guinan is the subject of Woman on Fire, the engaging new feature-length documentary from Pittsburgh-based filmmaker Julie Sokolow (Aspie Seeks Love). It makes its Pittsburgh premiere this weekend at a special event at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Brooke Guinan at a Pride event

Guinan grew up George William Guinan VI in a family of New York City firefighters. Both granddad and dad were committed to FDNY, describing the job as a brotherhood and “a home away from home.” But young George felt different growing up; he came out as gay as a teen, but that wasn’t quite it. “The person looking at me [from the mirror] was never the person in my head.” So began a journey: joining the FDNY as a gay man and having a rocky time of it, before transitioning to Brooke, a female. “I was always performing who I thought people wanted me to be,” she explains. Sokolow’s film spends a lot of time with the likable Brooke, as well as her family, who undergo their own journey of acceptance; Brooke’s parents stress how traditional firefighter families are, and how male-dominated the field is. And the film is big-hearted, acknowledging that everybody has struggles, whether it’s Brooke’s dad’s PTSD after Sept. 11; Brooke’s partner, Jim, negotiating with his elderly parents about his new relationship; or the sexism that other female firefighters face. (Even today, of the 10,000 who make up the NYFD, fewer than 50 are women.) But understanding and openness is key. As Sokolow documents Brooke’s commitment to fully be who she is, it’s an affirming go-girl story, with Brooke confronting and overcoming obstacles and prejudices. It’s a fight that culminates in some high-profile public victories, though for Brooke, the cessation of struggle within herself is surely the sweetest battle won. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 25. A Q&A with Guinan and her partner, Jim Baker, follow the screening, plus a reception with light refreshments and cash bar. Carnegie Museum of Art theater, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15. www.cmoa.org

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Polly

red films: the recove ed (1918) f Bre Scenes from al H e Th and cus (1917) of the Cir

TIME HAS COME TODAY {BY AL HOFF}

D

AWSON CITY: Frozen Time may be

one of the more remarkable and transfixing films I’ve seen in a while. Bill Morrison’s documentary is ostensibly about the discovery of some long-lost silent films. But it is easily a dozen films in one, effortlessly shifting between history lessons about early film, labor and gold-mining; experiential art film; and meditations on time, progress, decay and rebirth. It’s also about a long-forgotten, faraway time and town that nonetheless has links to well-known things as disparate as Hollywood’s Grauman’s Chinese Theater, the 1919 White Sox baseball scandal, Ken Burn’s filmmaking style, and Donald Trump. It all starts in a First Nations fishing encampment at the confluence of the Yukon and Klondike rivers, just 173 miles south of the Arctic Circle. Then came the Gold Rush of 1896, and the new boomtown of Dawson City filled up with hopeful miners. After the boom, the town shrunk considerably but remained viable enough to support three establishments that screened the latest entertainment — moving pictures. In time, the

Guggenheims consolidated the mines, a Carnegie Library opened, and families took to normal life in the far north. Few knew of tiny Dawson City. Until 1978, when a routine demolition of Dawson’s former athletic hall uncovered 533 reels of highly combustible silvernitrate films, buried in the permafrost. Shipped to archives in Ottawa, the “Dawson Find” turned out to be an astounding cache of studio films and newsreels, most from

DAWSON CITY: FROZEN TIME DIRECTED BY: Bill Morrison Starts Fri., Aug. 25. Hollywood

CP APPROVED the 1910s, that had escaped the fate of similar works, i.e. destruction, from being tossed in the river or incinerated. Even more remarkably, after restoration, the films were watchable, though some bore scars of environmental damage, such as water marks. In his film, director Morrison retells the

story of the town, its boom and bust, and the curious journey of these films. (The random circumstances that led to these films being preserved is a great story I’ll leave viewers to discover.) He uses archival photography (including gorgeous photographs taken of the Yukon Gold Rush by Eric Hegg) and footage. But in a move that serves both the historical narrative and the exposition of these extremely rare films, Morrison stitches together the tale of Dawson City using excerpts from 124 of the once-buried films. Some are newsreels, filling in world events, while others are comedies, historical dramas and melodramas, standing in. (For instance, in establishing Dawson’s lively gambling scene, Morrison compiles a reel of gambling scenes.) Thus, films such as The Girl of the Northern Woods (1910) and If My Country Should Call (1916) transcend their original function as entertainment, both to illustrate actual history and to stand as a reflection on fragile “permanence.” Boom towns, film stock, people and even history itself are there, and then gone — until an overturned shovel of dirt brings it all back into light. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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guise of “making poor decisions to further one’s art” or something. (Let us pause to remember how much of what we see on screen is written, as is this, by men.) Marc Webb’s film trundles along in this familiar vein, with awkward dinner parties, a wedding and assorted pining. Then, unfortunately, it takes the soapopera turn that it looked like it was going to take but you hoped it wouldn’t. It’s a groaner of a plot device, and even less satisfying since we all saw it coming. Starts Fri., Aug. 25 (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW EADWEARD. This new biographical drama from Kyle Rideout depicts the life of Eadweard Muybridge, 19th-century photographer who was a pioneer in the development of “moving pictures,” or early filmmaking. Starts Fri., Aug. 25 (no show Mon., Aug. 28). Parkway Theater, McKees Rocks

WIND RIVER. In writer-director Taylor Sheridan’s terse crime drama, a government animaltracker — he shoots predators — teams with an outof-her-element FBI agent to learn who killed a young Native woman on a reservation out West. Corey Lambert (Jeremy Renner) is half insider, half outsider on the rez, while Jane Banner (Elizabeth Olsen) didn’t even bring an overcoat — no small thing in a story where the deadly cold is practically a character in itself. The film is beautifully shot against a stark backdrop of sky, snow and pine trees, but its emotional core lies in a series of encounters between the white protagonists and the Native Americans, who include Cory’s ex-wife and young son; the victim’s family; local law enforcement; and trailer-dwelling drug dealers. That the nominal heroes are white might have undercut the subtext about the resilience of Native people. (The story was “inspired by actual events.”) But while the drama plays out satisfyingly, it’s the sense of tenuous connections between characters that sticks with you, along with the isolation and lack of agency often experienced by Native communities. (Bill O’Driscoll)

