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Welcome home, Stan

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O P E N S S AT U R DAY, J U N E 17

See The Frick Pittsburgh’s ad inside for details!

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EVENTS 6.16 – 5-9:30pm FACTORY SWING SHIFT The Factory stays up late! Free with museum admission

6.18 – 8pm DOUBLE FEATURE: ANDY WARHOL’S TARZAN & JANE REGAINED… SORT OF (1963) AND TARZAN THE APE MAN (1932) Ace Hotel Pittsburgh – Gym (East Liberty) Ace Hotel Pittsburgh is The Warhol’s official hotel sponsor. FREE; Register at warhol.org

7.21 – 5-8pm TEACHER WORKSHOP: POP CULTURE IN THE CLASSROOM Tickets $30

7.28 – 5-9:30pm FACTORY SWING SHIFT The Factory stays up late! Free with museum admission

7.28 – 7-10pm SILVER SCREEN BAZAAR Hollywood-related memorabilia and collectible marketplace and Pittsburgh premiere of the Warhol film San Diego Surf (1968/1996). Free with museum admission

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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Which city has the largest home ever built by Frank Lloyd Wright?

MEET THE

ERIC FRICK

UNEXPECTED

Know which city hosts the nation’s largest private garden walk? We do – and it features over 400 gardens. That’s right, GARDEN WALK BUFFALO, the BUFFALO & ERIE COUNTY BOTANICAL GARDENS and OPEN GARDENS make our city a center of all things green and growing.

Buffalo is an under-the-radar outdoor adventure mecca. And a paddle along the Buffalo River into the concrete canyons of ELEVATOR ALLEY is a one-of-a-kind experience of the special place in our city where natural and man-made beauty meet. Kayak rentals are available up and down the river and the Lake Erie waterfront.

ERIC FRICK

ERIC FRICK

ERIC FRICK

B

uffalo’s first period of incredible growth coincided with the golden age of American architecture. That’s why breathtaking buildings like the MARTIN HOUSE COMPLEX coexist with remarkable and varied neighborhoods.

With 24 BREWERIES and 6 DISTILLERIES spread across neighborhoods and towns all over Buffalo Niagara, craft beer and spirits are a leading catalyst of our local renaissance. Former pillars of industry are being filled with cold brews, warm spirits and good times. Come sample hand-crafted Buffalo.

UNEXPECTEDBUFFALO.COM 4

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06.14/06.21.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 24

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns CARLEY BONK, HALEY FREDERICK, KRISTA JOHNSON, HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN MILLER, MATT PETRAS

[ART]

{CP PHOTO BY VINCENT PUGLIESE}

[SPORTS]

No fan base that sticks catfish down its pants and listens to Kenny Chesney deserves to win a Stanley Cup. PAGE 38

[VIEWS]

Just as Paris was only a down payment on the fossil-free-fuel world we need, Pittsburgh must do more. PAGE 14

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[ADVERTISING] Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MACKENNA DONAHUE, BLAKE LEWIS Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[MARKETING+PROMOTIONS] Marketing Director LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing Assistant LIZ VENUTO Office Coordinator THRIA DEVLIN

Pittsburgh AIDS Center for Treatment

[ADMINISTRATION] Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[PUBLISHER]

The Pittsburgh AIDS Center for Treatment (PACT) provides continuous primary medical care and education for those who are infected with HIV or have AIDS. PACT also offers specialty services including women’s health care, Hepatitis-C care, and mental health care.

EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

[NEWS]

“It’s crazy to me how police officers’ dogs are considered human, but somebody’s pet isn’t.” PAGE 06

News 06 Views 14 Weird 16 Music 17 Arts 25 Events 29 Taste 32

Screen 36 Sports 38 Classifieds 41 Crossword 41 Astrology 44 Savage Love 45 The Last Word 46 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

To make an appointment at the PACT clinic, or for information about HIV/AIDS, call 412-647-PACT (7228) or visit UPMC.com/PACT.

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THIS WEEK

“MY DOG WAS SHOT; I COULD’VE BEEN KILLED.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Check out John Colombo’s photos from the Pride festivities in Downtown Pittsburgh on our slideshow at www.pghcitypaper.com.

City Paper’s blog PolitiCrap was named best blog at this year’s Golden Quill awards. Catch up on the latest posts at www.pghcitypaper.com/blogs/PolitiCrap.

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Pit bull King is on the mend after being shot by police officers on March 10.

Check out our Instagram feed for #CPStreetPortraits, our new weekly feature by intern Jordan Miller at Instagram.com/pghcitypaper.

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Our featured #CPReaderArt photo from last week is by @vicki.kucz. Use #CPReaderArt to share your local photos with us for your chance to be featured next!

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AGGRAVATED ASSAULT? N MARCH 10, Pittsburgh police officers were conducting a drug investigation in the 200 block of Tipton Street, in Hazelwood, when they approached Marlon Jackson, who was standing on his front porch a few feet away from the officers. Police say they approached Jackson and asked him to remove his hands from his pockets. But according to a criminal complaint written by officer Robert Berberich, who was at the scene, Jackson was hostile and responded, “Fuck you, this is my house, I don’t have to do shit.” Two other officers, Scott Brown and Christopher Goetz, then walked onto the porch. Berberich writes that Jackson opened the front door of the home to “intentionally” release his pit-bull dog, King.

“The dog then lunged at Officer Brown’s neck and face, possibly in an attempt to bite him, while cornering him into the area near the doorway,” Berberich writes. And “[i]n fear for Officer Brown’s safety, Goetz fired two rounds from his deputy pistol at the dog.”

Should a dog be considered a weapon when a police officer feels threatened? {BY REBECCA ADDISON} The first shot missed the target, instead hitting Brown, the very officer police say Goetz was trying to protect. The second shot hit King, who then ran away. Jackson’s account of the incident differs.

He says he opened the door to enter the house to avoid a confrontation with the police. Now he faces charges of assault and endangerment on the basis that he used his dog as a weapon. (Jackson’s cousin, Devon Paige, has been charged with tampering with evidence and possession of marijuana as a result of the March 10 incident. Paige was being taken into custody in front of Jackson’s home that day when police first approached Jackson. Marijuana has been decriminalized in the city of Pittsburgh.) “It was a traumatizing experience; a gun and Tasers were drawn on me and my dog; my dog was shot; I could’ve been killed,” Jackson says. Jackson’s June 7 preliminary hearing was postponed because officer Brown, who was shot in the foot during the March CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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J U N E 17– S E P T. 10

Experience the full range of iconic American photographer Irving Penn’s (1917–2009) career in this retrospective of more than 140 carefully selected works. Admission: $10, Members free. All visitors will enjoy free admission to the exhibition on July 8, July 29 and August 19, 2017, courtesy of the Jack Buncher Foundation.

Image: Irving Penn, Mouth (for L’Oréal), New York, 1986, printed 1992, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation. Copyright © The Irving Penn Foundation Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with generous support from ART MENTOR FOUNDATION LUCERNE, Sakurako and William Fisher, The William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment Fund, The Lauder Foundation – Leonard and Judy Lauder Fund, Edward Lenkin and Roselin Atzwanger, The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Margery and Edgar Masinter, The Margery and Edgar Masinter Exhibitions Fund, the James F. Petersen Charitable Fund in honor of Tania and Tom Evans, The Bernie Stadiem Endowment Fund, and the Trellis Fund. The C.F. Foundation in Atlanta supports the museum’s traveling exhibition program, Treasures to Go.

THEFRICKPITTSBURGH.ORG | 412-371-0600 | 7227 REYNOLDS STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA 15208

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AGGRAVATED ASSAULT?, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

incident and has not yet returned to duty, did not appear for court. Magisterial District Court Judge James Hanley granted a postponement until Aug. 10. It’s a case of he-said-they-said, and the outcome of this case could hinge on the credibility of the witnesses on either side. A search of Allegheny County’s criminal records indicates that Jackson’s only prior involvement with law enforcement was for violating the city’s open-container law in 2012. But Goetz, the officer who fired his weapon, has been accused of using excessive force before. In 2014, he was sued for using a Taser during an arrest. The civil lawsuit was later dismissed. Pittsburgh Police officials did not return calls seeking comment. Either way, activists and lawyers say, the number of dogs shot by police officers has reached epidemic proportions. They emphasize that no officer has ever been killed by a dog during the course of performing his or her duties (according to data from National Law Enforcement Officer’s Memorial Fund). And in order to protect man’s best friend, they’re calling for mandatory training for officers nationwide. “Some people have described it as an epidemic,” says Diane Balkin, an attorney with the criminal-justice program at the

Animal Legal Defense Fund. “And it has been underreported for decades because of the position animals are [in] within our society and [because] it is believed that police power allows for certain types of use of force on a daily basis.” THERE ARE several discrepancies about the March incident, but Jackson’s attorney Bret Grote and his mother, Saundra Cole McKamey, say one is especially troubling. They maintain that the dog, King, was running away and already across the street when officer Goetz fired the second shot. And they say the officers filed charges against Jackson to cover this up. “It’s a classic case of cover charges to cover their own misdeeds in this case,” says Grote. “For them to throw around felony charges like it’s a game and threaten people with prison just to save face is disgraceful.” Among the charges against Jackson are three counts of recklessly endangering another person, one count of aggravated assault, and one count of cruelty to animals. According to the criminal complaint, the aggravated-assault charge is on the basis that Jackson attempted to cause “bodily injury” to officer Brown. “They’re going to have to show that he had the intent to use the dog as a weapon,

and we will bring witness after witness, from the vet, to neighbors, to family members, to talk about the nature of this dog,” says Grote. “If they get to a jury trial, then that jury is going to hear ample testimony about how loving and friendly this dog is, and it will become abundantly clear that no one would’ve thought to use this dog as a weapon.” This isn’t the first time someone has been charged with reckless endangerment and aggravated assault for allegedly using a dog as a weapon. In Philadelphia in 2009, Tyree May was convicted of both charges. “In that case, the man was barricaded in a room behind a dog tied to a radiator, and when the police tried to get him he would throw the dog at the police, he would sic the dog on the police, and the dog bit the police,” says Grote. “That is an example of a man using a dog as a weapon.” But that incident is far different from what occurred on Tipton Street in Hazelwood in March, says Grote. “Here you have none of those [signs] of intent to use the dog as a weapon. There’s no siccing of the dog; there were no commands given; the dog did not bite anybody,” says Grote. “It’s insufficient to say there was the potential for danger or that

the police officers thought they were in danger. The only danger that was caused is when officer Goetz fired his gun and shot his partner in the foot.” McKamey agrees. She says the family’s 4-and-a-half-year-old pit bull has never attacked anyone. “Any dog is going to bark if there’s something going on outside of its house, but if you pet King and give him a pat on the head he’s like, ‘Fine, you can rob us now,’” McKamey says. “He’s a loving dog.” McKamey isn’t just speaking out on behalf of her son. She has been charged with hindering apprehension as a result of the incident, because after she arrived at the scene, she and her son attempted to leave to look for King. Now the family is asking for the charges against them to be dropped and for the city to pay King’s medical bills. The family paid approximately $2,500 to remove the bullet. “It’s crazy to me how police officers’ dogs are considered human, but somebody’s pet isn’t,” says McKamey. “We feel the same way when our dogs are hurt.” Grote says the family is also considering filing a lawsuit against the city for what they see as unfair treatment in this case. And they wouldn’t be the first CONTINUES ON PG. 10

JUNE 30

DAVE MATTHEWS TRIBUTE BAND WITH SPECIAL GUEST

ALEX TALBOT

Bessemer Court Stage | Rain or Shine ine e

PRESENTED BY: FULL 2017 SUMMER JAM SCHEDULE TO BE ANNOUNCED ON MONDAY, JUNE 26TH

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Call 1-844-241-9310** today and learn how to get more coverage at no additional cost. TTY users should call 1-866-407-8762.** UPMCHealthPlan.com/medicare

*Your Medicare Part B premium is paid on your behalf by the state’s Medical Assistance program. **Our hours of operation change twice a year. You can call us October 1 through February 14, seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. From February 15 through September 30, you can call us Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Premium and copays may vary based on the level of Extra Help you receive. Please contact the plan for further details. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, premium, and copays may change on January 1 of each year. This plan is available to anyone who has both Medical Assistance from the state and Medicare. UPMC for Life Dual is an HMO SNP plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Pennsylvania Medical Assistance (Medicaid) program. Enrollment in UPMC for Life Dual depends on contract renewal. UPMC for Life Dual is a product of and operated by UPMC for You Inc. UPMC Health Plan1 complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. 1 UPMC Health Plan is the marketing name used to refer to the following companies, which are licensed to issue individual and group health insurance products or which provide third party administration services for group health plans: UPMC Health Network Inc., UPMC Health Options Inc., UPMC Health Coverage Inc., UPMC Health Plan Inc., UPMC Health Benefits Inc., UPMC for You Inc., and/or UPMC Benefit Management Services Inc. ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-866-405-8762 (TTY: 1-866-407-8762). ͩNj쨰ƧưǷ̹ů୑ɄġNJ뼷ǷĻŗы͘ȦīДҶ྽Վ˖Ө뼶ɐٍǖ 1-866-405-8762 TTY : 1-866-407-8762) 뼶 H4279_17_1570 Accepted NEWS

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AGGRAVATED ASSAULT?, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink and drive.

family to win such a lawsuit. Last month, a jury awarded $1.26 million to a family whose dog, Vern, was shot and killed by a Maryland police officer in February 2014. According to the law firm representing the family, during the trial, the officer admitted that the dog did not bite or injure him. “The verdict sends a strong message to the police about community expectations,” said the family’s attorney, Cary Hansel, in a statement. “The duty to serve and protect extends to our animal family members as well. Shooting Vern was senseless, unnecessary and unconstitutional.” In an effort to curb these kinds of incidents, animal advocates are calling for better training for police officers. “There are millions and millions of households that have a pet dog,” says Balkin, of the Animal Legal Defense Fund. “So it behooves officers when they go out to any residence to be prepared for a pet dog being present at the scene. It behooves police officers to understand the bond between humans and their pets and how devastating it can be for them to seriously harm or kill a pet animal.” Balkin highlights training in Colorado,

as part of the Dog Protection Act, as a model. The training there helps officers interpret dog behavior and postures. It also teaches them what tools to use to help them control a dog without using lethal force, even in cases where the dog is being aggressive. “It teaches them to look at their ears, their eyes, how they might stand or crouch, whether or not they bare their teeth and what does that mean. Does it necessarily mean they’re going to bite you, or is it just a showing of them being alert or anxious or fear,” says Balkin. “And how should you stand? Should you stand face on or let them see your profile? Should you talk loud or soft? Should you run? Should you crouch down? What kind of tone of voice might calm them?” And this training doesn’t just benefit dogs and their families. Balkin says it can also prevent police officers from being harmed. “They also need to know when the use of force is appropriate,” says Balkin. “And part of the training addresses that to say you shouldn’t compromise your safety or the safety of others, but only use the force that’s necessary.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CIVIL MATTERS Advocates are concerned Port Authority’s new farecheck policy could lead to deportation of undocumented immigrants {BY RYAN DETO} ACCORDING TO statistics obtained by the Washington Post, immigration arrests rose 32 percent in the first few weeks of the Trump administration, compared to the same time period in 2016. In January, Trump signed an executive order declaring that immigrants could be detained merely for committing a criminal offense, even if no charges were filed and the immigrants had no serious criminal history. Monica Ruiz, of immigrant-rights center Casa San José, worries that number could grow in Allegheny County. She says Port Authority’s new light-rail fare-check could turn light-rail cars into impromptu deportation centers. The new policy, which Port Authority hopes to implement in August, will have riders pay as part of an honor system. Port Authority Police officers will check riders for proof of payment on light-rail cars and at T stations, run federal back-

{CP PHOTO BY JORDAN MILLER}

Will undocumented immigrants riding Pittsburgh light-rail face deportation for failing to pay their fare?

ground checks on riders who don’t pay, and potentially charge repeat offenders with criminal offenses. Ruiz is terrified about what might play out because U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has access to the same FBI database through which Port Authority Police will run fare-evaders’

