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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 07.05/07.12.2017 X PGHCITYPAPER XXX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX PGHCITYPAPER XX PGHCITYPAPER

RIVETING. IMPRESSIVE. TERRIFIC!

Attend the tale of SWEENEY TODD! Experience A GATHERING OF SONS. Hail XERXES! 40th Season thru July 23. See ad on p 9.


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EVENTS 7.18 - 7.24 - 1-4pm & 7.25 – 7.28 – 1-4pm SUMMER FASHION EXPERIENCE THE WARHOL & AIR Two week camp for youth ages 13-18; fashion design from inspiration to finished garment.

7.21 – 5-8pm TEACHER WORKSHOP: POP CULTURE IN THE CLASSROOM Tickets $30

7.28 – 7-10pm SILVER SCREEN BAZAAR Featuring a variety of Hollywood-related memorabilia from vendors and the Pittsburgh premiere of Warhol’s film San Diego Surf. Free with museum admission

7.28 – 5-9:30pm FACTORY SWING SHIFT The Factory stays up late! Free with museum admission

8.5 – 10am -12pm HALF-PINT PRINTS The Factory Free with museum admission

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen is generously supported by Cadillac.

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On the move? New to town, or just a new neighborhood? If you haven’t tried transit before maybe now is the time. Port Authority has convenient and frequent service to and from the urban areas of Pittsburgh. East Liberty is the heart of the East End’s transit service. Many Port Authority bus routes use the East Busway to bypass local traffic including the P1 and P3 from East Liberty’s busway station which offer quick rides to Downtown and Oakland. Various other routes have stops on Penn Ave. and serve just about anywhere in the East End of the city. Living Downtown? You CAN get anywhere from here. You can catch a bus or T to almost anywhere in Allegheny County. Groceries in the Strip District, take the 88. For all the flavor of Lawrenceville the 91 works. Nearly all of Port Authority's 100 routes travel in and out of Downtown. For more neighborhoods go to onthemove.portauthority.org and make this town your own.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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07.05/07.12.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 27

INVIGORATED.

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns CARLEY BONK, HALEY FREDERICK, KRISTA JOHNSON, HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN MILLER, MATT PETRAS

How I feel after my weight loss journey. -Judy Grimm

Lost 100 lbs. with gastric sleeve surgery

[ART] Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS]

[ADVERTISING]

“Time will tell exactly what benefits will come from having medicinal cannabis here in town.”

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Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS, JENNIFER MAZZA Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

Pennsylvania’s first privately owned spirits retailer opens in the Strip District.

Marketing Director LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing Assistant LIZ VENUTO Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN

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If your weight is keeping you down, the experts at UPMC Bariatric Services have so many ways to help you find a healthier, happier you. We offer a comprehensive weight-loss program for men and women that includes everything from behavioral and medical weight loss programs, online diet resources, and new bridge therapy alternatives such as the intragastric balloon. And our team will create a personalized plan to help you meet your goals. So find a new you and visit UPMC.com/Bariatrics, or schedule an appointment near you by calling 1-800-533-UPMC (8762).

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Need a new pair flip-flops? You can have Roberto Clemente’s for $1,000. PAGE 40

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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THIS WEEK

“WE’RE REALLY EXCITED HERE IN THE CITY TO BE ON THE FOREFRONT OF THIS NEW AND UPCOMING INDUSTRY.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

The Furries were in town! If you want to see more photos from Anthrocon 2017, head over to www.pghcitypaper.com.

The latest CP Longform looks at nearby Ford City, a town in need of a comeback. Check it out online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO}

City Paper’s blog PolitiCrap was named best blog at this year’s Golden Quill awards.

McKeesport Mayor Mike Cherepko

Catch up on the latest posts at www.pghcitypaper.com/blogs/PolitiCrap.

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Our featured #CPReaderArt photo from last week is by @sterlingcats. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

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GROWING ECONOMY C K E E S P O RT M ayo r M i ke Cherepko didn’t know much about medicinal cannabis when he was first approached by a company looking to build a growing facility in his community. But after learning about the health-care benefits of the marijuana plant, he now considers himself an advocate for its use as medicine. “It gave me the opportunity to educate myself about medicinal cannabis,” Cherepko says. “When you hear the success stories [and] the tremendous impact it can have on individuals with certain disabilities and illnesses, it’s unbelievable. “It’s heartwarming to see just how some of these people’s lives have changed once they were able to have access to medicinal cannabis.” Last month, the company that first

approached Cherepko, PurePenn LLC, was approved by the Pennsylvania regulators to build the medical-marijuana-growing operation in McKeesport. PurePenn was one of 12 grower/processors selected June 20

How will a planned medical-marijuana facility in McKeesport benefit those who live there? {BY REBECCA ADDISON} to receive a permit from the Pennsylvania Department of Health. Since then, the department has granted 27 permits for medical-marijuana dispensaries. “We’re really excited here in the city

to be on the forefront of this new and upcoming industry,” says Cherepko, “and to be part of the positive impact it’s going to have on health care here in the state of Pennsylvania.” Medical marijuana, for use in pain management, nausea, seizures and symptoms related to 17 serious medical conditions, was legalized in Pennsylvania in April 2016 after years of debate in the state legislature. While much of the debate centered around the positive impact the medicinal plant would provide to patients, proponents also emphasized the economic impact such an industry would have on communities across the state. According to a fiscal-impact report, released last April, state officials estimated application and registration fees would net $10 million within a year. Additionally, the CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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Let’s face it. Health care is complex. We keep it simple. Our Medical Assistance plan keeps it simple. You can expect more from UPMC for You. Let’s face it. Health care is complex. Our team of Health Care Concierges can see you through that journey. Your Concierge can arrange a visit to a doctor, check on your prescription coverage, or answer other questions you have. For the most from your Medical Assistance coverage, choose UPMC for You.

for You Affiliate of UPMC Health Plan

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UPMC for You complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, creed, religious affiliation, ancestry, sex gender, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation. ATTENTION: If you speak English, language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call: 1-800-286-4242 (TTY: 1-800-361-2629). ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia ingüística. Llame al 1-800-286-4242 (TTY: 1-800-361-2629).

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state will collect a 5 percent tax on medicalmarijuana purchases. In California, medical marijuana generates about $50 million in tax revenue annually. “Medical marijuana will help those who suffer from debilitating pain and serious medical conditions,” Pennsylvania Sen. Jim Brewster (D-McKeesport) said in a statement when the permits were announced. “Plus, the new permit will bring jobs and economic development to the region. The new industry in the city will attract other businesses who will want to locate near the facility and create spin-off businesses that will generate additional work for local residents. The entire economy of the region will be improved. “This is another large step in the rebuilding of the city and region. It is certainly good news for the city and the area as a whole.” Located in the Monongahela Valley, McKeesport is one of those towns hit hard by the declining steel industry. The median income there is $28,000 per year, 50 percent less than the county, state and national averages. Additionally, vacant residential and industrial properties litter the community. Cherepko says the new facility is just what his city needs. Combined with other companies that are moving into the area, he says there are ample opportunities for economic growth on the horizon. And PurePenn says it’s committed to making it a reality.

“Time will tell exactly what benefits will come from having medicinal cannabis here in town and the production facility,” says Cherepko. “In other places throughout the country where states have legalized medicinal cannabis, you hear stories of cities that may have been struggling in certain ways, and it really helped them. “Many of us throughout the entire Mon Valley have been in very similar situations here since the collapse of the steel industry in the ’80s, and I think it’s a big win for us.” McKeesport has a population of nearly 19,000 and its unemployment rate is 7.3 percent, four points above the national average. According to the FBI’s uniform crime reports for 2015, the most recent year available, McKeesport’s crime rate is 114 percent higher than the Pennsylvania average and 59 percent higher than the national average. But the city’s history of adversity is exactly what attracted PurePenn CEO Gabe Perlow to the city. “McKeesport had land that was affordable — open vacant land that was easily developable,” says Perlow, a Pittsburgh attorney whose background is in real-estate development. “It also has some good strong bones from its foundation in the steel industry. It might’ve fallen on hard times, but I could see it being ready for an influx of redevelopment. By bringing this operation there, it’s just the first step of revitalizing the town.”

“IT MIGHT’VE FALLEN ON HARD TIMES BUT I COULD SEE IT BEING READY FOR AN INFLUX OF REDEVELOPMENT.”

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“Mark Southers’ staging is riveting...Lead singers are impressive...TerriďŹ c show!â€?

4 0 TH SEASON

Thru JULY 23

– Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on A GATHERING OF SONS

Innovative

DAPHNE ALDERSON sings LEONARD COHEN Thurs., July 13

and intimate world-class performances. On tour around Pittsburgh and at Winchester Thurston, Shadyside.

Discover Strauss “IF I LOVED YOU...�

JULY 20-23

- Rodgers & Hammerstein Revue Some Enchanted Sunday Evenings! July 9 & 16

Tickets start at $20 Students from free to $12.50 w/ID.

Four days of exciting events and the PA premiere of INTERMEZZO

Festival Box Office: 412-326-9687

pittsburghfestivalopera.org

Pittsburgh Festival Opera is not affiliated with Pittsburgh Opera.

10 am Sat.

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JULY 9 $5 Admission for Members

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*First-come, first- served. Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for schedule.

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GROWING ECONOMY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Work yourself into a lather. blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Rinse. Repeat.

PurePenn has pledged to begin construction of the facility within 30 days of the June 20 announcement and will also be holding job fairs and a community event. Perlow says the plan is to have a fully functioning facility up and running by January 2018, the state’s deadline. PurePenn’s 21,000-square-foot facility will be built on five acres in the RIDC Industrial Center of McKeesport. Perlow says the facility will grow as market demand increases, and this will lead to additional job opportunities. PurePenn estimates that, in addition to temporary construction jobs, it will have an initial workforce of 10 people, which could increase with market growth to upwards of 75 employees. “The work ethic of the citizens of the Mon Valley, those who used to work in the mills, that never went away,” says Perlow. “So, we wanted to be in an area we could pull a diverse and strong workforce from. There are highly skilled workers who never left the Mon Valley area, and they just need the jobs to get back to work. We have a commitment to hiring in McKeesport for that reason.” So, what exactly will those jobs look like? Rosie Yagielo is the president of HempStaff, a national professional training and staffing company working in the medicalmarijuana industry. Her company recently conducted a training seminar in Pittsburgh, and she says Pennsylvania should expect to see job growth across the state. “Just think about the amount of jobs that come on board every time a new state opens up a [medical-marijuana] program,” Yagielo says. “If you’ve got 150 dispensaries and an average of five to six folks working in them — not to mention there’s going to be 25 cultivation/processing centers with another 40 to 50 people each — that’s a lot of people that get jobs, and it’s bringing down the state’s unemployment a notch at a time.” According to HempStaff, each manu-

facturing facility has an average of 32 employees, a cultivation center has an average of 26, and testing facilities employ an additional 12 people. Jobs include a master grower, security, a cultivation supervisor or assistant grower, extractors, trimmers and other cultivation site workers. While positions at the top of the organization, like master growers and cultivation supervisors, might require at least four to five years of experience, Yagielo says other positions like trimmers and general cultivation site workers are entry level. She also says these organizations tend to promote from within. According to Cannabis Training University, a company similar to HempStaff, trimmers start at about $12 per hour and can work up to jobs that pay $25-30 per hour. “The site workers are generally the people who start off doing everything. One day their job might be working as a trimmer; the next day it could be something else,” says Yagielo. “They learn a little about everything, and usually the master cultivator is watching everyone to see who shines and who doesn’t. The ones that shine are obviously the ones they usually groom to go further into a supervisory position.” Perlow’s plans for the McKeesport facility are on par with these national trends. He says employees just have to be age 18 and over. “We have a wide range of positions available,” Perlow says. “For packagers, there’s minimal to no experience required. But there are some other jobs that require some kind of advance degree from agricultural specialists, to our lead laboratory technicians. It’s a wide range, and it won’t be unheard of for someone who starts as a packager to move up, whether it’s through the agricultural side, laboratory side or even sales and marketing.” One additional restriction mandated by the state is that employees cannot have a CONTINUES ON PG. 12

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive. 10

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Call 412-329-6523 today to schedule your visit! Bethel Park

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GALLERY CRAWL in the Cultural District

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SPACE Wall Paintings: Storytellers | Guest curated by Robert Raczka A live art event featuring 12 artists or teams painting directly on the gallery walls, incorporating elements of narrative or storytelling.

Trust Arts Education Center Drap-Art An association of artists who use trash as their material and/or conceptual resource.

937 Liberty CSA PGH Remix CSA PGH creates “shares” of art to feed the public’s cultural appetite. See past editioned artwork and new work by alumni.

Agnes R. Katz Plaza Sponsors:

Devin Moses & The Saved Alternative folk band from Pittsburgh.

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drug charge on their record for any kind of controlled substance. PurePenn’s economic-development plan was approved unanimously by McKeesport’s Planning Commission and City Council. It includes “extensive safety measures; a community outreach component with financial support for McKeesport; and a commitment to hire local workers and provide them with good pay, health-care benefits and educational opportunities.” “When I initially heard about the facility coming to the area, I was apprehensive,” says Fawn Walker-Montgomery, a McKeesport city councilor and lifelong resident. “But I did some research and saw the benefits the treatment can give to families. It will also benefit us to be at the forefront of this medical research, in addition to the jobs it can bring to our area.” As part of the McKeesport community fund, PurePenn plans to create a community-benefit organization with members from both PurePenn and the McKeesport community on the board. PurePenn will commit a percentage of its revenue to the fund, as well as an initial investment to get the fund started early on before making revenue.

“It’s going to be there for different opportunities in the city of McKeesport, to help support some of the other groups, organizations and events that go on in the city,” says Mayor Cherepko. “There will be a fund set up to really have PurePenn play a part in our community. PurePenn has made it very clear they want to be a good partner with the city of McKeesport, and I truly believe they will be.” All these commitments PurePenn has made are why Cherepko has been singing its praises. He says concerns that the new facility won’t benefit McKeesport residents are unfounded, and he’s looking forward to building a stronger city for his residents. “They’re trying to make sure their employees are going to have careers here. They’re going to be able to raise a family, support a family,” Cherepko says. “Here in the city of McKeesport, we’re hoping to give people the opportunity to be a part of the foundation we really need … to take the city forward into the future. Without a question, it helps with that no matter what the numbers are. Your naysayers are really quick to say it’s only 60 to 100 jobs, but you have to start somewhere.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists. STED! RECE NTLY PO

TS B E N E F IIT Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

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NEW ACTIVISM

of this window we are in. But we don’t have the answer at this point. And the answer is not the 20th-century socialism from other countries. We’ve got to create a 21st-century socialism that will look very different.

Carl Redwood talks activism success, struggles and how to move forward {BY RYAN DETO} ON JUNE 26, local housing activist Carl

Redwood was honored by Garfield’s social-justice advocacy group the Thomas Merton Center. Redwood received the center’s 2017 New Person Award for his decades-long work advancing causes of racial, economic and social justice in the Pittsburgh area and beyond. Local artist/ activist Vanessa German spoke at the event and sang his praises. “Carl Redwood is a song weaver,” she said. “Carl will stand up to sing the song to us all. He is not afraid to say ‘another world is possible.’” Pittsburgh City Paper spoke with Redwood after the award ceremony to discuss his role and the future of activism in Pittsburgh. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR SUCCESSES AS AN ACTIVIST? The main thing was the creation of the Hill District Consensus Group, in terms of local neighborhood stuff. The consensus group started in the Hill District, and we also have a lot of consensus groups in a lot of different neighborhoods, which are ways to try to get people in the community to work together and to plan a future that works for them. And there are other areas too. I was active among the African-liberation support committee, supporting the liberation movements in Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau. I was also part of the Free South Africa Movement, where we worked to get Nelson Mandela out of jail. We have had some victories, but in the recent times, we have been winning skirmishes but losing the war in terms of housing and the displacement of black people from the city. We are losing people, so we are not winning on those fronts.

{CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

Carl Redwood receiving the Thomas Merton Center New Person Award in June

mit ourselves to the long, bitter struggle to create a new world.’ We all see what the root is. It’s harder to name it at different time periods. But it’s not as hard to name it today. Bernie Sanders says he is a socialist; it’s a different time. We’ve got to take advantage

pens is, people’s lives get worse. Even when we fight for those policy changes, which we know won’t change the system, we have to link it to the system that we know is the problem. Almost every issue is linked to capitalism being at the root of the problem. It may not be that way for racism, because racism existed before capitalism and will exist after capitalism. But in terms of the basic way society is set up, private profit for a small minority drives everything. And because that drives everything, it distorts everything. So we can fix the edges and we can get 20 [Democrats] back into the [U.S.] House. But we lost 20,000 black Pittsburghers from 1980 to 2010; we are losing three black people a day from the city of Pittsburgh. Even if we tinker with the edges of the problem, we have to go to the root. Not saying we can eliminate it right away, but over time we can.

IN YOUR ACCEPTANCE SPEECH YOU TALKED ABOUT BUILDING UP LOCAL GROUPS. WHY IS THAT IMPORTANT? We have to build strong [coalitions] in the neighborhoods around principled programs that support the majority of folks. And we have to get people to see that. It’s not about rich people in high places or even elected officials. It’s about what can people do and the power that we can build in the neighborhood. The power has to be the people organized in the neighborhoods. We haven’t been base-building, and the Democratic Party kind of co-opts the different movements, but doesn’t really get the essence of what the movements are about. And when it comes back from the [Democrats], it’s not the same thing. Obamacare was not what people wanted; they wanted health care for everybody. But it came back in another form that still benefited the profiteers. RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

(Editor’s note: This interview has been edited for space and clarity.)

“ALMOST EVERY ISSUE IS LINKED TO CAPITALISM BEING AT THE ROOT OF THE PROBLEM.”

WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE TO IMPROVE THESE PROBLEMS? What we need to do is create a new political instrument that can represent folks. And also, name what the source of our oppression is, which is really capitalism. Not saying we don’t fight on reforms. But sometimes we just change policies, but maintain the system as it is. And what hap-

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WHEN PEOPLE CHALLENGE CAPITALISM, THEY’RE TYPICALLY LABELED AN “UNHINGED RADICAL.” CAN PEOPLE BE CONVINCED OTHERWISE? We have to change that. We have to push back and make that the norm, and not the exception. The United States went through this whole McCarthy era, where there were real consequences for speaking radically. And there still may be consequences in the future, but that shouldn’t stop us from doing it. We’ve got to speak what is right. Like Martin Luther King said, ‘We’ve got to com-

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WAR OF WORDS Protest groups look to jumpstart Pittsburgh’s oncestrong anti-war movement {BY BILLY LUDT} ON JAN. 26, 2003, a crowd of several thou-

sand anti-war protesters took to the streets of Pittsburgh to object to the United States’ current occupation of Iraq. It was Super Bowl Sunday and, according to a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article at the time, a steady snowfall accompanied the march, the second of that weekend. This action was just one of many held in the city in the wake of the events of Sept. 11, 2001, and the United States invasion of Iraq. And while the crowd may have been supersized, a large protest gathering was nothing new to Pittsburgh at the time. The Steel City fostered an anti-war culture that ran at the heels of U.S. military action. Protests were organized at city colleges; anti-war organizations were formed, the most infamous of the time being Pittsburgh Organizing Group (POG), which at one point even found itself being monitored and infiltrated by FBI agents. Also at the front of this effort, as it has been since it formed in 1972 during the continued conflict in Vietnam, was the Thomas Merton Center. But the protests didn’t stop at anti-war. They marched for expression of free speech, against police brutality, and in response to the G20 Summit held in Pittsburgh in 2009. Protests have continued in Pittsburgh since, but the massive anti-war effort that once lived in this city has waned considerably. But on Sat., July 1, the Thomas Merton Center and a new organization, Pittsburghers in Solidarity Against War, held a march and rally in Oakland in an attempt to reignite that anti-war culture. “To get the word out — especially in Pittsburgh — [about] war profiteering and what’s really going on in some of these banks and universities,” said organizer Casandra Capri. “I was a part of the anti-war movement in the Bush era, and it was really robust for a while. It sort of tapered. People get complacent and look at who’s in office and go, ‘Things are better — things are OK now,’ and that’s not really the case.” The Oakland march last weekend started with a rally in Schenley Plaza and was made up of about 80 people from groups including Veterans for Peace, Socialist Alternative, Black Lives Matter and anti-fascists. At about 1:50 p.m., protesters took to the streets of Oakland and made stops at several locations seen as supporting this country’s war efforts. The first stop was the

{CP PHOTOS BY MARANIE STAAB}

About 80 anti-war protesters carried signs and marched through Oakland on Sat., July 1.

Steel City Naval ROTC office. Veteran and Industrial Workers of the World member Nick Posey addressed the crowd. “The state preys upon the young, the poor and the people of color to fight its wars of imperialism and corporate profits,” Posey said. “It does so by making military service the only viable option for many of these oppressed kids.” Posey discussed the Department of Defense’s spending on programs like Junior ROTC, ROTC, the GI Bill and the advertising costs behind them. Given his family’s economic circumstances, Posey enlisted at 17.

He told the crowd about the exploitation of low-income Americans by the military. The group’s next stop was outside PNC Bank on the corner of South Craig Street and Forbes Avenue. The topic of discussion was the involvement of Pittsburgh banks in war funding, through investments and loan dealings with nuclearenergy companies and defense contractors directly linked to nuclear weapons. According to a 2015 report “Don’t Bank on the Bomb,” from anti-war group Pax, local financial institutions with investments in defense contractors included BNY Mellon

($7.6 billion), PNC Bank ($928 million) and First Niagara ($108 million). “We need to let them know that we know that banks will always put profit before people,” Capri said. The third stop was outside the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University. According to CMU’s website, the SEI’s contract with the Department of Defense was renewed for another five years in 2015 to the tune of $1.73 billion. SEI develops software for U.S. military cybersecurity and technologies, some of which are unmanned. One of the programs at the institute is army robotics, working toward automating warfare. The march ended on the green outside the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh. A drumline performed, and some final speeches were given. “I think the military culture of this country is used to cover up and distract from deep-seated issues that are actually tearing it apart,” said Dan Galvin, a member of Veterans for Peace, a national organization of veterans and non-veterans who want to shed light on the effects of war through first-hand accounts. “I think that the same racism that justifies oppression abroad is the same racism that is brought to bear right here at home and, of late, in much more intense and threatening ways.” “I think that some of us have an obligation in certain moments of history to call it for what it is,” he said. “Which is racism and oppression that impacts everybody.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Hot Summer Nights at Your Local St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Stores! Neighbors helping neighbors HOT DEALS on vintage & designer clothing, jewelry, accessories, furniture, linens, & other unique & hidden treasures! 10% DISCOUNT on ALL PURCHASES made after 4PM until store closing.

[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

Charlie Deitch cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com Editor at Pittsburgh City Paper, 24-year veteran of print journalism. Tweets are my own thoughts and opinions.

Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:14 a.m.

Was going to write traditional column this week on @realDonaldTrump using @twitter to embarrass office of @POTUS #disgraceful Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:15 a.m.

But moron president @realDonaldTrump only understands @twitter language. Reading comprehension drops off at 140 characters. #dumb Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:17 a.m.

That’s why @realDonaldTrump doesn’t understand why #muslimban unconstitutional. Rulings must be on 3rd-grade level. #insulting2thirdgraders Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:18 a.m.

If I spent as much time on @twitter as @realDonaldTrump instead of working, I’d probably be fired. #garbagecomments #Idratheryouplaygolf Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:19 a.m.

HOT MUSIC by some of the region’s

greatest acoustic acts every Friday night!

JULY 7

Eric Emmons & Pocket Change

Recent personal attacks on @Morning_Joe host Mika Brzezinski (@morningMika) appearance are sexist, hateful & small #justlikeyourhandspeewee

CORAOPOLIS 6-8PM

Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:23 a.m.

MONROEVILLE 6-8PM

Doug Carnahan of After the Fall

Personal attacks are only thing @realDonaldTrump understands. FINE. You are a horrible @POTUS; just a wannabe dictator #butyouarejustadick Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:27 a.m.

PENN HILLS 5-7PM

.@POTUS is important job w/high stakes UR treating it like #TrumpUniversity or @thetajmahalac $-making schemes for you, heartache for others

SHARPSBURG 4-6PM

Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:29 a.m.

Ellie Lee Oldfield

Carrie Collins

SWISSVALE 6-8PM

David Hipchen of Tilted Shadows

Visit www.svdppitt.org for store locations! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:21 a.m.

CASTLE SHANNON 6-8PM

Dan Stonerook

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.@realDonaldTrump uses office to bully, intimidate & terrorize members of the media who disagree with him #pettyloser

07.05/07.12.2017

You try to avert attention from #RussiaGate by attacking @BarackObama. UR punching above your weight-class. He’s a legend. Ur #putinsbitch Charlie Deitch @CharlieDee71 • July 5 • 3:31 a.m.

.@realDonaldTrump needs to stop personal attacks & do his job. In other words #STFU #gettowork or #JustQuit so we can really #MAGA


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News of the Weird

S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS TO W E I RD N E W S @ E ART HL I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

{BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

COME DISCOVER WHAT’S BEYOND THE

WOODEN BOXES 412-408-2228 | 5122 BUTLER ST, 15201

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Weird news is forever, but this is my last News of the Weird column, as I am now exhausted after almost 30 years in the racket. In this final edition, I remember a few of my favorites. My deep thanks to Andrews McMeel Syndication and to readers, who started me up and kept me going. Y’all take care of yourselves. — CHUCK SHEPHERD

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(1995) Chesapeake, Va., inmate Robert Lee Brock filed a $5 million lawsuit against Robert Lee Brock — accusing himself of violating his religious beliefs and his civil rights by getting himself drunk enough that he could not avoid various criminal behaviors. He wrote: “I want to pay myself five million dollars (for this breach of rights), but ask the state to pay it in my behalf since I can’t work and am a ward of the state.” In April, the lawsuit was dismissed.

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(2002) The Lane brothers of New York, Mr. Winner Lane, 44, and Mr. Loser Lane, 41 (their actual birth names), were profiled in a July Newsday report — made more interesting by the fact that Loser is successful (a police detective in the South Bronx) and Winner is not (a history of petty crimes). A sister said she believes her parents selected “Winner” because their late father was a big baseball fan and “Loser” just to complete the pairing.

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(2001) A child pornography investigation in Minneapolis turned up 1,000 suspect images on the office computer of a 58-year-old University of Minnesota classics professor — named Richard Pervo.

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(2002) From time to time News of the Weird reported on the fluctuating value of the late Italian artist Piero Manzoni’s personal feces, which he canned in 1961, 30 grams at a time in 90 tins, as art objects (though, over the years, 45 have reportedly exploded). Their price to collectors has varied (low of about $28,000 for a tin in 1998 to a high of $75,000 in 1993). In June 2002, the Tate Gallery in London excitedly announced it had purchased tin number 004 for about $38,000. (The price of 30 grams of gold in 2002 was a little over $300.)

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(1993) In May, Elk River, Minn., landlord Todd Plaisted reported that his tenant Kenneth Lane had fled the area, abandoning his rented farmhouse and leaving behind at least 400 tons of used carpeting, at least 10,000 plastic windows from Northwest Airlines planes, and rooms full of sofas, mattresses and washing machines, among other things. Lane told townspeople he ran a “recycling” company, but there was no evidence of sales. A deputy sheriff driving by the farmhouse the year before saw Lane burying carpeting with a tractor and said Lane merely muttered, “I don’t know what to say. You got me. I can’t even make up an excuse.”

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(1992) The Philadelphia Inquirer reported in June on the local “Silent Meeting Club,” consisting of several people who gather at various spots around town and make it a point not to speak to each other. Founder John Hudak said his inspiration was his observation that people often feel obligated to talk when they really have nothing to say, such as at parties, and wondered how nice it would be “to have a group of people where you wouldn’t have to talk.”

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(1991) In May, Maxcy Dean Filer, 60, of Compton, Calif., finally passed the California Bar exam. He graduated from law school in 1966, but had failed the exam in each of his previous 47 tries.

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(1999) From a May police report in The Messenger (Madisonville, Ky.), concerning two trucks being driven strangely on a rural road: A man would drive one truck

100 yards, stop, walk back to a second truck, drive it 100 yards beyond the first truck, stop, walk back to the first truck, drive it 100 yards beyond the second truck, and so on. According to police, the man’s brother was passed out drunk in one of the trucks, so the man was driving both trucks home (though the success of such a scheme is better imagined if the driving brother has a high bloodalcohol reading, too — which was the case).

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(1988) And, from the very first News of the Weird column came good ol’ Hal Warden, the Tennessee 16-year-old who was married at 15 and granted a divorce from his wife, 13. Hal had previously been married at age 12 to a 14-year-old (and fathered children with both), but the first wife divorced Hal because, as she told the judge, “He was acting like a 10-year-old.”

Editor’s Note: News of the Weird will continue next week under new authorship.

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LOCAL

LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

BEAT

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

Zack Keim can typically be heard in the company of his garage-band mates, the Nox Boys. But two weeks ago, in the performance space at Get Hip Recordings (the label where Keim also works), he was armed with nothing more than an acoustic guitar. The occasion celebrated the release of his solo album, First Step, which revisits the music he played prior to starting Nox Boys. With a black-and-white cover and font similar to that used on Bob Dylan’s The Times They Are A-Changin’, along with credits that mention Get Hip’s Folk Series, the 10 songs welcome the descriptor “folk.” The album came to life after Keim rediscovered a 4-year-old demo of “Alice,” a song of unrequited love in which he leans into his vowels, phrasing much like young Dylan. Get Hip’s Gregg Kostelich and Barbara Garcia-Bernardo liked what they heard and encouraged him to get into the studio. The finished product displays a wide range of moods, from the direct “Alice” to more vulnerable, honest moments like “Open Your Doorway.” He even contributes a stirring version of the spiritual “Gonna Lay Down My Sword and Shield,” with harmony vocals coming from Kostelich. For a 20-year-old, Keim has a musical scope that is literally beyond his years. While he likes current artists such as Fleet Foxes and Tallest Man on Earth, he mentions ’50s pop star Ricky Nelson, English troubadour Nick Drake and CSNY’s Graham Nash as influences. “It’s always been a deep passion to play this stuff. It means something special to me to play folk music,” Keim says, explaining that he’s “not like [typical] folk artists. I’m a songwriter who likes writing songs that are folky.” A few songs, in fact, have some rock ’n’roll swagger. At least one, “If I Could Only Believe Her,” was an unused Nox Boys song. “Some of them are just pop songs,” Keim says. “I think the next record is going to be a little poppier, but it’ll still be folk, just me on guitar.” This week, Keim heads to New York for an in-store set at Rough Trade Records, and a show later in the month at Mercury Lounge, with reunited Youngstown, Ohio, band Blue Ash.

