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EVENTS 8.26 – 2pm MEMBER TOUR: STARS OF THE SILVER SCREEN Free for CMP members; registration is suggested

8.26 – 3pm DANDY ANDY: WARHOL’S QUEER HISTORY TOUR Free with museum admission

8.29 – 5:30 -10pm STARS OF THE SILVER SCREEN ROOFTOP SHINDIG Rooftop of the Theater Square Garage in Downtown Pittsburgh Rooftop Shindigs are made possible with the support of Alco Parking, The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, WYEP & WESA FM. The Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen exhibition is generously supported by Cadillac. Free

9.15 - 8pm TQ LIVE! A queer evening of dazzling performance, dance, poetry, comedy, music, and more. Please note this performance contains adult subject matter and strong language. Tickets $10/$8 members & students

9.16 - 8pm & 10 pm NIGHT OF 1,000 MARILYNS 8pm VIP & General, 10pm Late Night Tickets $200 VIP; $50 General; $25 Late-nite

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen is generously supported by Cadillac.

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08.09/08.16.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 32

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[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns CARLEY BONK, HALEY FREDERICK, KRISTA JOHNSON, HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN MILLER, MATT PETRAS

[ART] Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[ADVERTISING] {COVER PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

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“We wanted to pay homage to Pittsburgh hip-hop tradition and culture that helped shape the national hip-hop scene.” PAGE 18

Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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“These kinds of incidents occur because of a prejudice and a lack of understanding about people who are different from you.” PAGE 06

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News 06 Views 14 Weird 16 Music 18 Arts 26 Events 30 Taste 34

Screen 38 Sports 40 Classifieds 42 Crossword 43 Astrology 44 Savage Love 45 The Last Word 46 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“IF WE DON’T ADDRESS THESE ISSUES, THESE INCIDENTS MULTIPLY AND BECOME BIGGER AND BIGGER.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Having flights of fancy? Check out our video from this past weekend’s Red Bull Flugtag 2017 at the Three Rivers Regatta at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Homemade flying machines weren’t the only things at the Regatta. Smash Mouth also performed. Check out our slideshow from the performance online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

City Paper staff writer Ryan Deto won an Association of Alternative Newsmedia Award for his piece on undocumented immigrant Martín Esquivel-Hernandez. Read it online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Our featured photo from last week is by @cjonez11. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

Want to get the freshest content sent right to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletters at pghcitypaper.com/newsletters.

Look for this official Documenting Hate logo online at www.pghcitypaper.com to report hate crime incidents.

HATE TRACK O

N NOV. 22, a few weeks after the presidential election, an Indian man named Ankur Mehta was allegedly attacked at a Red Robin restaurant in the South Hills Village mall. In addition to the alleged physical assault, Mehta was also subjected to racial and ethnic epithets. “Things are different now ... I don’t want you sitting next to me, you people,” Mehta’s attacker Jeffery Allen Burgess allegedly said. According to Bethel Park Police, Burgess believed Mehta was Muslim. In March, Burgess was indicted by the Department of Justice for hate-crime assault. He has been accused of willfully causing bodily harm to Mehta because of his “perceived race, color, and national origin.” If convicted, Burgess faces a maxi-

mum sentence of 10 years in prison, a fine of $250,000, or both. The next hearing in the case is set for Sept. 29.

City Paper joins national initiative to document incidents of hate; activists say that’s the only way to reduce them {BY REBECCA ADDISON} Dozens of activists showed up to a preliminary hearing for Burgess in March. Among them were members of the Pittsburgh chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations who decried the incident shortly after it occurred in November.

“These kinds of incidents occur because of a prejudice or an ignorance and a lack of understanding about people who are different from you,” says Zohra Lasania, communications coordinator for CAIR. “If we don’t address these issues … these incidents multiply and become bigger and bigger.” In an effort to do just that, City Paper recently joined the national Documenting Hate project. Launched by ProPublica, a nonprofit news organization, in the wake of the election of President Donald Trump, the project is aimed at improving data collection related to hate crimes and incidents of harassment and intimidation that arise from racism, sexism, homophobia and xenophobia. “There has definitely been an increase since Trump has taken over,” says Lasania, CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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“… because of his continuous rhetoric of promoting hate. His ideas promote these kinds of incidents.” According to the FBI’s latest statistics, Pittsburgh is among the cities with the highest rate of hate crimes in the state. In 2015, the most recent year data is available, Pittsburgh had the same number of hate crimes as Philadelphia, but our city has just one-fifth the population. And this data is incomplete. The FBI collects data from state and local law-enforcement agencies about how many hate crimes take place per year. But according to Documenting Hate partner manager Rachel Glickhouse, many local and state agencies do not give their data to the FBI. According to FBI data, there is an average of between 6,000 and 7,000 hate crimes per year in the United States. However, other figures, including an estimate from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, based on annual survey results, indicate the number of hate crimes could be closer to 250,000 each year. According to BJS, part of the reason for that discrepancy is that an estimated half of all hate crimes are never reported to police. “The information the FBI has is lacking and doesn’t cover every single hate crime that does take place across the country,” says Glickhouse. “You have these different gaps happening at different levels. First, you have people who just never report it to police, so it can’t be investigated, and then you have the agencies not informing the FBI. And also hate crime laws are different in each state.” Glickhouse says another reason for the incomplete reporting lies in the difference between the federal hate-crime law and individual state statutes. If a hate crime takes place in a state that doesn’t have a law, it has to be prosecuted as a federal hate crime or, often times, it is simply not prosecuted as a hate crime at all. “Because there are differences in the law, it can also affect how these crimes are investigated and ultimately prosecuted,” Glickhouse says. “So we’ve identified a bunch of these different issues, and we’re hoping to see how we can fill the gap.” Another goal of the project is to shed light on those incidents that do not meet the requirements to be considered a hate crime, such as ethnic intimidation or harassment based on gender, sexuality or religion. “There’s no government agency that tracks those kind of incidents,” says Glick-

house. “We wanted to leave it open because people know when they were victimized in some fashion, and whether it was a crime or not doesn’t matter to us. We’re looking at this wide range of hate incidents. A lot of what we’ve seen come into the database are harassment incidents of some nature, so clearly there is a problem here.” There are currently more than 100 newsrooms across the country involved in the project, and a few more are added each week. Participating news organizations have already been able to see trends based on the data that has been accumulated since January. For instance, one major trend has been the number of incidents that involve individuals being told to “go back to Mexico” or another country. Pittsburgh has seen similar incidents in the past, including one in December 2015 when someone tagged the Las Palmas grocery store in Brookline with that exact phrase. “That’s the same kind of language that was used in the Kansas City killings,” says Glickhouse, citing a February shooting where the accused gunman allegedly told the two Indiaborn men he shot “get out of my country” before opening fire. “It’s a pattern that we’ve found that reflects more serious crimes that have taken place. What we find in the database is this typical harassment doesn’t often rise to something more than that, but there have been these high-profile murders where that rhetoric was used.” Lasania, from CAIR, says the goal of the Documenting Hate project — to raise awareness about hate-related incidents — is an important method for reducing them. For its part, CAIR has worked to bring attention to dozens of such incidents, whether the victim is Muslim or not. “Whenever we see a hate incident — and it doesn’t matter whether the person is Muslim or not — anything that occurs due to discrimination, due to ignorance, we have to document it,” says Lasania. “If it’s left undocumented, if it’s left unaddressed, then these incidents of intimidation turn into bigger incidents of hatemotivated violence.” In July, CAIR partnered with the Union Project and held a bystander-intervention training to help people learn how to address the incidents of harassment and intimidation they witness. Lasania believes the large turnout at the event, and the passion displayed by participants,

“THERE HAS DEFINITELY BEEN AN INCREASE SINCE TRUMP HAS TAKEN OVER.”

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indicates Pittsburghers have the power to reduce the number of hate incidents that has risen in the months since the presidential election. “So many people showed up,” Lasania says. “That certainly shows that people are aware and people want to stop it. They don’t want these incidents to take place.” Twenty-four-year-old Ernest Rajakone is similarly hopeful. He was among those who turned out with CAIR to support Ankur Mehta, who was a victim of hate crime in March. As a fellow member of the South Asian community, he felt it was important to support Mehta, but also to send a message. “It’s very important in today’s environment where there’s a lot of intolerant and, often times, xenophobic rhetoric, both societally and politically, for victims to know that communities are standing behind them,” Rajakone says. “It also sends a broader message to the community at large that this kind of thing isn’t acceptable, and there are people out there who are pursuing a tolerant and inclusive vision for our community.” Rajakone works as a community-

affairs liaison for the City of Pittsburgh. He interned for Gov. Tom Wolf in 2014, and before that he served as a congressional intern for the U.S. House of Representatives. But none of these accomplishments have spared him from being the victim of ethnic and racial intimidation and harassment. “At points within my life, there were times where I didn’t feel comfortable because of my race or ethnicity. There were times where the way I was treated was because of the color of my skin,” Rajakone says. “I grew up in Central Pennsylvania, the heart of Trump country.” Despite the increase in hateful rhetoric since the presidential election, Rajakone agrees with Lasania that Pittsburgh and the United States as a whole are far better off than other countries and are committed to addressing these persistent problems. “My parents immigrated to this country from an area that was ravaged by civil war and political oppression,” Rajakone says. “Whatever flaws there may be within our society, the great thing about America is people can raise their voice about things that matter to them.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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SLOW LEAK Despite what you have heard, Pittsburgh’s still losing population to the suburbs. Will that change? {BY RYAN DETO} IT’S NO SECRET that over the past few years, Pittsburgh has been receiving high praise. The city has made countless lists like “best city for millennials” and has been named the “new Brooklyn” in national travel publications. And these declarations seem to have led many people to assess the city as booming. In replying to an April New York Times travel article declaring that Pittsburgh “now thrives on culture,” a Facebook commenter from Phoenix wrote “LOVE Pittsburgh, great city, great example of how to turn the rust belt around and not with a time machine back to 1970.” But while the city has much cooler stuff than it had a decade ago, it’s not actually growing, at least in terms of population. According to U.S. Census figures, the city of Pittsburgh lost 4,378 residents from 2010 to 2016. However, during this same time span, more than 20,000 people moved to a few bustling suburban

{CP PHOTO BY JORDAN MILLER}

Drivers head west on I-376 during rush hour in the daily exodus of cars out of Pittsburgh.

areas surrounding Pittsburgh. Experts and politicians agree that, while the city is doing better at attracting residents, it’s still losing out to the likes of Cranberry, Robinson and Peters townships. But with development taking off in many neighborhoods of the city, an influx of young residents to Pittsburgh, and steady job figures, can Pittsburgh compete and capture some growth for ourselves? Trends

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say probably not, but some think otherwise. According to Jed Kolko, the chief economist at jobs website Indeed, the faster growth of suburbs compared to cities is a national trend. Kolko posted on his website in 2016 that “the share of Americans living in urban neighborhoods dropped by 7 [percent]” from 2010-2014. And while cities are growing more slowly, suburbs saw their growth speed up. According to data compiled by Kolko, lower-density suburbs (those typically located farther from the city core) saw growth of 1.3 percent from 2015-2016, while urban areas only grew by 0.5 percent. This is true in the Pittsburgh region, too. Growth here is concentrated in a few suburban pockets, mostly in areas about 30 minutes from Downtown, and near an interstate highway. For example, five growing communities north of Pittsburgh (Cranberry and Adams townships in Butler County, and Pine, Marshall and Franklin Park in Allegheny County) have added 9,079 residents from 2010-2016. Three western Allegheny County communities, Findlay, Robinson and South Fayette townships, have added 6,777 residents during that time. And Peters, Cecil and North Strabane townships in Washington County, just south of the Allegheny County border, added 3,171 people. Chris Sandvig, of the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, says sometimes there’s nothing a city can do to attract suburb-bound residents. He says that because the region’s population isn’t experiencing overall growth, the area appears to be shifting people around, usually helped along by the construction of interstate highways leading to Downtown. For example, he points to the expansion of I-376 in 1962 and subsequent growth of Monroeville, when new suburban-style

homes and strip malls were being constructed there, even as the region was starting to lose population. During the ’60s and ’70s, Monroeville added more than 8,000 residents, but since 2000, the borough has lost about 1,400 residents. This doesn’t mean there’s no hope for growing Pittsburgh’s population. Chris Briem, an economist at University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Social and Urban Research, says signs point to a city revival, even as the overall population will continue to decrease. Briem notes the average age of Pittsburgh residents is dropping, even as the region’s age is staying the same. “That is a tremendously rapid change,” says Briem. This means younger residents are moving to the city. But the overall population is still declining, largely due to the high number of deaths of older residents. From 2010 to 2016, the Pittsburgh area experienced about 20,000 more deaths than births. Briem also notes that Pittsburgh’s success in maintaining jobs within city borders — about 300,000 over the decades — is promising. “We haven’t lost the jobs, we have almost the same jobs as we had in 1959,” says Briem. “The jobs are different, but in many places they are better.” But Briem says there’s still an “unanswered question” of whether young people will stay in the city to start families. Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto realizes this is an area the city can improve on. “When it comes to millennials, I think we are winning the competition with the suburbs,” says Peduto. “When it comes to people who are in their 30s and 40s, who are starting families, we are losing that competition.” Peduto says 30- and 40-year-olds are looking for good school districts and, to a lesser degree, are concerned about higher taxes. He says continuing to improve Pittsburgh schools and keep tax rates at a “competitive level” should help the city grow. Peduto adds that a more targeted approach to city-run tax abatements, like the Local Economic Revitalization Tax Assistance program, can help encourage new development, including affordable housing, and create more jobs. Sandvig, of PCRG, says Pittsburgh can attract more residents, especially if it focuses on a job-attraction strategy first, instead of bricks-and-mortar redevelopment only, like what is currently booming in places like Lawrenceville. “In a region where we are not gaining population, we have to figure out how to invest in jobs and people,” says Sandvig. “We need to help our home-grown entrepreneurs succeed [and] get more people access to the existing job pool, especially in communities of color.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

Charlie Deitch Editor, Pittsburgh City Paper 650 Smithfield St. Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA15222 Donald J. Trump President of the United States 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, DC 20500 Your Excellency, Please accept this letter as my formal application for the position of White House Communications Director. I know this position has been a bit of a hassle for you to fill, but I think that I am the right person to control that office without contributing to the massive pile of shit that you have created through your infantile “leadership” style and socially backward policies that are sure to drive the country into a white-bread, screw-the-poor, fuck-the-environment idiocracy. I think you are having trouble filling this position because your standards are too high. Now, I don’t mean that you are a man of strong convictions; that’s obviously not the case. You want a communications director who will parrot your asinine ideas and phrases, and back your play when you start talking nonsense about immigrants and tweeting about “fake news” and de facto confirmation of leaked reports about North Korean intel on Fox News (that’s a bit hypocritical, by the way). Anyway, I have a three-pronged approach to getting the communications office and the country back on track. At my first press briefing, I will stand behind Kellyanne Conway, Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Stephen Miller and knock their heads together Three Stooges-style. This move will raise the public’s confidence in the office because, trust me, they’ve been wanting to do it themselves. Each night at 11 p.m., I will force you to put on boxing gloves and then handcuff your hands together. This will prevent you from tweeting stupid crap overnight. I know you think people want to see what gold nuggets you’re tweeting, but they don’t. According to an Aug. 8 national CNN poll, the majority of Americans, including 50 percent of Republicans, think your tweets are harmful to this country. At this point, everyone knows it but you; but in your defense, you’re an imbecile. This step is the key component to tie the whole plan together: I will write your resignation letter. “Patriotically” yours, Charlie Deitch

PS. If you’ve already filled this position by the time this issue is printed, hit me up when you fire them next week.

