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EVENTS 5.19 – 5-9:30pm FACTORY SWING SHIFT The Factory stays up late! Free with museum admission

5.20 – 10am TEACHER WORKSHOP: ART AND ACTIVISM Presented in conjunction with our collaborative public art project Activist Print. Tickets $30

5.26 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NIGHTLANDS WITH SPECIAL GUEST THE BUILDING The Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 members & students

5.27 – 6pm LGBTQ+ YOUTH PROM The Warhol entrance space Tickets $5/$10 door

6.18 – 8pm DOUBLE FEATURE: ANDY WARHOL’S TARZAN & JANE REGAINED… SORT OF (1963) AND TARZAN THE APE MAN (1932) Ace Hotel Pittsburgh – Gym (East Liberty) Ace Hotel Pittsburgh is The Warhol’s official hotel sponsor. FREE; Register at warhol.org

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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2017 ROCKS AT

THE MEADOWS

From the roots of rock ‘n’ roll to the top of the country charts, The Meadows is the spot for the best concerts! To purchase tickets, please visit TICKETMASTER.COM

DENNIS DEYOUNG: THE MUSIC OF STYX FRI • JUNE 2 Tickets on sale now

GRAND FUNK RAILROAD SAT • JUNE 3 Tickets on sale now

THE MIDTOWN MEN FRI • JULY 21

4 STARS FROM THE ORIGINAL CAST OF JERSEY BOYS Tickets on sale May 26

LITTLE ANTHONY & THE IMPERIALS SAT • JULY 22 Tickets on sale May 26

CHUBBY CHECKER & THE WILDCATS FRI • SEPTEMBER 22 Tickets on sale July 21

THE ONE. THE ONLY.

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CRAIG MORGAN SAT • SEPTEMBER 23 Tickets on sale July 21


05.17/05.24.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 20

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Digital Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Music Writer MEG FAIR Interns CARLEY BONK, KRISTA JOHNSON, HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN MILLER, MATT PETRAS

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{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL ARNOLD SAGER}

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Warm weather is on the way, and we’ve got plenty of ideas to help you get out and enjoy it in City Paper’s annual Summer Guide. PAGE 25

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In cases like Bill Cosby’s, jurors are more likely to base their verdict on what they bring to the courtroom.

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Madeleine Campbell keeps two business cards, reading “It’s okay to be vulnerable” and “Shit is gonna be okay.” PAGE 16

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

At UPMC, “PCP” stands for a lot more than primary care physician. It means confidence in knowing you’re connected to our nationally recognized medical experts. And it’s the primary care more people prefer, and trust, over any other in the region. Plus with expanded hours and online appointments, it’s never been more convenient to schedule care with a doctor who stands for you.

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THIS WEEK

“YOU HAVE TO GET JURORS TO GIVE UP THEIR SCRIPT AND LISTEN TO THE EVIDENCE PRESENTED.”

ONLINE

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City Paper checked out Morose and Macabre’s The Atrocity Exhibition at the Rex Theater. Check out our photo essay on page 110, with more photos at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Last week, the Red Hot Chili Peppers stopped by PPG Paints Arena. Check out our photo slideshow online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY KRISTA JOHNSON / BILL COSBY PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL OF PHILADELPHIA}

Jurors for the Bill Cosby sexual-assault trial will be selected in the Allegheny County Courthouse next week.

Catch up with how we got where we are today, with our account of President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office. It’s the latest installment of CP Longform online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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T THE BEGINNING of jury selection in a sexual-assault trial, many prosecutors have been known to give the following instructions to potential jurors: “Look at the person next to you and tell them about your most recent sexual experience,” he or she will say. The potential jurors often stare aghast or even gasp before the prosecutor tells them they don’t actually have to share such a personal experience with a stranger. But, the prosecutor says, that’s exactly what the alleged victim in this trial will be asked to do. Next week, jurors for the Bill Cosby sexual-assault trial will be selected right here in Allegheny County. Cosby is being tried for the alleged sexual assault of Andrea Constand, a former Temple University em-

ployee. The woman claims Cosby, a Temple alum and then-member of the school’s board of trustees, drugged and sexually assaulted her at his mansion in Elkins Park, Pa., in 2004. (City Paper does not typically print the names of alleged sexual-assault victims, however, Constand has spoken out publicly in this case.)

Jury selection in sexualassault cases like Bill Cosby’s present unique challenges {BY REBECCA ADDISON} From start to finish, sexual-assault cases are some of the most sensitive tried in court. In sexual-assault trials, jurors come to the courtroom with a set of preconceived no-

tions, and it’s up to legal teams to uncover them in an effort to ensure the case is not hampered by sexual-assault biases. But uncovering these biases presents its own set of problems for potential jurors as the process can be traumatic for those still coming to terms with their own experiences with sexual assault. And, ultimately, according to research into sexual-assault cases, biases are often unavoidable: In cases like Cosby’s, jurors are more likely to base their verdict on what they bring to the courtroom, not what they learn once they’re there. “It’s going to be a very complex jury selection,” says Jeffery Frederick, director of jury-research services for National Legal Research Group, Inc. “You have the nature of the case being a he said/she said case, and people’s experiences with sexual assault and rape, not only their own, but people CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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they know. You have Mr. Cosby as a public figure who has taken a great hit on his reputation, but there are still people who are great fans. There’s a lot of different issues that are floating around here.” The jury-selection process isn’t like picking teams in gym class. Legal teams don’t select the jurors they want; they can only exclude jurors from sitting in a trial. The prosecution and defense each has a set number of preemptory challenges, which can be used for any reason, and an unlimited number of challenges for cause, that are decided by the presiding judge. In order to decide which jurors to exclude, the legal teams conduct a process called voir dire, a preliminary examination that examines a juror’s background and attitudes toward the case. This is especially important in this case because sexual-assault accusations against Cosby have been at the center of media attention for years. “For either side, what you’re trying to do is, you’re trying to understand the opinions, viewpoints and motivations of the potential jurors you face,” says Frederick. “In this case there’s a number of avenues you have to consider. One is the substantial publicity of this case and all the information that’s been out there. Some of this information is inadmissible. For example, the 59 or 58 people who claim they have been sexually assaulted by Mr. Cosby, that is not relevant to this case. But the fact that there are indications of other alleged victims, you’ll have issues with that and whether jurors can set that aside.” Nowadays, some jury analysis is conducted behind the scenes by analysts who pore over a potential juror’s Facebook page. According to Frederick, 70 to 80 percent of people have Facebook pages, and thanks to the social-media site’s interface that allows users to respond to posts with emojis, analysts can uncover how jurors feel about certain topics. “You’d have to look at stories and articles related to Cosby on Facebook and look at the comments people have made. You go through to make sure none of the jurors that have come up have expressed their emotions on these posts,” says Frederick. “You want to see if they have certain likes that would indicate that they’d be more receptive to government or the defense. And there are actual Facebook pages that are pro- and anti-Cosby.” Uncovering the biases of potential jurors is especially important in

sexual-assault cases, says Lynn Hecht Schafran, director of the National Judicial Education Program. “People come into court with a mental script of what rape is. Rape is a stranger who jumps from the bushes with a knife and there’s a woman walking alone late at night in a provocative dress,” Schafran says. “That’s 180 degrees from reality. The reality is that the vast majority of rapes are committed by someone the victim knows, indoors. It has nothing to do with the clothing you’re wearing. There are no weapons involved. You have to get jurors to give up their script and listen to the evidence presented.” The biases jurors bring to sexualassault trials are especially important in those cases involving scenarios that mirror the Cosby case, where the defendant is known to the victim. And according to research, the preconceived notions jurors have about these kinds of incidents can often determine the verdict in these cases, regardless of the facts presented during the trial. In the 1960s, Philadelphia researchers Harry Kalven and Hans Zeisel observed jury deliberations and surveyed judges in 3,576 criminal jury trials. In approximately 25 percent of the cases, they found, the jury and judge disagreed on the verdict. “There was one area of the law where judges were in disagreement with where their juries were coming out, and only one,” Schafran says. “And that area was sexual assaults with one victim and one defendant who knew each other. Where the judges would’ve convicted, the jurors acquitted.” In the study, there were 42 cases where, much like the Cosby case, there was “one perpetrator, the parties knew each other, no weapon was used, and there was no physical injury extrinsic to the rape.” Of the defendants in this case, only three were convicted. “What the researchers concluded was that the jurors were making decisions based on their own feelings and assessments about the victim’s lifestyle, the risks they were taking,” Schafran says. “And instead of looking at the defendant and what did he do, they were looking at the victim and what did she do.” That’s why Schafran says it’s important for the prosecution to take its time during voir dire to uncover sexual-assault-related biases. Thankfully, she says, due to the high-profile nature of the Cosby case, she believes the prosecutor will

“IT’S GOING TO BE A VERY COMPLEX JURY SELECTION.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

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be given the necessary time. “People have very different kinds of questions they ask. Some will ask straight out, ‘Do you think it’s ever possible for a man to rape his wife?’ and there will be people who say no, so then they can be excused for cause,” Schafran says. “Sometimes people have indirect ways of trying to gauge where somebody’s personal convictions and sensibilities are. It really is an art, and even the best are not always able to surmount these really entrenched biases that people have about victims of sexual assault.” But these questions can also present problems. Schafran says it’s very common during this process for potential jurors to disclose their own experience with sexual assault, sometimes for the first time. “The incidence of sexual violence is so high, that in any jury pool, the likelihood that there will be women and men that have been victimized as children or adults is very high,” Schafran says. “We encourage judges to handle this part of the questioning with as much privacy as possible. What happens sometimes is somebody ends up making a disclosure in

open court. This questioning can be very rough for people who are survivors, and it’s important to bear that in mind. “The point is to be respectful of the fact that for many people this may be the first time they’ve disclosed, or that this is going to throw them right back into something they thought they had moved beyond.” Despite all of the research and analysis that goes into jury selection, there’s great debate about what makes someone a good juror for a sexual-assault case, and many assumptions about jury selection have been challenged. For example, while women might be viewed as more sympathetic to victims, a lot of prosecutors say women are more judgmental because they have difficulty acknowledging their own vulnerability. “Women sometimes think, ‘I wouldn’t have gone to that fraternity party, I wouldn’t have walked down the street, or I wouldn’t have parked the car there,’ as a way of distancing yourself from the situation,” Schafran says. “And people who have been victimized are not necessarily totally excluded. Judges want all the jurors they can get.” RA D D I S ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Celebrating our sixth year as the Tastiest Event in Town, Northside Sandwich Week celebrates the best sandwiches at the best Northside restaurants and pubs! Presented by Highmark from May 18-28, sample signature sandwiches at participating restaurants all week long. Look for the Sandwich Week banners! And while you’re at it, vote for your Favorite Northside Sandwich Joint in-restaurant. This year’s Sandwich Sampler will feature complimentary onion rings provided by the Priory Grand Hall Kitchen and a Beer Garden with beer from local breweries. Sample all of the sandwiches at the Northside Sandwich Sampler on May 18th at Pittsburgh’s Grand Hall at the Priory.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! CURRENT LISTING OF PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS Atria’s Restaurant Casellula Chateau Cafe & Cakery Hog’s Head Bar and Grill James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy Legends of the North Shore Max’s Allegheny Tavern Penn Brewery Rivers Casino Scratch F & B Southern Tier Brewing Co. Young Brother’s Bar

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BERMUDA TRIANGLE? Congressman Keith Rothfus could be in danger as three Democratic challengers step up {BY RYAN DETO} ON MAY 11, U.S. Congressman Keith Rothfus

(R-Sewickley) sent out an email to his supporters asking for assistance and campaign donations. He seemed nervous. “Last week I voted to repeal and replace Obamacare — fulfilling a promise I made to you,” wrote Rothfus from his campaign email address. “But now liberals and the media are attacking me! The Left is so angry that I even have 3 liberal opponents who have announced their campaigns to defeat me.” It’s hard to assess exactly how underattack Rothfus is; the nonpartisan Cook Political Report still grades his district as safely Republican. But his email is right about one thing: a new energy has emerged among liberals in Pennsylvania’s U.S. House 12th District, leading three of them to start campaigns. Democrats Aaron Anthony, of Shaler; Tom Prigg, of McCandless; and Beth Tarasi, of Sewickley, have announced

Democratic challengers Aaron Anthony, Tom Prigg and Beth Tarasi

candidacies to challenge Rothfus in the 2018 midterm elections. So far, they’ve all pledged to back many Democratic platforms, like LGBT- and immigrant-rights, environmentalism, pay equity and support for labor unions. But each offers unique viewpoints and campaign strategies that could turn the 12th District blue. Anthony, a 34-year-old former schoolteacher and current Ph.D. student in educational studies, understands flipping the 12th District isn’t going to be easy. Rothfus

We look phenomenal in pink And it’s thanks to you, Pittsburgh. This spring downtown Pittsburgh took a brief hiatus from black and gold while hundreds of redbud trees transformed the riverfronts, parks and hillsides to pink. So thank you volunteers, supporters and especially Colcom Foundation for seeding something special.

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won last year by 23 percentage points, but Anthony believes the race “is part of the bigger movement to flip [U.S.] Congress” to Democratic control. Thus, Anthony wants to create a message that resonates nationally, and doing that requires a lot of cash. “Our goal is to raise $75,000 in the second quarter of 2017,” says Anthony. “It’s going to take at least $2.5 million to be competitive in this race.” According to campaign-finance reports, Rothfus raised $223,000 in the first quarter of 2017, and currently has $766,000 cash on hand. Anthony has already assembled a team of friends and supporters from across the country to raise campaign funds, and has held events in Philadelphia and Chicago. While he has lived and worked in Shaler most of his life, Anthony says fundraising must come from inside and outside the district to compete with Rothfus. (In the first quarter of 2017, about half of Rothfus’ donations came from outside the 12th District, according to campaign-finance reports.) Anthony says he was naive in thinking President Donald Trump would lose the 2016 election, but that result motivated him to run. “We are old enough to stop waiting for the older generation to fix it,” says Anthony. He says his campaign will focus on increasing funding for education, poverty programs and drug treatment to combat the opioid epidemic. Another challenger, Tom Prigg, believes he can relate to the rural parts of the 12th District. Originally from a rural part of Washington County, Prigg says his grandparents worked in the steel mills, and he grew up baling hay. Prigg thinks his working-class upbringing, along with his 16 years in the U.S. Army as a sniper, provides contrast to Rothfus’ background as a

corporate lawyer. He’s confident he can win the 12th District’s substantial veteran vote (census figures show 10 percent of the voting-age population are veterans). Prigg plans to focus his campaign on areas in economic decline; he says grants can be given to small businesses to keep them open. “We already give enough tax breaks to corporations, we should be giving those to the communities,” says Prigg. Prigg says he was first politically inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement and has thought about running for office since. Prigg says he would try to get subsidized trade schools to move into rural regions, ones that “target future jobs” and teach students how to code. Prigg has already started a blog on Daily Kos, a liberal political website, and his seven-member campaign team will focus on a wideranging media campaign. Prigg says he wants to garner the votes of 12th District independents who normally vote Republican, and not just run an antiRothfus campaign. “That is like hitting on a girl in a bar by saying, ‘I am the only one talking to you,’” says Prigg. “It doesn’t work.” The third challenger, Beth Tarasi, is a lawyer from Sewickley who has lived in the 12th District her entire life. She too felt she “had to run” after the election of Trump. She says the district isn’t being properly represented by Rothfus. “He’s not bringing in anything,” says Tarasi. “Allegheny County is attracting new businesses, but we need to see that spread all over the district. We need to take advantage of our natural resources.” Rothfus recently announced Corsa Coal, in Somerset County, was adding 70 jobs, but Tarasi points out the company is simply replacing some lost jobs, as Corsa cut 130 jobs in 2015. Tarasi would like to see more investments like the Shell cracker plant in Beaver County, as well as green energy like wind farms. “As a lawyer, this is what I do,” says Tarasi. “I bring in resources in to solve problems.” She serves as a Democratic ward chair in Sewickley and says she can succeed with help from Western Pennsylvania’s Democratic Party institutions. If elected, Tarasi would want to be placed on the transportation committee because she believes the 12th District needs infrastructure improvements to move forward. She adds that she wants to serve constituents as if they were her legal clients. “Rothfus says he is the employee of constituents,” says Tarasi. “I think they are more like clients, and I want to keep the clients happy.”

“BUT NOW LIBERALS AND THE MEDIA ARE ATTACKING ME!”

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[GREEN LIGHT]

Our First Shipment of Trees & Shrubs Have Arrived!

EARTH TO TRUMP

Cavacini

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} THE environmental journalists behind WESA 90.5 FM’s Allegheny Front launched their new podcast, Trump on Earth, in January, they didn’t know how long it would last. Sure, the new president was a climate-change denier who’d vowed to strangle the Environmental Protection Agency. But how much could there really be to say that others weren’t already covering? “I was worried that we’d run out of things to talk about,” says Reid Frazier, who co-hosts the podcast with Kara Holsopple and Julie Grant “Initially we just thought, ‘We’ll just see for the first hundred days,’” says Holsopple. But it didn’t take 100 days. “We got just a couple weeks in, we realized we were going to be going a lot further than that,” says Holsopple. Unfortunately for people concerned about the environment, Trump on Earth (www.trumponearth.org) might prove a long-running show indeed. Allegheny Front executive producer Kathy Knauer says the idea emerged after the November election as a way to focus the team’s expertise not just on the local stories the radio show covers, but on matters national in scope. The podcast format accommodates in-depth interviews with policymakers, scientists, journalists and other experts that are nonetheless quicker to produce than radio pieces tightly limited by time and format. Most of the 14 episodes have run from 20 to 30 minutes each. “They’re not easy topics to talk about in five minutes,” says Knauer. “We thought there would be an appetite out there [for getting] beyond the headlines of some of these changes, and what does it mean for people and the country and the impacts on people’s daily lives.” “I think it’s really important to get into the real details of what’s going on,” says Chris Rolinson, who heads Point Park University’s new environmental-journalism program, Allegheny Front’s partner in the podcast. Despite their collective decades of experience, TOE staffers still had a lot of questions about a Trump presidency — like what he could and couldn’t do in terms of repealing environmental laws and rules. The latter was the subject of episode one, an interview with Jody Freeman, founding director of the Harvard Law School Environmental Law and Policy Program. (Freeman’s answer, condensed: While only Congress can void an environmental law, like the

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Clean Air Act, Trump can unilaterally undo executive policies, like the Clean Power Plan, and the White House can attempt to starve regulators for funding, or order them to loosen enforcement.) Other episodes have featured Christine Todd Whitman, EPA administrator under President George W. Bush; former New York Times journalist Andrew Revkin, now with ProPublica, who supplied context from his three decades of reporting on climate change; and both outspoken Penn State climate researcher Michael Mann and Myron Ebell, the climate-denier who headed Trump’s EPA transition team. Themed episodes have tackled threats to food-safety protections and the story of President Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which Trump has vowed to scrap. It’s been an education. “I’ve learned more about federal environmental policy in the last six months than I ever learned before,” says Frazier. Podcast team members say they’re also learning how much public comment and deliberation go into environmental regulations (the Clean Power Plan has its roots in the 1990s) and how big a role the courts play. Knauer characterizes Trump on Earth’s audience as “small but growing.” The show is sharing content with Stanford, Calif.-based podcast Generation Anthropocene, and is seeking other cross-promotional opportunities. The current production schedule is about thrice monthly; new last week was “Will This Land Still Be Your Land?”, about proposals to use public lands, including national monuments, for drilling and mining. One thing’s certain: In a time when the EPA is dismissing scientists from science panels, and suggesting they’ll be replaced with industry representatives, Trump on Earth will likely stay busy. As co-host Grant says, “There’s just so much going on all the time, you can’t keep up.”

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Join us at the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center for ongoing workshops in October as we continue programming on architecture, history, design, urban planning, and other topics related to how cities function and historic preservation as a tool of community development.

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GARDENING WORKSHOP: PLANTS FOR POLLINATORS

“THEY’RE NOT EASY TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT IN FIVE MINUTES.”

MARTHA SWISS GARDEN WRITER & DESIGNER Looking to improve your garden’s habitat for bees, butterflies, and other pollinators? This class profiles beautiful perennials, annuals, shrubs, and trees they especially adore and will help you learn which are best suited to your garden’s growing conditions. We’ll also discuss ways you can make your garden more enticing to pollinators and birds, and how to have your property certified as a wildlife habitat. About the Presenter: Martha Swiss is a garden writer, designer, and speaker. She is a regular contributor to Pennsylvania Gardener magazine and the publications editor for the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. Her articles have also appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Fine Gardening. She is a graduate of Chatham University’s landscape design program and a Penn State master gardener. ALL PROGRAMMING IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG

RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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PYRAMID

News of the Weird

TATTOO & Body Piercing

PYRAMIDTATTOO.COM Bridgeville, Pa

LET ’S GET S CIAL

{BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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It is legal in China to sell electric “building shakers” whose primary purpose apparently is to wreak aural havoc on apartment-dwellers’ unreasonably noisy neighbors. Models sell for the equivalent of $11 to $58 — each with a long pole to rest on the floor, extending ceiling height to an electric motor braced against the shared ceiling or wall and whose only function is to produce a continuous, thumping beat. Shanghaiist.com found one avenger in Shaanxi province who, frustrated by his miscreant neighbor, turned on his shaker and then departed for the weekend. (It was unclear whether he faced legal or other repercussions.)

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Earn $17,500 for two months’ “work” doing nothing at all! France’s spacemedicine facility near Toulouse is offering 24 openings, paying 16,000 euros each, for people simply to lie in bed continuously for two weeks so it can study the effects of virtual weightlessness. The institute is serious about merely lying there: All bodily functions must be accomplished while keeping at least one shoulder on the bed.

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Sidewalk Wars: (1) Thirty-four residents of State Street in Brooklyn, N.Y., pay a tax of more than $1,000 a year for the privilege of sitting on their front stoops (a pastime which, to the rest of New York City, seems an inalienable right). (The property developer had made a side deal with the city to allow the tax in exchange for approving an architectural adjustment.) (2) The town of Conegliano, Italy, collects local taxes on “sidewalk shadows” that it applies to cafes or businesses with awnings, but also to stores with a single overhanging sign that very slightly “blocks” sun. Shop owners told reporters the tax felt like Mafia “protection” money.

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“Oh, come on!” implored an exasperated Chief Justice Roberts in April when the Justice Department lawyer explained at oral argument that, indeed, a naturalized citizen could have his citizenship retroactively canceled just for breaking a single law, however minor — even if there was never an arrest for it. Appearing incredulous, Roberts hypothesized that if “I drove 60 miles an hour in a 55-mile-an-hour zone,” but was not caught and then became a naturalized citizen, years later the government “can knock on my door and say, ‘Guess what? You’re not an American citizen after all’?” The government lawyer stood firm. (The Supreme Court decision on the law’s constitutionality is expected in June.)

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Wait, What?: (1) Emily Piper and her husband went to court in January

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in Spokane, Wash., to file for a formal restraining order against a boy who is in kindergarten. Piper said the tyke had been relentlessly hassling their daughter (trying to kiss her) and that Balboa Elementary School officials seem unable to stop him. (2) A private plane crashed on take-off 150 feet from the runway at Williston (Fla.) Municipal Airport on April 15, killing all four on board. But despite more than a dozen planes having flown out of the same airport later that day, no one noticed the crash site until it caught the eye of a pilot the next afternoon.

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Didn’t Think It Through: (1) Edwin Charge Jr., 20, and two accomplices allegedly attempted a theft at a Hood River, Ore., business on April 23, but fled as police arrived. The accomplices were apprehended, but Charge took off across Interstate 84 on foot, outrunning police

until he fell off a cliff to his death. (2) Police said Tara Cranmer, 34, tried to elude them in a stolen truck on tiny Ocracoke Island, N.C., on April 22. Since it is an island, the road ends, and she was captured on the dunes after abandoning the truck.

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Variations of the Semen-Weaponization Fetish: (1) Timothy Blake, 28, faced several charges in January after admitting to a spree of semen incidents at a Walmart in Marietta, Ohio. The liquid was his semen, he finally admitted, but he squirted it at his female victims only from a syringe rather than the old-fashioned way. (2) Brian Boyd, 27, was charged in January with squirting women from a syringe in a similar series of incidents at a Tampa Target store. However, though Boyd had simulated masturbation, the syringe itself contained only white liquid “hair conditioner.”

WAYNOVISION


Here’s a deal that’ll Perk your interest. It’s called Job Perks and it offers commuter tax-savings benefits for both employers and employees. Employees can save hundreds of dollars annually on their monthly transit passes since they are paid for through payroll deduction and are exempt from federal income or FICA taxes. Employers also save big by not paying FICA and FUTA unemployment taxes on the amount of the pass for each employee enrolled in the program. Now on a ConnectCard. Job Perks participants now receive Port Authority ConnectCards, a plastic smart card with a computer chip inside that stores the monthly pass. Employers can conveniently manage employee ConnectCards through an online web portal. Employees easily activate their new pass each month by tapping the ConnectCard at any farebox, validator or ConnectCard machine. Additional Perks: • Convenient, user-friendly online card management for workplace administrators. • Improved security. The pass can easily be replaced if ConnectCard is lost or stolen. • FREE one-time supply of ConnectCards ($1 per card fee is waived). How does my company enroll? Call Port Authority’s Marketing Department at 412.566.5283.

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LOCAL

LISTEN AS YOU READ: SCAN THE CODE FOR OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST, A SOUNDTRACK TO THE STORIES IN THIS SECTION, OR VISIT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM/BLOGS/FFW/

BEAT {BY MEG FAIR}

PENDING RELEASE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIEN MCCLAIN}

In the spirit of Summer Guide, City Paper has compiled a short list of bands and solo artists releasing music this summer. This is by no means a comprehensive list of every album or EP coming from Pittsburgh musicians in the next few months, but rather an incentive to get you digging on your own.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAWN CARE}

AllegrA EEL Wreck Loose Chillent The Homeless Gospel Choir Sam Pellegrino

{CP PHOTO BY JORDAN MILLER}

Now hear this: Madeleine Campbell

ALL ACCESS

Lawn Care Monzo & Finita Searights Law Jaw Devin Moses & The Saved Predicting Earthquakes

{BY ALEX GORDON}

Y

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAT BRUENER}

OU’LL LEARN a lot about Madeleine

Manic Soul Cousin Boneless All Over the Place TRASH BAG/SIKES, split EP Silver Car Crash/Melancholy Manor, split EP Have you got a new release you want us to listen to and consider for an upcoming story or review? Send digital files to megfair@pghcitypaper.com, and send CDs, cassettes, vinyl, 8-tracks or whatever to Meg Fair c/o Pittsburgh City Paper, 650 Smithfield St., Suite 2200, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15222.

Campbell and her new recording studio, Accessbile Recordings, just by looking at her desk. There’s a stack of books, including reference guides like Pink Noises: Women on Electronic Music and Sound by Tara Rodgers and Principles of Digital Audio by Ken Pohlman; then there’s more experiential stuff, like John Cage’s Silence. She’s big on John Cage. There are issues of Women In Sound, Campbell’s zine that aims to “showcase the achievements of women, queer and trans people working in live and recorded sound” and “increase and maintain conversation that is accessible to audioworkers of all levels.” If there’s one value you’d take away from an hour spent with Campbell, it’s accessibility. She takes the word to heart. To the left of the console, there’s a modular synth from Campbell’s day job at Pittsburgh Modular. It looks intimidating: a complex system of short wires criss-

MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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crossing into tiny outlets, seemingly designed to convey “do not fuck with this, noob.” But if you ask her about it, she’s happy to explain it in language that’s simple and accessible (there’s that word again). She’ll assure you that it wouldn’t damage the console to rip out all the intricately arranged patch cables, which will suddenly become very tempting to do. But you don’t.