Stepping out: Zack Keim {CP PHOTO BY JORDAN MILLER}

FIRST STEPS

Palehound’s Ellen Kempner

GOOD GRIEF {BY ELI ENIS}

G

RIEF IS ONE of the most powerful emotions we’re forced to encounter during our lifetimes. Since music is often an outlet for such potent sentiments, there’s been no shortage of grief-laden albums since, well, the invention of albums. Palehound’s A Place I’ll Always Go offers a sobering yet ultimately hopeful take on anguish. In conjunction with its theme of intertwining love and loss, the album sonically oscillates between warm, inviting guitar licks and dreary, almost funereal-like basslines. This dynamic is best represented in the song “If You Met Her,” an oddly melodic, bass-driven track that singer/songwriter Ellen Kempner says was “an emotional experience, as the whole record was” to create. “That song is about the feeling after losing someone where this nostalgia

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is everywhere in your life,” the Bostonbased 23-year-old tells City Paper. “You walk down the street to get a coffee at the Dunkin’ and can’t even do that without thinking about them.”

PALEHOUND

WITH DENZELL, RUE 7 p.m. Tue., July 11. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10-12. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Kempner effectively captures that looming feeling in mournful lines like, “Now it’s April sixth / first one that you’ll miss / you were young but you’ve got the answers / to the questions that your parents pointed to their god.” “I kind of wrote [that] on the year an-

niversary of my friend’s passing. Sort of like a letter to her in a way, and how I miss her and how things are going well for me and stuff,” Kempner says. The “going well” part arrives during the conclusion of the song, as Kempner softly intonates, “I’m with someone new / and I know that you would love her if you met her,” as if she truly is communicating directly to her subject. A song like this — so deeply personal that it earns legitimate empathy from its listener — relies on the frankness of the songwriter, and Kempner’s narratives on this record are particularly authentic — even more so than on past works. “I just kind of became more comfortable with myself, and decided that a lot of the musicians that I really love and connect with are really honest with themselves, so


I was inspired, honestly,” she says. This openness not only comes through in lines about her friend’s death, but also during the romantic portion of the record, during which she references her queer relationship. Gone are androgynous lines like, “mouth ajar, watching cuties hit the half-pipe,” in the standout track “Healthier Folk,” from Palehound’s 2015 debut full-length, Dry Food. Now, a straight-up love song like “At Night I’m Alright With You” is affirmed by the very title of “If You Met Her” to be about Kempner and her female partner. “I used to really be worried about being pigeonholed as an artist,” she says, referring to being either tokenized or placed into a bubble for identifying as a queer musician, as many still are. However, as bold as it is, Kempner doesn’t phrase her newfound openness as some sort of grandiose proclamation. She makes it seem like it was just the logical thing to do in order to maintain her earnest relationship with her budding fan base — as well as with her loved ones. “Part of the reason I came out in my music in a bigger way was because I had queer friends and wanted to connect with them,” she says. “I want it to be relatable to everyone. The songs are about being queer, but are also just about love. And I feel like that’s something that’s pretty universal.” As interesting as the record is lyrically, it’s also a noticeable maturation compositionally from Dry Food. Given that it’s a couple tracks longer, there was room for a choppy, mechanical intro like “Hunter’s Gun,” a lo-fi acoustic cut like “Silver Toaster” (which features a delightful banjo solo), and the moody, rhythmic “Backseat.” All of these are interspersed between Palehound’s signature brand of groovy, ridged yet soothing indie rock that’s more conducive to “oohs” than “ahhs.” However, it’s the album’s title and album art, a colorful drawing of a grocery store, that tie it all together beautifully. “Grocery shopping is very meditative for me,” Kempner says. “It was a place I went when my friend passed away. It’s kind of a mundane thing that allows you to think a lot better. Then my relationship with the grocery store changed when I started seeing my partner, which was a representation of how our relationship was manifesting itself.” As for the title, Kempner says she got the phrase from her best friend, who was working on a lot of the record’s insert art. “They texted me during this period of time when I was anxious about naming the record and said, ‘Your record is a place I’ll always go to feel close with my best friend,’” Kempner says.

GERI ALLEN, 1957-2017 {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

Geri Allen

At her first Pitt Jazz Seminar Concert as its director, pianist Geri Allen opened the 2013 program with a composition by her predecessor, Dr. Nathan Davis. “If” had a low-down swampy groove, closer to Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew album than the hardbop tunes that often opened the concerts in the 42 years prior. It was clear: There was a new sheriff in town. Much like everything she did, Geri Antoinette Allen knew history and respected it. But she wasn’t afraid to help it evolve. That night, with a band that, among others, included two drummers, a tap dancer and a vocalist, she gave the Pitt Jazz Seminar Concert a strong push. Allen passed away on June 27, at age 60. According to her manager, the cause was cancer. To fans like this writer, the news was sudden, coming only a day after Motéma Music, her record label, posted on Facebook that Allen was “gravely ill.” The pianist leaves behind a legacy that acknowledged her Detroit roots, and contained diverse original works under her own name, as a support player, and in collaborative groups with bassist Esperanza Spalding, drummer Terri Lyne Carrington and saxophonist David Murray. Significantly, she recorded two albums with Ornette Coleman in 1996, making her one of the few pianists to master the saxophonist’s style, a challenge for any keyboardist. The international jazz community has suffered a loss with Allen’s passing. In some ways, Allen’s death also has a great impact on Pittsburgh’s music scene. Trying to fill her shoes is going to be a challenge. But for the moment, the best thing to do is listen to Allen’s music and give thanks for the time she was with us. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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NEW RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

WRECK LOOSE OK, WRECK LOOSE SELF-RELEASED WWW.WRECKLOOSEBAND.COM/MUSIC

Wreck Loose is the kind of band that you could share with your parents and grandparents; it’s a band that everyone can enjoy together. It doesn’t even matter if the whole family understands the cheeky lyrical quips and pop-culture references that peek through. It’s a blend of Elton John, Ben Folds and Rupert Holmes, with a sprinkle of Steely Dan spice. The debut full-length OK, Wreck Loose sounds bright and dreamy, with a delightfully warm tone. Despite the somewhat comforting nostalgia offered by the music, Wreck Loose’s lyrics have an anxious, moody underbelly. A few well-timed jokes and jabs keep the load from getting too heavy, but that duality exists on the record. OK, Wreck Loose plays like a collection of songs you’d drunkenly belt out, along with your buddies at your favorite neighborhood bar. From the very first notes, and a Springsteen-y dramatic intro, the record has that big-rock feel. It carries through on tracks like “Placebo” and “Phil Spector Killed Someone Today.” The classic-rock epic feel shows up on “Country Mouse,” a tune that moves from a twangy, bluesy trip to a straightforward pianorock track, before concluding with an introspective lounge feel. Frantic dance energy consumes “Hearts Been Broken,” showing that Wreck Loose can speed it up, as well as rock a mid-tempo ballad or dark voyage like “Isn’t It a Shame About Kurt.” Perhaps OK, Wreck Loose is not a record that delivers a brand-new sound or presents a genre you’ve never heard before. But its ability to take classic influence and package it into a more modern sound is pretty satisfying. MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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alleghenycounty.us/summer {CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON}

A close-up of a synthesizer available at Pittsburgh Modular Synth Playground

PLAYFUL EXPERIMENTATION {BY MEG FAIR} DESCEND INTO the cozy embrace of Spirit Lodge on the first Wednesday of every month and you’ll discover a treasure trove of synthesizers, effects pedals and drum machines — all there for playing and exploring. A welcoming team of knowledgeable synth enthusiasts and Pittsburgh Modular employees hang around, happy to answer questions. People in headphones study equipment, while others play around with strangers or friends to create sounds using the studio-quality monitors on hand. This live-action experiment in sound is the work of Pittsburgh Modular, a local business that makes modern analog synthesizers. It has set up a free monthly playground that provides an accessible space for folks of all skill levels to play with and learn about synthesizers. Pittsburgh Modular wants the playground to be a space where folks can comfortably learn the basics of synthesis and synthesizers in order to apply it to their own creative processes. “There’s only so much you can gain from online demos,” writes Perry Willig, an employee of Pittsburgh Modular and a coordinator of the event, via email. “Many of these instruments can be hard to find in person. It provides an outlet for curious musicians to gain valuable hands-on experience in a welcoming environment.” The event begins with two hours of exploration. The sometimes-elusive gear at these events has diverse qualities and functions. It’s the kind of equipment that invites a deep dive on individual machines. “Each instrument has its own feel

and workflow, so it helps to try them all,” explains Willig. The playground then pauses for part of the night to showcase local artists using similar equipment to create music, ambience and sound. Sometimes it’s pure modular synthesis, but four-piece bands have also performed. The format is intentionally open, but Willig welcomes the opportunity to show off the electronic scene. “There’s a small but extremely talented electronic-music scene here in Pittsburgh. We hope to help support and grow the community,” he writes. Given the range of genres, not all the performers use synthesizers, but when they do, it encourages attendees to experiment after the set.

July 7 BNY Mellon Jazz presents Joey DeFranco & Catherine Russell (Jazz) July 9 Tank & The Bangas

with special guest Sweet Crude(Funk/Soul)

PITTSBURGH MODULAR SYNTH PLAYGROUND 7 p.m., Wed. July 5, at Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441

All concerts are free

“There’s often this moment in between sets where people will try to recreate the sounds they just heard,” explains Willig. “Having the instruments set up and ready to play really narrows the gap between inspiration and creation.” August marks the first anniversary of the program, and the potential for growth is encouraging. The group is working on a video compilation of artists who’ve performed at the events; it will be released at a later date. Pittsburgh Modular plans on partnering with other makers and collectors to showcase an even broader variety of instruments. “Seeing people discover new sonic textures and improvise with each other is pretty cool,” writes Willig. “We love seeing that first spark of understanding when a newcomer realizes the musical potential synths have to offer.”

Food trucks and Hop Farm Brewing Company craft beer at all concerts beginning at 6:00 p.m. 3WS

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CRITICS’ PICKS

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF AUDREY MELTON}

er2 Summ

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Just Summer! is part of the Kelly Strayhorn Theater’s East Liberty LIVE! series.

[HXC] + FRI., JULY 07

[BLUEGRASS] + TUE., JULY 11

New York, Massachusetts and California are sending in three of their finest hardcore bands to tear it up at everyone’s favorite all-ages venue, the Mr. Roboto Project. Absolute Suffering, of Springfield, Mass., makes thrashy hardcore ripe for the fist-in-the-air, head-bang combo, while Albany, N.Y.’s two-step masters Concrete will make you feel like showing off your finest moves in the pit. These Streets, of Modesto, Calif., make brooding metallic hardcore with a melodic edge. Pittsburgh’s No Good Deed and Settle For Nothing hold it down for the 412. Meg Fair 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. All ages. www.robotoproject.org

The Howlin’ Brothers, the Nashville-based trio of not-brothers, are a string band rooted in old-time bluegrass and folk, with hints of New Orleans jazz and Delta blues. Their sound is stripped down without being dumbed down, and they sing about subjects you’d expect from a banjo, guitar and fiddle (namely, whiskey, love, guns, cheating). Joining the group at Howlers tonight are the local mountainmusic singers Stillhouse Pickers. HL 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 21 and older. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerspittsburgh.com

[FUNK] + SUN., JULY 09 New Orleans-based Tank and the Bangas are lively, upbeat and colorful. The band made a well-deserved name for itself after winning the coveted Tiny Desk Concert contest on NPR. Catch its unique blend of jazz, funk, and spoken word for free at Hartwood Acres Amphitheater as part of the Allegheny County Summer Concert Series, along with Louisiana Francophone group Sweet Crude. Hannah Lynn 7:30 p.m. 4000 Middle Road, Allison Park. www.tinyurl.com/AcConcerts nyurl.com/AcConcerts

[PUNK] + WED., JULY 12 It’s very easy to look at everything released in 2017 as a reflection of our turbulent political climate, but that sense of fury, attitude and resistance is nothing new for the Washington, D.C-based Priests. The group’s third album, Nothing Feels Natural, which came out in early 2017, tackles consumerism, complacency and government-sponsored oppression, with tracks like “Pink White House.” Think surf rock with a razor’s edge. Catch the band at Mr. Smalls, with local noise-punk group Glowworms. HL 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $11-13. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

The cool thing about living in a global society, other than international viral videos of dogs, is thatt regional music can influence people who o live across the globe. Despite growing up in n Australia, Hamish Anderson was deeply y influenced by American n blues and rock. He even ven has “Last Act to Open n for B.B. King” on his résumé. umé. He’s joined at Club Café af afé tonight by the even bluesier (and local) Dan Bubien en and The Delta Struts. HL 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. de. $10. 21 and older. 412-431-4950 1-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

07.05/07.12.2017

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GUS BENNETT JR.}

[BLUES] + TUE., JULY ULY 11

Tank and the Bangas


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SAT 08

ROCK/POP THU 06 CLUB CAFE. Missy Raines & the New Hip. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE GLITTER BOX THEATER. Glenn Jones, Pairdown & Sagas. 9 p.m. Oakland. 724-699-2613.

FRI 07 BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. Six Speed Kill, Wax Brain & The Invalid People. 7 p.m. Allentown. 740-424-0302. CLUB CAFE. Thieves & Lovers w/ A Little Less Human. 6 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. DORMONT VFW HALL. The Rockers. 7 p.m. Dormont. 412-344-4667. LINDEN GROVE. Totally 80s. 9:30 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Squeazen the Shaman. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Colourshow. 6 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

TUE 11

HOWLERS. The Howlin’ Brothers CLUB CAFE. The Mike Moscato & Stillhouse Pickers. 8 p.m. Project. 6 p.m. South Side. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. 412-431-4950. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & DIESEL. Vibro Kings w/ Gene SPEAKEASY. Aubrey Bruce & The Walker & Shonuff. 7 p.m. East Coast Project. Ballroom. 6 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. North Side. 412-904-3335. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. 8:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB CLUB CAFE. Bumpin Uglies. 7 p.m. & SPEAKEASY. Antoinette South Side. 412-431-4950. & No Ordinary Soul Band. CRAFTHOUSE STAGE Speakeasy. 8:30 p.m. & GRILL. The GRID. North Side. 7 p.m. Whitehall. 412-904-3335. 412-653-2695. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. www. per a p ty 9 p.m. Warrendale. pghci m .co 724-799-8333. SUB ALPINE CLUB. King’s BELVEDERE’S. NeoNoir Ransom. 9 p.m. Turtle Creek. Dark 80s w/ Erica Scary. First 412-823-6661. Thu. of every month. 10 p.m. THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. Flow Tribe. 7 p.m. Millvale. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 413-381-6811. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Billy The Kid & PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby the Regulators. 6 p.m. Dormont. D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-942-0882. 412-471-2058.

WED 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

DJS

THU 06

SUN 09

FRI 07

MP 3 MONDAY {PHOTO COURTESY OF LAUREN HUHN}

ASTRA ROBOTICA

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. First Fri. of every month, 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 08 DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. Ladies night. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Feeling Without Touching. Second Sat. of every month, 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Rambo. 11 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825.

Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s a hypnotic, meandering track from Astra Robotica called “Android,” from June’s Android EP. This is minimalist electronic music for people who prefer slow and steady to the melodramatic drops of EDM. Also, if you’re averse to bells, stay far away from this one. Stream or download “Android” at FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

TUE 11 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

NEWS

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

HEAVY ROTATION

WED 12 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Here’s what CP photo intern Jordan Miller can’t stop listening to:

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 08 SATALIO’S. Masters of the Universe Rap Show. Feat. DJ Ladi Bugg da Plugg, Roscoe Wiki, I am Uglyface, P.I.R.A.T.E.G.A.N.G, Narue Pearson, Bryce Tacy, Harley Dyse, Real SK, Yung Allen & more. 8 p.m. Mt. Washington. 412-431-9855.