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GOOD TIME. Benny and Josh Safdie direct this gritty drama about a bank robber (Robert Pattinson) who spends the night trying to evade those looking for him and getting his brother out of jail. Starts Fri., Aug. 25 THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD. Nothing says summer like a fun and stupid action movie with beautiful people and even more beautiful explosions. Patrick Hughes’ comedic actioner is not that movie, though it wants to be. It stars Ryan Reynolds, who has the charisma of a peanut-butter sandwich, as a bodyguard trying to restore his career, and Samuel L. Jackson, with the maniacal energy of a scary uncle, as a hitman embroiled in the trial of a genocidal Eastern European dictator (Gary Oldman). The two Americans traipse their way through London, Denmark and Sweden, firing and dodging storms of bullets. It’s clearly meant to feel like a skewed buddy comedy, but using loosely accurate geopolitics as a subplot vehicle for Jackson to say “motherfucker” proves unsettling. At some point in the movie, the dictator deploys Plan B, which is to send a truck full of bombs into the crowd protesting outside his trial. In the context of recent news, it was one of the most jarring scenes I’ve ever watched on the big screen. Then again, what else can be expected from a movie with the tagline “Get triggered.” (Hannah Lynn)

Menashe boy: Should he compromise, and accept the dictates of the community over his cautious toe-dips into individuality? There is not much more plot than that, but the nonactors Weinstein employs are warm and engaging. They inhabit a world that is in many ways quite different from modern secular life in New York City, but the issues of loneliness and family strife are all too universal. In Yiddish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 25. Manor (AH)

Wind River INGRID GOES WEST. Aubrey Plaza stars in this dark comedy about a woman who becomes obsessed with an Instagram star (Elizabeth Olsen) and moves to Los Angeles to stalk her and maybe become her friend. Matt Spicer directs. Starts Fri., Aug. 25 LADY MACBETH. William Oldroyd’s drama is a chilling domestic noir hidden within a period romantic potboiler. Note: This film’s opening date has been postponed repeatedly; here’s hoping. See www.pghcitypaper.com for full review. Starts Fri., Aug. 25 LEAP! In this animated feature, a young French girl leaves her country home for Paris, hoping to fulfill her dream of becoming a ballerina. Eric Summer and Eric Warin direct. Starts Fri., Aug. 25 LOGAN LUCKY. Steven Soderbergh directs this heist comedy about three West Virginia siblings who try to pull off a heist during a NASCAR race. Ever-hopeful Jimmie (Channing Tatum) wants something more, and an unceremonious lay-off from a job at the Charlotte Motor Speedway pushes him toward Plan B: liberating some of the cash that speedway takes in on big race days. So he ropes in his bartender brother, Clyde (Adam Driver), and his sassy sister, Mellie (Riley Keough), plus noted bomber Joe Bang (Daniel Craig) and his crew — and it’s on. The film has a comfortable shaggy feel, even as it unspools a fairly tight heist. There are detours into kiddie pageants, John Denver songs, prison life, and the odious sorts of celebrities who hawk energy drinks. Honestly, it’s hard to lose with a cast this

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fun — Tatum gets blobby and a bit unkempt, downplaying his movie-star good looks and ultra-bod to portray the high school football star turned thirtysomething laborer — and there are loads of recognizable actors and assorted other famous people in cameos. And Soderbergh, who directed Oceans 11, 12 and 13, knows his way around a heist comedy. (There is a throwaway gag in the film about “Oceans 7-11,” riffing on the crime’s less glitzy milieu.) At the end of what feels like a tepid summer at the multiplex, this is a film you can feel confident dropping $10 on. Plus, there is a great Game of Thrones gag that will never be as funny as it is right now. (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY DOLLAR BANK CINEMA IN THE PARK. On a Wing and a Prayer, Wed., Aug. 23 (Schenley Park: Flagstaff Hill) and Sat., Aug. 26 (Riverview). Beauty and the Beast, Thu., Aug. 24 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 25 (Arsenal); and Sat., Aug. 26 (Grandview). The BFG, Sun., Aug. 27 (Schenley Plaza); Tue., Aug. 29 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., Aug. 31 (Brookline). Jason Bourne, Wed., Aug. 30 (Schenley Park: Flagstaff Hill). Films begin at dusk. Free. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

THE ONLY LIVING BOY IN NEW YORK. As we know from countless other films, novels and even memoirs, meaningful life for sensitive young men who yearn for creative fulfillment is truly difficult, especially if they come from New York City’s affluent corners. There’s so much to fret about: Is my girlfriend arty enough? Is she even my girlfriend? Will anyone get my novel? Is the Lower East Side too trendy now to slum in? Thomas (Callum Turner) has all these problems and more. He’s just discovered that his father (Pierce Brosnan) is having an affair with a colleague named Johanna (Kate Beckinsale). Thomas decides to resolve this emotional crisis … by pursuing Johanna as well. His tenement neighbor, a salty, boozy author played with gusto in his sleep by Jeff Bridges, encourages this skeevy set-up, under the

INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM. It’s whip-crackin’ adventure in India as the be-hatted Jones (Harrison Ford) searches for a mystical stone. Steven Spielberg directs this 1984 hit, the sequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 23. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 CONTINUES ON PG. 46