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names and addresses. She says this means that forgetting to pay a $2.50 fare one time could lead to a deportation. “They are basically turning [light rail] into a border checkpoint,” says Ruiz. Port Authority says its new policy is about improving the efficiency and safety of riding light rail, as well as helping the Port Authority become more financially stable. The authority says that wording in the policy protects riders’ civil rights, and that transit police have no intention of working with ICE. But a coalition of civil-rights advocates, including Ruiz, say wording in the policy is too vague, and that Port Authority hasn’t provided enough written proof that it’s serious about protecting immigrants. Activists want the authority to alter the policy. Port Authority spokesperson Adam Brandolph says Port Authority Police officers don’t communicate with ICE. “Our police department is not ICE, it shares no information with ICE, and the list of firsttime offenders will not be shared with ICE,” says Brandolph, referencing the internal list the Port Authority will keep of fare-evaders. He adds that Port Authority, which has its own holding cells, won’t detain undocumented immigrants without a warrant signed by a judge, and that Port Authority Police Chief Matt Porter told him the authority has never received a request by ICE to hold an immigrant. Brandolph points out that the authority’s new fare-check policy states that officers are prohibited from unfairly targeting or discriminating against riders “based on race, color, national origin, immigration status, religious beliefs, physical or mental disabilities, sexual orientation or gender

identification.” He says officers will check proof of payment of everyone in the area. “We hear their concerns, and we have a policy that we believe addresses those concerns,” says Brandolph. But Ruiz says Port Authority’s written policies may not be enough to ensure that law-abiding undocumented immigrants avoid deportation. “Once Port Authority runs your name, ICE will check that name and can detain you,” says Ruiz. In May, a Minnesota transit officer questioned the immigration status of an undocumented immigrant who failed to pay a light-rail fare. That officer was fired for violating agency practices, but the immigrant was charged with fare evasion, and eventually detained by ICE. He currently faces deportation, even though the Minnesota transit agency didn’t contact ICE. Brandolph says there’s nothing in Port Authority Police protocol barring officers from contacting ICE. But Brandolph says it would be violating protocol for officers to contact ICE, and officers who do could face consequences. Gabriel McMorland, of social-justice group the Thomas Merton Center, says Port Authority’s assurances aren’t adequate. “That is not how you protect civil rights,” says McMorland. “You need to have written policies.” McMorland wants Port Authority to make its police protocols accessible to the public. He is asking the authority to alter the fare-check policy to have non-police staff check for fares. McMorland hopes Port Authority will make fare-evasion a civil offense where offenders are sent bills via mail, instead of being put into the criminal-justice system. Brandolph says that at least five other transit agencies across the country utilize transit-police officers to check fares. Cleveland’s transit agency is one of those, and also makes fare-evasion a criminal offense, but it allows violators up to 48 hours to pay their fine as a civil matter and avoid criminal prosecution. Brandolph says state law currently bars the Port Authority from using non-police staff to check fares, but McMorland and other advocates cite Pennsylvania Turnpike rules that makes fare-evasion a civil offense. Brandolph says Port Authority will soon begin a public-education campaign on the new policy, with fliers, signs and announcements in English and Spanish. The Thomas Merton Center, along with other advocacy groups, will hold a public forum for people concerned about the new Port Authority fare-check policy at 1 Smithfield St., Downtown at 6 p.m. Thu., June 15 (www.facebook.com, search “casa san jose”). RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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[GREEN LIGHT]

URBAN CLIMATES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} ON JUNE 1, President Donald Trump made

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A Pittsburgh Premiere Jun 16–Jul 2, 2017 New Hazlett Theater, Northside

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headlines worldwide by withdrawing the U.S. from the historic Paris climate accord, a deal widely considered crucial for mitigating global warming; Trump said he’d been elected to “represent … Pittsburgh, not Paris.” Then, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto made his own international headlines by rejecting the idea that Trump represents Pittsburgh, and joined dozens of U.S. mayors and governors who vowed to fulfill the commitment to 2015’s Paris Agreement themselves, cutting U.S. greenhouse-gas emissions to 26 percent below 2005 levels by 2025. Peduto’s defiance prefaced a rousing June 3 speech to the impressive crowd of 800 who’d rallied in Market Square during that day’s MarchforTruth. “In Pittsburgh, we say Pittsburgh and Paris,” said Peduto, who was among the mayors who’d gone to Paris to push for the accord. “We are all on this planet together.” Cities are massive users of fossil fuels. They’re also especially vulnerable to heat waves (all that concrete) and, so many being coastal, they’re unusually prone to flooding, extreme weather and other risks of global warming. But given that so much climate action has been federally driven — from the Paris Agreement to President Obama’s Clean Power Plan, now similarly imperiled under Trump — how much can mere cities do to address civilization’s biggest challenge? Even when the pro-Paris side, according to www.wearestillin.com, now boasts 200 cities and counties, nine states, hundreds of colleges and universities, and hundreds of businesses (including megacorps) and investors? And even with bankrolled buy-in from billionaire Michael Bloomberg? Pittsburgh’s climate goals, per Peduto’s June 2 executive order, include: moving municipal operations to 100 percent renewable electricity; 100 percent diversion of waste from landfills (because trash = wasted energy); and halving energy consumption citywide, all by 2030. Pittsburgh, like other cities, is in fact already pursuing such goals, with strategies like switching to LED streetlights and retrofitting municipal buildings for energy efficiency. Through the long-running Western Pennsylvania Energy Consortium, Pittsburgh and other municipalities and nonprofits jointly purchase electricity whose portion of renewables keeps growing — it’s now 35 percent, says Grant Ervin, the city’s chief resilience officer. Independent but allied initiatives include the Green Building Alliance’s 2030 District, which aims to get building-owners (for now mostly Downtown and in Oakland) to cut

{CP PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Pittsburghers protest the Paris Agreement withdrawal on June 3.

energy use, water consumption and transportation emissions in half by 2030; the project’s nearly 500 buildings have reduced collective energy use by 10.7 percent. But just as Paris was only a down payment on the fossil-free-fuel world we need, Pittsburgh must do more. “We can’t wait for the feds,” says Court Gould, executive director of nonprofit Sustainable Pittsburgh. Ervin says Pittsburgh is working on everything from speeding up energy retrofits for buildings to spurring more locally produced clean energy (community-based solar, for example) and expanding public transit (for instance, the Bus Rapid Transit proposal). Gould cites proposals to deploy micro-hydro power plants on the rivers here, even in sewers. And renewables, like wind and solar, are becoming more accessible. “Clean solutions are getting very close to cost-competitive,” says Neil Donahue, a Carnegie Mellon University professor of engineering and public policy. Cities can exploit the inherent energy efficiency of being densely built, with smaller living spaces and shorter trips. California now gets 27 percent of its electricity from renewables; San Francisco, using an innovative energy-buying plan, is at 44 percent citywide. Still, even “deep, rapid emissions reductions” by all U.S. cities would get the U.S. only one-third of the way to its Paris goal, according to international urban-climate group C40. And with the White House in Republican hands, helpful things like federal tax credits for renewable energy, rising gas-mileage standards, and federal funding for transit and other infrastructure might be scarcer. Having a climate-denier in the White House, in other words, will still hurt. “We’ll all have to work a little harder and be a little more creative … to move the country off fossil fuels,” says Adam Garber, field director of nonprofit PennEnvironment. But Gould remains optimistic. “It will slow down our progress,” he says. “It’s not gonna stop it.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PUBLIC PLAY & EVENTS 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE CLUBHOUSE EVENT CENTER

$

10 3 $

LITE CANS BUCKET

NEWS

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3

Double Flags June 17 & 18 where Juniors play for Free – 6700 Saltsburg Road, Pittsburgh, Pa 15235 –

LITE 20 OZ LITE 20 OZ DRAFTS DRAFTS

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Bring this ad for a $99 foursome! Expires 7/31/17

412-793-7111 | www.3LakesGolf.com lf

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News of the Weird

S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS TO W E I RD N E W S @ E ART HL I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

{BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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alleghenycounty.us/summer

June 16 Nicole Atkins with special guest Bindley Hardware Co. (Soul/Americana)

Father’s Day Car Cruise & Concert featuring Johnny Angel & The Halos (Oldies) All concerts are free and begin at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Food trucks and Hop Farm Brewing Company craft beer at all concerts beginning at 6:00 p.m. 3WS

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You Mean Jethro and Abby, Too? In contrast to the exciting work of the TV series (near the top of broadcast ratings for the last decade), real agents in the Naval Criminal Investigative Service have labored over computer screens eight to 10 hours a day for two months now employing their facial-recognition software — just to scour websites to identify victims of nude-photo postings of military personnel that came to light earlier this year. “[Y]ou get pretty burned out,” said the NCIS director. A simple word search of “uniformed military nude” got nearly 80 million hits, according to a May Associated Press dispatch from the Quantico Marine base, where the 20 investigators labor side by side.

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Military Allies in Odd Places: (1) In April, three days after ISIS fighters reportedly executed 25 villagers about 50 miles south of Kirkuk, Iraq, the three murderers were themselves killed (and eight more wounded) when a pack of wild boars overran

Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam argues that his “hands are tied” by “federal food laws” and that fresh, “all-natural” milk with the cream skimmed off the top cannot be sold in Florida as “milk” (or “skim milk”), but must be labeled “imitation milk” — unless the “all-natural” milk adds (artificial) vitamin A to the product. A family farm in the state’s panhandle (Ocheesee Creamery) decided to challenge the law, and Putnam, who recently announced his candidacy for governor, said he would try to resolve the issue soon.

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If high schoolers seem stressed by active lifestyles and competitive pressures, and consequently fail to sleep the recommended nine to 10 hours a day, it must be a good idea for the federal government to give grants (including to Las Cruces High School in New Mexico) to purchase comfy, $14,000 “nap pods” that drive out the racket with soft music, for 20 minutes a shot during those frenzied classroom days. A May NPR report based on Las Cruces’ experience quoted favorable reviews by students, backed by a doctor and a nurse practitioner who pointed to research showing that adequate sleep “can” boost memory and attention and thus “can” improve school performance (and therefore must be a great use of federal education dollars).

News You Can Use: (1) Briton Fred Whitelaw, 64, who has bowel cancer, recently began working “therapeutic” breast milk into his diet, but only that supplied by his daughter, Jill Turner, who recently gave birth and said she is happy to doublepump to assure both Fred and baby Llewyn adequate supplies (although husband Kyle is trying it out for his eczema, as well). (2) Scientists writing in the journal of the American Society for Microbiology recently recommended that parents not discourage children from picking their noses because snot contains a “rich reservoir of good bacteria” beneficial to teeth and overall health (fighting, for example, respiratory infections and even HIV).

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Inexplicable: (1) It recently became necessary for Candace Frazee and Steve Lubanski to acquire a bigger home in the Los Angeles area because their 33,000 “bunny”related items (stuffed bunnies, antique bunnies, bunny paintings, bunny dinnerware, etc.) needed more space. (2) The world’s only museum devoted to the “house cat” allows self-guided tours in Sylva, N.C., where curator Harold Sims displays 10,000 artifacts including a genuine petrified cat (with whiskers!) pulled from a 16th-century English chimney. (3) Brantford, Ontario, real-estate agent Kyle Jansink, speaking for unidentified sellers, said he accepted the challenge of selling the meticulously maintained home “as is” — still packed with the sellers’ clownrelated items (dolls, miniatures, porcelain statues, paintings).

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their position and gnawed them into martyrdom. (2) In April, a Russian naval reconnaissance ship sank in the Black Sea off Turkey (likely op: Syria-related) when it collided with a livestock barge flying the flag of Togo. All aboard the Russian ship were rescued; the much-heavier Togolese vessel suffered barely a scratch.

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Rights in Conflict: An elderly German man, unnamed in news reports, was fined the equivalent of $110 in May for “terrorizing” neighbors in the town of Hennef by violating a 2015 agreement to lower the sound of his pornographic videos. He demanded sympathy because of his hearing disability, arguing that if he wore headphones, he could not hear the doorbell, or burglars, and therefore would feel unsafe. (At his May hearing, he objected to the characterization that the “sex sounds” were from videos; on the day in question, he said, he had a prostitute in the room. “It was not porn,” he insisted, confusingly. “It was live!”)

WAYNOVISION


LOCAL

LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

In a popular sketch from his eponymous TV show in 2004, Dave Chappelle spends a night on the town with Wayne Brady, the affable and famously inoffensive actor, singer and comedian. In the sketch, though, Brady shows a different side. He’s a pimp. There’s a drive-by. He bullies and manipulates Chappelle and eats his cheese sandwich. At one point, they talk about life as black actors in Hollywood and the need to stick together in an industry that stacks the odds against them. That sketch served as the inspiration for Black Actors, the latest EP from Pittsburgh-based producer and rapper, NVSV (pronounced “Nasa”). The four tracks take aim at the music industry in Pittsburgh and beyond; the regional camaraderie (sincere or not) between artists in a given genre; the discrepancies between public and private personas; and the roles that bravado and vulnerability play in hip hop. But that’s below-the-surface stuff. NVSV’s songs don’t pronounce their intentions too clearly. At face value, his lyrics tread familiar territory like blunts and swagger, but repeat listens reveal a more complex, ironic character. There’s a dissonance to both his lyrics and his production that gives the music a peculiar, provocative edge. That dichotomy can be chalked up to NVSV’s production style, which is, for a lack of a more descriptive term, dark. It’s not dark in the way of the threatening self-confidence of gangster rap — it’s closer to something like discomfort. If that description is unclear, listen to “Drinks on Me,” from NVSV’s 2017 full-length Mystic. It has an amelodic minimalist beat, built on warbling de-tuned industrial drums, which NVSV counteracts with a chilledout, steady-handed flow. Mystic, which was released earlier this year by Library Collaborative, is full of clever contradictions like the ones in “Drinks on Me.” It’s a loose but tangibly themed record that serves as a good introduction to NVSV’s curious talents and unique voice. There’s no lack of material to follow up with: He writes about eight beats a day. Though two releases deep into 2017, he’s already planning a project for “no later than November.” ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Mystic is available on Apple Music and Spotify. Black Actors is available on Soundcloud. NEWS

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NVSV {PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIELLE MEDIATE}

SPACE RACE

WHAT IS IT IT? {CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON}

{BY MEG FAIR}

IT IT: Tyler, Eric, JF and Patrick

I

T IT IS the kind of band that lives in online obscurity. The band’s Facebook page features just one photo of the musicians. If you want to find its music online, it’s necessary to use quotes around the name; otherwise it’s impossible to locate in the depths of the internet. Although the name is not terribly SEO-friendly, the band’s sound has turned heads both locally and elsewhere. When City Paper recently spoke with members of Baltimore-based Wildhoney about Pittsburgh’s music scene, IT IT was one of the bands that guitarist Joe Trainor raved about. On a cloudy, slightly chilly late-spring afternoon, CP caught up with IT IT at Allegheny Cemetery. We set up shop on the steps of a mausoleum with sphinx statues on each side of its stairs. The cemetery is pretty quiet, save for the occasional medical helicopter flying overhead or the whisper of the wind. At one point, we stop talking to make eye contact with a doe about 30 feet away, as if it’s a totally normal thing to do. The four band members seem comfortable, as if this particular

mausoleum is a usual haunt. Since its inception in 2015, IT IT has been a band that builds experimental pop music driven by found sound and samples with just a pinch of rock. The four-piece, composed of JF, Tyler, Eric and Patrick (these are first-name only artists), lives and creates music together in Garfield. They practice in the basement, fleshing out songs as a democratic unit in the comfort of their own home.