The Stairwells

“Cocoa Butter Kisses”

MON 10

Shag Rock

SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Kap G & J.R. Donato. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

“Sunbleached Girl”

BLUES CATTIVO. The Jauntee. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-381-6811.

Dylan Rockoff

FRI 07

From classic attractions to new neighborhood gems, our annual City Guide magazine brings you our favorite things all over Pittsburgh

“Paranoid”

BISTRO 9101. The Blues Orphans. 7:30 p.m. McCandless. 412-318-4871. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Jimmy Adler Band w/ John Gresh’s Gris Gris. 8 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-9100. WALKER’S BAR. Strange Brew. 9 p.m. Ambridge. 724-457-0662.

NIED’S HOTEL. Jimmy Adler Band. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PARADISE ISLAND. Strange Brew. 9 p.m. Neville Island. 412-264-6570.

THE R BAR. Billy The Kid’s American All-Stars. 7 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

Elujay

“Golden”

ROLAND’S SEAFOOD GRILL. Art Sherrod Jr. 9 p.m. Strip District. 412-567-2804.

SAT 08

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ron Wilson w/ Paul Thompson. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. 5 p.m. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB John C Hall. Ballroom. 7 p.m & SPEAKEASY. The Roger North Side. 412-904-3335. Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Monroeville. 412-728-4155. Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. Saturdays. Jazz-happening series VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. feat. live music, multimedia Eric Johnson. experimentations, more. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. Hosted by The Pillow 412-394-3400. Project. Second Sat. of every month, . w ww per 8 p.m. Point Breeze. ANDORA RESTAUa p ty ci h pg 412-225-9269. RANT - FOX CHAPEL. .com Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. ROCKS LANDING BAR & 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John 412-967-1900. Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. CITY. Eric DeFade, Paul Thompson, 412- 875- 5809. Thomas Wendt. 8 p.m. North Side. STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. 412-435-1110. Erin Burkett, Virgil Walters, JAMES STREET GASTROPUB Max Leake & Mike Tomaro. & SPEAKEASY. Hanging Hearts 12:30 p.m. Acme. 724-423-5604. w/ The Bleil Brothers. Speakeasy. 6 p.m. Benny Benack Senior! Ballroom. 7 p.m. North Side. HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie 412-904-3335. Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, LA CASA NARCISI. The Etta Cox Trio. 6 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m.

JAZZ

THU 06

COMING JULY 12

FRI 07

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 09

MON 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

07.05/07.12.2017

MUSIC TO MY EAR. EMay. 12:30 p.m. Ross. 412-223-9747. THE SHARP EDGE CREEKHOUSE. Tracy Lee Simmen. 7 p.m. Crafton. 412-922-8118. TIKI BAR. Right TurnClyde. 6 p.m. Washington. 724-348-8888. WALNUT GRILL. Eclectic Acoustics. 8 p.m. Robinson. 412-747-2100.

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. The Vagrants. 12 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. THE CLUBHOUSE. Right TurnClyde. 4 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-449-9090. HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 12

SAT 08

SUN 09

SAT 08

SUN 09

THU 06

CITY GUIDE

to today 8 p.m. North Side. 412-322-2337. CLUB CAFE. Scott & Rosanna, Fate McAffe & Jim Loss of the Ben Davenport Band. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. KEYSTONE BAR. EASE. 9 p.m. Sewickley. 724-758-4217.

Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 11 CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Roger Humphries. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

WED 12 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Free Music Series: Ben Sherman and Greg Jones. Dining Room 7 p.m. High Standards & Firm Roots. Speakeasy. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7-10 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

REGGAE THU 06 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

OTHER MUSIC THU 06 LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. STAGE AE. 311 w/ New Politics & The Skints. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FRI 07 RIVERS CASINO. Satisfaction. 7 p.m. Kevin Howard Trio. 9 p.m. The Lava Game. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777.

THU 06

SAT 08

THE BULLPEN. Eclectic Acoustics. 5 p.m. Avella. 724-356-3000. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. First Thu. of every month, 7:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Scott & Rosanna, Ferdinand The Bull & Her Ladyship. Speakeasy. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Travlin’. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RIVERS CASINO. Brighton Boys. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE GLITTER BOX THEATER. Summer Time Bruise w/ FluxionAD, N.Breinich, 8C, II-Go & Cutups. 9 p.m. Oakland. 724-699-2613.

FRI 07

STAGE AE. Megadeth. 5:30 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

BEER HEAD BAR. Eclectic Acoustics. Jaime Gaglia and Mark C. Graham of The Eclectic Acoustics will be performing all of your acoustic favorites from the 70s

TUE 11 WED 12 LINDEN GROVE. Oldies Night. 7 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

July 5-11 WEDNESDAY 5

show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest The Movement. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Jane Lynch

With special guest Sweet Crude. Free show. For more info visit alleghenycounty.us/ summer. 7:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pitts burghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

MONDAY 10

Iration w/ J Boog

Hands on Harley-Davidson

Gallery Crawl

THURSDAY 6 311

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests New Politics & The Skints. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

TGIS Summer Concert Series: Detention & Gashouse Annie THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. All ages show. Free show. 6p.m.

FRIDAY 75 Colourshow

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guests Marina City, A Story Told, Royal Street, Primer & Greyscale. All ages

NEWS

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS Cultural District. Free. For more info visit trustarts. org. 5:30p.m.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH North Side. For more info visit pittsburgh kids.org. Through Sept. 10.

Wine, Beer & Comedy Festival

TUESDAY 11

MONROEVILLE CONVENTION CENTER Monroeville. With special guests Mike Marino, Jim Krenn, Kathleen Madigan & Bill Crawford. Over 21 event. Tickets: druskyent.com. Through July 8.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Meshuggah, TesseracT & Lillake. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

Megadeth

GALLERY CRAWL CULTURAL DISTRICT JULY 7

In the Heights

after 4pm. For more info visit svdppitt.org.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through July 16.

South Side Works Exposed Artists’ Market

Hot Summer Nights ST. VINCENT DE PAUL THRIFT STORES. Live music & 10% discount on purchases

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SATURDAY 8 Flow Tribe

MR. SMALLS FUNHOUSE Millvale. 412-421-4447. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 7:30p.m.

SOUTH SIDE WORKS South Side. All ages event. For more info visit facebook.com/ events/1454121638040250. Through July 9.

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MATTRESS FACTORY North Side. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit eventbrite.com/e/imbibe-north -side-tickets-35179801734. 7p.m.

George Jones New View Trio

SUNDAY 9

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: livenation.com. 8p.m.

Tank & The Bangas Imbibe North Side

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HARTWOOD ACRES PARK.

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AGNES R. KATZ PLAZA Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free show. 5p.m.

Idina Menzel

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“IT WAS LIKE THEY THOUGHT A DEAD MAN WAS VOTING.”

[EXHIBIT]

BIRD’S EYE {BY MATT PETRAS}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

700 Arch St., North Side. $8 per person plus general admission ($14-15). 412-323-7235 or www.aviary.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

[BOOKS]

Flight simulation: Birdly in use

While watching someone take flight on Birdly, a human-sized, bird-shaped contraption outfitted with virtual-reality goggles, I was distracted by a passing toddler who stopped to gawk. His eyebrows said it all: He was absolutely baffled by what he saw. What he was looking at was a new virtual-reality experience that turns participants into eagles soaring over and through a digital version of New York City. “Reactions are really different,” says Carly Morgan, marketing manager at the National Aviary, where Birdly opened in April. “Every flight is unique.” Birdly flights can be booked in 10-minute blocks for up to two people, who take turns. Each flight lasts two-and-a-half minutes. Birdly is at two North America locations, the other being The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, Calif. It was developed by Swiss company SOMNIACS. Pilots lay on their stomachs on the outstretched frame of a bird, with movable wings, an HTC Vive VR headset, and a fan that blows wind on their faces to further the simulation. A monitor lets bystanders see what the participant sees through the headset. Elizabeth Pacanovsky, 26, and Angela Guy, 34, friends from Cleveland, decided to travel to Pittsburgh, and the Aviary was one of their stops. Guy had never been to Pittsburgh before. Neither of them had ever been a bird. “It felt very natural and comforting,” Pacanovksy said after her flight. The experience allows each pilot to fly how she likes. Calm flights work, but if someone wants to flap her wings really hard to get high above the buildings, and then dive sharply, that’s possible, too. That move in particular is pretty scary, though. Trust me. Within the simulation, any billboard you see with glitter flowing from it can actually be entered, warping the virtual flight into a vastly different experience. One turns NYC black and white, and King Kong arrives to terrorize the city. At one point, Guy found herself up against Kong. “Angela!” Pacanovksy shouted. “Fly into the gorilla!” After her flight, Guy revealed why she didn’t listen to her friend. “I was sort of like, ‘I don’t want to be involved in that,’” she said. Guy enjoyed her flight, though. “If you’ve always wanted to fly, that’s a fun thing to attempt,” Guy said.

COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES {BY JODY DIPERNA}

F

OR LOCAL newshounds and those

who love them, journalist Ray Sprigle is the first name in Pittsburgh journalism. Bill Steigerwald (of those Steigerwalds) has been both fascinated and inspired by his work for more than 20 years, and refers to Sprigle as the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Babe Ruth. Steigerwald’s new book, 30 Days a Black Man (Lyons Press, $26.95), chronicles Sprigle’s exposé of Jim Crow, which was written while Sprigle traveled the Deep South undercover as a black man in the late 1940s. In 1995, when Steigerwald was still working for the P-G, the paper was running a series of World War II anniversary stories. He found a series Sprigle wrote near war’s end, in which he had gone undercover to expose the black-market food trade circumventing wartime meat rationing. “He disguised himself, took his teeth out, put on some goofy 50-cent cap, got a total beat-up old truck,” says Steigerwald, who got hooked on the story. He read more, including the series of investigative articles that Sprigle wrote for the P-G in 1938, proving that newly appointed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black had been a member of the Ku Klux Klan. Sprigle won a Pu-

07.05/07.12.2017

Bill Steigerwald

litzer Prize for that series. He later embedded himself in London during the Battle of Britain, in 1940. After returning home, he continued to dig for good stories, including the black-market series. Then in 1948, he went deep undercover to write a series of 21 articles collectively titled “I Was a Negro in the South for 30 Days.” Sprigle, born in 1886, in Akron, Ohio, wasn’t in the trenches fighting for social change, emphasizes Steigerwald, who speaks at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Made Local series on Thu., July 6. Simply put, Sprigle was a driven journalist always on the hunt for a good story, and he wasn’t shy about going undercover to get it. So, in

his 60s, he decided to see for himself what things were really like under Jim Crow. To disguise himself as a black man, he spent time in Florida working on a tan — but mostly, he learned that if he presented himself as black, nobody questioned him, irrespective of skin tone. (Sprigle’s series predated, by more than a decade, a similar journey taken by novelist John Howard Griffin that resulted in his famous book Black Like Me.)

BILL STEIGERWALD 6 p.m. Thu., July 6. Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures at the Carnegie Library International Poetry Room, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free with registration at 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

More important than passing as black, Sprigle needed someone to take him places he could never find on his own,


and to make introductions; he needed a fearless man who knew the lay of the land and would be trusted in black communities and black homes. John Wesley Dobbs agreed to guide him. Dobbs was a giant in fighting for civil rights in the Jim Crow South, and worked tirelessly to register black voters in Atlanta, his hometown. When he started his voter-registration drive, in 1936, just 600 black residents were registered; when he was finished, 20,000 were registered. He was instrumental in the city of Atlanta hiring its first black police officers — eight of them in 1948, the year Dobbs set out with Sprigle. Much of Steigerwald’s 336-page book retraces Sprigle and Dobbs’ journey. Some of Sprigle’s own robust prose is sprinkled throughout, like this account of a black man murdered for simply being the first black person to vote in his county:

To contemporary critics who’d say that Sprigle, however well intentioned, was still trading on white privilege, Steigerwald has a simple answer. “I learned that white audiences weren’t reading the Courier in 1948 — they definitely weren’t reading black papers,” he says, referencing the Pittsburgh Courier, one of the most important black newspapers of its day, locally as well as nationally, and known for its coverage of Jim Crow. “Black people had to read black papers and white papers. And the P-G didn’t cover [black culture].” Sprigle’s series was syndicated by white papers nationally, but in the South only by the Courier itself. Yet ironically enough, the only way any white readers were going to learn about the black perspective was from a white reporter who went deep undercover.

WORK IT OUT

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JULY 27

Presented by:

Micro Wrestling

{BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

Tom Protulipac in One Man, Two Guvnors {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES ORR}

Bright and early on election day Macy appeared at the polling place — and voted. Afterward Macy told a friend that the white folks on the election board appeared “sorta dazed” as he cast his ballot. “It was like they thought a dead man was voting,” Macy said laughingly to his friend who told me the story of how a Georgia Negro died. Private Snipes didn’t know it, but the white folks were right. He was already dead when he dropped that ballot in the box. The white folks just let him walk around another week before they buried him. Just a week later four white men drove up to Macy Snipes’ home, called him out and after a few words riddled him with bullets and drove off.

JULY 7-9 & 14-16

[PLAY REVIEW]

MUSIC

Work sucks. That old adage is at the forefront of One Man, Two Guvnors, now playing at Little Lake Theatre. Based on Carlo Goldoni’s The Servant of Two Masters, this 2011 British play by Richard Bean updates the source material’s Italian setting to 1960s Brighton, England. The setup is simple enough: Francis (Tom Protulipac) is a down-on-his-luck ne’er-dowell who finds himself suddenly upgraded from aimless to over-employed, when he is hired simultaneously by two bosses. Of course, things aren’t as straightforward as they seem: The two bosses secretly know one another, and Francis must struggle to keep his double-employment under wraps. Cue the disguises, half-brained schemes and mistaken identities characteristic of slamming-door farces. Fortunately, One Man, Two Guvnors rises above the usual fare with its high energy, and under the direction of T.J. Firneno, the cast more than delivers. Protulipac is an accomplished physical actor, and his monologues are a frenetic joy to behold. In them, Francis balances his work commitments with his food obsession — this show cycles through more menus than a four-star restaurant — along with his budding attraction to the feisty Dolly (a delightful Erin Bock), an assistant to one of Francis’s governors. To up the irreverent ante, between scenes, the cast performs offbeat doowop-style songs written by Grant Olding. These serve as fun interludes in a rapid-fire show during which it’s almost difficult to catch your breath. However, the play is not without its missteps. Many jokes exploit the mid-century setting, and although the time period is rife with comic possibilities, more often than not, those deliberately dated bits fall awkwardly flat. In fact, setting the show in the 1960s seems an almost curious choice, considering that it would work more or less as well in any decade. Furthermore, anybody seeking a sympathetic storyline should look elsewhere. With self-serving motives always at the forefront, there’s not an entirely likable character in the bunch. But Firneno directs the ensemble with impeccable timing, and the actors give winning performances all around. The end result had the audience roaring throughout the two-hour-plus running time on opening night. While the bawdy humor is certainly not for everyone, One Man, Two Guvnors is an ideal night out for those looking to cut loose with a show that’s anything but austere.