ACCESSIBLE RECORDING 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Facebook.com (“accessible recording”)

On top of the rack holding the studio’s primary audio units, Campbell keeps two business cards, reading “It’s okay to be vulnerable” and “Shit is gonna be okay.” The flipside of the latter reads, “Calm the fuck down.” They’re put to use on a daily basis. The whole desk conveys a person deeply

committed to collaboration and maintaining a thoroughly open environment: open to questions, open to experimentation, open to admitting what you don’t know and taking it from there. “I don’t claim to be an expert on anything, says Campbell, 25. “I’m learning so much as I go and I want this to be a space that celebrates that.” “Most simply, what I want for this space is what I really wanted for a younger version of myself,” says Campbell. “A place that’s financially accessible to my friends — and not my friends. And financially accessible to artists who don’t have financial support from a label, who, like me, don’t make a lot of money, but are still working really hard to make meaningful work.” Campbell opened Accessible Recordings in the Bloomcraft building in Oakland earlier this month, financed primarily through a $8,000 Kiva loan. That’s a tiny figure for a music studio, but Campbell makes it work CONTINUES ON PG. 18


’ LET S

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ALL ACCESS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

by not overextending herself when it comes to gear, and relying on friends and the music community for help. Almost every corner of the studio has a story behind it, a favor traded or a serendipitous deal found through a friend. The hardwood floors come courtesy of Sam Pace of Come Holy Spirit, installed in exchange for some housework. Douglas Vento, of Tanning Machine, built the wall and installed the door separating the two sections of the formerly one-room studio. The list of favors and trades is too long to include here, but without them, Campbell would not have been able to open. “I absolutely want people to get paid for their work and don’t expect everyone to just trade everything,” says Campbell. “But that is so much of how I was able to get to the point where I am now.” In terms of community collaboration and DIY, you could do worse than setting up shop in the Bloomcraft building. 1Hood, Babyland, The Good Peoples Group and Justseeds all have offices there. The artist and musician (and close friend of Campbell’s) Jenn Gooch has her WERK studio just across the hall from the studio, and the Glitter Box Theater is on the other side of the wall. The building and its tenants embody what Campbell wants out of the studio. Organizations like Glitter Box and 1Hood blur the lines between activism, art and education, which is an approach she’d like to emulate. “I just want a space where people can come, afford, be comfortable, have programming here. Something equal parts studio and creative learning space,” says Campbell. On the day City Paper visited, the studio had been open less than a week. Campbell’s ambitious in what she wants the space to be, with plans to begin expanding into skillsharing programs. But today, she’s mostly trying to appreciate where she is: finally in her own studio, trying to calm the fuck down. The schedule is coming together slowly — she still has that day job at Pittsburgh Modular, serves on the board of directors for Girls Rock! Pittsburgh, and is working on the next Women In Sound, due out in June — but there are projects on the docket already. She’s in the process of recording Tanning Machine’s new record and helping Matthew Buchholz, of Alternate Histories, compile samples for his new project about movie scores from sci-fi films from the ’50s and ’60s. “This is such a strange and scary time in so many ways, and I feel like now more than ever, it’s such a critical time for people to be creating and producing their work in all different ways,” says Campbell. “My hope is that this can be some small contribution toward facilitating that process. “Lately I’ve realized … do it yourself, but do it together.” AL E X GO R DO N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES {BY MEG FAIR}

156/SILENCE KARMA SELF-RELEASED

In 12 minutes, 156/Silence manages to give a modern voice to early 2000s metalcore that feels relevant and challenging. 156/ Silence unearths a dark and gritty tone that leans heavily into smart, mathy grooves — the kind that make you bob your head involuntarily. Aleks Pihl’s vocals, while harsh and slightly distorted, are enunciated well enough that you can really feel the fire of his lyrics. The EP’s closer, “After All We Were Put Through,” is a prime example of 156/ Silence playing to its strengths. It begins with the vocals at the forefront, building intensity and suspense that leads to a gruff, bassy bridge before blasting into a polyrhythm-entrenched verse. Emerging from this technically impressive movement is a simplified breakdown so hard it could shatter concrete. It’s this versatility that makes 156/Silence compelling. FOR FANS OF: Poison the Well, The Chariot, dank grooves

RYAN HOFFMAN THE PINES SELF-RELEASED

Delicate and precise, Ryan Hoffman’s The Pines is a gentle foray into full-band folk-drenched indie rock. Hoffman manages to pen lyrics and guitar melodies that pair with moving strings to evoke a feeling of longing and emotional hunger, as exemplified on “View and the Void.” The Pines is just five songs, all of which rely upon building layers of instrumentals and subtle harmonies. They peak in a crescendo of instrumental movements and vocals in the same triumphant way that made Arcade Fire’s first EP so intriguing. These songs sound best while listened to outside, eyes closed, with the cool breeze brushing your face and your feet firmly planted in the grass. FOR FANS OF: The Airborne Toxic Event, Of Monsters and Men, naps in Allegheny Cemetery MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


DV8’S GOODBYE {BY MEG FAIR}

{CP PHOTO BY MEG FAIR}

Terri and Sean Barill at DV8

When Terri and Mark Barill moved to Greensburg 15 years ago, they drove past a cute, brick building in the town’s business district and fell in love. They bought that building (plus the one next door), renovated it and opened DV8, an espresso bar and gallery. As soon as it opened, the community flocked there and supported the venture. But now, after a decade and a half, DV8 is closing its doors. For as long as I can remember, DV8 has been Greensburg’s only DIY art gallery and music hub. In its 15 years of existence, more than 100 artists have shown work in its gallery. In the past three years, more than 150 concerts have been held there as well. The music shows have featured local and touring acts, and have always been free. All were alcohol-free and open to all ages. It was Terri Barill’s vision to create a space that encouraged a sense of community across all ages. It was also this environment in which Terri raised her son, Sean. Now a high school senior, he books the shows at DV8. The two make a great team. As Sean’s graduation from Greensburg Salem approaches, and his move to college grows nearer, Terri decided it was a good time to close up shop to spend time traveling to visit her sons. To celebrate DV8’s legacy, Sean and Terri have coordinated a final show featuring some of the artists who have performed at there over the years, with space for jams and impromptu performances. “It’s a great feeling that people who have played here over the years want to come back and play because they love it,” says Terri. “It’ll be fun to celebrate together one last time.” DV8 was an important hub to so many musicians in the community. Terri has realized her vision of providing a home for intergenerational friendships, and community-inclined organizing and gathering, and a place to experience art and live music for free and in a safer space. And as much as the shop is closing on good terms, Terri acknowledges it’s a bittersweet time. “I’ll miss it a lot,” she says. MEGFAIR@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DV8’S LAST STAND 7 p.m. Fri., May 19. DV8 Espresso Bar and Gallery, 208 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Greensburg. Free. 724219-0804 or www.tinyurl.com/DV8laststand NEWS

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diesel C LU B | LO U N G E

UPCOMING CONCERTS 5/21 | 7:00 PM | AA

5/25 | 7:00 PM | AA

6/5 | 8:00 PM | AA

6/9 | 7:00 PM | AA

6/ 12 | 7:00 PM | AA

6/ 13 | 7:00 PM | AA

6/ 1 8 | 8:00 P M | 21+

6/20 | 7:00 PM | AA

6/22 | 7:00 PM P M | AA

6/29 | 7:00 PM | AA

7/ 1 | 7:00 7 00 PM | AA

v I B RO K InG S

20TH ANNIVERSARY/REUNION SHOW 7/8 | 7:00 P M | 21+

7/ 1 3 | 7:00 P M | 18+

for tickets visit DIESELPGH.COM or Dave’s Music Mine (southside) 1801 e. carson st | pittsburgh |412.481.8800

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PAIN MANAGEMENT {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} OVER THE course of her new full-length record, Silhouette of Sirens, Chastity Brown uses her soulful, smoky voice to spill every ounce of emotion out of her heart and into your ears. The Minneapolis-based folk singer is a gifted lyricist who spends the 10 cuts on this record taking the listener on a journey filled with pain and angst, while not forgetting to describe the little pockets of joy and victory that helped her get through it all. So it’s curious that right before the last minute of the final cut, “Lost,” she stops singing. Her last note drifts quietly into an organ solo by Tommy Barbarella, who previously played with Prince’s New Power Generation. It’s as if Brown suddenly lifts her foot off the gas pedal of a car at the end of a very long, but satisfying drive, and Barbarella’s slow, deliberate tones help you coast calmly to your destination. In a record filled with great moments, this may be the greatest. It’s an unexpected ending that works too well to be accidental. “That was definitely intentional,” Brown tells City Paper by phone. “Tommy had me sing that line to him, and he went into the solo. It was just like, that one last breath; and if you take it to the end, it doesn’t entirely resolve. “My favorite novels, they don’t entirely resolve either. You are left with questions like, ‘Where does the story go from here?’ It is quite an emotional album, and I think the coolest thing about it is that it really reflects the time period when I felt like this. I’m not in that place anymore, but I can full well fucking know what it’s like to go there.” Born in Tennessee, Brown moved to Minneapolis to focus on her music in 2006. She’s one of the best breed of new artists — grounded in traditional style, but with the talent and moxie to bend those sounds into something unique. Musically, she’s often compared to artists like Nina Simone, Roberta Flack and Richie Havens. But while her singing voice is extraordinary, it’s the influence of writers like James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Maya Angelou and Louise Erdrich that inspires her songwriting, which is where her grace and talent as an artist truly shine. After three self-releases, Brown released her first label-backed record in 2012. Last year, she signed with the indie-roots powerhouse label Red House; Silhouette

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF WALE AGBOOLA}

Chastity Brown

of Sirens is her first release in five years. Brown says the May 19 release and supporting tour is an “emotional and humbling” time for her. Recently, the record was featured on NPR’s First Listen, and the moment brought her to tears. “You spend so much time on a body of work and then, boom, it’s out,” Brown says. “It’s like yesterday, it was in the dark, and now it’s not. When the record was featured on First Listen yesterday, it made me cry.” “Everybody wants to be seen and I don’t mean that in a big way,” she says. “But in an ‘I exist and what you do matters’ sort of way. Next, with this style of music, I’m not a pop singer; folk musicians have to go out and earn their keep on the road. Now I get to go to cities, and go to towns, and ask folks to show up and let me sing to them a bit.” One of the great dimensions of this record is that while not all of the stories told are autobiographical for Brown, the emotion that they emit are. But the stories are personal, she says, and “comprised from snapshots of memories both real and imagined.” Brown says the album is about heartbreak, but not necessarily the “heartbreak of a coupled relationship — just living life and the experiences that break your heart.” The pain that Brown drew on for this work was the result of experiences with PTSD and dealing with old trauma in her life, including experiences with an abusive stepfather. “Myself, in particular, but anyone who has struggled with the waxing and waning of their mental health, that’s a real thing. It’s not a thing to sell records. It’s not a thing to fuck with, but it made me very vulnerable,

“I JUST DECIDED, I HAD TO GO THE HONEST ROUTE.”

and it opened up something in me to try and give breath to those types of stories to share with other people.” She continues, “I don’t think there’s a single person who doesn’t know what it’s like to feel like a wound from their past can burst open and catch you off guard. We all carry those wounds. I had a very abusive stepfather, and that shit will just pop up some time.” However, Brown emphasizes that those precise experiences are not what the record is about. The record is inspired by the pain, whatever the cause, of “having my heart split open.”

CHASTITY BROWN

WITH HANNAH JENKINS 7 p.m. Mon., May 22. Club Cafe, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

“You realize you’re in a different place, but somehow that wound still brings up questions,” Brown says. “And people always say that classic thing to you: ‘Well, just let it go.’ And it’s like, ‘Well, fuck you, man.’ If I could let it go, I would.” And while she wouldn’t trade the pain and the understanding it has brought to her, Brown says she’s in a different place now, and it’s a better place. In fact, several times during our phone conversation, birds can be heard cheerfully singing in the background, an aural representation of where she is as she prepares for the launch of a project she’s proud of. She says: “In James Baldwin’s essay ‘The Artist’s Struggle for Integrity,’ he says, ‘I tell you my pain so that I might relieve you of yours.’ So, I just decided, I had to go the honest route.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS

Pharmakon

[ELECTRONIC MUSIC] + FRI., MAY 18

[PRETTY] + SUN., MAY 21

Pittsburgh is stacked in the electronic-music department these days. Granted, it’s a big-ass department, populated with subgenres so distinct that it’s a little weird to house them all under one term. Regardless of what you call it, this city has some top-shelf DJs and producers. See for yourself tonight at Spirit, where Good Dude Lojack is celebrating the release of his new album, Voyage, alongside Glo Phase, Buscrates and Variar. For fans of disorienting sampling, intricate percussion, smart synths or minimalist IDM (sorry, nobody likes Good that term, but I am powerless against it), Dude this night is for you. Lojack Check out Dude’s new single, “Slowbreaker,” (featuring Nice Rec) over at our music blog at pghcitypaper.com. Then head to Spirit to dance intelligently with your pals. Neat. Alex Gordon 9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

Whitney makes music that is beautiful. It’s layered with lots of simple instrumentation that feels sublime when tied together. The breathy falsetto, gentle string arrangements and catchy hooks create a sense of nostalgia for ’60s folk while calling to mind more contemporary acts like Dr. Dog. Enter Spirit Hall and feel yourself consumed by the beauty of it all, while melodies as pure as those in songs like “Polly” surround you in a blanket of warmth. Natalie Prass will also perform her nostalgia-infused folk rock. It’ll be just as easy to get swept away in her dainty timbre and jazz-tinged melodies. Meg Fair 8 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $16-18. All ages. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

[HIP HOP] + SAT., MAY 20 More so than any of his peers, Chance the Rapper frequently drops references to church, salvation and God, which is fitting because his fans look to him as a higher power. You could read the words of the Holy Book, or you could hear the words of Chance’s Coloring Book, probably with less guilt. This would make PPG Paints Arena a mega church, but one where your favorite spiritual leader rocks custom designer overalls. Plus, you can have beer and nachos instead of church wine and wafers. Hannah Lynn 8 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $75. 412-642-1800

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Do You Shop at Convenience Stores?

[LOUD/ABRASIVE] + TUE. MAY 23 One of the most powerful, honest artists walking among us, Pharmakon’s harsh noise and industrial art, created around themes like disease, existence and empathy, express a primal nature — the true feelings we all have brewing inside of us, but refuse to scream out of our beings. Wolf Eyes are an influential noise/industrial band whose art has ways of bending your reality as well, and Container makes techno that is grimy and punk in nature, the kind of music that makes you either drop it low or shove your friends. Margaret Cox shows off the 412’s talents in the experimental world. Earplugs encouraged for this one at The Shop. MF 8 p.m. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $15. All ages. 412-951-0622

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Have you ever purchased energy drinks, cookies, or cigarettes from a convenience store? If so you may be eligible for a research study. The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to earn about what ADULTS, ages 18-65, buy at convenience stores. Participation requires completion of a 10 minute phone or internet survey, one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center, and a short follow-up phone call. People who complete the study will be compensated for their time and effort with $75 in gift cards. Parking or bus passes will be provided. If you are interested and want to learn more about the study, please call 412-204-7353, e-mail adult-cstore-study@rand.org or visit us at www.rand.org/storestudy. The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

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ROCK/POP THU 18 CLUB CAFE. SZLACHETKA. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. DIESEL. The Elovaters. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Billy the Kid & the Regulators. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Warpaint. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. O’DONNA’S. The Bo’Hog Brothers. 8 p.m. Beaver. 878-313-3418. STAGE AE. Coheed & Cambria w/ The Dear Hunter. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FRI 19

5968 Baum Blvd East Liberty

Men’s Underwear Swimwear Socks Shirts & More

565 LIVE. The Monday Blues Revue. 8 p.m. Bellevue. 412-301-8158. ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE & WINE CELLAR. The Rockers. 5 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-260-6968. CLUB CAFE. Avi Diamond w/ Morgan Erina. 6 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. The Danzas w/ Murder for Girls, Crooked Cobras & The Filthy Lowdown. 9 p.m. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS. The Dark Lines, Buckle Downs & The Love Letters. “Future Self” EP release. 8:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. No Bad Ju Ju. 9 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE LAMP THEATRE. Scott Stapp Of Creed. 7:30 p.m. Irwin. 724-367-4000. MOONDOG’S. Van Waylon. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Heather Kropf. 8 p.m. Millvale. 6034337465.

SAT 20 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Second Shift Band. 9 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. CLUB CAFE. Matt Aquiline & the Dead End Streets. 6 p.m. Marc Reisman & the Strong Way Band Album Release Show ft. The Steeltown Horns w/ Tony Resch. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. 8:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. Bottle Rat, The Full Counts & The Lopez. 10 p.m. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Donnie Iris & the Cruisers. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LOCK WALL ONE MARINA. The Bloody Seamen w/ The Beagle Brothers. 8 p.m. Strip District. 412-965-3014.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

05.17/05.24.2017

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Beware Of Darkness w/ Badflower. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Felix & the Hurricanes. 9:30 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SMILING MOOSE. Conan, North, Horehound & CANT. 6:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668. SQUIRREL HILL SPORTS BAR. theCAUSE. 9:30 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1001.

MON 22

SUN 21

CLUB CAFE. G-Nome Project. 8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE R BAR. Craig King Hump Day Band. 8:30 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

DIESEL. Lorna Shore w/ Bodysnatcher, Extortionst, Hive & Feast of the Fallen. 7 p.m. South Side. 421-431-8800. HOWLERS. J. Navarro & The Traitors w/ Grizzly Yinzers & The Skratchtrax. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ty Segall. 7 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Billy The Kid & the Regulators. 6 p.m. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

CLUB CAFE. Chastity Brown. 7 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4950.

TUE 23 GOOSKI’S. B Boys & Bat Zuppel. 9 p.m. Polish Hill. LOL. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Rose McDowall & Doors in the Labyrinth. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

WED 24

DJS THU 18 BELVEDERE’S. DJ hates you 2.0 & DJ killjoy. 80s night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. 9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

MP 3 MONDAY NVSV {PHOTO COURTESY OF MASON LUCKIEWICZ}

Bethel Park Independent Retirement Living Bethel Park, PA bethel-park.net

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

Each week, we post a song from a local artist online for free. This week, it’s a tune from Pittsburghbased rapper and producer NVSV (pronounced “NASA”). “Feel It in the Air” is not the throw-yourhands-up banger the title suggests, but something closer to a threat. It’s sparse, thoughtfully constructed and dark as hell. Don’t sleep on NVSV. Stream or download “Feel It in the Air” for free at FFW>>, the music blog at pghcitypaper.com.


HEAVY ROTATION

SAT 20

Here are four songs City Paper summer music intern Hannah Lynn can’t stop listening to: Perfume Genius

“Wreath”

GETAWAY CAFE. The Witchdoctors. 8 p.m. Brookline. 412-343-1333. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Blues Orphans. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. MARINA PUB. Strange Brew. 9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-7775. MOONDOG’S. Ray Fuller & the Bluesrockers. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. RIVERTOWNE BREWING COMPANY. Shot O’ Soul. 7 p.m. Northside. 724-519-2145.

The B52s

“Dance This Mess Around”

“Fly Away”

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

FRI 19

WED 24

FRI 19 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BELVEDERE’S. DJ admc. Dirty south night. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. 8:30 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. 9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 20 BELVEDERE’S. Sean MC & Thermos. 90s night. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. 9:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-8800. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. 9 p.m.

NEWS

Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Dance Crush. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 10 p.m. South Side. 412-431-2825.

TUE 23 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

WED 24 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta & Preslav. Top Dollar Dancehall. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. (4120-688-8820. SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. 9:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-4668.

HIP HOP/R&B WED 24 STAGE AE. Wale. 7 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

OTHER MUSIC

PIRATA. The Flow Band. 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

FRI 19

THU 18 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 7 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

SAT 20 NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe w/ The Stillhouse Pickers. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-770-8150.

w paper pghcitym .co

724-799-8333.

WED 24

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Hobb Sisters. 8 p.m. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

CLASSICAL FRI 19 ROMANTIC BRAHMS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 8 p.m. 412-392-4900.

SUN 21 CITY OF BRIDGES. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 7 p.m. 412-392-4872. DAVID BENNETT. Cooper-Siegel Community Library, Fox Chapel. 2 p.m. 412-828-9520.

LINDEN GROVE. Elmoz Fire. 9 p.m. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Hewlett Anderson Duo. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-7777. STAGE AE. Seether & Poison The Parish. 6:30 p.m. North Side. 412-229-5483.

SAT 20 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Travlin’. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-904-3335. PALANZO’S BEER DISTRIBUTOR - 2ND FLOOR. Sagas, That’s My Brother, The Psychic Lawyer, Zen Garden & Brother Derek. A very far out trip through the life and teachings of Tug Johnson w/ host Dan WardPresented by White Reeves Productions. Anointment ceremony & oatmeal service w/ complementary Kool-Aid Station. 8:30 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-537-8058. RIVERS CASINO. The Bill Henry Band. 9 p.m. Etta Cox Trio. 9 p.m. Levelz. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE GLITTER BOX THEATER. Come Holy Spirit, Cruces, DJ Erica Scary. video release party. 9 p.m. Oakland. 724-699-2613.

SUN 21 CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Joel Pace Organ Trio. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell, John Hall, Howie Alexander & Dennis Garner. 7 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412- 875- 5809.

MON 22 HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Tony Campbell Jazz. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110.

THU 18 BRILLOBOX. Billy Price Band. Benefit concert for Shambhala Meditation Center. 8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

FRI 19 MIKE’S NEW MOON SALOON. Jack of Diamonds. 9 p.m. Gibsonia. 724-265-8188. ROY’S BY THE TRACKS. Strange Brew. 9:30 p.m. Finleyville. 724-348-7118.

MUSIC

THU 18

WED 24

BLUES

+

1810 TAVERN. RML Jazz. 8 p.m. Beaver. 412-370-9621. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Billy Price Band. 8 p.m. speakeasy. Tony Campbell Jam Session. 5 p.m. ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. 7 p.m. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

ROMANTIC BRAHMS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 2:30 p.m. 412-392-4900.

TUE 23 FULL JERGEL’S RHYTHM T IS GRILLE. Eldorado. L E 7:30 p.m. Warrendale. ONLwIN w.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. 9 p.m. North Side. 412-224-2273. PENN HEBRON GARDEN CLUB. Penn Hills Coffeehouse. Singer songwriter showcase featuring a rotating lineup of jazz, acoustic, bluegrass & world music. 7 p.m. Penn Hills. 412-204-7147. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. 7 p.m. Ross. 412-487-8909.

SAT 20 PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. 10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-2058. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Tall Tees w/ Pete Butta & DJ Motormane. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-726-0061.

COUNTRY

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Tom Paxton & the DonJuans. 7 p.m. Oakland. 412-361-1915. HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. 5 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. 6:30 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Paul Thompson Trio. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-435-1110. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. RML Jazz. 8 p.m. North Side. 412-370-9621.

Yola Carter

SAT 20

SUN 21

THU 18

“Down in the Ground”

REGGAE

565 LIVE. Jake Rubenstein Acoustic. 8 p.m. Bellevue. 412-301-8158. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustic Rust. 8:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. THE HARDWOOD CAFE. Eclectic Acoustics. 8 p.m. Butler. 724-586-5335.

JAZZ Handsome Family

ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. 8:30 p.m. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. SPOONWOOD BREWING COMPANY. Mark Mandeville & Raianne Richards. 8 p.m. Bethel Park. 412-833-0333.

+

ACOUSTIC THU 18 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Y. 9:30 p.m. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-726-7912.

FRI 19 DOUBLETREE BY HILTON HOTEL PITTSBURGH - CRANBERRY. EASE. 5 p.m. Cranberry. 724-778-4177.

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

+

SCREEN

+

SPORTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

23


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

May 17 - 23 Gojira

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Oni, Code Orange & Deafhaven. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

A Lot Like Birds SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Household, Hearts Like Lions, OWEL & Atlas Decay. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 5:50p.m.

Vibe & Direct JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 412-904-3335. With special guest Charm & Chain. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 18

Sebastian Maniscalco HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: livenation.com. 8p.m.

DIRTY DANCING HEINZ HALL MAY 23 - 28

Coheed & Cambria STAGE AE North Side. With special guest The Dear Hunter. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Windhand CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. With special guests Satan’s Satyrs & Molasses Barge. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 19 195 Daniel O’Donnell

SEETHER

21+ Night: Sci-Fi CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER

The Next Stop KELLY STRAYHORN THEATRE East Liberty. 412-363-3000. Tickets: attacktheatre.com/ thenextstop. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 20 BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. With special guest Vivian Green. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guests From Indian Lakes & Queen of Jeans. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Donnie Iris & The Cruisers

MONDAY 22

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 412-799-8333. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Letters From the Fire & Kaleido. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Pittsburgh DJ Battle ROOM 16 Strip District. 412-916-7365. With special guests Large Professor, DJ Precision & X-Ecutioners. All ages event. Tickets: dmc412.com. 8p.m.

R Kelly

PHOTO BY MATTHEW MURPHY

WEDNESDAY 17

Dreams of Hope: Big Wig Ball North Side. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit carnegiesciencecenter.org. 6p.m.

LATIN FOR BEAUTIFUL

PITTSBURGH OPERA Strip District. Over 21 event. For tickets and more info visit dreamsofhope.org/ bigwigball. gwigball. 7p.m.

Abbey Arts Festival THE ABBEY ON BUTLER Lawrenceville. Tickets: redfish bowl.com. Through May 20.

SUNDAY 21

Balance & Composure

Chastity Brown

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Hannah Jenkins. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 23 Dirty Dancing

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through May May 28. 2 . 28

$88

+tax

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

05.17/05.24.2017

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Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $88 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

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2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center Inc.

412-488-2750

WWW.COTRAIC.ORG


#OpenStreetsPGH with a few fresh twists and turns

Presented By:

Walk, run, bike, skate, shop or dance at OpenStreetsPGH. On three Sunday mornings this summer Pittsburgh streets will be packed with tens of thousands of people and not a single car. This May 28th OpenStreetsPGH heads from Downtown to Uptown to South Side. Don’t miss out on your chance to make it to OpenStreetsPGH this summer.

SUNDAYS New Route:

May 28 Downtown to South Side

June 25 Downtown to West End

July 30 Downtown to Lawrenceville

openstreetspgh.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

3


MAY 24

MAY 25

JUNE 11

JUNE 15

SATURDAY, JUNE 17

FRIDAY, JUNE 23

SATURDAY, JUNE 24

JULY 14

TAG US IN YOUR POSTS! KEYBANK PAVILION KEY_BANK @KEYBANKPAVILION

JULY 18

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

JULY 26

JULY 28

LIVENATION_PGH


AUGUST 1

AUGUST 6

AUGUST 7

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18

SATURDAY, AUGUST 19

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

SEPTEMBER 12

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETMASTER LOCATIONS, ONLINE AT LIVENATION.COM OR CHARGE BY PHONE AT 800-745-3000 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

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S ION RAT UST {ILL

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

BY

ER} SAG LD RNO A L HE RAC


MUSIC VENUES

MUSIC SUMMER

19TH HOLE. 535 McClellandtown Road, Uniontown. 724-438-6169 THE ABBEY ON BUTLER STREET. 4635 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-682-0200 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. www.warhol.org AUGUST WILSON CENTER. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-471-6070 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-6769

BELVEDERE’S. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555

BENEDUM CENTER. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. 412-291-8994 BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 421-621-4900 BYHAM THEATER. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. 510 E. 10th St., Munhall. 412-368-5225 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3114

CATHEDRAL OF HOPE. 116 S.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NATALIE GINELE MILLER}

Birds of Chicago, June 7

MAY 17 Code Orange, Gojira, Deafheaven. Stage AE

Meat Puppets and Mike Watt. Mr. Smalls Lincoln Durham. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Obituary. Rex Theater Twiztid. Diesel A Lot Like Birds. The Smiling Moose Ian Hunter & the Rant Band. Jergel’s Angaleena Presley. Club Café Vibe & Direct. James Street Gastropub

MAY 18

DV8’s Last Stand. DV8 Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes. Cattivo Spencer Allan Patrick. Revel + Roost Joe Grushecky. Rex Theater Billy Strings. James Street Gastropub Greywalker, Heartsick, False Accusations. Black Forge Remember Jones. Hard Rock Café Oak Haven, Nullity. The Smiling Moose Rainbow Machine. Mr. Smalls The Hills and the Rivers, Billy Strings. James Street Gastropub Avi Diamond, Morgan Erina. Club Café (early)

Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-441-3800 CATTIVO. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 CLUB CAFÉ. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950 CROSSROADS CHURCH. 325 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-494-9999 CRUZE BAR. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-471-1400 DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL. North Side. www.deutschtownmusicfestival.org DV8. 208 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Greensburg. 724-219-0804 DIESEL. 1601 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-8800 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. 6070 Steubenville Pike, Robinson. 412-489-5631 FEASTIVAL. Route 51 & Furnace St., McKees Rocks. www.pghfeastival.com THE FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 GET HIP HQ. 1800 Columbus Ave., North Side. 412-231-4766 THE GLITTER BOX THEATER. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. 412-302-0248 GOOSKI’S. 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. 412-681-1658 HAMBONE’S. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318 HARD ROCK CAFÉ. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. 412-481-7625 HARTWOOD ACRES. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. 412-351-2528 HEINZ FIELD. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. 412-322-9662 HEINZ HALL. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-392-4900

Warpaint. Mr. Smalls Coheed and Cambria. Stage AE SZALACHETKA. Club Café Windhand. Cattivo Decrepit Birth. The Smiling Moose Kitchen Dwellers. James Street Gastropub XEB. Hard Rock Café

The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls

Square Drive, Station Square. 412-224-4900 HOWLERS. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-0320

MAY 19

MAY 20

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB AND SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St.,

The Dark Lines. Howlers Muscle Before Paradise. Mr. Roboto Daniel O’Donnell. Benedum Center PSO: Romantic Brahms. Heinz Hall Seether. Stage AE

L.S. Hellebore. Club Café (late) Abbeyfest. The Abbey on Butler Street Daniel O’Donnel. Benedum Center CoBoss. Mr. Smalls Heather Kropf, Joy Ike.

Chance the Rapper. PPG Paints Arena Come Holy Spirit. The Glitter Box R. Kelly, Vivian Green. Benedum Center PSO: Romantic Brahms. Heinz Hall The Orwells. Rex Theater

HIGHLAND PARK, CITIPARKS RESERVOIR OF JAZZ SERIES. www.citiparks.net

HIGHMARK STADIUM. 510 W. Station

North Side. 412-904-3335

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. 724-799-8333

KEYBANK PAVILION. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. 724-947-7400

LADYFEST 2017 017. k.com/ www.facebook.com/ rgh/ LadyfestPittsburgh/

MARLENE’S CORNER O BAR & GRILL. 148 S. Arch St., Connellsville. 724-628-1830 MELLON PARK, CITIPARKS BACH BEETHOVEN AND BRUNCH SERIES. www.citiparks.net MOONDOGS. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. 412-828-2040 THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.org MR. SMALLS THEATRE. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 412-821-4447 THE OAKS THEATER. 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. 412-828-6322 OWL HOLLOW. 10 Nansen St., Hazelwood. www.4thrivermusiccollective.bandcamp.com PALACE THEATRE. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. 724-836-8000 PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. 412-648-3054 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-622-6914

PITTSBURGH JAZZLIVE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL. www.pittsburghjazzlive.com PITTSBURGH WINERY. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 PLMS. 600 Constitution Blvd., New Kensington. 724-339-0808 PPG PAINTS ARENA. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. 412-642-1800 RADIOACTIVE EVENTS CENTER. 227 Market St., Kittanning. 724-209-7033 REVEL + ROOST. 242 Forbes Ave., Downtown. www.revelandroost.com REX THEATER. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6811 RIVERS CASINO. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. 412-231-7777

RIVERVIEW PARK, CITIPARKS STARS AT RIVERVIEW JAZZ SERIES. www.citiparks.net ROCK ROOM. 1054 Herron Ave., Polish Hill. 412-683-4418

SKULL FEST. www.skullfestpgh.com ST. CLAIR PARK. 135 N. Maple Ave., Greensburg. 724-838-4323

SCHENLEY PARK, CITIPARKS WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES. www.citiparks.net SCHENLEY PLAZA. 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-682-7275 THE SHOP. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. 412-951-0622 THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668 SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. South Park. 412-835-4810 SPIRIT. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com STAGE AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483 SYRIA SHRINE CENTER. 1877 Shriners Way, Cheswick. 724-274-7000 TEQUILA COWBOY. 380 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-930-0895 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-6070

WIGLE WHISKEY AND BARRELHOUSE. 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side. 412-235-7796 WILD THINGS PARK. 1 Washington Federal Way, Washington. 724-250-9555

CONTINUES ON PG. 08

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

7


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

Conan, North, Horehound.

Horrid Ordeal. Marlene’s Corner Bar & Grill Rachel B. Revel + Roost

Smiling Moose

Beware of Darkness, Bleeker, Badflower. Mr. Smalls Donnie Iris and the Cruisers.

MAY 27 Cousin Boneless. Gooski’s Franz Ferdinand. Stage AE Stone Cold Killer. Mr. Smalls The Spectres. Howlers Tim Vitullo. Wigle Whiskey & Barrelhouse Bill Toms & Hard Rain.

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Billy Castle, SayBrook. 19th Hole KICK: The INXS Experience. Hard Rock Café Billy Price Band, The Blues Orphans. James Street Gastropub

T-ravill. Radioactive Events Center Far From Fiction, Young Lungs. PLMS Matt Aquiline & the Dead End Streets.

James Street Gastropub

Xasthur, Johanna Warren. Black Forge Army of Optimism. Club Café Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers. Rivers Casino Dawn Ray’d, Dahkma. Rock Room

Club Café (early)

Marc Reisman. Club Café (late) Daniels & McClain. Downey’s House The Turpentiners. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Dumplings. Howlers DUMP HIM. Mr. Roboto

MAY 28 Future Islands. Stage AE Cayetana. Smiling Moose Jon Camp. The Glitter Box Wildhoney. Mr. Roboto

MAY 21 Ty Segall. Mr. Smalls Bat Zuppel, SIDE EYE. The Funhouse

MAY 29

at Mr. Smalls

Balance and Composure, Queen of Jeans, From Indian Lakes. Rex Theater Whitney. Spirit Lexa Terrestrial. Black Forge Lorna Shore. Diesel Club Lounge T.J. Ellison. Cruze Bar Antoinette Manganas Trio. James Street Gastropub

MAY 22 Chastity Brown, Hannah Jenkins. Club Café

Mac DeMarco. Mr. Smalls

Deal Casino, Dollys. Black Forge {PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM HINES}

Future Islands, May 28

MAY 30 Ruby the RabbitFoot. Spirit Old Crow Medicine Show. Stage AE Com Truise. Rex Theater Okilly Dokilly. Hard Rock Café Taj Weekes & Adowa. Club Café Frankie, The Cheats. The Smiling Moose David Throckmorton.

MAY 23

MAY 24

Wolf Eyes, Pharmakon, Container.