IT IT

WITH THOUSANDZZ OF BEEZZ, THE MOON BABY, SPEDNAR 9 p.m. Sat., June 17. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

“Since Tyler moved to Pittsburgh and has started writing with us, I feel like the process is truly democratically collaborative,” says Eric, “None of us know what the song is going to be when we get in the room together.” The band’s forthcoming album, Formal

Odors, has a sound that’s hard to connect to pre-existing art. One could try to grasp at tangential influences, but it would bear little fruit for explaining the band’s sound to others. The band collectively admires groups like The Books and Deerhoof, and Tyler is inspired by Women’s guitar work, but IT IT sounds like none of those bands. “JF’s parts usually start the collaborative process,” says Patrick. “He has a collection of sounds that we usually build on with the live instrumentation.” “He’s always collecting sound and samples regardless, so he has all these pre-structured found-sound samples that we’re excited about,” Eric says. “Then we get into a room with them and add the live instruments, and it grows exponentially from there.” Used carefully, as if from a treasure chest of random percussive instruments, JF’s samples light a spark throughout IT IT’s compositions that keeps listeners on their toes. Woven around the catchy samples is the kind of percussion work that commands your limbs and strong, CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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WHAT IS IT IT?, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

angular guitar riffs that defy the convention of indie guitar rock. The melodies have a pop catchiness, so the entire composition challenges your brain while worming into your ear. A prime example of this is “Dawn Ever,” the second song on the album. The saccharine, falsetto hook sings over funky samples and is bookended by beeping, twinkling synths and bassy tones. The nine songs that make up Formal Odors have more consistent structure than those on the self-titled EP released in 2016. “There’s less open space on this release,” says Patrick. “It’s got a more driving quality, and more grooves,” adds Eric. Songs like “Jath,” “Spring Break” and “Tears in the Rain” show off this more tailored, driving structure while still playing with holds and open sonic space. Although there is less of the drifting structure floated around samples, it’s still the sampling and experimental elements of Formal Odors that make IT IT stand out. The monologue at the end of “Tears in the Rain” is so artfully crafted that it feels as if it was born to live alongside the guitars. In addition to taking a more refined structural pattern, the audio quality on this release is also much more pristine in the hands of Nate Campisi, who recorded and mixed Formal Odors. Wild Kindness is putting out the album for IT IT on gray-colored cassettes. This release adds to its already strong roster of some of Pittsburgh’s finest rock bands across the genre spectrum. But if you don’t have a tape deck handy to enjoy IT IT’s first full-length, don’t fret. There is a green alternative. For Formal Odors, Tyler made the paper for the album’s download codes to be printed on. It’s biodegradable and also includes broccoli seeds, so if you place the paper in water and give it some sun, edible broccoli sprouts grow from it. “It’s making homemade paper and putting broccoli sprout seeds in it, and making it so that you can grow the paper on your counter, and in a week or so, it’ll grow into a broccoli-sprout patch that you can eat,” explains Tyler. “Making tapes or CDs or whatever is cool, but it does put more plastic into the world.” It’s all about the little details, like homemade broccoli-sprout paper, or obscure samples peeking through inventive guitars and tight percussion, or the adventurous internet dive required to find its music, or the notion that IT IT has favorite mausoleums to hang out at in Allegheny Cemetery. The band’s art and air of unpretentious mystery create a formula that brings listeners back over and over again. ME GFAIR @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES

STEPHEN SCIULLI HIGH IN THE MOUNTAIN GET HIP FOLK SERIES WWW.STEPHENSCIULLI.BANDCAMP.COM

Stephen Sciulli has led a diverse musical life in Pittsburgh. A founding member of the punk band Carsickness, he was also part of that band’s second life as the Celticinfluenced Ploughman’s Lunch, before forming the sound-healing duo Life in Balance and, more recently, the group Standing Wave. Sciulli calls High in the Mountain, his first solo release, “country music from an imaginary country.” The description sums up the expansive release. He handles all the instruments, including resonator guitars, lap steels, flutes, synths and pre-programmed beats. The immediacy of country music gets filtered through a delivery that recalls Oar, by ex-Moby Grape member Skip Spence. Like that cult classic, Mountain’s sweet melodies have an eerie delivery, where guitars seem to be melting onto the beat. Sciulli sings in a low voice that often recalls the late Leonard Cohen. Even when songs clock over seven minutes, they maintain focus by going through prog-like changes or spinning strange tales in its verses. BY MIKE SHANLEY

Sciulli performs at the closing for Non-Punk Pittsburgh at SPACE. 7 p.m. Fri., June 16. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723

MAW PAW SECRET MUSIC SELF-RELEASED WWW.MAWPAW.BANDCAMP.COM/ ALBUM/SECRET-MUSIC

Maw Paw’s Secret Music is a blend of progressive rock and indie melodies. It teeters between bright and spooky, with elements of heavy, down-tempo passages that induce headbanging, sandwiched between beautiful harmonies and clear, arpeggiated guitar work. Justin Endler’s vocals take a consonant heavy approach, adding a bassy quality; the blend of female and male vocals add intrigue, serving as an extra set of instruments outside of the guitar, bass, drums and tenor saxophone. It’s an impressive use of unique rhythmic choices and clever guitar riffs and licks that make for a sonically big display in a genre that doesn’t have an enormous presence in Pittsburgh. BY MEG FAIR


{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

Linda May Han Oh

BOLD FLAVOR {BY MIKE SHANLEY} NOW IN ITS sixth year, the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival presents an array of performers for ticketed indoor performances and numerous free outdoor shows at stages around Penn Avenue, Downtown. While the Festival has typically welcomed both top-level acts along with one or two that could be considered “wildcards,” this year’s outdoor stages feature a large number of bold performers. Bassist Linda May Han Oh (who performs at 1:15 p.m. Sun., June 18, on the Ninth Street Stage) has become one of the year’s rising jazz stars, even though she’s been performing in the U.S. since the late 2000s. Along with the release of her fourth album, Walk Against Wind, she is currently touring with guitarist Pat Metheny. Oh, who was born in Malaysia and grew up in Australia, has also performed with trumpeter Dave Douglas and saxophonist Joe Lovano, creating a strong presence that balances rhythmic duties with a bold improvisational voice. Walk Against Wind features tenor saxophone (Ben Wendel), guitar (Matthew Stevens) and drums (Justin Brown), along with Oh’s bass and some additional keyboards and percussion. The band’s instrumentation and Oh’s approach to writing give the music many layers. “Sometimes it might start with a melody that I hear. Sometimes it might start with a bass fig-

ure or a bass sketch or just an underlying thread,” she says, a day after returning from a European tour with Metheny. “And that thread could be that Korean rhythm [in the song ‘Mantis’]. Some of the tunes have their own little underlying logic, little underlying puzzles, which may not be apparent first off when you first listen to them. But the more and more you kind of get into it, the more you can see these threads or patterns.” Te n o r s a x o p h o n i s t Odean Pope could be considered something of a legend in his hometown of Philadelphia, where he has performed and recorded. Pope has recorded numerous albums as a leader and with legends like drummer Max Roach. While he definitely pays homage to his inspirations, the saxophonist’s big tone and rugged vocabulary push the music forward.

LINDA MAY HAN OH HAS BECOME ONE OF THE YEAR’S RISING JAZZ STARS.

PITTSBURGH JAZZLIVE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL Fri., June 16 through Sun., June 18. Various stages, Downtown. www.pittsburghjazzlive.com/schedule/

At 2 p.m. Sat., June 17, on the Penn Avenue Stage II, Pope leads his Saxophone Choir, an ensemble that has included up to nine of the reeds and a rhythm section. The group’s vast sound incorporates the lush feeling of a big band, delivered with the visceral attack of the World Saxophone Quartet. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUELINE BADEAUX}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Ghost Wolves

[JAZZ/R&B] + THU., JUNE 15

[POP] + SAT., JUNE 17

If an artist is lucky enough to have been praised by Prince, it will inevitably follow her for the rest of her career. Laura Mvula, whom Prince once said he listened to before and after his shows, finds herself in that class. But while Prince’s recommendation is great, Mvula stands on her own with her inventive and complex sound — part jazz, part R&B, part soul, and part something else unfamiliar. Prince’s favorite song of Mvula’s was “Green Garden” (mine is “Show Me Love”), but it’s really worth choosing your own, which you can do tonight at the August Wilson Center. Hannah Lynn 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $41.25. 412-456-6666 or www.cultural Laura Mvula district.org

If you believe in golden ages, then you might say we’re living in the golden age of alternative pop; there’s Lorde, Lana Del Rey, Perfume Genius. There’s also Banks, who, like a lot of her peers, sings dark and low, but remains accessible and endearing. The kind of sound you might dance to when you’re sad in the club. Her lyrics can be biting too, like on “Gemini Feed,” where she sings, “I follow you around like a dog that needs water / But admit it that you wanted me smaller.” Also playing Stage AE tonight is R&B/soul/electronic musician TOULOUSE, whose bluesy “No Running From Me” was featured on the 50 Shades Darker soundtrack. Listen, sometimes bad movies have good music. HL 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. 412229-5483 or www. promowestlive.com

[POP/SOUL] + FRI., JUNE 16 If you listen carefully to Nicole Atkins’ music, you can hear the different layers of influence. On songs like “Goodnight Rhonda Lee,” from her new album of the same name, there are hints of Loretta Lynn. On her cover of “Bye Bye Blackbird,” there’s a clear reference to John Coltrane. Other tunes, like “Listen Up,” would fit comfortably on the same bill as Sara Bareilles. Joining Atkins tonight at the free Allegheny County Summer Concert Series at South Park Amphitheater is upbeat and countrytinged Bindley Hardware Co. HL 7:30 p.m. 3778 Buffalo Drive, South Park Township. 412-835-5710 or alleghenycounty.us/specialevents/summer-concert-series

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[ROCK] + TUE., JUNE 20 The Ghost Wolves have a pretty solid band name, but it’s even better when you learn that the husband-and-wife duo’s last name is Wolf. Don’t get it twisted, though — these two aren’t on stage crooning love songs to each other, unless your version of a love song includes knives and poison (maybe it does, we don’t judge). You can hear the Texas in their music, as much as you can hear the ghosts of rock ’n’ roll past, like a rodeo clown hanging out with The Ramones. Ghost Wolves are joined onstage at Brillobox by local promoters of debauchery Those Gorgeous Bastards. HL 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. $10. 21-and over. 412-621-4900 or www.brilloboxpgh.com


LYNN CULLEN IS GOING BACK TO SCHOOL!

Lynn Cullen Live is now broadcasting daily from studios at Point Park University’s

Center for Media Innovation The show, presented by Pittsburgh City Paper in conjunction with Point Park University, airs daily at 10 a.m. at

www.pghcitypaper.com

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diesel C LU B | LO U N G E

UPCOMING CONCERTS TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} 6/20 | 7:00 PM | AA

ROCK/POP 6/22 | 7:00 7: 00 PM P M | AA

THU 15 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Ray Lanich Band. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

OF “THE PLOT IN YOU” 6/24 | 7:00 PM | AA

FRI 16

6/29 | 7:00 PM | AA

7/ 1 | 7:00 PM | AA

v I B RO K InG S

20TH ANNIVERSARY/REUNION SHOW 7/8 | 7:00 P M | 21+

BALTIMORE HOUSE. Lenny Smith & The Instant Gators. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. CLUB CAFE. The Mulligan Brothers. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Wreck Loose w/ Buffalo Rose. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Fathertime. 9 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE PARK HOUSE. Sun Hound. 9-11 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 17

7/ 1 3 | 7:00 P M | 18+

7/ 14 | 7:00 PM | AA

7/20 | 7:00 PM | AA

8/3 | 7:00 PM | AA

8/7 | 7:00 PM | AA

FAREWELL TO RACHEL B SHOW 8/25 | 7:00 P M | 21+

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Ferris Bueller’s Revenge Band. 8-11 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. CAFE DOWN UNDER. FUBAR & Rewired Messiah. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. West Mifflin. 724-961-5640. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Waiting For Ray. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Greg Kihn Band. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Washington. 724-225-5221. MOONDOG’S. 8th Street Rox. 8 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. OBEY HOUSE. Bleach Fuzz. 9 p.m. Crafton. 412-922-3883. THE R BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Soule Monde feat. Ray Paczkowski & Russ Lawton. 8 p.m.-midnight. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. Banks. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

MON 19

for tickets visit DIESELPGH.COM or Dave’s Music Mine (southside) 1801 e. carson st | pittsburgh |412.481.8800

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DIESEL. Otep w/ The Convalescence & The World Over. 7-11 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Bachelor Boys Showcase. Ballroom. 7-10 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335.

WED 21 HOWLERS. Old Blood, Burn Thee Insects & Smoke Wizzzard. 8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PUGLIANO’S ITALIAN GRILL. Lenny Smith & Larry Siefers. 7-10 p.m. Murrysville. 724-327-8991.

DJS THU 15 BELVEDERE’S. REM & Stimpy: The Lopez vs the 90s. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 16 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BELVEDERE’S. Drake night w/ DJ admc. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ NIN. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 17 BELVEDERE’S. Sean MC & Thermos. 90s night. Third Sat. of

MP 3 MONDAY GLO PHASE

SUN 18 CLUB CAFE. Marshall Crenshaw & Los Straitjackets. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. DIESEL. Indigenous. 8-11 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE R BAR. Billy The Kid & the Regulators. 6-9 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

9/7 | 7:00 P M | 21+

TUE 20

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Sebastian Bach. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s “Tchoupitoulas,” from Glo Phase’s Halftone. That title (pronounced “chop-it-too-las”) references a street in New Orleans, where much of the album was written over a month this past winter. Words like hip hop, IDM and chillwave might work to describe it, but the album art (above) does it much better. Stream or download “Tchoupitoulas” at FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.


HEAVY ROTATION

vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. PENN STATE NEW KENSINGTON. Erin Burkett, Virgil Walters & Max Leake. 6-9 p.m. New Kensington. 724-334-6110.

Here’s what CP music intern Hannah Lynn can’t stop listening to:

SUN 18 HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Third Sun. of every month, 5 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 21

SAT 17

Rupert GregsonWilliams

“Wonder Woman’s Wrath”

Carly Rae Jepsen

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Tony Campbell Jam Session. 5-8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7-10 p.m. Thru Dec. 27. Ross. 412-487-8909.

SUN 18

REGGAE

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Thomas Wendt Quartet & Mark Strickland. Speakeasy. 6-10 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. MaryAnn Mangini. 6 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7-10 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412-875-5809.

“Cut to the Feeling”

Harry Styles

“Sign of the Times”

THU 15 PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m.-midnight. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

SUN 18 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Ras Prophet. 2-6 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

COUNTRY WED 21

MON 19

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Gone South. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

Janis Joplin

“Mercedes Benz”

CLASSICAL

TUE 20

every month. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Third Sat. of every month, 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Push It!. DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Third Sat. of every month, 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825.

SUN 18 THE PARK HOUSE. SoulfulFella & The Bike Funx. Third Sun. of every month, 6 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-224-2273.

TUE 20 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

WED 21 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BLUES THU 15 COLONIAL GRILLE & TAPROOM. Jimmy Adler Band. 8 p.m. Irwin. 724-863-8358.

NEWS

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

FRI 16 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jimmy Adler Blues Band. Speakeasy. 5:30-9:30 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. MIKE’S NEW MOON SALOON. Jack of Diamonds. 9 p.m.-midnight. Gibsonia. 724-265-8188.

WED 21

SUN 18

ACOUSTIC

THE R BAR. Billy The Kid’s American All-Stars. 7-10 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

PNC POPS W/ ELLA & LOUIS: ALL THAT JAZZ. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

THU 15 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. LAZYBLACKMAN, Isaiah Smalls, Greenhouse Hooligans & more. Speakeasy. 7-11 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. 8-11 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Shelley Duff. 7-10 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. STAGE AE. Sigur Ros. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FRI 16 ARSENAL CIDER HOUSEWEXFORD. Aaron Lefebvre. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Wexford. 724-777-2402. RIVERS CASINO. Etta Cox Trio. 9 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 17

MON 19 NATHAN CARTERETTE. Pianist Nathan Carterette gives his last solo recital in Pittsburgh before departing. Music of his specialties Bach and Quentin Kim, as well as Schubert, Prokofiev & Ravel. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

FRI 16

WED 21

PNC POPS W/ ELLA & LOUIS: ALL THAT JAZZ. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

A CHORUS DIVIDED. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-421-5884.

ARSENAL CIDER HOUSEWEXFORD. Second Breakfast. 4:307:30 p.m. Wexford. 724-777-2402. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS. Dancing Queen. Gibsonia. 412-365-1335. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Travlin’. 8-11 p.m. Thru July 29. North Side. 412-904-3335. RIVERS CASINO. Darryl & Kim. Levels. 9 p.m.-midnight. Terrance Vaughn Band. Drum Bar. 9 p.m.-midnight. North Side. 412-231-7777.

CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Thumbscrew. 8-10 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. RIVERS CLUB. Roger Barbour Band. 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

FULL LIST ONLINE pg

THU 15 HYEHOLDE. Ron Wilson w/ Paul Thompson. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Moon. 412-264-3116. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jazz Happy Hour w/ Martin Rosenberg. 5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

FRI 16 ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo &

MUSIC

SUN 18

OTHER MUSIC

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. Third Thu. of every month, 8-11 p.m. Lawrenceville. . w ww er 412-726-7912. hcitypap

JAZZ

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MUSIC OF FLIGHT & FANTASYSENSORY FRIENDLY CONCERT. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Guest Conductor Lawrence Loh present a musical celebration of flight & fantasy featuring the music of John Williams. Join us in Heinz Hall for a family-friendly concert in a welcoming, inclusive & relaxed environment designed especially for patrons of all ages & especially those individuals w/ autism spectrum disorders, sensory sensitivities & other different abilities. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. PNC POPS W/ ELLA & LOUIS: ALL THAT JAZZ. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

THU 15

TUE 20 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Jill West & Blues Attack. 7:30 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

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MOONDOG’S. Richard Parker Trio. 8:30-11:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SPACE. Stephen Sciulli. CD release. 7-11 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

SAT 17 1810 TAVERN. Right TurnClyde. 8-11 p.m. Bridgewater. 724-728-5282. FOX CHAPEL YACHT CLUB. Right TurnClyde. 12-6 p.m. O’Hara. 412-405-9721. MUSIC TO MY EAR. Cathasaigh. 12:30-3:30 p.m. Ross. 412-223-9747. THE HARDWOOD CAFE. Eclectic Acoustics. 8-11 p.m. Butler. 724-586-5335.

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What to do IN PITTSBURGH

June 14-20 WEDNESDAY 14 James Vincent McMorrow

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticket web.com/opusone. 8p.m.

FUSE@PSO: Mash-Up, Mix-Down w/ Time for Three HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org. 6:30p.m.

The Little Mermaid BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through June 25.

THURSDAY 15 Sigur Ros

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Laura Mvula AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Dead and Company KEYBANK PAVILION Burgettstown. All ages show. Tickets: livenation.com. 7p.m.

Free event. For more info visit warhol.org. 8p.m.

ICON FOR HIRE CATTIVO JUNE 20

Family Funfest STATION SQUARE For more info visit station square.com. 3p.m.

FRIDAY 16 165

MONDAY 19

After 87, Vantage Blue, Atlas Decay, Saybrook & Keystone Soundhouse

Strawberry Girls

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Comrades, Belle Noir & Nephele. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

The Christians

TUESDAY 20

NEW HAZLETT THEATER North Side. Tickets: kinetictheatre.org or 1-888-718-4253. Through July 2.