Foundation

Book, Music & Lyrics by Jim Jacobs & Warren Casey

The original “MICRO” professional Wrestling organization

JULY 29

JULY 28

Pure Prairie League

TUSK TRIBUTE TO FLEETWOOD MAC

222 MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN IRWIN 724-367-4000 • LAMPTHEATRE.ORG

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

FROM THE CREATOR OF HAMILTON!

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry. A HIGH-ENERGY ERUPTION OF SONG & DANCE!

July 7 - 16

July 18 - 23

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pittsburghCLO.org

At the Benedum Center

ONE MAN, TWO GUVNORS continues through Sat., July 15. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $13.7521.75. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org +

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[ART REVIEW]

REMEMBRANCES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} IN THE AGE of memories downloaded or outsourced — the ones in our heads made redundant by endless documents, selfies, social-media profiles — it’s curious that so many of the nine shows currently at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts refer, implicitly or explicitly, to memory. Yet as these solo and collaborative exhibitions by regional artists, make clear, the vagaries and possibilities of memory still call strongly to the imagination. Indeed, the PCA’s front-most gallery houses Nicole Renee Ryan’s exhibit of seven oil-on-board abstracts titled The Place and the Unplace: Memories of Memories. These “imagined landscapes” render the land in blocky swatches of orange, green and pink, the sky in faint blue, with filmy yellow clouds; one painting suggests a cityscape. Most create feelings of expansive contentment, save the tumultous “You Don’t Know How Much I F**ing Love You.” Memory as palimpsest informs Horizon Lost, Nikki Brugnoli’s works built around photographs of 120 19th-century beehive coke ovens (steel-industry relics) in a rural mining town. In the monochromatic “Swallowed,” dripped ink and scratched graphite emphasize the gravelike nature of the oven mouths; her watercolor screenprints contain colorful, overlapping imagery powerfully evoking these mortared ruins (with haunting audio piped in). Place-memory also figures in Jiyon Hong’s “Corrected Memory of a City,” a wall-sized schematic of cryptically annotated circles and arrows representing Pittsburgh, including its two biggest parks, and text reading “CMU” and “To Airport.” Jiyon’s nearby photorealistic paintings of river rocks neatly spaced on otherwise blank canvases, and of fanciful wooden constructions, make the gallery feel larger than it is, suggesting that his real

Nikki Brugnoli’s “Memory” (detail)

subject is space itself. Perhaps the most powerful exhibit here exploring memories is Oblivion, Misty Morrison’s collection of nine large oils. Two are still-lifes, one of a kitchen with an upended chair and smashed crockery; in three, the same adult woman interacts with a version of herself (two paintings are actually 180-degree reversals of each other). The subdued palette, harsh up- and side-lighting and accompanying printout of text messages — like “I can’t believe the way I treat people I love” — document emotional trauma and disassociation from the self. Morrison’s command of facial expressions is masterful; the effect is quietly devastating. Not all recourses to memory succeed equally. In her wall-text for Cave, Lauren Wilcox states that she’s critiquing received notions of femininity, and how our “memory” of how people are supposed to be can cloud our understanding of what they are. It’s a valid point, strongly suggested by six

manipulated photos of subjects, including a blindfolded young woman. The other seven works are abstracts encrusted with Borax crystals; the effect is interesting, but connecting these pieces to the artist’s statement about “the cumulative effect of passing impressions” is a metaphorical stretch.

2017 SOLO & COLLABORATIVE EXHIBITIONS continue through July 23. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pfpca.org

PCA’s largest gallery is devoted to He’s American, a potent collaboration between Devan Shimoyama and Danny Ferrell that “examines fantasies and fears about the other through depictions of everyday queer black and white male experiences.” In Ferrell’s oil paintings, a Diet Coke can gripped in a tattooed, cigarette-bearing hand re-

flects the image of two beefy naked dudes embracing; a young man, irradiated green, sits on a riverbank holding a second, semighostly man, both of them shirtless; and a young man, his Calvin Klein briefs visible, covers his face with the tail of his sweatshirt. The luminous palette suggests a slightly overexposed photo. Shimoyama offers “A Kiss,” a pair of Timbalands flung across an overhead cable, one plain, one rhinestone-spangled and sprouting flowers; two supersized black-velvet hoodies, one beaded, one feathered; and “For Tamir III,” a totemic tree branch, suspended from the ceiling, rhinestoned and bearing feathers, a tragic memorial. Not everything here explicitly concerns memory. Reveries juxtaposes Shannon Hines’ whimsical vanities (curvaceous upholstered benches and mirror frames) with Isabel Farmsworth’s installations, including the witty “Bouyancy (dreaming of flight).” Interdependent pairs Angela Biederman’s amusing “Poles” (two utility poles, complete with wires) with Jonathan Schwarz’s assemblies incorporating found objects and broken pottery. Schwarz’s pieces are hit-or-miss, but his “youandi” does warrant its own room: Atop a spindly column, two vaguely anthropomorphic ceramic figures contemplate a perilous journey across a flimsy wooden bridge suspended over a pile of time-darkened wooden lathe. Finally, MO Studios is less a coherent statement than a look at the studio environment of Magic Organs (which, to be fair, is all it purports to be). All four walls and the ceiling are covered with edgily playful paintings, prints, collages and video, plus examples of the found materials used by collaborative co-founders DS Kinsell and Julie Mallis; note Mallis’ “Hello White People Signs” (“White Guilt Tears Sins,” with “guilt” and “tears” crossed out) and Kinsel’s “n-word signs” (“How Many Niggaz Do You Know?”). If you don’t know MO, this is a decent introduction, and one you’ll remember next time you see their work. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Image: Irving Penn, Salvador Dalí, New York, 1947, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the artist. Copyright © The Irving Penn Foundation

T H R O U G H S E P T. 10 Admission: $10, Members free. All visitors will receive free admission on July 8, courtesy of the Jack Buncher Foundation.

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THEFRICKPITTSBURGH.ORG 412-371-0600 7227 REYNOLDS STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15208

Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with generous support from ART MENTOR FOUNDATION LUCERNE, Sakurako and William Fisher, The William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment Fund, The Lauder Foundation – Leonard and Judy Lauder Fund, Edward Lenkin and Roselin Atzwanger, The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Margery and Edgar Masinter, The Margery and Edgar Masinter Exhibitions Fund, the James F. Petersen Charitable Fund in honor of Tania and Tom Evans, The Bernie Stadiem Endowment Fund, and the Trellis Fund. The C.F. Foundation in Atlanta supports the museum’s traveling exhibition program, Treasures to Go.


FOR THE WEEK OF

07.06-07.13.17

FreeEvent

Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

{CP FILE PHOTO}

One year ago, Baron Batch was arrested for spray-painting graffiti on the Three Rivers Heritage Trail. The prominent, locally based artist (a former Pittsburgh Steeler) was charged with 30 counts of criminal mischief; he eventually was sentenced to 18 months of probation and 150 hours of community service, and paid $17,000 in restitution. But the story doesn’t end there. One of Batch’s arresting officers was graffiti-squad veteran Alphonso Sloan. “I explained to him that I was an artist also,”

says Sloan. “Right off the bat he wanted to collaborate.” Or, as Batch (pictured) tells City Paper, “Artists know artists. You hit it off. You start talking.” The two have already collaborated on a couple works. On Fri., July 7, they’ll be creating in public for Wall Paintings: Storytellers, a live art event at SPACE gallery that’s part of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s quarterly Downtown Gallery Crawl. Twelve artists or artist teams each will get eight hours and a 12-by-12-foot expanse of wall to make new work; visitors are welcome the whole time, starting at 1 p.m. Wall Paintings was organized by curator Robert Raczka, his fourth such live art event at SPACE. Most of the artists work in comics, illustration or graphic design, including Caitlin Rose Boyle, M.L. Walker, Mike Budai, Jessica Heberle, Renee Ickes, Nils Balls Hanczar and Paulette Poullet. Raczka hasn’t asked the artists what they’ll paint. And other than saying that his and Sloan’s work would send a positive message to young people, Batch adds only, “It’s going to be a lot of us figuring it out when the day gets here.” The Gallery Crawl features art, live music, comedy, film and more at some three dozen venues, with new exhibits also opening at 707 and 709 Penn galleries and The Lantern; the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership’s Night Market; and the debut of FLOW, Erwin Redl’s large-scale public light installation at the Wood Street T Station.

{ART BY TONY HAVRILLA}

^ Sat., July 8: The Natural Being

friday 07.07 FESTIVAL A new series at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh called Northside Neighbor Days continues with Girls Rule. It’s three days of performances and arts-and-crafts activities aimed primarily at empowering ing girls (though boys can join in). There are girl-centric story times; self-portrait drawing awing classes; and a health fair with sponsors nsors Allegheny Health Network and Allegheny General Hospital. Everyone, North orth Sider or not, is welcome, but those with IDs proving North Side zip codes (15212, 15212, 15233 or 15214) get half off admission for up to five people. Bill O’Driscoll 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Also 10 a.m.5 p.m. Sat., July 8, and d Sun., July 9. Free with museum eum admission ($14-16; free e for kids under 2). 412-322-5058 -5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org ds.org

Pittsburgh-based hi hip-hop artist Livefromthecity is known to some a as King of the Sun, after the title of his 2016 m mixtape. And he takes light, and all it symbolizes, seriously: He’s the host of symbol Sun Fest ’17 ’17, a three-day series of hip-hop/ Afro-futurism-themed art, performances Afro-futur and more, mor celebrating life, at BOOM Concepts. Tonight, as part of Penn Conce Avenue’s monthly gallery crawl Ave Unblurred, a gallery show curated Un by b Tresa Murphy-Green is complemented by performances c by b VUDU L U C, Pirate Gang, 1Hood, Prospectz Nation, 1

“Disco, to me, seems to o come from a distant idyllic era.” ra.” So

Gallery Crawl: 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org +

FESTIVAL

ART

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

NEWS

writes curator Emily Colucci, of Future Tenant’s Night Fever. The art exhibition, which opens tonight, features the work of nine local and national artists, examining the aesthetic and cultural legacy of disco — from its resonant visual iconography (shimmery disco disc divas) and performative nature (dancing alone, together) to the scene’s embrace and toge empowerment of gay, black and Latin communities. It’s been 40 years since Saturday Night Nigh Fever catapulted disco into the mainstream to acclaim and a derision; now we ask what it all meant. Al Hoff Reception: 5:30-10 p.m. 819 Penn Ave., Recept Downtown. Free. www.futuretenant.org www.futu

> Fri., July 7: John Witherspoon itherspoon

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

^ Fri., July 7: Sun Fest ‘17

North Side

Livefromthecity and more. Saturday’s Sun Shower is an afternoon streetwear pop-up shop and family barbecue. The fest wraps Sunday with brunch, trap music and a lecture by VUDU L U C. BO 6-10 p.m. 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. www.livefromthe.city

CRITIC: Susan

COMEDY

EVENT: Tom Roberts’

Charlie Chaplin Silent Picture Show, City of Asylum, Rupani, 63, holistic counselor and gardener from Highland Park

WHEN: Thu.,

June 29

“I have [been to City of Asylum before]. I really love it. Over the years, I’ve come when I can. I really appreciate what they do; I think it’s quite a gift. I’ve always enjoyed when I come, so I wanted to come and support and be entertained. The subject sounded really fascinating. I think the group here has been fun, but I’ve been really entertained by the performers, and the movies have been fun, too. The music — oh, it’s just so fun! It’s so light-hearted and well cued to the movie, and I think both performers are quite phenomenal. I couldn’t imagine what it [was] going to be like, so it’s been really fun to see what they created and how they went about it. I was amazed at how much time went into music — I had no idea.” B Y M ATT P ETRAS

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If you’ve seen episodes of The Boondocks, Black Jesus or The Tracy Morgan Show, or the hit Friday movie series, you may already be familiar with John Witherspoon. His energetic persona has been injected into a variety of characters over the years, such as the dad in The Wayans Bros. The 75-year-old comic brings his own style of funny to the Pittsburgh Improv. He knows his stuff: The Detroitborn funnyman has been working since the 1970s. Matt Petras 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. Also 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., July 8, and 7 p.m. Sun., July 9. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, Homestead. $25. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

STAGE

is changed drastically by a lottery ticket. The cast includes Blanca Camacho as Camila, David Del Rio as Sonny, and Damon J. Gillespie as Graffiti Pete. MP 8 p.m. Continues through July 16. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25.75-75.75. 412-281-3973 or www. pittsburghclo.culturaldistrict.org

saturday 07.08 SCREEN The Carnegie Science Center is shutting down the Rangos Omnimax Theater — to be replaced with the Rangos Giant Cinema this fall — and is sending the oddly shaped, domed movie theater off in style with a 31-hour movie marathon. It will be screening nearly 20 large-format faves like Hubble, Born to Be Wild, D-Day, Tornado Alley and National Parks Adventure. Tickets include in-out privileges, access to the exhibits and a piece of 70 mm Omnimax film. AH 10 a.m. through 5 p.m. Sun., July 8. One Allegheny Ave., North Side. $10 ($5 for members). www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

GOATS

If you can’t get tickets to Perhaps you read about Hamilton — and who can landscaping goats in last week’s except VIPs like Mike Pence, Animal Issue? Now catch them who managed to provoke in action as the herd from a clap-back from the cast — Allegheny GoatScape starts consider In the Heights, munching through the invasive beginning tonight at the plants that overwhelm the South {ART BY KYLE ANGER} Benedum Center. This 2008 Side Slopes “Jurassic Valley.” ^ Tue., July 11: NOW Tony Award-winning musical At today’s Goat Fest, folks can was written by Lin-Manuel meet the goats; catch some Miranda, who later wrote Hamilton. In this musical tunes from Colonel Eagleburger’s Highstepping Goodtime filled with hip hop and pop music, a New York City community Band, and Ethan Kovalcik; take a hike; nibble on cake and

07.05/07.12.2017


PROUDLY TATTOOING PITTSBURGH SINCE 1994!

tattoo & piercing studio

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK GARVIN}

^ Fri., July 7: In the Heights

Open Daily, 1pm-8pm

grilled cheese; and see a fire truck (1-3 p.m.). AH Noon-4 p.m. Bandi Schaum Community Garden (park at Mission Street lot), South Side Slopes. Free. www.facebook.com (search “Goat Fest”)

walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended!

ART UnSmoke Systems Artspace hosts the opening reception for two art exhibits, both rather different from each other. One is The Natural Being, which combines the paintings of Aimee Heinnickel, Tony Havrilla, and Brandon McDonald, all emerging artists based in Southwestern Pennsylvania. The other exhibit is Surface/ Structure, an ongoing project from Pittsburgh-based artists Natalia Gomez and Kara Skylling. In it, new works, examining existing structure and built history, will be created on site in response to the raw exhibition space. MP 6-9 p.m. Continues through July 30. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. www.unsmokeartspace.com

(412) 683-4320 5240 Butler St.