Mumford & Sons. KeyBank Pavilion Mako Sica. The Shop Wale. Stage AE Deicide, Dreadeth. Rex Theater Samothrace. Black Forge G-Nome Project. Club Café

Backstage Bar at Theater Square

MAY 25

MAY 31

Warthog, La Misma, Concealed Blade. Brillobox The Semi-Supervillains.

Morbid Angel. Mr. Smalls Pallbearer. Rex Theater Jacob Whitesides. Club AE Katastro and Pacific Dub. Hard Rock Café Joe Hertler & the Rainbow Seekers.

The Shop B’flow. Brillobox B Boys. Gooski’s Flo Wilson. Backstage Bar at Theater Square

Red City Radio, Russian Girlfriends, World’s Scariest Police Chases. Howlers

James Street Gastropub

The Benny Benack Big Band. Phipps Conservatory Future. KeyBank Pavilion Oddisee. Mr. Smalls SayWeCanFly. Rex Theater

Club Café

JUNE 1 Everclear. Stage AE Hed P.E. Rex Theater Slingshot Dakota, Petal. Mr. Roboto The Main Squeeze.

Great Good Fine Ok. Cattivo

Club Café

(downstairs)

Tim Vitullo, A Day Without Love, Izzy Heltai, Strange Monsters. Cattivo (upstairs) Blue Clutch. Club Café Affiance. Diesel Alteras. Radioactive Events Center

A 40th birthday party for Calliope, with legendary singer-songwriter

TOM PAXTON

Sunday, May 21, 7:00 pm, Carnegie Lecture Hall. VIP tickets include food and drink after the concert with Tom & the DonJuans Go to: calliopehouse.org or 412-361-1915

Kerchief, Chilhowee Royal, Swampwalk, Proseed. The Smiling Moose

Hollis Brown. Mr. Smalls

JUNE 2 Chastity Brown, May 22 {PHOTO COURTESY OF WALE AGBOOLA}

MAY 26 As It Is. Rex Theater ’68, Listener. The Smiling Moose The Building. Andy Warhol Museum Sarah Halter, Megan Pennington Trio, Blue Clutch. Club Café (early) The Hernies. Club Café (late) Skeleton Hands. Cattivo Pachyderm, Incadescents. Mr. Roboto Benny Benack. James Street Gastropub

Rebirth Brass Band, Delicious Pastries, Brooke Annibale, Jimbo and the Soupbones. Three Rivers Arts Festival Trash Bag, Sikes. Get Hip HQ The Stickers, The Hobb Sisters. South Park Amphitheater Ms. Lauryn Hill. Byham Theater PSO: Mahler’s Resurrection. Heinz Hall Tom Papa. The Oaks Theater Parquet Courts. Rex Theater Brother Ali. Mr. Smalls Boss Hog. Cattivo Adelaide in Autumn. Club Café Tusk. St. Clair Park Clash of the Decades. Rivers Casino Working Breed. Revel + Roost Hot Mulligan. The Smiling Moose Acid Witch. Gooski’s CONTINUES ON PG. 10

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

9


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VANESSA HEINS}

PUP, June 13

JUNE 3 Hippo Campus, Brachtopus, Pet Clinic. Three Rivers Arts Festival AFI. Stage AE PSO: Mahler’s Resurrection. Heinz Hall White Reaper. Cattivo Walker and the Rebellion. Club Café (early) Easy Roscoe. Club Café (late) Freedom. Cathedral of Hope Chuck Blasko and The Vogues. Rivers Casino

JUNE 4 Las Cafeteras. Three Rivers Arts Festival

Blossoms. Club Café Tim Kasher. Brillobox Slow Caves, Searights, Bascinets. Spirit

JUNE 7 Birds of Chicago, Sean Rowe. Three Rivers Arts Festival U2, The Lumineers. Heinz Field Ferla-Marcinizyn Guitar Duo. Schenley Park Real Friends. Rex Theater Kolars. Club Café Bent Knee. Mr. Smalls The Dwarves. Belvedere’s Martin Freeman, Pat Cain. The Glitter Box

Foster the People.

JUNE 8

Stage AE

Southern Culture on the Skids.

Beats + Bars. Three Rivers Arts Festival

Rex Theater

Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds.

Margaret Glaspy. Club Café

Carnegie Lecture Hall

Dan Koshute.

Wilco. Stage AE Darwin Deez.

Howlers

Sir Cadian Rhythm. Hard

Mr. Smalls

Chillent, Manic Soul. Club Café Echo Black. Cattivo The Whiskey Gentry. Howlers

Rock Café

PSO: Mahler’s Resurrection. Heinz Hall

David Murray and Kahil El Zabar. James Street Gastropub

Pittsburgh Opera. Hartwood Acres

JUNE 9 Future, May 25 {CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

JUNE 5 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Three Rivers Arts Festival

Tool. Petersen Events Center Hayley Kiyoko. Stage AE Tail Light Rebellion. Belvedere’s The Stolen. Hard Rock Café The Steel Wheels. Club Café

JUNE 6 Michael Kiwanuka, Cloves. Three Rivers Arts Festival Mr. Big. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille JOSEPH. Mr. Smalls

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

Dawes, The Accidentals, IT IT. Three Rivers Arts Festival Tamburitzans. South Park Amphitheatre Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. PPG Paints Arena

Protoje. Rex Theater Mike Zito. St. Clair Park Electric Guest. Cattivo L.O.S. Club Café (early) Funkle Aaron Project. Club Café (late) Clubhouse, Liberty Deep Down. Stage AE Carousel Kings. The Smiling Moose Schools Out Tour. Mr. Smalls September Mourning. Diesel Amanda Noah. Revel + Roost Thieves & Lovers. Stage AE PSO: Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto. Heinz Hall


JUNE 10 Sarah Jarosz, Fruition. Three Rivers Arts Festival

The Naked and Famous. Stage AE Manic Pixi. Mr. Roboto Wiz Khalifa, Lil Uzi Vert. Wild Things Park B.o.B. Diesel Tania Grubbs Quartet. Riverview Park Joe Grushecky & the Houserockers. Club Café

Hail the Sun. Cattivo King 810, Eternal Sleep. Rex Theater Ugly Blondes. Mr. Smalls Selwyn Birchwood. Moondogs Johnny Hates 45s, Define Irony. The Smiling Moose

PSO: Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto. Heinz Hall

JUNE 11 St. Paul and the Broken Bones, The Shacks. Three Rivers Arts Festival Zac Brown Band. KeyBank Pavilion Russ. Stage AE St. Paul and The Broken Bones. Three Rivers Arts Festival Mephiskapheles. Club Café River City Brass Band. Hartwood Acres

PSO: Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto. Heinz Hall

JUNE 12 Bruce Robison. Club Café 24Hrs, Isaiah Small. Rex Theater

JUNE 13 PUP. Spirit Hall and Oates & Tears for Fears. PPG Paints Arena Toto. Palace Theatre

Michael Franti & Spearhead. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall Elvis Costello & The Imposters. Heinz Hall

All Them Witches. Club Café Barns Courtney. Stage AE The Orphan, the Poet. Diesel Culture Abuse. Mr. Roboto anybody but the cops. The Glitter Box Ghostnote. Cattivo

JUNE 14 FUSE@PSO: Mash-Up Mix-Down with Time For Three. Heinz Hall James Vincent McMorrow. Mr. Smalls Bailen. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls All Them Witches. Club Café Rainbow Kitten Surprise. Stage AE Gaelic Storm. Palace Theatre Los Colognes. Brillobox Bruce Katz. Schenley Park Bill Nace, Twig Harper. The Glitter Box

JUNE 15 Sigur Rós. Stage AE Dead & Company. KeyBank Pavilion The Hootz. Tequila Cowboy Bar & Grill Curse Words. Spirit

JUNE 16 The Mulligan Brothers. Club Café Nicole Atkins. South Park Jevon Rushton. Revel + Roost Jason Walker. Hard Rock Café Black Masala. St. Clair Park

SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 9:00 PM AUGUST WILSON CENTER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

11


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 11

After 87. Smiling Moose David Sanborn Electric Band.

JUNE 25

Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Multiple venues.

Halo Circus. Club Café The Well. Howlers Weedeater. Cattivo The Regrettes. Mr. Smalls Orkestra Mendoza. Hartwood Acres Quinta Voce Wind Quintet. Mellon Park

JUNE 17

JUNE 26

August Wilson Center

4th River Music Festival. OWL Hollow

JUNE 16-18

Xenia Rubinos. Club Café Byrne and Kelly. Pittsburgh Winery

Angélique Kidjo. August Wilson Center Banks. Stage AE IT IT. Cattivo Sam Hunt. KeyBank Pavilion Amuck. The Smiling Moose Greg Kihn Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Semi-Supervillains.

JUNE 27 Thursday, mewithoutYou. Mr. Smalls Planes Mistaken For Stars, Slaves B.C. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Fates Warning. Rex Theater Free Throw, Heart Attack Man.

James Street Gastropub

The David Bach Consort. St. Clair Park Tough Night on Carson.

The Smiling Moose Gates. Mr. Roboto

Mr. Small’s Theatre

4th River Music Festival. OWL Hollow Stitched Up Heart. Mr. Smalls Rachel B. Riverview Park

JUNE 28

JUNE 18

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK FANCHER}

Marshall Crenshaw y Los Straitjackets. Club Café Indigenous. Diesel 4th River Music Festival. OWL Hollow Johnny Angels & The Halos. Hartwood Acres

River City Brass. Mellon Park

JUNE 19 Strawberry Girls. The Smiling Moose See Through Dresses. Black Forge Thomas Wyn & the Believers. Club Café Icon For Hire. Cattivo

JUNE 20 Brian Setzer’s Rockabilly Riot. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall Icon for Hire. Cattivo CupcakKe, K.I.D. Club Café Tera Melos, CHON. Rex Theater Otep. Diesel Adrenaline Mob. Hard Rock Café The Ghost Wolves. Brillobox

Saintseneca, June 21

JUNE 21 Tigers Jaw, Saintseneca. Rex Theater Teen Daze, Sam OB. Club Café Rivers & Robots. Crossroads Church rch GumBand. Schenley Park Alvarez Kings. Mr. Smalls Two Tall Twins. Revel + Roost

JUNE 22 Water Seed. Spirit Shotgun Shane. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Otherwise. Diesel Telekinetic Yeti, Sarlacc, Mires. Mr. Roboto

JUNE 23 BJ Barham. Club Café U.S. Army Field Band Jazz Ambassadors. South Park Amphitheatre Rhode Island Sound, The Navy Rock Band. St. Clair Park

Train, O.A.R., Natasha Bedingfield. KeyBank Pavilion

The Coteries. The Frick Art & Historical Center Kevin Greenspon. Cattivo

JUNE 23-25

Snakehips. Mr. Smalls Dirty Heads. Highmark Stadium Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Joel Lindsay. Revel + Roost Evergreen. Schenley Park Fates Warning. Rex Theater The elovaters. Diesel

JUNE 29 The O’Jays. Heinz Hall Cody Jinks, Paul Cauthen. Stage AE Miss May I. Rex Theater

Ladyfest 2017. Multiple venues. PSO: Honeck Conducts Beethoven. Heinz Hall

JUNE 30

JUNE 24 The Clarks. Stage AE Dierks Bentley. KeyBank Pavilion Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears. Schenley Plaza

Holy Ghost Tent Revival. St. Clair Park Illustrations. Black Forge Johnny Hates 45s. Mr. Roboto Round2Crew. The Smiling Moose Mutlu. Club Café Lee Robinson. Riverview Park

Marshall Tucker Band. Palace Theatre Jared & The Mill. Cattivo Orkestra. St. Clair Park The Best of the Worst. Mr. Roboto Cobalt. Black Forge The British Invasion Experience. The Frick Art & Historical Center

JULY 1 Adult Mom, Free Cake For Every Creature. Mr. Roboto CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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SOUTH SIDE HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM • FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

412.431.0700 • PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM 12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

)ROORZXVWRƓQGRXWZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER Ř FACEBOOK.COM/PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER


3WS

All concerts are free and Food trucks and Hop Farm Brewing begin at 7:30 p.m. unless Company craft beer at all concerts otherwise noted. beginning at 6:00 p.m.

June 2 June 9 June 16

The Stickers with special guest The Hobbs Sisters (Country) Tamburitzans (Eastern European Folk Music & Dance) Nicole Atkins with special guest Bindley Hardware Co.

June 4 June 11 June 18

U.S. Army Field Band Jazz Ambassadors – America’s Big Band

(Jazz)

June 25 July 2 July 9 July 16 July 23

NRBQ with special guest Wreck Loose (Rock/Folk) Gin Blossoms with special guest Jimmer Podrasky & The Redd-Ups

July 30 Aug. 6

JD McPherson with special guest Dan Getkin & The Twelve Six

Aug. 13

Sauce Boss with special guest Jimbo & The Soupbones (Blues) The Outlaws with special guest The Steppin Stones (Southern Rock) Summer of Love (Woodstock) The Commonheart with special guest The Telephone Line (Rock)

Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Sept. 3

(Soul/Americana)

June 23

(Big Band/Patriotic)

July 1 July 7 July 14 July 21

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (Orchestral) -Starts at 8:05 pm BNY Mellon Jazz presents Joey DeFrancesco & Catherine Russell

(Alternative Rock)

July 28

(Rockabilly/Blues)

Aug. 4 Aug. 11 Aug. 18 Aug. 25

alleghenycounty.us/summer

Pittsburgh Opera (Opera) River City Brass Band (Classical/Pops/Jazz) Father’s Day Car Cruise & Concert featuring Johnny Angel & The Halos (Oldies) Car Cruise@2:00-7:00 pm - Concert@7:30 pm

Orkesta Mendoza with special guest Beauty Slap (Ranchera/Indie Rock) Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (Orchestral) -Starts at 8:15 pm Tank & The Bangas with special guest Sweet Crude (Funk-Soul) Boz Scaggs with special guest Jeff LeBlanc (Rock/Soul/Blues) The Mavericks with special guest The Last Bandoleros (Americana/Country Pop)

Con Funk Shun with special guest Funky Fly Project (Funk) “Nick’s Fat City Night” feat. Gathering Field and Brownie Mary with special guests Scott, Rob & Greg of the Clarks Acoustic (Rock/Pop/Folk) BNY Mellon Jazz presents Larry Carlton with special guest Don Aliquo Sr. & Jr. “Fathers and Sons” Album Release Celebration (Jazz) Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre (Ballet) Billy Porter (Pop/Soul/Broadway) 18th Annual Allegheny County Music Festival featuring Rusted Root with special guests The Velcro Shoes, The Buckledowns and Andre Costello & The Cool Minors (World Beat/Rock/Pop)- $20 per vehicle requested

donation benefits Allegheny County Department of Human Services Opening bands at 5:00 pm - Rusted Root at 8:00 pm

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

13


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

New Kids On The Block, Boyz II Men, Paula Abdul. PPG Paints Arena Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

JULY 9 Tank & The Bangas. Hartwood Acres Pine Creek Community Band. Mellon Park

South Park Amphitheatre Rumours. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Pokey LaFarge. Rex Theater

JULY 11 Megadeth, Meshuggah. Stage AE Idina Menzel. Heinz Hall Hamish Anderson. Club Café Escuela. Mr. Roboto

Peter Mawanga & the Amaravi Movement. St. Clair Park Rock 4 Vets Music Festival. Moondogs Wildspeaker. Black Forge Olga Watkins. Riverview Park

JULY 12

JULY 2

PRIESTS. Mr. Smalls Karl Franklin. Schenley Park

Chase and the Barons. Hambone’s

JULY 13

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

Pinegrove, Half Waif. Cattivo Robbie Fulks. Club Café

Hartwood Acres

Edgewood Symphony Orchestra. Mellon Park

JULY 14

JULY 3 Beatlemania Magic. Rivers Casino

JULY 4

{PHOTO COURTESY OF EBRU YILDIZ}

No Bad JuJu. Rivers Casino

JULY 5

PWR BTTM, July 7

Blackbear. Mr. Smalls Seventh Nova. Schenley Park

JULY 7

JULY 8

JULY 6

PWR BTTM, iji, T-Rextasy. Cattivo Darling Nikki: A Tribute to Prince. Hard Rock Café

Miss Raines & The New Hip.

Western Centuries. St. Clair Park Satisfaction. Rivers Casino JD Eicher. The Frick Art & Historical Center Joey DeFrancesco, Catherine Russell.

Punchline. Mr. Smalls Flow Tribe. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Secret Stuff. Mr. Roboto Mushroomhead. Rex Theater Dancing Dream. St. Clair Park U2 By UV. Hard Rock Café Jay Vonada Trio. Riverview Park BxC Collective. The Glitter Box

Club Café 311. Stage AE Jauntee. Cattivo Glenn Joney. The Glitter Box

South Park Amphitheatre

Vans Warped Tour. KeyBank Pavilion Airpark. Club Café NRBQ. South Park Amphitheatre Corey Feldman. Hard Rock Café Center for Young Musicians, The Emotions. The Frick Art & Historical Center Front Country. St. Clair Park Earthling, Ether. Black Forge

JULY 14-15 Deutschtown Music Festival. Multiple venues.

JULY 14-16 PSO: The Music of John Williams. Heinz Hall CONTINUES ON PG. 16

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

15


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

JULY 15

JULY 27

James Taylor, Bonnie Raitt.

Julie Byrne, Johanna Warren. Mr. Smalls Love and Theft. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

PPG Paints Arena

Girls Guns and Glory. St. Clair Park Divulge, Remissions. The Smiling Moose Big Fat Jazz. Riverview Park

JULY 28 Amos Lee, Lake Street Dive. Stage AE Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Boston. KeyBank Pavilion The Wailers. Rex Theater Sun King Warriors. St. Clair Park Strand of Oaks. Schenley Plaza JD McPherson. South Park Amphitheatre Elle Casazza. The Frick Art & Historical Center Chris Higbee, The Hobb Sisters.

JULY 16 MercyMe, Jeremy Camp, Natalie Grant, Jimi Cravity. KeyBank Pavilion

Boz Scaggs. Hartwood Acres West Hills Symphonic Band. Mellon Park

JULY 17

Rivers Casino

Violent Femmes, Echo and the Bunnymen. Stage AE Maticic. Mr. Smalls Fraternal Twin, Stolen Jars. Mr. Roboto

JULY 29 Kelsey Waldon. St. Clair Park Jim Donovan. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Kea Michaels. Riverview Park

JULY 18 OneRepublic, Fitz & The Tantrums.

JULY 30

KeyBank Pavilion Antichrist. Smiling Moose

JULY 19 Phish. Petersen Events Center Pink Talking Fish. Rex Theater R.E.D. Schenley Park

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GUS BENNETT JR.}

Tank and the Bangas, July 9

JULY 20 PSO ft. Common. Heinz Hall Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams. Club Café

Raekwon. Mr. Smalls Wild Child. Rex Theater Full Monty. Moondogs

JULY 21 Lawn Care. The Glitter Box Gin Blossoms, Jimmer Podrasky & The Redd-Ups. South Park Amphitheatre Rockin’ the Paradise. Rivers Casino Classical Mystery Tour. Heinz Hall King Fez. The Frick Art & Historical Center

be cool this summer.

JULY 22-23 Pittsburgh Blues & Roots Festival.

JULY 31 Old Salt Union. Club Café The Melvins. Rex Theater The Australian Pink Floyd Show.

Syria Shrine Center

Palace Theatre

JULY 22

Glass Animals, Little Dragon. Stage AE Hurray for the Riff Raff. Mr. Smalls

Johnny Mathis. Heinz Hall Matt the Electrician. Club Café 10,000 Maniacs. Mr. Smalls Dan Getkin and the Twelve Six. Cattivo Honey Island Swamp Band. St. Clair Park Shining Star and Get Ready.

AUG. 1 LFO. Hard Rock Café The Shins, Tennis. Stage AE Muse, 30 Seconds to Mars, PVRIS. KeyBank Pavilion

AUG. 2 Rancid, Dropkick Murphys, The Bouncing Souls. Stage AE Tana Mongeau and Friends.

Rivers Casino

Bobby Short. Riverview Park

JULY 23 Maticic. Hambone’s Dwight Yoakam.

Subscribe to Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Jazz’s fall season!

Mr. Smalls

Béla Fleck and the Flecktones.

Palace Theatre

The Mavericks, The Last Bandoleros.

Named one of the best venues in the world by Downbeat Magazine for live Jazz.

Hartwood Acres

For concert information call 412.322.0800 or visit us at MCGJazz.org.

JULY 25

Follow us @mcgjazz.

Neurosis, Converge. Rex Theater Primus. Stage AE Foxygen. Mr. Smalls Con Funk Shun. Hartwood Acres Mon Valley Community Band. Mellon Park

Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall Jahouija Bones. Schenley Park

Aeolian Winds. Mellon Park

JULY 24 Mt. Joy. Club Café

31 13

31 YEARS 13 SHOWS 3 FAN PIX 1 GREAT NEW SEASON

AUG. 3 Violent Femmes, July 17 {CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

NE-HI. Mr. Smalls Social Distortion. Stage AE

AUG. 4

Negative Approach, Bloodclot. Cattivo Bob Schneider. Club Café All Time Low. Stage AE

Jimmy Herring & the Invisible Whip.

JULY 26

AUG. 5

Piebald. Mr. Smalls Spoon, The New Pornographers. Stage AE Davy Knowles. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Kea Michaels. Schenley Park Incubus, Jimmy Eat World. KeyBank Pavilion

Mr. Smalls

Southern Avenue. St. Clair Park Sauce Boss. South Park Amphitheatre Digitour. Rex Theater Merrow. James Street Gastropub The English Channel. St. Clair Park Austin John Winkler. Diesel L.A. Guns. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Roger Humphries. Riverview Park CONTINUES ON PG. 18

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

17


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

N AT I O N A L F O L K D A N C E E N S E M B L E O F C R O AT I A

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 7:30PM BYHAM THEATER, 101 6th St, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 presented by:

www.CroExpo.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF SIMONE CECCHETTI}

Kaki King, Aug. 25

AUG. 6 Jeff Rosenstock, Laura Stevenson. Mr. Smalls

The Rocket Summer. Rex Theater The Tillers. Club Café Brantley Gilbert. KeyBank Pavilion The Rocket Summer. Rex Theater Don Felder. Palace Theater Gathering Field, Brownie Mary.

Johnny Hates 45s. Mr. Roboto Tuika’s Polynesian Island Magic. The Frick Art & Historical Center Carolyn Wonderland. St. Clair Park The Outlaws. South Park Amphitheatre Head Games. Rivers Casino The Bloody Lips, Sketchy. Gooski’s

AUG. 12 Foreigner, Cheap Trick.

Hartwood Acres

Allegheny Brass Band.

KeyBank Pavilion

Crack the Sky.

Mellon Park

Jeff Lashway.

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Selwyn Birchwood Band.

Highland Park

AUG. 7

St. Clair Park

Reggie Watkins.

Nickelback. KeyBank Pavilion

“An audience of 5000 certainly appreciated some of the most skillful and inventive performances of the national dance ever seen at the Royal Albert Hall.” EVENING NEWS – LONDON

Riverview Park

AUG. 8

AUG. 13

Rozwell Kid, Chris Farren.

Gov’t Mule.

Mr. Smalls

Stage AE

Tesla. The

Dick Dale. Rex Theater

Palace Theatre

Sidewalk Chalk. Spirit InAeona. Black Forge Dashboard Confessional. Stage AE

AUG. 9

Larry Carlton, Don Aliquo Sr. and Jr. Hartwood Acres Chris Farren, Aug. 8 {PHOTO COURTESY OF ERICA LAUREN}

www.trustarts.org

Box Office hours: 9am - 9pm (Monday through Saturday); Noon - 6pm (Sunday)

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

Craig Davis. Highland Park

AUG. 14

Schenley Park

Yes. Palace Theatre Taking Back Sunday, Every Time I Die. Stage AE Todd Rundgren, Carl Palmer.

AUG. 10

[412]456-6666

Mellon Park

SPORTS (OK). Spirit The Roosevelts. Mr. Smalls Scott Sharrard. James Street Gastropub Wizdom World Beat Reggae Band. Die Antwoord. Stage AE

tickets:

East Winds Symphonic Band.

Dark Star Orchestra. Stage AE Earth, Wind & Fire, Chic. PPG Paints Arena

AUG. 11

Uhtcearu. Black Forge

AUG. 16

Palace Theatre

Sabrina Carpenter. Byham Theater Carol McHenry. Schenley Park

Chris Stapleton, Margo Price.

AUG. 17-20

KeyBank Pavilion

Skull Fest 9. Multiple venues.


AUG. 18 DOOM, Seige, Behind Enemy Lines, Appalachian Terror Unit. Spirit B. St. Clair Park Kings of Leon. KeyBank Pavilion Stephen Stills & Judy Collins. Palace Theatre

Summer of Love. South Park Amphitheatre The Mixus Brothers. The Frick Art & Historical Center

AUG. 19 Florida Georgia Line, Nelly, Chris Lane. KeyBank Pavilion

Banditos. St. Clair Park Rick Finkelstein, Marti Aggazio. Riverview Park

AUG. 20 Neal Morse Band. Mr. Smalls Shawn Mendes, Charlie Puth. PPG Paints Arena Ted Nugent. Palace Theatre Max Leake. Highland Park

AUG. 22 Bruno Mars. PPG Paints Arena The Chris Robinson Brotherhood. Mr. Smalls

AUG. 23 Two Tall Twins. Schenley Park

AUG. 24 The Juliana Theory. Rex Theater

AUG. 25 The Juliana Theory. Rex Theater Kaki King. August Wilson Center Major and the Monbacks. St. Clair Park The Commonheart. South Park Amphitheatre Funky Fly Project. Riverview Park The Optimists. The Frick Art & Historical Center

AUG. 26 Resilient. Howlers Luke Wade. St. Clair Park Leftover Salmon. Feastival

AUG. 27 Billy Porter. Hartwood Acres Cliff Barnes Trio. Highland Park

AUG. 30 7 Bridges: The Ultimate Eagles Experience. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Shinizyn. Schenley Park

AUG. 31 Haken. Rex Theater

SEPT. 1 Deep Purple, Alice Cooper. KeyBank Pavilion

Think Pink. St. Clair Park The Pitt Pendulums, Emily French. The Frick Art & Historical Center

SEPT. 2 Birds of Chicago. St. Clair Park

SEPT. 3 Rusted Root. Hartwood Acres Alton Merrell. Highland Park

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

19


PIRATES FANJAM POSTGAME CONCERTS PRESENTED BY HIGHMARK

FLO RIDA

FRIDAY, MAY 26 | 7:05PM PIRATES vs METS See Flo Rida and hear some of his biggest hits like Low, GDFR, Right Round and My House.

Plus — get even closer to the acts when you purchase a field pass for the concert for $25!

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


CHICAGO

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4 | 7:05PM PIRATES vs PADRES Watch them perform favorites like Saturday in the Park, Colour My World and Hard to Say I’m Sorry.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

21


FILMS SUMMER

{BY AL HOFF}

47 Meters Down, June 16

HERE COMES the summer season,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

and with it, at least one reason to hit the movie theater: air conditioning. But let’s stay hopeful that the usual schedule of action films, silly comedies and oddball movies of August will prove worth the trip. Summer is a great time for catching up with old friends, and some sequels will let you do just that. On May 26, judge if the scallywags of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales have worn out their welcome on their fifth visit. Apparently, these mechanical things never stop running: Cars 3 returns on June 16, and on June 23, it’s Transformers: The Last Knight. Check back with your minion pals in Despicable Me 3, on June 30, and your angry simian relatives in War for the Planet of the Apes (July 14). Another alarming check-up arrives courtesy of Al Gore on July 28: An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power. A couple of old favorites also get a rework this summer. It’s the battle of the bare-chested in Baywatch, hitting the beach on May 25. Tom Cruise confronts an ancient Egyptian spooky chick in The Mummy (June 9), and Tom Holland webs up as the crime-fighter in Spider-Man: Homecoming (July 7). There is plenty of action in the warmer

War for the Planet of the Apes, July 14

Dunkirk, July 21

months. A lady kicks it off with Wonder Woman, on June 2. It’s candy-colored space adventure in Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (July 21). Charlize Theron is a kick-ass Cold War spy in Atomic Blonde (July 28). From the Stephen King novels, The Dark Tower, starring Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey, drops Aug. 4. CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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Just Summer! is part of the Kelly Strayhorn Theater’s East Liberty LIVE! series.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

23


SUMMER FILMS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

All Eyez on Me, June 16

Amuse yourself with a slate of (hope- the poop emoji. The local art and rep houses will offer fully) funny films. Rough Night (June 16) finds a bachelorette party going off the fare beyond explosions. During the Three rails; on July 21, similar problems befall a Rivers Arts Festival, the Harris Theater will group of women on a New Orleans trip in present the International Animated Shorts Girls Trip. The Big Sick (June 23) adapts the Program and Workshop (June 2-5). On June real-life rom-com of Kumail Nanjiani, the 5-6, in conjunction with the festival and Muslim American comedian who has con- Pride Week, the Harris will screen the 2016 flicts with his in-laws when his wife gets documentary The Freedom to Marry, about the legal fight for marriage equality. And sick. Amy Poehler and Will Ferrell star in check the Pittsburgh FilmmakThe House (June 30), about a desers website for other indie, perate couple who open their off-beat and classic films own casino. Two sets of this summer (www. laughs on Aug. 18: The pghfilmmakers.org). Hitman’s Bodyguard, The Hollywood, with Ryan Reynolds in Dormont, will and Samuel L. Jackpresent Exhibition son, and Steven on Screen, a miniSoderbergh’s Logan series about artists, Lucky, about a heist featuring I, Claude at a NASCAR race. Monet (May 20), For more draThe Artist’s Garden: matic fare, looks for American ImpresAll Eyez on Me (June sionism (June 3) and 16), a Tupac Shakur Michelangelo: Love and bio-pic; Sofia Coppola’s Death (June 17). On May Southern-gothic thriller Atomic Blonde, July 28 26, look for two new docuThe Beguiled (June 23); Chrismentaries about jazz, Chasing topher Nolan’s World War II film Dunkirk (July 21); and Detroit (Aug. 4), Trane and I Called Him Morgan. The warmer weather means area Kathryn Bigelow’s drama about the 1967 riots that shook that city. Thrills come cour- drive-ins are open, and Pittsburghers can tesy of the pandemic horror film It Comes also walk to several city parks for outdoor at Night (June 9) and the underwater freak- films: The Dollar Bank Cinema in the Park out 47 Meters Down (June 16). Then there (www.citiparks.net) series returns on June are the films that resist classification, such 4, with recent films including Moana and as A Ghost Story (July 7), starring an old- Queen of Katwe, plus Spark!, three films fashioned sheet-with-eyes-cut-out ghost, designed to encourage discussion; this and animated The Emoji Movie (July 28), year, see films at a new added location at featuring Patrick Stewart as the voice of Oakland’s Schenley Plaza. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


Downtown Summer Fun! JULY 28-29, 2017

Friday and Saturday Noon – 10 PM CLEMENTE BRIDGE | DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

Swing by Market Square for more free fun and activities including Kidsplay, Yoga, Thursdays Farmers Market, Move it Mondays, Dancing In the Square, Games, Reading Room and much more!

Kids PLay a

ENLIVEN and enrich your child’s summer with KidsPlay at Market Square! This FREE program brings fun and educational programs for children and their families to Downtown.

TUESDAYS: JUNE 13 – AUG. 29, 10:00–11:30 A.M. SATURDAYS: JUNE 17 – AUG. 26, 10:00 A.M.–1:00 P.M.