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DEVASTATING INJURIES OR DEATH

“WE CHANGE PEOPLE’S LIVES”

3333 Gulf Tower, 707 Grant St Pittsburgh (412) 391-6636

Today’s businesses are in a state of constant evolution and change. The search for capable, qualified employees is becoming a challenging task. KROWN EMPLOYMENT SERVICES, LLC has been procuring top notch people for a variety of businesses for many years. Owner/ President Pam Plesh Weigand & her team are dedicated to offering staffing solutions that work and are in a state of constant training -- keeping abreast of important business issues. As a full-service company, Krown Employment Services provides administrative, 801 Vinial St, #102 hospitality, mortgage, industrial & technical candidates to businesses Pittsburgh throughout Allegheny, Beaver, Butler & Westmoreland Counties. (412) 567-7111 Krown Employment Services requires that all applicants meet with them personally so they can see how their skills could benefit their business partners. The staff at Krown Employment Services prides themselves on being “in tune” with the unique needs of local businesses and employees. Visit: www.krownempsvc.com

Personal injury attorney Mark Homyak of THE HOMYAK LAW FIRM, PC concentrates his practice in representing the injured & the families of the deceased, killed by the negligence of others or dangerously defective products. Mark’s practice includes the areas of industrial accidents, liquor liability, premises liability, truck, car & motorcycle accidents, animal attacks, product liability, medical malpractice and inadequate security. Mark’s law practice has collected settlements & judgments for many of his clients in the millions of dollars. Mark believes it is his responsibility to aggressively pursue his clients’ rights and to protect their interests within the bounds permitted by law. Visit: www.homyaklaw.com

FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY BABCOCK DENTAL CENTER, PC is a family-oriented dental

3372 Babcock Blvd Pittsburgh (412) 369-9010

FAMILY LAW, ATTORNEY MEDIATOR, COLLABORATIVE LAW

practice in Ross Township in the North Hills area. The doctors: Dr. Joanne M. Tovissi and Dr. Elena V. Kureichyk and their team realize that each individual’s dental needs are as unique as they are. Babcock Dental Center offers a wide array of services, including professional cleanings, same-day crowns, Zoom whitening, Invisalign orthodontics, and complimentary oral cancer screening using Velscope technology. Everyone at Babcock Dental Center understands that dental care can make people apprehensive. They are non-judgmental and try to make you comfortable and at home in their dental office. Your healthy and beautiful smile is their number one priority. Visit: www.babcockdentalcenter.com

Attorney Mildred B. Sweeney of SWEENEY LAW OFFICE emphasizes that mediation is a dignified, non-adversarial alternative to a “traditional” litigated divorce. It is often faster and much less expensive than litigation. Mildred has 25 years of prior experience as a Social Worker for a children’s community mental health service. Along with her associates Heather M. Papp-Sicignano and Flora Sweeney Hunzeker, 20581 Rte 19, #1 she also has a general practice that includes divorce & child custody, Cranberry Twp grandparents’ & father’s rights, elder law, estate planning, personal (724) 742-2590 injury, adoptions, juvenile matters & civil litigation. Mildred notes that mediation can be used for selected family law matters within the context of a disputed divorce, such as issues of custody, parenting, property & finances and any dispute that may arise after the divorce is over. Another approach is Collaborative Law, which also stresses resolution over litigation. However, if you ever need a strong, dedicated relentless advocate in your corner to protect your rights, this is the firm. Visit: www.sweeneyfamilylaw.com

MORIARTY CONSULTANTS, INC is a community-based service providing an important non-medical resource to help families and caregivers. Their service is an affordable solution for families, older individuals, couples or disabled adults capable of managing their physical needs but who require non-medical assistance. Moriarty Consultants assists with personal care (dressing, bathing, grooming 3904 Perrysville Ave & incontinence care), medication reminders, light housekeeping, Pittsburgh laundry, cooking & meal prep, shopping & errands, incidental trans(412) 732-9584 • (866) 303-1156 portation, escorting to various events and friendly companionship. Their sister company - MORIARTY CERTIFIED, provides a full team of nurses available for inhome skilled nursing services, adding to their effectiveness as a comprehensive in-home provider. Headquarters in Pittsburgh with eight locations nationally. Visit: www.moriartyconsultants.com

HELPING TRANSITION BACK TO FAMILIES & COMMUNITIES

HAPPIER HEALTHIER HUMANS

QUALITY IN-HOME CARE

Everyone deserves a second chance. RENEWAL, INC is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping individuals in the criminal justice system transition back to families and communities through prevention, early intervention, programming and treatment approaches. For more than four decades, Renewal has created pathways to help people successfully transition back into society, reemerging from the criminal justice system as productive individuals. Programs and services at Renewal include work release programs, 601 Grant St drug & alcohol treatment, mental health outpatient services, work 5th Fl, Pittsburgh development, family support and community services. Renewal (412) 690-2445 is accredited by the American Correctional Association, meeting and often exceeding all nationally recognized performance-based standards for their industry. Tax-deductible donations & volunteers are welcome. Visit: www.renewalinc.com

Marc Turina, MPT, CPE & his team at ERGOSMART CONSULTANTS have provided support for many Fortune 500 companies, helping to reduce injury risk for workers that manufacture many products that you use on a daily basis. As a Pennsylvania licensed physical therapist practicing for 13 years, Marc learned first hand how pervasive and debilitating work related musculoskeletal injuries had become. ErgoSmart’s team of Certified Professional Ergonomists provide comprehensive ergonomics consulting services, including evaluation One Winter Dr & complete development of ergonomics programs, assessments in McKees Rocks manufacturing, industrial & office settings, back safety, ergonomics (412) 788-4018 awareness, musculoskeletal injury prevention & ergonomic design training, Customized stretching programs, functional job descriptions development, and Ergo hotline services. Visit: www.ergosmart.net

A SPECIAL KIND OF MOVING COMPANY

EARLY CHILDHOOD SERVICES

The professionals at TWO MEN AND A TRUCK know that moving ranks as one of the most stressful times in a person’s life. That’s why they strive to make their customers’ moves as stress-free as possible. Employing “The Grandma Rule” to every customer, they treat their clients like they’d want their own grandmother treated—with great care and compassion. Two Men and a Truck offers free on-site or over the phone estimates, professionally-trained uniformed movers and drivers, and expert packing services and supplies. 355 Valley Dr, Pittsburgh The Pittsburgh franchise is locally-owned and is operated by 1800 Preble Ave, Pittsburgh lifelong Pittsburghers who understand the ins and outs of America’s (412) 357-2690 Most Livable City. Two Men and a Truck is an A+ accredited company with the Better Business Bureau and has a more than 96% customer referral rating. Visit: https://twomenandatruck.com/movers/pa/pittsburgh/southwest NEWS

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It’s all about our children. THE EARLY LEARNING INSTITUTE (TELI)’S early Intervention services are provided in the family home by licensed therapists to eligible children ages 0-3 in the areas of Speech, Occupational & Physical Therapies, Developmental Instruction, Social Work, Nutrition, Vision and Hearing Services. When children are not eligible for Early Intervention, or “age out”, but continue to need more therapy, therapists in their Outpatient Rehabilitation program can see the child for Speech and/or Occu2510 Baldwick Rd pational Therapy at offices located in Bethel Park & Greentree. From Pittsburgh their beginning, they continue to provide much needed care for de(412) 922-8322 velopmentally challenged children with diagnoses such as Down Syndrome, Autism Spectrum disorders (such as Asperger’s Disorder or Pervasive Developmental Disorder), delays caused by premature birth, and speech delays. Visit: www.telipa.org +

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A local chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees in Battle Creek, Mich., is butting heads with Western Michigan University this summer after the school brought in a goat crew to clean up an overgrown woodlot on campus, leaving union workers without jobs. The AFSCME’s grievance cites a collective-bargaining agreement with WMU, but university officials counter that “the area is rife with poison ivy and other invasive species,” which are difficult for humans to remove. The 20-goat crew, rented from Munchers on Hooves in Coldwater, Mich., is ahead of schedule in clearing a 15-acre area.

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Robert Kanoff, 49, celebrated Independence Day in an unusual way: High on drugs, he was dropped off in his birthday suit at a Tempe, Ariz., Walmart by two people who thought it would be “funny to see him naked,” said police. There he walked around the store wearing only shoes and carrying methamphetamines. Maricopa County sheriff’s officers caught up with him around 10 p.m. across the street from the store.

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First bikes, then cars ... now umbrellas. Maybe. Sharing E Umbrella hit the streets of 11 Chinese cities in April with more than 300,000 umbrellas for rent from subway and bus stations. Unfortunately, the company’s founder, Zhao Shuping, didn’t provide instructions about returning the rentals after use, and most of the umbrellas have disappeared. Zhao noted his mistake, saying, “Umbrellas are different from bicycles. ... With an umbrella you need railings or a fence to hang it on.” He plans to replenish his stock with 30 million umbrellas nationwide by the end of the year.

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The Do Son Buffalo Fighting Festival, in which water buffalo are pitted against each other, has been a tradition in Hai Phong, Vietnam, since the 18th century. But on July 1, buffalo trainer Dinh Xuan Huong, 46, met his doom when his own bull turned on him. The buffalo first knocked Dinh to the ground, then flipped him over its head, goring Dinh’s leg with its horn. Dinh later died at the Vietnam-Czech Friendship Hospital. Buffalo fighting was stopped in the country during the Vietnam War, but the fights resumed in 1990.

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412.704.7057 - 13040 FRANKSTOWN RD.

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH 412.281.4155 - 1509 5TH AVE

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S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS I T E M S TO

Police in Slidell, La., stopped a “car full of drunks” on July 8 and arrested the driver for driving while intoxicated. The car’s passengers rode home in a taxi, but one of the women then drove back to the police station to bail out the driver. Slidell officers arrested the woman for DWI, and she joined her friend in jail. “Lesson of the day,” Slidell officers posted on their Facebook page: “Don’t drive drunk to a police station in order to bail out your drunk friend!”

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Baseball fans at the Los Angeles Dodgers-Kansas City Royals game at Dodger Stadium on July 8 were treated to some righteous moves on the dance cam by “Rally Granny,” an older fan who capped her performance by flashing her bra at the 40,000-plus spectators. “You don’t see THAT much at a baseball stadium,” deadpanned Dodgers first baseman Cody Bellinger (who actually missed the spectacle).

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Two women in Arlington, Texas, called police for help on July 10 as a mentally ill man doused himself with gasoline in preparation to commit suicide. When responding officers began talking with the distraught man, he poured more gasoline on himself and appeared to be holding a lighter in his hand. Hoping to subdue him, one of the officers used his Taser on the man and the gasoline ignited, engulfing him in flames. Officers wrapped him in blankets and removed him from the house. His family reports he was severely burned, and at press time he was in critical condition.

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A mathematician in Bucharest, Romania, scored a 44,900-euro profit when he made an exciting discovery at a flea market there: a rare World War II Enigma machine, used by the Nazis for encrypting messages. After paying the unwitting seller just 100 euros ($114 U.S.) for it, he took it into his care, cleaning and repairing it and learning how it worked. On July 11, a Bucharest auction house sold the machine for 45,000 euros ($51,500 U.S.) to an unnamed bidder.

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Why hire moving professionals for just one appliance? A man in Brisbane, Australia, gamely tried transporting his full-size refrigerator on a Queensland Rail car in April. He first rolled the fridge, strapped to a handcart, onto an elevator to the train platform. Shortly after guiding it into the train carriage, the man and his icebox were removed from the car by transit officers, who wrote him a $252 ticket. Apparently, his item would not fit under a seat, in an overhead rack or in a designated storage area, as Queensland Rail rules specify.

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LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

NEW LOCAL RELEASES House & Hawk MICK JAGGER SOLO ALBUM HEAVY RIVER RECORD CO. WWW.HOUSEANDHAWK.BANDCAMP.COM/

House & Hawk is a local pop duo that fuses elements of indie rock, electro-pop and soundscape artistry to create a sound that reaches into many pockets of electronic music. On its latest album, Mick Jagger Solo Album, H&H creates a flowing voyage through different sonic landscapes. Alexander Strung (vocals, guitar, bass, synth) and Steve Ninehouser (guitar, bass, synths, drum machine) put their creative minds together to compose songs that feel expansive, like you could listen to them many times over and each time pick up on a subtle synth sound, dynamic or riff that you missed before. Strung’s gentle vocals and harmonies are a comforting-human anchor in a sea of digital sounds, particularly on tracks like the meandering epic “Tin Machine Singer.” In 11 minutes of shifting musical themes, Strung’s lyrics weave a tale of hunger for affection, acceptance of loneliness and eventual hope. His falsetto also drives the tone of ‘80s pop tinged “Stung (The Sweater Song)” and “American Beatles.” “Private Image Unlimited” and “George Michael” are two of my favorite tracks on the record, as they serve as nice outlier. “George Michael” is a slightly grimier track with Hollywood-esque campiness, the kind of track that makes sense to crank in your shitty banged up convertible as you cruise through the trash-ridden streets. “Private Image Unlimited” on the other hand is a more digitized track with a moodier energy and softer touch. Everything on this record sounds really nice. The synth sounds are super pleasing and pair nicely with the guitars and live drums. Mick Jagger Solo Album is intended to be listened to in its entirety on vinyl (the purple vinyl is gorgeous), but it’s worth digging up the full digital album on Heavy River Record Co. to have on hand for long drives in the dark. BY MEG FAIR FOR FANS OF: Neon signs, inflatable cacti, cold night air

Mandatory Attendance: Tune into 91.3fm WYEP this Friday during the Morning Mix with Joey Spehar to hear CP Digital Editor Alex Gordon’s recommendations — demands, really — for shows to check out this week.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

1Hood: Jacquea Mae, Jasiri X and Blak Rapp M.A.D.U.S.A.

GREATER HOOD {BY ALEX GORDON}

I

F YOU’VE attended any event in

Pittsburgh in the past decade where hip hop, education and activism intersected, it’s a safe bet you already know 1Hood Media, or have at least rubbed elbows with its members. The collective was formed in 2006 by activist and artist Jasiri X as a platform to bring hip hop, education, activism and community outreach under one roof to connect with communities in Pittsburgh. In the decade since, the group has evolved into one of the city’s most active and visible cultural institutions. On Fri., Aug. 11, at Spirit, the collective celebrates another milestone year with the third annual 1Hood Day, featuring performances from veteran rappers Beanie Sigel and Freeway (both Philly dudes, but 1Hood isn’t really about putting up

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walls), plus Jasiri X and 1Hood members Idasa Tariq, Blak Rapp M.A.D.U.S.A., Jacquea Mae, Livefromthecity, DJ Big Phill, L U C, Jordan Montgomery and more.