Urban Garden Party 2017 THE MATTRESS FACTORY North Side. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit mattress.org. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY 17 BANKS

Icon For Hire

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Toulouse. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Soule Monde, Ray Paczkowski & Russ Lawton

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guest Galactic Duo. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 9p.m.

SUNDAY 18

Angélique Kidjo

Double Feature: Andy Warhol’s Tarzan & Jane Regained and Tarzan the Ape Man

AUGUST WILSON CENTER

ACE HOTEL East Liberty.

PYRAMID ADORNING YOUR BODY, TABLE & BED

SATURDAY, JUNE 24TH

“PURSUIT”

TATTOO & Body Piercing

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06.14/06.21.2017

VINTAGE HOME DÉCOR ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES GARDENING FURNISHINGS & ART KITSCHY GIFTS

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. With special guests Assuming We Survive & The Art of Burning Bridges. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Miller-Porfiris Duo KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER East Liberty. 412-363-3000. Tickets: chambermusicpitts burgh.org. 7p.m.


[BOOK REVIEWS]

“I THINK SHE TAPS INTO ANOTHER REALM.”

IMAGERY {BY FRED SHAW} It’s natural that poetry, with its oftemphasized imagery, and the visual arts, like painting and photography, would make for good collaborations. In 2013, New York’s Museum of Modern Art did just that by having a poet read in the museum’s galleries while visitors viewed the artwork. To quote MoMA’s website, “Visitors’ responses revealed that the combination of poetry and visual art breathed life into the respective mediums … provided an opportunity to focus … on a work from different perspectives and think about it in new ways.” Indeed, this appears to be the intention of collaborative efforts in two recent books bringing together local artists and poets. The first, Under the Kaufmann’s Clock (Six Gallery Press), teams poet Angele Ellis and photographer Rebecca Clever for 83 Pittsburgh-centric pages. While Clever’s black-and-white photos are thematically and compositionally interesting, giving readers pause to consider connections, the publisher’s decision not to use glossy, more high-definition printing robs them of some clarity and power. The same can’t be said of Ellis’ strong writing, which veers between prose, haiku-like epigraphs and narrative poems. In “Landscape,” Ellis highlight’s the city’s vistas, writing of “[t]hat first hint of gold in the Tubes / when you come through / at night: the trumpets / of daffodil lights, / lifting Pittsburgh like spring.” UtKC effectively revolves around the four seasons, with subject matter ranging from memories of past relationships to a Phyllis Hyman concert at the Stanley Theater in 1979. While instances of prose are solid, Ellis is at her best in narrative poems like the sexually charged “Fake Fur Christmas,” which ends with the speaker running her “hands over the flanks. / just to see some electricity / that comes from friction, the collision / of a body with the atmosphere.” Another collaboration, The 4 Seasons ($30, order through termanp1@gmail. com), finds poet and Clarion University professor Phillip Terman’s verses coming to life among 35 pages of Mercer, Pa., artist James Stewart’s naturalistic oil paintings. This book is literally a piece of art, beautifully hand-sewn by Susan Frakes, a well-known bookbinder in the Clarion area. Terman’s well-crafted meditations run philosophical, using seasons as big-picture metaphors when he asks, “how many do we have left? Spring dusks I mean?” Terman’s pastoral imagery throughout The 4 Seasons gels nicely with Stewart’s landscapes, and like UtKC, rich artistry and potent writing bloom together, making these group-efforts greater than their parts.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PATTY BRAHIM}

Charlee Canty (back row) and, left to right, Rudy Giron, Demareus Cooper and Michelle Williams play Spirits in Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s A Gathering of Sons.

[OPERA]

THE SPIRITS SPEAK

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

T

AMEKA CAGE CONLEY grew up in Louisiana, in a religious household where the dead were known to commune with the living. “There was definitely a belief in the spirit world when I was growing up. That spirits can come back and visit you,” says Conley, who was raised Baptist, with a Pentecostal grandmother. “I was always terrified and intrigued by this idea of people not staying dead. The idea of the spirit being stronger than the flesh.” That idea vividly informs A Gathering of Sons, the opera that premieres this week at Pittsburgh Festival Opera (formerly Opera Theater SummerFest), with a libretto by Conley. The jazz-gospel opera, with music by Pittsburgh-based composer Dwayne Fulton, confronts an

issue that Conley, as an African American married to a black man and the mother of a 3-year-old son, finds inescapable: police brutality.

PITTSBURGH FESTIVAL OPERA PRESENTS

A GATHERING OF SONS Thu., June 15-July 8. Various venues. $20-75. 412-326-9687 or www.pittsburghfestivalopera.org

With characters who are the supernatural embodiments of earth and sky, and the spirits of the departed, among other magical-realist elements, Gathering of Sons promises a different kind of social-justice story, says the show’s direc-

tor, Mark Clayton Southers. “By dealing with the spiritual world, I think [Conley] goes beyond the [victims’] mothers being interviewed on TV,” he says. “We become numb to the violence. She taps into the afterlife. … I think she taps into another realm.” Gathering of Sons is the second commissioned work in Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s Music That Matters series, which began with 2015’s eco-themed A New Kind of Fallout. The shows complement the troupe’s more traditional offerings with works that speak directly to contemporary audiences. To create a socialjustice-themed opera, in 2015 artistic director Jonathan Eaton turned to Conley, a rising Pittsburgh-based poet and playwright whose work often tackles such

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THE SPIRITS SPEAK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

issues, and Fulton, a studio musician, composer and Minister of Music at Larimer’s Mount Ararat Baptist Church. Conley (now a fellow at the famed Iowa Writer’s Workshop) crafted a story about what happens when a predatory white cop named Lockdown profiles and shoots a young black man named Victor even as Victor’s older brother, a cop named City, and his wife, Violet, are expecting their first child. Other characters in the large cast include the spirit of that unborn son; Victor’s mother, Victoria; the spirit of Victor’s late father; and, perhaps most strikingly, two choruses, one consisting of the spirits of African-American men and boys, the other including elemental but otherworldly figures including The Speaking Earth, The Sky That Can’t Stop Seeing, The Waters and The Blood. And then there’s Glock — Lockdown’s gun in forbidding human form. Conley’s libretto is sometimes lyrical, sometimes poetically direct. “What I got is magic. And if you want it, you gotta kill me,” Victor tells Lockdown. “The shock of me fills the room,” announces Glock. Ful-

ton’s score, combining elements of jazz, classical and gospel music, will be played live by a seven-piece band. Glock is sung by the internationally known bass Kevin Maynor. (Maynor was recruited by director Southers, whose work with Maynor’s New Jersey-based Trilogy: An Opera Company has included directing such contemporary operas as Anthony Davis’ Five, about the Central Park Five.) Gathering of Sons’ mostly black cast also includes Terriq White, Miles WilsonToliver, Adrianna Cleveland and Robert Gerold. Seven performances of Gathering of Sons are planned; the first five comprise an in-city “tour” that takes place before Festival Opera’s official opening night, July 1. “Let’s not just expect people to come to us, we’ll go to them,” says Eaton. The first two shows are at Mount Ararat church, with a third at Oakland’s Rodef Shalom synagogue, and two at the Kaufmann Center, in the Hill District. (The July 1 and 8 shows are at Festival Opera’s home base, the Falk Auditorium at Shadyside’s Winchester Thurston School.) With its strong pedigree, Gathering of

GATHERING OF SONS PROMISES A DIFFERENT KIND OF SOCIALJUSTICE STORY.

Sons is artistically promising. The jazz/ gospel score, with lyrics in English, also makes it accessible. The subject matter is ripped from the headlines, and the approach is healing and hopeful. Yet attracting nontraditional audiences is opera’s perennial challenge. Gathering was developed partly via a series of free public workshops at area community centers, libraries and churches, and feedback solicited from attendees including community leaders. But will the label “opera” still keep people away? Maynor, based on his experience with Trilogy, says outreach is key, even at the performances themselves. “You have to teach people how to watch and listen,” he says. Denise Sheffey Powell, the Pittsburgh-based performer who plays Victoria, says that this opera’s grounding in the black spiritual tradition will help bridge the gap. “I think the majority of the audience will really understand that,” she says. “It will get people talking … and open up discussions about what needs to be done.” That aligns with Conley’s intent. With the opera’s supernatural elements, “I wanted to bring in a higher power, if you will,” she says. “I wanted to bring in something that can’t be argued with.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

“Tingled with raw energy!” – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

OPENS THIS WEEK! 4 0 TH SEASON JUNE 15 — JULY 23

Experience world-class performances in unique and intimate venues. On tour around Pittsburgh and at Winchester Thurston, Shadyside. Passports and subscriptions for your preferred seats available now. The Three (Counter) Tenors featuring Andrey Nemzer, who also sings the title role of Xerxes with Lara Lynn McGill. (right)

Tickets start at $20 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

06.14/06.21.2017

Mozart by Moonlight Discover Strauss Four days of exciting and exclusive events. Explore the life and works of Richard Strauss and the Pennsylvania premiere of INTERMEZZO

pittsburghfestivalopera.org Festival Box Office: 412-326-9687


BROADWAY’S UNDER THE SEA SPECTACULAR!

[BOOKS]

CIVIL UNREST {BY STUART SHEPPARD} YOUR NEW BOOK IS CALLED HOUSE OF NAMES. WHY A NOVEL BASED ON THE THE ORESTEIA? A new translation of a late play by Euripides called Iphigenia in Aulis appeared. As a result of reading it, I realized that this changed everything, because it told the story from the point of view of Clytemnestra, and you got to see the enormous trick that Agamemnon had played on her, and how understandable, to some extent, her rage against him was, leading in turn to the fact that her murder of him made some sense. Once I read that play, I saw that there was a novel in this.

Now - June 25

FROM THE CREATOR OF HAMILTON!

1/2 Price

WAS ORESTES A HERO? ARE HEROES BELIEVABLE TODAY? In my version, he’s not heroic. Because a contemporary novel doesn’t lend itself to heroism. It’s very difficult to put a fullbodied, full-blooded hero into a contemporary novel without the reader looking for a flaw in that. Pure heroism allows for no shadow or ambiguity. It might be very good in an action movie, but it would not work in the more textured and demanding space of a novel, in which we want to see a human being rendered.

for Children 3-14!*

July 7 - 16

Sponsored by

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIGITTE LACOMBE} *Certain Restrictions

Novelist Colm Tóibín

strife is more part of the deal than wars between countries. Look at things now, in relation to what’s happening in Syria, in Libya, and with ISIS. I come from Ireland, where we’ve had two civil wars in the 20th century. Cities were divided, and families took different sides. I’m not dealing in this novel with the Trojan War; I’m dealing with a war within the House of Atreus. With a father murdering his daughter, a woman murdering her husband, and a son murdering his mother. I’m using the bones of that story, but I’m putting my own blood and flesh around those bones. That really is a contemporary sensibility.

Diana Huey in Disney’s THE LITTLE MERMAID | Photo: Mark & Tracy Photography

pittsburghCLO.org 412-456-6666

Groups 10+ 412-325-1582

Benedum Center

“A CONTEMPORARY NOVEL DOESN’T LEND ITSELF TO HEROISM.”

COLM TÓIBÍN 7 p.m. Tue., June 20. Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures at Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $31 (includes copy of House of Names); students: $10 (admission only). 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

IS IT IMPORTANT FOR OUR AGE TO HAVE AN UNDERSTANDING OF GREEK TRAGEDY? I think we’re living in a time when civil

Summ

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June 20

is duo Miller-Porfir nt films violin + viola + sile

presents

YOU HAVE CLYTEMNESTRA DECLARE, “THE TIME OF THE GODS HAS PASSED.” IS THIS NECESSARY FOR US TO HEAR AS MODERN READERS, OR WAS THIS EMBEDDED IN HER CHARACTER ALL ALONG? I think the novel, today, is a very secular space, and it’s difficult to put the gods into a novel in any serious way. Think of Jane Austen, for example. Even though her novels are filled with clergymen, God — or the intervention of God’s power — does not play any part. Instead it’s people facing choices and taking chances.

#Just

THIS STORY OF GENERATIONAL GUILT BRINGS TO MIND THE INVESTMENT SCANDAL OF BERNIE MADOFF, AND COMMENTATORS INSISTING THAT HIS CHILDREN, WIFE AND EVEN GRANDCHILDREN BE PUNISHED, ALTHOUGH THEY HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH HIS CRIME. This was a country where one was meant to be able to invent one’s self. America has become, oddly enough, this strange country of families. The whole idea of the Clintons have elements of the Greeks. The whole idea of the Kennedys have elements of the Greeks. And the Trumps, the Kushners. America has become a strange space for these families to inhabit.

$25 6:30 mixer

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Just Summer! is part of the Kelly Strayhorn Theater’s East Liberty LIVE! series.

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

ABOUT FAITH {BY TED HOOVER} THERE’S A certain type of “religious” show — Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?, The Book of Mormon, Nunsense, to name a few — that spends an act-anda-half getting big yuks out of the loopiness of faith only, in the final 15 minutes, to recant everything and close out with a heartwarming “but still, God is great and loving and etc.” As a flaming atheist, such inconsistency always annoys me, so I’m very pleased to tell you about An Act of God, making its Pittsburgh debut at Public Theater. The premise of this 2015 play is simple: God adopts a human form for one evening and, accompanied by archangels Gabriel (as in “blow”) and Michael (and in “row”) takes over the Public’s stage to present an updated version of the Ten Commandments. What’s really happening is that playwright David Javerbaum, under cover of nonstop one-liners, has set out to destroy spirituality. And no, I don’t mean organized religion, or rather just organized religion. I’m talking the concept of belief itself. He doesn’t do it by attacking God. His

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL HENNINGER}

Left to right: John Shepard, Marcus Stevens and Tim McGeever in An Act of God

AN ACT OF GOD continues through July 2. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-56. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

VERSU

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FOOD F TRUCKS T

MONSTER

TRIKE NIGHT

YOUR NIGHT. YOU DECIDE. 8PM $25 9PM

KAIJU BIG BATTEL: LIVE MONSTER FIGHTING

$5 ADV. $10 DOOR

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MONSTER TRIKE NIGHT: ADULT BIG WHEEL RACING

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JUNE 24 DIVISIONS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

AUGUST WILSON CENTER 412-456-6666 BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

ALL OF THE ABOVE. ALL NIGHT.

God — though funnier than the original — is the brutish, murderous, can’t-be-bothered God we’ve all read about in the Bible, the torturer of Noah, Abraham and Job. Javerbaum is attacking the people who created God … people. And, if our God is everything we say He is, then we must be insane in either the creation or the worship. I find such clarity refreshing, but judging from some of the displeasure I witnessed around me in the O’Reilly Theater, I may be in the minority. If their God did come to earth, He could hardly pick a better vessel to inhabit than Marcus Stevens. A Point Park graduate and now star in New York, Stevens is more adorable than any human being has a right to be, and with his perky show-biz manner he manages, with Ted Pappas’ swift and spot-on direction, to give Javerbaum’s dark material a highly entertaining sheen. Being more of an essay than an actual play, An Act of God becomes a bit monotonous near the end of its 85 intermissionless minutes. But Stevens and Pappas barrel through to the finish of a surprisingly blistering, but hugely entertaining show.

TRUSTARTS.ORG

Prize- and Tony-winning family drama about doubt, insecurity and mathematics still resonates. Rest assured, you don’t need to know serious math. It does help to realize that academics in general and scientists in particular tend to be wound a turn-and-a-half too tight. That describes three-quarters of the four-character cast. Proof moves back and forth through time, and in the imagination, to tell the story of the differing daughters of a math genius, and his former grad student. Robert (a towering James Critchfield) was a giant and a revolutionary in several branches of mathematics. He was famous before his mid-20s, but succumbed to (an unidentified) mental illness for most of what should have been his remaining career, leaving him to his daughters’ care. At the center of the vortex is Catherine (Jena Oberg, convincingly fragile), the younger daughter who abandoned her own studies to remain in the dilapidated family home and take personal charge. She is the daughter of whom Robert is “proud,” for her math talents as well as her devotion. She has inherited at least some of his genius; will she also face his instability? That’s her greatest fear among many others. Elder daughter Claire (Mary Meyer acting the perfect priss) is merely deemed “satisfactory,” even though she has provided vital financial support. No surprise that she’s the outsider, and doesn’t visit often. Completing the quartet and providing a romantic interest — and much conflict — for Catherine is Hal (a suave Jared Pfennigwerth, doubling as technical director), now a teacher himself at the University of Chicago.