YOGA in the

SQUARE

Visit DOWNTOWNPITTSBURGH.COM for Details! Follow us att

Pittsburgh’s favorite FREE YOGA series is expanding and will now bring TWO FREE one-hour yoga classes to Market Square with some of the region’s best yoga instructors!

SUNDAYS, WITH JUNE 4 – SEPT. 24, 10:00–11:00 A.M. WEDNESDAYS, WITH JUNE 7 – AUG. 30 FROM 5:30–6:30 P.M.

@ @DowntownPitt D PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

25


{ART BY SETH STORCK}

SUMMER

ARTS CURRENT The Andy Warhol Museum. Firelei Baéz: Bloodlines (paintings and drawings on themes of race and colonialism), through Sun., May 21. Jace Clayton: Silver Clouds, through June 11. Activist Print: Alicia B. Wormsley: We Live, through June 18. Also: permanent exhibits. Lantern Building. Remembering Pittsburgh (David Aschkenas’ photos of neighborhoods circa 1980), through Sun., May 21. ToonSeum. Hermetically Sealed: The Art of Ed Piskor (work by local artist best known for The Hip Hop Family Tree graphic-history series), through Sun., May 21.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. The Art

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. When Modern Was Contemporary: Selections from the Roy R. Neuberger Collection (tracing the development of modern art in the U.S.), through Sun., May 21. Carnegie Museum of Art. Action, Ideas, Architecture: Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio (50 years of the iconic Pittsburgh-based architect), through Mon., May 22. Teenie Harris Photographs: Erroll Garner and Jazz from the Hill, through July 23. Michael Williams (new canvases and more from the pioneering artist who combines painting, airbrushing and ink-jet printing), through Aug. 27. Styles and Customs of the 2020s (virtual-reality experience), through Sept. 4. Shaping a Modern Legacy: Karl and Jennifer Salatka Collect (works by de Kooning, Johns, Warhol and more), through Oct. 15. Plus permanent exhibitions. Jewish Community Center. Pittsburgh 10 + Friends (group show of contemporary work in various media), through May 26. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Thrown & Altered (juried group ceramics show), through May 26.

Contemporary Craft BNY Mellon Satellite Gallery. /Kyoob/, a multimedia group show for 17 international artists exploring the geometric form of the cube, through May 27. FrameHouse & Jask Gallery. Talismans + Transformations (100-plus works on paper, paintings and more by Connie Merriman and Michel Demetria Tsouris), through May 27.

Deep Delirium: Fever Dream Beings by Seth Storck, Aug. 19-Sept. 30 at The Gallery 4

{ART BY JOAN BRINDLE}

Overgrown in Pittsburgh opens June 1 at the Irma Freeman Center. {ART BY LYLE ASHTON HARRIS / IMAGE COURTESY OF THE STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM, PHOTO BY SASHA J. MENDEZ}

The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art opens July 22.

June 29 & 30, July 1 & 2 FREE ADMISSION

TWIN LAKES PARK www.artsandheritage.com 26

Gallerie Chiz. In The Afterglow (porcelain and stoneware by Nicholas Bernard, oil on paper by Susan Middleman), through May 27. The Mine Factory. Work by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh members, curated by Christine Smith, through May 27. Percolate Artspace. 98 Reasons (paintings by Johnstown resident Mildred Sidorow, age 98), thorugh June 1. Artists Image Resource. The Digs — Sexism in the Arts (group show by women artists), through June 2.

• 4 Stages of LIVE Entertainment • Over 40 Ethnic Food Booths • Over 200 Artist Market Booths • Fine Art & Photography Exhibit • Interactive Art Mural • Booth Signings • FestivalCon

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

of Healing Exhibition: Reflections 2017, through June 2. Lawrence Hall. Paintings by Lisa Bergant Koi, an Associated Artists of Pittsburgh show, through June 3. be Galleries. Respite (painting and textiles by Sharon McCartney), through June 7. North Hills Art Center. Regional Show (juror: Ron Donoughe), through June 9. Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. Teapots! (11th annual invitational), through June 10. Gallery on 43rd Street. Pinched Clay Pots: A Tribute to the Work of Marlene Boyle, 1949-2013, through June 17. 707 and 709 Penn Galleries. Communal Resurrection: The Soul of a Community (works by Steve Prince reflecting the history of black music in America), through June 18. Gallery talk and printmaking party: May 26 Future Tenant. Cross-Eyed and Painless: Exploring Myth in the Digital Color Field (paintings by Patrick Schmidt), through June 18. SPACE Gallery. Non-Punk Pittsburgh (compilation of photos, video and more from the late-’70s/early-’80s underground music scene), through June 18. East Liberty Presbyterian Church. Cursed by Night (photos by Hannah Price about “the world of darkness to which black males are unfortunately tied”), through June 23. Gallery 4. Salon Show 2016 (annual group show with some two dozen artists), through June 24. Hoyt Center for the Arts. Hoyt at the Confluence. Don Gold & Students (paintings), through June 29. August Wilson Center. Instill & Inspire: The John and Vivian Hewitt Collection of African-American Art (58 paintings and drawings by 20th-century artists), through June 30.

FEATURING JOANNA CONNOR MARK SHILANSKY & JOIN THE CLUB STEVE BLUM & THE MOLECULAR ORGAN TRIO REGGIE WATKINS & THE STEELTOWN HORNS PLUS 5 MORE BANDS

SATURDAY, MAY 27 | INDIANA, PA 10:00 A.M.-LATE

FREE ADMISSION

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MUSEUMS + GALLERIES

“Vivid, perceptive, and quietly gripping.” — The New York Times

707 PENN GALLERY. Downtown, 412-325-7017

AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Squirrel Hill, 412-521-8010

THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. North Side, 412-237-8300

ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF BUTLER COUNTY. 724-283-6922 BE GALLERIES. Lawrenceville, 412-687-2606 BOOM CONCEPTS. Garfield, www.facebook.com/boomconcepts

BOXHEART GALLERY. Bloomfield,

LANTERN BUILDING. 12-471-6070 Downtown, 412-471-6070 LAWRENCE HALL. Downtown, D k www.pointpark.edu MATTRESS FACTORY. North Side, 412-231-3169 THE MINE FACTORY. Point Breeze, www.minefactory.com

East Liberty, 412-441-3800

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS. Shadyside, 412-441-5200 PANZA GALLERY. Millvale, 412-821-0959 PERCOLATE ART SPACE. Wilkinsburg, 412-606-1220 PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. North Side, 412-231-7881 PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Shadyside, 412-361-0873 PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Downtown. www.trustarts.org PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Friendship, 412-365-2145

FILMMAKERS GALLERIES.

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY.

412-687-8858

BUTLER ART CENTER. Butler, 724-822-6922 CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Oakland, 412-622-3131

CONCEPT ART GALLERY. Edgewood, 412-242-9200

CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Strip District, 412-261-7003

CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Downtown, 412-261-7003 EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. North Oakland, 412-681-5449

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Point Breeze, 412-371-0600

FRAMEHOUSE & JASK GALLERY. Lawrenceville, 412-586-4559

FUTURE TENANT. Downtown, 412-325-7037 GALLERIE CHIZ. Shadyside, 412-441-6005 THE GALLERY 4. Shadyside, 412-363-5050 GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Lawrenceville,

South Side, 412-431-1810

SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT JOHNSTOWN. 814-269-7234 SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT LIGONIER VALLEY. 724-238-6015 SPACE GALLERY. Downtown, 412-325-7723 SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Friendship, rclaraval@gmail.com

SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS.

412-683-6488

Sewickley, 412-741-4405

HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS.

THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Downtown,

New Castle, 724-652-2882

www.3riversartsfest.org

HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Oakland, 412-268-2434 IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Bloomfield, 412-924-0634 JAMES GALLERY. West End, 412-922-9800 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER.

TOONSEUM. Downtown, 412-232-0199 UNSMOKE ARTSPACE. Braddock,

Squirrel Hill, 412-521-8010

www.unsmokeartspace.com

WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Greensburg, 724-837-1500 WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Downtown, 412-471-5605

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Exquisite Patterns in

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier Valley.

Nature, through June 30.

Dennis Sheehan: Atmopsheres an American Tonalist (paintings), through Aug. 6. Contemporary Craft. #PinballLand (Jhenny Adams explores weaving and engineering), through Aug. 11. Oaths and Epithets: Work by Sonya Clark (“an investigation of the inherent histories embedded in familiar materials” including human hair, thread and gold), through Aug. 19. Wood Street Galleries. Bios and The Big Picture (Robotlab creations drawing landscapes and transcribing the Bible), through Sept. 3. Frick Art Museum. Elise Adibe: Respiration Paintings (unusual exhibition in the Frick’s greenhouse), through Oct. 15.

Jewish Community Center. Pittsburgh 10+ Again — Art for a Cause (multimedia group show), through June 30. Spinning Plate Gallery. Shakespeare Drawings by Richard Claraval, through June 30. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Solo & Collaborative Exhibits (nine gallery shows in a variety of media), through July 23. American Jewish Museum. Rochelle Blumenfeld: Hill District Paintings, through July 30. Pittsburgh Glass Center. States of Flux (experimental work by Leana Quade), through July 30. Summer Lecture Series continues weekly through Aug. 9 (except for May 31 and July 12). Mattress Factory. Factory Installed (group show of installations), through Aug. 6. so it is (artists from Northern Ireland), through Aug. 6. A Second Home (house-sized installation by Dennis Maher), ongoing. Plus permanent installations.

Photo Antiquities Museum of Photographic History. Some 260 photos and artifacts, some getting their first-ever public display, make up this show centering on Abraham Lincoln, through December. James Gallery. The gallery will host “an evolving, curated display of works by regional and national artists throughout the summer.”

[ MAY 13 – JUNE 4, 2017 ]

IRONBOUND BY Martyna Majok DIRECTED BY Tracy Brigden

Use code CITYCITY to save $5 on single tickets

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org / South Side

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

27


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

the 2016 Pennsylvania election), June 10July 29 (reception June 10). be Galleries. Art by Cynthia Cooley starts June 10. The Andy Warhol Museum. Andy Warhol: Stars of the Silver Screen (archival exhibition exploring Warhol’s fascination with celebrity), June 16-Sept. 24. Activist Prints: Bekezela Mguni opens June 19. Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. Glassweekend ’17, June 16-Sept. 30. Frick Art Museum. Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty (140-plus images from the famed photographer, from social-realist works to portraits and fashion photos), June 17-Sept. 10. Mattress Factory. Urban Garden Party, June 18 Concept Art Gallery. Signs (photographs by Chuck Biddle and Mark Perrott), opening reception June 22. Silver Eye Center for Photography. (re) Opening Celebration at new location, June 24. Past Present Future: Western Pennsylvania’s People and Places (salon-style survey spanning a century and featuring images from icons like W. Eugene Smith and Duane Michals, plus contemporary student work), June 27-Aug. 19 (reception: July 7).

MAY Hoyt Center for the Arts. Christopher Clamp (oil paintings) and Raul Diaz (paintings and sculptures), Tue., May 23-July 27. Butler Art Center. Annual Spring Show, May 26-June 17. Small Works Art Show, May 26June 17. Dual opening reception: May 26. Artists’ Gallery. A Fine Art Exhibition (work by Pittsburgh Area Fine Arts Photography members), May 26 and 27. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Reminiscence Art Pop-Up Show, May 26-28. BoxHeart Gallery. Carolyn Reed Barritt: Black & Blue (paintings, drawings and sculpture), May 30-June 30; Theodore Bolha: Before We Were Born (cut-paper art), May 30-June 30. Dual reception: June 3.

JUNE Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, June 2.

BOOM Concepts. Yes And, the conversation continues (Anna Failla on sexual-assault awareness) opens June 2.

Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. With performances, public art, a juried visual-art exhibition and more, June 2-11.

JULY

First Friday Pop-Up Gallery. Work by local artists and local student artists, June 2-17 (reception June 2), 659 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-215-6687 Gallerie Chiz. A New Season (pastels by Don Art by Theodore Gardi, clay by Margaret Bolha, May 30Haden), June 2-July 1 June 30 at (reception: June 2). BoxHeart Gallery Lantern Building. Cosmic Design: Work by Shanthi Chandrasekar, June 2-July 2.

Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Overgrown in Pittsburgh

Art by Michel Demetria Tsouris, through May 27 at Framehouse & Jask Gallery

(paintings by Pittsburghnative artist Joan Brindle, Roshida Abira Ali, Jim Brindle and Irma Freeman) June 2-July 15 (reception June 2).

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Handle With Care (touchable art from the Society of Sculptors), June 6-July 30. The Art of Movement: Alexander Calder, Georege Rickey & Tim Prentice (20th-century kinetic art), June 10-Sept. 17 (reception: June 10). UnSmoke Artspace. Nice Painting

(new works by Ryan Lammie), June 9-28 (reception June 9). Framehouse & Jask Gallery. Da Burgh: Images of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh Society of Artists group show), June 9-30 (reception: June 9).

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. Truth in Animals: Linda Mitchell (mixed-media paintings), June 9-Aug. 18.

Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Turning Red (Pennsylvania artists respond to

The Gallery 4. Vivid Visions: The Vibrant Colors of Marion Di Quinzio, July 1-Aug. 12. Hoyt Center for the Arts. Hoyt at the Confluence: Random Acts of Artists (juried group exhibition), July 6-Aug. 31. Cultural District Gallery Crawl. Downtown, July 7 (Pittsburgh Cultural Trust). SPACE Gallery. Wall Paintings: Storytellers (live art event with 12 artists painting on the gallery walls), July 7; exhibit continues through Aug. 20. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, July 7. BOOM Concepts. Live from the City (three-day music festival with visual art created live), July 7-9. Future Tenant. Night Fever (multimedia group show about disco’s asthetic legacy), July 7-Aug. 13. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

enjoy green space close to home

$//(*+(1</$1'7586725* 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


C O M E C E L E B R AT E

, T H E Y E A R I T A L L S TA R T E D .

Friday, June 16, 2017

M AT T R E S S FA C T O R Y

A PA R T Y 4 0 Y E A R S I N T H E M A K I N G

Hosted by the Mattress Factory + Eric J. Werner

Friday, June 16, 2017

Tickets on sale now at mattress.org OUR SPONSORS:

UPMC & UPMC Health Plan Rivers Casino A-1 Realty, Inc. AIO The Eye Surgeons All in Good Taste Productions Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff

Allegheny Health Network & Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield CentiMark Corporation First National Bank Lightwave International Leech Tishman Fuscaldo & Lampl LLC

PJ Dick PNC Radiant Hall Lisa M. Cibik, MD, FACS, and Bernie Kobosky Susan and Scott Lammie Nancy and Woody Ostrow

Mattress Factory 500 Sampsonia Way Pittsburgh, PA 15212-4444

mattress.org 412.231.3169

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

29


{ART BY STEVE PRINCE}

SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

Summer Break Series June 10: CATurday July 22: Celebrating 20/20

cmoa.org/summerbreak Charles “Teenie” Harris, Man wearing sunglasses and eating popsicle, standing in front of telephone pole and houses (detail), ca. 1960, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund, © 2017 Carnegie Museum of Art, Charles "Teenie" Harris Archive

Saturday celebrations of art, music, interactive activities, and sunshine!

Communal Resurrection: The Soul of a Community, through June 18 at 707 and 709 Penn

Kelly y Strayhorn The eater www.attacktheatre.com/thenextstop 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

707 Penn. Body in the Landscape of the Mind (ceramic and mixed-media sculptures by Angela Biederman), July 7-Aug. 27. Panza Gallery. PSA People’s Choice (Pittsburgh Society of Artists group show), opens July 8. BoxHeart Gallery. Heather Kanazawa: Investigations of Life (paintings), July 11Aug. 11; Group A: NOW (group show of contemporary abstract art), July 11-Aug. 11. Dual reception, July 15. Butler Art Center. World War II/1940s-Era Photo Show, July 12-22 (opening reception: July 15). Filmmakers Galleries. I solo (photography by S. Rick Armstrong), July 14-Sept. 3 (reception July 14). Carnegie Museum of Art. 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art, with the Carnegie and the museum that promotes the work of artists of African descent presenting works in dialogue, July 15-Dec. 31. Spinning Plate Gallery. Slippery Rock University Professors Show, July.

AUGUST Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Fashion in Art (fashion-themed works from the collection) opens Aug. 1. Hoyt Center for the Arts. The Four Seasons and Selected Works: James Stewart, Susan Frakes and Philip Terman (paintings, bookbinding and poetry); Robin Gibson (printmaking); and Jack Carlton (printmaking), Aug. 1-Oct. 5. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue, Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, Aug. 4. BOOM Concepts. Photography by Kenneth Neely opens Aug. 4. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Curated by ModernFormations (with artists including Ron Copeland, Jesse Best, Ryder Henry and more), Aug. 4-Sept. 1. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh, Aug. 11-Oct. 29. Work by Christine Lorenz, Desiree Palmer, Amy Shissel and others, Aug. 11-Oct. 29. Dual reception Aug. 11. CONTINUES ON PG. 34


CAMP RESCUE AT THE WILDLIFE CENTER -

6000 Verona Road, Verona, PA

June 12 - 16, 9:00am - 12:00pm (HALF DAY) I Grades Pre-K through kindergarten June 19 - 23, 9:00am - 3:00pm (FULL DAY) I Grades 1st - 2nd July 10 - 14, 9:00am - 3:00pm (FULL DAY) I Grades 3rd - 4th July 17 - 21, 9:00am - 3:00pm (FULL DAY) I Grades 3rd - 4th July 31 - August 4, 9:00am - 3:00pm (FULL DAY) I Grades 5th - 6th Camp Rescue at the Wildlife Center allows kids to discover animals native to Pennsylvania and their habitats in an educational and engaging way! Campers will be able to learn about the unique adaptations of wildlife while exploring our 16 acre campus and meeting live educational animal ambassadors.

COST: $100 for half day, $200 for full day

CAMP RESCUE AT THE SHELTER -

6926 Hamilton Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15208

July 24 - 28, 9:00am - 12:00pm (HALF DAY) I Grades K - 2nd July 24 - 28, 1:00pm - 4:00pm (HALF DAY) I Grades 3rd - 6th Do you have a wild child that loves pets? Bring them to our very own Camp Rescue! New for 2017, this camp allows kids to learn about taking care of domestic animals, play fun games, make tasty treats for our shelter animals and so much more! Join us for a pawsitively fun time!

COST: $100 per half day

For more information and to register, visit www.animalrescue.org/wildlifecamp For additional questions, contact: mwallace@animalrescue.org or 412-345-7300 x503 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

31


TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

GET YOURS TODAY! iˆ˜â> œÝ"vwVi| 412.392.4900 | pittsburghsymphony.org

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS:

FUSE@PSO:

Mash-Up Mix-Down

Wednesday, June 14 Happy hour starts at 5:00 p.m., concert begins at 6:30 p.m. HEINZ HALL

Season Finale! Honeck Conducts Beethoven Friday, June 23, 8:00 p.m. Saturday June 24, 8:00 p.m. Sunday, June 25, 2:30 p.m. HEINZ HALL

PNC POPS:

Ella & Louis – All That Jazz! Friday, June 16, 8:00 p.m. Saturday, June 17, 8:00 p.m. Sunday, June 18, 2:30 p.m.

The O’Jays

Thursday,June 29, 7:30 p.m. HEINZ HALL

HEINZ HALL

SENSORY-FRIENDLY PERFORMANCE:

Music of Flight and Fantasy

In Honor Of Service: An Americana Concert

HEINZ HALL

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL & MUSEUM (OAKLAND)

Saturday, June 17, Pre-concert activities 1:15 p.m., concert 2:30 p.m.

TITLE SPONSORS:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

SENSORY-FRIENDLY SUPPORTED, IN PART, BY

Friday, June 30, 7:00 p.m.

IN HONOR OF SERVICE SUPPORTED, IN PART BY:

MEDIA SPONSOR:


Concerts in the Park: Saturday, July 1, 8:00 p.m. SOUTH PARK

Sunday, July 2, 8:15 p.m. HARTWOOD ACRES

A Night of Symphonic Hip Hop Featuring Common Thursday, July 20, 7:30 p.m. HEINZ HALL

*plus one Guatemalan love song

Classical Mystery Tour: Sgt. Pepper’s 50th Anniversary

HEINZ HALL

HEINZ HALL

Jane Lynch Sings The Great American Songbook* Friday, July 7, 8:00 p.m.

PNC POPS:

The Music of John Williams Friday, July 14, 8:00 p.m. Saturday, July 15, 8:00 p.m. Sunday, July 16, 2:30 p.m.

Friday, July 21, 8:00 p.m.

Johnny Mathis

Saturday, July 22, 8:00 p.m. HEINZ HALL

HEINZ HALL

412.392.4900 • pittsburghsymphony.org/summer PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

33


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier Valley. Two Decades’ Delights: Highlights from 20 Years of Exhibitions at SAMA-Ligonier Valley, Aug. 18-Nov. 5. Art from the Heart: A Celebration of SAMA Ligonier Valley’s Founders, Aug. 18-Nov. 5. The Gallery 4. Deep Delirium: Fever Dream Beings by Seth Storck, Aug. 19-Sept. 30. BoxHeart Gallery. William DeBarnardi and Dale Huffman: New Works (painting and ceramics), Aug. 22-Sept. 22. Andrew Ooi: IOI OOI (art with cut, painted and folded paper), Aug. 22-Sept. 22. Dual reception: Aug. 26.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. Allied

be

galleries

3583 Butler Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15201 • (412) 687-2606 Summer Hours: Wednesday – Friday 11-6, Saturday 11-5

DREAM IT.

BUILD IT.

National tour sponsored by

Locally sponsored by

Hands-On Harley-Davidson™ was created by the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum in collaboration with Harley-Davidson Motor Company. Hands-On Harley-Davidson and Harley-Davidson® are trademarks of H-D and are used with permission.© 2017 H-D. All rights reserved.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

North Side, 412-237-3400

SEPTEMBER

MEADOWCROFT ROCKSHELTER AND HISTORIC VILLAGE.

OTHER EXHIBITS

May 20 - September 10, 2017

Oakland, 412-622-3131

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER.

Artists of Johnstown 85th Annual Juried Art Exhibition, Aug. 25-Dec. 15. Spinning Plate Gallery. Paula Weiner, Spinning Plate resident, August.

Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield, Sept. 1. BOOM Concepts. Asia Bey Illustration Exhibition & Birthing Rights Performance opens Sept. 1. Spinning Plate Gallery. Donnie Pomeroy, Connie Cantor and Adrienne Heinrich, September.

RIDE IT.

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.

CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Garfield, www.postnatural.org CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-322-5058 FORT PITT MUSEUM. Downtown,

Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Penn Avenue,

pittsburghkids.org

OTHER ER VENUES UES

412-281-9284

Avella, 724-587-3412

NATIONAL AVIARY. North Side, 412-323-7235

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS. Oakland, 412-622-6914

RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Swissvale, 412-464-4020

SEN. JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Strip District, 412-454-6000

Garrison Drill, June 17, July 15 and Aug. 19; and Fourth at Fort Pitt, July 4.

Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Small Wonders: The World of

Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Permanent exhibits include

Cryptocrystalline Quartz and Feathered Dinosaur, ongoing. The Power of Poison in the Natural World, May 27-Sept. 4. Plus Dinosaurs in Their Time and other permanent exhibits. Museum After Dark (21-and-over event): Indiana Jones … After Dark (with costume contest, whip artist, scavenger hunt, movie screenings and more), June 10. Carnegie Science Center. Permanent exhibits including Highmark SportsWorks, roboworld and Rangos Omnimax Theater. Also: BodyWorks (about the human body), H2Oh! Why Our Rivers Matter, SpacePlace, Exploration Station and more. Center for Postnatural History. Exhibits about genetic engineering and the like, ongoing. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Permanent exhibits plus attractions and activities including: Ice Station Zebra (interactive, espionage-themed exhibit), through May 28; Tough Art (original interactive artworks), ongoing; and Hands-On Harley-Davidson (branded interactive motorcycle exhibit), Sat., May 20-Sept. 10. Fort Pitt Museum. Nat Youngblood’s Pittsburgh (retrospective of work by the late Pittsburgh artist), ongoing. Plus permanent exhibits on the French and Indian War and more. Special programs include: Massy Harbison: 225 Years After Her Capture, May 27. Living History programs include: Free Family Fishing Day, May 28; Hands On History, June 2, 3, 4 and 9; Artillery and Artificers, June 3 and 4, Aug. 5 and 6; and Fife and Drum, June 10 and Aug. 5; Fort Pitt

archaeological site with 16,000 years of human habitation and recreations of a Native American village and 19th-century settlers’ village. Also: Walk Through Prehistory (guided nature hike), June 11; 19th Annual Atlatl Competition (stone-age spear-throwing implement), June 17; Insider Tour of Meadowcroft Rockshelter, June 24 and Sept. 9; Independence Day Celebration, July 2; vintage 1860s baseball game, Aug. 19. National Aviary. Birdly (virtual-reality flight-simulator), ongoing. Nature’s Voice (free-flight live bird show), ongoing. Plus Penguin Point, Tropical Rainforest, Wetland and other permanent exhibits.

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden. BioBlitz (annual scientist-led biological survey), June 11. Butterfly Forest, through Sept. 4. Super.Natural: Glass Art by Jason Gamrath (larger-than-life plants), through Nov. 5. Tropical Forest Congo, ongoing.

Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area. Saturday and Sunday tours of historical Carrie Blast Furnace continue weekly through October. Friday tours of Carrie start June 2 and continue weekly through August. See website for other tours and events. Sen. John Heinz Regional History Center. The Gift of Art (a century of art donated to city schools), through June 30. #Pixburgh (400plus archived photos of the city and its people from 1850 to today), through Sept. 10. Visible Storage (artifacts from the museum’s collection), ongoing. Also: From Slavery to Freedom (African-American history) and other ongoing exhibits. Also houses the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum.


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SUMMER

STAGE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW MURPHY}

An American in Paris, May 30-June 11 at the Benedum

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

NOW ON STAGE

MAY

Peter & The Starcatcher. Peter Pan

The Philadelphia Story. Philip Barry’s

prequel that’s a recent Broadway hit play with music, through Fri., May 20 (Stage 62). Sive. Irish playwright Johh B. Keane’s 1959 drama about a village girl who’s sold to an old man, through Fri., May 20 (PICT Classic Theatre). Always Patsy Cline. Ted Swindley’s revue-style show about the country singer’s relationship with a female fan, featuring 27 of her songs, through Sat., May 21 (Apple Hill Playhouse). Anything Goes. Classic musical set on an ocean liner and featuring the music of Cole Porter, through Sat., May 21 (McKeesport Little Theatre). Death of a Salesman. Arthur Miller’s classic, starring noted screen actor Zach Grenier, through Sun., May 21 (Pittsburgh Public Theater). Hercules Didn’t Wade in the Water. Michael A. Jones’ drama centers on two men trapped on a rooftop during a hurricane, through Sun., May 21 (Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.). Ironbound. Martyna Majok’s new drama about a Polish-immigrant cleaning woman struggling to make a life in contemporary Newark, N.J., through June 4 (City Theatre).

classic 1939 comedy about a socialite’s madcap wedding, May 18-June 3 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). Tea for Three. A one-woman 2013 show depicting First Ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon and Betty Ford, by Eric H. Weinberger and Elaine Bromka, May 18-June 3 (South Park Theater Co.). The Pink Unicorn. Playwright Elise Forier Edie’s one-woman show about a recent widow in a small, conservative Texas town whose daughter comes out as gender-queer, May 18-21 and Aug. 3-6 (Off the Wall Theater Co.). Violet. Award-winning 1997 musical about a young woman, scarred by an accident in her youth, traveling across the Deep South in 1964 to find the TV evangelist she believes can make her beautiful, May 19-28 (Front Porch Theatricals). Dirty Dancing. Touring live stage version of the crowd-pleasing movie romance about a dreamy dance instructor and the irrepressible Baby, May 23-28 (PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh). La Rondine. Puccini’s romantic opera about a dissatisfied mistress, May 25-28, at Carlow University’s Antonian Theatre (Undercroft Opera).


THEATER COMPANIES + VENUES ALPHABET CITY. North Side, 412-323-0278

NEW HAZLETT LETT THEATER. North Side,

APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE.

0 412-320-4610

Delmont, 724-468-5050

OFF THE WALL ALL PRODUCTIONS. Carnegie, 724-873-3576 PICT CLASSIC. Oakland, 412-561-6000 PITTSBURGH CLO. Downtown, 412-325-1582 PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Downtown, 412-456-6666 PITTSBURGH FESTIVAL OPERA. 412-621-1499

ARCADE COMEDY THEATER. Downtown, 412-339-0608 BENEDUM CENTER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 BRICOLAGE THEATRE. Downtown, 412-394-3353 BYHAM PRODUCTIONS. Downtown, 412-456-6666

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Munhall, 412-462-3444 CARNEGIE STAGE. Carnegie, 724-873-3576 CITY THEATRE. South Side, 412-431-2489 CLUB CAFÉ. South Side, 412-431-4950 CLO CABARET. Downtown, 412-281-3973 FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS. North Side, www.frontporchpgh.com HEINZ HALL. Downtown, www.pittsburghsympony.org

JOHNNY APPLESEED CHILDREN’S THEATER. Delmont, 724-468-5050 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. East Liberty, www.kelly-strayhorn.org

KEYSTONE STATE MUSIC THEATER. Cranberry Township, www.keystonestatemusictheater.org LITTLE LAKE THEATRE. Canonsburg, 724-745-6300 LOOKING GLASS THEATRE. Canonsburg, 412-561-4402 MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. McKeesport, 412-673-1100 NEW HORIZON THEATER. Homewood, www.newhorizontheater.org

PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATER CO. Downtown, www.pghplaywrights.com

PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER. Downtown, 412-316-1600

PLAYHOUSE JR. Oakland, 412-621-4445 PNC BROADWAY IN PITTSBURGH. Downtown

PRIME STAGE THEATRE. North Side, www.primestage.com

QUANTUM THEATRE. Various venues, www.quantumtheatre.com SOUTH PARK THEATRE. South Park, 412-831-8552 STAGE 62. Carnegie, 412-429-6262 THE SUMMER COMPANY. Uptown, www.thesummercompany.com THE THEATRE FACTORY. Trafford, 412-374-9200

THROUGHLINE THEATRE COMPANY. Lawrenceville, www.throughlinetheatre.org TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 TWELVE PEERS. Lawrenceville, www.12peerstheater.org UNDERCROFT OPERA. www.undercroftopera.org

An American in Paris. Acclaimed

June 1-July 2 (Pittsburgh Public).

choreographer Christopher Wheeldon is behind this new Tony-winning musical based on the classic film, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, May 30-June 11 (PNC Broadway).