1HOOD DAY

FEATURING BEANIE SIGEL, FREEWAY, JASIRI X, IDASA TARIQ, BLAK RAPP M.A.D.U.S.A., JACQUEA MAE, LIVEFROMTHECITY, DJ BIG PHILL, L U C, JORDAN MONTGOMERY AND MORE 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 11. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15 online, $20 at door. All ages. 412-586-4441 or 1hood.org

“Our idea for 1Hood Day came out of two things we saw were lacking in Pittsburgh’s entertainment community. The first was a festival dedicated to hip hop,”

Jasiri X wrote in an email to City Paper. “We wanted to pay homage to Pittsburgh hip-hop tradition and culture that helped shape the national hip-hop scene, going back to when [Pittsburgh hip-hop artists] Mel-Man and Sam Sneed helped Dr. Dre create his legendary sound. “The second reason we started 1Hood Day was to give local hip-hop artists a platform to perform and showcase their skills. The venues in Pittsburgh don’t do a lot of hip-hop shows, and when they do, many promoters charge the artists to open up for national acts. We wanted to give the countless talented MCs that have come through 1Hood [an] opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder and rock with some of the best rappers to ever pick up a mic.” One of the hallmarks of 1Hood’s aesthetic is how it blurs the lines between


art and politics, activism and education. No performance is apolitical; no workshop or demonstration is without a sense of artistry. “The organization was founded by Jasiri 10 years ago to counteract violence in the city and create a productive space where people could write about what they’re feeling, sing about what they’re feeling, rap about what they’re feeling,” says Tye Clarke, director of public relations and creative enrichment at 1Hood. “It’s a beautiful way to intertwine art and activism together.” The first 1Hood Day, in 2015, was presented in collaboration with AR3, a summer basketball league dedicated to the memory of Anthony Rivers. After Rivers was murdered in 2008, his older brother Jason started the league (named for his initials and jersey number from his days at Penn State Greater Allegheny) as an effort to help redirect young people in the community away from violence. For the past two years, AR3 has hosted a basketball tournament in conjunction with 1Hood Day, and although they’re being held separately this year, 1Hood will still be involved. As a testament to the power of the event, the brother of the man convicted of killing Rivers now participates in the AR3 tournament, Clarke says. “That’s really an organic representation for what it means to really be community and come together despite differences and adversity and try to be productive,” says Clarke. In addition to splitting the tournament and the performances, this year’s concert will be the first to be held indoors and take place over only one day — to avoid potential weather issues and keep the event focused, respectively. While Clarke says the goal is to cultivate the vibe of a family reunion, reaching out and connecting to new voices in the community is also a priority at the event. 1Hood regularly receives inquiries about how to join the collective, and the event provides up-and-coming artists the opportunity to get a feel for what the collective and its members are all about. It plans to begin auditions and applications for new 1Hood artists in the next few months. New voices are vital to 1Hood’s success. “That’s where the name comes from,” says Clarke. “It’s about everyone being united. That means us as black people, putting out the issues that we’re having in our communities, but also finding allies and siding with the oppressed, no matter what color they are, what gender they are, just speaking for the people who can’t find their own voice.” AL E X GOR DON@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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PATH LESS TRAVELLED {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} IN FEBRUARY 1972, Todd Rundgren released what is widely known as his most popular record, Something, Anything. The double album contained hits like “Hello, It’s Me,” “I Saw the Light” and “Couldn’t I Just Tell You.” Fans responded positively to the record’s four sides of pop gold. So, following that record Rundgren knew exactly what his next step had to be: Make the weirdest fucking records possible. “A lot of artists are searching for a sound — some kind of signature thing that can then be driven into the public consciousness and have expectations built up around it. The kind of sound that you become locked into, and you couldn’t change it even if you wanted to without everyone accusing you of treason,” Rundgren tells City Paper by phone. “For me, being a musician was what I did in public. I actually made my living producing records for other artists [The Band, Patti Smith]. So, I didn’t feel the economic pressure that other artists would feel to be successful, to find a formula and stick with it.” After the string of hit singles off

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LYNN GOLDSMITH}

Todd Rundgren

Something, Anything, Rundgren did a “complete about-face and started making these weird records that didn’t even have singles on them,” he says. “I realized I

TODD RUNDGREN WITH YES

7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 16. Palace Theatre, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $85-350. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheater.org

couldn’t justify my existence if I was just going to imitate the things that other people were doing. I could only justify it by doing something nobody else would do. That became my calling card.” His new record, White Knights, is a series of collaborations with artists including Trent Reznor, Daryl Hall and Joe Walsh. He’ll be at Greensburg’s Palace Theatre on Aug. 16, opening for prog-rock outfit Yes, which was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame earlier this year (see story page 21). Critics have called the new album Rundgren’s most accessible in years. It’s the kind of endorsement that is either complimentary of the new record, or an indictment of all the experimental music Rundgren has been churning out since 1973. “I’ve often gotten the sense when someone is assigned to write a review of one of my records, and they’re overtaken with that feeling of, ‘Oh, crap, now I have to listen to the whole thing and I know I’m not going to understand it,’” he says with a laugh. “It doesn’t bother me when someone writes that they don’t like my record today. It doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with it. It may just be out of time, the same way that A Wizard, A True Star was out of time when it was released [in 1973]. But in the long run, it turned out to be the album that most influenced other artists.” Rundgren says understanding pop songs, like the ones on Something, Anything, is easy. The tunes contain messages and themes that relate to a lot of folks. But putting out music that is “different in form and content,” he says, “gives other musicians ideas about things that they can dare to do.” And while Rundgren’s music has often been left out of the mainstream for its uniqueness, the idea of doing something different shouldn’t seem that radical.

“People seem to forget about the long evolution that The Beatles went through. When they started out, most of their records were cover songs,” Rundgren says. “Then they started writing more and more of their own music, and then they began experimenting in other genres. George [Harrison] started playing the sitar, John [Lennon] started taking psychedelic drugs, and they started playing songs backwards and things like that. “They would essentially move through other genres and then discard them. I think that’s what you’re supposed to do as a musician. You’re not supposed to just rest on your laurels and play the same things all the time.” After finishing Something, Anything, Rundgren went back and listened to the songs and realized that most of them took him about 20 minutes each to write. A lot of contemporary artists today brag about how briskly they’re able to write songs. But Rundgren saw it as a problem. “I stepped back and said to myself, ‘That’s not right. I’m not thinking about this hard enough,’” he says. From there, Rundgren started pulling from all of his musical influences, from electronic music to classical music to Gilbert and Sullivan. He even changed his songwriting process; he built his own studio, which removed the pressure of needing to create fast to avoid paying exorbitant amounts of money for studio time. Rundgren says he likes to write the musical composition first, record it as it develops and then tweak it as needed. Once the track is done, he says, the lyrics come out very fast because he had spent weeks or even months thinking about them, “tamping them back down and letting my subconscious do the work.” That kind of deep dive into an artist’s mind is missing from a lot of today’s music. Rundgren says that comes from artists writing solely to make hits that appeal to as many fans as possible. Not that all contemporary acts are like that. Earlier this year, Rundgren made a surprise appearance at Coachella and played his “Couldn’t I Just Tell You” with New York band, The Lemon Twigs. But still, he says, a lot of today’s music lacks depth and a willingness to step out on a limb creatively. “Lyrics today have a lot of people going, ‘whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa; yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah; and la, la, la, la, la.’ Lyrics, today, have gotten inane,” he says. “The songs don’t have any depth because the people don’t have any depth. They’ve spent their whole lives singing about stuff and acting out the life of a pop star. They don’t actually go out and have real experiences like regular people do.” C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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SKY’S THE LIMIT {BY BILL KOPP} The landscape of pop history is littered with one-and-done acts, artists whose first album — no matter how good it might have been — failed or was lost in the commercial marketplace. Nearly all of these groups fade into obscurity, never to make an album again. Crack the Sky doesn’t fit into this particular narrative, though. In 1975, Rolling Stone named Crack the Sky’s first record “debut album of the year.” And then … nothing happened.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GLENN GOTTLIEB}

Yes

YES PLEASES {BY BILL KOPP} CURRENTLY THERE are two bands touring

as Yes. Long story short, after more than a dozen lineup shakeups and less-thanceremonious splits, the group now tours in two iterations. Both feature longtime members of the progressive-rock band: the group calling itself “Yes featuring ARW” includes original singer Jon Anderson, celebrated keyboard virtuoso Rick Wakeman, and Trevor Rabin, guitarist in the band 1982-94. The other band — simply known as Yes — is led by guitarist Steve Howe; he’s not the group’s original guitarist, but he joined in 1970. The Steve Howe-led Yes features several musicians who’ve been with the band — admittedly on and off — for a very long while: drummer Alan White (45 years), bassist Billy Sherwood (7 years, handpicked by founding bassist Chris Squire as his replacement before Squire’s 2015 death), vocalist Jon Davison (5 years) and keyboardist Geoff Downes (9 years). Downes, who featured most prominently on two of Yes’ finest albums (1980’s Drama and Fly From Here in 2011), appreciates that a Yes concert in 2017 has to be carefully put together to appeal to a diverse fanbase. “You have to kind of balance it out with the old and the new, if you like,” he tells City Paper in a phone interview. “And I think we do a fair job of that.” Yes’ set is designed to satisfy all kinds of fans. When Alan White joined in 1972, he was effectively thrown in the deep end. “Learning the whole repertoire in three days was quite an exciting challenge for me,” he tells CP. “And in fact, the first show I seemed to play most things right!”

After all these years, White has a hard time picking a favorite Yes tune. At first, he mentions a track from 1972’s Close to the Edge. “Playing ‘Heart of the Sunrise’ for instance is a great experience,” he offers, adding, “Oh boy, I could go on: ‘Sound Chaser’ and ‘Gates of Delirium’ from Relayer [1974].” Yes released 10 albums of new material between 1969 and 1980. And on this “Yestival” tour — coming to the Palace Theatre on Aug. 16 — it will play one song from each of those records, in chronological order. That’s likely to include anything from big hits (possibly “Roundabout” or “Long Distance Runaround” from 1971’s Fragile) to fan favorites (perhaps the entire album-side-long “Ritual” from Tales From Topographic Oceans).

Crack the Sky

Because of the group’s record label’s distribution conflicts, many potential fans couldn’t find its albums, even if they knew to seek them out. As a result, Crack the Sky never got the national-level exposure it deserved. But the progressive-rock band, led by guitarist and songwriter John Palumbo, persevered. “I hate looking back,” Palumbo tells CP in a phone interview. Instead, he and his bandmates focused on making high-energy and adventurous music for themselves, and for the band’s small yet ardent fanbase. Today, Crack the Sky uses social media to connect with listeners in a way that it couldn’t have back in the early days. “It’s amazing how social media has shrunk the world,” Palumbo says. “Our music gets out to a whole lot more people now.” Since 1975, Crack the Sky has released more than 25 albums. Many have been released on the band’s own label, Aluminum Cat Recordings. While most bands splinter within a few years, the 2017 version of Crack the Sky features three of its original members. Asked to reveal the secret to keeping a lineup together for such a long time, Palumbo chuckles and admits, “We don’t play that often!” As driven as Palumbo is to create new music, he’s responsive to what live audiences want. “We do what people want to hear; we’re there to entertain,” he says. So while the band might preview a track or two from the upcoming album, he says Crack the Sky’s live set features “the songs people know and have grown to appreciate.” Palumbo is straightforward when he tells what people coming to the show can expect: “Two-anda-half hours of rock ’n’ roll.”

YES WITH CARL PALMER’S ELP LEGACY AND TODD RUNDGREN 7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 16. Palace Theatre, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $85-350. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheater.org

Yes was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame earlier this year, one of few progressive rock groups to be included. And while they’re honored at the recognition, veteran members of the band view it with some bemusement. “You become eligible for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame when you’re 25 years [old as a] band,” Alan White says. “And it’s been almost 25 years since that happened to us!” And Downes believes Yes still has plenty to say as a band as it approaches its 50th anniversary next year. Even though the lineup has gone through many iterations — a hardcore Yes fan might refer to it as “Perpetual Change” (a song off 1971’s The Yes Album) — Downes says that “it’s the focus of the central core of musicians that really carries the torch.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CRACK THE SKY 8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 12. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. $25-29. 724-799-8333 or tickets.jergels.com

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGAN MCISAAC}

Valley Queen

alleghenycounty.us/summer

August 11 The Outlaws with The Steppin Stones

[CALI ROCK] + THU., AUG. 10

(Southern Rock)

August 13

BNY Mellon Jazz presents Larry Carlton with Don Aliquo Sr. & Jr. “Fathers and Sons” Album Release (Jazz)

All concerts are free and begin at 7:30 p.m.

Food trucks and Hop Farm Brewing Company craft beer at all concerts beginning at 6:00 p.m.

[FESTIVAL] + SAT., AUG. 12

includes vendors from nearby restaurants like Round Corner Cantina and Ki Ramen. This festival is open all day and costs zero dollars, so good luck coming up with a valid excuse not to go. HL Noon-midnight. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441 or www.spirightpgh.com

[SOUL] + SUN., AUG. 13 Retro-tinged soul group Durand Jones and the Indications, playing Mr. Smalls tonight, hails from Indiana via Louisiana. Jones and crew infuse their eponymous debut album with classic influences like Marvin Gaye, and classiccontemporaries like Leon Bridges. inspired contemporarie Jones’ voice is emotive, encompassing pining, sorrow and triumph, and the band backs it up with a slow but steady groove. Album highlights include includ the sweet “Can’t Keep My Cool,” about love bursting at the seams, and the fast-paced and perfectly f named “Groovy Babe.” HL 9 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Ave. Millvale. $10-12. 18+. 412-821-4447 or o www.mrsmalls.com

There are so many any summer music festivals, both in n town and across the country, thatt it can be overwhelming. Are any of them even worth th going to, or is it best to just st lie on a cold tile floor? ? Spirit is doing a great job of trying to lure you out of the house e with its second annual Summerr Durand Jones and Recess Food and d the Indications Music Festival. Music will include de such local talentt as Amir Miles, Honey, Sluggs, Super Yamba Band, and, Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution, n, High Waisted, Swampwalk, Chantillion, antillilil on on, The Hills and the Rivers, e Riv vers err , Outsideinside, The Va Van Allen Belt, Glowworms wworms and Good Sport. t. Food

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN HUBLER}

3W S

It’s surprisingly satisfying when a band’s name matches its sound. A band called Valley Queen seems like it would have a laid-back, West Coast sound in the vein of Fleetwood Mac, and it does! In March, the Los Angeles-based group released its debut EP, Destroyer, a minimalist album characterized by mellow, melancholy songwriting. Frontwoman Natalie Carol anchors its sound with her clear, strong voice and lyrics playing on the mythology of California, like “Out in California / Where no one ever dies / Or admits to growing older.” Valley Queen plays Brillobox tonight with local jazz-pop group Badluxe, fresh off the July release of its first EP, Ribcage Xylophone. ophone. Hannah Lynn 8 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 21+. 412-621-4900 orr brilloboxpgh.com