S c h wa r z e n e g g e r EXPERIENCE

MARJORIE PRIME. Jon Hamm and Tim Robbins star in this sci-fi dramedy, set in the near future, in which people interact with holograms of deceased loved ones. Michael Almereyda directs. Starts Fri., Aug. 25. Harris MENASHE. Joshua Weinstein directs this gentle dramedy set in Borough Park, Brooklyn, within an insular Hasidic community. Menashe (Menashe Lustig), whose wife died a year ago, plods through his life, somewhat unsatisfied. He has a tiresome job as a supermarket cashier, suffers the contempt of his in-laws, and is resisting various matchmaking efforts. Worst of all, he no longer has custody of his sweet teenage son, Rieven (Ruben Niborski), who, under religious law, cannot live in a single-parent household; Rieven is under the care of Menashe’s brother-in-law. Menashe is torn — though an observant Jew, he balks at some of the strictures; why can’t his boy live with him, or get ice cream? It also doesn’t help that Menashe is a bit of a mess, prone to clumsiness and not as neatly dressed as he should be. But he misses his

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

The Only Living Boy in New York ALICE IN THE CITIES. Wim Wenders’ 1974 film depicts a road trip shared by a German journalist and a 9-year-old girl he finds left in an airport. In English, and German, with subtitles. Aug. 25-30. Row House Cinema

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THE BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB. Wim Wenders’ lovingly made 1999 documentary profiles a group of elderly, near-forgotten practitioners of traditional Cuban music, both in their homeland and in concert abroad. In English and Spanish, with subtitles. Aug. 25-30. Row House Cinema WINGS OF DESIRE. Wim Wenders’ 1987 drama depicts two angels who watch over Berlin, one of whom (Bruno Ganz) has fallen in love with a trapeze artist. In German, with subtitles. Aug. 25-30. Row House Cinema PARIS, TEXAS. Harry Dean Stanton stars in Wim Wenders’ 1984 drama about a man who once ran away, but now is back and trying to reconnect. Aug. 25-30. Row House Cinema THE TERMINATOR. James Cameron’s 1984 sci-fi actioner put some real kick into time travel, when a cyborg from the future is sent back to now to essentially save himself. 6:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 25. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 TERMINATOR 2. James Cameron’s 1991 sequel — in which one cyborg from the future is after another — is back as a digitally remastered 3-D version. Screens all day, Fri., Aug. 25 only. AMC Loews Waterfront THE CHOP. When times grow lean at an auto-body shop owned by a former cop and his daughter, each turns to risky activities to keep the business afloat. She starts street racing, and he offers to “chop” a car for a dangerous man. The locally produced and shot drama is directed by Jack Davis. 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 26. Hollywood. $5 CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST. It’s a classic flesh-eating video nasty: Ruggero Deodato’s 1980 cult-horror film in which “found footage” depicts the fate of an unlucky film crew lost in the Amazon. Midnight, Sat., Aug. 26. Row House Cinema

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MURDER MY SWEET. Edward Dmytryk’s 1944 adaption of Raymond Chandler’s novel is a decent dark noir in which the cynical detective Marlowe is portrayed to surprising effect by the former freshfaced star of frothy musical comedies, Dick Powell. Captured by a nefarious doctor, Marlowe has a druginduced nightmare, one of the great early cinematic surrealistic freak-outs. To be screened in 35 mm. 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 27. Hollywood. $15 (includes chili, hot dogs, sides and beer or soda)

LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY. The city slums are the setting for this 1925 silent film starring Mary Pickford, directed by William Beaudine, in which the actress plays a tenement kid who is forced to grow up when her policeman father is shot. This restored version includes a newly composed and recorded musical score. 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 27. Hollywood

The Hitman’s Bodyguard MATA HARI. George Fitzmaurice directs this 1931 love story, loosely adapted from real life, about the titular exotic dancer who was a World War I spy. Greta Garbo and Roman Navarro star. The film, a favorite of Andy Warhol’s, screens in conjunction with The Andy Warhol Museum. There will also be live music and dance, and a vintage market, plus food, beer and cocktails for sale. Event opens at 5:30 p.m.; film screens at dusk. Tue., Aug. 29. Rooftop of Theater Square garage, Downtown. www.DowntownPittsburgh.com. Bring your own chair. Free RISKY BUSINESS. Paul Brickman directs this 1983 comedy about a teen (Tom Cruise, in Ray-Bans) who throws a big party when his parents are away. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 30. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 A LIFE IN WAVES. Brett Whitcomb’s new documentary profiles the life and innovations of composer and electronic-music pioneer Suzanne Ciani. In the lobby before the film, check out vendors of electronic music, as well as synthesizer demos. Doors at 6:30 p.m.; screening at 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 31. Hollywood


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COMFORT RIDE

“ATTACK IT. OWN IT. PADDLE THROUGH IT.”

{BY RYAN DETO} Jo Yong Jo and Ha Joo Young are students from South Korea on a mission: to bike across the U.S. and spread awareness about victims of sexual enslavement. During World War II, the Japanese army abducted women in Korea and throughout the Far East, and forced them into sex work with Japanese soldiers. In 2015, the Japanese government started a fund for the victims, referred to by their captors as “comfort women,” and the Korean government agreed to stop publicly criticizing Japan for those actions.

{CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

Ha Joo Young (left) and Jo Yong Jo (right) in Pittsburgh

However, many Koreans weren’t satisfied with that agreement and are asking Japan to more fully acknowledge its wrongdoing. Jo and Young are working to put the pressure on the Japanese government by spreading the story of comfort women across the U.S. The students started in Los Angeles on June 23 and biked along historic Route 66 to Chicago. From there, the friends biked to Pittsburgh; some days they traveled as many as 100 miles. They met with Pittsburgh City Paper on Aug. 15. “We want to raise this issue in the U.S. because the U.S. is the center of the media world,” said Young. “We don’t want to see this tragedy in any other [country].” Last year, Jo learned more about the details of comfort women and the campaign to get Japan to more fully acknowledge its role. “This news shocked me,” Jo said. “I decided to do something before [all of the comfort women] pass away.” Jo says that only 37 victims in South Korea are still alive, and most are in their 80s and 90s. The two young Koreans only trained for two months before starting their trek. They have enjoyed the ride so far, but Young says that biking in the Mojave Desert in California was difficult, and that Pennsylvania has been “hilly and hot.” On Aug. 16, a day after grabbing sandwiches at Primanti Brothers in the Strip District, the two students hopped on the Great Allegheny Passage trail toward Washington, D.C. They will end their trip at the end of August in New York City. RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{CP PHOTOS BY JAKE MYSLIWCZYK}

SUP 3 Rivers takes a group out on the Allegheny River.

SURF ’S UP I

F YOU’VE LOOKED out onto Pittsburgh’s three rivers lately, you might’ve noticed something a little different. In addition to the barges, tailgating boaters and jet skis, a new community of paddleboarders has emerged on the Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio rivers. Pittsburgh native Matthew Rumbaugh, 48, is one of them. He got his start with the adventure sport in 1997, in Hawaii. “I spent some time working over there for a few months and was able to learn how to catch some waves and surf a little bit,” says Rumbaugh, co-owner of SUP 3 Rivers, one of Pittsburgh’s paddleboarding tour and equipment-rental companies. “Then when I came back to the states, there were some people who were starting to stand up on long boards. And it

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started to take off.” His father built him a 14-foot kalua paddleboard, and he started going out on Pittsburgh’s waterways. From there, Rumbaugh bought a few more boards, and he and his SUP 3 Rivers partner Connie Bradley began taking people out for tours.

Standup paddleboarding is growing more popular on Pittsburgh’s rivers {BY REBECCA ADDISON} “I always believed the three rivers were a great place for urban adventure,” Rumbaugh says. “Paddleboarding gives you an opportunity to stand up, take a look at our

city, and take it in.” Standup paddleboarding is essentially a mix of surfing and kayaking. A certain level of balance is required, but Rumbaugh says it’s one of the more relaxing sports. “It can be a chill sport or a big sport for somebody who wants to really go at it,” Rumbaugh says. “I can take a novice and give them that exhilaration of being on the river in an urban setting. Or there are people who want to paddle super hard and keep their head down.” City Paper went out on the Allegheny River with Rumbaugh on a day when the waters were particularly rough. But he never let on. He exudes confidence and never lets newcomers believe they’re facing something they can’t handle. “Attack it. Own it,” he says after directing


you to angle your board into the wake created by a passing boat. “Paddle through it.” RUMBAUGH SAYS paddleboarding really

took off in Pittsburgh after the city hosted that giant yellow rubber duck, in 2013. People who came into town to see the duck also saw Rumbaugh and his fellow paddlers out on the river, and they talked to spectators about the emerging watersport. “You can always throw a board on top of your car and find a body of water somewhere and just go out and chill,” Rumbaugh says. “You can be on an ocean one day and a river the next.” Since then, both the local paddleboarding community and SUP 3 Rivers has grown. A few years ago, they reached an agreement with Citiparks to provide paddleboarding from Allegheny Landing, on the North Side, and South Side’s Riverfront Park. The rivers provide a unique experience for paddlers who have done excursions in different bodies of water around the city. While perhaps not as intense as paddleboarding on the ocean, Pittsburgh’s rivers make for a challenging experience. “I get a lot of people who say, ‘Oh, I’ve paddleboarded before,’ but not here, not on these rivers,” Rumbaugh says. “We’ve got wind, we’ve got current, we’ve got recreational boaters, we have kayakers, we have commercial boaters going by, and it changes your perspective.” And the rivers can be unkind. In July, SUP 3 Rivers took a hit when its boat was

damaged. The boat ferries boards and passengers onto the rivers, but it also provides a relaxing atmosphere for nervous newbies, complete with swinging hammocks. “Our boat took a dink this summer in these storms at the marina, but we dealt with it and it should be back in the water in September,” Rumbaugh says. “We didn’t stop doing what we do. We took a beating but we’re recovering.” And next month, SUP 3 Rivers will host its third annual South Side OutSide Paddle and Music Fest. As part of the event, on Sept. 2, paddlers will do a 10K from South Side’s Riverfront Park to the Roberto Clemente Bridge. This year’s 10k is dedicated to Rumbaugh’s friend Ronald “R.C.” Carik, who passed away three months ago.

WWW.SUP3RIVERS.COM “We always keep his life jacket on our boat,” Rumbaugh says. “We’re going to do a Hawaiian tribute to him out on the water for his family and his friends.” For first-timers looking to try out the experience, SUP 3 Rivers offers a “friendly first-timer” tour for $35 that includes a life jacket, board, leash and paddle. Rumbaugh or another instructor will help you learn the ropes, before pulling back a little to let you experience it on your own. “We’ll break off from that mini-tour with about a half-hour left so people can take it in themselves,” Rumbaugh says. “From there, it’s about their adventure.”

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

GAME MANAGERS

Jerome Bettis. Along the way, Knox tallied 186 victories; only nine NFL coaches have won more games.

{BY MIKE WYSOCKI} PITTSBURGH FOOTBALL fans have always loved the local players who made it to the big time. But we’ve also had our share of good coaches. Granted, the list isn’t as spectacular as the player list, but it does include two head coaches who are in the top 10 of all time in wins, and three who have won a Super Bowl. So let’s take a look at the local top 10.

Marty Schottenheimer He is one of them. Marty’s 200 wins rank him seventh on the all-time list. The reason he’s not higher on this list is the postseason. Maybe it’s fair, maybe it’s not, but winning hardware is usually what counts. Schottenheimer almost took the Browns and the Chiefs to the Super Bowl, so he should get credit for just getting close. He went to the same Fort Cherry High School that Marvin Lewis attended. Those two guys from a tiny little town accumulated 318 regular-season wins, but have gone 5-20 combined in the playoffs.