Pgh, PA • 15201

> Sat., July 8: King Lear

“As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods. / They kill us for their sport.” Few would accuse King Lear of pussyfooting about loss, fate, foolishness or mortality. But acclaimed literature scholar Julian Markels and Guggeheim Fellow James Kincaid think they’ve found a way to sharpen the Shakespeare classic’s irredeemably tragic message. Tonight, Bricolage Productions offers a free reading of their new edit by a cast of top local actors, including Ken Bolden, Lissa Brennan, Jeffrey Carpenter (pictured), Tami Dixon and James FitzGerald. Risher Reddick directs. BO 7 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free; email ticket request to tami@webbricolage.org.

tuesday 07.11

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BECKY THURNER}

STAGE

ART BoxHeart welcomes two art exhibits to its gallery — Heather Kanazawa’s Investigations of Life and Group A’s NOW. The exhibit from Kanazawa, a Pittsburgh-native, features abstract paintings that explore memory. Members of Group A, a collective of artists originally founded in 1944, were asked to submit a recent piece, regardless of theme. So expect works that are wildly different, but still represent the group’s commitment to contemporary thought and freedom. A reception with artists from both exhibits is on July 15 from 5-8 p.m. MP Gallery opens 11 a.m. Continues through Aug. 11. 4523 Liberty Ave, Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

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STROZZAPRETTI WAS AS DELICATE A DISH AS A PASTA CAN BE

TACO TIME {BY RYAN DETO} Oscar Reyes moved to Coraopolis five years ago from New York to start a roofing company. Over the years, he and his mostly Latino crew grew annoyed they couldn’t find a good place to nosh on authentic Mexican fare in the western part of Allegheny County. So, Reyes decided to open a taqueria. “We were always looking for a place to eat, a place that is really Mexican,” says Reyes. “Now, when my guys are done working, they can come here and eat.”

{CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

La Poblanita tacos garnished the traditional Mexican way

In April, La Poblanita Mexican Store opened in an abandoned gas station on Fourth Avenue in Coraopolis. Reyes named the store after his hometown of Puebla, Mexico. The market is small, but includes an impressive array of Mexican products. It also has an in-house deli, where butchers make their own chorizo and prepare exotic meats like beef cheek. But the real draw is the tacos. La Poblanita’s tacos offer seven different fillings, and Reyes likes the lomo (ribeye steak) and chicken fajitas best. Tacos are $2.50 apiece and are loaded with meat. Patrons — who purchase their tacos inside the market and then are given a ticket to relay to the cook — are encouraged to garnish their softcorn-tortilla tacos the traditional Mexican way: chopped onions, cilantro, lime and a choice of homemade salsa. Reyes said he wanted to keep the price of tacos reasonable so people in the area could visit for a snack, or place multiple orders for a full meal. And Reyes says the taqueria is becoming more popular each day. When City Paper visited, one customer parked his tractortrailer on the side of the road so he could wait in line for tacos. When asked, the man replied: “Think I would have parked here like that if it wasn’t good?” La Poblanita is open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Arrive late at your own risk, because the more popular taco meats run out earlier in the evening.

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Grilled octopus

NEW ITALIAN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

R

AISE YOUR HAND if you remember

RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the Xplorion! A futuristic information hub installed in the lobby of the Alcoa Building when it became the Regional Enterprise Tower, it was, in retrospect, a symptom of a trying-too-hard phase of Pittsburgh’s bumpy transition to a 21st-century city. Now that Downtown, in particular, has got some momentum, the office tower is filled with apartments, and a charming Italian restaurant occupies the former Xplorion’s ground-floor space. “Charming Italian” may evoke checkered tablecloths and raffia-cloaked bottles, or perhaps cracked plaster walls and candlelight, but Talia — a venture of the Vallozzi family — has pulled off a neat trick in a dining room of unusual proportions. It isn’t very large in floor space — perhaps 20 tables, with an open kitchen on one

801 Fourth Ave., Coraopolis. 412-716-7768

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side and a bar tucked around the corner — but has ample volume thanks to quite tall ceilings and, of course, huge, aluminum-framed windows facing the street. It

TALIA 425 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-456-8214 HOURS: Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Dinner Mon.-Thu. 5-10 p.m., Fri. 5-11 p.m., Sat. 4-11 p.m.; Sunday brunch 10 a.m.-2 p.m. PRICES: Antipasti, salads, pizza and panini $9-15; entrees $16-40 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED sounds like a recipe for a bright, modern space, but Talia’s Tuscan color scheme of deep-red piers, charcoal-gray walls and soft-brown upholstery and tables balances brightness and depth, formality

and warmth, trend and tradition. The restaurant’s subtitle is Americano Cucina & Rosticceria, suggesting that Italian authenticity isn’t the core concept. But the cuisine is unmistakably of Italy, though perhaps with a modern sensibility. Take beans and greens, a dish that we love for its time-honored combination of wilted escarole, firm white beans and savory broth, perfect for pairing with crusty bread. Talia’s menu skips the name, listing just the main ingredients, the “greens” of which has been updated to dandelion. The preparation, too, bore the kitchen’s own signature: The beans were blended into a thick purée that coated other, whole beans and hearty dandelion greens alike. We loved it. Octopus was served in a distinctly haute manner, with two plump tentacles crisscrossed on a puddle of aioli and haloed with


a grass-green ring of thin scallion sauce. Jason found the deeply charred tentacles a bit tough at the ends, but Angelique appreciated their substantial, almost steak-like quality. We both thought the flavor combo of the warm, creamy chili aioli and bright, herbal green onion was brilliant. Of course, Talia has pizza. But not the kind that permits soggy centers to gain thin, crispy crusts. Our margherita pizza provided substantial crust with every bite. The cooked tomato sauce was a mellow orange and rich, not bright in either color or flavor. Plenty of basil and just enough cheese rounded out the traditional trifecta of Italian ingredients. It gave us strong reason to believe Talia’s other two pizzas — Calabrian and baked clam pizza with preserved lemon and nduja, the spicy prosciutto paste — would be winners as well. It also wouldn’t be an Italian dinner without pasta, and we ordered two (full or half portions are available). Ricotta gnocchi were plump and pillowy in an assertive sauce of San Marzano tomatoes augmented by piquant Calabrian chilis. Plenty of tender, savory beef brisket and more dandelion greens gave this dish a hearty, robust character. Strozzapretti, on the other hand, was as delicate a dish as a pasta can be. The house-made long noodles were handformed to curl over on themselves, as if they’d been rolled around a pencil, and they were pleasingly thick and chewy. Flavorings were perfectly light and simple: butter and cheese, with pink peppercorns providing a slight floral aroma and subtle kick. The rosticceria part of Talia’s name refers to the big, red, imported rotisserie visible in the open kitchen, and the source of dry-aged ribeye, free-range roasted chicken and porchetta. The latter is having a bit of a moment: While it’s long been a staple of Italian deli counters, this multi-cut pork feast has drawn some recent notice as a main dish. The original preparation consists of a whole pig deboned, sewed shut, and spit-roasted until full of juices and surrounded by crackling skin. More reasonably, a whole pork loin can be wrapped in a whole pork belly, pairing lean with fat, luscious flesh with crisp skin. Talia’s version was fantastic, a garlic-herb paste at the juncture between loin and belly acting as the only seasoning for a slice that comes out thick and shimmering with juices. It’s one of the best pure pork experiences you’ll ever have. It’s no wonder that new Italian restaurants are always popping up: From its humblest to its most elevated forms, the cuisine is endlessly pleasing. With its excellent, occasionally strikingly original takes on classic Italian cuisine, Talia is a great place to renew or reinforce your love affair with Italy. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

FRIED DOUGH {BY OLAFEMI MANDLEY} Fried dough is delicious and chameleonlike, transforming into irresistible treats that are sweet, savory, crispy, crunchy or spongy. Fried dough is humble. It makes amazing foods, from akra to beignets, croquettes to tortillas, even wontons. I have been in love with fried dough for 45 years. My banana fritters are inspired by African cuisine and my first love. My mother never fried food, not even chicken. For some black folks, no fried chicken is unimaginable. I was 9 when my mother introduced me to vegetarianism. She sprang the dietary changes on me like a knife ejecting from a switchblade. She announced meatless Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Whole grains and honey replaced processed, devitalized grains and refined sugar. The no sugar was a battle. I was a cranky, crying little girl. No candy. No Kool-Aid. Big problem! My mother made an exception just once to the new rules — yeast-raised donuts. Once the word spread — freshly fried donuts — there was a line at our kitchen door. I will forever be grateful for fried dough. They brought Curtis Jones to the kitchen door. Curtis was our 15-year-old paperboy. I watched him eat, fantasizing about kissing the sugar that clung to his lips. No napkin needed.

Destination

412-252-2877 Check us out @ frontporchgrille.com

INGREDIENTS • 3-4 large very ripe bananas, mashed • 1 cup organic whole milk • 4 large organic eggs, beaten • 6 tbsp. sugar • 2 tbsp. butter, melted • 1 tbsp. pure vanilla extract • 1/8 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg • 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour • 1½ tbsp. baking powder • ½ tsp. sea salt • 2 quarts canola oil • 2 cups confectioner’s sugar • ½ cup cinnamon sugar INSTRUCTIONS In a mixing bowl, combine bananas, milk, eggs, butter, vanilla, nutmeg and sugar. Set aside. In a separate bowl, lightly whisk all dry ingredients together. Add dry ingredients to wet. Stir until blended. Batter should be smooth and thick. Let sit 30 minutes. Heat oil in cast-iron pot, until it is 365 degrees F. Carefully drop the batter in using a tablespoon. Cook about 45 seconds. Do not overcrowd. Remove from oil and drain. Dust with powdered sugar or cinnamon sugar while hot. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Olafemi Mandley is a cook, caterer, educator and storyteller. She teaches African foods classes at Phipps Conservatory and is available for catering and storytelling. www.ola cateringco.wixsite.com/ola-appetit-catering WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

OAXACAN CUISINE

FRIDAY, JULY 7TH LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR

s Wednesday - Friday 5PM-7PM Half Off Appetizers!

{CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON}

Christian Simmons in Pennsylvania Libations

[ON THE ROCKS]

DRINK LOCALLY Pennsylvania Libations Opens in the Strip District {BY CELINE ROBERTS} CHANGE IN Pennsylvania is a-brewin’ ...

WE CATER!

and distilling and fermenting its way onto the shelves of Pennsylvania Libations, the state’s first privately owned spirits retailer located in the Strip District. Owner Christian Simmons, along with his sister and director of operations, Faith George, are dedicated to carrying only Pennsylvania-made spirits, wines, ciders, beers and meads. Their goal is to have about two dozen different distillers. Their current list includes Big Spring Spirits, Maggie’s Farm Rum, Boyd & Blair, Liberty Pole Spirits and others. Although Simmons just opened in late June, he already has plans to open a second location in the Pittsburgh airport.

PENNSYLVANIA LIBATIONS 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. www.pennsylvanialibations.com

Simmons started in the industry as the co-founder and co-owner of Four Seasons Brewing Company in Latrobe. Today, he’s no longer involved in day-to-day operations there, and that allowed him to spend time opening Pennsylvania Libations, the idea for which started in 2015. He started a spirits brokerage company, CJ Spirits in Kane, Pa., and expanded on his passion for spirits and small business. Simmons always enjoyed connecting local brewers and distillers with each other and encouraging cross-promotion. “It’s all about building relationships,” he said of the brokerage work. He relied on the contacts he’d made with manufacturers, as well as strong family relationships, to help guide him through the complicated appli-

cations, approvals and licensing processes with the state. He cites the deep experience and trust with manufacturers who’ve been in the business for up to 35 years. “Now we have a retail store. It’s still about building relationships, but now we can service the public, [whereas] before we could only service liquor-license holders,” he says excitedly. “I’m for the people. I’m not a part of any party. I just like to party.” The business model works on a consignment system. Everything stocked in the store is on consignment. There’s also a stocking fee and a commission from the sales. “We have what we believe is one of the most prime retail locations in the state, and because of that, it’s very favorable for a lot of distilleries to have us be their management company. We’re a licensed management company, the first ever in the history of Pennsylvania for PA distilleries,” says Simmons. “We want these to be brand-equity hubs and help these manufacturers get their products out to bars and restaurants as well.” Simmons is open to working with companies of all sizes: “We’ll take any manufacturer that has one product or 12 products.” He also runs them through a vetting process for quality and pricing, in order to be confident he can sell it. Customers are welcome to schedule one free 20-minute tasting a day to try before they buy. He hopes this will increase the familiarity with Pennsylvania brands. “It’s an incubator for the distillers that sell their product in the state store systems, to sell to bars and restaurants and [provide knowledge to] the public,” says Simmons. C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: GIN RICKEY

VS.

Needle & Pin

Benjamin’s Western Avenue Burger Bar 900 Western Ave., North Side DRINK: Gin rickey INGREDIENTS: Bombay Sapphire gin, lime juice, simple syrup, soda , lime twist OUR TAKE: This straightforward classic is sweetly refreshing. Soda gives it larger bubbles for a less carbonated mouthfeel, and the fresh-squeezed lime juice provides tartness and a zesty citrus nose. Botanicals from the gin — notes of lemon and juniper — pop on the palate.

3271 W. Liberty Ave., Dormont DRINK: Gin rickey INGREDIENTS: Tanqueray Rangpur gin, lime cordial, Red Ribbon seltzer, lime wheel OUR TAKE: Simple, refreshing and citrusy, this gin rickey is the perfect drink for the first day of summer. The lime cordial wasn’t overly sweet and highlighted the tartness of the lime. The choice of locally made seltzer, that’s dry with smaller bubbles, added a nice effervescence to the cocktail and complemented the soft Rangpur lime notes of the gin.

Learn more about Pittsburgh’s food scene on our podcasts Sound Bite and Five Minutes in Food History online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Dogfish Head Festina Peche $45.99/case I’ve caught flack for loving this beer, but love it I do. Its very tart peach flavor wakes up the palate for easy summer sipping that isn’t too sweet. At 4.5 ABV, this beer is also refreshing without too much of an alcoholic wallop. RECOMMENDED BY CELINE ROBERTS

Dogfish Head Festina Peche is available at Save Mor Beer & Pop Warehouse.

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NAILING THE ROLE OF PETER PARKER IS WAY MORE IMPORTANT

BACK ON THE JOB {BY AL HOFF} Those pill-shaped minions and their amusingly grumpy leader Gru will just never be as fresh and funny as they were in their 2010 debut Despicable Me. A 2013 sequel and a Minions-only spinoff last year were fine, but it’s not like the world needs another kid-friendly animated franchise to grind out in perpetuity. So yeah, now the gang is back for the fourth time in Despicable Me 3, directed by Eric Guillon, and it’s … OK.

In the pink: Gru

Gru (voiced by Steve Carrell) has lost some of his edge: He’s no longer a bad guy, and is married to Lucy, (Kristen Wiig), an agent with the Anti-Villain League. There’s some plot jiggering to give Gru a purpose: He and Lucy bungle the capture of a crook — washed-up 1980s TV star Balthazar Bratt (Trey Parker) who has stolen a giant pink gem — and get fired from the League. Conveniently, Gru learns he has a long-lost brother, Dru (also Carrell), who wants to learn cool spy-like villain behavior. So Gru trains Dru, and our three heroes work to steal the diamond back from Bratt, a.k.a. commit a crime for good. Bratt is a silly-fun foil, if you’re old enough to appreciate all the 1980s pop-culture jokes woven through his mullet, and to get the laughs about how child stars can wind up as grotesque parodies of themselves. (Preening one’s once-beloved catchphrase “I’ve been a bad boy” isn’t a good look for an adult.) And Bratt’s antics come preloaded with era-appropriate pop songs (A-Ha, Michael Jackson, Madonna) — but do any of today’s kids care? Also (presumably) for the accompanying adults are a number of nods to other animated favorites such as Finding Nemo, Dr. Seuss’ Grinch and the Pink Panther. Meanwhile, the minions are oddly sidelined. After Gru renounces villainy, they walk out in protest, so their various antics — entering a singing competition, landing in jail, escaping said jail in a jerryrigged contraption — occur outside of the main story. Given their over-exposure, less is certainly more, but fans will miss the dynamic push-pull of the minions with Gru. In 3-D, in select theaters

Tubular: Tom Holland as Spider-Man

WEB HISTORY {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

T

HE KEY TO any superhero movie is

not in casting the person best suited to play the title character, but rather finding the best person to play the character’s true identity. Quite honestly, any well-toned actor can play Spider-Man; nailing the role of Peter Parker is way more important. Director Jon Watts’ Spider-Man: Homecoming works because of the actors he employs in the film’s two crucial roles; Tom Holland, as Spidey, and Michael Keaton, as The Vulture. These two ably carry the film, with strong support from actors such as Marisa Tomei, Jon Favreau, Bokeem Woodbine and Robert Downey Jr. The film picks up after the happenings of last year’s Captain America: Civil War. Spider-Man, fresh off of aiding Team Iron Man against Team Captain America, has returned home to New York; he’s also now in possession of a super-suit designed for him by Tony Stark (Downey). He’s told to lay low and get used to the suit, by becoming a “friendly neighborhood Spider-Man.”