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08.09/08.16.2017

[PUNK] + AUG. 16 Get rea ready for an angsty night at The Mr. Roboto Project, featuring both traveling and featu local loca talent. Eight-piece pop-punk outfit Teenage pop Halloween has plenty of Ha angst, but also the big an sound you’d expect from so its hometown of Asbury Park, Pa evident on tracks like lik “Tiki Party.” Howardian is the dark Ho and experimental project of Ian V Vanek, utilizing spoken prologues and unconventional instruments. instruments s Rounding out the night Pittsburgh-based emo rock is the Pittsbu Corps., and the funky/ of Capsule Co of Soda Club. HL 7 p.m. dreamy pop o 5106 Penn Ave., Av Bloomfield. $7. All ages. therobotoproject.org thero


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mojo Dia & The Fireball Horns. 8:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. The CLUB CAFE. Nathan Angelo. Renfields, Thunder Vest, Mindless 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. Chaos & Appalachia Undergound. DIESEL. Cryptic Wisdom, 9 p.m. Allentown. 740-424-0302. C The Gray, Mix Fox, Young JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Niek & iD. 7 p.m. South Side. SPEAKEASY. Working Breed, 412-431-8800. Charm & Chain, Danielle Ponder & The Tomorrow People. Ballroom. 7 p.m. GOOSKI’S. Fire At the Outer Space Costume Point, The Elemental & Party w/ Starship Mantis www. per a p North By North. 9 p.m. & Dr. Slothclaw. 8 p.m. pghcitym o .c Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. North Side. 412-904-3335. MR. SMALLS THEATER. KENDREW’S. Hellin Blues Traveler w/ Swear Back Band. 9 p.m. Moon. & Shake. 7 p.m. Millvale. 724-375-5959. 412-821-4447. KEY BANK PAVILION. Foreigner, SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Cheap Trick & Jason Bonham’s Strap-On Halo, Adrian H & Led Zeppelin Experience. 7 p.m. The Wounds, Morpheus Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. Laughing & Erica Scary. 9 p.m. THE R BAR. The Rockit Band. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. 9 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

THE R BAR. Billy the Kid’s Steel Town All-Stars. 7 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882. STAGE AE. Gov’t Mule w/ Galatic. 6:30 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

SAT 12

SUN 13

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Mercedez Band. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

HOWLERS. J Flax and the Heart Attacks, The Bird Hour, Ouais. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

DJS

ROCK/POP THU 10

FULL LIST E N O LIN

FRI 11

MP 3 MONDAY LIVEFROMTHECITY

FINAL FRIDAYS WYEP’S

Fun, free Friday night concerts at Schenley Plaza Presented by

MON 14 CLUB CAFE. Janiva Magness. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Kleptokrat, The Lampshades & Valerie Kuehne. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Aug 25

TUE 15 HOWLERS. Fox 45, Heavy Traffic & Monolith Wielder. 8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

7 p.m.

CLOUD NOTHINGS

WED 16 CLUB CAFE. Goran Ivanovic Trio. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. STAGE AE. Taking Back Sunday w/ Every Time I Die, All Get Out. 6:30 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

THU 10 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

With special guests,

Wreck Loose Bike valet by Bike Pittsburgh

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NJAIMEH NIJE}

FRI 11 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. PLAY: an electronic chill out session. speakeasy. 10 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

More info at wyep.org

SAT 12 DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Feeling Without Touching. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825.

Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week’s track is Livefromthecity’s “Swim,” featuring his trademark melodic flow and a sick ’80s synth hook (think John Carpenter scores or, for the youngsters, It Follows). You can see Livefromthecity perform at 1Hood Day on Fri., Aug. 11, at Spirit (learn more in this week’s main music story). Stream or download “Swim” at FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

Sponsored by

TUE 15 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

FALL MUSIC INTERN WANTED The music intern will have a working knowledge of the local music scene and experience writing reviews, previewing shows and interviewing artists. Please send résumé, cover letter and samples to editor Charlie Deitch, cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com by Aug. 25, 2017.

SEVICHE. Hot Salsa & Bachata Nights. 10 p.m. Downtown. 843-670-8465.

WED 16 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BLUES THU 10 MOONDOG’S. Miller & the Other Sinners w/ The Stevee Wellons Band. 7:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 11 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Tony Janflone Jr. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. MIKE’S NEW MOON SALOON. Jack of Diamonds. 9 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-265-8188.

SAT 12 ELLIOTT’S BBQ & STEAKHOUSE. Texas Tex & His Honky Tonk Project. 9 p.m. Pleasant Hills. 412-779-3882.

The internship includes a small stipend. No calls, please.

JAZZ THU 10 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Lucarelli Jazz w/

ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. DTC Organ Trio. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Mark Strickland. speakeasy. 6 p.m. Return to Forever: Chick Corea Tribute. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. VINOSKI WINERY. Avi Diamond. 6 p.m. Greensburg. 724-872-3333.

“Cluck Old Hen”

Johnnyswim

“Hummingbird”

Arrow: Tribute to Neil Young. 7:30 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000.

MON 14

SUN 13

THU 10

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. The Vagrants. 12 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Ezra John Acoustic. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. STAGE AE. Dark Star Orchestra. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 16 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. J. GOUGH’S TAVERN. Academy Pickers. 8 p.m. Greenfield. 412-315-7029. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. www. per pa 9 p.m. North Side. pghcitym .co 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 11

08.09/08.16.2017

The Whiskey Shivers

7 p.m. Crafton. 412-922-8118. THE HARDWOOD CAFE. Eclectic Acoustics. 8 p.m. Butler. 724-586-5335.

ACOUSTIC

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

“Riot in the Streets”

ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Aaron Lefebrve. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

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Pokey LaFarge

SUN 13

WED 16

724-972-7734

“Sometimes”

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Jr. & Matt Ferrante. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-6769. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. 8 p.m. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

DISAPPEARINGINK.NET

Luke Bell

SAT 12

TUE 15

PITTSBURGH, PA 15201

Here are four songs that City Paper Editor Charlie Deitch can’t stop listening to:

FRI 11

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

3603 BUTLER ST

HEAVY ROTATION

Andy Yalch. 8 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

REGGAE

OTHER MUSIC

FRI 11 CLUB CAFE. Beauty Slap w/ Friends at the Falls & Northern White. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. RIVERS CASINO. Head Games. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 12 RIVERS CASINO. Artistree. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

BOULEVARD PUB. Eclectic Acoustics. 9 p.m. Canonsburg. 724-746-2250.

THU 10

SUN 13

PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

SAT 12

SUN 13

ARNOLD’S TEA HOUSE. Deutschtown Summer Series w/ Heather Kropf. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-322-2494. BLUE. Union Jack. 8 p.m. Allison Park. 412-369-9050. THE SHARP EDGE CREEKHOUSE. Tracy Lee Simmen.

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Tom Watt and the Fruitcakes. 5 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Henry Biggs. Henry L. Biggs has made music his life’s work as an accomplished vocalist, pianist, and teacher. He served as a music teacher for the Pittsburgh Public Schools for 33 years and has also been a member of the contemporary gospel singing group Voices for Christ for 31 years. 2 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

COUNTRY FRI 11 THE LAMP THEATRE. Broken


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

August 9-15 WEDNESDAY 9 Die Antwoord

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Hear Tonight, Sigmund Lloyd & Phased Out. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

21+ NIGHT: LET’S GET PHYSICAL CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER AUGUST 11

Gov’t Mule STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Galactic. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Larry Carlton

Free Fur-Ball

Nathan Angelo & Matt Simons

HUMANE ANIMAL RESCUE East End & North Side. Free cat adoptions. For more info visit humananimalrescue. org. Through August 12.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 8p.m.

HARTWOOD ACRES PARK. With special guests Don Aliquo Sr. & Jr. Free show. For more info visit allegheny county.us/summer. 7:30p.m.

MONDAY 14

FRIDAY 11 115

Future Thieves & Motherfolk SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Northern Gold & Horus Maze. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Janiva Magness

21+ Night: Let’s Get Physical CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit carnegiesciencecenter.org. 6p.m.

The Outlaws

THE FUNHOUSE AT MR. SMALLS Millvale. 412-421-4447. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SOUTH PARK. With special guest The Steppin Stones. Free show. For more info visit alleghenycounty.us/summer. 7:30p.m.

The Stolen

NEWS

Artie Lange CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall.

+

MUSIC

TUESDAY 15 George Heid III

The Roosevelts

THURSDAY 10

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opus one. 8p.m.

+

Cobb. Tickets: livenation.com. 7p.m.

412-462-3444. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 12 Crack the Sky

Chris Stapleton

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

KEYBANK PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guests Margo Price & Brent

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Foreigner & Cheap Trick KEYBANK PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guest Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience. Tickets: livenation.com. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 13

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AGNES KATZ PLAZA Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free show. 5p.m.

Ann Wilson of Heart THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. All ages show. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

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AND CLEARLY THINGS TOOK AN UNWANTED TURN

[DANCE]

WONDER LAND Legendary ballroom/vogue icon Leiomy Maldonado makes her Pittsburgh debut as headliner of True T Entertainment’s third edition of its #BlackOUT Weekend. The three-day, multi-venue festival, Aug. 11-13, features vogue workshops, dance parties, a kiki ball, picnic and performances celebrating queer people and artists of color. Maldonado performs Aug. 12 at Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s Alloy Studios, in Leiomy Maldonado — Legendary Leiomy, Iconic Vogue. The event begins at 6 p.m. with a pre-performance mixer. At 7 p.m., the dancing kicks off with True T’s performance troupe #kNOwSHADE in a vogue tribute to the underground ballroom scene. The ten-minute performance, says True T co-executive director Duane Binion, “will encompass the energy and vibe of what it means to be a queer person of color participating in ballroom.” Maldonado then takes the stage for a 15-minute voguing rendition of the “Cell Block Tango” from the Broadway and film smash Chicago, danced to an audio mix from Kevin JZ Prodigy, DJ Delish and DJ Mike Q. In an interview with Oxygen Media, the 30-year-old Bronx native says she began voguing in 2002 in order to cope with the anxieties of being transgender. Since then, her high-energy, daredevil performing style has rocketed her to international stardom. She has appeared on MTV’s America’s Best Dance Crew, and choreographed and appeared in Willow Smith’s music video “Whip My Hair.” Most recently, Maldonado became the newest face of Nike’s Be True equality campaign. Her signature hair-flip move, “The Leiomy Lolly,” has been adopted by Beyoncé, Britney Spears and Lady Gaga. Of the five traditional elements of vogue performance, it’s Maldonado’s “spin and dip” — collapsing one leg under her and falling backward in a dead drop to the floor — that has garnered her the nickname “Wonder Woman.” Says Binion: “Leiomy is a performer that always amazes the crowd. She feeds off of the audience’s energy so there will often be times where they clap and scream.” Rounding out the two-hour Aug. 12 program will be a post-show discussion with Maldonado, moderated by transgender activist Ciora Thomas, of SisTers PGH, and Naheen Cavalleri, of True T Entertainment. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LEIOMY MALDONADO — LEGENDARY LEIOMY, ICONIC VOGUE 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 12 (6 p.m. pre-show mixer). Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Admision is pay-what-makes-you-happy. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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Leiomy Maldonado {PHOTO COURTESY OF EBRU YILDIZ}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF REBECCA LESSNER}

Chamber of secrets: Natasha Neira’s This Isn’t About You (detail)

[ART REVIEW]

ROOM TO MOVE {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

U

PON ENTERING 709 Penn Gallery to experience Natasha Neira’s This Isn’t About You, if you take a few steps forward and keep your back to the door, it’s easy to forget where you are. This whole-gallery installation creating the private space of a young woman in emotional turmoil is precise, specific and rich, full to bursting with the trappings of a nostalgic rendition of femininity — and the traps of attempting to navigate safely within its boundaries. Vintage furniture, bedframe, dresser, wardrobe and vanity are all well-crafted hand-me-downs from a departed grandmother or maiden aunt, clean but plain and worn, received rather than chosen, more the backdrop of the room than its backbone. It’s what rests atop, within,

08.09/08.16.2017

around and beneath them that introduces and connects us to the girl — and “girl” is fair, because the room suggests the imitation of anticipated womanhood rather than its actualization, biological adulthood not yet ripened by maturity — who

THIS ISN’T ABOUT YOU continues through Aug. 27. 709 Penn Gallery, 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org

has made this space her own. And this being an interactive exhibition as well as an immmersive one, you’re permitted to inspect everything here hands-on. Garments silky, fuzzy, translucent and

diaphanous hang on a dressing screen and relax on hangers: limp pantyhose, seethrough peignoirs useless for any purpose but seduction, poodly wool coats with collars of real ermine or fox. Jewelry and purses and accessories provide support with sparkle and twinkle and shine, festooned with sequins, pearls and glitter. Warpaint in the form of lipstick and powder waits ready beside a mirror or abandoned on the floor, and reference materials of Playboy and scandal rags are strewn everywhere. Clearly there was a mission. A few halfused packs of birth control pills back it up. And clearly things took an unwanted turn. Augmenting the flotsam of persuasion and jetsam of entrancement is the detritus of rejection and the desperate depression that follows, ashtrays abundant


with butts and stinking, empty bottles of booze ready to be broken underfoot, prescription bottles strewn pell-mell and, one can imagine, ineffective. And finally, the last refuge of the lovelorn, frantic and fraught: the empty hope of divination — prayer candles promising invocations to resurrect the flames of passion grown cold, once their wicks are lit and burning, and fortune-telling cards making the unwieldy boast that, if read correctly, they will reveal the necessary action to bring your loved one back into your arms. These objects collectively construct a narrative, and once regarded with the requisite attention, the story unfolds loud and clear — sometimes literally so, with the assistance of an old-school turntable and a Bakelite phone that will doubtless raise questions as to its purpose from younger observers. At first, the story could be deciphered as a tale from decades gone by: The majority of the articles, whether lingerie or porn, are flawless period pieces from the middle of the last century. But a

SEEING CLEAR {BY FRED SHAW}

few anachronisms make us reassess the timeline — records by the Talking Heads and Blondie, the writings of Erica Jong and Don DeLillo, empty cartons of Chinese food, can after can after can of LaCroix. These are jarring, but what they do for our appraisal is heartening. This no longer seems the story of a woman who has reached, sadly, an end, but a woman who is in transition, progressing from attempts to be what she believes she’s supposed to be, to figuring out who she is. The title of this work references the clichéd and painful excuses given by the one who no longer loves to the one who still does, a throwaway phrase designed to cushion the blow of abandonment and make it easier — not for the injured party, but for the one doing the wounding. It’s not you, babe, it’s me. But while that blithe and worn nugget of douchebaggery might be originally intended to recall words spoken to the artist, it can also be interpreted as words spoken by the artist to those viewing her work. Contextualized thus, this compact phrase positions viewers to consider not only their response to what they’re observing, but their role in doing so. This work is here, and you can look at it, you can respond to it and have an opinion and ideas. But this work is not here for you. This work is here for this locally based artist, driven by her need to tell this tale.