A COMPACT production and tight cast add

up satisfactorily for Little Lake Theatre Co.’s Proof. David Auburn’s 2001 Pulitzer

PROOF continues through June 24. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, North Strabane. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

In the aftermath of Robert’s death, Hal studies the former’s voluminous notes looking for some remaining shred of genius. What he finds, how he reacts, and the resolution of the characters’ conundrums — well, that’s what Proof is really about. Director Art DeConciliis paces the humor-studded drama with sensitivity. There are some rough spots, but the staging works and the production succeeds in striking a few nerves. Have fun. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.15-06.22.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC.}

Andy Warhol helped create the popculture era we live in, and his 1968 quote “In the future, everybody will be world-famous for 15 minutes” seems to have heralded reality TV and social media. But Warhol’s own relationship with celebrity began much differently. Growing up in smoky, industrial 1930s Pittsburgh, in a world before television, Andy Warhola was a movie nut, collecting studio publicity photos of

stars and frequenting Oakland’s three cinemas. “As a gay man, it was a place he could escape into, the beauty and the glamor,” says Andy Warhol Museum film curator Geralyn Huxley. In partnership with Matt Wrbican, the museum’s archival consultant, Huxley curated Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen, an exhibit opening June 16. The show features 170 of the pack-rat artist’s thousands of movie-star photos; 50 he shot himself, after becoming famous; posters and collectibles including a Jean Harlow dress, Clark Gable’s shoes; and more. Then there’s Warhol’s own celeb-themed art, including source material for his famous paintings of Marilyn and Liz, and the intriguing, never-completed circa-1962 composite of the faces of Sophia, Joan, Marlene and Greta (pictured). The exhibit also spotlights Warhol’s own experimental films, featuring his “superstars” (Edie Sedgwick, Candy Darling, Viva, et al.) and often spoofing Hollywood. Huxley says Warhol reveled in the scandal and gossip of the deglamorized 1970s and ’80s Tinseltown, when stars began seeming more accessible and more human. Is it paradoxical that Warhol made paintings that glamorized film stars, and movies that didn’t? “I think he genuinely admired the movie stars,” says Huxley. “You can still see the dark side while admiring the light side.” Witness both facets of Warhol’s fandom yourself on Sun., June 18, when East Liberty’s Ace Hotel hosts a free double bill of his feature-length 1963 spoof Tarzan and Jane Regained … Sort Of (starring a scrawny Taylor Mead) and 1932’s Tarzan the Ape Man (with Johnny Weissmuller).

^ Fri., June 16: Carnegie Science Center 21+ Prom Night

thursday 06.15

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

MUSIC

ART

On June 16, literature aficionados worldwide mark Bloomsday with readings and festivities. It’s the date on which James Joyce set his classic novel Ulysses, chronicling the humble wanderings (in 1904) of his hero, Leopold Bloom. Tonight, local Irish-Appalachian music outfit Devilish Merry offers a Bloomsday Eve twist with a program called The Music of James Joyce, featuring songs associated with the Irish legend and his work. At Point Breezeway, Burr Beard (hammered dulcimer), Jan Hamilton-Sota (fiddle), Sue Powers (banjo), Jeff Berman (fretted dulcimer, percussion) and L.E. McCullough (flute, tin whistle, harmonica) perform, and McCullough reads from his article “The Music of James Joyce.” (For info on June 16’s Bloomsday readings, see www.bloomsdaypittsburgh.org.) Bill O’Driscoll 7-9:30 p.m. 7113 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $20. www.pointbreezeway.com

Tonight, glassweekend ’17 gets its opening reception at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. The show features sculptures and jewelry by 16 internationally exhibited artists, including Christine Barney and Dolores Barrett. Barney, based in New Jersey, has done abstract sculpted works, some of it furnace-formed and polished. Barrett, born in California, does jewelry. Her colorful work includes earrings and necklaces; one necklace strings together a series of M&M candies made of glass and silver. Matt Petras Reception: 5:30-8:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 30. 5833 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-441-5200 or www.morganglassgallery.com

Exhibit runs Fri., June 16, through Sept. 24. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org NEWS

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PARTY For those feeling high school nostalgia, Carnegie Science Center throws a 21-andolder prom night. The Pittsburgh DJ Company will play music from the 1990s and 2000s. Anyone who wants some direction for their grooving can also learn moves like the Electric Slide from the Pittsburgh Dance Center. Everyone can

> Fri., June 16: glassweekend ‘17 {ART BY WESLEY RASKO}

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK WOLBERG}

^ Mon., June 19: The Beer Yogis

EVENT: Smoke and Mirrors Penn Out Loud Art Crawl, in Friendship,

STAGE

Alvarez, 19,

a student from Oakland

WHEN: Sat.,

June 10

[BOOM Concepts] is just the first part of the day that I’ve been experiencing. It’s overwhelmingly positive, just the fact that we’re using art to bring up issues on gender equality and sexual violence, and that’s really important. Those are kind of tough topics that we never talk about. I guess I would describe [this station] as an open environment for anyone, artist or not, to just come over and share their experiences. I had the feeling that I’d come to this very elitist expo and I’d be out of place, but surprisingly, but maybe not surprisingly, I’ve been really welcomed here. It really makes me want to come back. I’ll give [the other stations] a look, definitely. I’d love to talk about what I write about and just meet more new people. I just want to see more places and more faces. BY MATT PETRAS

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The vibrator dates to the 19th century, when its early uses included treatment of “female hysteria.” That history provided rich terrain for playwright Sarah Ruhl, whose In the Next Room or The Vibrator Play premiered to acclaim in 2009. The comedy concerns a Dr. Givings, who employs the treatment, and his wife’s attempts to cope with their passionless union. Throughline Theatre Company opens its eighth season (theme: “The Fair Sex”) with a new production at the Henry Heymann Theatre. Abigail Lis-Perlis directs a cast including Ricardo Vila-Roger and Moira Quigley; the first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through June 24. 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-20 (opening night: add $10). www.throughlinetheatre.org

saturday 06.17 ART

STAGE Kinetic Theatre Company stages the Pittsburgh premiere of The Christians at the New Hazlett Theater. Starring Pittsburgh favorites David Whalen and Joshua Elijah Reese, and directed by Andrew Paul, this drama follows Pastor Paul, the head of an American megachurch, who abruptly announces that he longer believes there is a hell. Written by Lucas Hnath, The Christians has garnered widespread critical acclaim since it debuted, Off-Broadway, in 2015. “Whether or not you believe in God, you should believe in Lucas Hnath,” writes Alexis Soloski for The Guardian. MP 8 p.m. Continues through July 2. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-36 (family discounts available). 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org

MUSIC A pair of world-class talents team with Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra to honor two legends of American music. Ella & Louis: All That Jazz celebrates the legacies of Ella Fitzgerald

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> Fri., June 16: Ella & Louis: All That Jazz

Bloomfield and Garfield

CRITIC: Jorge

and Louis Armstrong with three PNC Pops shows at Heinz Hall, starting tonight. Internationally touring trumpeter and vocalist Byron Stripling, who starred in the stage musical Satchmo, sings and plays Armstrong, while Fitzgerald is channeled by actress and singer Marva Hicks, a Broadway veteran who has toured with Stevie Wonder and Michael Jackson. It’s “Love Is Here to Stay,” “They Can’t Take That Away From Me” and more, backed by the PSO as led by visiting conductor Lawrence Loh. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., June 17, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., June 18. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $22-99. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

make a crown and claim the title of Prom King or Queen, with a photo in front of a green screen, too. Regular exhibits will also be open to attendees. MP 6-10 p.m. One Allegheny Ave., North Side. $12-17. 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

The late Irving Penn, who would’ve turned 100 on June 16, was among the past century’s most important photographers. A new touring retrospective, Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty, spans his seven-decade career, from his early street photography and surrealist influences, and memorable portraits of artists like Dalí and Miro, to his still lifes and the Vogue covers that epitomized his iconic fashion work. The exhibit, featuring 146 photos, even delves into Penn’s lesser-known studio portraits of tradesmen, and images of garbage found in the street. Today, the show, organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, opens a three-month run at The Frick Pittsburgh. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 10. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $6-10 (free for kids under 5 and active-duty military and their immediate families). 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

WORDS The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater hosts two days of readings and workshops as part of the Next Generation of Black Poets event. Courtesy of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at The University of Pittsburgh, the selected poets come from around the country. Aziza Barnes (pictured), of Oxford, Miss., won the 2015 Pamet River Prize for her full-length collection i be but i ain’t; other readers include


JADE EARTH EVENTS, REFINED CULTURE & CC’S LIFESTYLE PRESENTS....

Phenomenal

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FEATURING ARTIST JG THE JUGGANAUT COLUMBUS, OH

21 & OVER

FRIDAY

6.30.17 DOORS OPEN 3PM • SHOW 4PM-10PM

SHERWOOD EVENTS CENTER 400 SHERWOOD RD., PITTSBURGH, PA 15221

{PHOTO COURTESY OF {PHOTO COURTESY OF A.H. JERRIOD AVANT}

^ Sat., June 17: Next Generation of Black Poets

FASHION SHOWCASE BY REFINED CULTURE VENDORS | SWIMMING POOL, BRING SWIMWEAR DONATION $10 | BYOW | COLLEGE ID $5 | ARTIST SIGN UP CONTACT: JADEEARTHEVENTS@GMAIL.COM

Tyree Day and Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves. On Sunday, starting at noon, there will be a free workshop at the theater’s nearby Alloy Studios with poets Kamden Hilliard and Aricka Foreman. MP 6 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-363-4320 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

TICKETS/VENDORS INFO: 412-301-7300 JADEEARTHEVENTS@GMAIL.COM

sunday 06.18 CRAFTS Know something people don’t do much anymore? Aside from using pay phones? Whittling. But the time-honored craft of shaping wood with a small knife is a great way to make art while learning new hands-on skills and safety practices. Today, the Children’s Museum’s MAKESHOP offers an hour-long Whittling Workshop, tools and materials provided. It’s for anyone ages 8 and up, but children must be accompanied by adults. The workshop is free with museum admission, but sign up ahead of time because space is limited. BO 1 p.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $14-16 (free for kids under 2). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

monday 06.19 YOGA Yoga and beer turns out to be as good a pairing as peanut butter and jelly. A duo called {ART BY IRVING PENN. IMAGE COURTESY OF SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN The Beer Yogis — ART MUSEUM; COPYRIGHT THE IRVING PENN FOUNDATION} yoga experts Melissa ^ Sat., June 17: Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty Klimo-Major and Mikki Trowbridge — is touring the country from Cleveland to New Orleans. Tonight they stop at East End Brewing. Sign up for a 60-minute, guided yoga session, followed by some beers; the first round is free with registration. While folks of all experience levels are welcome, all participants must supply their own yoga mats. MP 6:30 p.m. 147 Julius St., Larimer. $25-30. www.thebeeryogis.com

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WE REALLY LIKED SOUTHERN TIER’S CRISPY PARMESAN CAULIFLOWER

HUGE FOOD {BY REBECCA ADDISON} This week, three Pittsburgh-area restaurants will get their 15 minutes of fame. Carnegie’s Bakn, Downtown’s Emporio and every Pittsburgher’s favorite sandwich spot, Primanti Bros., will be featured on the Food Network show Ginormous Food at 8 p.m. Fri., June 16. In the show, comedian Josh Denny travels across America sampling a variety of dishes with one thing in common: They’re huge. Earlier repasts have included a 14-pound bagel topped with smoked salmon; a stack of chicken tenders with a tower of four fried-cheese sandwiches; and a 5-foot pizza. At Emporio, Denny will try The Six Pack, a loaf of ciabatta bread filled with six large meatballs. Primanti’s will offer him an oversized version of the classic Primanti’s Pitts-Burger sandwich, usually consisting of a beef patty, tomatoes, lettuce, french fries and cole slaw, on white bread. And the chef at Bakn has created a new dish especially for the occasion. Inspired by the Bakn ’Cake Tacos (baconstuffed pancakes with cheese and eggs), chef Randy Tozzie created the Bakn Quake, a “taco” containing a pound of applewood-smoked bacon, a pound of peppered-bacon strips, 12 eggs and a pound of cheddar cheese. The taco shell is an 18-inch pancake made with another pound of bacon in the batter. The Carnegie restaurant will host a viewing party the night of the premiere that will include special prices and dishes just for the occasion.

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Beer-cheese-filled burger, with black-pepper bacon, garlic aioli, jerk pickles, arugula and ale-battered onion ring, and side of potato chips

NEW YORK STYLE {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

RADDISON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

335 East Main St., Carnegie. 412-275-3637 or www.eatbakn.com

the

FEED

It’s your annual ual reminder that you ou needn’t pay top dollar lar for fancy fruit popsicles. es. Buy a plastic popsicle cle mold, fill it up with quality ty fruit juice, and freeze. If inspired, add mushed-up up fruit, like strawberries, es, bananas or peaches to o the liquid. Nostalgic for childhood? dhood? Fill up the mold with super-sweet r-sweet fruit-flavored drink and enjoy njoy the summer like the kid you once were.

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W

HAT WITH the tech companies, the press accolades and the gentrification — for better or for worse — Pittsburgh should be able to shed its inferiority complex at last. Still, it made us sit up a little straighter when Southern Tier Brewing chose our fair city as the site of its first extramural location. The pride of Lakewood, N.Y., hard by Lake Chautauqua, Southern Tier distributes its product through 30 states. What does it say about Western Pennsylvania that we are, collectively, a particularly enthusiastic consumer? Well, that we get our own outpost of Southern Tier before anyone else, for starters. We’ll leave it to better beerologists than us to judge those brews (although we enjoyed what we tried). When it came to the food, the menu stood out from those at oth-

06.14/06.21.2017

er gastropubs through a deft combination of brevity (one page), comprehensiveness — everything from smoked garlic almonds to portabella fettuccine — and invention. While a few items were more or less perfunctory — you needn’t cross state lines to

SOUTHERN TIER BREWING COMPANY 316 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-301-2337 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-midnight PRICES: $6-15 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED find pretzel bites with dijonnaise — pretty much everything else demonstrated care and craft, whether the housemade kraut in

the reuben or the apple-sherry jus with the roasted chicken. The surroundings were a bit more bythe-book: Edison bulbs and barnwood (OK, barrel staves, a slight departure from the usual, but still firmly in the distressedwood category). A white-painted grid on the back wall seemed to have wandered in from a modernist restaurant, while a variety of seating situations — bar, high-top tables, communal tables and booths — kept the cavernous floor space interesting. Once settled in a booth, we got down to ordering. The nachos were heavily loaded and enticing, but we went with skillet fries topped with bacon, beer cheese, jalapeños and scallions. Simple but satisfactory — the fries formed a hearty base, the bacon was well-crisped, and the beer cheese was thick, creamy and slightly funky from the


hops. The jalapeño slices were not punishingly hot, but, along with the zingy scallions, punched all that salt, starch and cream up nicely. Is fried cauliflower the new roasted Brussels sprouts? Might be too soon to call, but we really liked Southern Tier’s crispy parmesan cauliflower. Each floret was surrounded by a halo of caramelized edges that were crisp, as promised, and emphasized the vegetable’s native nutty sweetness. The big parmesan flavor meant they were good on their own; garlic aioli was an addictive addition, bold but not harsh. The meat, smoked in house, in the pulled-pork sandwich came in chunks rather than shreds, the better to savor its slow-cooked tenderness, but we wished for more smokiness. Edge pieces that displayed some bark were tasty, but the center of the shoulder could just as well have come from an oven. There was a tangy vinegar sauce on offer, as well as brown-sugar barbecue; despite the name, the latter was not too cloying. Jerk pickles and a tangy slaw helped enliven the sandwich, served on a rich brioche bun. The same bun reappeared on the house burger, filled with an oozing center of beer cheese and topped with black-pepper bacon, more garlic aioli and jerk pickles, arugula, and ale-battered onion rings. It was delicious but a bit of a slippery mess to eat, which made getting the ideal bite with all of these flavors in it a challenge. The smoked-meatloaf entrée featured a sandwich in disguise. Not only were the slices of loaf served open-face, they were actually stacked atop a grilled-cheese sandwich. It’s a brilliant idea, but alas, the chef went overboard, piling on peppers, onions, pickles, provolone, mustard, barbecue and horseradish cream. The poor meatloaf — which, amid all this, was on the scanty side — was buried beneath these flavors, which cohered but didn’t quite combine, like a chorus singing competently in harmony without ever soaring. In different proportions, and perhaps with a lightly edited ingredient list, this could be a masterpiece. Churrasco hanger steak was much more straightforward and successful, helped by a tender piece of meat that was seared but not cooked much more. We thought we detected some sweetness, perhaps from a spice rub, but the primary flavoring was blue-cheese chimichurri butter. It was rich and flavorful, even if its dairy lushness needed more punch from the herbs. Standing out among the gastropubs is an increasingly tall order. Southern Tier does so with a concise, creative menu and food that’s worth eating no matter what your affinity for beer. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

SWEET AND SPICY BLACK-BEAN QUESADILLA

Destination

{BY ALEX GORDON} Growing up, I had some bizarre eating habits. I drank those little half-and-half cups straight. I took the cheese off pizza. I ate unskinned cucumbers whole without dressing. I had a mistrust of black beans so deep that I’d negotiate horrifically unfair deals with my brother to avoid washing dishes in which they’d been cooked. And I didn’t eat meat — not due to any particular moral backbone, but simply because I thought it was gross; morals came later. I’m still a modest meat-eater, but otherwise, my palate’s pretty wide these days. Part of the fun of being a little shithead when it comes to food is that there’s so much to explore when you’re finally ready to step out and try things. It’s been a wild ride, but I still feel bad for all those cheeseless pizzas and black beans that went uneaten. So here’s to making amends: a tasty, veggie quesadilla built on black beans and cheese.