Mixed Emotions. A widower courts a widow

JUNE Thom Pain (based on nothing). Will Eno’s critically acclaimed 2004 monologue, produced around the world, at the University of Pittsburgh Studio Theatre, June 1-18 (Twelve Peers). Lotto: Experience the Dream. A middle-aged water-department worker wins $99 million and things change, in Bryan Roquemore’s 1992 comedy, June 2-11 (New Horizon Theater). Proof. David Auburn’s Pulitzer-winning 2000 drama about a mathematical genius dealing with the aftermath of her mentally ill father’s demise, June 8-24 (Little Lake). Alone Together. Three adult sons come home to empty-nester parents in Lawrence Roman’s 1984 comedy, June 8-24 (South Park Theatre). An Act of God. The Supreme Being and archangels Michael and Gabriel are the protagonists of this satiric comedy by former Daily Show writer David Javerbaum, starring Pittsburgh favorite Marcus Stevens,

in Richard Baer’s comedy, June 8-17 (Apple Hill). Charlotte’s Web. Adaptation of the E.B. White classic set in a barnyard, June 9-18 (McKeesport Little Theater). The Little Mermaid. Popular musical based on the hit animated Disney movie, June 14-25 (Pittsburgh CLO). Clue: The Musical. The 1997 musical based on the board game, June 15-25 (Summer Company). A Gathering of Sons. World premiere of an opera about police shootings, with a book by Tameka Cage Conley and composer Dwayne Fulton, June 15-29 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera). In the Next Room or The Vibrator Play. Sarah Ruhl’s 2010 comedy about the, er, coming of the vibrator in the 19th century, June 16-24 (Throughline Theatre Co.). One Man, Two Governors. A bumbling fellow must keep each of his two bosses from learning he’s employed by the other in Richard Bean’s 2011 farce, June 29-July 15 (Little Lake).

A Second Helping: The Church Basement Ladies Sequel. The edition of the franchise about church-basement ladies in small-town Minnesota that’s set in 1969, June 29-July 15 (South Park). CONTINUES ON PG. 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

JULY Hansel and Gretel. Engelbert Humperdinck’s short 1893 opera based on the fairy tale, July 1, 8 and 15 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera). Seussical — The Musical. The Ahrens-Flaherty musical based on the works of Dr. Seuss, July 6-22 (Apple Hill). In the Heights. Before he wrote Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda created this acclaimed hit musical about chasing the American Dream in one New York City neighborhod, July 7-16 (CLO). Sweeney Todd. Stephen Sondheim’s modern-classic musical about the Demon Barber of Fleet Street, July 7-22 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera). Pippin. A young prince An Act of God, finds his way in the world June 1-July 2 in Stephen Schwartz’s at Pittsburgh 1973 musical, July 7-23 Public Theater (Theater Factory). Xerxes. Handel’s opera set in the Persian royal court, July 14, 16 and 22 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera). Disney’s Newsies. Turn-of-the-lastcentury New York newsboys go on strike in

this Tony-winning 2011 musical, July 18-23 (Benedum Center). Spamalot. The hit musical based on Monty Python and the Holy Grail, July 20-30 (Stage 62). Wonder of the World. David Lindsay-Abaire’s madcap 2000 comedy about a woman on an adventure and the characters she meets, July 20-Aug. 5 (Little Lake). Trumbo. 2003 drama by Christopher Trumbo, based on the letters of his father, famed Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, who was blacklisted in the 1950s, July 20Aug. 5 (South Park). Intermezzo. Strauss’ romantic opera, July 21 and 23 (Pittsburgh Festival Opera). Rumors. The Neil Simon farce, July 27-Aug. 5 (Apple Hill). Mamma Mia. Hit musical scored to ABBA tunes, July 28-Aug. Aug 6 (CLO).

AUGUST UST Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Post-Ele Play. Anne Washburn’s dark comedy iimagines a postCONTINUES ON PG. 44

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Pinkalicious The Musical. Stage version of the popular book series about a little girl who turns pink from eating pink cupcakes, through Sun., May 21 (Playhouse Jr.). The Adventures of Nate the Great. The kid detective from Marjorie Weinman Sharmat’s books takes the stage, through Sun., May 21 (Playhouse Jr.).

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MAY

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EQT Children’s Theater Festival. Four-day Downtown festival, including hands-on activities, featuring troupes from around the world, May 18-21 (Pittsburgh Cultural Trust).

JUNE 24, NOON - 4PM

JUNE Rapunzel. Sunny Disney Fitchett’s comic adaptation of the fairy tale, June 14-July 1 (Looking Glass Theatre). The Princess King. Jeff Fluharty’s comedy about a princess who disguises herself as a prince to enter contest to become king, June 19-28 (South Park Theatre Children’s Theatre).

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

A Winnie The Pooh Birthday Tale. A.A. Milne’s characters search

for Tigger’s missing tail, June 20-23 (Johnny Appleseed). seed).

JULY The Ever After. Cinderella, nder Jiminy Cricket and more are characters in this fairy-tale spoof set on a modern-day talk show, July 3, and July 5-12 (South Park). Fantastic Mr. Fox. Adaptation of Roald Dahl’s children’s book about a clever fox targeted by some greedy farmers, July 5-22 (Looking Glass). Beauty and the Beast. The classic fairy tale. July 17-26 (South Park). Schoolhouse Rock Live! Jr. Get your adverbs here as those short, catchy, educational musical cartoons from the ’70s form the basis for this show, July 26Aug. 12 (Looking Glass). The Emperor’s New Clothes. Musical version of the classic tale, July 31-Aug. 9 (South Park).

AUGUST Cinderella. Sally Netzel’s contemporary adaptation, Aug. 8-11 (Johnny Appleseed). Rapunzel. Aug. 15-16 (South Park).


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41


ADVERTORIAL

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Outdoor DINING

now open

here was a time when the Al-Fresco offerings around the Steel City were limited. However in recent time, we have seen a resurgence of the outdoor patio, from street side dining, rooftop patios, to magnificent courtyards. It’s Summer and the sun shines again over us, and reminds us why we bear through the winters of the ‘Burgh. Even though this year’s winter was tamer than the rest, it was still winter after all. Get out there Pittsburgh, and soak up as much vitamin D, cocktails, wine and food while you still can. The following are some our favorite outdoor spots to do just that.

LUCCA – Lucca on Craig street has stood the test of me. Many restaurants on this street have come and gone, but Lucca remains and anchor. A substan ally Italian-influenced menu and curated wine list, keep Lucca a des na on worth returning to. In the summer me, its expansive outdoor dining pa o allows you to take in the sights of the passersby and sip the day away. THE FOUNDRY – The Foundry is a new gastropub to the Pi sburgh restaurant scene with cra beers and proper cocktails located on the North Side trail with river views and access to a connected trail. The area around the Foundry has become quite the des na on with new offices, condos and restaurants making the North Side bustle with excitement. A great place to stop by before or a er a show at Stage AE, and an amazing stand-alone des na on to enjoy lunch, brunch or dinner. POROS - Soak in the warmth of the summer sun and the style of the Mediterranean at Poros. One of the new addi ons to Market Square, this restaurant and accompanying wrap around pa o provides fresh fish and wine list perfect for a break from a long day.

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LUKE AND MIKES FRONT PORCH – The wrap around porch at this Aspinwall favorite is sure to provide a break from the dog days of summer. Enjoy one of their specialty cocktails on the porch and listen to the breeze rustle the leaves of these oak-lined streets of Aspinwall. The place provides an oasis among the concrete jungle of Downtown Pi sburgh. HARRIS GRILL – The Shadyside favorite, Harris Grill has a bustling pa o almost year round, but especially in the summer months. It provides the perfect place to sip on the signature frozen cosmo and enjoy their famous ham water soup. Get here early to reserve your spot and then stay all day.

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SHILOH GRILL – Perched atop Mount Washington in the business district of Shiloh street, sits the big deck of Shiloh Grill. It expands from the building out to the street providing ample room for shady and sunny spots. Enjoy joking with the owners, and some delicious grub. Come for the bacon, but stay for the big deck. NOLA ON THE SQUARE – Another Market Square favorite, serves up the flavors of a New Orleans Brasserie. Enjoy its world-famous jambalaya, while taking in live Jazz Music, and sitng al fresco with its extensive sidewalk sea ng.

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

Pennsylvania Wine Cellar www.pawinecellar.com

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The Ellipses Condition presents Thought Pockets, June 2 and 9

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

apocalyptic future where today’s entertainments (including The Simpsons) have become the building blocks of a fledgling culture, Aug. 3-20 at Pitt’s Studio Theatre (Twelve Peers). Million Dollar Quartet. Early rock ’n’ roll hits score this 2006 musical inspired by the real-life 1956 meeting of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins, Aug. 8-13 (CLO). The Audience. Queen Elizabeth’s 60 years of secret weekly meetings with her prime ministers is the subject of Peter Morgan’s 2013 drama, Aug. 10-26 (Little Lake). Cahoots. An accidental murder among neighbors is the subject of this 1990 dark comedy by Rick Johnston, Aug. 10-26 (South Park). Cloud 9. Colonialism, racism, sexual oppression and more are on the table in Caryl Churchill’s 1979 play set in 1880s Africa and 1979 London, at the Henry Heymann Theatre, in Oakland, Aug. 11-19 (Throughline). Billy Elliot. It’s the first local production of the hit Elton John/Lee Hall musical about a British coal-miner’s kid who turns to ballet, Aug. 11-18 (Keystone State Music Theater). Go Back for Murder. A 1960 mystery by Agatha Christie, Aug. 17-27 (Summer Company). Big Fish. A skeptical son ABBEY: In The seeks the truth behind Red, May 25-27 his traveling-salesman at the August father’s outrageous Wilson Center tall tales in Andrew {PHOTO COURTESY OF KITOKO CHARGOIS} Lippa’s 2013 musical, Aug. 18-27 (Front Porch). Red Hills. An African and an American meet in Rwanda 20 years after war threw them together in this world-premiere drama by Sean Lewis, Aug. 17-Sept. 10 (Quantum Theatre).

The Dixie Swim Club. Five women, old college classmates, meet and discuss life over a 30-year period in this comedic drama, Aug. 24-Sept. 2 (Apple Hill). Living on Love. Joe DiPietro’s 2016 comedy about a jealous diva getting back at her husband, Aug. 31-Sept. 16 (South Park). A Masterpiece of Comic Timing. Robert Caisley’s 2016 backstage comedy, set in the ’60s, about a producer who needs a hit comedy from a young playwright stuck on tragedy, Aug. 31-Sept. 16 (Little Lake).

DANCE

Attack Theatre. Longstanding Pittsburgh troupe teams with internationally known choreographers Helen Simoneau and Norbert De La Cruz III for a show titled Next Stop, May 19 and 20. Bodiography Center for Movement. Spring Concert (Bodiography dance students), June 10 (Byham Theater).

Carnegie Performing Arts Center. Annual student recital, June 3 and 4. Carnegie, 412-279-8887

The Ellipses Condition. Pearlann Porter and John Lambert present the three-hour, immersive public performanceart installations they call Thought Pockets, June 2 and 9 (Downtown locations TBA). www.thoughtpockets.com

An Evening of Bellydance with Michelle Sorenson. The internationally touring dancer performs July 1 (Carnegie Stage). fireWALL dance theater. EFF.UL.GENTS (Elisa-Marie Alaio’s work set to music by Reni Monteverde), July 7-16 (Off the Wall Productions).


Heinz Hall. Lifetime TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bring It! LIVE, Aug. 2. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. Infinity: A Dance Showcase (KG Dynasty features 20-plus dancers performing a combination of hip hop, contemporary, jazz-funk and burlesque), May 26 and 27. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. The troupeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Ballet Under the Stars performance at Hartwood Acres, Aug. 20. www.pbt.org Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. The spring dance performance including classical and contemporary works performed by students from both student and pre-professional divisions, May 26 and 27 (Byham). STAYCEE PEARL dance project. Premiere of ABBEY: In The Red, Staycee Pearlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work exploring historic and contemporary civil-rights issues through the music of jazz vocalist and composer Abbey Lincoln and her partner, percussionist Max Roach, May 25-27 (August Wilson Center). Texture Contemporary Ballet. Resounding Sound, July 20-23 (New Hazlett Theater, North Side). www.textureballet.org

OTHER PERFORMANCE

EVERY DAY DESERVES AN UPGRADE.

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL. The famed troupeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new touring show, Ovo, makes its Pittsburgh debut, May 24-28. www.cirquedusoleil.com MULTIPLE CHOICE. Costumed performers act out a fantasy-monster scenario in Kaiju Big Battel, the centerpiece of the latest edition of this Pittsburgh Cultural Trust series, June 24. Downtown. RESTLESS SOUL SYNDROME. A new comedy cabaret by Pittsburgh native Tom Rocco, June 3 (Carnegie Stage).

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SUICIDE GIRLS BLACKHEART BURLESQUE. Touring troupe described by Vice as â&#x20AC;&#x153;comic-con meets burlesque nerd orgy,â&#x20AC;? May 27. Rex Theater, South Side. www.blackheartburlesque.com

COMEDY

Arcade Comedy Theater. The Playlist: Music-Inspired Improv, Thu., May 18. Improv Pop-Up Night, Thu., May 18, June 15, July 20 and Aug. 17. Comedy Royale (short-form improv competition), Fri., May 19, June 17, July 15 and Aug. 19. Vidiots!: Old Videos, New Comedy, Fri., May 19. Beta Stage (improv), Sat., May 20, and May 27. Arcade Upgrade: HouseTeam MegaMix (improv), Sat., May 20. Grammelot, Sat., May 20. Technically Sunday Comedy Show, Sat., May 20. Bonus Stage (improv), Sun., May 21, Thu., May 25 and May 28. The Line Up: Stand Up Showcase, May 26. Stand-Up Get Down: Comedy Gameshow, May 26. Penny Arcade (kid-friendly comedy), May 27, June 10 and 17, July 8 and 22, and Aug. 12 and 26. The Death Show, Sat., May 27. Knights of the Arcade: Epic D&D Comedy, May 27. Dinner with the Nolens (long-form improv), June 2, July 1 and Aug. 5. Your Life: The Musical, June 3. What Ever Happened to babyGRAND? A Musical Feud! (improv musical), June 8. Comedy Queens!,

Visit DDperks.com for program terms and conditions. Offer valid when you use your enrolled DD Card the day after the Pittsburgh PiratesŽ win at home during the 2017 regular season. Excludes Cold Brew. Valid at participating Pittsburgh, PA locations. Visit www.pirateswinyouwin.com for more information. Š2017 DD IP Holder LLC.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

45


SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

June 9. ArGAYde Improv Show, June 9. Pride After Hours, June 9. PRIDE: Arcade Hootenanny!, June 10. ArGAYde Stand-Up Show, June 10. 24 Hours in Sketchville (timed sketch-comedy showcase), July 22. Downtown, 412-339-0608 Byham Theater. #ImomSoHard (web stars Kristin Hensley and Jen Smedley on parenting), July 13. Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead. Jim Breuer, May 27. Sinbad, June 2. Munhall. www.librarymusichall.com Club Café. DA Funny Team Presents Lillian Cannon, David “The Frog” Bey and more, May 27. Race to the Coffin Comedy Presents Comedy Roulette: Roast Battle with Jeff Scheen and Ryan Donahue. Hosted by John Dick Winters, June 2. South Side. 412-431-4950 Comedy Sauce Showcase. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber every Monday; local comics and out-of-town guests, at the Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603 DVE Comedy Festival. Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show host comics including Colin Quinn, Robert Kelly, Kevin Brennan, Rachel Feinstein and Bill Crawford, June 23 (Byham). Heinz Hall. Sebastian Maniscalco, May 18. Mr. Smalls. The Vagical Mystery Tour (comedy and reproductive rights) with Daily Show co-creator Lizz Winstead, Joyelle Johnson, Leah Bonnema, Jill Sobule, Buzz Off, and Lucille, July 19. Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Pittsburgh Improv. Ed Bailey: Still Standing, Wed., May 17. Jacqueline Ziemanski Presents: Comedy for a Cause, Thu., May 18. Bruce Bruce, Fri., May 19-21. Stand Up Pittsburgh Open Mic, Wed., May 24. ATU Night Out, Thu., May 25.

LITERARY + TALK 3 Rivers Comicon. Comics convention

Doug Stanhope, at the Improv, June 28

Rod Man, May 26-28. Theo Von, June 1-4. Bash in the Burgh, June 7, 14, 28, July 5. Marlon Wayans, June 9-11. The Pump and Dump,

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June 15. Jim Florentine, June 16-18. Ryan David, June 21. Jake Johannsen, June 22-25. The Honky Tonk Man, June 29. Doug Stanhope, June 28. John Witherspoon, July 7-9. Guy Torry, July 1316. Bert Kreischer, July 20-22. Deray Davis, July 28-30. West Homestead. 412-462-5233 Pittsburgh Improv Jam. Thursdays at Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-281-3973

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Monessen Elks Lodge No. 773 Funny Fundraiser: Colin Chamberlin, Herbie Gill, Blair Parker, Sat., May 20. Slapsticks Comedy Club at The Crowne Plaza Marissa Landrigan, Hotel and Suites Aug. 3 at Pittsburgh Pittsburgh South: John Arts & Lectures Evans, Matt Light, David {PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER KRESGE} Kaye, Sat., May 20; David Kaye emcees, June 17. Slapsticks Comedy Club at Rose Bar and Grille (White Oak), June 3. TriCounty Active Adult Center Funny Fundraiser!: Jeremy Hall, David Kaye, Missy G, June 16. John Evans, Colin Chamberlin, David Kaye at the Rough Cut Cavern, June 24. www.slapsticksproductions.com Unplanned Comedy. Mondo! with Heather Shurina, Fri., May 19. Sit Down and Laugh, with host Alex Stypula, Sat., May 20. Asperger’s Are Us, Aug. 1. Lawrenceville. 412-212-7061

hosted by New Dimension Comics, May 20 and 21, Century III Mall, West Mifflin. www.3riverscomicon.com Alphabet City. Nigerian author Unoma Azuah (Blessed Body: Secret Lives of LGBT Nigerians), May 23. Young Steel Teen Poetry Championships, June 4. Indian writer and journalist Aatish Taseer (Stranger to History: A Son’s Journey Through Islamic Lands), June 13. Cave Canem poets (Major Jackson, Robin Coste Lewis and Haki Madhubuti), June 15. Steel City Grand Slam (winners compete at 2017 National Poetry Slam), June 17. North Side. www.alphabetcity.org Autumn House Press. Bantam Night poetry reading by Amie Whittemore and Judith Vollmer, Mon., May 22 (Wigle Whiskey, North Side). www.autumnhouse.org Battle of Homestead Foundation. “Willa Cather in Pittsburgh” talk, Sun., May 21. Pump House, Munhall. 412-478-5907 Brew House. Book launch for poet Judith Robinson’s Carousel, May 20. South Side. www.judithrobinson.com Brillobox. Book launch for Scott Silsbee’s Muskrat Friday Dinner, May 27. The Bridge Series: Brian Broome, Cheryl Hall-Russell, Yona Harvey (benefits Alumni Theater Company), May 31. Bloomfield. www.brilloboxpgh.com Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 17th Annual Summer Reading Extravaganza (free family activities and entertainment), June 11. Oakland. 412-622-3151 City Books. Katie Fallon (Vulture), June 10. North Side. 412-321-7323 Confluence-SFF. Literary conference with a focus on science fiction, fantasy and horrors, Aug. 4-6 (Sheraton Pittsburgh Airport Hotel). www.parsec-sff.org

Creative Nonfiction. Creative Nonfiction Writers Conference (workshops and discussions), May 26-27. www.creativenonfiction.org

Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series. Barry Governor, Roberta Hatcher, Joe Kaldon, Don Krieger, Kathy McGregor, Aaron Novick, Stuart Sheppard and Alyssa Sineni, May 23. Squirrel Hill Poetry Workshop (M. Soledad Caballero, Ann Curran, Erin Garstka, Joseph Karasek, Christine Doreian Michaels, Randy Minnich, Pam O’Brien, Joanne Samraney and Shirley Stevens), May 30. Barbara Edelman, Robert Gibb, Mike Schneider and Fred Shaw, June 6. Nikki Allen, Jennifer Jackson Berry, Bradley J. Fest, Jason Irwin, Sharon Fagan McDermott and Kayla Sargeson, June 13. Michele Battiste, Jimmy Cvetic, Daniela Buccilli, Gene Hirsch, Leslie Anne Mcilroy and CONTINUES ON PG. 48

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

Adam Matcho, June 20. Ziggy Edwards, Timons Esais, Jay Carson, Judith Robinson and Michael Wurster, June 27. Joan E. Bauer, Sheila Carter-Jones, Karla Lamb, Justin Vicari, Arlene Weiner and Robert Yune, July 11. Michael Albright, Jen Ashburn, Liane Ellison Norman, John Stupp and Bob Walicki, July 18. Grand Finale: Jason Baldinger, Stephanie Brea, Kristofer Collins, Angele Ellis, John Korn, Bart Solarczyk, Adriana Ramirez and Meghan Tutolo, July 25. Hemingway’s Café, Oakland. jbauer103w@aol.com Irma Freeman Center. Reinventing You Launch Party (with author Tiffany Huff), June 10. Feminist Zine Fest, June 17. www.irmafreeman.org A Midsummer Night’s Solstice Poetry Reading. With Eva Diodati D-pa, Andy Goldbert, Amanda Oaks, Jay Bachelder and more, June 20. Black Forge Coffee House, Allentown. www.blackforgecoffee.com The Moth StorySLAM. Themed storytelling nights: “Celebration,” June 6. “Beauty,” July 7. Rex Theater, South Side. www.themoth.org

Mystery Lovers Bookshop. Coffee & Crime: Kristen Lepionka, Sat., June 17. Oakmont. www.mystery.lovers.com Nasty Slam. Head-to-head poetry slam, May 24. Spirit Lounge, Lawrenceville. www.facebook.com (“nasty slam pittsburgh”)

The Next Generation of Black Poets: Cave Canem Fellows & Friends. Aziza Barnes, Tyree Daye, Aricka Foreman, Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves, Kamden Ishmael Hilliard and Jayson Smith, June 17. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. www.kelly-strayhorn.org Penguin Bookshop. Nathaniel Philbrick, May 18. Kate Moore (Radium Girls) in conversation with Heather Terrell, May 30. Book launch for J.D. Barker’s The Fourth Monkey, June 29. Sewickley. www.penguinbookshop.com Public Source. White House correspondent April Ryan, Wed., May 24. www.publicsource.org Steel City Slam. Spoken-word poetry

competition, Tuesday nights. Capri Pizza, East Liberty. www.pghpoetry.org Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Jonathan Safran Foer, June 9. Baseball-book authors Pete Peterson and Douglas Branson, June 15. Irish novelist Colm Toíbín, June 20. Bill Steigerwald (author of 30 Days a Black Man, about pioneering Pittsburgh investigative journalist Ray Spriegel), July 6. Novelist Daniel Lowe (All That’s Left to Tell), July 20. Marissa Landrigan (The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat), Aug. 3. Journalist Kapsambelis (author of Niki K a book on Alzheimer’s), b Aug. Au 10. All at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-622-8866

Sen. John Heinz History Center. Books in the ’Burgh: Stories of Ethnic Identity & Military Service (panel discussion), Wed., May 24. Andrew Porwancher (The Devil Himself), Porwa June 14; Gabby Means (The Decade, about the legendary Pittsburgh rock club), July 19. Paul Hertneky (Rust Belt Boy), Aug. 23. www.heinzhistorycenter.org TEDx Pittsburgh. Local speakers and performers tackle technology, entertainment and design issues (Byham), June 4. www.tedxpittsburgh.org Versify. Poetry reading series. Meghan Tutolo, Heather McNaugher, Alison Taverna and Noah Stetzer, Sat., May 20. White Whale, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com White Whale Bookstore. Toby Altman reads from Arcadia, Indiana, with Brian Broome, Dakota R. Garilli and Candace Opper, Wed., May 24. Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com WordPlay. Quarterly Bricolage Productions series blending true stories with live DJ, hosted by comic Alan Olifson; Pride Month edition, June 2 and 3. Downtown. www.bricolagepgh.org


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49


SUMMER

FAIRS, FESTIVALS + SPECIAL EVENTS

JULY 10 Vintage Grand Prix Car Show. Walnut Street, Shadyside. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

JULY 15 Polish Hill Arts Festival. Brereton Street, Polish Hill. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

JULY 22

ONGOING

Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands.

Pittsburgh Neighborhood Festivals. Held

412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

throughout the city through fall. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net for complete list

JULY 23-29

Open Streets. Recreate on more than four

Bedford County Fair. Bedford County Fairgrounds, Bedford. 814-623-9011 or www.bedford-fair.com

miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Uptown to South Side. www.openstreetspgh.org

JULY 27-AUG. 5

MAY 28

Fayette County Fair. Fayette County Fairgrounds, Dunbar. 724-628-3360 or www.fayettefair.com

MAY 29 Memorial Day Celebration. Soldiers & Sailors Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253

JULY 28-29

JUNE 2-11

Picklesburgh. A celebration of pickles and pickling. Sixth Street Bridge, Downtown. www.picklesburgh.com

Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown. Visual-art exhibitions, public art installations, music and dance performances, and arts-and-crafts market. 412-456-6666 or www.3riversartsfest.org

JULY 29 143rd Annual Rain Day. Waynesburg, Greene County. 724-627-8111 or www.raindayfestival.com

JUNE 10 Harmony Herb and Garden Fair. Harmony Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org Riverview Park Heritage Day. Family fun, games, crafts, more. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

JUNE 11 Pride Awareness March and PrideFest. Downtown. www.pittsburghpride.org

JUNE 17 Atlatl Competition. Meadowcroft,

{CP PHOTO BY STEPHEN CARUSO}

EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta, Aug. 4-6

JUNE 25

JULY 2

Classic Car Show. Pennsylvania

Independence Day Celebration. Meadowcroft, Avella, Pa. Games, food and demonstrations of 19th-century rural celebrations. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

Trolley Museum, Washington. 877-728-7655 or www.pa-trolley.org Open Streets. Recreate on more than four miles of closed city streets from Downtown to North Side to West End. www.openstreetspgh.org

JULY 2-16

JULY 30 Open Streets. Recreate on more than four miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

AUG. 3-6 Fort Armstrong Folk Festival. Riverfront Park, Kittanning. Arts and crafts, food, music and other entertainment. www.armstrongfestival.com

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Various

AUG. 4-5

JUNE 29-JULY 2

locations. Vintage car races and shows. www.pittsburghvintagegrandprix.com

JUNE 19

Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival. Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg.

JULY 7

Flood City Music Festival. Johnstown. Roots music festival featuring 20 artists. www.floodcitymusic.com

Wine Time at the Colony. Wine, food

724-834-7474 or www.artsandheritage.com

and marketplace. Saxonburg. 724-352-9922 or www.winetimeatthecolony.com

JUNE 30-JULY 8

Avella, Pa. Try your hand at the ancient hunting implement. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

JUNE 24 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

Big Butler Fair. Butler County Fairgrounds. Head for the biggest fair ’round these parts. 724-865-2400 or www.bigbutlerfair.com

Doo Dah Nights: Stephen Foster Music and Heritage Festival. Spirit Lounge,

Downtown. www.yougottaregatta.com

JULY 8

AUG. 5

Tropical Forest Congo Festival. Phipps

Pittsburgh VegFest. Allegheny Commons Park

Conservatory, Oakland. phipps.conservatory.org

East, North Side. www.pittsburghvegfest.org

Look for new #CPReaderArt photos on Instagram every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday

pghcitypaper PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta.

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50

AUG. 4-6


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Pittsburgh Irish Festival, Sept. 8-10

AUG. 19-26 Somerset County Fair. Meyersdale. 814-634-5619 or www.somersetcountyfairpa.com

AUG. 5-6 Harambee Ujima Black Arts and Culture Festival. Kelly Street, Homewood. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net Regatta at Lake Arthur. South Shore, Moraine State Park. www.lakearthurregatta.org

AUG. 6-12

AUG. 19-SEPT. 24 Greater Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival. West Newton. Open Saturdays, Sundays and Labor Day. 724-872-1670 or www.pittsburghrenfest.com

AUG. 22-26

724-627-4752 or www.greenecountyfair.org

Hookstown Fair. Hookstown, Beaver County. 724-573-4512 or www.hookstownfair.com

AUG. 7-12

AUG. 26

Greene County Fair. Waynesburg.

Butler Farm Show. Butler.

Feastival. Food, music, arts.

www.butlerfarmshow.com

McKees Rocks. www.pghfeastival.com

AUG. 11-13

AUG. 26-27

Black Family Reunion. Schenley Park Oval, Oakland. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

AUG. 12

The Arts Festival on Walnut. Shadyside. National, regional and local artists. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

Annual Antique Gun Show. Harmony

AUG. 26-SEPT. 2

Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

Indiana County Fair. Indiana. www.indianacountyfair.com

AUG. 12-19 Washington County Agricultural Fair. Washington. 724-225-7718 or www.washingtonfair.org

AUG. 14-19 Lawrence County Fair. Lawrence County Fairgrounds, New Castle. 724-654-7745 or www.lawrencecountyfair.com

AUG. 29-SEPT. 2 Big Knob Grange Fair. Rochester, Beaver County. 724-752-5973 or www.bigknobgrangefair.org

Little Italy Days. Bloomfield. www.littleitalydays.com

SEPT. 8-10

724-423-5005 or www.westmorelandfair.com

AUG. 19 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

MOUNTAINRAIL ADVENTURE!

Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Labor Day Festival. Westmoreland County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. 724-863-4577 or www.familyfestivals.com

Westmoreland County Fair. Greensburg.

NEXT ADVENTURE A

SEPT. 1-4

AUG. 17-20 AUG. 18-26

MAKE YOUR

Pittsburgh Irish Festival. Riverplex at Sandcastle, West Homestead. www.pghirishfest.org

SEPT. 9 Wine Time at the Colony. Wine, food and marketplace. Saxonburg. 724-352-9922 or www.winetimeatthecolony.com

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51


GET OUT

OF

S p e c i a l A d v e rti s i n g S e c ti o n

TOWN

You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to buy a plane ticket to escape from the city. Gather your family or friends together and visit any of these drivable destinations. Flip the pages to find your next vacation spot...

Get out of town and experience something new! CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 866-908-4569 ChqSpring.com What Would You Like to Learn Today? Spring, a Season of Leisure Learning in Chautauqua County, New York. Spring is metaphorically a season of new beginnings for many people. Some may honor this tradition by spring cleaning their home, an act that implies cleaning the nooks and crannies of our living spaces or purging our underused belongings. Maybe it is a time for reinvention. A new wardrobe, hair style, or self-care routine might be just what

we need. Or it could be a time to start a new hobby ... jogging or gardening anyone? Here in Chautauqua County, New York, we think of spring as an opportunity for learning and exploration. We ask our guests, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What would you like to learn today?â&#x20AC;? and direct them to the myriad of Chautauqua in Spring events dedicated to this concept of leisure learning.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; May 12 - June 18, 2017 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; features leisure learning activities such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Romance in France,â&#x20AC;? a wine pairing dinner at Johnson Estate Winery on May 27th, a Full Mood Paddle on Chautauqua Lake hosted by Evergreen OutďŹ tters on June 3rd, Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Museum and Comedy Center Behind the Scenes Tours on May 13th and 27th and the Bach and Beyond Baroque Music Festival at the 1891 Fredonia Opera House June 9th-11th.

Before you arrive, request a free 2017 Chautauqua County Visitors Guide and Accommodations Directory by calling CCVB at 866-908-4569. Visit the Tour Chautauqua website, www. Dozens of experiences, tours and culichqspring.com, for a complete list of nary events will have guests enjoying the local bounty, great outdoors and The above are just a short list of the Chautauqua in Spring events, stay and heritage of Chautauqua County. The over 100 Chautauqua in Spring events play promotions, and area attraction ďŹ ve week Chautauqua in Spring season taking place May 12-June 18, 2017. We information.

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have something to pique just about every travelerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest, whether they are a self-proclaimed food and wine aďŹ cionado, outdoor adventurer, nature enthusiast, arts and culture maven or history buff.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017



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WhatWouldYou LiketoLearnToday? Celebrate Chautauqua in Spring. A season of leisure learning, May 12-June 18, 2017. Dozens of experiences, tours and culinary events. Register today. Enjoy the local bounty, great outdoors and heritage of Chautauqua County.