Liane Ellison Norman begins her new poetry collection, Way Station (Finishing Line Press), with “2015,” which reads, “In these latter days / I throw my poems — / small stones — into still ponds / In hope / that someone / will see rings.” She’s looking to make connections with readers. Forgoing experimentation and clever wordplay, the book leaves its mark through Norman’s sincere voice as her speaker observes and explores a life genuinely lived. Norman, a member of Carlow University’s Madwomen in the Attic workshops and long-time Pittsburgh resident, was born in Montana, the daughter of a Forest Service range ecologist and an elementary-school teacher. This perspective informed much of her previous collection, the solidly written Breathing the West: The Great Basin Poems. Her newer work continues to consider family, aging and the dynamics of nature and human intervention. Here, poems about a daughter dying young of cancer are especially poignant. In “Mend,” Norman writes of “The lovely wool sweater / hand-knit by a dear old friend / for my daughter’s 36th birthday.” The tactile lines describe the speaker wearing “a cotton turtleneck so the wool / won’t castigate my skin.” With the once moth-eaten sweater now mended, Norman writes, “when I wear it, I feel how short / the time was between Emily’s / birthday and her death / less than a month later.” The garment looms as a tender symbol for the brevity of life. Meditations on growing old, like the title cut, “Way Station,” show the speaker grieving “for the mind I once had,” while “Self-Portrait as I Am,” concludes by confidently stating, “Blood still courses in veins that stand / ropey and blue, little mountain ranges.” “Lately” finds Norman musing that “I’ve been rehearsing / death — / the next big thing.” While poems on maturing may not be racy, the honesty of these, including “Losing Memory,” with its metaphorical ending: “It’s the small things — / forgetting the name / at the tip / of my tongue … / rainbow trout / in the cold mountain stream,” makes them uniquely insightful. An appreciation of nature abounds in these 78 pages, relying on crisp images and a tone that swings between wonderment and dismay with humanity. The e.e. cummingsesque “Every Year” highlights the former, as Norman writes, “Although / it’s happened / before / I’m astounded / as the small blades / cut through wet soil / then / as if by magic / everything’s in bloom.” In the end, Way Station is a book that sees the big picture in engagingly personal ways.

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Through September 8, 2017 Plan to spend Friday evenings at the Frick this summer! Join us for: Free Performances • Family-friendly Activities • Wine Bars • Food and Fashion Trucks

The Frick is open Fridays until 9:00 p.m. Visit TheFrickPittsburgh.org for information.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF HANK BULLINGTON}

Front row, left to right: Brittany Tague, Matt Henderson and Sara Ashley Fisher in Mr. Burns, a post-electric play, at 12 Peers Theatre

[PLAY REVIEW]

TELL A VISION {BY TED HOOVER} THE WORLD is devastated; civilization

What have you always wanted to know about Pittsburgh?

“WHY DOES PITTSBURGH HAVE AN H IN IT?” “IS A PARKING-SPOT CHAIR LEGALLY BINDING?” “WHAT IS SLIPPY?” Mike Wysocki has the answers. (well...sorta)

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has collapsed, and the humans left alive wander from city to city in search of food, family, fuel and, hopefully, an end to their crushing sorrow. Their last connection to the old times, the one element bringing them together and, perhaps, ameliorating their loss, grief and aching need for connection is … The Simpsons???? That’s what playwright Anne Washburn would have you believe in her dark 2012 comedy Mr. Burns, a post-electric play, now getting its local premiere through 12 Peers Theater.

MR. BURNS, A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY continues through Aug. 20. 12 Peers Theatre at University of Pittsburgh Studio Theater (Cathedral of Learning), 4200 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $20. www.12peerstheater.org

In the first act, an unnamed apocalyptic event has left the world without electricity, and a group of survivors bands together somewhere in New England. To fill the void, they pull from their combined memories the “Cape Feare” episode of The Simpsons, which spoofed the 1991 remake of the 1962 film Cape Fear. The second act takes place seven years later, when this group is now making a living as troubadours performing that episode, along with commercials, for the populace. In the intervening years, the episode has changed, reflecting the nature of memory as well as how external forces can alter received perception. Act III is set 75 years hence. The episode

has now become myth, as we watch a group presenting “Cape Feare” as a morality play/religious pageant; it’s become a cautionary tale explaining how the world became what it’s become. I’ll say one thing for her: Washburn’s got an enormous imagination, and this look at the evolution of storytelling is an intellectually intriguing one. In its way, Mr. Burns is a scathing indictment of faith and consumerism, something you don’t often see in the theater. The 12 Peers production features a fully committed cast attacking the play with conviction and utter fearlessness. While I wish that director Vince Ventura had upped the dramatic stakes considerably (especially during a listless first act, where the characters aren’t just sitting around a campfire telling stories but, really, sitting shiva), the company plows through the following two acts of what is, ultimately, an unworkable play. Alfred Hitchcock used to gleefully mock people he called “The Improbables” ... those who let plot holes and gaps of logic distract them from the movie. Being an Improbable at Mr. Burns is impossible, since the plot is nonsense. In 82 years, no one has learned to generate electricity? (Did the rivers stop flowing?) And if there is electricity, can no one work a DVD player? And if so, hasn’t anyone thought to watch a Simpsons disc? I also didn’t understand why rival performance troupes would be fighting for pieced-together television scripts with 500 years of complete playscripts laying around. In an apocalyptic landscape, I predict a Neil Simon revival. If Washburn had trimmed an hour from this two-and-a-half hour play, we might not have had time to ask these questions, and Mr. Burns could be a far more successful entertainment. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Paulette Poullet’s “Game Day Bacchanal”

[ART REVIEW]

WALL STARS {BY LISSA BRENNAN} JULY’S PITTSBURGH Cultural Trust Gallery

Crawl began early at SPACE Gallery in preparation for Wall Paintings: Storytellers. Works were not hung on the walls, but painted directly on them, by artists given eight hours to create their contributions in public view leading to that evening’s opening reception. Robert Raczka, who has guest-curated three previous live-painting exhibitions at SPACE, selected a dozen artists or teams to participate. The premise, “storytelling” (arguably the premise for every single work of art ever generated), was the lone theme, and 12 feet by 12 feet the dimension. The result is a varied collection that follows the directive in ways ranging from specifically literal to highly interpretive.

comics, caricature, and animation, and her entry here is clean and vivid, evocative of old-school cartooning, charming in its simplicity. Longtime Pittsburgh art aficionados will immediately recognize the subject of Marcel Lamont Walker’s portrait as the late artist Judy Penzer, depicted with images from some of her best-known works; it’s great to see her again, and, for those who are unfamiliar, it’s great to be introduced to the person behind her iconic murals. Paulette Poullet’s “Game Day Bacchanal” incorporates intoxication, cornhole, dogs and sports; if you imagine a soundtrack of “Love Is Like a Rock” seguing into “Renegade,” it’s a carton of Turner’s away from being The Most Pittsburgh Artwork Ever, and is a damned good time. Nils Hanczar’s “Family History” takes a more holistic view of local life in what initially looks like a glorious narrative of a beautiful existence in a beautiful town, until you notice the labor necessary to support it all; the respect given to bluecollar work makes it beautiful and, well, emotional but not sentimental. The biggest flaw in this exhibition is shared by all exhibitions of this kind. All of these works will go away, erased when the walls are painted over in preparation for what comes next. One hopes that the artists will incorporate these transient works into something permanent, as all deserve to continue.

THE BIGGEST FLAW IS THAT ALL OF THESE WORKS WILL GO AWAY.

WALL PAINTINGS: STORYTELLERS continues through Sept. 3. SPACE, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

Jayla Patton depicts the storyteller herself, mouth frozen mid-speech, caught in the act of spinning a tale to captivate her audience in “Better Than A Villian” [sic]. Patton typically works in

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.10-08.17.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com Cleveland native Stephanie Armbruster came to Pittsburgh to study painting at Carnegie Mellon University; she graduated in 2006, and within a few years became a presence on the local scene with her striking abstract encaustic paintings. Numerous solo and group shows followed. But for most of 2016, Armbruster took a sabbatical from painting, partly because of her travel schedule as a digital marketing consultant for higher education (with clients including

Penn State). Travel, however, has since repaid her art. What Hath Night to Do With Sleep, Armbruster’s new solo show at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, was inspired by those trips — which included, more recreationally, her first visit to Europe. The large-scale title work, for instance, was sparked by taking in the Louvre — “Nothing prepared me for the scale of it all,” she says — where several works referenced John Milton. (The show’s title quotes the famed British poet.) Armbruster traces “Speak Your Name by the Secret Door” to a site in Berlin, and “The Moon as Viewed From the Bottom of a Well” was inspired by a Haruki Murakami novel she read while flying to San Francisco. While Armbruster’s three new works in molten wax and pigment reflect a palette that still forefronts deep, dusty blues, she’s also including examples of a new technique, with five mixed-media works on paper, incorporating oil paints and coal blacks: “I’ve completely fallen in love with it.” What Hath Night is one of seven new shows opening Aug. 11 at PCA. Also featured is work by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh, and Allegheny Metals Club, and by solo artists Christine Lorenz, Laura Jean McLaughlin, Desiree Palermo and Amy Schissel. BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS Opening reception: 5:30-9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 11 (free). Exhibits continue through Oct. 29. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pfpca.org

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY MARGESON}

^ Thu., Aug. 18: BikeFest

thursday 08.10 CYCLING Bicycling has gotten so big here that it was an issue in the mayoral campaign. Mark the growth with Bike Pittsburgh’s 13th annual BikeFest. The 18-day fest includes some 40 events, mostly independently organized rides — long and short, urban and rural, easy and hard — but also safety seminars and other fun stuff for every interest and experience level. Start with tonight’s BikePGH beer er release, at Grist House, or Saturday’s kickoff party, rty, at the Wheel Mill, and ride on from there. BikeFest concludes Aug. 27 with UPMC Health Plan PedalPGH, the region’s biggest ride. Bill O’Driscoll Aug. 10-27. Various venues. Most events are free. Complete schedule at www.bikepgh.org

MUSIC Contemporary Broadway tunes sung by local professional talents, for free, alongside one of the most spectactular views of Downtown: Broadway at the Overlook has all that, this weekend and next. On the West End’s Elliott Overlook, hear Pittsburgh Musical Theater artists, backed by a live band, offer selections from shows in PMT’s upcoming season, including Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Evil Dead: The Musical and High School Musical. Picnickers are welcome

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starting an hour prior to the 90-minute program. BO 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. nightly Fri., Aug. 11; Sat., Aug. 12; and Aug. 18 and 19. Free. West End. www.pittsburghmusicals.com

friday 08.11 POP CULTURE The Steel City Con returns to the Monroeville Convention Center today, bringing comics and toys to buy, and celebrities to see, including headliner Burt Reynolds. Hundreds of vendors are promised, plus contests for costumes and trivia. Panel participants include cast members of The Brady Bunch; the Karate Kid himself, Ralph Macchio; and Beverly D’Angelo and Dana Barron, who played Ellen and Audrey Griswold in the National Lampoon’s Vacation movies. Matt Petras 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 12, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., Aug. 13. 209 Mall Blvd., Monroeville. $23-50. 724-502-4350 or www.steelcitycon.com

^ Fri., Aug. 11: Zinzi Clemmons {PHOTO COURTESY OF NINA SUBIN}


PROUDLY TATTOOING PITTSBURGH SINCE 1994!

tattoo & piercing studio Open Daily, 1pm-8pm

^ Fri., Aug. 11: Café Racer Magazine Readers Ride-In Bike Show

walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended!

WORDS It’s her debut novel, but Zinzi Clemmons is already receiving a great deal of praise for What We Lose. Clemmons primarily tackles loss, following a protagonist grieving over the death of her mother. “The story not only thematically and structurally changes the usual story of loss, but also highlights a hardened subject matter with new and original attention,” writes Elena Bruess for The A.V. Club. Clemmons, raised in Philadelphia and currently living in Los Angeles, visits White Whale Bookstore tonight. MP 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www. whitewhalebookstore.com

(412) 683-4320 5240 Butler St.

Pgh, PA • 15201 inkadinkadoo.net

LET S GET ’

S CIAL

FESTIVAL Sewickley is custommotorcycle central this weekend courtesy of the 10th annual Café Racer Magazine Readers Ride-In Bike Show. You needn’t subscribe to the internationally distributed, Sewickley-based periodical to enjoy its biggest show ever, dedicated to hand-built street bikes. Festivities begin with tonight’s cocktail party at The Slippery Mermaid and a screening of Quadrophenia (rockers vs. mods!) at the Tull Family Theater. All day tomorrow, in War Memorial Park, join pro and amateur builders ^ Fri., Aug. 11: Artie Lange from across the U.S. and Canada for demo rides, a used-bike marketplace, a parts-and-accessories swap, cash-and-prizes bike contests, food trucks and more. There’s even a day-long film fest of classic British biker flicks. BO 7 p.m. (various venues). Also 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., Aug. 12 (625 Blackburn Road). Sewickley. $5 (bike registration: $10; Quadrophenia screening ticketed separately). www.caferacermag.com

STAGE

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British playwright Caryl Churchill (Top Girls, A Number) is known for her fierce wit and daring experiments with dramatic structure. In the 1979 comedy Cloud 9,

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAQUELINE FOUASNON}

^ Fri., Aug. 11: Good Joke/Bad Joke Bingo

saturday 08.12 act one follows the escapades, sexual and otherwise, of a British family in colonial Africa circa 1880; act two is set a century later with several of the same characters, though they’ve aged only 25 years. Cross-gender and cross-racial casting are also involved. Starting tonight, Throughline Theatre Co. tackles Cloud 9 at the Henry Heymann Theatre. Edwin Lee Gibson directs a cast including Malic Williams, Liam Ezra Dicksinson and Tracey D. Turner. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 19. 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-20 (add $10 for opening-night party; Aug. 12 performance is pay-what-you-can). www.throughlinetheatre.org

EVENT:

EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta at Point State Park, Downtown CRITIC:

Clyde Myers, a factory worker from DuBois

WHEN:

Sat., Aug. 5

COMEDY

It was kinda neat watching the [Red Bull Flugtag competition]. It was like they were trying to launch, like they were in airplanes. So they’d launch them off, but they just fell in the water [laughs]. They were like a small airplane, they weren’t real big. I just happen to catch it. We sat on the Fort Pitt Bridge and watched it from there. There was a lot of people [watching]. A lot of people on the bridge, people on the stands, people over by the Point. It was just kinda interesting, I’d never seen anything like it. It was different. I try to come to the [Regatta] every year. The powerboat race is probably No. 1. I like watching the boats. I like being around water, so anything around the water. B Y M ATT P ETRAS

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Shawn Wickens brings his touring comedy show Good Joke/Bad Joke Bingo to Steel City Improv tonight. Wickens thought it was crazy that his fellow New York comedians didn’t want to leave the state following Donald Trump’s election, fearing poor crowd reaction, so he went ahead and did it. The show finds Wickens performing standup based on jokes randomly pulled via bingo numbers. Audience members can also win prizes described as “cheap, insignificant [and] hilarious.” MP 8 p.m. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $10. 412-404-2695 or www.steelcityimprov.com

FESTIVAL You don’t need permission to make chalk art on public pavements. But today’s inaugural Northside Chalk Walk encourages everyone to grab a stick of compressed limestone and get to work on the sidewalks. Seven neighborhood locations, including James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, Artists Image Resource and Scratch Food & Beverage, will have sidewalk chalk on hand at this day-long, family-friendly event, which also incorporates art vendors, live painters, music, food trucks and more. The evening’s Adult Chalk Walk includes ticketed sets by local bands at James Street. BO 11 a.m.7 p.m. Adult Chalk Walk: 7 p.m.-midnight (free). North Side. www.facebook.com (“NSChalkwalk”)