Check us out @ frontporchgrille.com

MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

INGREDIENTS • 2 mid-sized sweet potatoes • 1-2 16-ounce cans, black beans • 1 16-ounce can, corn • tortillas • ½ red onion • 1 bell pepper, red • sriracha • balsamic glaze • olive oil • butter • pepper-jack cheese

OAXACAN CUISINE

FRIDAY, JUNE 16TH LIVE MUSIC

INSTRUCTIONS Boil water with salt in a big pot. Chop the taters into one-inch cubes, peeled if you prefer. Heat oil in small pan. Dice onion and pepper, then add to pan and cook on low heat. Boil potatoes until tender, then strain. Mash the potatoes with butter and salt. Drain and rinse the corn. Add black beans (also drained and rinsed), corn, pepper and onion to the mashed potatoes,, and mix thoroughly. Add sriracha to taste. Heat a lightly oiled grill pan. Place the tortilla on the grill pan and spread potato mash across one half; sprinkle with cheese, then fold the other half on top and smush lightly so it adheres. Cook at medium heat for two to three minutes, then flip and cook for another two. Remove from pan, drizzle balsamic glaze on top and let sit for a minute or two. Pairs well with hefeweizen or white Belgian beer.

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN RESTAURANT

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine

HAPPY HOUR

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Wednesday - Friday 5PM-7PM Free Hot Appetizers!

• Award Winner for Best Indian food 2000-2017 • The proud caterer for G20 summit - #1 choice for catering Indian cuisine. All events, weddings, anniversaries, baby showers • Lunch buffet 7 days a week • Dinner buffets Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

by chef/owner Usha Sethi since 1996.

WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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[ON THE ROCKS]

DRIVE TO DRINK Fill your summer with boozy weekend getaways {BY DREW CRANISKY} WITH SCHOOL letting out and temperatures climbing, summer is officially in full swing. And that means, it seems, that every conversation turns to summer plans. For those of us who have booked glamorous beach escapes or cabins by the lake, that’s all well and good. But for those who have exhausted our credit cards and vacation time, there’s not a whole lot to brag about. Not to worry. With a few bucks and a weekend to spare, you can find plenty of great places to sneak off to. Here are a few (booze-themed) getaways that are close, convenient and a whole lot of fun.

Columbus (about 3 hours from Pittsburgh) Columbus is home to one of my favorite bars on the planet. Curio is a cozy, welcoming cocktail bar tucked away on an unassuming street in the German Village neighborhood. From the wildly creative original cocktails to the perfect wood-fired pizza (ordered from sister restaurant Harvest), no trip to Columbus would be complete without a visit to Curio. That said, Columbus offers plenty of other options for the intrepid boozehound. The city is home to a number of acclaimed breweries, including Seventh Son, Hoof Hearted and Wolf’s Ridge. Check out Watershed, a craft distillery that now boasts a full kitchen and bar, or stop by one of the city’s many “barcades” for classic arcade games and cold pints.

Lancaster/ Harrisburg/Hershey (about 3.5 hours from Pittsburgh) There’s a lot more to this state than Philly

and Pittsburgh. Central Pennsylvania is home to plenty of great drinking destinations, along with lovely scenery and family-friendly attractions. Tröegs (located in Hershey) is a must-visit. The bright, airy brewery offers excellent food, guided tours and a rotating selection of breweryexclusive beers. And the surrounding area is thick with craft breweries both young and old, from Pizza Boy, in Enola, to Stoudts, in Adamstown. If you tire of beer (gasp!), stop by one of the distilleries or wineries sprinkled across the region. And when you need a break from boozing, explore central Pennsylvania’s rich culture and history. Be sure to swing by Lancaster’s Central Market, the oldest farmers’ market in the country.

The Finger Lakes (about 5 hours from Pittsburgh) The Finger Lakes region of New York has long been known for its world-class wines. Though closely associated with Riesling, Finger Lakes vineyards grow a wide array of grapes. From Dr. Konstantin Frank Winery, a historic winery that put the region on the map, to Bloomer Creek, a small, all-natural vineyard established in 1999, the Finger Lakes offer wines for all palates. Though you could easily spend a weekend in a happy wine haze, take a moment to enjoy the spectacular views and outdoor recreation of the region. And while wine is still king, breweries like Abandon Brewing and distilleries like Finger Lakes Distilling prove there’s more to the Lakes than grapes. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: LONG ISLAND ICED TEA

VS.

Blue Moon

Tequila Cowboy

5115 Butler St., Lawrenceville

380 North Shore Drive, North Side

DRINK: Strong Island Iced Tea INGREDIENTS: Gin, blanco tequila, triple sec, white rum, vodka, sours, Coca-Cola OUR TAKE: Blue Moon is known for its very strong Long Islands. The bartender told me that a good Long Island needs at least 15 vigorous shakes and should be frothy. My drink was slightly sweet and salty, with all the booze you could want. Like sweet tea with a huge kick.

DRINK: Blueberry Long Island INGREDIENTS: Gin, blanco tequila, triple sec, white rum, vodka, sours, blueberry mix OUR TAKE: If you love blueberry candy, then this is the drink for you. Sweet and tart, with almost no flavor from the many alcoholic components, it tastes a lot like a blueberry soda.

Learn more about Pittsburgh’s food scene on our podcasts Sound Bite and Five Minutes in Food History online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer La Cappuccina Garganega, Soave, Italy 2015 $11.50/glass This light, mineral white has soft notes of honeysuckle, accentuated by a concentrated aroma of fresh-cut cantaloupe on the nose. The minerality adds dimension and balances the light sweetness in the body of the wine. A glass that’s perfect for a warm summer night. RECOMMENDED BY CELINE ROBERTS

La Cappuccina Garganega is available at Butterjoint, in Oakland.

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EVEN AS A POPCORN FILM, THE MUMMY IS RATHER DULL AND A TONAL MESS

TROUBLED {BY AL HOFF} Writer-director Michael O’Shea’s debut film, The Transfiguration, is a comingof-age horror story set in New York City. Its focus is teenage Milo (Eric Ruffin), who lives with his seemingly depressed older brother, and who is obsessed with vampires. Enough that Milo is attacking people and drinking their blood. The neighborhood toughs call him “freak,” and there are indications that Milo has serious emotional problems. But he finds a potential friend in Sophie (Chloe Levine), another troubled teen who moves into his building. She’s even open to his interest in vampirism, though they naturally argue about the merits of Twilight.

Milo (Eric Ruffin) is an odd sort.

CP APPROVED

O’Shea’s film is a slow burn, punctuated by some shocking violence. And Ruffin and Levine sell their characters well, making these somewhat difficult-to-like or -understand characters compelling and even sympathetic. It’s Milo himself who gives two useful clues how to process this film, when he tells Sophie that his two favorite vampire films are the 2008 Swedish thriller Let the Right One In and Martin, George Romero’s lesser-known 1978 movie shot in Braddock. Let the Right One In is as much about alienated adolescents living in a high rise who find common ground in the social isolation as it is about blood-sucking. And Transfiguration feels like a direct descendent of Martin, both in its set-up (broody sensitive teenage boy living with an older male relative in rundown circumstances) and execution, from the unnerving 1970s-style electronic score to the central conceit that what matters most is that the protagonist believes he is a vampire, whether he actually is or not. Starts Fri., June 16. Hollywood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

All Eyez on Me Benny Boom directs this bio-pic about Tupac Shakur; Demetrius Shipp Jr. portrays the late rapper. Starts Fri., June 16

Mummy’s day out: Sofia Boutella

WRAP IT UP {BY AL HOFF}

I

F YOU’RE a movie-producing entity

currently without a “universe” (a.k.a. ever-regenerating franchise), woe unto you. So Universal has dusted off its classic 1930s movie monsters — Frankenstein, Dracula, Mr. Hyde, et al. — and set up “Dark Universe” to explore their exploits. First out of the spooky shadows is Alex Kurtzman’s The Mummy, which begins where any modern story about ancient Egypt does — in 12th-century England. But rest assured, this gets explained through one of many data dumps that bog down the action and actually end up confusing things. (Stuff we already know: A mummy is an ancient linen-wrapped dead Egyptian who, after his tomb is disturbed, hurts people until stopped.) The twist is that this year’s mummy is a slinky Egyptian princess (Sofia Boutella) who is killed during some palace intrigue, and inexplicably entombed (to presumed staggering effort and expense) in not-nearby Iraq. Said tomb, complete with a lake of mercury (!), is uncovered when a couple of present-day douchebag looters — Nick

Morton (Tom Cruise) and sidekick (Jake Johnson) — come under fire and call in a U.S. airstrike. (We have a bomb, available at the call of antiquity thieves, which blasts a giant hole while leaving the ancient artworks intact. Good to know.)

THE MUMMY DIRECTED BY: Alex Kurtzman STARRING: Tom Cruise, Sofia Boutella, Annabelle Wallis, Russell Crowe In 3-D, in select theaters

The dudes, plus a slinky archeologist (Annabelle Wallis) who suddenly materializes, descend into the tomb, where they retrieve the mummy; they fly it back to England and set a bunch of shit into motion. Chiefly, Morton gets mind-melded with the mummy, who appears moving pantherlike across sand dunes, while white gauzy fabric blows around her (a.k.a. high-end perfume ad). “You have set me free,” she whispers in ancient Egyptian. In London, Morton also makes a visit to the

enormous underground Chamber of WTF, presided over by Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde, played by Russell Crowe, who has clearly become stout eating scenery. Meanwhile, Miss Mummy is sucking the souls out of unlucky bystanders, which has the effect of filling out what is a skincolored leotard with hanging strips of fabric. It is very close to a “sexy mummy” outfit from a Halloween superstore. But I’m here for the makeup: Girl, those kohlrimmed, super-smoky eyes! Even as a popcorn film, The Mummy is rather dull and a tonal mess, shifting from buddy comedy to CGI-actioner to chickrescue flick to the rare but still very real Tom Cruise bomb. It “wraps up” with an unearned act of self-sacrifice, and a completely stupid set-up for many movies to come. It is a brutal realization that The Mummy is just an incoherent 110-minute preview for unasked-for “Dark Universe” films. “Sometimes it takes a monster to defeat a monster,” intones Dr. Jekyll. And sometimes it takes an epically bad movie to stop other bad movies. Here’s hoping! A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Overlook); and Thu., June 22 (Brookline). Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, Wed., June 21 (Schenley: Flagstaff Hill). Films begin at dusk. Free. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net.

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

GUN HILL ROAD. This Bronx-set drama tracks two concurrent journeys: the coming-of-age of transsexual teen-ager Michael, a.k.a. Vanessa, and the struggle of his tough-guy father (Esai Morales), just released from jail, to accept Vanessa’s identity. It’s a sympathetic portrayal that doesn’t offer pat solutions. 7 p.m. Wed., June 14. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. www.reelq.org. Free

NEW AFTER THE STORM. In this new lowkey drama from Hirokazu Koreeda (Like Father, Like Son), a fractured Japanese family spends some time together (partly due to a rainstorm) and perhaps learns some things about themselves, each other and how to get along better. There’s the elderly granny, who doesn’t want to die with grievances unresolved; her feckless son (Hiroshi Abe), who gambles away his meager salary rather than provide child support; the aggrieved ex-wife; and the boy, caught between the squabbling parents. It’s a gentle tale, with not much plot, that relies on our relating to these common domestic problems and our belief that people can change (if just a bit) and things can get better. Kirin Kiki as the grandmother is quite the scene-stealer, and her character’s sly manipulations, scarred-over heartbreaks and amusing frugality are both familiar and poignant. It’s a quiet piece, but resonant in its humanity and hope. In Japanese, with subtitles. Starts Fri., June 16. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

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FROM THIS DAY FORWARD. Sharon Shattuck’s 2015 documentary recounts her own family’s journey, beginning with her dad transitioning to female while Sharon was in middle school through her parents’ decision to remain together. 6:30 p.m. Thu., June 15. Eddy Theater, Chatham University campus, Shadyside. www.justfilmspgh.org. Free

After the Storm

A WILL FOR THE WOODS. Amy Browne’s 2014 documentary looks at the practice of “green burial” through the preparations of musician, folk dancer and psychiatrist Clark Wang, who is determined to have his death and burial benefit the earth. A postscreening discussion with feature Pete McQuillin and John Davis, of Penn Forest Natural Burial Park. The film continues a series of environmental films. 7 p.m. Fri., June 16. Phipps Conservatory, 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free with regular admission. phipps. conservatory.org

BEATRIZ AT DINNER. Salma Hayek, John Lithgow and Connie Britton star in Miguel Arteta’s comedy, penned by Mike White, about a dinner party. Starts Fri., June 16 THE BOOK OF HENRY. Colin Trevorrow’s drama takes place in a small town where things are not what they seem, and 11-year-old Henry (Jacob Tremblay) has a plan. Starts Fri., June 16 CARS 3. Lightning McQueen is still racing in this ongoing digitally animated story about talking cars; Brian Fee directs. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., June 16 47 METERS DOWN. Two sisters are trapped underwater in a shark cage, while the oxygen runs out and deadly fish circle closer. Johannes Roberts directs this thriller. Starts Fri., June 16 I, DANIEL BLAKE. The Kafkaesque bureaucracy of the welfare state complicates life for two well-intended but struggling working-class folk in Ken Loach’s new film (penned by his frequent collaborator Paul Lafferty). Recovering from a heart attack, carpenter Daniel (Dave Johns) is caught between medical disability and employment. There are the endless rounds on telephone hold; trips to the job center, where he’s told to come back with a résumé; a round at the public library trying to learn how to use a computer. Partly to stay busy, he takes a young single mother, Katie (Hayley Squires), under his wing. In a society — both in the U.K. and the U.S. — that seems ever more bureaucratic and tech-driven (customer service is a robot voice), while simultaneously safety nets fray, Loach’s film is exquisitely on point. It’s a heartbreaking, heartwarming and infuriating work, though not without some humor. There’s no pat solution here, but Daniel has one Pyrrhic victory worth a cheer. Starts Fri., June 16. Melwood (AH)

CP

MY COUSIN RACHEL. Philip (Sam Claflin), due to inherit a country estate in 19th-century England from his recently deceased guardian, grows convinced that the man’s widow, his cousin Rachel, might have killed him. But he is nonetheless surprised and then entranced when Rachel (Rachel Weisz) arrives for a visit. Thus begins a mostly polite round of head games as Philip and Rachel flirt and spar; as

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LA PROMESSE. This 1996 drama from Belgian directors Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne portrays a family that falls apart when the teenage son can no longer tolerate the abuses his father inflicts on undocumented immigrant laborers. In French and Romanian, with subtitles. Fri., June 16, through Sun., June 18. Harris

BACK TO THE FUTURE. Through the use of a time machine, young ’80s dude Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) finds himself back in the 1950s, where he’s tasked with getting his parents to hook up, in Robert Zemeckis’ 1985 comedy. Fri., June 16, through Thu., June 22. Row House Cinema

I, Daniel Blake

Paris Can Wait

recounted from Philip’s point of view, we, like him, never have a clear idea of the enigmatic Rachel’s intentions. Roger Michell’s film is adapted from Daphne Du Maurier’s novel, and while it has some broody people and quiet tension, it never really achieves the more entertaining heights of a nervy gothic thriller. It has good actors, truly lovely Cornwall landscapes and the appeal of a genteel parlor drama, but alas, it is a bit too dull and ultimately unknowable for its own good. (AH)

ROUGH NIGHT. Lucia Aniello directs this raunchy comedy about a bachelorette party that goes bad when the hired male stripper dies. Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell and Ilana Glazer stars. Starts Fri., June 16

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. In Steven Spielberg’s 1981 film, our square-jawed hero, archeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), tackles everything from giant boulders to snakes and conniving Nazis. June 16-20 and June 22. Row House Cinema

WAKEFIELD. Coming home late from his lawyer job in the city, Howard Wakefield — married, father to twin teen girls — impulsively decides to spend the night in the storage room above the garage of his suburban home. Then, Howard (Bryan Cranston) opts to stay there, without communicating his presence to anyone. He watches through the window as his family freaks out over his absence, and then, as the days roll by, how they go on without him. Despite having no mod cons, Howard revels in his newfound freedom, enjoying the primal nature of having to scavenge for survival. Beyond a few flashbacks, Wakefield is a one-man vehicle for Cranston, who is fantastic, cycling through the variety of emotions that comprise Howard’s breakdown and disappearance from his own life. His work holds Robin Swicord’s film together, though it’s hard to shake the nagging thought that the world may not need another exploration of a privileged white middle-aged male in crisis. Starts Fri., June 16. Manor (AH)

THE PRINCESS BRIDE. Rob Reiner’s 1987 film is that rare bird — a film to delight children and adults alike, an upbeat fairy tale with romance, comedy, swordplay and deliciously quotable lines. June 16-19 and June 21-22. Row House Cinema