CHQSpring.com | 866.908.4569

September 22, 23, 24 10 wineries 20 bands 150+ exhibitors

CHAUTAUQUA IN

general admission $5 pre-sale / $7 at the gate wine tasting day pass $20 pre-sale / $25 at the gate wine tasting weekend pass $50 pre-sale only more information & tickets at www.nechamber.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

53


Spe c i a l A d v e r t is i n g S e c t i o n

CLEARFIELD COUNTY VisitClearfieldCounty.org

OF

TOWN And experience something new!

GET OUT

and your family plenty of choices so that you can plan your trip accordingly.

Arrive, Revive, Repeat in the backwoods. backroads. backwaters. of Let Visit Clearfield County help you plan your weekend away from home. Visit Clearfield County. our website at www.VisitClearfieldLooking for a place that will take you County.org. Like us on Facebook and away from the hustle and bustle of ev- make sure to share your backwoods. eryday life; our backwoods have miles backroads. backwaters. experience. of untapped beauty to explore by foot, bike, horseback or ATV. You will never be completely alone during your jour- CRAWFORD COUNTY ney with the host of wildlife, so don’t 800-332-2338 VisitCrawford.org forget your camera. When we go on vacation we all look After your long journey through the for value, great places to stay and fun wilderness, relax and revive at one of things to see and do. Check out our Hoour local libations where there is no tel Overnight Stay packages, quaint lack of local flavor with over 120 wines B&B’s, lake front Hotel, Cabins, Campand 30 IPAs at our locally-owned es- sites, and Cottages. tablishments. Clearfield County offers close to 1,600 rooms which gives you There are so many fun things to do in

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

Crawford County, PA. You just have to know where to look. Crawford County is known for our Outdoor adventures. Kayaking, boating and canoeing is huge here because we have 7 lakes. Five of those lakes are Glacial Lakes and one lake, Conneaut Lake, holds 2 state fishing records. That also means we have some of the best fishing in PA. Our Pymatuning Lake was named in the Top Ten in the Nation for the best family fishing vacations. Need a Guide for fishing? We can hook you up! Need a kayak, boat, pontoon, or canoe? We can get you floating asap!

will love. More details are on our website. Attractions: Pymatuning State Park & Spillway; Conneaut Lake Park; Conneaut Lake Resort Area; Canadohta Lake Resort Area; Meadville Market House; Avalanche’ Xpress Tubing Park; Oil Creek and Titusville Railroad; Drake Well Oil Museum; Wine, Distillery, and Brew Pub Trail; Hiking, Biking and Water Trails.

Events: Crawford County Fair; Maple Taste and Tour; Thurston Hot Air Balloon; Blue Grass Festival; Pumpkin Fest; Ghost Lake; Oil Creek and Titusville Fall Train Rides; Ice House Festival; HOTA Like culture? The Oil Creek and Titus- Festival; Pymatuning Winter Fun Day. ville Railroad has some of the best dinner theatres around. Yes, dinner theatre Visit our website VisitCrawford.org for on a train! Plus, you can have an over- the most up-to-date attractions and night stay in a Caboose car. events! Call us! We are here to help you plan the best vacation ever. CrawIn the Fall a “must do” is the Pump- ford County Convention and Visitors kin Festival and Ghost Lake Hauted Bureau: 800-332-2338. Amusement Park. Winter you must try the Avalanche’ Xpress Tubing Park. And these are just a few fun things to to ARTS & EDUCATION AT THE HOYT 724-652-2882 do — there is so much more.

HoytArtCenter.org Here are some of our top Ten attractions and events that you and your family

Discover what you can see, learn and do at Arts & Education at the Hoyt, New


Castle. Just an hour north of the city, this regional arts center and museum offers a year-round schedule of exhibits, classes, camps, festivals and more from two exquisitely maintained 1917 mansions. Take a guided tour of the historic houses, browse contemporary art in the galleries, or just poke around the gift shop for a nice selection of local art by local artists. Daily admission is free. Open MondayWednesday, 11-8 and Friday-Saturday, 11-4. Call 724-652-2882 for more info or visit www.hoytartcenter.org.

NORTH EAST 814-725-4262 NEchamber.org The 36th Annual Wine Country Harvest Festival opens September 22-24 in beautiful and historic North East, PA. This three day celebration features wine tastings, winery tours, live entertainment with over 20 bands, a Stomp Off competition, cruise-in

car show, hand crafters, artisans, exhibitors, a variety of food vendors and much more. Hop on the free festival shuttle to experience activities taking place in two parks. Presale tickets are available online at www.nechamber.org. While you are in North East, bike along meandering country lanes and farms, hike scenic trails, fish in clear, cold streams or relax on the beach. If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush, check out Lake Erie Speedway or Peek N Peak’s jungle ropes course in nearby Findley Lake. Tour the many wineries the region has to offer and visit the shops and restaurants in and around North East. History buffs should stop by the Historical Museum, Lake Shore Railway Museum, and the Welch’s Museum in the Grape Country Marketplace. Call the North East Area Chamber of Commerce at 814-725-4262 or visit www.nechamber.org for a complete schedule of activities and lodging information.

LIFE LESSONS INCLUDED WITH ADMISSION This is a place to share something special. Here, in this Hall, life lessons live and the unspoken is communicated through a shared love of the Game, beloved for how closely its struggles, challenges and victories mimic real life.

PROFOOTBALLHOF.COM

GREATNESS LIVES HERE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

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NOW HIRING FOR IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! Provide support to adults in our residential homes throughout the Greater Pittsburgh area.

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Defy gravity and take Science to new heights at our Highmark SportsWorks®

Ropes Challenge! OPENS MONDAY

JUNE 19 56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


Which city is home to one of the oldest jazz clubs in the country?

ERIC FRICK

MEET THE

UNEXPECTED

Held every year since 1975, Buffalo’s JUNETEENTH FESTIVAL (June 17-18), is a two-day celebration of family, culture and tradition that draws more than 100 vendors and thousands of attendees. Festival events include an annual 5K Run and Festival Parade.

RHEA ANNA

KC KRATT

O

ne of the few remaining clubs of its kind in the country, the COLORED MUSICIANS CLUB AND MUSEUM is a place where American musical history is kept alive thanks to new exhibits, concerts and jam sessions.

For two weekends each August since 1989, Buffalo’s African American Cultural Center presents the PINE GRILL JAZZ REUNION (August 5-6 & 12-13), a highly-anticipated Buffalo tradition that draws thousands to the city’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Park to make new memories under the summer sky.

What better way to understand the Underground Railroad than by following in the footsteps of those hearty souls who risked everything in pursuit of freedom in Canada? MOTHERLAND CONNEXTIONS’ costumed guides take you on a journey into the past that you will never forget.

U NEXPECTED B UFFALO.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

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OUTDOORS SUMMER

yoga and much more. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org Dek Hockey. Available at outdoor rinks in Banksville Park; Marmaduke Playground, Brighton Heights; Lewis Playground, Hazelwood; Ormsby Playground, South Side; Bloomfield Park; and Brookline Memorial Park. City of Play. Try a smorgasbord of games from cards to Circle Rules Football, a team sport using a fitness ball and a circular field. Various locations around the city. Full schedule at www.cityofplay.org. BIG League Sports. Organized programs for kids include baseball, softball, soccer and hockey. Co-sponsored by Citiparks, Pirates Charities and Pittsburgh Penguins. 412-622-7353 Inline Skating. Weekly through September. Offers beginner, intermediate and advanced skates throughout the week around the city and on the Eliza Furnace Trail. www.skatepittsburgh.com

sponsor free yoga every Sunday morning. Market Square, Downtown. www.downtownpittsburgh.com

JUNE 9 Riverview 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 or www.riverview5k.com

JUNE 12 Riverview Park Heritage Day. Free family fun includes games, crafts, refreshments and more. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493

JUNE 17 Pittsburgh Pirates Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy. 5K course. PNC Park. www.efwp.org

JUNE 24 Annual Rachel Carson Trail Challenge. A 34-mile

MAY 21

endurance hike from North Park to Harrison Hills County Park. Two shorter events — the 18-mile Homestead Challenge and a 7-mile Friends and Family Challenge — also take place that day. www. rachelcarsontrails.org

Annual Pittsburgh Walk NOW for Autism. Schenley Park. www.walknow forautismspeaks.org

MAY 28 {CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Open Streets, May 28, June 25 and July 30

ONGOING City Pools. Citiparks pools are open June 13 through Labor Day. Programs include swimming lessons and swim teams. Purchase seasonal pool tags or pay a daily entrance fee. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net Spray Parks. From May 27 until early fall enjoy the movement sensors that cause sprayers to turn on and off in Hazelwood, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Beechview. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net Summer Soul Line Dancing. Exercise to R&B tunes at area parks. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net Tennis. Regional tennis courts are open in Allegheny Commons, Arsenal, Frick, Highland, Moore, Schenley and Washington’s Landing. Summer programs include camps and lessons. 412-244-4188 Lawn Bowling. Open lawn-bowling and league play, plus free lessons. Frick Park,

Regent Square. 412-782-0848 or www.lawnbowlingpittsburgh.org Skateboarding. Go boarding at these city-run skate parks: McKinley, West Penn and Sheraden. 412-255-2539 Kayak Pittsburgh. The city is known for its three rivers; Kayak Pittsburgh lets you play on them. Rentals and launch points in North Park and the North Side. Other rentals include stand-up paddleboards, rowboats, pedal boats and canoes. www.kayakpittsburgh.org Pittsburgh Sports League. Year-round adult co-ed sports, including basketball, kickball, volleyball, softball. Various city locations. 412-338-2133 or www.pump.org Venture Outdoors. Venture Outdoors sponsors hundreds of outdoor events at area parks, including family-fun walks, plus beginner-to-advanced sessions in hiking, backpacking, mountain-biking, rock-climbing, horseback-riding, canoeing, kayaking,

Open Streets. The city will close down selected streets in Pittsburgh for a day of walking, biking and other activities. www.openstreetspgh.org

JUNE 3 Pittsburgh Melanoma Foundation 5K. South Park.

Pittsburgh Ultimate Wine Run. A 5K run City Pools, June 13-Labor Day. {PHOTO OF HIGHLAND PARK POOL COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

www.melanomapgh.org

JUNE 4 Rollercoaster Race. 10K race or 5K run/walk at Kennywood Park. 412-951-8572 or www.rollercoasterrace.com Greenfield Glide. 5K run and walk over a cross-country course. Schenley Park Overlook. 412-255-2493 or www.greenfieldglide.com

JUNE 4-SEPT. 24 Yoga in the Square. The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and Fitt PGH

that includes a post-run wine-tasting. Frick Park. www.theultimatewinerun.com

JUNE 19-24 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis tournament open to boys and girls 16 and younger. Frick Park, Regent Square. 412-244-4188

JUNE 25 Open Streets. The city will close selected streets in Pittsburgh for a day of walking, biking and other activities. www.openstreetspgh.org

JULY 2-16 Paul G. Sullivan Championship. Tennis tournament open to players 16 and older. Frick Park Red Clay Courts, Regent Square. 412-244-4188

•Crafts •Summer Fun •Keeping Cool •Ceramics •Games •Making Friends

5887 FORBES AVE. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-2909 • cmmpgh@gmail.com pittsburgh.colormemine.com .........................................

301 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE Pittsburgh, PA 15241 412-854-1074 • colormemineshv@gmail.com southhills.colormemine.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.


{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race, Sept. 24

JULY 15

SEPT. 16

Habitat for Humanity Kids Triathlon.

Dollar Bank Junior Great Race.

Ages 7-12. Wave Pool, South Park. 412-351-0512

One-mile fun run for kids under 12. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

JULY 22 Night Nation Run. A running music festival complete with lights, lasers, beats and celebration. North Shore Riverfront Park. www.nightnationrun.com

JULY 30

SEPT. 24 Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race. The annual 10K foot race grows every year, so register early. There’s also a 5K run/fitness walk. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

Open Streets. The city will close down selected streets in Pittsburgh for a day of walking, biking and other activities. www.openstreetspgh.org

Conservation is in Our Nature

AUG. 5 Habitat for Humanity Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-15. Pool, North Park. 412-351-0512

AUG. 12-13 Pittsburgh Triathlon and Adventure Race. Compete in an international- or sprint-distance triathlon, or the “Adventure” tri featuring a 2-mile paddle, 20K bike ride and 5K run. Point State Park, Downtown. www.pittsburghtriathlon.org

AUG. 12 Brookline Breeze 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Plus non-competitive one-mile Mini-Breeze fun run. Brookline Memorial Recreational Center. 412-571-3222

AUG. 18-27 Bikefest. A celebration of life on two wheels in Pittsburgh. Various events and locations. www.bike-pgh.org

AUG. 26

LOCATIONS LOCATIONS IN IN BLOOMFIELD, BLOOMFIELD, GREENTREE GREENTREE & CORAOPOLIS CO R AO PO LIS WE HOST HOS OSTT PARTIES PART PA RTIE RT IESS IE AERIAL AERI AE RIAL RI AL SILKS SIL ILKS KS AND AND CIRCUS CIRCUS CIRC US CLASSES CLA LASS SSES SS ESS FOR FOR AGES AGES 5-ADULT 5-AADU DULT LT

Run Around the Square 5K Run/Walk. Henrietta Street and Milton Avenue, Regent Square. www.runaroundthesquare.com

For more than 80 years, the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy has protected, restored and beautified the region. We’ve accomplished our goals only with the help and hard work of our volunteers, the commitment of our partners and the generosity of our supporters. Together, we have conserved more than a quarter million acres of land and countless miles of waterways, planted and maintained gardens, trees and green spaces in cities and towns around the region—and preserved Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater.® To join us, learn more or donate, visitŏ0!. * %"!ċ+.#ċ

SEPT. 9 Alphabet Trail and Tails. A free early-elementary interactive literacy event incorporating children’s books. Blue Slide Playground, Frick Park, Squirrel Hill. 412-655-3665

Pittsburgh Aerial Silks 412-681-0111 412 681 0111 011 PITTSBURGHAERIALSILKS.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

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BNY MELLON

JAZZ presents

JAZZLIVE 2017

AGNES R. KATZ PLAZA 06.06 06.13 06.20 06.27 07.04 07.11 07.18 07.25 08.01 08.08 08.15 08.22 08.25 09.05 09.12

5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm 5-7pm

YOKO SUZUKI DK ANDERSON KENNY BLAKE KENIA CLOSED GEORGE JONES NEW VIEW TRIO DWAYNE DOLPHIN ERIC JOHNSON STEVIE WELLONS CLIFF BARNES GEORGE HEID III JEVON RUSHTON KEVIN HOWARD THOMAS WENDT ROGER HUMPHRIES JAM SESSION

HOT JAZZ COOL DRINKS GRE AT PEOPLE For tickets and more information visit trustarts.org/jaz zlive 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

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one of the top children’s zoos in the country. The zoo also hosts themed programs called “Wild Wednesdays” that take place from June 14-Aug. 2. Highland Park. 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org Tyke Hikes. Venture Outdoors offers weekdaymorning nature hikes in area parks. Hikes are geared toward children younger than 6, and center on themes like waterways and birds. Stroller-friendly. www.ventureoutdoors.org

SUMMER

KIDS ONGOING

SUMMER CAMPS

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Library branches throughout the city offer daily kids’ and teens’ programs — like puppet shows, sing-alongs, STEM workshops and literature discussions — all summer. www.carnegielibrary.org Carnegie Science Center. Most of the ongoing science exhibits are kid-centric, including SpacePlace, roboworld, the Highmark SportsWorks. The Exploration Station teaches youth about lasers, electricity and solar power. North Side. 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. This season’s exhibit, beginning May 20, is Hands-On Harley-Davidson, which includes an interactive motorcycle ride, as well as a mock dealership and engineering lab. North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org Citiparks Dek Hockey. Dek hockey is basically ice hockey without the ice or skates. Full-size rinks are open at Banksville Park, Bloomfield Park, Brookline Memorial Park, Hazelwood’s Lewis Playground, Marmaduke Playground in Brighton Heights, and South Side’s Ormsby Playground. www.citiparks.net

Assemble. A community space in Garfield

The Exploration Station at Carnegie Science Center

Citiparks Recreation Centers. City rec centers offer sports and outdoor activities for youths and all ages; archery, table tennis, volleyball, dance and karate are just some of the options available. Most centers are open 1-9 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. www.citiparks.net

NEED C NTROL?

Center for Family Planning Research is looking for women interested in participating in a year-long investigational birth control pill

E4 Freedom Study To learn more, please contact us! Call: 412-641-5496 Text: “Join CPR” to 412-999-2758 Or visit our website:

www.birthcontrolstudies.org Eligible participants will be compensated for their study participation.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

Citiparks Swimming Pools and Spray Parks. From June 13 through Labor Day, the city offers a chance to cool off at 18 outdoor swimming pools; swim lessons (free from June 26-July 7) are available at each. Spray parks, a beautiful combination of sprinklers and playground, open May 27 in Beechview, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Hazelwood. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

Heinz History Center. Youth-friendly exhibits include Mister Rogers Neighborhood, the Kidsburgh playplace, and the interactive Discovery Place learning space. The museum also hosts “Living History” events at Point State Park, including a family fishing day on May 28. Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

Pittsburgh Toy Lending Library.

that encourages artistic and technological creativity offers weekday camps from June 19-Aug. 18. Themes this year include superheroes, DJs and solving problems of the future. www.assemblepgh.org Carnegie Museums. From June 12 through Aug. 25, kids ages 4-13 can participate in camps with activities including art classes, pseudo-archeology digs, and interactive history experiences. For kids in Westmoreland County, full-day sessions are available at Carnegie’s Powdermill Nature Reserve in Rector, Pa. Oakland. 412-622-3288 or www.artandnaturalhistory.org/camps/ Carnegie Science Center. A variety of science-themed camps are available for children ages 4-18. Kids can learn about engineering, robotics, video-game science and insects. Camps run June 5-Aug.18. North Side. 412-237-1637 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org/ programs/summer-camps/ Citiparks Citicamp. Pittsburgh Citipark recreation centers host day camps for children 7-12. Adventure titles include “Inventor’s Workshop,” “Scales and Tales” and “Urban Adventures.” Programs run from June 20-Aug. 12. See individual rec centers for details. www.citiparks.net

Citiparks Sports Academies. Kids

Hands-On Harley-

Davidson at Children’s Children up to age 6 Museum of Pittsburgh, can improve their beginning May 20 social and motor skills in this indoor art-andplay space, which also features a library full of parenting books for members. Hours vary, so call or check online. Shadyside. 412-682-4430 or www.pghtoys.org Pittsburgh Pirates Kids Days. It’s all about kids on Sundays at PNC Park. Special ticket and concessions prices are offered, as well as special events for children to participate in, like a chance to run the bases. North Side. www.pittsburghpirates.com Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. The hands-on Kids Kingdom area is rated

ages 7-12 looking for a sport-specific experience with scrimmages, fun competitions and a real game can partake in six week-long camps, including tennis, volleyball, flag lacrosse and basketball. Camps run from June 19-Aug. 11. 412-255-2539 or www.citisports.org Citiparks Tot Camp. From June 20Aug. 5, half-day camps are held for kids ages 4-6. Themes include “small scientists” and “all about art,” and each theme lasts one week. 412-885-7445 or www.citiparks.net Frick Art & Historical Center. Starting July 17, the Frick offers a weeklong day camp for kids ages 10-13 delving into creative art. Beginning Aug. 14: a full-day program for kids ages 7-10 exploring the museums exhibits and partaking in sculpturing, painting and printmaking. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

Citiparks Spray Parks, June 13-Labor Day

Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Five week-long, half-day classes run four consecutive weeks beginning June 19. Classes include a yoga camp, a DIY maker class, a sewing camp, many dance classes and more. Most camps for ages 6-12, and a 12-17 camp has been added this year. Bloomfield. www.irmafreeman.org National Aviary. Running from June 19Aug. 4, kids ages 4-18 can interact with birds, go on birding-photography hikes and even get lessons on training falcons by a licensed falconer. North Side. 412-258-9439 or www.aviary.org/summer-camps Phipps Conservatory. A series of camps exploring ecology, botany and conservation is available from June 12-Aug. 24. For kids ages 2-13. Oakland. 412-441-4442 x3925 or phipps.conservatory.org Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Full-day and half-day camps are available from June 12-Aug. 25 in a range of disciplines for kids ages 4-13. High school immersion camps (ages 14-18) are also offered that teach a wide array of subjects, from digital photography and ceramics to jewelrymaking and a mini drone class. Shadyside. 412-361-0455 or center.pfpca.org Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. From June 12-Aug. 18, kids ages 2-13 can attend half-day and full-day summer zoo camps that offer story time for little ones, animal study and interaction for older kids, and even the opportunity to create a “Commercial for Conservation” with a film crew. Highland Park. www.pittsburghzoo.org Saltworks Theatre Company. The Young Actors Studio camp teaches kids ages 4-16 about movement, role-playing, improv and other stage techniques at day camps held in Sewickley and Oakland. Camps run from July 24-Aug. 4. 412-621-6150 x205 or www.saltworks.org Steel City Rowing Club Camp. Summer camps for experienced and novice rowers and other river activities are offered to kids ages 8-18 in half- and full-day sessions from June 6-Aug. 8. Verona. 412-828-5565 or steelcityrowing.org

OTHER EVENTS MAY 25

Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank Presents Kids Cook. Kids ages 5-11 will learn how to prepare and taste delicious recipes at this event at the Carnegie Library Knoxville branch beginning at 2 p.m. Knoxville. 412-381-6543 or www.carnegielibrary.org

COMEDY FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

Kids Camp June 19– Teens Camp June 26 23 –30

th

nd Every 2 & 4 Saturday at 1:00pm

WISH”

Tickets are now “PAY AS YOU y family! ever Every Penny show is open to Learn more at 321letsplay.com

811 LIBERTY AVE 8 L E TY AV DOWNTOWN D OW W NTOW T OWN N arcadecomedytheater.com

a arcadecomedytheater.com e e he r. om

JUNE 1-3 Allegheny County Marbles Tournament. Allegheny County is home to 11 National Marbles Champions, so the county’s tourney is the crème de le crème. Watch at the County Courthouse Courtyard, and see which winners head to the national competition, June 19-23 in New Jersey. Downtown. 412-350-2455 or www.alleghenycounty.us/parks

JUNE 13-AUG. 4 Citiparks Roving Art Cart. On its 44th season of providing free multi-media art projects for kids, the Roving Art Cart travels around and sets up shop in city parks in almost every neighborhood. The cart can be visited Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., for eight weeks throughout the summer. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net

JUNE 19-24 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Three divisions — 16 and under, 14 and under and 12 and under — can compete in this annual tennis tournament. Both Pittsburgh and non-city residents are welcome. Regent Square. www.clayfricktennis.org

SEPT. 9 Alphabet Trails and Tales. A walk through Frick Park teaches hikers 26 awesome things to do on its Alphabet Trail. The free event promotes early-elementary literacy through a day of nature, reading and hand-painted sets. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2017

63


Where To Find A Dollar

Proudly serving Pittsburgh’s communities since 1855.

dollar.bank/locations DOWNTOWN ALLENTOWN 412-431-0100

HILL DISTRICT 412-471-8986

OLIVER 412-261-8400

FOURTH AVENUE 412-261-7538

MARKET SQUARE 412-261-2343

SOUTH SIDE 412-431-4157

GATEWAY CENTER 412-261-3098

OAKLAND 412-621-3178

EAST BRADDOCK HILLS 412-271-8400

MONROEVILLE 412-373-7000

SQUIRREL HILL 412-521-7031

EAST LIBERTY 412-362-7638

MURRYSVILLE 724-325-4130

WESTMORELAND 724-836-7455

GREENGATE 724-832-8139

NORTH HUNTINGDON 724-864-6635

MCKEESPORT 412-673-7366

PENN HILLS 412-244-8589

NORTH BUTLER 724-283-3838

NATRONA HEIGHTS 724-224-8500

CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP 724-779-3800

NORTH HILLS 412-366-2626

FOX CHAPEL 412-782-4848

PINE TOWNSHIP 724-933-6900

RICHLAND 724-443-0250

SOUTH BRENTWOOD 412-881-3777

PETERS TOWNSHIP 724-942-2660

SOUTH HILLS 412-831-2584

DORMONT 412-344-9911

PLEASANT HILLS 412-653-8600

VIRGINIA MANOR 412-531-2422

LEBANON SHOPS 412-344-6626

SOUTH FAYETTE 412-257-2780

WASHINGTON 724-228-3305

WEST CRAFTON 412-922-4208

ROBINSON TOWNSHIP 412-788-1099

MOON TOWNSHIP 412-262-1444

SEWICKLEY 412-741-8310

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC. Copyright © 2017, Dollar Bank, Federal Savings Bank.

BRD390_17


[ART REVIEWS]

“WE HAVE BEGUN TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF OUTSIDE INFLUENCES AND PERSPECTIVES.”

POTENT PRINCE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust has devoted two storefront venues, 707 and 709 Penn Galleries, to artist Steve Prince, and the space is well justified. Communal Resurrection: The Soul of a Community is a riveting exhibit by this New Orleans-native artist, now teaching at Allegheny College. 707 features 10 prints, mostly linocuts depicting couples. In “Soul Music,” a man and woman gaze into each other’s eyes, a miniature drummer in his chest cavity, a trumpeter in hers. While other works share similarly surreal elements, “Exodus: Bread From Heaven” finds its rhythm in how the couple’s legs are arrayed beneath their chairs. In these beautiful images, Prince’s men and women don’t smile; they look contemplative, some impassioned with love, others troubled, but never defeated. It’s powerful stuff, capped by “Communal Resurrection: Song for Aya,” an epic fivepanel, 40-foot-long woodblock carving in the same style, which depicts music in African-American life from the cotton fields (and The Cotton Club) to a DJ and emcee at a Bronx playground. Near the piece’s center, a couple exchange loving looks; to their right, an enraptured singer, lily in her hair, fronts a jazz band with an African drummer. Shavings on the gallery floor, chiseled from the work’s matteblack surface, testify to the labor behind Prince’s gorgeous lines, as sinuously alive as rippling water, or marsh grass in a breeze. The 709 exhibit is dominated by three large drawings, including “Urban Nativity” (a crime scene with a young black victim) and “Who Is My Neighbor?” a portrait of interracial solidarity. Communal Resurrection continues through June 18 at 707 and 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. From noon-6 p.m. Fri., May 26, 707 Penn hosts a free Print Party and Gallery Talk with Steve Prince. www.trustarts.org

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Fans of graphic novels, or old-school hip hop, likely know Ed Piskor, the Munhall native (and resident) internationally famed for Hip Hop Family Tree, his fourvolumes-so-far graphic history of the music and its culture. Through May 21, the ToonSeum hosts Hermetically Sealed, Piskor’s first solo gallery show. It ranges from junior-high juvenilia (an obscene Dick Tracy parody; “Jack Kirby’s Creations”) to pages from Piskor’s self-published breakthrough, Wizzywig. But most of these 120-plus pieces are from the Fantagraphics-published HHFT, actionpacked with hilariously rendered characters and episodes from early hip hop. You can even take home a piece, with Piskor’s $10 prints of characters from the series. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.toonseum.org

“Communal Resurrection: Song for Aya” (detail), by Steve Prince

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{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Attack Theatre dancers (from left) Dane Toney, Anthony Williams and Kaitlin Dann rehearse for The Next Stop.

[DANCE]

FRESH INPUT {BY STEVE SUCATO}

T

“We began to look at the totality of what Attack Theatre has become,” says Kope. “The organization we built and nurtured over the years now includes many

HE TITLE OF Attack Theatre’s latest program The Next Stop references the company’s 22-year journey so far. Born of the minds and bodies of married couple and former Dance Alloy dancers Michele de la Reza and Peter Kope in 1994, the company has taken many stops on the path to becoming one of Pittsburgh’s most popular contemporary-dance troupes. It’s gone from de la Reza and Kope running the company from their kitchen table to having all the trappings of a full-time dance organization. However, for this “next stop” — with three performances May 19 and 20 at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater — Attack comes to a place it has rarely visited before: commissioning outside choreographers to create works for the company.

ATTACK THEATRE PERFORMS

THE NEXT STOP 8 p.m. Fri., May 19, and 3 and 8 p.m. Sat., May 20. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-45. 412-281-3305 or www.attacktheatre.com

more people and has many more needs, wants and desires. What we have begun to understand is the importance of outside influences and perspectives in how to

make work and challenge our dancers so they continue to grow.” Until now, Attack’s many productions, including Incident[s] in The Strip (2009), Site/Re-Site (2010) and Soap Opera (2013), have been choreographed by de la Reza and Kope in collaboration with the dancers. With The Next Stop, the two co-artistic directors begin an experiment with outside choreographers that might lead to more of the same. For this trial balloon, Kope says they turned to two contemporary choreographers he and de la Reza have a lot of respect for, North Carolina-based Helen Simoneau and New York-based Norbert De La Cruz III. Simoneau, a native of Quebec, is a graduate of the North Carolina School for

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the Arts and directs her own company, Helen Simoneau Danse, which includes Pittsburgh’s own Jasmine Hearn. Simoneau has created works for the American Dance Festival and Springboard Danse Montréal, and this past November restaged her work “Flight Distance 1” on Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company. Her new work “Epilogue,” for Attack Theatre’s female company members Kaitlin Dann, Ashley Williams and Sarah Zielinksi, along with guest dancers Sonja Gable and Chelsea Neiss, is a 15-minute exploration of the dancers as individuals and how they relate to each other as a group working toward a singular goal. Set to music by American composers Steve Mackey, Mike Wall and Philip Glass, “It has an otherworldly feel to it,” says Simoneau by phone from New York. De La Cruz, born in the Philippines and raised in East Los Angeles, is a graduate of Juilliard and a 2012 Princess Grace Foundation-USA Awardee. He was named to Dance Magazine’s prestigious 25 to Watch list in 2015; in the article marking this honor, I wrote that De La Cruz “mixes the precision of classical ballet technique with the groundedness of modern dance to create movement that is as intriguing in detail as it is in structure.” He has created works for Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Philadelphia’s BalletX and Tulsa Ballet II. His new 16-minute duet “Under the Rug,” for Attack’s Dane Toney and Anthony Williams, is a prop-heavy work dense with metaphor. De La Cruz, speaking by phone from New York, says the work takes some inspiration from his personal life and his relationship with his partner. Set to music from San Gabriel, Calif., singer Liela Avila and original music by San Francisco-based electronic composer Ben Juodvalkis, the work looks at the intimate relationship between two men going about daily life: their hopes, dreams and failings, as well as those things often swept under the rug. De La Cruz creates a surreal world the two men exist in. “There are these drastic shifts in mood in the piece, sort of like snapping out of a daydream and being faced with the reality and heaviness of the world around you,” he says. Rounding out the program will be a 25-minute reworking of Act 2 of Attack’s 2016 production Unbolted, newly adapted for the proscenium stage and retitled “Unresolved Truths.” The work will also include a newly created four-minute prelude choreographed and performed by de la Reza and Kope in response to the nation’s current divisive political climate. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

[BOOK REVIEW]

LOOKING BACK {BY FRED SHAW} Nostalgia has long had a place in literature. From Homer to the Romantics, Proust and a host of modernists, yearning for one’s home and childhood is a way of preserving memory. Perhaps poet Robert Browning summed up such longing best when he wrote, “how sad and bad and mad it was — but then, how it was sweet.” This could also characterize local writer Judith Robinson’s latest collection, a retrospective (mostly) of previous work. In Carousel: New & Selected Poetry & Fiction (Lummox Press), she explores loss in ways that are by turns poetically reflective and narratively straightforward. While Carousel focuses on memory, its 121 pages read best when Robinson shies from the universal and strives for the personal. In “Now the sadness,” she writes, “of searching for one lost / and not found in memory but / for a static camera image: / …a smile at fourteen / reflecting bright sunlight / a striped bathing suit / the bluegreen Atlantic.” It’s these moments of the mind’s betrayal that she lists as “hoard[ing] a berry scent, / a young baritone, / a mother’s kiss on tender skin … / why this outrage, this thievery?” The tactile moments are presented as empirical gifts, now misplaced and impossible to retrieve. A favorite, “Hawaiian Night,” deals with dating for the mature, where “singles won’t mingle / quite yet. The used-to-be-boys / cluster in corners / the tall & the short / clutching pina coladas / laugh out loud over nothing / as the ladies, lit up by torches, / chatter & flutter, hens among the palms.” The imagery here, strong and evocative, suggests the difficulty of overcoming bereavement. While Robinson’s poetics remain solid, her short stories here present a mixed bag. The strongest is “Mercy.” Set in 1971 Miami, the story follows 39-year-old Marilyn handling the aftermath of her husband’s stroke. Marilyn’s loss is palpable as she deals with his sudden deterioration, which seems cruel set against the backdrop of “a fabulous pastel world of palm trees and pink houses … everyone on holiday pursuing pleasure.” Instead, Marilyn is coming to terms with a life she hadn’t bargained for, and isn’t ready for. And like much of Carousel, Robinson asks readers to consider what it means to age and remember, in the face of what’s already gone. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JUDITH ROBINSON BOOK LAUNCH 7 p.m. Sat., May 20. Brew House, 711 S. 21st St., South Side. Free. www.judithrobinson.com/carousel


[PLAY REVIEWS]

MOTHERS’ DAYS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} WELCOME TO the comfy, cozy kitchen of

THE PINK UNICORN Thu., May 18-Sun., May 21. Off the Wall Productions at Carnegie Stage, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $25-40. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

Unicorn explores many issues, most satisfyingly the differing mother-daughter relationships. Trish reflexively seeks to understand and protect her child, while dodging her own mother’s incessant put-downs. There’s a lot here about family and families, as Trish reconciles with her long-estranged brother and with the differing beliefs of her late husband.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF OFF THE WALL THEATER}

Amy Landis in The Pink Unicorn at Off the Wall

Bonus: Rarely have I seen the ACLU depicted so accurately. (Disclaimer: I’m on the Pittsburgh chapter’s board, and I remember real cases of school districts banning all extracurricular groups rather than allow a Gay-Straight Alliance on campus.) There’s nothing off the wall about the truthfulness and humanity of The Pink Unicorn. And free cookies at intermission, too.