ART Sweetwater Center for the Arts opens the exhibit Familiar Spaces, featuring the work of Lauren Scavo. The landscape drawings by this Pittsburgh native are “extremely intimate,” according to press materials; Scavo was inspired by actual Western Pennsylvania landscapes. Several works feature a thick grey border that frames the drawing in a distinctive way. Scavo herself visits for an Aug. 17 artist talk. MP 9 a.m.5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 9. 200 Broad St., Sewickley. 412-741-4405 or www.sweetwaterartcenter.org

BURLESQUE

Like burlesque itself, the Steel City Kitty Burlesque & Variety Show’s summer {PHOTO COURTESY OF WITTY PIXEL} COMEDY party is a tradition. The sixth annual ^ Sat., Aug. 12: Steel City Burlesque & Variety Show Comedian Artie Lange, a former iteration of producer Kat de Lac’s regular on Howard Stern’s radio extravaganza features Kitty regulars program, continues to have a like Just Jingles and boylesque star Smokin’ McQueen successful career despite his history of drug addiction alongside an all-star cast of visiting talents working in and a 2010 suicide attempt. Lange, who plays the burlesque, comedy, contortion, puppetry, sideshow and drag. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall tonight, is known for Guests at the Rex Theater include New England’s Kristen his openness about his foibles. In one standup routine, Minsky & The TropiGals; New York’s Clea Cutthroat; Seattle’s on Comedy Central’s This Is Not Happening, he cracked up Luminous Pariah (described as “hyper-intelligent satire mixed explaining how he once hurriedly bought some drugs from with avant-garde costume pageantry”); Toronto-based drag a dealer while still in a pig outfit for a Mad TV skit. MP king and comedian Maximum Capacity; and more. BO 8 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $39-49. 877-987-6487 or 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20-30 (VIP: $50-100). www.librarymusichall.com www.steelcitykittyshow.com

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CURRIED-CHICKEN POT PIE WAS TOPPED WITH ETHEREALLY CRISP PUFF PASTRY

TRUCK TRACKER {BY ALEX GORDON} Paul Landry’s idea for a food-truck-tracking app dates back to 2013, as Pittsburgh’s food-truck scene was growing from niche novelty to ubiquitous dining option. Landry was a Pitt student and passionate food-truck patron who would “buy food out of the back of basically any vehicle that [offered] it.” But he found himself frustrated by the inconsistency and unpredictability of food-truck schedules. “I thought that if there was a way to track food trucks in real time, I wouldn’t have to drive all that way only to have nothing but sadness for lunch,” Landry wrote in an email to City Paper. So he contacted his friend and Radio Shack co-worker Jonathan Worek — who, ironically, had never eaten from a food truck — with the idea to build an app that would track food trucks in the area in real time using GPS. It took a couple years, working around full-time careers and families, but today, Mobile Nom is fully operational in Pittsburgh and 17 other metro areas around the country. A user opens the app and enables location services, and then a map appears displaying all the food trucks in the area. Click on a pin, and the app shows how long that truck will stay in that location, when it’ll be there again, and a menu of its offerings. You can download Mobile Nom from the app store, or discover more at Mobilenom.com. ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

Many store-bought

granola bars are glorified sugary cookies. Make healthier ones easily in the oven (there are many simple directions online, for chewy or crispy). Combine whole oats and other grains with the nuts and dried fruits of your choice. A great summer snack, and a big batch keeps well in a tin.

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{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Scotch eggs: sambal mustard, seven-minute egg, housemade sausage and English toast crust

BRITISH AND INDIAN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

C

ULTURES AND identities are constantly in flux, and what we think of as the central foods of many national cuisines feature ingredients that haven’t always been there. Still, we were a bit leery when we first heard of a ginand-curry-themed restaurant opening in Dormont. Undeniably, Indian ingredients and cooking techniques influenced the eating habits of colonial Brits, and vice versa. But would this be a problematic celebration of the Raj era? While the menu at Needle & Pin is primarily British-Indian, almost nothing else about the place suggests imperial kitsch or the exoticization of the world’s most populous democracy. The design is smartly modern, with white marble tile, darkstained wood and odd, yet fetching, wall art comprised of faux-grass checkerboards

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and botanical glass mosaics. A larger-thanlife-size mosaic of an elephant above a little lounge area in the back of the dining room was the only overt reference to India at all, and a subtle and handsome one at that. Our only complaint about the premises was that it was awfully noisy.

NEEDLE & PIN 3271 W. Liberty Ave., Dormont. 412-207-9724 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 4:30 p.m.-midnight; Fri.-Sat. 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m.; Sun. brunch 10 a.m.-2 p.m., dinner 4:30 p.m.-midnight PRICES: Small plates $9-13, large plates $16-24 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Otherwise put at ease, we dove into the menu. Divided between smaller “plates” and larger “dishes,” the page-long list was

a nearly even blend of curried British classics and English-inflected Indian foods, although (it comes as no surprise when you consider the culinary reputations of the respective nations) curry tended to win out, flavor-wise. Deciding was tough. In the end, we got nearly half of what was on offer, and for shockingly little money: four plates, two dishes, and two fancy cocktails barely topped $100. Jason loves Scotch eggs, but they do tend to be a bit … heavy. Needle & Pin didn’t mess with the essential formula, but they only cooked the egg seven minutes and didn’t go overboard with the housemade sausage coating. Scotch eggs tend to be paired with hearty, bold sauces. Nobody would consider a curry bland, but the spicing in the sambal mustard was much subtler, and a


wonderful complement to this more refined version of the British pub staple. When we ordered the cumin-crusted lamb lollipops, we were just as excited about the cucumber slaw, but that turned out to be too watery to provide much punch. Fortunately, the lamb — available as two bones or three — made up the difference, with some char and a flavorful Bengal-spiced cilantro emulsion that was a bit like a creamy chimichurri. Curried-chicken pot pie came topped with a big square of ethereally crisp puff pastry, beneath which finely shredded chicken and carrot chunks reposed in a rich, mildly spiced gravy. A good choice for the timid, this was tasty and professionally prepared, but rather staid as a whole. Our final small plate was actually two-in-one and its reference — grilled cheese and tomato soup — as familiar to Americans as to Brits: tikka grilled cheese with curried-coconut tomato bisque. The sandwich — with cave-aged Gruyere and white cheddar plus onion jam on crusty, thick-sliced farm bread — was excellent on its own, but together with the soup, amazing. The roasted-tomato base took on a distinctly subcontinental inflection with garam masala warm spice blend, kashmiri chili powder and shredded coconut to give the soup a bit of texture and underscore its slightly sweet notes. We also went full-on tikka with Needle & Pin’s interpretation of chicken tikka masala. The rich, complex tomato sauce was served with shredded roasted chicken breast and thigh for a pleasing mix of white and dark meat, and chopped vermicelli noodles were a surprisingly good substitute for rice. The “English tea biscuit” in the menu description turned out to be a small square of the same heavenly puff pastry we’d so enjoyed atop the pot pie. A lot was happening with the bangers and mash. It started with traditional British sausage and got creative from there: Potatoes were mashed with ghee (Indianstyle clarified butter) and turmeric, turning them a vibrant yellow-orange, and then wrapped in puff pastry, which added texture, of course, but also doubled down on richness, especially as it absorbed the jus and tamarind chutney in which it rested. There was a certain similarity to the pot pie, with humble foods both fancified and fused to Eastern flavors. But this dish packed more punch, thanks in part to the chutney, the sweet spice of which helped cut the otherwise pervasive richness. Needle & Pin neither negates the socio-political context of the food it serves, nor confronts it. Its focus is, rightly, on the food, a historical culinary fusion prepared with creativity and skill. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

ONE-PAN BREAKFAST {BY SAWYER SIDELINGER, REGENT SQUARE}

Now Open!

At home, I like to make things that are easy, look appealing and are nutritious. This one-pan breakfast is my go-to for Saturday mornings — it’s super tasty and very easy to make. You can change it as you please, adding different spices, herbs or vegetables each time, so it’s not tiresome. My favorite version is the one I’ve included below.

412-252-2877 Check us out @ frontporchgrille.com

INGREDIENTS • 3 small yellow potatoes, quartered • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into comparable size to the potatoes • 1 clove garlic, minced • ¼ red onion, large diced or julienned • A handful of spinach • 4 eggs Add all spices to taste: • paprika • cumin • chili powder • chili flakes • salt and pepper

MON to SAT 11A - 9P | SUN 4P - 9P 5865 ELLSWORTH AVE, 15232 | 412.441.4141

INSTRUCTIONS I prefer to use a well-seasoned, 10-inch cast-iron pan for this recipe, but a non-stick oven-safe pan will work as well. Begin by preheating your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. On the stove top, start with a tablespoon of olive oil in the cast-iron pan and turn the heat on high. Raise the temperature of the pan until the oil shimmers, then decrease the heat to medium-high. Place the yellow potatoes into the pan and begin to brown them. Once you start seeing color on the potatoes, add the sweet potatoes. Let the potatoes caramelize and brown on all sides. Turn down the heat just slightly to avoid burning, and add the onions and garlic. Then add the paprika, cumin, chili powder, chili flakes, salt and pepper. (I typically know I have the right amount of seasoning by the look of the potatoes. I like to see even color distribution of the spices, but I also want to see the potato flesh.) Next, add the spinach and let it begin to slightly wilt, adding a bit more salt and pepper. Once the spinach starts to cook, I crack in three to four eggs and place the pan in the oven until the egg whites begin to set around the yolk. Pull out the pan and serve immediately.

WWW WW WWW.SENYAIPGH.COM W S ENY NYAI AIPG PGH CO M

Join us for the 34th Annual Ypapanti Greek Food festival August 17, 18, 19 and 20 Free Admission and Parking 11:00AM - 10PM Thurs - Sat 11:00AM - 7PM Sun

Olympia Hall 1575 Electric Avenue • East Pittsburgh, PA 15112 w w w. y pa pa n t i . n e t • w w w. g r e e k b u r g h . c o m

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WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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TAJ MAHAL INDIAN RESTAURANT

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine

MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

OAXACAN CUISINE

FRIDAY, AUG. 11TH LIVE MUSIC LATIN GUITAR

HAPPY HOUR

• Award Winner for Best Indian food 2000-2017 • The proud caterer for G20 summit - #1 choice for catering Indian cuisine. All events, weddings, anniversaries, baby showers • Lunch buffet 7 days a week • Dinner buffets Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

s Wednesday - Friday 5PM-7PM Half Off Appetizers!

{CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON}

A selection of drinks available at Superior Motors

[ON THE ROCKS]

ALCOHOL-FUELED Superior Motors revs up a superior drinks program {BY DREW CRANISKY}

TAJ MAHAL IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY CHEF/OWNER USHA SETHI SINCE 1996.

7795 McKnight Rd • 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com

WE CATER! Authentic traditional handcrafted Hungarian cuisine

A LEGACY BAR & GRILL

627 E North Ave

in Pittsburgh’s Northside

412-322-8795 huszarpittsburgh.com

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IF YOU KNOW only one thing about Superior Motors, you know this: It’s been a long time coming. Thanks to a record-breaking Kickstarter campaign, the ambitious Braddock restaurant had more than a few folks watching its progress. For the better part of three years, there wasn’t much to watch. But despite construction delays and tight budgets, chef Kevin Sousa and his team finally opened Superior Motors in mid-July. What’s left to do but have a drink? Beverage director Jeremy Bustamante is happy to provide one. Bustamante’s relationship with Sousa goes back to Salt of the Earth, where he ran the bar for several years. When the job with Superior Motors came his way, Bustamante says it was a no-brainer. Fans of Salt will recognize a familiar format in Superior Motors’ cocktail program, which consists of a clean list of 10 drinks named after their base spirits. “It’s a very seasonal menu,” explains Bustamante. “We try to use a lot of fresh herbs, and try to keep sugar levels low.” Perhaps no drink on the opening menu embodies this approach more than the one called “Vodka.” The seasonal cocktail contains just three ingredients: vodka, mulberries and lemon. There is no sugar aside from the slight sweetness of the mulberries. The vodka is local (Boyd & Blair), and the mulberries are hyper-local: Bustamante and general manager Chris Clark harvested the fruit from a tree in Superior Motors’ parking lot. (The mulberries have since been switched out for tomatoes.) Like Sousa’s food, the drinks will feature foraged ingredients and local produce,

including herbs grown right down the street at Braddock Farms. The 50-bottle wine list, curated by Clark (formerly of wd~50 in New York), is split evenly between Old World and New World selections. In keeping with the restaurant’s focus on education (it is developing a youth training program), Clark offers something called a “dual strand,” which allows guests to sample a rotating pairing of New World and Old World wines. Reflecting a nationwide obsession with pink wine, rosé comprises nearly a third of the list, and seven rosés are available by the glass. Clark has also assembled an impressive sake selection, which pairs nicely with Sousa’s Asian-tinged cuisine.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. 412-271-1022 or www.superiormotors15104.com

As for beer, the bar boasts six drafts and a small selection of bottles and cans. Not surprisingly, one tap pours Brew Gentlemen beer, which is made just blocks from the restaurant. The other taps are all Pennsylvania beers, and Bustamante hopes to eventually make the entire draft list local. Like the food, the drinks at Superior Motors will change with the seasons and the whims of Bustamante and his team. But regardless of the specific selection the night you stop in, the energy and excitement of the long-awaited venture will be palpable. “How happy am I to be working with Kevin Sousa again?” says Bustamante, beaming. “I can’t even describe it.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: THE BEE’S KNEES

VS.

Carmella’s Plates & Pints

Kelly’s Bar & Lounge

1908 E. Carson St., South Side

6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty

DRINK: The Bee’s Knees INGREDIENTS: Hendrick’s gin, honey-ginger syrup, lemon juice OUR TAKE: Sour, floral and sweet flavors make this precisely what a bee might love to drink. The botanicals of the Hendrick’s are highlighted by slightly spicy ginger and citrus notes.

DRINK: The Bee’s Knees INGREDIENTS: Dry gin, honey syrup, lemon juice OUR TAKE: Crisp, refreshing and sweet, this classic drink is a perfect simple pick-me-up for the hot weather. Gin and lemon pair bracingly with light notes of rose.

This week on Sound Bite: We visit the student-staffed East End Fruit Cart. www.pghcitypaper.com

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Absolut Hibiskus Vodka $19.89/L “This is something summery and floral. I bartend during the Saturday and Sunday matinees and I make lemon vojitos [vodka mojitos] with this. Three slices of lime, six mint leaves and a sugar cube muddled and then shaken with this vodka. It’s a great, mellow weekend-afternoon drink.” RECOMMENDED BY KASSIA TOTH, BARTENDER AT PETER ALLEN’S ITALIAN

Absolut Hibiskus is available at Peter Allen’s Italian and Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores.