PARIS CAN WAIT. After her movie-producer husband (Alec Baldwin) leaves for Budapest, Anne (Diane Lane) opts to take a car journey from Cannes to Paris in the company of his business associate, Jacques (Arnaud Viard). A relatively short drive turns into a leisurely two-day sojourn as Jacques — a committed sensualist — insists on stopping at top-rated bistros, Roman ruins and rose gardens, and throwing impromptu picnics. (Many bottles of fine wine are enjoyed.) The journey — and the film — gets off on an awkward foot; the set-up seems forced. But by the midway point, the film, like Jacques and Anne, has settled into a comfortable groove, and the time spent in this company grows more enjoyable. There is much food porn, a light Euro-jazz score, plenty of sunny scenery and, in time, a couple of potentially life-changing (albeit low-key) realizations. The film is the debut feature of writer-director Eleanor Coppola, the 80-year-old wife of Francis Ford Coppola, who likely knows a thing or two about being the wife of a movie man, good wine and the nice parts of France. It’s not breaking any new ground, and the characterization are thin and border on stereotypical, but hey, it’s a nice drive if you can afford it. Starts Fri., June 16. Manor, Tull Family Theater (AH)

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REPERTORY DOLLAR BANK CINEMA IN THE PARK. Ghostbusters, Wed., June 14 (Schenley: Flagstaff Hill) and Sat., June 17 (Riverview Park). Sing, Thu., June 15 (Brookline); Fri., June 16 (Arsenal); and Sat., June 17 (Grandview). The LEGO Batman Movie, Sun., June 18 (Schenley Plaza); Tue., June 20 (West End/Elliott

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THE SHINING. Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel drops some of the supernatural elements in favor of omnipresent dread and a meditation about the collapsing family unit, but it’s still a freaky, hair-raising ride. With Jack Nicholson. Fri., June 16, through Wed., June 21. Row House Cinema MICHELANGELO: LOVE AND DEATH. David Bickerstaff directs this new documentary about the Renaissance artist. Both his life and his artwork are explored. 2 and 4 p.m. Sat., June 17; and 2 p.m. Sun., June 18. Hollywood FREEDOM TO MARRY. Eddie Rosenstein’s recent documentary charts the decades-long fight to win marriage rights for gay couples, culminating in 2015’s landmark Supreme Court decision that guaranteed same-sex marriage. The film features two of the keep-it-steady lawyers — Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom to Marry, and Mary Bonauto, an attorney with GLAD — who help craft and deliver the winning argument. Wolfson, a native of Pittsburgh, will attend the screening and lead a Q&A. 2 p.m. Sun., June 18. SouthSide Works. $10

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HISTORY LESSONS

THE PENS ARE SET UP TO DOMINATE FOR YEARS TO COME.

This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} A look back at events that you’ve either forgotten about or never heard of in the first place. JUNE 16, 2012 The short-lived Pittsburgh Power of the Arena Football League becomes the first team in 15 seasons to complete a two-point dropkick. It would be the highlight of the franchise’s short existence.

DRIVING

JUNE 17, 1962 One of the greatest sports rivalries of all time begins when Jack Nicklaus defeats Arnold Palmer at the U.S. Open at the Oakmont Country Club. After tying at the end of the final round, Nicklaus beat Latrobe’s Palmer by three strokes to capture his first of many PGA victories.

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

F Max Carey

JUNE 17, 2009 During a game in Minnesota, rookie slugger Andrew McCutchen hits his first home run. And Pirates Adam and Andy LaRoche became the first brothers to homer in the same game in 71 years.

REIGN

JUNE 19, 1946 “The Pittsburgh Kid,” Billy Conn, returned from World War II, gets a rematch with heavyweight boxing champ Joe Louis at Yankee Stadium. It is the first boxing match to be shown on TV. Louis knocks out Conn in the eighth round. JUNE 19, 1984 The fortunes of the Pittsburgh Penguins are set for years to come when the team signs Mario Lemieux to his first contract. JUNE 20, 1925 Pirates center fielder Max Carey becomes the first switch-hitter ever to hit for the cycle. JUNE 21, 1961 Former Pirates infielder Gene Baker becomes the first black manager of any Major League-affiliated team when the Pirates name him manager of the Batavia Pirates farm team.

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Back-to-back winners: This week’s cover shows Sidney Crosby holding up the cup during Sunday’s Stanley Cup win in Nashville; pictured here is Sidney Crosby holding up the cup during the 2016 Stanley Cup Victory Parade.

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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OR A HOCKEY fan in a hockey city,

the sport seems bigger than all others. In some cities, they feel the same way about the NBA as Pittsburgh fans feel about the NHL. While the sport is popular across the country, in a hockey city it can feel just as big as the NFL, MLB and the NBA. And that sort of reaction is not uncommon. In places like Alabama and North Carolina, fans probably feel like NASCAR is bigger than those other four sports combined. When you talk about the greatest franchises in sports history, people tend to skew their picks toward the sport they like. There are some franchises, however, that cross all spectrums. These are teams that at some point were so good and so accomplished that they breached the sometimes-closed minds of fans of other sports. With their fifth Stanley Cup win on June 11, I think the Pittsburgh Penguins reached that level. Many will argue, as sports fans are wont to do, that the Penguins do not belong in the same conversation as teams like the Steelers, the Cowboys, the Yankees, the Bulls, the Lakers, and Dale Earnhardt and crew. But after this victory, I find it hard to keep the Pens out of the conversation. The Penguins are the first hockey team to win back-to-back championships since 1998. This is their third cup in eight years. Since 1991, they’ve won five cups. Let’s compare those numbers with other teams considered to be the best across all sports.


{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Pens fans cheering on the team during 2016’s Stanley Cup victory parade

Between 1974 and 1980, the Steelers beyond regional and local notoriety. Not only do the Pens have a solid won four Super Bowls. The New England Patriots have won five Super Bowls, in- record of winning championships and cluding three in four years, since 2002. turning out MVPs, they also have the Of the Lakers’ 16 NBA championships, good fortune to be from Pittsburgh — they won five between 1949 and 1954; the City of Champions. Certainly, they five in the 1980s, and five between 2000- have added to that legacy by winning 2010. The Boston Celtics won 11 cham- titles, but their run in the past decade pionships in 13 seasons during the Red cements their legacy in sports history, Auerbach/Bill Russell era. The Penguins and with fans. The Pens’ fan base is rabid. And it haven’t won as many championships overall as teams like the Lakers, Bulls doesn’t rely on gimmicks like the Nashand Yankees, but their performance ville Predators’ horrible musical performances at intermission, and the flying since 1991, and specifically since 1989, catfish. Let’s be honest — no team is just as noteworthy. with fans who shove catfish Adding to the résumé is 2017 down their pants deserves to the fact that this isn’t even win a Stanley Cup. VICTORY close to the end of the The Penguins also have PARADE Penguins’ run. Right now, TO.S PHO personnel who have become the Pens are set up to domiw at ww aper household names: Sidney p nate for years to come. I pghcitym .co Crosby, Mario Lemieux, Evgeni know we all said that in 2009, Malkin, Marc-Andre Fleury, after that year’s cup win. But Tom Barrasso, Ron Francis and even in those years when the Penguins couldn’t close the deal, they played even announcer Mike Lange. In fact, pretty good hockey. Now you have head if you ask any hockey fan what team coach Mike Sullivan, who has won Stan- Jaromir Jagr played for, she will tell you ley Cups in each of his first two seasons, the Pittsburgh Penguins before telling and a roster of key players returning. In you the names of the 614 other teams he addition to Sidney Crosby and Evgeni skated for over the years. Every sport has teams that fans in Malkin, the Pens will also return Patric Hornqvist, Phil Kessel, Matt Murray and other parts of the country latch onto. Kris Letang. Other core players like Jake Teams like the Yankees, the Cowboys and Guentzel, Tom Kuhnhackl, Bryan Rust, the Bulls have fans everywhere because Scott Wilson and Carter Rowney are also of the outstanding accomplishments they’ve managed to accrue. Much the coming back. Now if you’re a fan in Philadelphia, way the Cowboys have become “AmerWashington, D.C., or Nashville and ica’s Team” — at least that’s what their you’ve made it this far, I’m sure you’re marketers want you to believe — I think ready to tell me to kiss your ass. But be- the Pittsburgh Penguins are becoming yond the championships, the Penguins America’s hockey team. Just another have other intangibles that elevate them title to cement this team’s legacy.

CHEERLEADERS PITTSBURGH 3100 LIBERTY AVENUE PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-281-3110

CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

GOOD NEWS BEARS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} IF IT BOTHERS you to spend a bunch of money on a major-league game just to see athletes with seven- or eight-digit salaries not run out a ground ball, pure, oldfashioned baseball exists just 80 minutes upstream on the Monongahela River. In Morgantown, the West Virginia Black Bears hustle on every play. While majorleaguers bank money like CEOs of huge corporations, these guys get paid worse than hospital volunteers. It’s short-season singleA baseball, a collection of high school- and college-aged aspirants who have to hustle if they ever want to play for anyone other than the West Virginia Black Bears. Maybe they aren’t as polished or proficient as the guys who travel by plane, but in Pittsburgh, we endured 20 years of subpar baseball. How bad can they be? When a player is drafted into the Pirates organization, there is a seven-step process to PNC Park. First, it’s off to Bristol, Va., to play in the Appalachian League. Players live with residents of the town right on the Virginia/Tennessee border in the place that claims it invented country music.

{LOGO COURTESY OF THE WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEARS}

Morgantown is the second step. If a player advances from Morgantown (as 40 players already have in two seasons), the next step is a move across the Mountain State to the big-city lights of Charleston to play for the Power. Step four is a trip to Florida, the land of sunshine, beaches and odd, toothless criminals. The Bradenton Marauders are the advanced A affiliate. After that, it’s a trip to AA ball in Altoona, the land of Sheetz and Mallow Cups. Once the organization deems you too good to continue as a Curve, Indianapolis is step six before

a player makes it to The Show. Dovydas Neverauskus recently became the first Black Bear to make it. He is also the first Lithuanian player, so he’ll never have to buy a drink again in either Morgantown or Vilnius, Lithuania. So he’s got that going for him. There’s only been one player from Morgantown to make it to the bigs, because this is only the third year of the team’s existence. But the Baby Pirates won the New York-Penn League Championship in their inaugural 2015 season. Yes, that means they’ve already won more baseball championships in two years than Cleveland’s baseball team has in 68. The Black Bears dispatched their Pinckney Division rival, the Philadelphia Phillies-affiliated Williamsport Crosscutters, in the first round. They embarrassed a team that plays in a town where Little League baseball is a bigger deal than the Crosscutters. The Black Bears defeated the Staten Island Yankees right in their ferryloving backyard to bring the NYPL title to Morgantown. Jamestown, N.Y., hometown of five-time Emmy winner Lucille Ball, has a statue honoring the television legend. In 2014, Jamestown lost its beloved Jammers when the team moved to a town with a statue of five-time Emmy-winner Don Knotts. That’s right, Morgantown is responsible for bringing Barney Fife from The Andy Griffith Show and Mr. Furley from Three’s Company to life. But despite that, after years of Backyard Brawls and tough, physical Big East Basketball, Pittsburgh fans may still find it hard to embrace a team with WVU logos everywhere. Maybe it’s weird being on the same side as Bob “Huggy Bear” Huggins, but we have to keep in mind that the Black Bears are part of the Pirate family. The

Bears share the 2,500-seat Monongalia Stadium with the Mountaineer baseball team. It’s shockingly refreshing to see any venue not named after a bank, energy company or fast-food joint. Either nobody wants to sponsor the team or they have this thing called integrity. We can also get behind former Pirates closer Joel “The Hammer” Hanrahan. He of 100 major-league saves is starting his first season as an assistant pitching coach for the Black Bears. Wyatt Toregas, who had a cup of coffee in the majors (four at bats with the Bucs in 2011), has had more success as a coach. Toregas is the first and only manager of the team, and he’s already put a ring on it. The Black Bears technically play in Granville just about 10 minutes from Morgantown. The season runs from mid June to early September. There are 14 teams in the New York-Penn League, which has been around since 1939. Teams from Maryland, Ohio, Vermont, Connecticut, Massachusetts and West Virginia compete, as well as teams that actually play in the states listed in the league’s name. The best thing about minor-league games is that all the seats are you-know-what. Fans can sit on the grassy hillside of the outfield, concertstyle, for only $8.50. If roughing it is not your style, seats are available for $10.50. If you are super-ultra-fancy, you can upgrade those nosebleed seats and sit with the elite for just two more dollars. Mascots — Mo, Copper, Greene Turtle and Pepperoni Rolls — will entertain the kids. Firework nights happen almost every six games. June 19 is opening day, as the hated Mahoning Valley Scrappers come to town. In early July, the Williamsport Crosscutters return to seek revenge on the Black Bears. Then all the attitude of New York swaggers into town as the Staten Island Yankees and Brooklyn Cyclones come into Morgantown thinking they are better than you. Morgantown has the Personal Rapid Transit cars that take fans to the game while WVU is in session. The small automated vehicles are technology from 1975, but no other town has anything like it. Morgantown was chosen as an experiment for mass transit, but it never really caught on. The cars still run 42 years later, despite having control boards that look like something out of old NASA footage. Try the unique transportation, eat pepperoni rolls, pay homage to Don Knotts and watch future major-leaguers. Not a bad way to spend a summer road trip.

THERE IS A SEVEN-STEP PROCESS TO PNC PARK.

MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN. F O L L OW H I M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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HALFBACKS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

Tuesday, June 26, 2017 Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission (PHRC) Monthly Meeting Public Session: 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm. (Public is welcome to attend at this time.) Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh at Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Avenue, Pittsburgh 15208

ACROSS

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

1. Draweropening button 7. Makes a decision 11. Baby food 14. Prime company 15. Fanciful notion 16. College e-mail ender 17. All-Poitier, all the time station? 19. Solder component 20. Learn all of European history in an evening, say 21. Dog who plays Martin on “Downward Dog” 22. ^ 24. Changing country singer Rucker’s opinion? 28. No-win situation? 29. Amongst 30. Stoned Depardieu? 36. “My Heart Will Go On” singer 39. Poem on a Grecian urn 40. Galaxy’s brain: Abbr. 41. “Twin Peaks” channel: Abbr. 42. Hit the gym, say 44. TV program that’s not yet visible? 48. Meat inspector’s letters 50. Approving vote 51. Folks who are more lenient? 57. Wedding guest, likely

SOFTWARE ENGINEER

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on July 11, 2017, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for the following:

Uber Technologies, Inc. has multiple positions open in Pittsburgh, PA for the following: Software Engineer (Ref#A6QQZR) Dsgn/archtct, dev &/or test SW apps using Uber’s tech stack. Refer to Ref# & mail resume to Uber Technologies, Inc, Attn: S. Tateno, 685 Market St, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94105.

Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Cooling Tower Replacement Mechanical Prime Project Manual and Drawings are available for purchase on June 6, 2017 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

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58. Audi about face 59. Table land 62. “Who’da thunk it?” 63. Wayne Manor butler gasps for air? 67. Apple Music machine 68. Homeowner’s transaction, briefly 69. Greatly enjoys 70. ___-J (band with the 2017 album “Relaxer”) 71. Enc. with a forever on it 72. Acropolis’s home

DOWN 1. Meth lab raider 2. Boxer Figueroa 3. Mubarak’s predecessor 4. Horizon arc measurement 5. Sadiq Khan’s head 6. New Haven’s borders? 7. Back in the day 8. Herbal Essence’s owner, briefly 9. Italian prime 10. Overhead stadium shooter 11. Cultured container 12. “Until next time” 13. Passes on, as a question 18. Kamoze of reggae 23. Parched and then some 25. Oil facility 26. Wedding

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announcement word 27. Family member who stereotypically builds the IKEA furniture (at least in my family) 30. Smoking 31. “What people think ___” (meme) 32. Kneel in church 33. Cage The Elephant’s label 34. Likely (to) 35. Feel badly about 37. “Lookie here!” 38. “Why are you stalling?” 43. Is, in Ixtapa 44. Dancerchoreographer Lubovitch

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45. “Bill ___ Saves the World” 46. Neon’s atomic number 47. Half of a college entrance exam 49. Big name in scotch 51. Frat letter 52. “Inside the NBA” anaylst 53. Smokes 54. Stick house 55. Healthy bread selection 56. Feel in one’s bones 60. Floor 61. Biting reptiles 64. Cow country eatery? 65. 1-Down employer 66. Gentle touch {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.14-06.21

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Actress Marisa Berenson offers a line of anti-aging products that contain an elixir made from the seeds of a desert fruit known as prickly pear. The manufacturing process isn’t easy. To produce a quart of the potion requires 2,000 pounds of seeds. I see you as having a metaphorically similar challenge in the coming weeks, Gemini. To create a small amount of the precious stuff you want, I’m guessing you’ll have to gather a ton of raw materials. And there may be a desert-like phenomena to deal with, as well.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): There are three kinds of habits: good, bad and neutral. Neutral habits are neither good nor bad but use up psychic energy that might be better directed into cultivating good habits. Here are some examples: a good habit is when you’re disciplined about eating healthy food; a bad habit is watching violent TV shows before going to bed, thereby disturbing your sleep; a neutral habit might be doing Sudoku puzzles. My challenge to you, Cancerian, is to dissolve one bad habit and one neutral habit by replacing them with two new good habits. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, cosmic forces will be on your side as you make this effort.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Dr. Astrology: Good fortune has been visiting me a lot lately. Many cool opportunities have come my way. Life is consistently interesting. I’ve also made two unwise moves that fortunately didn’t bring bad results. Things often work out better for me than I imagined they would! I’m

grateful every day, but I feel like I should somehow show even more appreciation. Any ideas? — Lucky Leo.” Dear Lucky: The smartest response to the abundance you have enjoyed is to boost your generosity. Give out blessings. Dispense praise. Help people access their potentials. Intensify your efforts to share your wealth.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Years ago, a fan of my work named Paul emailed to ask me if I wanted to get together with him and his friend when I visited New York. “Maybe you know her?” he wrote. “She’s the artist Cindy Sherman.” Back then I had never heard of Cindy. But since Paul was smart and funny, I agreed to meet. The three of us convened in an elegant tea room for a boisterous conversation. A week later, when I was back home and mentioned the event to a colleague, her eyes got big and she shrieked, “You had tea with THE Cindy Sherman.” She then educated me on how successful and influential Cindy’s photography has been. I predict you will soon have a comparable experience, Virgo: in-

get your yoga on!

advertent contact with an intriguing presence. Hopefully, because I’ve given you a heads up, you’ll recognize what’s happening as it occurs, and take full advantage.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’ll never get access to the treasure that’s buried out under the cherry tree next to the ruined barn if you stay in your command center and keep staring at the map instead of venturing out to the barn. Likewise, a symbol of truth may be helpful in experiencing deeper meaning, but it’s not the same as communing with the raw truth, and may even become a distraction from it. Let’s consider one further variation on the theme: The pictures in your mind’s eye may or may not have any connection with the world outside your brain. It’s especially important that you monitor their accuracy in the coming days.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Maybe it wasn’t such a good idea to go gallivanting so heedlessly into the labyrinth. Or maybe it was. Who knows? It’s still too early to assess the value of your experiences in that maddening but fascinating tangle. You may not yet be fully able to distinguish the smoke and mirrors from the useful revelations. Which of the riddles you’ve gathered will ultimately bring frustration and which will lead you to wisdom? Here’s one thing I do know for sure: If you want to exit the labyrinth, an opportunity will soon appear.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Over the years I’ve read numerous news reports about people who have engaged in intimate relations with clunky inanimate objects. One had sex with a bicycle. Another seduced a sidewalk, and a third tried to make sweet love to a picnic table. I hope you won’t join their ranks in the coming weeks. Your longing is likely to be extra intense, innovative and even exotic, but I trust you will confine its expression to unions with adult human beings who know what they’re getting into and who have consented to play. Here’s an old English word you might want to add to your vocabulary: “blissom.” It means “to bleat with sexual desire.”

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your life in the coming days should be low on lightweight diversions and high in top-quality content. Does that sound like fun? I hope so. I’d love to see you enjoy the hell out of yourself as you cut the fluff and focus on the pith … as you efficiently get to the hype-free heart of every matter and refuse to tolerate waffling or stalling. So strip away the glossy excesses, my dear Capricorn. Skip a few steps if that doesn’t cause any envy. Expose the pretty lies, but then just work around them; don’t get bogged down in indulging in negative emotions about them.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Inventor, architect and author Buckminster Fuller lived to the age of 87. For 63 of those years, he kept a detailed scrapbook diary that documented every day of his life. It included his reflections, correspondence, drawings, newspaper clippings, grocery bills and much other evidence of his unique story. I would love to see you express yourself with that much disciplined ferocity during the next two weeks. According to my astrological analysis, you’re in a phase when you have maximum power to create your life with vigorous ingenuity and to show everyone exactly who you are.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You have a cosmic license to enjoy almost too much sensual pleasure. In addition, you should feel free to do more of what you love to do than you normally allow yourself. Be unapologetic about surrounding yourself with flatterers and worshipers. Be sumptuously lazy. Ask others to pick up the slack for you. Got all that? It’s just the first part of your oracle. Here’s the rest: You have a cosmic license to explore the kind of spiritual growth that’s possible when you feel happy and fulfilled. As you go through each day, expect life to bring you exactly what you need to uplift you. Assume that the best service you can offer your fellow humans is to be relaxed and content.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You have to admit that salt looks like sugar and sugar resembles salt. This isn’t usually a major problem, though. Mistakenly sprinkling sugar on your food when you thought you were adding salt won’t hurt you, nor will putting salt in your coffee when you assumed you were using sugar. But errors like these are inconvenient, and they can wreck a meal. You may want to apply this lesson as a metaphor in the coming days, Aries. Be alert for things that outwardly seem to be alike but actually have different tastes and effects.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s a possible plan for the next 10 days: Program your smartphone to sound an alarm once every hour during the entire time you’re awake. Each time the bell or buzzer goes off, you will vividly remember your life’s main purpose. You will ask yourself whether or not the activity you’re engaged in at that specific moment is somehow serving your life’s main purpose. If it is, literally pat yourself on the back and say to yourself, “Good job!” If it’s not, say the following words: “I am resolved to get into closer alignment with my soul’s code — the blueprint of my destiny.” Do a homemade ritual in which you vow to attract more blessings into your life. Report results at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m almost 30 and I’m a virgin. I’m an overweight, straight-ish guy (I’m attracted to a few men, but those cases are exceedingly rare). I’ve also gone through an absolute hell life thus far, losing a testicle to cancer and having an abusive father who threatened a teenage me into celibacy by invoking the phrase “penile lobotomy” should I have sex with any girlfriends. I’ve barely dated in 10 years, and while I’m free from my father and the aforementioned mortal dick terror, I’m also INCREDIBLY scared about putting myself out there. I’m disabled, I’m not conventionally attractive by most standards, my whole zone down there is scarred up from surgeries, and, to top it all off, I’m on the small side. The last time I had the opportunity for sex, I went for it, but I was so terrified that I couldn’t keep it up. The woman I was with said something to the effect of “Well, I can’t do anything with that, now can I?” after which I asked her to leave because, seriously, that’s kind of an asshole thing to say. I’m notionally on Tinder and Bumble, but I really don’t know what I’m doing — and more often than not, I feel like the right thing for any theoretical partners would be for me to just stay in hiding and not inflict my grotesque presence on them. I’m scared of another humiliation, as that’s most definitely not my kink, and I’m at an age where my complete lack of experience and physical deformity are (I would have to imagine) major issues for anyone I might encounter. I truly want romance, sexuality and companionship in my life. I haven’t fought through poverty, disability, physical and emotional abuse, and my genitalia trying to kill me, to stay entombed in my office alone and unloved. I just do not know where to even begin.

you’ll feel less isolated and less alone. Even if you never meet someone (I’m not sugarcoating things — some people don’t), going places and doing things means you’ll have a rich and full and active life regardless. You’re not alone. OK, you’re alone — but you’re not alone, alone. Meaning, there are women (and men) out there who feel just as paralyzed as you do — because they’re 30-yearold-or-older virgins, because they’re not conventionally attractive, because their first/only sexual experiences were just as humiliating, because they had traumatic childhoods and bear emotional scars. You want a woman to come into your life who is patient and accepting and kind and willing to look past your disability and your inexperience and your difficult history. Be patient, accepting, kind and similarly willing. Good luck, TVWBFAWLJNITGW. We’re rooting for you. I’m a straight woman, and I’ve been dating my boyfriend for about eight months. We have a wonderful relationship and amazing sex. There’s one thing he does in the bedroom, however, that I find off-putting and I was hoping you might be able to provide some insight. About 25 percent of the time after he ejaculates, he briefly licks some of his come off his fingers. This kind of creeps me out. I’ve been with more than a few dudes, so I obviously understand that a woman eating their come is a common turn-on, but this is my first experience with this particular incarnation. At first I was worried my aversion might be rooted in some deeply buried homophobic beliefs, but we’ve discussed the idea of me pegging him, and that I can get behind. I think it’s more that this smacks of a certain egotism I find frivolous. Like, I wouldn’t go around shoving my fingers inside my pussy and rubbing the results all over my face. Typically we’re able to discuss any kind of conflict or confusion that arises between us, but this one seems tough to broach for me. Three questions: How common is this? Do I need to just get over it or should I try to talk to him about it? Would most guys suck their own dick if they were able?

WOULD MOST GUYS SUCK THEIR OWN DICK IF THEY WERE ABLE?

THE VIRGIN WHO’S BEEN FUCKED A WHOLE LOT JUST NEVER IN THE GOOD WAY

Off the top of my head … Hire a sex worker. It will allow you to separate your anxieties about finding romance and companionship from your anxieties about being sexually inexperienced. A kind, indulgent, competent sex worker can relieve you of your virginity and help restore — or instill — confidence in your dick’s ability to get and stay hard in the presence of another human being. Be totally honest about your inexperience and your concerns. If you get the sense during negotiations — which should be brief and to the point — that the woman you’re talking to is impatient or uncaring, thank her for her time and start over. There are kind, caring, compassionate sex workers out there. Presumably you’ve got a computer in your office, TVWBFAWLJNITGW. Use it to find one. Get out of the house. Go places, do things — as much as your disability and budget allow. Even if you have to go alone, go. Even if the things you want to do are unlikely to put you in front of many/any women, do those things. You’re likelier to meet someone if you’re out of the house and moving through the world. Even if you don’t meet someone right away,

YEARNING UNDERSTANDING CONCERNING KINK

1. It’s not common, YUCK, but it’s not unheard of, either. Maybe your boyfriend grew up with sex-phobic parents who blew up at the sight of a crusty sock — so he opted to destroy the evidence by eating it and developed a taste for it. Maybe he thinks his semen contains powerful woo-hoo-y masculine energy and wishes to retain some of it. Maybe he had a girlfriend who thought it was hot to see him eat his come and he (wrongly) assumes it’s a turn-on for you, too. 2. Yes, you need to get over it and, yes, you should ask him about it. The former almost certainly requires the latter. 3. Every man on earth tries, a select few succeed, and we all would if we could. On the Lovecast, advice from a dominatrix on kinky parties: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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Jimmy Cvetic {PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

IDENTITY THEFT AND THE VANITY OF YOUR WORTH

DOG’S DAY {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

I’ve known Jimmy Cvetic for a lot of years. Not that I’m special, of course, because there are thousands of people in Allegheny County who can say the same thing. The difference is which Jimmy Cvetic you know. He’s a former police officer and detective. He’s a boxing trainer. He’s a poet. He’s an artist. He’s the head of the Western Pennsylvania Police Athletic League, a group that takes kids, mostly those at-risk, and gets them working out their aggressions through sports instead of on the streets. Finally, for hundreds of kids every year, he’s Santa. Cvetic, along with the other members of PAL, spends his year collecting toys, and cash to buy toys, for underprivileged kids at Christmas. He knows everybody and everybody knows him. And he does the things he does for others, not for himself. Countless times over the years, he has asked not to be quoted or photographed, instead asking that the attention go toward the volunteers he works with, or the kids who are trying to make their lives better. But at 6 p.m. Thu., June 15, at the Roberto Clemente Museum in Lawrenceville, the spotlight will be directly on Cvetic with Day of the Dog: An Art and Poetry Exhibition, subtitled “A Fundraising Event and Celebration of the Poetry & the Extraordinary Life of Jimmy Cvetic.” “Dog” is Cvetic’s nickname from his days as an Allegheny County police officer. The event is timed to the release of Cvetic’s newest book of poetry, Dog Is a Love From Hell. The title is an homage to Cvetic’s favorite writer, Charles Bukowski, based on the latter’s 1977 poetry collection, Love Is a Dog From Hell. Cvetic will read from the book. The event was planned by three longtime Cvetic collaborators: artist Rick Bach, photographer Duane Rieder and artist Bob Ziller (their works will also be available at the event). There will be a special appearance by writer and NPR sports commentator Bill Littlefield, as well as a tasting of wine specifically bottled and labeled for the event from Rieder’s EngineHouse 25 wine cellar. The $100 general-admission ticket includes a wine sampling, hors d’oeuvres and a signed copy of Cvetic’s new book. The $150 VIP ticket includes all of that, plus a special reception at 5 p.m., a bottle of wine and a signed copy of the book with an “embellished sketch” by illustrator Rick Bach. All proceeds benefit Police Athletic League programs. If you’ve never read his work, Cvetic’s poetry is raw, edgy, unflinching, brash and occasionally but necessarily, offensive. The poem on this page is without question, my favorite of all Cvetic’s work. It’s a poetic autobiography of the kind his life deserves. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more tickets and more info about the event, visit tinyurl.com/june15dogday.

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A guy called me with a foreign accent, I think he could have been from India or maybe from some country in Africa that has tigers and hippopotamus and he sounded like he was from a place that I probably couldn’t pronounce a Godforsaken place where children play in raw sewage where the men probably stone women for adultery. “I’ve stolen your identity.” I said, “You want to be me? I don’t even want to be me! How’d you get my phone number? It’s unlisted.” He said, “Nothing is unlisted, haven’t you read Orwell’s book 1984? I said, “But that was over twenty years ago, nobody reads that book anymore, except maybe some professors that used to be hippies in the ’60s and probably swam in Walden’s Pond.” He said, “You only have $22.00 in your checking account, would you like to borrow some money?” I said, “No, you can keep the money, I would only use it to buy tofu, or maybe a Bukowski or Twain book.” He asked, “You don’t care about your identity?” I said, “Not really, I’ve reached the age when I get up to pee at least three times a night, and sometimes I stub my toe which hurts, but I’m too old to even jump around in pain, so you can keep my identity.” I hung up the phone, went to the refrigerator and found a piece of yesterday’s pizza. I thought of my father … how he’d go to the bakery and buy yesterday’s doughnuts. It was good except he’d make powdered milk, which was not really that good, and I don’t even want to mention the government cheese, but in a strange wino way it was all good. I lost my balance the other day and I felt like I’d been drinking, so I went to the doctor. I found out it was because my inner ear had to be cleaned, which had me feeling almost drunk. Anyway, the guy calls me back, “I want to give you back your identity.” “You can keep it,” I said. I hung up the phone and felt all the pain in my body and looked up at the ceiling, because that’s where God is usually hiding, when he’s not punishing someone orr curing them from some terminal disease,

and I said, “God, you only punish my vanities. I should have never danced naked on the bar, because, truth be told, it wasn’t pretty then and it sure ain’t pretty now.” The next day at 5 in the morning the phone rang. “Please take back your identity.” I said, “You stole it, you can keep it.” He cried like a sissy who just had his gym shoes flushed in a toilet, “But there’s nothing in your wallet.” I said, “I told you that.” He said, “But now everyone thinks that I’m you and I’m getting calls about how a kid was shot or how a guy beats his wife or a mother that needs money for her teeth, another called because her daughter is whoring and is on heroin, or needs this or that and needs help with a ticket for driving the wrong way on a one-way street. I now go around sweeping cigarette butts off streets in Pittsburgh. I don’t even smoke.” I said, “It makes good practice if you can find the Tao in sweeping up the butts. It’s almost like Zen & the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, actually, more like becoming an Archer or studying the Art of War.” “I don’t want your identity, you’ve seen stuff that I don’t want to see, besides, your manly hangs too low, and when I sit on the toilet it presents a problem.” I said, “Alright, I’ll take it back on two conditions. He said, “Anything, please.” “Promise me you will not vote straight Republican or Democrat, and when you go to church you will not stare at women’s backsides. Also, one more thing, you must read all the teachings of Buddha at least twice.” He said, “Agreed. Thank you, and may the fleas of a camel never alight on your privates.” I hung up the phone and it rang again, “Dog, you don’t know me but my son is smoking crack and stealing Granny’s bingo money. Can you help me?” I asked, “How did you get my number?” She said, “I found it in the toilet stall at the bus terminal.” I said, “Alright, you got the right guy. But try to hurry, I’ve got to sweep up some cigarette butts. Go ahead and tell me the sad story anyway, I need a fix.” BY JIMMY CVE CVETIC


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Mike Thompson Kennedy’s living-liver donor Age 38

It takes a big heart to donate part of your liver. Become a living donor to a child who needs a new liver. Kennedy Stevenson Liver recipient Age 5

It’s always hard for kids to wait. But when a child is waiting for a lifesaving liver transplant, the wait is even more difficult. However, for the more than 30 kids who are on Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC’s liver waiting list, there’s another option: living donation. This is when a part of an adult liver is transplanted into a child. The adult’s liver grows back, while the child can go on to live a healthy life. We are on a mission to find donors for these children and to save lives through living donation. Donors are carefully screened and not everyone is eligible. So spread the word and please consider being a living donor to a child. You’ll leave a legacy. And you’ll save a life. Visit UPMC.com/BeADonor.

June 14, 2016 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 - Issue 24

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