Bud Carson If the category were best defensive coordinator, the Brackenridge native and designer of the “Steel Curtain” would’ve been at the top. After one winning season in Cleveland, his “Dawgs” stumbled out of the gate the next season at 2-7, so the Browns fired the legend. This was just a few years before the geniuses that run the operation found a reason to fire Bill Belichick, too.

Joe Walton The father of Robert Morris University football was also an underrated athlete. Walton coached for the New York Jets during the ’80s, and had a 53-57-1 record. The perennially losing Jets even appeared in the postseason twice during Walton’s reign. The Beaver Falls native is also beloved at Pitt, where he played in two major bowl games for the Panthers, in 1955 and 1956. He also caught 28 touchdowns in the NFL. That’s a pretty good football life.

Joe Schmidt Maybe the greatest Detroit Lion this side of Barry Sanders or Bobby Layne. Schmidt has his number retired at Pitt and with the Lions. The Brentwood native also is

Mike Ditka Bill Cowher during a White House visit in 2006 after the Steelers won Super Bowl XL

in both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall. Plus, he did a little coaching. He took over as the leader of the Lions at the age of 34 and from 1967-72 compiled a 43-34-7 record. That wasn’t good enough for the Lions, who really haven’t had a better coach since.

Dave Wannstedt The Baldwin Highlander had the very unenviable task of replacing Mike Ditka in Chicago. He was like Ronnie James Dio taking over for Sabbath after Ozzy was gone. That’s a tough crowd to win over. He then took over for Jimmy Johnson in Miami and along the way went 85-89, including a 1-2 record in the postseason. He then went back to Pitt as head coach, but couldn’t live up to Pitt’s unrealistic expectations either.

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Marvin Lewis The greatest coach in modern Cincinnati Bengals history despite never winning a game in the playoffs. That’s seven losses for the McDonald native in seven tries. Lewis has a 118-103 record overall and has put together a few really good teams. Lewis has been handling Cincinnati since the beginning of the Iraq War, in 2003. He’s had about the same success rate, however.

Chuck Knox The former Quaker Valley star was the son of a steel-driving man. Players affectionately called the generous Knox “Dolemite,” in the 1970s for his ability to relate to minority players. After working under Joe Schmidt in Detroit, Knox went to Los Angeles and led the Rams to five straight division titles. His teams never made the Super Bowl, as the Minnesota Vikings knocked them out twice. He went on to coach Buffalo and Seattle before returning for one more year in L.A. to coach a young running back named

The only reason he’s higher than Marty is because Coach Ditka once did the Super Bowl Shuffle. He also led the legendary 1985 Chicago Bears team to the franchise’s only Super Bowl win. The Aliquippa tough guy went 121-95 in the NFL, including a less successful stint with the Saints.

Mike McCarthy At this rate, McCarthy will be No. 1 in a few years. He’s already won a Super Bowl, much to the dismay of the Steelers faithful in 2010. In 11 years at Lambeau, McCarthy has had only one losing season and has won the NFC North six times.

Bill Cowher Bill Cowher is so good that some Mike Tomlin detractors give him credit for winning two Super Bowls — one on his own and Tomlin’s first Super Bowl, won with “Cowher’s players” two years after Cowher left. But, until that flimsy conspiracy is proven, it’s only one world-title win. The Crafton Chin accumulated 161 wins in the NFL, including the Big One. In 2005, Cowher mercifully ended the Steelers 26-year Lombardi drought.

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The Pittsburgh District Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will hold a public meeting on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm at 531 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222. If you need an alternate format or any other accommodations, please contact Marci Katona at 412-392-4952. You can also connect remotely to listen to the discussion by using the following number August 29, 2017 1-800-260-0718 PIN: 426705.

TECHNICAL Cisco Sytems, Inc. is accepting resumes for the following position in Pittsburgh, PA: Software Engineer (Ref. #PIT10) Responsible for the definition, design, development, test, debugging, release, enhancement or maintenance of networking software. Please mail resumes with reference number to: Cisco Systems, Inc., Attn: G51G 170 W. Tasman Drive Mail Stop: SJC 5/1/4 San Jose, CA 95134 No phone calls please. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without sponsorship. EOE. www.cisco.com

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Resident Leadership Development Neighborhood Allies calling for leadership development organizations/individuals to develop residents into leaders of their neighborhoods. To see curriculum/proposal contact Shikha Jerath, Program Manager (412) 471.3727 (ext. 219) Shikha@neighborhoodallies.org or visit the website: http://neighborhoodallies.com/resources/rfp/ Deadline for Proposals: 5 pm, September 15th 2017

NORTH CAROLINA CRAVEN COUNTY

IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION FILE NO.: 17-CVD-523

CRISTY NICOLE MAYERNIK, Plaintiff, vs. ALBERT JAMES MAYERNIK, Defendant.