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IT TREATS THE ART FORM WITH RESPECT

GETTING WARMER {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Al Gore wasn’t the first person to warn us about global warming. But with the 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth, he became the loudest. And that film — like the Nobel Peace Prize that followed — helped raise awareness and spur action on this gravest threat facing civilization. A decade later, though, the need to address global warming is only more urgent. Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk’s An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power follows Gore around the world as he continues pushing humanity to quickly ramp down our greenhouse-gas emissions.

More warnings: Al Gore

CP APPROVED

Inconvenient Truth was the former U.S. vice president’s engrossing slideshow primer on global warming. Sequel assumes we know the science, and instead is built around Gore’s talks to trainees in his own Climate Reality Leadership Corps, from Miami to China. One message is that his decadeold warnings — which climate-denialists reflexively called alarmist — were possibly not dire enough, given the increased frequency of heat waves and extreme storms. “Every storm is different now,” he notes. He aptly links Syria’s civil war to the historic drought that preceded it. The earnest but wry Gore takes side trips to witness the linked phenomena of calamitously melting glaciers in Greenland and high-tide flooding in Miami Beach (which just keeps building its streets higher!). The film addresses well-funded, industry-backed climate-denial campaigns, and includes clips of candidate and President Trump dismissing climate change as a hoax. But Sequel’s centerpiece is the 2016 Paris climate talks, where Gore is portrayed as helping to bring fossil-fuel-fixated India on board by making solar more accessible through credit and technology-sharing. The film’s take-away is that switching wholesale to renewable energy is both crucial and feasible: Gore indicates that nations from Scotland to Chile have made great advances, and even visits a deep-red Texas town that’s going renewable. He might have offered more specifics: What government policies work best? Are there technical obstacles? But with mainstream media mostly quiet on the climate, and Washington headed backward into denial, we need every voice possible out there. That one is as indefatigable as Gore’s is just a bonus.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NETFLIX}

Betty Gilpin and Alison Brie take it to the mat.

LADIES OF THE ’80S {BY MEG FAIR}

T

HE NETFLIX series GLOW is a fiction-

alized dramedy set in the 1980s and inspired by the real wrestling show Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling (1986-89). Centered around a motley crew of women who answer a vague casting call, GLOW weaves the tale of women learning to wrestle on the fly for a show dreamed up by earnest trust-funder Bash (Chris Lowell) and directed by cynical, sexist, coke-snorting director Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron). It stars Alison Brie as Ruth, a try-hard struggling actress, and Betty Gilpin as Debbie, a new mother who left behind the world of soap-opera acting for the domestic realm, and is now forced to find work in the face of marital discord. While most of the drama revolves around conflict between friends-turned-enemies Ruth and Debbie, the supporting actresses get time in the sun as well. Brie and Gilpin are wonderful in their roles, but the supporting actresses often steal the show. Cherry Bang (Sydelle Noel) is one of the

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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more dynamic characters; she is forced to take on the role of wrestling coach after Sylvia foolishly fires the professional wrestler who was originally hired to train the women. Britney Young portrays Carmen Wade, whose in-ring persona, Machu Picchu, is a nod toward the original GLOW performer Mountain Fiji. Rhona (Kate Nash), Sheila (Gayle Rankin) and Arthie (Sunita Mani) are all characters I wanted to see more of.

GLOW is available for streaming on Netflix. This show is wonderful because it’s about wrestling, but it’s not just for wrestling fans. The way in which GLOW brings non-wrestling fans into its world of professional graps is subtle and fun, yet it doesn’t feel patronizing if you are already a wrestling fan. It treats the art form with respect and makes its production part of the plot,

rather than an easy punchline. GLOW also shines in its honesty about wrestling in the ’80s. Nationalism and stereotype-based gimmicks were unfortunately the norm, and we see the women having to take on those roles. The characters Junk Chain and Welfare Queen are designed to exploit cheap humor about African-American women, but Cherry and Tammé (Kia Stevens, a.k.a. Awesome Kong) push back against the racial stereotyping. It also is not shy about depicting the sexism that performers did, and still do, face in the world of acting, especially women of color. The season zips by with 10 episodes clocking in at just half-an-hour each. GLOW packs a lot of character development into that time, but I’d have loved to see more wrestling. Hopefully, a second season will give us more wrestling and even more time to get to know and love the cast. With onpoint soundtrack, high production values, fun costuming and great characters, GLOW is worth a binge-watch (or several). M E G FA I R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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NEW ANNABELLE: CREATION. David F. Sandberg directs this horror thriller about the possessed trouble-making doll. The tale is part of “The Conjuring universe,” and in this iteration, we meet the dollmaker. Starts Fri., Aug. 11 THE GLASS CASTLE. Adapted from Jeannette Walls’ best-selling memoir, Destin Daniel Cretton directs this drama about a teenage girl growing up in a poor nomadic family given to fanciful thinking. Brie Larson, Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts star. Starts Fri., Aug. 11 THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE. The gang of critters tries to save their homes from being demolished by an amusement park development. Cal Brunker directs this animated comedy. Starts Fri., Aug. 12

REPERTORY DOLLAR BANK CINEMA IN THE PARK. Almost Christmas, Wed., Aug. 9 (Schenley Park: Flagstaff Hill) and Sat., Aug. 12 (Riverview). Queen of Katwe, Thu., Aug. 10 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 11 (Arsenal); and Sat., Aug. 12 (Grandview). Moana, Sun., Aug. 13 (Schenley Plaza); Tue., Aug. 15 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., Aug. 17 (Brookline). The Great Wall, Wed., Aug. 16 (Schenley Park: Flagstaff Hill). Films begin at dusk. Free. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net BACK TO THE FUTURE. Through the use of a kicky time machine, young ’80s dude Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) finds himself back in the 1950s, where he’s tasked with getting his parents to hook up, lest he never be born. Christopher Lloyd, Crispin Glover and Lea Thompson also star in Robert Zemeckis’ 1985 comedy. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 9. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5

The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature 1973 science-fiction film relates the tale of slaves and masters, and the inevitable revolt, on the faraway planet of Ygam. In the 1970s, the French film was a rep-house staple, frequently paired with other trippy films that looked like innocuous kids’ films, but were loaded with larger philosophical ideas. In French, with subtitles. Aug. 11-17. Row House Cinema STALKER. In Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 sci-fi drama set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland, two men and a guide search for a mysterious “room.” In Russian, with subtitles. Aug. 11-13 and Aug. 15-17. Row House Cinema THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN. Marc Caro and JeanPierre Jeunet direct this fanciful 1995 tale, set in a dystopia, in which kidnapped children have their dreams harvested. In French, with subtitles. Aug. 1116. Row House Cinema

of actresses. One young woman seems to be his ideal mate, but things turn out rather badly. In Japanese, with subtitles. Midnight, Sat., Aug. 12. Row House Cinema CENTRALIA: PENNSYLVANIA’S LOST TOWN. Joseph Sapienza II directs this new documentary about the abandoned central Pennsylvania town, under which a coal fire has been burning since 1962. 5 p.m. Sat., Aug. 12, and 1 p.m. Sun., Aug. 13. Row House Cinema CIRCUMSTANCE. Three Iranian young people — two girls rebelling at secret nightclubs and a recovering drug addict who turns to fundamentalism — struggle for identity in modern-day Teh-

ran. Maryam Keshavarz directs this 2011 drama, which was filmed in Lebanon. The film screens in as part of Reel Q’s Reel Stories series, highlighting recent films that depict the struggles and triumphs of the international LGBTQ community. In Persian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Tue., Aug. 15. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. www.reelq.org DIE HARD. It’s pretty much the worst way to spend Christmas Eve, single-handedly defending a Los Angeles skyscraper from a dozen terrorists. But New York cop John McLane (Bruce Willis) makes it look fun. John McTiernan directs this 1988 actioner that made Willis a big-time movie star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 16. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5

THE VALLEY OF DECISION. Tay Garnett’s 1945 adaptation certainly takes some liberties with Marcia Davenport’s sprawling, sudsy novel of Pittsburgh steel magnates and the working classes who line their coffers. But who can resist the against-all-odds love story: Can an Irish maid from a union family find happiness with her employer, a scion of North Side steel? Greer Garson, Gregory Peck and the full trappings of mid-century Hollywood melodrama say yes. Presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation, and to be followed by a discussion. 7 p.m. Thu., Aug. 10. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleof homestead.org (AH) DOCUMENTARY SALON. This month’s screening is Float, a work-in-progress presented by director Phil Kibbe and Ben Saks. It depicts the “the lives of introverted competitors and their stunningly designed model airplanes,” employing a blend of time-lapse photography, archival material, animated motion graphics, and detailed interviews filmed over the course of seven years on four continents. 7 p.m. (6:30 reception). Thu., Aug. 10. Melwood BRAZIL. Terry Gilliam’s gloriously quirky, dystopian 1985 adventure finds a fantasy-driven government drone (Jonathan Pryce) crashing into reality after a Big Brother-ish computer malfunctions. Michael Palin and Robert DeNiro co-star. Aug. 11-12 and Aug. 14-17. Row House Cinema FANTASTIC PLANET. René Laloux’s animated

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Stalker QUADROPHENIA. This 1979 film, with music by The Who, is a coming-of-age tale set in 1965 Britain. Young Jimmy (Phil Daniels) hates life, except when he’s with his crew, a group of scooter-riding Mods. The film’s centerpiece is a beachside brawl between the Mods and their rivals, the Rockers. The film screens as part of the Café Racer Magazine Readers Ride-In Bike Show, in Sewickley, on Aug. 12. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 11. Tull Family Theater, Sewickley AUDITION. Takashi Miike directs this 1999 horror thriller about a widower who takes up dating again with the help of a friend who stages fake auditions

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SHOWS LIKE GAME OF THRONES HAVE ADDED TO THE POPULARITY OF SWORD FIGHTING

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} There will be fewer items in this week’s history lesson because the first one deserves some extra space.

AUG. 16, 1890 Pittsburgh Pirate Bill Phillips becomes the first pitcher to ever give up two grand slams in the same game. He would remain the only person to do so for the next 109 years. Los Angeles pitcher Chan Ho Park gave up two to St. Louis’ Fernando Tatis … in the same inning.

AUG. 16, 2012 Los Angeles shortstop Hanley Ramirez hits a home run and taunts Pirates pitcher A.J. Burnett as Ramirez rounds third base. In the sixth-inning, Burnett struck out Ramirez and promptly told the Dodger infielder to “Sit the Fuck Down.” You can still buy S.T.F.D. t-shirts around town to this day. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Pud Galvin

AUG. 13, 1889 Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Pud Galvin leads his team to 9-0 shutout win over Boston. But, this entry is just an excuse to talk about Galvin, who had a career ERA of .285 and pitched an average of 400 innings every season (for perspective, San Francisco Giants ace Madison Bumgarner has never thrown more than 226 innings a year). But the most interesting thing about this game is the fact that Galvin, way back in 1889, used performance -enhancing drugs before the game and everyone knew it. Galvin mixed “BrownSequard” elixir into a drink prior to what would be this fantastic game. And what is BrownSequard? Why, it’s testosterone drained from the nut sack of a monkey. But instead of being given the bum’s rush, The Pudster and the elixir were hailed in the Washington Post: “If there still be doubting Thomases who concede no virtue of the elixir, they are respectfully referred to Galvin’s record in yesterday’s Boston-Pittsburgh game. It is the best proof yet furnished of the value of the discovery.” Not only was Galvin not chastised, he was lauded and not just by the Post. In 1965, Galvin was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. So maybe there’s a chance for Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds.

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Two Broken Plow martial artists dueling with German longswords

OLDE STYLE {BY RYAN DETO}

W

HEN PEOPLE watch Game of

Thrones or other medieval fantasy shows, sword fights tend to look pretty bad-ass. But ask the martial artists at Broken Plow Western Martial Arts in West Deer Township about the authenticity of the TV fights, and you’ll get one answer: They’re bullshit. Not that the members, who practice the lost art of Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA), aren’t fans of the show. They just know that the choreographed fights on TV don’t showcase the true nature of medieval sword combat. Scott Barb, an instructor at Broken Plow, says technique and strategy are key in German long-sword fighting. Strikes can’t be sent willy-nilly at opponents, because an attacker could then become vulnerable to a counter-strike. “You have to be on offense and defense at the same time,” says Barb. “First thing is to ruin your opponent’s line of attack

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before you can strike.” This is the level of seriousness that HEMA martial artists apply to their craft; Barb says Broken Plow has to constantly dispel myths that the club is merely a group of fantasy enthusiasts. When City Paper recently visited the group’s gym, housed in an old church, the intensity was on full display. Participants clad in padded jackets, protective gloves, and what look like beefed-up fencing masks squared off, first in slowmotion drills and then in full-speed sparring, clanging their three-pound, 50-inch blunted long swords. Participants were working up serious sweats. Gym co-owner Josh Parise, who served with the U.S. Marines, says he teaches his students techniques without weapons first, and that this dedication to the martial-arts components of HEMA is necessary. “If you don’t know how to use these,” says Parise, gesturing towards his hands, “you have no business using a sword.”

Parise’s background is in taekwondo, the Korean martial art, but he wants to help resurrect the martial arts of medieval Europe, and hopes that HEMA will continue to grow in popularity. The Broken Plow club has about 100 members, and they practice many different types of HEMA, including long sword, rapier (light, thin sword), the short dagger called a Dussack, and sometimes sword-work while on horseback. Parise and co-owner Ben Michels started the club five years ago. While they acknowledge shows like Game of Thrones aren’t necessarily accurate, they have contributed to Broken Plow’s growth over the years. Says Michels: “We used to have a HEMA group that was just four to six dudes in a park.” RYA N D E TO@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

For more information about Broken Plow, including classes, tournaments and events, visit www.pittsburghswordfighters.com.


[THE CHEAP SEATS] Series trophy, and that was 39 years ago. New Castle’s favorite son followed the McKechnie rule of being a decent guy. Tanner is routinely credited with being one of the nicest men to ever be a big-league manager. After working for some crazy baseball owners, including the Chicago White Sox’s Bill Veeck (who made his players wear shorts) and the Oakland A’s Charlie Finley (who wanted yellow baseballs), Tanner came back home to juggle a stacked Pirates roster. The partying Pirates of the 1970s needed a calm, steady hand, and Tanner was the perfect match.

MANAGING SUCESS UCESS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} AS A BIG-LEAGUE manager, Wilkinsburg’s kinsburg’s

Bill McKechnie won 1,896 gamess and led three different teams to a pennant. ant. Only one other manager in history (Dick Dick Williams) has managed that feat. McKechnie also won two World Series titles. les. One with the Pirates in 1925, the otherr with Cincinnati in 1940. We all know that Western Pennsylvania is a football, ball, ketchup and zombie factory, but the region has also produced some me decent baseball skippers. “The Deacon,” as McKechnie nie was known, was the antithesis of o loud-mouth, hard-drinking, degennerate managers like his contempoorary John McGraw. He never drank nk or smoked, and it is rumored that hat nobody ever heard him swear. Bill McKechnie is the gold standard d of baseball managers from the Pittsburgh burgh region, but there have been some e pretty good ones since.

Terry Francona

Terry Francona (1,432-1,254)

Buddy Bell (519-724) On the bright side, he did win 519 games. To Bell’s credit, he’s the best player on n this list, as Buddy had more than 2,500 hits ts in a 17year career. Timing is everything, and Bell arrived at three destinations with teams in shambles. He couldn’t resurrect the Tigers, Rockies or Royals, and those three strikes put him out of the old ball game. The Bell family has produced three generations of major-league players; Buddy was born here while his dad, Gus, played for the Bucs, and his son, David played for the Phillies.