PETER AND THE STARCATCHER continues through Sun., May 21. Stage 62 at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-20. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.com

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

CATCHING ON

ONCE YOU’VE SEEN IT IT, YOU’LL FIND IT HARD TO SETTLE FOR LESS EVER AGAIN” AGAIN.” —The Wall Street Journal

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI} IT’S EASY to see the appeal of Peter and

the Starcatcher to a community theater like Stage 62 production: large, stretchable cast propelled by stagecraft — not fancy (read: expensive) — sets and costumes. Credibility is not an issue. Laughs are. Stage 62 delivers. Mostly. The provenance of this Peter ranges from J.M. Barrie (the creator of Peter Pan in various books and plays starting in 1902) to Dave Barry, the Pulitzer-winning humorist who gets top billing with coauthor Ridley Pearson in a continuing series of young-adult-book “prequels” to the Pan saga. The first, Peter and the Starcatchers (2004), inspired Rick Elice to adapt it into a play, with music by Wayne Barker. It opened in 2009 and took Broadway by storm in 2012. AN AMERICAN IN PARIS MUSIC AND LYRICS BY

GEORGE GERSHWIN AND IRA GERSHWIN

[CORRECTION]

BOOK BY

CRAIG LUCAS

The May 10 review of Perks of Being a Wallflower, at Prime Stage Theatre, incorrectly identified the show’s director, Jeffrey Cordell.

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a woman whose world is imploding, in Off the Wall Theater’s production of The Pink Unicorn. Elise Forier Edie’s 2013 one-woman drama has many comic moments and a few tough truths, as a conservative Christian widow grapples with revelations of the gender identity of her only child. Directed by Ingrid Sonnichsen, Unicorn immediately pulls us into the home and mind of Trish and her tale of bewilderment, concern, anger and, mostly, love. Off the Wall is staging Unicorn over three separate single-weekend runs throughout the year; as seen in the February staging, Amy Landis channeled Trish’s strengths and fragilities, seamlessly blending with the character as she copes and grows with her fast-changing place in a society she thought she knew. As a storyteller, Trish enlivens (though does not actually portray) a lively set of offstage characters covering a surprising gamut of the populace of a small Texas town. There’s the pompous principal, the once-revered pastor and the town’s outcasts, who turn out to be surprisingly supportive. It’s not just Trish’s religious beliefs that are being challenged, but her very being. The design/tech team is as faultless as the cast: Adrienne Fischer’s meticulously detailed set; Kara Sinclair’s careful costumes; Antonio Colaruotolo’s subtle lighting. It’s all held together by resident stage manager Heidi Nagle in the intimate theater space.

There is a plot, with not much sense to it, but the fun is mostly in watching cast members create cabins, waves and more, with strategic bits of rope, well-placed ladders, umbrellas en masse and other unlikely props. And let us not forget that British mainstay: drag. The manlier the man, the funnier the gag. And even if you know in advance that there will be a full-cast chorus line of mermaids a la Rockettes, you’ll still be knocked over. There’s also quite a bit of wordplay, much of it getting mashed up between the cavernous theater space and the intense sound effects, not to mention tangling with mangled accents. But enough jokes make it through. Director Spencer Whale juggles a jolly multicasted 11 men and one lone actual female, Casey Duffy, as the plucky young heroine. Brett Goodnack wins the scenerychewing competition as the malapropic Black Stache, the evil but dashing pirate villain. The hirsute Cody Sweet excels as nanny Mrs. Bumbrake and the sexy mermaid Teacher, with Andrew Wolf as the former’s swain. Nate Willey is charming in the title role. The stars might not hold our destinies, but Peter and the Starcatcher holds an assortment of chuckles, giggles and guffaws.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.18-05.25.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com By the end of the EQT Children’s Theater Festival, kids in attendance might be even more cultured than adult theater-goers. This annual four-day Pittsburgh Cultural Trust production at various Downtown venues includes shows by troupes from the U.S. and around the globe. One piece, The Way Back Home, about a little boy who explores outer space, is a puppet-based show from Teater Refleksion (Denmark) and Branar Téatar (Ireland) and is recommended for children ages 3-8. Pulse, an interactive work from

Mexico, is specifically designed for infants and toddlers. Other shows include Elephant & Piggie’s We Are in a Play! (The Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences), based on the popular Mo Willems book series; Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale, from Dallas Children’s Theater; and The Cashore Marionettes’ Simple Gifts. All shows offer multiple performances. There is more than just theater at this event, however, and these additional activities are free of charge. Children can also build a Lego car to race at the August Wilson Center; improve their comedy chops at Arcade Comedy Theater; and construct urban landscapes out of cardboard boxes at We Built This City, an interactive outdoor exhibit from Australia’s Polyglot Theatre.

^ Sat., May 20: SwimJitsu Lite

friday 05.19 CONFERENCE

BY MATT PETRAS

Thu., May 18-Sun., May 21. Various venues, Downtown. Ticketed events: $9 (multi-show discounts available). 412-456-6666 or www.pghkids.trustarts.org

It says it right there in the name:

Nasty Slam

. Which also calls itself “a gathering of impropriety,” just so you know what you’re in for at Spirit Lounge on Wed., May 24. This head-to-head poetry slam is judged by audience applause, and the winner takes half the door cash. Competitors can come prepared or improvise, but there’s a strict three-minute limit, and props, costumes and musical accompaniment are prohibited. 9-11 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5 to slam, $10 to watch. www.facebook.com (“pittsburgh nasty slam”)

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Seminars, workshops and networking opportunities with Hollywood wood writers, producers, playwrights and d filmmakers (as well as local experts) highlight ight the 3 Rivers Screenwriters Conference.. Learn what it takes to break in and do o it right with the likes of screenwriter and nd producer Ashley Edward Miller (X-Men: Men: First Class), talent-agency story editor Christopher Lockhart; playwright ywright and screenwriter David Paterson on (Bridge to Terabithia); and Laura Harkcom, creator, producer and writer ter of TV’s The Lost Room. The three-day, -day, Point Park University-hosted event ent also includes a pitch competition, on, film screenings and more. Bill O’Driscoll May 19-21. Downtown. $50-100 50-100 per day; for prices for select events and complete schedule, see www.3RSConference.com. nference.com.

STAGE Front Porch Theatricals opens ens its season with Violet. The 1997 musical, ical, written by Brian Crawley and composed posed by Jeanine Tesori, follows a young oung woman who roams the 1960s American erican South

05.17/05.24.2017

searching for the televangelist who she believes will fix telev her physical deformation. The show’s score embraces deformat American, folk and gospel sounds. Front Porch’s production, go boasting an “all Western Weste Pennsylvania cast” including Elizabeth Boyke and Lamont Walker, gets its first La performance at the New Hazlett Theater tonight. Matt Petras 8 p.m. Continues through May 28. p 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $24-30. S 412-765-2720 412-765-272 or www.frontporchpgh.com

MUSIC This week weekend, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and guests gues tilt at Strauss’ Don Quixote. The 45-minute 45-minu tone poem, which debuted in 1898, evokes scenes from Cervantes’ epochal ev Christoph König conducts, with novel. Guest G solos by world-renowned German cellist Maximilian Hornung (in his PSO debut) Maximil and PSO principal viola Randolph Kelly. program opens with Brahms’ Symphony The progr known as his Eroica. There are No. 3, also k performances at Heinz Hall, tonight and two perform Sunday. BO O 8 p.m. Also 2:30 p.m. Sun., May 21. Ave., Downtown. $20-94. 412-392-4900 600 Penn Av www.pittsburghsymphony.org or www.pit ^ Fri., May 19: Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra {PHOTO COURTESY COURT OF MARCO BORGGREVE}


^ Sat., May 20: 3 Rivers Comicon

saturday 05.20 SPORT Inflatable floating obstacle courses are a familiar site at swim clubs, but SwimJitsu has made a sport of it. This initiative of USA Swimming (competitive swimming’s national governing body, from the Olympics on down) comes to town in the form of SwimJitsu Lite. The day-long series of age-group heats, for “swimjas” from age 8 and under to 19 and older, hits the Mount Lebanon High School pool today as part of its third season, in a national tour of 40-plus cities. BO First “wave”: 8 a.m. 155 Cochran Road, Mount Lebanon. $25-30. www.swimjitsu.com

CONVENTION

celebrate recovery

The annual 3 Rivers Comicon comes to Century III Mall for two days. The Con, organized by New Dimension Comics owner Todd McDevitt and store manager Jon Engel, focuses on actual comic books more so than the most well-known cons. Dozens of vendors and creators are scheduled, including the prolific Mark Waid, who has written seminal Superman and Daredevil comics, among many other classics. MP 10 a.m.6 p.m. Also 10 a.m.5 p.m. Sun., May 21. 3075 Clairton Road, West Mifflin. $12.99 per day, $17.99 for both. (VIP: $29.99;“Beer Party”: $49.99). 412-655-8661 or www.3rivers comicon.com

PEOPLES OAKLAND Annual Gala Benefit

THURSDAY, MAY 25 6-9PM @ SCHENLEY PLAZA LIVE MUSIC BY THE LEGENDARY SOUL MAN

BIL L Y PRICE

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open bar + heavy hors d’oeuvres

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DEANA MURO} This “crankie” ^ Fri., May 19: Violet isn’t grouchy. Katy DeMent and Laura Ramie’s Climate Change Crankie is their take on an archaic Appalachian entertainment, a manually powered scroll of paper, lit from behind as it unwinds past a screen. (It’s like hand-made TV.) The story is meant to inspire discussion about Pittsburgh’s industrial history and environmental legacy, and how we can make a better future. Tonight’s performance, at Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, includes live music. Refreshments are provided, and ticket sales benefit PCCR. BO 6 p.m. 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. $15-30. www.facebook.com (“climate change crankie”)

TICKETS: $75 DONATION via paypal or by check at peoplesoakland.org for more information call 412.683.7140 ext. 234

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

by Cole Porter

MAY 19, 20, 21, 2017 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $12.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM {PHOTO COURTESY OF CIRQUE DU SOLEIL}

^ Wed., May 24: Ovo

PARTY It’s a fundraiser, but also a hair-raiser. Tonight’s Big Wig Ball is a bash benefitting Dreams of Hope, a group that produces and supports queer and trans youth arts. Schedule in some extra prep time beforehand, because “wig-flipping styles” are de rigueur for hair and clothes alike. The VIP dance party is early, the regular dance party (with beats by Ratchet Ivy League, Theodore Rexx and Herman “Soy Sos” Pearl) is late. But all night long at Pittsburgh Opera headquarters, expect live performances by LGBTQA+ music and dance artists. The event is 21 and over. BO VIP: 7-10 p.m. ($125-200). Dance party: 10 p.m.1 a.m. ($30-50). www.dreamsofhope.org

sunday 05.21 TALK

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933 Liberty Avenue 1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA 94

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Willa Cather lived in Pittsburgh full time for just a decade, and remains best known for her novels of the Great Plains. But the Pulitzer-winning novelist’s years here ^ Sat., May 20: Climate Change Crankie were artistically formative, and even after moving to New York, she summered here — and she wrote O Pioneers! while lodging in Squirrel Hill. Today, the Battle of Homestead Foundation explores Cather’s local connections in Willa Cather in Pittsburgh. The program at the Historic Pump House features talks by scholars from the region and other experts, including California University of Pennsylvania professor Kim Vanderlaan. BO 3 p.m. 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomestead.org

tuesday 05.23 WORDS Nigerian-born Unoma Azuah left her home country in 1999, after receiving numerous death threats because of her activism and writing about LGBT issues. Azuah now teaches writing at the Illinois Institute of Art, in Chicago, but her research continues. Tonight, she’s at Alphabet City to read from Blessed Body: Secret Lives of LGBT Nigerians, her new nonfiction collection giving voice to those

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: “Hip Hop Hates Women” talk by HollyHood, Artists Image Resource, North Side CRITIC: Elizabeth Kivowitz, 38, a hip-hop promoter and Lyft driver from Squirrel Hill WHEN: Fri.,

May 12

I wanted to see HollyHood talk about sexism in hip hop. It was very informative. I think it gave a nice insight as to why sexism is in hip hop and what people can do about sexism in hip hop. I agree [with the speaker]. I think it was a perspective you don’t hear so much. You know it, but it’s not talked about at all. You’ve loved the music since you were a kid, and it’s changed so drastically. As you get older, you realize how those lyrics shape your life to think that you can either be this or that. You have to sort of figure that stuff out on your own, realizing you can be whoever you want to be, not necessarily this or that. It goes across the board — there’s all kinds of sexism in all genres, but [in] hip hop there is obviously, and that’s what I deal with at hip-hop shows. B Y MAT T PE T R AS

forced to live invisible lives in a nation of repressive anti-LGBT laws. BO 8 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. Registration suggested at www.alphabetcity.org.

WORDS Another sign of summer: The Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series is back. Pittsburgh’s favorite poet/ex-narcotics detective/boxing coach, Jimmy Cvetic, hosts this Oakland institution, which common-sensibly combines poets reading their work with a tavern setting: Hemingway’s Cafe’s intimate back room. The series, weekly through July, starts tonight by featuring members of the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange, including Barry Governor, Roberta Hatcher, Joe Kaldon, Don Krieger, Kathy McGregor, Aaron Novick, Stuart Sheppard and Alyssa Sineni, as introduced by local poetry legend Michael Wurster. An open mic follows. BO 8 p.m. 3911 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. JBauer103w@aol.com

wednesday 05.25 TALK Nonprofit news publication Public Source hosts a talk by longtime White House correspondent April Ryan, whose confrontations with President Donald Trump and White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer (see also: Melissa McCarthy) have gone viral. In February, Ryan asked Trump at a press conference whether ^ Wed., May 25: April Ryan he’d be hearing from the Congressional Black Caucus, to which he asked: “Are they friends of yours?” Ryan, recently just named Journalist of the Year by The National Association of Black Journalists, appears tonight at the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. MP 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave, Oakland. $8-15 (VIP: $40-100). 412-515-0060 or www.publicsource.org

CIRQUE Cirque du Soleil currently has some 20 shows touring globally, and while a few, like Varekai, have made it to Pittsburgh on the troupe’s near-annual visits here, one that hasn’t is Ovo. This particular showcase for Cirque’s inimitable blend of wild costumes and sets, fantastical acrobatics and lyrical theatricality is insect-themed. Think airborne fleas, ants that juggle with their feet, spiders swinging from silk lines. Catch the buzz at one of seven shows in five nights at the Petersen Events Center, starting tonight. BO 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 28. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. $25-165. www.cirquedusoleil.com

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THE MULLIGATAWNY SOUP EPITOMIZED THE CRUCIAL DISTINCTION BETWEEN SEASONED AND SPICY

SALT OF THE EARTH {BY ALEX GORDON} At first glance, salt may seem too simple a product to build a business on. Sodium and chloride, found readily in nature — there you go. But there’s a whole lot more complexity and variety to it than you’d think, says John Tarallo, founder of Steel City Salt Company. Your basic table salt, for example, is processed to remove minerals, resulting in a sharp, acidic taste, says Tarallo. Naturally harvested salts, like the Himalayan or Sicilian varieties, retain those minerals, which leads to more subtle and complex tastes. Such varieties are what shoppers will find at Steel City Salt Company, which sets up shop in the Strip District each weekend, and is currently working toward a brickand-mortar storefront in Millvale. July is the hoped-for opening date. Tarallo’s product line includes saltbased seasonings, with favorites like Steeltown Garlic and Herb (with dried garlic, onion, parsley, rosemary, sage and thyme) and the Black and Gold (mixing Steel City’s Hickory Smoked Sea Salt with various spices). The Millvale store for Steel City Salt Company, which Tarallo runs with his wife and a rotating cast of family members, will accommodate both manufacturing and retail in one location. They’re in the process of finalizing the space, but rest easy: The Strip location will remain open in the interim and beyond.

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Mediterranean salad, garlic-parmesan fries and a beer flight

STATION STOP

ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fri.-Sun. 21st Street and Penn Avenue, Strip District. www.steelcitysalt.com

T

RUE TO ITS name, Railyard Tap Room

the

FEED

It’s a great excuse to leave the office, and to pick up some fresh, locally produced food. The

Market Square Farmers Market, Downtown, is open for the season. Shop from more than two dozen vendors – including 13 news ones — for produce, baked goods, cheese, flowers and, new this year, booze. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursdays

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is located right across Railroad Street from the tracks in Bridgeville, just down the block from the historic train station on, yes, Station Street. The building has been radically remodeled from an old Tambellini’s, so that instead of something vaguely Tuscan, here is something vaguely Old West, or at least rustic, with shades of trendy gray and barn wood. But it’s pulled together with some rather sharp graphic design, including a Photoshopped rail-crossing sign that was blown up and applied to the table tops. Despite these efforts to tie the decor to the name and location, Railyard is not exactly a theme restaurant, but a — mostly — straightforward bar and dining room with plenty of TVs and a truly impressive array of beverages on tap. The most remark-

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able thing about the interior was perhaps the double-height space in back of the bar with billboard-size photo-murals of PNC Park and other venues. For South Hills suburbanites loathe to drive into the city for a game, this must be the place to be.

RAILYARD GRILL AND TAP ROOM 413 Railroad St., Bridgeville. 412-221-7245 HOURS: 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: $5-15; special entrees, $16-26 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED But back to our earlier suggestion that Railyard is not altogether a typical tavern. Scattered among the poutine, Scotch eggs, wings and burgers were a selection of Indian items, some imported whole (Mulli-

gatawny soup) and others hybridized with contemporary pub cuisine (chicken tikka tacos). According to our friendly server, one of the owners is Indian and suggested adding the dishes on a hunch (correctly, as far as we are concerned) that diners would appreciate such unusual offerings. Beyond that, Railyard’s menu impressed us with its refined touches (demi-glace in the poutine), use of beer in the kitchen (stout BBQ wings), specially sourced ingredients (Serenity Hill bacon) and a specials menu featuring more ambitious entrée options (steelhead trout with butternut squash and an Indian-spiced roasted chicken on the night we were there). The aforementioned poutine included a fried egg, which sounded delicious but was perhaps a bit too filling as a starter. Instead, we chose the bacon-fat fries. The flavor was


clean, not overwhelmed by smoke, and the texture of the shoestring-style fries was impeccable, crispy but not crunchy and with softer edges as well. Lardons — cubes — of bacon added chew and meaty punch, while plentiful slivered scallion brightened the starchy, salty notes and added its own texture. This was a promising start. Angelique went with a triple play from India for her meal: Mulligatawny soup (a personal favorite that is, truth be told, rarely seen on Indian restaurant menus, let alone in gastropubs), veggie samosas from the specials menu, and chicken tikka tacos. The soup was thick, stew-like, and substantial, with the earthy notes of lentils and root vegetables balanced against warm spices such as cinnamon, cumin and coriander. Did we also detect the bittersweetness of fenugreek and the pepperiness of garam masala? Whatever it was, this soup epitomized the crucial distinction between seasoned (which it was) and spicy (which it wasn’t). As for the chicken tikka tacos, just one question: Why has no one thought of this before? The concept is brilliant. Tender morsels of grilled chicken — coated, not drowned, in a mild tomato-yogurt-curry sauce — were folded into a flour tortilla (not unlike Indian naan) with fresh tomatoes, grilled scallion, baby bitter greens and cucumber raita standing in for sour cream. The tortillas had a bit of a tough texture, but other than that, this dish was a crosscultural revelation. An order of wings made for a split verdict. The meat was merely OK, not as plump and juicy as we’d hope. But the sauce — sweet and spicy BBQ made with cider — happily delivered much more spice than sweetness, invigorating rather than condescending to our palates. The grilled-apple burger combined smoked cheddar with grilled slices of lemonhoney-infused apple. Those flavors are arguably too subtle for a nicely charred halfpound burger, but there’s no question that they made a difference, augmenting the sweetness of the apple without swerving the sandwich into fruitburger territory. The apple had a nice texture, too, softened but not mushified by the heat, and the smoked cheese reinforced the grilled flavor while evoking Southern apple pie with cheddar on top. It was a clever recipe, well executed. Railyard Grill’s Indian accent may be its most distinctive offering, but hardly the only one that charmed. Almost without exception, the food was delicious, and the menu, while fairly brief, had both depth and breadth. The vegetarian options were far better than most; we might return just to try the housemade veggie burger. Bridgeville is fortunate to have something special down by the railroad tracks. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

REALLY SIMPLE CHICKEN IN ZA’ATAR {BY ALICE JULIER} Many people in my life have cared for me in one way or another. Call them other mothers, mentors, academic parents, whatever, but as I reach a certain age, I’m grateful for the various ways they have, e, intentionally or not, taught me things. Often, that involves food. When I started writing about food, there was a professor in the gender-studies program named Arlene, an Armenian-American feminist activist whom I found intimidating. She approached me one day and said, “I hear you are starting to work on food and gender. So am I. Let’s share books and talk.” So we did and have ever since. Over the past 20 years, our lives have held profound tragedies and ordinary difficulties, but I have always been fed by her, often, but not exclusively, Middle Eastern foods. This isn’t her recipe, but it’s based on spices and flavors from her cooking.

Sushi Kim

MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR

OAXACAN CUISINE

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INGREDIENTS • 1 whole chicken, cut in half or large pieces. • about ½ cup of za’atar blend: sumac, sea salt, toasted sesame seeds and crushed red peppercorns, mixed together (adjust the amount of each component according to taste) • 1 to 2 cups of yogurt — plain or lightly flavored is fine, but don’t use Greek yogurt for this; it’s too thick • 1 or 2 lemons, juiced, and zested (save zest for garnish) • 1 to 2 cups chicken broth • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced potatoes

CLOSED C LLOS OSED OS ED M MONDAY ONDA ON DAY D A

WE CATER!

1241 PENN AVE • 412-281-9956 Formerly the

Tin Angel blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free.

INSTRUCTIONS Cut up enough potatoes to fill the bottom of a large roasting pan, about four large ones. A few hours before dinner, coat the chicken halves or pieces with yogurt and let sit in a nonreactive dish. Mix the spices and sprinkle over the top of the chicken; refrigerate and let marinate. If roasting, set oven to 350 F degrees. Place chicken in the pan; add more spices, if you like, then add the potatoes around the chicken. Add the lemon juice, garlic and chicken broth to the pan. Bake for 45 minutes. Or, in warmer weather, grill. Leave out the potatoes and broth; add the lemon juice to the marinade. Grill the chicken with a foil-wrapped brick on top to keep it flat. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Dining with a

Actually, so are all the others.

Alice Julier is director of the Chatham University Food Studies Program

1200 GRANDVIEW AVENUE • MT. WASHINGTON 412-381-1919 • VUE412.COM

WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: AMARETTO SOURS

[ON THE ROCKS]

BACK TO NATURE Getting old-school with natural wines {BY DREW CRANISKY} Six Penn Si P Kitchen Kit h 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown DRINK: Oranchia Glad INGREDIENTS: Deep Eddy Orange vodka, amaretto, orange and sour-cherry compote, chia seeds OUR TAKE: This even-boozier take on an amaretto sour ends up candy-sweet. Tart from the compote, but not truly sour, this drink is for those who have more mild palates. The compote by itself is tasty enough to eat with a spoon.

VS.

FOR ALL ITS flaws, the global food industry has certainly made progress in cleaning up its act. From fair-trade coffee to grass-fed beef to organic tomatoes, concerned eaters now have more options than ever to craft diets that align with their morals. Alcohol, however, has largely been left out of that conversation. What’s the ethical boozehound to do? For Dom Fiore, one answer is natural wine. As sommelier at Bar Marco, Fiore pours exclusively natural wine, a small but growing category that offers an alternative to conventional, industrial wine. Unlike other designations, “natural” is not a welldefined or regulated term. Fiore sums up the approach this way: “Take what nature

gives you, and don’t do a whole lot to it.” Fiore considers a wine to be natural if it meets his “big three” criteria. The grapes must be grown without chemicals, and ideally in a polyculture (i.e. planted with other crops). The wine should be fermented with wild, native yeast rather than commercially purchased strains. And most importantly, the wine should undergo minimal manipulation in the cellar. This means little to no added sulfur (a common preservative) and none of the many additives winemakers use to control taste, clarity and stability.

All of this means wine that is kinder to the Earth and closer to what we drank for the vast majority of human existence. But ethics and romance aside, the taste is what sold Fiore on natural wine. “Never in a million years did I think I’d be just as excited, if not more excited, about wine like this than [about] pulling a cork on a $500 bottle of wine,” he says. He cites the way natural wines tap into a world of flavors beyond conventional bottles. A few years ago, Fiore made the risky move of switching Bar Marco’s list to entirely natural wine. “It’s not because I found this niche thing,” he explains. “I fell head over heels in love with these types of wine.” The hands-off philosophy of natural winemaking means great variation in bottles. A familiar style might taste and look different than you expect: Wild yeast may bring surprising funky notes, and cloudiness is common. But despite (or perhaps because of) these variations, Fiore says customers have embraced Bar Marco’s all-natural approach. And though “nonindustrial” often means “expensive,” many natural wines cost the same as a decent bottle of the conventional stuff. Because “natural” is not a regulated term, it can be difficult to know whether a wine is natural right off the shelf. For an introduction, head to one of the growing number of Pittsburgh bars pouring natural wines. In addition to Bar Marco’s extensive selection, Allegheny Wine Mixer, Smallman Galley and Ace Hotel all include natural offerings on their wine lists. Fiore is excited about the spread of natural wine, and sees a bright future ahead. As he says, “It’s not a trend. It’s a movement.”

“I FELL HEAD OVER HEELS IN LOVE WITH THESE TYPES OF WINE.”

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

This week on Sound Bite: Wild forager Tom Patterson takes us hunting for culinary spring jewels: morels and ramps. www.pghcitypaper.com Club Café

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer

56 S.12th St. South Side DRINK: Apricot Amaretto Sour INGREDIENTS: Amaretto Disaronno, apricot liqueur, lemon juice, cherry OUR TAKE: This sour is a bright, balanced summer sipper that is high on citrus notes and drinkability. The apricot liqueur warms the palate, without overdoing the sweetness that some fruit liqueurs can add. The amaretto brings roundness to fill out the cocktail, so it goes down smoothly.

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Pimm’s No. 1 Cup Liqueur $19.99/750ml “This English spirit is most famous for the Pimm’s Cup cocktail. It’s a nice refreshing cocktail, and there are a zillion different ways to garnish it. I like cucumber and sprigs of mint with mine. It’s gin-based, which can turn some people off, but it’s my favorite thing to bring to a party.” RECOMMENDED BY MEGAN FITZGERALD, BARTENDER AT ROUND CORNER CANTINA

Pimm’s No. 1 Cup Liqueur is available at Fine Wines & Good Spirits stores.


AUGUST HENRY’S BENJAMIN’S BURGER BAR BLOCK 292 BRGR BURGATORY BURGH’ERS CAIN’S SALOON THE COMMONER DOROTHY 6 BLAST FURNACE CAFE EASE: MODERN COMFORT CUISINE THE FOUNDRY TABLE & TAP HARD ROCK CAFE HONEST JOHN’S THE MODERN CAFE OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFE PIG IRON PUBLIC HOUSE PITTSBURGH STEAK COMPANY SHARP EDGE SOCIAL STACK’D STATION SUNNY JIM’S TESSARO’S

MAY 15-21

CUSTOM BURGERS ALL WEEK LONG www.pghburgerweek.com #pghburgerweek NEWS

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AT CAMELOT, A PLUMBING ISSUE REVEALS A SWORD STUCK IN A ROCK

HOUSE OF HORRORS {BY AL HOFF} Australian writer/director Ben Young makes a strong debut with Hounds of Love, a well-constructed and deeply disturbing thriller about a husband and wife who kidnap and torture a teenage girl. The film is set in Perth, in December 1987 (a weird-to-us season of blazing sunlight and Christmas decorations), and opens with one of the film’s visual tricks, an off-kilter slowmotion scene that is languid and creepy.