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION

TO: Albert James Mayernik TAKE NOTICE that a Complaint for Absolute Divorce and Equitable Distribution was filed against Defendant in Craven County, North Carolina, File No.: 17-CVD-523, in the above-entitled action. You are required to make defense to such pleading no later than 40 days after August 9th, 2017, the date of the first publication of this Notice. Upon your failure to answer the Complaint during the time prescribed, the Court will issue a Judgment for Absolute Divorce and equitably distribute the marital assets, debts, and divisible property of the parties. Publication Dates: August 9th, 2017, August 16th, 2017 and August 23rd, 2017. Katherine A. Forrest FORREST FAMILY LAW 1315 S. Glenburnie Rd., D-17, New Bern NC 28562 Tel.: (252) 631-5333 Fax: (252) 631-5340 N. C. State Bar #32673 Katherine@ForrestFamilyLaw.com

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ACROSS 1. With 69-Across, advice for the sad undergoing retail therapy? 4. Orlando hoopsters 9. DEA operations 14. Artist who owns warisover.com 15. Ever 16. “Star Trek” communications officer 17. Come-ons for the anxious in retail therapy? 20. Knockout stuff 21. Old-school TV comic Jack 22. Twee string instruments 23. First halves of LPs 25. Set with nothing in it 27. “Monument Valley” princess 28. Retro alcopop 29. Veggie in paella 32. Just okay 35. Somewhat 37. Five Pillars faith 39. Transaction discussed during Freudian retail therapy? 42. Iranian tongue 43. Word in a Shepard Fairey poster 44. Googly ___

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45. Give it a shot 46. Mass closing 48. Bring down to the station 50. Tag word 51. Pretend to be 54. 65-Across’s home 57. Plat du ___ 59. Scherezade’s home 61. Depressing number in retail therapy? 64. ___ Monday (first Monday after Thanksgiving) 65. French Indochina’s capital 66. Green: Pref. 67. Bug-eyed character of fiction? 68. Stamps purchase 69. See 1-Across

11. Put on a dour face 12. Tire swing’s spot 13. Attitude 18. Drawn out and boring 19. Instrument in a kit 24. Small batteries 26. Of the cloth 28. Attach, as a hood to a jacket 29. Recess activity 30. Calmness 31. Iowa city 32. Look (through) 33. Don of Reggaeton 34. Lively 36. Lumbering beasts 38. Mama grizzly

40. Make-up artist? 41. Gambling mecca 47. Magic art 49. Barbecue part 50. Gallery’s embarrassments 51. Likely (to) 52. “The Little Mermaid” mermaid 53. Plaster painting 54. Softball pitch paths 55. Bean variety 56. Polaris, e.g.: Abbr. 58. Home of the Uintas 60. Cat call? 62. Wacoal product 63. “Five Guys Named ___” {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

DOWN 1. Predict 2. Chapters in history 3. Dinosaur in the Mario World 4. Defective 5. Put away the plates 6. Struggles for air 7. “Casablanca” ingenue 8. Parent’s order to a mess-making kid 9. Long way around town? 10. Moving company

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.23-08.30

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): What I wish for you is a toasty coolness. I pray that you will claim a messy gift. I want you to experience an empowering surrender and a calming climax. I very much hope, Virgo, that you will finally see an obvious secret and capitalize on some unruly wisdom and take an epic trip to an intimate turning point. I trust that you’ll find a barrier that draws people together instead of keeping them apart. These wonders may sound paradoxical, and yet they’re quite possible and exactly what you need.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Psychologist James Hansell stated his opinion of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud: “He was wrong about so many things. But he was wrong in such interesting ways. He pioneered a whole new way of looking at things.” That description should provide good raw material for you to consider as you play with your approach to life in the coming weeks, Libra. Being right won’t be half as important as being willing to gaze at the world from upside-down, inside-out perspectives. So I urge you to put the emphasis on formulating experimental hypotheses, not on proving definitive theories. Be willing to ask naive questions and make educated guesses and escape your own certainties.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when you’ll be likely to receive gifts at a higher rate than usual. Some gifts could be big, complex and catalytic, though others may be subtle, cryptic or even covert. While some may be useful, others could be problematic. So I want to make sure you

know how important it is to be discerning about these offerings. You probably shouldn’t blindly accept all of them. For instance, don’t rashly accept a “blessing” that would indebt or obligate you to someone in ways that feel uncomfortable.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You are currently under the influence of astrological conditions that have led to dramatic boosts of self-esteem in laboratory rats. To test the theory that this experimental evidence can be applied to humans, I authorize you to act like a charismatic egomaniac in the coming weeks. JUST KIDDNG! I lied about the lab rats. And I lied about you having the authorization to act like an egomaniac. But here are the true facts: The astrological omens suggest you can and should be a lyrical swaggerer and a sensitive swashbuckler.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I invite you to eliminate all of the following activities from your repertoire in the next three weeks: squabbling, hassling, feuding,

get your yoga on!

confronting, scuffling, skirmishing, sparring and brawling. Why is this my main message to you? Because the astrological omens tell me that everything important you need to accomplish will come from waging an intense crusade of peace, love and understanding. The bickering and grappling stuff won’t help you achieve success even a little — and would probably undermine it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Stockbrokers in Pakistan grew desperate when the Karachi Stock Exchange went into a tailspin. In an effort to reverse the negative trend, they performed a ritual sacrifice of 10 goats in a parking lot. But their “magic” failed. Stocks continued to fade. Much later they recovered, but not in a timely manner that would suggest the sacrifice worked. I urge you to avoid their approach to fixing problems, especially now. Reliance on superstition and wishful thinking is guaranteed to keep you stuck. On the other hand, I’m happy to inform you that the coming weeks will be a highly favorable time to use disciplined research and rigorous logic to solve dilemmas.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the coming days, maybe you could work some lines from the Biblical “Song of Solomon” into your intimate exchanges. The moment is ripe for such extravagance. Can you imagine saying things like, “Your lips are honey,” or “You are a fountain in the garden, a well of living waters”? In my opinion, it wouldn’t even be too extreme for you to murmur, “May I find the scent of your breath like apricots, and your whispers like spiced wine flowing smoothly to welcome my caresses.” If those sentiments seem too flowery, you could pluck gems from Pablo Neruda’s love sonnets. How about this one: “I want to do with you what spring does to the cherry trees.” Here’s another: “I hunger for your sleek laugh and your hands the color of a furious harvest. I want to eat the sunbeams flaring in your beauty.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