Ken Macha (524-447) That’s a pretty good record for somebody without a job. Macha took over the Oakland A’s in 2003 and promptly won 96 games and a division title. His team won 91 the next year and 88 the following season. In 2006, Oakland swept the division series against the Minnesota Twins after winning 93 regular-season games. For some reason, that wasn’t good enough, because the A’s fired the Monroeville native; the team won just 78 games the following year. Milwaukee noticed Macha was a good manager, though, and hired him for two seasons which turned out to be two normal Milwaukee seasons (normal

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLEVELAND INDIANS}

being code for not very good).

Art Howe (1,129-1,137) Macha replaced Howe in Oakland and took over the experiment known as “Moneyball.” Howe is the only guy on this list to be portrayed on film by Philip Seymour Hoffman, which is a pretty cool honor. Howe started his managerial career with an office in Houston’s Astrodome. In Oakland, he won more than 600 regularseason games and six postseason games. Again, that wasn’t good enough for the A’s, who at least replaced Howe with a fellow Pittsburgher. Howe ingloriously finished his managerial career with the Mets and couldn’t clean up the mess the Mets front office found itself in. He stayed around for a few years as a coach and had an all-around respectable career.

The best a manager can do is to get his team in a position to win a championship. Just last year, Francona had his team in Game 7 of the World Series. In fact, he had his team tied after nine innings and playing at home. But not even a proven miracle-worker like Francona could overcome the bad luck of the Cleveland Indians. Francona has already been beatified by Red Sox fans after they witnessed him perform two miracles. The Red Sox won their first World Series title in 86 years and ended the legendary “Curse of the Bambino.” Three years later, they did it again. Four years after that, Boston had a bad September and they fired him. Wham, bam, thank you, Fran. The long-suffering and obnoxious Boston fan base finally could stop bringing up the topic of heartbreak because Terry Francona did what no other Red Sox manager could do. If he can win a World Series with the Indians, I wouldn’t be surprised to one day seeing him walk on Lake Erie.

Get A Room! PRIVATE CHAMPAGNE ROOM OPEN TILL 4AM FREE ALCOHOL! Only 5 Min. from Downtown and Northshore.

Chuck Tanner (1,352-1,381) The head of the “Family,” Tanner is the last Pirates manager to hold up a World

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THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed bids will be received in the Office of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time, TUESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2017 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following supplies:

ROCK SALT & ICE MELT General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid. 42

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08.09/08.16.2017

NORTH CAROLINA CRAVEN COUNTY

CRISTY NICOLE MAYERNIK, Plaintiff, vs. ALBERT JAMES MAYERNIK, Defendant.

IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION FILE NO.: 17-CVD-523

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION

TO: Albert James Mayernik TAKE NOTICE that a Complaint for Absolute Divorce and Equitable Distribution was filed against Defendant in Craven County, North Carolina, File No.: 17-CVD-523, in the above-entitled action. You are required to make defense to such pleading no later than 40 days after August 9th, 2017, the date of the first publication of this Notice. Upon your failure to answer the Complaint during the time prescribed, the Court will issue a Judgment for Absolute Divorce and equitably distribute the marital assets, debts, and divisible property of the parties. Publication Dates: August 9th, 2017, August 16th, 2017 and August 23rd, 2017. Katherine A. Forrest FORREST FAMILY LAW 1315 S. Glenburnie Rd., D-17, New Bern NC 28562 Tel.: (252) 631-5333 Fax: (252) 631-5340 N. C. State Bar #32673 Katherine@ForrestFamilyLaw.com

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46. Game-playing computers, for short 47. Tim Tebow’s team 48. Warm greeting to a Canadian, eh? 52. Your and my 53. April 15th payment 54. Event featuring roping 57. Store in the overhead locker 59. Button on the Pope’s hat? 63. “Aeneid” setting 64. Roman historian 65. Turkish cabbage 66. A few 67. Strong urges 68. [The other copy editor didn’t know what he was doing]

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.09-08.16

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Each of us comes to know the truth in our own way, says astrologer Antero Alli. “For some it is wild and unfettered,” he writes. “For others it is like a cozy domesticated cat, while others find truth through their senses alone.” Whatever your usual style of knowing the truth might be, Leo, I suspect you’ll benefit from trying out a different method in the next two weeks. Here are some possibilities: trusting your most positive feelings; tuning in to the clues and cues your body provides; performing ceremonies in which you request the help of ancestral spirits; slipping into an altered state by laughing nonstop for five minutes.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Would you scoff if I said that you’ll soon be blessed with supernatural assistance? Would you smirk and roll your eyes if I advised you to find clues to your next big move by analyzing your irrational fantasies? Would you tell me to stop spouting nonsense if I hinted that a guardian angel is conspiring to blast a tunnel through the mountain you created out of a molehill? It’s OK if you ignore my predictions, Virgo. They’ll come true even if you’re a staunch realist who doesn’t believe in woo-woo, juju or mojo.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): This is the Season of Enlightenment for you. That doesn’t necessarily mean you will achieve an ultimate state of divine grace. It’s not a guarantee that you’ll be freestyling in satori, samadhi or nirvana. But one thing is certain: Life will conspire to bring you the excited joy that comes with deep insight into the nature of reality. If you decide to take advantage of the opportunity, please keep in mind these thoughts

from designer Elissa Giles: “Enlightenment is not an asexual, dispassionate, head-in-theclouds, nails-in-the-palms disappearance from the game of life. It’s a volcanic, kick-ass, erotic commitment to love in action, coupled with hard-headed practical grist.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some zoos sell the urine of lions and tigers to gardeners who sprinkle it in their gardens. Apparently the stuff scares off wandering house cats that might be tempted to relieve themselves in vegetable patches. I nominate this scenario to be a provocative metaphor for you in the coming weeks. Might you tap into the power of your inner wild animal so as to protect your inner crops? Could you build up your warrior energy so as to prevent run-ins with pesky irritants? Can you call on helpful spirits to ensure that what’s growing in your life will continue to thrive?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The fates have conspired to make it right and

get your yoga on!

proper for you to be influenced by Sagittarian author Mark Twain. There are five specific bits of his wisdom that will serve as benevolent tweaks to your attitude. I hope you will also aspire to express some of his expansive snappiness. Now here’s Twain: 1. “You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.” 2. “Education consists mainly in what we have unlearned.” 3. “It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.” 4. “When in doubt, tell the truth.” 5. “Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “My grandfather used to tell me that if you stir muddy water it will only get darker,” wrote I.G. Edmonds in his book Trickster Tales. “But if you let the muddy water stand still, the mud will settle and the water will become clearer,” he concluded. I hope this message reaches you in time, Capricorn. I hope you will then resist any temptation you might have to agitate, churn, spill wine into, wash your face in, drink or splash around in the muddy water.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1985, Maurizio Cattelan quit his gig at a mortuary in Padua, Italy, and resolved to make a living as an artist. He started creating furniture, and ultimately evolved into a sculptor who specialized in satirical work. In 1999 he produced a piece depicting the Pope being struck by a meteorite, which sold for $886,000 in 2001. If there were ever going to be a time when you could launch your personal version of his story, Aquarius, it would be in the next ten months. That doesn’t necessarily mean you should go barreling ahead with such a radical act of faith, however. Following your bliss rarely leads to instant success. It may take years. (Sixteen, in Cattelan’s case.) Are you willing to accept that?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yin yoga ÁRZ\RJD meditation

teacher training ashtanga yoga prenatal yoga family yoga

Tally up your physical aches, psychic bruises and chronic worries. Take inventory of your troubling memories, half-repressed disappointments and existential nausea. Do it, Pisces! Be strong. If you bravely examine and deeply feel the difficult feelings, then the cures for those feelings will magically begin streaming in your direction. You’ll see what you need to do to escape at least some of your suffering. So name your griefs and losses, my dear. Remember your near-misses and total fiascos. As your reward, you’ll be soothed and relieved and forgiven. A Great Healing will come.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I hope you’re making wise use of the surging fertility that has been coursing through you. Maybe you’ve been reinventing a long-term relationship that needed creative tinkering.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

08.09/08.16.2017

Perhaps you have been hammering together an innovative business deal or generating new material for your artistic practice. It’s possible you have discovered how to express feelings and ideas that have been half-mute or inaccessible for a long time. If for some weird reason you are not yet having experiences like these, get to work! There’s still time to tap into the fecundity.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano defines “idiot memory” as the kind of remembrances that keep us attached to our old self-images, and trapped by them. “Lively memory,” on the other hand, is a feisty approach to our old stories. It impels us to graduate from who we used to be. “We are the sum of our efforts to change who we are,” writes Galeano. “Identity is no museum piece sitting stock-still in a display case.” Here’s another clue to your current assignment, Taurus, from psychotherapist Dick Olney: “The goal of a good therapist is to help someone wake up from the dream that they are their self-image.”

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Sometimes, Gemini, loving you is a sacred honor for me — equivalent to getting a poem on my birthday from the Dalai Lama. On other occasions, loving you is more like trying to lap up a delicious milkshake that has spilled on the sidewalk, or slow-dancing with a giant robot teddy bear that accidentally knocks me down when it suffers a glitch. I don’t take it personally when I encounter the more challenging sides of you, since you are always an interesting place to visit. But could you maybe show more mercy to the people in your life who are not just visitors? Remind your dear allies of the obvious secret — that you’re composed of several different selves, each of whom craves different thrills.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Liz, my girlfriend when I was young, went to extreme lengths to cultivate her physical attractiveness. “Beauty must suffer,” her mother had told her while she was growing up, and Liz heeded that advice. To make her long blonde hair as wavy as possible, for example, she wrapped strands of it around six empty metal cans before bed, applied a noxious spray, and then slept all night with a stinky, clanking mass of metal affixed to her head. While you may not do anything so literal, Cancerian, you do sometimes act as if suffering helps keep you strong and attractive — as if feeling hurt is a viable way to energize your quest for what you want. But if you’d like to transform that approach, the coming weeks will be a good time. Step One: Have a long, compassionate talk with your inner saboteur. When they say “Be yourself,” which self do they mean? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My boyfriend of eight months, K, and I are polyamorous. We started the relationship on that foot, and for a while I was the partner he spent the most time with. There have been ups and downs, but overall our relationship is solid and loving. However, recently we both started dating the same woman, L, and they have been spending more time together than with me due to my work schedule. They both reassure me that they love me and care for me deeply, but I am an anxiously-attached person and sometimes I have panic attacks when they spend more time with others/themselves and fear that they’re going to leave me. I’m working on becoming more secure via books on cognitive behavioral therapy, and I’m looking into in-person therapy. This is my first serious relationship, but not his (I’m 22, he’s 35). And while K has been super patient with me, my worry and grasping is a point of friction in the relationship. K has told me he doesn’t want to be solely responsible for my sexual satisfaction and my need for constant reassurances that he cares. The anxiety has been flaring up most strongly concerning sex — we’re all switches, and K and L are both professional Dominants. I feel neglected if K doesn’t penetrate me but he penetrates L, or if L gets to penetrate K via a strap-on and I don’t. He’s very good about voicing what he desires, while I’m learning to speak up despite feeling like I’m just being needy and grasping again. I love both my partners, but I’ve been feeling sexually neglected — and with a HIGH sex drive, it’s been quite painful. This is my first “trio rodeo” and I really want to make it work — I’ve seen a future with K for a while (the I-want-your-children kind), and L is joining those future visions. How can I find a way to create more opportunities for sexytime and not ruin it with anxiety attacks?

working on their emotional and mental health. You and your therapist can start by re-evaluating whether a poly relationship is right for you in practice. In theory, you understand poly and you may want a poly relationship. (Particularly if it’s the only way you can have K.) But as someone with anxiety issues and hang-ups about all sex acts being divided up equally, poly may not be right for you, or it may not be right for you right now. This is about your Campsite Rule. I think you should amend it. In 1984, when I was 20 years old, I met an LGBT rights activist who was 53. He was working with the group I contacted after I’d called the local youth crisis hotline here in Baton Rouge and got called a faggot. (I hadn’t realized they created youth crises rather than fixing them — my bad.) We had a summer fling (initiated by me), and then I went off to study in Europe. Because of him, I knew the difference between making love and getting your rocks off, and I moved through the world with the self-confidence he told me I deserved to have. I ended up working in national politics for 30 years, and I did all of it as an out gay man. I moved back home a few years ago and tried to find him with no luck. Finally, about a month ago, I did. He’s in his mid-80s now and under hospice care, but he does remember me. I got to tell him everything I’d done with what he taught me. I only got about a third of the way down the list before his eyes filled with tears — and pride. To call that a special moment would be an understatement. So here’s my suggested amendment: If you benefited from the Campsite Rule — if someone left you in better shape than they found you — look that person up and tell them what they meant to you. And if he’s alone and in hospice care, spend some time being there for him and holding his hand.

“EVERYONE SHOULD COMMIT TO WORKING ON THEIR EMOTIONAL AND MENTAL HEALTH.”

BDSM ENTHUSIASTIC LOVER ON VOYAGE4 EMOTIONAL DURABILITY

I’m always suspicious when two (or more) people claim to be deeply in love after dating for a short period of time, BELOVED, and eight months qualifies as a short period of time. You’ll feel a lot less anxious about this relationship, BELOVED, if you make a conscious effort to lower the stakes. In other words: Dial it way back, girl. You’ve been dating K for a little more than half a year, and you’ve been dating L for whatever “recently” adds up to in a world where eight months equals LTR. It’ll reduce your anxiety levels and soothe your insecurities if you tell yourself you aren’t committed to K and L as life partners. Not yet. This is the beginning of both these relationships. All you’re committed to right now is continuing to get to know K and L. You’re committed to dating them, you’re committed to exploring where this might go, you’re committed to enjoying your time with them, however long it lasts. But you are not committed to them. Either of them. Not yet. Committing yourself to therapy is a good idea, BELOVED. Everyone should commit to

CAN’T THINK OF FUNNY ACRONYM

Your old summer fling left you in better shape than he found you — the heart of my Campsite Rule — and the lessons he imparted had a hugely positive impact on your life. But instead of amending my Campsite Rule, CTOFA, which covers the conduct of older and/or more experienced people dating and/or fucking younger and/ or less experienced people, I’m going to amend my Tea and Sympathy Rule. “And if you benefited from the Campsite Rule — if years ago a lover left you in better shape than they found you — look that person up and tell them what they meant to you.” My first truly serious boyfriend, who I met at college, was a wonderful and very sexy guy who helped me grow in so many ways. He definitely left me in far better shape than he found me — like CTOFA, I was able to express my gratitude to him before he died and I’m so glad I did. (RIP, Tommy Ladd.) If you were lucky enough to have a Tommy in your life, dear readers, if you were lucky enough to have an early sex and/or romantic partner who left you in better shape than they found you, reach out to them and express your gratitude. You’ll be glad you did.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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WE GOTTA REGATTA Scenes from the EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta {PHOTOS BY KRISTA JOHNSON)

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August 9, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 32

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