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07.05/07.12.2017

But Parker wants to do more to prove that he deserves to be a full-time member of the Avengers. That lands the wall-crawler directly in the path of The Vulture. Vulture’s team is making weapons out of spare parts salvaged from the wreckage of the various Avenger-related episodes (for example, a gun made out of Voltron’s arm).

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING DIRECTED BY: Jon Watts STARRING: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Marisa Tomei, Robert Downey Jr. Starts Fri., July 7

CP APPROVED Holland brings a youthfulness and charm to the character that was sorely lacking when Tobey Maguire played the part in the early aughts. Holland finds Parker’s insecurity and vulnerability, a characterization more in line with the comics that he first starred in. The actor is endearing and

likable and, despite being 20, plays the role of a 14-year-old to perfection. Peter Parker was always the superhero you wanted to root for, and that’s what Holland brings to the role. Then, there’s Keaton, as Parker’s foil, The Vulture. He flawlessly plays the role of a villain, who is a regular Joe who has been pushed into a corner one too many times. Keaton is one of those actors who can terrify you simply with a look. Add to that an intense, slow-burning delivery, and you get Marvel’s first truly frightening and believable villain since the Cinematic Universe began in 2008. While I could watch a four-hour Marvel film, most people will find the movie is probably a little longer than it needs to be at two hours and 13 minutes. But you won’t be bored, and for fans of the MCU, you’ll be ecstatic about this film and its place in Marvel’s vision. Spider-Man Homecoming is not the best movie in Marvel’s highly profitable cinematic universe, but it’s the best Spider-Man film ever produced. C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T YA P E R. C OM


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NEW THE BAD BATCH. Ana Lily Amirpour (A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night) directs this drama, set in a dystopic future where a woman (Suki Waterhouse) sets out seeking revenge on the cannibals who amputated and then ate a couple of her limbs. Starts Fri., July 7. Hollywood MANIFESTO. In Julian Rosefeldt’s film, actress Cate Blanchett costumes herself as various characters — a schoolteacher, a homeless man, a television anchor — and in various settings, delivers a series of monologues — all taken verbatim from well-known manifestos. If that sounds arty, it is: Originally, these monologues were part of a video installation at the Australian Centre of the Moving Image, in which all 13 ran simultaneously on 13 different screens. How much you’ll enjoy the linear form depends on your capacity to simply enjoy the film’s strengths, absent any larger plot or guidelines. Blanchett is remarkable, and always a delight to watch. The work is handsomely produced, and some of the monologues are well served by their incongruent settings (a funeral, a suburban dining room, post-industrial landscapes). And if you’re the sort that appreciates a good manifesto about art (as most of these are), this is like a Top 10 set. But the manifestos are not identified on screen, so it can be a bit of a scramble to even know what is being talked about, and in what context. You’d have to be a pretty well-read intellectual to recognize all of these texts. (For the record, I knew one [Marx on capitalism] and correctly guessed another [Dogme film].) The lack of identification is an aesthetic choice (perhaps even supported by one of the manifestos …), but without larger context, viewers may be left with: What is this person talking about? But if you’re onboard, this is a provocative intellectual exercise. Starts Fri., July 7. Harris (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY DOLLAR BANK CINEMA IN THE PARK. Captain America: Civil War, Wed., July 5 (Schenley Park: Flagstaff Hill) and Sat., July 8 (Riverview). Pete’s Dragon, Thu., July 6 (Brookline); Fri., July 7 (Arsenal); and Sat., July 8 (Grandview). Alice Through the Looking Glass, Sun., July 9 (Schenley Plaza); Tue., July 11 (West End/Elliott); and Thu., July 13 (Brookline). Rogue One, Wed., July 12 (Schenley Park: Flagstaff Hill). Films begin at dusk. Free. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net THE SURVIVALIST. Writer-director Stephen Fingleton’s lean but intense drama is set some time in the near future, after catastrophic events have destroyed civilization. A young man (Martin McCann), living in a ramshackle cabin deep in the woods, is joined by a mother (Olwen Fouere) and her teenage daughter (Mia Goth), in a bargain exchanging sex for food. An uneasy household takes root, in which nobody trusts anybody and the deprivation makes everybody’s behavior unpredictable and dangerous. The film offers plenty of tension, and a raw scene or two. There’s little dialogue, and little plot, though it’s inevitable something is going to give. Life is filthy, fraught and feral, kill or be killed. The Survivalist is well done and well produced, but it’s a grim tale. 7:30 p.m. nightly, Wed., July 5, and Thu., July 6. Hollywood (Al Hoff) ROUGH AUNTIES. Kim Longinotto’s 2008 documentary profiles a group of women who fight many a battle to protect and care for the abused,

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Manifesto neglected and forgotten children of Durban, South Africa. 7 p.m. Thu., July 6. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. RSVP at www.alphabetcity.org. DIRTY DANCING. The much-loved 1987 romance from Emile Ardolino is back on the big screen, for one night. Swoon anew as Baby (Jennifer Grey) learns about dance, love and heartbreak from local dirty-boogier Johnny Castle (Patrick Swayze) while vacationing in the Catskills. You just might have … the time of your life. July 7-13. Row House Cinema BILLY ELLIOTT. A boy in an economically depressed British mining town finds solace in ballet dancing, much to the consternation of his family and peers. Jamie Bell stars in Stephen Daldry’s 2000 feel-good film. July 7-13. Row House Cinema BLACK SWAN. A ballerina (Natalie Portman) succumbs to the pressure of the job, begins to experience terrifying hallucinations in Darren Aronofsky’s 2010 melodrama. July 7-13. Row House Cinema CENTER STAGE. Nicholas Hytner directs this 2000 ensemble film about a group of teenagers enrolled in New York’s American Ballet Academy. July 7-13. Row House Cinema

What have you always wanted to know about Pittsburgh?

“WHY DOES PITTSBURGH HAVE AN H IN IT?” “IS A PARKING-SPOT CHAIR LEGALLY BINDING?” “WHAT IS SLIPPY?” Mike Wysocki has the answers.

THE FPA. This 2011 film, from Brandon and Jason Trost, finds rivals in the a post-apocalyptic future competing via Beat Beat Revelation, a dance-off similar to Dance, Dance Revolution. 9:30 p.m. Fri., July 7. Row House Cinema

(well...sorta)

OMNIMAX MOVIE MARATHON. The domed Rangos Omnimax Theater is shutting down to be re-built as a new Rangos Giant Cinema (featuring the latest in 4K laser digital projection). As a final hurrah, the Carnegie Science Center is hosting a 31-hour movie marathon featuring some popular large-format films. Among the nearly 20 movies to be screened are: Special Effects, Tornado Alley, Born to Be Wild, Hubble, D-Day and National Parks Adventure. Tickets include in-out privileges, access to the exhibits and a piece of 70 mm Omnimax film. 10 a.m. Sat., July 8, through 5 p.m. Sun., July 8. $10 ($5 for members). www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

SUBMIT YOUR PITTSBURGH QUESTIONS AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KILLER KLOWNS FROM OUTER SPACE. Really, what more to you need to know? Aliens who look like clowns terrorize a small American town in this 1988 cult classic from Stephen Chiodo. Midnight, Sat. July 8. Row House Cinema CINEMA PARADISO. Giuseppe Tornatore directs this sentimental 1988 charmer about a young Italian boy’s coming of age in the milieu of the local cinema during the 1950s. In Italian, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Tue., July 11. Tull Family Theater, Sewickley

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GOT A FEW THOUSAND BUCKS LAYING AROUND? TREAT YOURSELF TO ROBERTO CLEMENTE’S SHOWER SHOES

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History

Think about the mundane items you save, like receipts, tax forms and membership cards. We keep these things because we think someday we might need them; even though deep down, we know they’re worthless. And theyy are, unless you’re Roberto Clemente. On Tue., July 11, during the MLB’s All-Star festivities, Hunt Auctions will be auctioning off what the company calls “the most significant player collection to have ever been offered at public auction.” If you’ve got the money, you can buy things like Clemente’s game-worn 1960 World Series uniform (top value of $500,000). That’s awesome, but my favorite items are the truly bizarre ones. Here are some of our favorites. For more information or to bid online go to www.huntauctions.com.

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} A look back at events that you’ve either forgotten about or never heard of in the first place. JULY 5, 1886 Pittsburgh Pirates catcher and old-timey hits-machine Fred Carroll set the Major League record for the most hits in one day when he had nine hits in a doubleheader against Baltimore. No one has ever beaten that mark, although eight players have subsequently hit nine. The most recent was in 1961.

JULY 6, 1933

JULY 7, 1959 Then-Vice President Richard Nixon throws out the first pitch at the MLB All-Star Game at Forbes Field.

JULY 8, 1933 Art Rooney founds the Pittsburgh Steelers, becoming the NFL’s tenth team.

JULY 9, 2003 The biggest scandal to ever rock the Pittsburgh Pirates occurs in Milwaukee. During the Brewers’ “Sausage Race” — similar to our Pierogie race — Bucco first baseman Randall Simon lightly hits the costume of one of the sausages with his bat, forcing the racer off-balance and tumbling to the ground. Simon is arrested and fined $575.

JULY 10, 1934 Pirate Pie Traynor becomes the first person to steal home during the All-Star Game.

JULY 11, 1985 Legendary Steelers linebacker Jack Lambert retires from professional football after 10 seasons with the team.

JULY 11, 2001 The Pittsburgh Penguins trade long-time star Jaromir Jagr to the Washington Capitals for Kris Beech. It was not a fair trade.

JULY 12, 1897 Beaver native and Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder Tom McCreery becomes the first and only major leaguer to hit three inside-the-park home runs.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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Need to work out your stress spots? Get the Roberto Clemente electric massage machine ($400-600). Turns out No. 21 was a physical-therapy buff.

2.

Tired of getting athlete’s foot in the shower? Get the Great One’s rubber shower shoes ($500-1,000). “Clemente” is written across the top “quite possibly by Roberto himself.”

3.

You’ll be a hit the next time you rent a car at the airport if you “accidentally” flash Roberto Clemente’s Hertz membership card ($300-500). Bonus: The phone number still works 45 years later (we checked).

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For an estimated $5,000-10,000, you can get his personal pool table and balls. For another $500-750, get his personal pool cue.

5.

In my opinion, the greatest item in this auction is this white gravy boat with a wheat-stalk decorating the side. Why? Because Clemente studied ceramics and made it himself! When your mother starts bragging about your siblings’ success, you can retort with: “Well, I own a goddamned gravy boat made by Roberto Clemente!” nte!”

6.

The baseball Clemente notched his 2,000th hit with comes with a great story. The home e run was retrieved by 15-year-old Gary Chick. Chick met Clemente after the game and gave the legend the ball for an autographed bat and ball. This ball is worth upwards of $40,000! I wonder what Chick’s bat and ball is worth.

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Clemente received lots of awards during his career, and some were kind of bizarre. In recognition of his selection to the 1966 All-Star team, for example, Clemente was given a silver coffee urn ($1,000-2,000).

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Finally, Clemente’s 1955 Topps rookie card is a highly sought-after item. Now imagine,, owning a Clemente rookie card that was actually owned by a 20-year-old Roberto Clemente ($2,000-4,000). Yeah, I have chills too.

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2.

1. Fred Carroll

The first-ever All-Star Game is played with Pirates players Paul Waner and Pie Traynor taking the field for the National League.

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07.05/07.12.2017

BY CHARLIE DEITCH EITCH

8.


[THE CHEAP SEATS]

NEEDS IMPROVEMENT {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} A GOOD WAY for a team to check its progress is by looking at where you were at the same time last year. At this point last season, the Pirates sat 15 games behind the eventual World Series champion Chicago Cubs. The Buccos are in a better position now, but it’s not because they’ve gotten better; rather, the rest of the division has gotten worse. This year, the Pirates have no shot at a Wild Card, but are within four or five games of a division title (depending on the day of the week). As we hand out the midseason report cards, some players have had dramatic improvements, while others have fallen off significantly. First, the head of the class. Ivan Nova and Felipe Rivero are the only two to have straight A’s so far this season. These two pitchers exemplify two great moves made by general manager Neal Huntingdon: the re-signing of Nova in the offseason, and the trade that sent Melancon out of town, only to get a reliever with even more impressive numbers. Rivero’s ERA nudged up from 0.82 to 0.86, so he’s not quite as good as he once was. Rounding out the honors’ class are Andrew McCutchen, Jordy Mercer, Elias Diaz and Jose Osuna. Shame on you if you thought McCutchen was washed up. Cutch is like a vintage car that just needs a little time to warm up before going full throttle down the highway. His resurgence has kept the team in this thing. Same can be said for Mercer, who has upped his average by 50 points since the last grading period. Osuna has also improved like Mercer, but in a more limited role. It’s been so far, so good for Diaz. The perennial “catcher of the future” is becoming a serious threat to take over for oft-injured Francisco Cervelli. There’s nothing wrong with being a B-student, especially if you got failing grades the semester before. John Jaso raises his F to a B, bringing his average up 75 points in the last 40 games. Sure, he looks like the most un-athletic Pirate since Rick Reuschel, but his hard work is paying off. Gerrit Cole and Juan Nicasio both slip to B’s after standout perfor-

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN HAMILTON}

Pirates shortstop Jordy Mercer jumps to the head of the class.