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08.23/08.30.2017

Welcome to Swami Moonflower’s Psychic Hygiene Hints. Ready for some mystical cleansing? Hint No. 1: To remove stains on your attitude, use a blend of Chardonnay wine, tears from a cathartic crying session, and dew collected before dawn. Hint No. 2: To eliminate glitches in your love life, polish your erogenous zones with pomegranate juice while you visualize the goddess kissing your cheek. No. 3: To get rid of splotches on your halo, place angel-food cake on your head for two minutes, then bury the cake in holy ground while chanting, “It’s not my fault! My evil twin’s a jerk!” No. 4: To banish the imaginary monkey on your back, whip your shoulders with a long silk ribbon until the monkey runs away. No. 5: To purge negative money karma, burn a dollar bill in the flame of a green candle.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A reader named Kameel Hawa writes that he “prefers pleasure to leisure and leisure to luxury.” That list of priorities would be excellent for you to adopt during the coming weeks. My analysis of the astrological omens suggests that you will be the recipient of extra amounts of permission, relief, approval and ease. I won’t be surprised if you come into possession of a fresh X-factor or wild card. In my opinion, to seek luxury would be a banal waste of such precious blessings. You’ll get more health-giving benefits that will last longer if you cultivate simple enjoyments and restorative tranquility.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The coming weeks will be an excellent time to cruise past the houses where you grew up, the schools you used to attend, the hotspots where you and your old friends hung out, and the places where you first worked and had sex. In fact, I recommend a grand tour of your past. If you can’t literally visit the locations where you came of age, simply visualize them in detail. In your imagination, take a leisurely excursion through your life story. Why do I advise this exercise? Because you can help activate your future potentials by reconnecting with your roots.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): One of my favorite Cancerian artists is Penny Arcade, a New York performance artist, actress and playwright. In this horoscope, I offer a testimonial in which she articulates the spirit you’d be wise to cultivate in the coming weeks. She says, “I am the person I know best, inside out, the one who best understands my motivations, my struggles, my triumphs. Despite occasionally betraying my best interests to keep the peace, to achieve goals, or for the sake of beloved friendships, I astound myself by my appetite for life, my unwavering curiosity into the human condition, my distrust of the status quo, my poetic soul and abiding love of beauty, my strength of character in the face of unfairness, and my optimism despite defeats and loss.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Witwatersrand is a series of cliffs in South Africa. It encompasses 217 square miles. From this area, which is a tiny fraction of the Earth’s total land surface, humans have extracted 50 percent of all the gold ever mined. I regard this fact as an apt metaphor for you to meditate on in the next 12 months, Leo. If you’re alert, you will find your soul’s equivalent of Witwatersrand. What I mean is that you’ll have a golden opportunity to discover emotional and spiritual riches that will nurture your soul as it has rarely been nurtured. Each of us has a secret ignorance. What’s yours? What will you do about it? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

A few years ago, my dad was busted by the cops for using an online forum to solicit escorts. The arrest and infidelity destroyed his marriage to my mom. My brother and I were in our mid-teens at the time and were angry enough with him that we asked him to not seek custody. He obliged, and neither of us has seen him since. I miss my dad — or the man I thought he was. I know part of my anger comes from how badly he hurt my mom. As I mature, I’m wondering if I was unfair to my dad by cutting off all contact. I don’t think sex work is immoral. I don’t think people who see sex workers are bad. But because my dad was involved in this bust, and because I had to become aware of the double life he led, I felt uncomfortable around him. It doesn’t help that some of the girls were not much older than I was at the time. I think I’d like to get to know my dad again, but I’m not sure what kind of relationship I’m ready to have. He was a wonderful father — and on some level, I recognize I cut him off when he showed me he was human. How do I reach out to him? PLEASE HELP

Each of us is a writhing mass of contradictions, PH. We all have public personas and private personas, and there are always gaps between the two. And while those gaps, when exposed, can be mutually negating, that’s not always the case. It is possible for someone to be a good dad and a shitty husband. The good dad you knew your dad to be? That wasn’t a lie. It was one of your father’s truths. That he failed as a husband and hurt your mom — with an assist from laws criminalizing sex work — is another of your father’s truths. You don’t say why your dad was seeking sex outside the marriage, PH, and I can’t imagine that was a conversation you wanted to have with your dad in your mid-teens — and it may not be one you ever want to have. But it’s possible your parents’ marriage was more complicated than you know. (“The victim of an affair is not always the victim of the marriage,” as Esther Perel says.) But you’re not an awful daughter for refusing to see your dad during a contentious, confusing and most likely humiliating time. (I imagine there was press.) As for how to reach out, I think email is the best way to re-establish contact after an estrangement. You can take your time crafting what you want to say, and your dad can take his time crafting a response. And you’ve already written a good opening line for your first email to your dad: “I’d like to get to know my dad again, but I’m not sure what kind of relationship I’m ready to have. But I’d like to start talking — via email, for now.” Give your mother a heads up, PH, so she doesn’t feel blindsided. Good luck.

is more than casual, and we really care about each other. My concern is this guy has some alt-right sympathies that reveal themselves in our political discussions. He’s a Trump guy, but hesitates to admit it because he knows I’m antiTrump. He shares memes created by Mike Cernovich and Milo Yiannopoulos; he gets his news from hard-right publications; and his sister and brother-in-law are Holocaust deniers. This concerns and confuses me because he’s such a sweet guy and, honestly, so goddamn good in bed. He might be the best lay I’ve ever had. I can’t reconcile these two sides of him, but I also can’t help trying to enlighten him a little bit. One of his best features is his open-mindedness. He’s read books and watched documentaries I’ve recommended. I feel a responsibility to this young, confused and frankly nottoo-bright person who’s surrounded by bad influences. I want to be understanding and gently guide him in a better direction, but sometimes his ignorance is aggravating. I can also sense that he’s beginning to feel a little judged, which can only make things worse. I keep thinking of your Campsite Rule, and I wonder at what point does one give up throwing logic and articles at someone who thought Hillary Clinton ran a child-sex ring out of a pizza parlor? Can I continue to have sex with someone who thinks the left is conspiring to turn everyone communist? CONFLICTED LOVER

Don’t fuck Nazis. If someone you just met tells you they’re a Nazi, don’t fuck that Nazi. If you’re already fucking someone and they reveal themselves to be a Nazi, stop fucking that Nazi. If someone tells you they’re a Nazi and you fuck that Nazi anyway and keep fucking that Nazi because they’re good at sex (for a Nazi), your effort to “gently guide” that Nazi away from being a Nazi doesn’t make it OK for you to fuck that Nazi. OK, OK: This guy might not be a Nazi at all — although it sure as fuck sounds like his family is, and they probably have more influence over him than you do. It’s possible this young, confused and not-too-bright boy is merely a Trump-supporting conspiracy theorist, and maybe I’m still too upset about Charlottesville to be impartial. Or, hey, maybe this guy is already a Nazi and hasn’t revealed the full extent of his odious political beliefs to you, CL, because the sex is good and he’s hoping to fuck the Nazi into you before you can fuck the Nazi out of him. Finally, good people don’t worry about making Nazis “feel judged.” Nazis should be judged — à la Judgment at Nuremberg, an old film with a feel-good ending that’s worth watching right about now. Another thing good people don’t do? They don’t fuck Nazis.

“THEY DON’T FUCK NAZIS.”

I’m a woman in my early 30s having sex with a guy in his early 20s. The sex

On the Lovecast, women in gay bars — we have a problem: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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{CP FILE PHOTO}

RACISM IN BRONZE {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

EVEN FOR A SCULPTURE that has been the subject of scorn and accusations

of racism for decades, Giuseppe Moretti’s statue of Stephen Foster, on Forbes Avenue in Schenley Plaza next to Dippy the Dinosaur, has had a busy and controversial couple of weeks. The Pittsburgh-native 19th-century composer is consistently praised in the United States and abroad, often viewed as the inventor of American popular music. His songs such as “Oh Susanna,” “Camptown Races” and “Jeannie With the Light Brown Hair” remain widely recognized classics. However, many of his songs sentimentalize or spoof the lives of enslaved African Americans in imagined dialect that is roundly offensive today. Historians argue that Foster was sympathetic to enslaved African Americans, and even African-American abolitionist Frederick Douglass praised his songs. “They awaken sympathies for the slave, in which antislavery principles take root, grow, and flourish,” Douglass wrote. But today’s context of equal rights sets profoundly different standards than did the Abolition era. Changing sensibilities also apply to the larger-than-life bronze, which was created in 1900 by Moretti, with creative guidance from a committee that included newspaper publisher Thomas Keenan and political boss Christopher Lyman Magee, as well as Foster’s brother. The statue depicts not just Foster, but also Uncle Ned, the fictional, enslaved African-American subject of a song by the same name. In the sculpture, banjo-strumming Uncle Ned embodies a number of negative racial stereotypes — ragged clothing, bare feet and a frivolous grin, as well as his position at the feet of the serious and well-dressed Foster. There could hardly be a more vivid representation of a white man keeping a black man down. Unlike Foster’s music, there are no period comments from African Americans praising the sculpture. Kirk Savage, a professor of art history at the University of Pittsburgh who specializes in representations of race in art, says the monument, influenced by Foster’s brother, “is really a product of Jim Crow … making a statement about [the perceived] proper relation of the races.”

monuments to the Confederacy before outside groups chose those artworks as a focus for a local protest turned fatal riot and national headline. The City of Baltimore responded by removing its Confederate statues literally overnight. Locally based, nationally known blogger Damon Young, of Very Smart Brothas, published a post titled, “The Most Racist Statue in America Is In … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You Will Ever See,” as an intensifying flurry of inquiries emerged on social media, and in new outlets. “It’s becoming a much more public conversation,” says Savage.

THERE COULD HARDLY BE A MORE VIVID REPRESENTATION OF A WHITE MAN KEEPING A BLACK MAN DOWN. Pittsburgh activist Florence Bridges advocated for the removal of the statue during the civil-rights movement in the 1960s. In 1997, Mayor Tom Murphy responded to complaints about it by forming a committee. “But nothing happened,” said local pop-culture historian and cartoonist Joe Wos. In 2010, when local playwright Martin Giles directed a play celebrating Foster’s music at the Stephen Foster Memorial, located just across Forbes, he criticized the statue in comments to CP: “I don’t know why it is still there.” Even last year, as Pitt celebrated its Year of Diversity, the university fielded numerous complaints from students about the monument. Pitt Vice Chancellor for Diversity Pam Connelly formed an advisory committee including students, faculty and other interested community members. But now comes August 2017, and violence erupted in Charlottesville, Va., over the call to remove a public statue of Robert E. Lee. In fact, Charlottesville had conducted a series of deliberative discussions with numerous of its own community groups to consider the fate of its Lee statue and other

Pittsburgh’s mechanism for reviewing the work, which is city-owned and located on city property, is actually in place. “The way our system works, the Art Commission is the body to review it,” explains City Planning Director Ray Gastil. “The issues that have been raised are very serious ones.” Art historian and events producer Kilolo Luckett, who sits on the Art Commission, has advocated for removal of the monument since her days as a student in the 1990s: “No words of context could ever resolve the racist imagery that that statue reinforces.” A recent statement from the National Trust for Historic Preservation argues for precisely the kind of case-by-case deliberation that the Art Commission is scheduled to undertake in the fall, though Gastil, who oversees the Art Commission, says a date has not been set. Such a process will address the problems of the Foster monument, which include imagining African-American voices as subservient, instead of engaging them as equals. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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August 23, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 34

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