mances earlier this year. Cole is finally getting a little run support, and Nicasio was probably playing over his head a bit. But these two hurlers are integral to the Pirates if they want to see the postseason for the first time in two years. (It sounds great to even say that instead of “20 years.”) Josh Harrison gets a B+; he has been the most consistent offensive player in 2017. There’s a logjam of mediocrity at the C-level. That’s the overall grade for the Bucs for the first two semesters. Daniel Hudson and Trevor Williams should be quite happy with their grades after receiving F’s in the first term. They’ve been OK, but even that’s an improvement. They both lowered their ERAs from six to four, and the amount of cringing from fans when either of them are on the mound has been reduced dramatically. Hitters Josh Bell and Gregory Polanco are tough to figure out. Polanco has quintupled his homers (from one to five), while Josh Bell has provided a surprising display of power. But they both struggle to keep their averages in the .240s. For the Pirates to raise a division banner for the first time since George H. W. Bush was president, these two will need to straighten things out. Same with Adam Frazier and David Freese. They replaced Starling Marte (out on a per-

formance-enhancing drug suspension) and Jung-Ho Kang (multiple DUIs and immigration issues) and started off hot. Both have cooled considerably, though, and there’s only three more weeks until Marte comes back. Wade LeBlanc also

drops from an A to a C, in case you were wondering. I assume you weren’t. On to the underachieving D students. Tony Watson got an A on his first report card, but he may have peaked in May. Poor Watson has received the brunt of the fans’ frustrations. People will say things like, “I hate him so much,” just because he had a few bad outings. But, the life of a relief pitcher is all about what you’ve done lately. Starter Chad Kuhl gets a D too, but unlike Watson, that’s an improvement. Chris Stewart really hasn’t played that much, and he has as many home runs as I do. But he has two RBI and gets some extra credit for being OK defensively. Now, onto the failures. Most of the failing grades belong to the Pirates notso-deep infield bench. An F is what Max Moroff and his .100 average gets (that isn’t even a very impressive blood-alcohol level). Moroff follows the standard set by Chris Bostick, Phil Gosselin, Gift Ngoepe and Alen Hanson — all of whom failed to produce and were sent away. It’s possible the Pirates could win the division by winning just 81 games. But they’re going to have to get better to get it done. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Job Fair - Come work with us! Familylinks is hiring direct care Teacher/ Counselors at our youth residential facilities in Plum, Verona, Uptown, McKeesport and Wilkinsburg. Opportunities include working with males and females between the ages of 12 and 21 years old with a mental health diagnosis. We are also hiring direct care Teacher/Counselors at our adult addiction residential programs for women in Penn Hills and Allentown. Hourly rates from $10.20 to $15.00 per hour based on location, having a degree and experience. Applicants must be 21 years old, have a valid driver’s license and access to transportation to and from the job site. A bachelor’s degree is preferred. Act 33, 34 and FBI clearances are required upon hire and applicants will be required to have a pre-employment drug screen and physical exam. If you’re looking for an opportunity at a nonprofit that helps families across western Pennsylvania, Familylinks is the place for you! 42

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IN PERSON INTERVIEWS: WHEN: Friday July 14, 2017 10a.m. to 4p.m. WHERE: 401 North Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206

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FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 412-661-9750

GROUND BEEF

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. It comes in sheets 4. “Dayum!” 9. Mane locations 14. Do like 15. Actress Knightley 16. Source of a big boom 17. Candies made in Revere, Massachusetts 19. Vanzetti’s co-defendant 20. I.T. guy on “Community” 21. Curry, e.g. 23. Whole mess 24. ___ Killa (Wu-Tang clan rapper) 27. Bagels, shapewise 28. Take in 29. Cheer for Real Madrid 30. Actress Charlize 32. Strike a chord (with) 35. Nat. that spends dinars 36. Sam’s Club rival 39. Triangular sail 40. Found hysterical 41. Not hidden 43. Rapper Sy ___ Da Kid 44. Digital image format 47. “___ Heir” (“Cabaret” song)

48. “Let’s do this!” 50. Passage, in anatomy 52. Swagger 54. Deli gadget 55. Polished off 56. Some masonry works 60. Make some changes to 61. Monte ___ 62. Lance of the mid ‘90s fame 63. 39-Across holders 64. Vice President who wrote the book “Go Quietly ... or Else” 65. Animal tipped in this puzzle’s theme answers

DOWN 1. Places for splitting headaches? 2. Hogwarts lessons 3. Formal announcement 4. “This is fine” 5. Bunny man? 6. Golfer Michelle 7. Only successful escapee in “Catch-22” 8. Never happened 9. Agcy. that produces the ScienceCasts videos 10. Small bite

11. Bench press muscle 12. Leafy green vegetable 13. Cloud work 18. Hides for cover 22. Scored with a single, say 24. City with the ZIP code 83843 25. Warm welcome? 26. Ladies of La Paz 31. “___ Whore” (Cheap Trick single) 33. French 101 verb 34. Last Olds made 36. Process that gives you the big picture 37. Renders

unnecessary 38. New York prison 39. Double Oak bourbon brand 42. Make up 45. Slanted script 46. Was beaten by 49. “E lucevan le stelle” opera 51. Toss around, as more seeds 53. Connecting words 54. Garbage collector 57. Recess classic 58. Decaf holder 59. 2016 World Series losers: Abbr. {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.05-07.12

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s prime time for you to break through any inhibitions you might have about accessing and expressing your passion. To help you in this righteous cause, I’ve assembled a batch of words you should be ready to use with frequency and sweet abandon. Consider writing at least part of this list on your forearm with a felt-tip pen every morning so it’s always close at hand: enamored, piqued, enchanted, stirred, roused, enthused, delighted, animated, elevated, thrilled, captivated, turned-on, enthralled, exuberant, fired up, awakened.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Matt Groening, creator of the cartoon series The Simpsons, says that a great turning point in his early years came when his Scoutmaster told him he was the worst Boy Scout in history. While this might have demoralized other teenagers, it energized Groening. “Well, somebody’s got to be the worst,” he triumphantly told the Scoutmaster. And then, “instead of the earth opening up and swallowing me, instead of the flames of hell fire licking at my knees — nothing happened. And I was free.” I suspect you may soon be blessed with a comparable liberation, Leo. Maybe you’ll be released from having to live up to an expectation you shouldn’t even live up to. Or maybe you’ll be criticized in a way that will motivate your drive for excellence for years to come.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Nineteen of my readers who work in the advertising industry signed a petition requesting that I stop badmouthing their field. “Without advertising,” they testified, “life itself would be impos-

sible.” In response, I agreed to attend their reeducation seminar. There, under their tutelage, I came to acknowledge that everything we do can be construed as a kind of advertising. Each of us is engaged in a mostly unconscious campaign to promote our unique way of looking at and being in the world. Realizing the truth, I now feel no reservations about urging you Virgos to take advantage of the current astrological omens. They suggest that you can and should be aggressive and ingenious about marketing yourself, your ideas and your products.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 2003, the American Film Institute announced the creation of a new prize to honor acting talent. Dubbed the Charlton Heston Award, it was designed to be handed out periodically to luminaries who have distinguished themselves over the course of long careers. The first recipient of the award was, oddly enough, Charlton Heston himself, born under the sign of Libra. I hope you’re inspired by this story to wipe away

get your yoga on!

any false modesty you might be suffering from. The astrological omens suggest it’s a favorable moment to create a big new award named after you and bestow it upon yourself. As part of the festivities, tell yourself about what makes you special, amazing and valuable.

has authorized you to pursue your own brand of fanatical idealism in the coming weeks. To keep yourself honest, make fun of your zealotry every now and then.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

The potential breakthrough I foresee for you is a rare species of joy. It’s a gritty, hard-earned pleasure that will spawn beautiful questions you’ll be glad to have awakened. It’s a surprising departure from your usual approach to feeling good that will expand your understanding of what happiness means. Here’s one way to ensure that it will visit you in all of its glory: Situate yourself between the fabulous contradictions in your life and say, “Squeeze me, tease me, please me.”

Here’s your riddle: What unscratchable itch drives you half-crazy? But you’re secretly glad it drives you half-crazy, because you know your half-craziness will eventually lead you to an experience or resource that will relieve the itch. Here’s your prophecy: Sometime soon, scratching the unscratchable itch will lead you to the experience or resource that will finally relieve the itch. Here’s your homework: Prepare yourself emotionally to fully receive and welcome the new experience or resource. Make sure you’re not so addicted to scratching the unscratchable itch that you fail to take advantage of the healing it’s bringing you.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The best way to go forward is to go backward; the path to the bright future requires a shadowy regression. Put another way, you should return to the roots of a triumph in order to find a hidden flaw that might eventually threaten to undo your success. Correct that flaw now, and you’ll make it unnecessary for karmic repercussions to undermine you later. But please don’t get all solemn-faced and anxious about this assignment. Approach it with humorous self-correction, and you’ll ensure that all goes well.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

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44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

07.05/07.12.2017

Are you familiar with the psychological concepts of anima and animus? You’re in the midst of being intoxicated by one of those creatures from inner space. Though you may not be fully conscious of it, you women are experiencing a mystical marriage with an imaginal character that personifies all that’s masculine in your psyche. You men are going through the analogous process with a female figure within you. I believe this is true no matter what your sexual orientation is. While this awesome psychological event may be fun, educational and even ecstatic, it could also be confusing to your relationships with real people. Don’t expect them to act like or live up to the very real fantasy you’re communing with.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As a recovering save-the-world addict, I have felt compassionate skepticism toward my fellow junkies who are still in the throes of their obsession. But recently I’ve discovered that just as a small minority of alcoholics can safely take a drink now and then, so can a few save-the-world-aholics actually save the world a little bit at a time without getting strung-out. With that as a disclaimer, Aquarius, I’m letting you know that the cosmos

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Unless you were raised by a pack of feral raccoons or a fundamentalist cult, now is a perfect time to dive in to your second childhood. Is there a toy you wanted as a kid but never got? Buy it for yourself now! What were the delicious foods you craved back then? Eat them! Where were the special places you loved? Go there, or to spots that remind you of them. Who were the people you were excited to be with? Talk with them. Actions like these will get you geared up for a full-scale immersion in innocent eagerness. And that would be just the right medicine for your soul.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What I wish for you, Taurus, is toasted ice cream and secrets in plain sight and a sacred twist of humorous purity. I would love for you to experience a powerful surrender and a calm climax and a sweeping vision of a small but pithy clue. I very much hope that you will get to take a big trip to an intimate turning point that’s not too far away. I pray you will find or create a barrier that draws people together instead of keeping them apart.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Dr. Seuss’ book, Horton Hatches an Egg, an elephant assumes the duty of sitting on a bird’s egg, committed to keeping it warm until hatching time. The nest is located high in a tree, which makes the undertaking even more incongruous. By the climax of the tale, Horton has had to persist in his loyal service through a number of challenges. But all ends well, and there’s an added bonus: The creature that’s born is miraculously part-bird, part-elephant. I see similarities between this story and your life right now, Gemini. The duty you’re carrying out doesn’t come naturally, and you’re not even sure you’re doing it right. But if you keep at it till it’s completed, you’ll earn a surprising reward. What was the pain that healed you most? What was the pleasure that hurt you the worst? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 29-year-old straight woman facing a dilemma. I dated this guy about a year ago, and in many ways he was exactly the guy I was looking for. The main hitch was sexual. Our sex was good, but he had a fetish where he wanted me to sleep with other guys. Basically, he gets off on a girl being a “slut.” He was also into threesomes or swapping with another couple. I experimented with all of that for a few months, and in a way I had fun with it, but I finally realized that this lifestyle is not for me. I want a more traditional, monogamous relationship. I broke it off with him. We reconnected recently, and he wants to get back together. He says that he wants to be with me, even if it means a more traditional sex life. I’m interested, but suspicious. If he decides to forego his fetish in order to be with me, can he ever feel truly fulfilled with our sex life? I don’t want to be with someone I can’t completely satisfy. I also worry that down the road he might change his mind and try to convince me to experiment with nonmonogamy again, which would make me feel pressured. I’m looking for someone to settle down with, and I’m scared to waste more time on this guy, even though in many ways he’s a great fit. Do you think it’s possible for us to be happy together in a traditional arrangement when deep down he wants more? INTERESTED DESPITE KINK

their kinks on the shelf for years, decades or all their lives because they love their partner, but their partner doesn’t love their proclivity for ballbusting/piss-pigging/whatever-evering. And, yes, sometimes a person says they’re willing to let go of a kink and then changes their mind and starts pressuring their partner years or decades later — often when it’s much harder for the non-kinky partner to end things, i.e., after marrying, having kids, etc., which renders the pressure coercive and corrosive. Another thing that sometimes happens: People who never thought they’d be into X and married someone with the understanding that X was forever off the table suddenly find themselves curious about X and wanting to give X a try years or decades later. Who we are and what we want at 39 or 49 can look very different than who we were and what we wanted at 29. My partner has a hard time dealing with the fact that, before him, I had several casual flings and one-night stands. It has repeatedly caused issues with us. He is disturbed by the vastness of my past and concerned that I am sometimes impulsive. Because of these things, he often feels too scared to move forward in the relationship. In all other ways we have a supportive, fun-filled, and loving relationship — but I wonder if this issue is just too fundamental. I cannot change my past (and wouldn’t even if I could) and I am trying to be less impulsive, but I’m not sure he sees the changes I’m making.

BROS WHO CANNOT SHUT UP ABOUT YOUR PAST ARE CONDEMNED TO RESIDE IN IT.

Every partnered person on earth is with someone they “can’t completely satisfy.” No one person can be all things to another person — sexually or in any other way. So don’t waste too much time stressing out about that. That said, IDK, this guy gets off when girls — his girl in particular — are “sluts.” That doesn’t mean he can’t/won’t/doesn’t get off when you’re not being slutty. (In this situation, “being slutty” refers to you sleeping with other people, which is only subjectively slutty.) He likes it when you’re a slut, but I bet he also likes it when you ___, ___ or ___. (I don’t know your sex life. Fill in the blanks.) Are you focusing too much on one of the things he’s into (you fucking other people) and not enough on all the other things he’s into (things like ___, ___ and ___)? If those other things are enough for him to have a great sex life with you without getting to enjoy this particular kink, you can make this work. In other words, IDK: If giving up his hotwife/ cuckold fantasies is the price of admission he’s willing to pay to be with you, maybe you should let him pay that price. If being with someone who fantasizes about sexual scenarios you would rather not participate in (and who may be fantasizing about them while you’re having sex) is the price of admission you’re willing to pay to be with him, maybe you should pay that price. Another maybe: Are there accommodations that would allow him to have his fetish/fantasies without having to stifle them and allow you to have your monogamous commitment? No fucking other guys, but sometimes sharing stories of past exploits? Or making up dirty stories you can share while you’re fucking? Kinky people sometimes place a few of

What have you always wanted to know about Pittsburgh?

PARTNER’S ANGST SERIOUSLY TROUBLING

“WHY DOES PITTSBURGH HAVE AN H IN IT?” “IS A PARKING-SPOT CHAIR LEGALLY BINDING?” “WHAT IS SLIPPY?”

With apologies to George Santayana: Bros who cannot shut up about your past are condemned to reside in it. DTMFA.

I was surprised by your advice to CUCK, the gay man whose husband was sleeping with another man who insisted on treating CUCK like a cuckold — sending him degrading text messages — even though CUCK isn’t into that. Why isn’t this a case of someone involving another person in his sex life without his consent? While CUCK has agreed to let his husband fuck another person, he didn’t agree to receive sexually explicit texts from that person.

Mike Wysocki has the answers. (well...sorta)

SUBMIT YOUR PITTSBURGH QUESTIONS AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONSENSUAL LOVIN’ IS PARAMOUNT

The Other Man (TOM) is fucking CUCK’s husband, CLIP, so TOM is involved in CUCK’s sex life — at the margins, on the edges, but kindasorta involved. When CUCK told his husband he didn’t appreciate TOM’s texts, his husband asked CUCK to play along because it turns TOM on. (I suspect it also turns CUCK’s husband on.) I told CUCK that he should play along only if the texts didn’t bother him. It may have been out of line for TOM to send that first message without making sure it would be welcome (I’ll bet CUCK’s husband, who was there, gave TOM the OK), but it was a party foul at best. And, again, if the texts don’t bother CUCK and he’s willing to play along for his husband’s benefit, I think he should. On the Lovecast, Mistress Matisse is back to talk about her very special lube: savagelovecast.com.

Add us by snapcode or search by username PGHCITYPAPER

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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DONALD TRUMP TWITTER WORD SEARCH We hid 36 words and phrases the president tweeted in recent months. How many can you find?

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Tweet us a photo of your completed puzzle to @pghcitypaper, and we’ll randomly select two readers to get a City Paper T-shirt. Stuck? Find an answer key to the words and phrases we included at www.pghcitypaper.com.

46

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07.05/07.12.2017


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July 5, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 27

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