CP APPROVED

A bad marriage: Stephen Curry and Emma Booth

Vicki (Ashleigh Cummings) sneaks out of the house for a party, and en route encounters John (Stephen Curry) and Evelyn (Emma Booth), who offer her a ride. She accepts their offer to buy weed, and winds up in their house in an ordinary workingclass neighborhood. In short order, she is drugged, chained to a bed and forced, like us, to watch in horror as her kidnappers embrace passionately to “Nights in White Satin.” Young never shows us the worst of the physical assaults — doors are closed on what we presume are torture-rapes by John — but is that any better? Like Evelyn, we wait in the other room, nervously glancing at the closed door. Nor is the emotional violence in this film any easier to process, particularly with the intimacy Young creates — physically, within the small home, and by placing us in the center of this twisted triangle. Hounds is a tense character study rather than an exploitive torture-porn film. At first, viewers are invested in the classic binary of victim and dominant abuser, but it’s Evelyn who is the most fascinating and whose motivations are more deeply explored. Evelyn is revealed to be emotionally fragile and conflicted; she is both abused and abuser, and it’s on her that Vicki places her slim hopes of relief. Besides exploring unthinkable pathologies, the film unpacks other issues, such as the engrained sexism and gender roles that make it harder for women to assert themselves (Vicki’s mom presents a more “normal” version of this situation), and the various power dynamics that play out between husbands and wives, and parents and children. Hounds is a compelling work, but take heed: This is a tough film to sit through — and it’s apt to stay with you. Starts Fri., May 19. Harris

Charlie Hunnam works the Arthur look.

ROYAL MESS {BY AL HOFF}

B

Y THE GODS! King Arthur: Legend

of the Sword, Guy Ritchie’s rework of the classic British legend, opens mid-battle in a CGI-intensive fury that finds giant elephants, shape-shifting smoke monsters, flaming towers and who the hell knows! When the dust settles, we learn that at this gloomy castle (saddest Camelot ever), Vortigern (Jude Law, set to “salty ham”) has usurped the crown from his brother, who has shipped his toddler son, Arthur, away in a boat, like a slightly more modern Moses. After a flashback depicting his raffish upbringing among thieves, whores and kung-fu masters in Londinium, we meet the buff and glistening grown-up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam). Back at Camelot, a plumbing issue reveals a sword stuck in a rock. Arthur and some streetwise Londiniumers wind up at the castle, where David Beckham (not a typo) is guarding the sword-in-rock. Becks mocks Arthur, who nonetheless promptly pulls out the sword. Some stuff about a re-

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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volt, blah blah, then Arthur goes to fulfill his destiny in the Darklands. More swords and giant snakes. If you don’t have much time, it’s worth noting that you won’t waste any of it caring for anybody in this film. It occasionally suggests a Band of Bros vibe, but then it triples down on the one hot guy and his

KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD DIRECTED BY: Guy Ritchie STARRING: Charlie Hunnam, Jude Law In 3-D, in select theaters

even hotter sword (really, it glows). Not much work here for women — Astrid Bergès-Frisbey plays the mage who helps Arthur, and a few other actresses turn up in cameos as prostitutes (with hearts of gold, natch), as part of a human-eel creature or as the Lady in the Lake. Ritchie brings his usual bag of razzamatazz — slow-mo, choppy editing,

crappy music — but Arthur is more like a comic book enchanted to yell at you than an entertaining comedic actioner. Viewers could make a drinking game out of all the fantasy tropes and characters that remind you of other movies. (Or TV: When Arthur gathers his dudes around his fancy carved table, it’s Sons of Anarchy all over again.) Much of this film felt underdeveloped, overstuffed and incoherent, but at least it winds up someplace familiar: two guys fighting for control of a penis-shaped tower. All this hot garbage is too much for even the bulging shoulders of Hunnam. He can’t shake the effect that his pretty face and fine physique — clad in various leathers, quilted jackets and fur-trimmed capes — are actually in service of some edgy European fashion campaign: “Now, drench this fur coat in mud, and smolder … bellissimo!” Admittedly, Hunnam looks fantastic when stylishly brooding and raging out in slow motion. This movie is terrible, but I just might buy that mud-covered coat. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


facility while doing missionary work in the Dominican Republic and was granted rare access to the camp and to its inhabitants. The film screens as part of Reel Q’s ongoing series Reel Stories, which presents films about the struggles and triumphs of the LGBT community. 7 p.m. Thu., May 18. Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave., North Side. www.reelq.org/ events. Free

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW ALIEN: COVENANT. In a perfect world, there would just be Alien, the stripped-down jolt of a 1979 sci-fi thriller. But we got three sequels, the Alien vs. Predator spin-offs, and now we are trudging our way through a prequel trilogy. One purpose of this prequel, directed by Ridley Scott, is to trot out some dorm-room-philosophy questions about power, playing God and the mess that inevitably happens when humans misjudge the artificially intelligent help they’ve built. (Not for nothing does somebody in this film intone: “Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair.”) But this re-hash of ideas can be found in better sci-fi works; the primary goal here is very expensive fan service: to provide an origin story for the freaky creature that blasted onto the scene in the original Alien. The plot is pretty basic: A spaceship, Covenant, is heading into deep space on a colonization mission, with everybody in hypersleep. But the crew gets woken up by a storm, and discovers they are near an earth-like planet which is sending a bizarre message. Ill-advisedly, the crew, led mostly by the co-captain (Katherine Waterston) and the ship’s android helper (Michael Fassbender), head down there to check it out. Bad idea. You can figure the rest out, and also how this planet connects to 2012’s Prometheus, and likewise where it’s headed (classic Alien!). Most everybody dies horribly, but among the hardier, Waterston has a nice no-nonsense resignation, and Fassbender ably gives us android realness — and more. He is, after all, the half-man/half-machine vessel in which all the existential self-examination rests. Yet, despite lofty ideals, it’s hard not to process these add-on Alien films as just perfunctory grossthing-attacks-space-worker, over and over, but in slightly different settings. Starts Fri., May 19 (Al Hoff) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL. David Bowers directs this family comedy, adapted from the book series, that finds the Heffleys on a road trip. Starts Fri., May 19 EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING. A teenage girl with a medical condition has led a sheltered life indoors. But then she meets the teenage boy who moves in next door. Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robinson star in this dramedy adapted from Nicola Yoon’s novel and directed by Stella Meghie. Starts Fri., May 19 THE LOVERS. Debra Winger and Tracey Letts are a long-time married couple, each of whom is having an affair. However, the discovery of each other’s infidelity puts a spark back in their relationship, in Azazel Jacobs’ romantic comedy. Starts Fri., May 19. Manor NORMAN. Richard Gere stars as Norman Oppenheimer in Joseph Cedar’s low-key dramedy, subtitled “The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer.” We meet Norman engaged in setting up a deal, and it’s clear that tap-dancing through half-promises is his modus operandi. If only Person A will do Thing B, then Person C can execute Thing D, and so on. This is the time-honored stuff of street corners, bars and markets, but Norman is operating in some rarefied midtownManhattan air. He takes a gamble on a visiting Israeli government official (Lior Ashkenazi), and this one lucky break sets in motion the

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RESERVOIR DOGS. Quentin Tarantino’s stylish 1992 debut charts the failure of a heist in nonlinear fashion, while riffing on dozens of earlier crime thrillers and their conventions. May 19-25. Row House Cinema (AH) PULP FICTION. Quentin Tarantino’s nonlinear, darkly comic 1994 celebration of crime, coincidence and fast-food hamburgers has many noted players, quotable lines and memorable scenes. Often imitated, Pulp Fiction still holds its own against the scores of pale pretenders that followed. May 19-20 and May 22-25. Row House Cinema

Snatched

KILL BILL, VOL. 1. Quentin Tarantino’s 2003 film is Charlie’s Angels Gone Bad, crossed with a Japanese samurai movie, crossed with a spaghetti Western, and crossed yet again with a Hong Kong martialarts throwdown. Our hero, The Bride (Uma Thurman), watched as Bill and her former assassinationcrew comrades spoiled her wedding by killing everyone there, mistakenly leaving The Bride herself for dead. Now The Bride is out for bloody, fastest-sword-in-the-West (and East) revenge against her would-be murderers. May 19-25. Row House Cinema (Bill O’Driscoll) KILL BILL, VOL. 2. Quentin Tarantino’s 2004 film karate-kicks right in where Vol. 1 left off: The avenging bride and professional killer (Uma Thurman) continues down her list of targets. It’s shot with Tarantino’s typical verve, so expect stylized riffs on pop culture, quoting from neo-spaghetti Westerns, kung-fu films, and even a nail-biting splash of Hammer horror, all buoyed with a vibrant and kicky soundtrack. May 19-25. Row House Cinema (AH)

Alien: Covenant

Norman titular rise and fall. Norman is fed by his own often-deluded vision of his influence, and even seems to thrive on how precarious it all is: “I’m a good swimmer,” he says, “as long as my head is above water.” But there is a pervasive melancholy that runs through this work; we see enough of reality to worry for Norman, and indeed, as expected, the waters around him grow more treacherous. This is a fine little film, with a good performance from Gere (doing a downmarket version of his more typical slick-businessman roles) and a supporting cast that includes Michael Sheen, Steve Buscemi and Charlotte Gainsbourg. In English, and Hebrew, with subtitles. Starts Fri., May 19. AMC Loews Waterfront, Regent Square and Tull Family Theater, Sewickley (AH) SNATCHED. A feckless selfie-taking woman (Amy Schumer) talks her uptight mom (Goldie Hawn) into taking a vacation together in Jonathan Levine’s comedy. They settle in at a deluxe resort in Ecuador, where they are kidnapped by a smooth talker, because … I dunno, there is some market for whiny American women? Leaving aside the not-very-cool politics of presenting Latin America as a place of deranged Spanish-speaking thugs, this film still can’t find a comic groove. Scenes play out like blackout sketches, with little cohesion between them, and most of the jokes rely on the two women freaking out. I’m not here to judge Hawn’s personal choices, but this kind of physical comedy relies heavily on facial expression, and Hawn’s crease-free frozen face is really jarring. Another couple of pros — Wanda Sykes and Joan Cusack — are wasted in poorly developed supporting roles. I’d advise staying home. (AH)

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REPERTORY MRS. DOUBTFIRE. Robin Williams stars as a divorced dad who doubles as the wacky but lovable nanny Mrs. Doubtfire in Chris Columbus’ 1993 comedy. And who says there are no good roles for middle-aged women? 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 17. AMC Loews Waterfront DOCUMENTARY SALON. Celebrate the beloved oddball musical instrument that is the theremin, played by moving your hands through the air. The evening screening is the award-winning 1994 documentary Theremin: An Electric Odyssey, followed by a chance to play a theremin yourself. Those inspired can move across the street to The Glitter Box (460 Melwood Ave.) for a concert by theremin virtuoso Pamelia Stickney. 6 p.m. (reception); 6:30 p.m. screening. Thu., May 18. Melwood Screening Room. $5-10. pghdocsalon@gmail.com MOTHERS OF BEDFORD. Jenifer McShane’s 2011 documentary profiles a little-discussed issue — 80 percent of women in prison are mothers to schoolage children. The film examines the lives of five women, incarcerated at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility, in New York, and how they struggle to maintain relationships with their children. 6:30 p.m. Thu., May 18. Eddy Theater, Chatham University campus, Shadyside. www.justfilmspgh.org. Free KIDNAPPPED FOR CHRIST. Kate Logan directs this 2014 documentary about a “re-education camp” in the Dominican Republic, where American parents send their gay teen children to be “fixed.” Logan, herself a Christian college student, learned of the

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RACING TO ZERO: IN PURSUIT OF ZERO WASTE. Christopher Beaver’s 2014 documentary examines the global issue of garbage, specifically how to reduce it, where to put it and how to make good use of it when possible. The screening will be followed by a discussion led by Teresa Bradley, of the Pennsylvania Resources Council. The film continues a series of environmental films. 7 p.m. Fri., May 19. Phipps Conservatory, 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free with regular admission. phipps.conservatory.org I, CLAUDE MONET. The story of the impressionist painter Claude Monet is told through his own words, using his personal letters. Phil Grabsky’s new documentary was shot in Europe, at some of the iconic spots depicted in Monet’s work. 1 and 4 p.m. Sat., May 20; and 4:30 p.m. Sun., May 21. Hollywood MANTRAP. “It Girl” Clara Bow stars in this 1926 silent comedy about a flirty city girl who chafes at living in the rustic Canadian village of Mantrap with her dull husband. Then a cute divorce layer comes to town … Organist Jay Spencer will provide live musical accompaniment. To be screened in 35 mm. 2 p.m. Sun., May 21. Hollywood SUPERMAN III. The Man of Steel turns bad when he gets poisoned by synthetic kryptonite. Richard Lester directs this 1983 action comedy starring Christopher Reeves and Richard Pryor. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 24. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 5-25-77. This coming-of-age story from Pat Johnson (and based on his own life) depicts a film geek growing up in rural Illinois in the 1970s. Among other life-changing experience, he falls in love and, on May 25, 1977, there comes a certain sci-fi adventure film that takes place in a galaxy far, far away … 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 25. Hollywood

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“I WANT THESE KIDS TO LEARN THAT THEY CAN DO ANYTHING.”

HISTORY LESSONS This week in Pittsburgh Sports History {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} A look back at events that you’ve either forgotten about or never heard of in the first place. MAY 18, 1987 Jane Pauley and Bryant Gumble come to town and do interviews with two of the city’s most noteworthy residents: then-Mayor Richard Caligiuri and, of course, the Pirate Parrot. MAY 19, 1981 Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Jim Bibby gives up a base hit to Atlanta’s Terry Harper before sitting down the next 27 batters. MAY 20, 1978 Pittsburgh Pirates captain Willie Stargell hits a monstrous 535-foot home run in Montreal’s Olympic Stadium, the only dinger hit into the massive facility’s second level.

Babe Ruth

MAY 20, 1988 Former Pirates star Willie Stargell and former manager Chuck Tanner, both now with the Atlanta Braves, are booed by Pirates fans inside Three Rivers Stadium. MAY 21, 1969 While on a team road trip in San Diego, Pirates legend Roberto Clemente is abducted off the street in an attempt to rob him. When the kidnappers realize who he is, the story goes, they take him to the spot where they picked him up and return his wallet, cash and All-Star ring. Clemente, who did not report the incident but recalled it in later stories, plays later that day, collecting three hits. MAY 23, 1993 Cyclist Lance Armstrong notches his first major victory by winning Pittsburgh’s Thrift Drug Classic, the first leg in the Thrift Drug $1 million Triple Crown. Armstrong would win all three races and the top prize. However, evidence has surfaced in recent years that competitors were paid off to lose the third leg of the race in Philadelphia. MAY 25, 1935 Although he would play in five more games, Babe Ruth gives his career the sendoff it deserves when he goes 4-4, including three home runs, against the Pirates at Forbes Field. One of those homers flies over the right-field grandstand, becoming the first and only home run ever hit out of the storied stadium. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{CP PHOTOS BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Camp coaches work with hard-of-hearing students on batting, throwing, running and catching in PNC Park’s outfield.

05.17/05.24.2017

PERFECT PITCH {BY RYAN DETO}

T

HERE AREN’T many differences be-

tween hearing and deaf athletes playing baseball. The sport already has an extensive sign-language built in (catchers signaling to pitchers; base coaches signing to batters). But like many things in our complex society, hard-ofhearing people still face added obstacles, even in baseball, thanks to stigmas. Not many people know this more than Curtis Pride. As a young man, Pride was initially told he couldn’t play in a community-club league because he was deaf, but eventually was allowed to join. Good thing. He went on to play 11 seasons in the Major Leagues, one of just a handful of deaf athletes to play professional baseball. And on May 12, Pride joined the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Western Penn-


sylvania School for the Deaf in hosting a baseball and softball camp for deaf and hard-of-hearing kids to refine their baseball skills and remind them that becoming a professional athlete is not out of reach. “I want these kids to learn that they can do anything,” Pride told City Paper during the camp. “Build up their selfconfidence.” Traveling youth-baseball coach Kevin Giza started the Perfect Pitch camp seven years ago. He was inspired to do so thanks to his aunt and uncle, who are deaf. More than 60 young athletes got to throw, hit and run in the outfield of PNC Park during this year’s camp. Giza said giving the kids a chance to play on the field is about inspiring them. He says many of the kids already have substantial baseball skills, and the camp is “a small way to give these kids a voice.” Training deaf ballplayers is less challenging than people might think. During the camp, Pride helped refine players’ swings by gesturing to keep their hips aligned and shoulders square: classic baseball fundamentals. The only difference was that the few times he had to use words, he signed them. Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf senior Nick Bertone said he was ecstatic to participate in the camp to learn more about baseball, which is his favorite sport. “This is my passion,” he said. “I am not gonna give up on playing. … This teaches us that we can do anything.” Fourteen-year-old Olivia Larson said she hopes the camp can hone her skills and give her the confidence to pursue playing college softball. “I am hoping this will help to get a college to look at me,” she said. This is exactly the message Pride wants

{COURTESY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF}

Basic signs in American Sign Language

the deaf and hard-of-hearing athletes to take away. Even though there aren’t many traditional avenues for players with disabilities to make it in pro sports, that doesn’t mean kids shouldn’t try. RYAN DETO @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

FINAL THREE {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} THE FINAL installment of the best Pittsburgh Pirates of all time ends with the team’s strongest collection of talent — the 10 best outfielders since the untimely end of the Roberto Clemente era. This top 10 is comparable to, if not better than, any other major-league team’s. These guys are elite, and the top three could arguably make up the best historic outfield of all time. 10. When Bill Mazeroski finally hung up his cleats, the fans in Polish Hill needed a new Bucco to call their own. Richie Zisk actually entered the majors as a late-inning replacement for Clemente. The former Seton Hall Pirate was an unsung laborer in the famed Pittsburgh Lumber Company. Zisk had four solid seasons in Pittsburgh, hitting .302, knocking in 279 runs, with 68 homers and an .848 OPS (on-base plus slugging percentage). 9. Scoops had mad hits like he was Rod Carew. In fact, in the entire decade of the 1970s Al “Scoops” Oliver had more hits than anyone besides “Hit King” Pete Rose. Oliver had several productive seasons alongside Clemente in the Bucs’ outfield. These numbers are just in the few years after. Still,

{CP FILE PHOTO}

Andrew McCutchen

Oliver hit .303, stole 39 bases, went deep 80 times and drove in 413 runs. Recently Oliver was awarded a settlement because majorleague owners had colluded against him and other players to keep salaries down in the mid-’80s. This probably kept Oliver from obtaining 3,000 hits. 8. From 2003-2008, Jason Bay was the only reason to go to PNC Park. The finest non-hockey Canadian import to Pitts-

burgh, Bay made fans forget about Brian Giles, for whom he was traded. Bay was the first Pirates player to start an All-Star Game since Andy Van Slyke did it in the early 1990s. Also, he was the first Bucco to win Rookie of the Year since the award was created in 1947. 7. Bobby Bonilla, who ranks as the most productive Pirates third baseman in the past five decades, now makes this list for his work in the outfield. Bobby Bo hit .284, smacked 114 homers, and knocked in an even 500 runs. He wore nine different uniforms in his career, but had his best numbers as a Pirate. 6. Willie Stargell played the outfield for three years after Clemente passed. Sure, he was in his mid-30s at the time, but he still makes the list. Captain Willie was by far the best first baseman in team history and is also a top-10 outfielder. His career numbers would’ve ranked him higher, but even in baseball middle age, Willie Stargell is better than all but five guys on the list. 5. Brian Giles looked like Lenny Dykstra on steroids. Actually Lenny Dykstra was on steroids, but he should have skipped them because he never looked like Brian Giles. Monster numbers were the norm for Giles. As a Bucco, Giles had an OPS of 1.017, which is the best among any Pirates outfielder (Clemente included). In his four full seasons, the lowest number of homers Giles hit was 35, and only Pedro Alvarez has hit more than that since. Giles clubbed 165 home runs and knocked in 505 runs, all while hitting .308. 4. Andy Van Slyke won five consecutive Gold Gloves, hit 117 home runs and stole 134 bases while playing center field.

He wasn’t the best in any category, but was among the leaders in almost all of them except for OPS (.811). He had a pretty good arm, too, and runners eventually decided to stop testing him after he enjoyed a long run atop the league’s outfield-assists list. Postseason let-downs and an unfriendly personality were traits he shared with his non-BFF outfield mate, Barry Bonds. 3. Dave Parker once hit the cover off a baseball and not figuratively, either. The Cobra crushed catchers who blocked home plate, threw lasers from right field, won two Gold Gloves and an MVP award. But Dave Parker was never loved by fans. Seen as too brash and as too well paid (traits we love today), Parker even had to dodge batteries and loaded socks that were thrown at him by his own fans. A remarkable talent who, if not for his penchant for non-performance-enhancing drugs, may have been one of the league’s best of all time. Also, you have to admit that picture of him smoking a cigarette in the dugout is pretty cool. Parker pounded 166 home runs, hit .305, stole 123 bases and drove in more runs than anyone on the list, with 758. 2. Andrew McCutchen has more home runs (175) more stolen bases (160) and a better OPS (.868) than Dave Parker. We know he’s struggling now, but at the age of 30, Cutch has been better than anyone … almost. He’s not been involved in a single controversy, and he’s had no confrontations; nothing but good has come out of Andrew McCutchen as a Pittsburgh Pirate. He also has an MVP under his belt and a legacy that is still being created. See him now while he’s still here! What more do we want from a player? Cutch has won the Roberto Clemente Award for his off-field contributions, and in spirit we would love to give him this Clemente Award for the best outfielder since The Great One. But when the numbers are finalized, nobody has been better than … 1. Barry LaMar Bonds. He’s got two MVPs, three Gold Gloves, 176 homers and 251 stolen bases to go along with an .883 OPS and the highest defensive ranking on this list. All these numbers were accrued by the time he was 28, and a full seven years before (allegedly) adding “juice” to his everyday diet. The most hated ex-Pittsburgher this side of Jaromir Jagr, Bonds was Dave Parker all over again, only better. The knocks against him were terrible postseasons and a churlish attitude. His lifetime WAR (wins above replacement level) is 162.4, which is behind only Walter Johnson, Cy Young and Babe Ruth in the annals of baseball history.

THESE GUYS ARE ELITE.

MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN. F O L L OW HI M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I

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Pittsburgh Local 6 International Union of Elevator Constructors will be accepting applications from May 12, 2017 thru May 26, 2017. Application MUST BE COMPLETED ON-LINE by visiting www.neiep. org/careers or for more information contact: ocowan@neiep.org

If you worked at Pittsburgh Metals, Pittsburgh, PA, between 1961-1972, please contact Investigator Sherry Day at (734) 878-5236 or email Sherry@ SLDinvestigations.com

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1. Beachside building 7. NFL Hall-ofFamer Jerome 13. Paternity test sites 15. Like some city political races 16. North American reindeer 17. Pizza spice 18. Missing Link’s ancestor 19. Give some relief 21. Spanish numeral 22. “Late Night” host Meyers 24. Sci-fi movie with a lightcycle scene 25. Little bounce 26. Hinder, in legalese 28. Pair in ballet? 30. “Moana” frames 31. Gawked 33. PowerPoint graphic 35. So-called shadow government that can’t be overthrown, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 37. Commedia dell’Arte clown 39. Chocolatecovered treat 43. “Frozen” villain 44. Dessert pastries 46. Dumbledore’s killer 47. Cartoonists Jaffee and Capp 48. Narcissist’s love 50. Cruising?

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on May 16, 2017, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for the following:

Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Science Labs & ADA Restroom Renovations Plumbing Construction Prime Contract - REBID Pittsburgh Liberty K-5 ADA Stage Lift General Construction Prime Contract - REBID Project Manual and Drawings are available for purchase on May 1, 2017 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us NEWS

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{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

Be your own boss. Flexible hours. Unlimited earning potential. Must be 21 with valid U.S. driver’s license, insurance & reliable vehicle. 866-329-2672 (AAN CAN)

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51. Force that was the first to hire a female officer 53. Some choppers 55. Like some discount mdse. 56. “Shawshank Redemption” star 58. Like verbs that join the subject of a sentence to a subject complement 60. Warning sounds 61. Like a rogue 62. With 6-Down, publicly visible 63. 100% dependable

DOWN 1. Plastic music holders 2. Two short syllables followed by a long one, poetically 3. Robert Blake TV cop series 4. Activist Ayaan Hirsi ___ 5. Picks up 6. See 62-Across 7. Comic Roseanne 8. Illuminati symbol 9. Subway request 10. Air carrier? 11. He played Bilbo Baggins in “Lord of The Rings” 12. One-masted boats 14. Bolivia’s capital 15. Like some romantic evening walks

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20. Sword, colloquially 23. Mobs 27. Jury member 29. Old Swedish import 30. Richard of the Rambo movies 32. Expression of stupidity 34. Classic Pontiacs 36. Exterminator’s stock 37. Be buddybuddy (with) 38. Case worker? 40. Creatures that can turn you to stone 41. Renée Fleming or Plácido Domingo, e.g. 42. It’s doesn’t quite

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sound the same 43. Step from B to C, say, on a scale 45. “Cut me some ___!” 49. “Full ___” (Samantha Bee’s show) 52. Famous Marquis 53. Candy that comes in milk chocolate, peanut, and pretzel (among others) 54. Manager Anderson in the Baseball Hall-of-Fame 57. Octavia Spencer’s Oscar-winning role in “The Help” 59. Throat dangler {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.17-05.24

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): My pregnant friend Myrna is determined to avoid giving birth via Caesarean section. She believes that the best way for her son to enter the world is by him doing the hard work of squeezing through the narrow birth canal. That struggle will fortify his willpower and mobilize him to summon equally strenuous efforts in response to future challenges. It’s an interesting theory. I suggest you consider it as you contemplate how you’re going to get yourself reborn.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I invite you to try the following meditation: Picture yourself filling garbage bags with stuff that reminds you of what you used to be and don’t want to be anymore. Add anything that feels like decrepit emotional baggage or that serves as a worn-out psychological crutch. When you’ve gathered up all the props and accessories that demoralize you, imagine yourself going to a beach where you build a big bonfire and hurl your mess into the flames. As you dance around the conflagration, exorcise the voices in your head that tell you boring stories about yourself. Sing songs that have as much power to relieve and release you as a spectacular orgasm.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In normal times, your guardian animal ally might be the turtle, crab, seahorse or manta ray. But in the next three weeks, it’s the cockroach. This unfairly maligned creature is legendary for its power to thrive in virtually any environment, and I think you will have a similar resourcefulness. Like the cockroach, you will do more than

merely cope with awkward adventures and complicated transitions; you will flourish. One caution: It’s possible that your adaptability may bother people who are less flexible and enterprising than you. To keep that from being a problem, be empathetic as you help them adapt. (P.S. Your temporary animal ally is exceptionally well-groomed. Cockroaches clean themselves as much as cats do.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Lady Jane Grey was crowned Queen of England in July 1553, but she ruled for just nine days before being deposed. I invite you to think back to a time in your own past when victory was short-lived. Maybe you accomplished a gratifying feat after an arduous struggle, only to have it quickly eclipsed by a twist of fate. Perhaps you finally made it into the limelight but then lost your audience to a distracting brouhaha. But here’s the good news: Whatever it was — a temporary triumph? incomplete success? nullified conquest? — you will soon have a chance to find redemption for it.

get your yoga on!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): While shopping at a funky yard sale, I found the torn-off cover of a book titled You’re a Genius and I Can Prove It. Sadly, the rest of the book was not available. Later I searched for it in online bookstores, and found it was out of print. That’s unfortunate, because now would be an excellent time for you to peruse a text like this. Why? Because you need specific, detailed evidence of how unique and compelling you are — concrete data that will provide an antidote to your habitual self-doubts and consecrate your growing sense of self-worth. Here’s what I suggest you do: Write an essay entitled “I’m an Interesting Character and Here’s the Proof.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Leonardo da Vinci wrote a bestiary, an odd little book in which he drew moral conclusions from the behavior of animals. One of his descriptions will be useful for you to contemplate in the near future. It was centered on what he called the “wild ass,” which we might refer to as an undomesticated donkey. Leonardo said that this beast, “going to the fountain to drink and finding the water muddy, is never too thirsty to wait until it becomes clear before satisfying himself.” That’s a useful fable to contemplate, Libra. Be patient as you go in search of what’s pure and clean and good for you. (The translation from the Italian is by Oliver Evans.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): My friend Allie works as a matchmaker. She has an instinctive skill at reading the potential chemistry between people. One of her key strategies is to urge her clients to write mission statements. “What would your ideal marriage look like?” she asks them. Once they have clarified what they want, the process of finding a mate seems to become easier and more fun. In accordance with the astrological omens, Scorpio, I suggest you try this exercise — even if you are already in a committed relationship. It’s an excellent time to get very specific about the inspired togetherness you’re willing to work hard to create.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yin yoga ÁRZ\RJD meditation

teacher training ashtanga yoga prenatal yoga family yoga

east liberty squirrel hill north hills

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In ancient Greek myth, Tiresias was a prophet who could draw useful revelations by interpreting the singing of birds. Spirits of the dead helped him devise his prognostications, too. He was in constant demand for revelations about the future. But his greatest claim to fame was the fact that a goddess magically transformed him into a woman for seven years. After that, he could speak with authority about how both genders experienced the world. This enhanced his wisdom immeasurably, adding to his oracular power. Are you interested in a less drastic but highly educational lesson, Sagittarius? Would you like to see life from a very different perspective from the one you’re accustomed to? It’s available to you if you want it.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “You remind me of the parts of myself that I will never have a chance to meet,” writes poet Mariah Gordon-Dyke, addressing a lover. Have you ever felt like saying that to a beloved ally, Capricorn? If so, I have good news: You now have an opportunity to meet and greet parts of yourself that have previously been hidden from you — aspects of your deep soul that up until now you may only have caught glimpses of. Celebrate this homecoming!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I predict that you won’t be bitten by a dog or embarrassed by a stain or pounced on by a lawyer. Nor will you lose your keys or get yelled at by a friend or oversleep for a big appointment. On the contrary! I think you’ll be wise to expect the best. The following events are quite possible: You may be complimented by a person who’s in a position to help you. You could be invited into a place that had previously been off-limits. While eavesdropping, you might pick up a useful clue, and while daydreaming you could recover an important memory you’d lost. Good luck like this is even more likely to sweep into your life if you work on ripening the most immature part of your personality.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Time out. It’s intermission. Give yourself permission to be spacious and slow. Then, when you’re sweetly empty — this may take a few days — seek out experiences that appeal primarily to your wild and tender heart as opposed to your wild and jumpy mind. Just forget about the theories you believe in and the ideas you regard as central to your philosophy of life. Instead, work on developing brisk new approaches to your relationship with your feelings. Like what? Become more conscious of them, for example. Express gratitude for what they teach you. Boost your trust for their power to reveal what your mind sometimes hides from you.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A 2-year-old kid is like using a blender, but you don’t have a top for it,” said comedian Jerry Seinfeld. Would you like to avoid a scenario like that, Aries? Would you prefer not to see what happens if your life has resemblances to turning on a topless blender that’s full of ingredients? Yes? Then please find the top and put it on! And if you can’t locate the proper top, use a dinner plate or newspaper or pizza box. OK? It’s not too late. Even if the blender is already spewing almond milk and banana fragments and protein powder all over the ceiling. Better late than never! Imagine what your life would be like if you even partially licked your worst fear. Describe this new world. FreeWillAstrology.com

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a happily married straight man. My wife, who is 33 years old, cannot orgasm through intercourse since we had our last child. Her explanation is that she has this constant sensation to pee. Now we find other means to please her through toys, oral, etc. Are there exercises or other means to get her to climax through intercourse? Is this common from childbirth? CLIMAXING LIBERALLY IS FUN

“Failure to orgasm with penile penetration is not a medical condition,” said Dr. Jennifer Gunter, an OB-GYN, writer (drjengunter.wordpress.com), and kick-ass tweeter who practices in the San Francisco Bay Area. “If a woman can orgasm with other methods — oral sex or masturbation or toys — then that means everything is working just fine. Remember, it’s not how she gets to the party that matters, it’s that she got to attend the party.” As all straight men need to be aware, CLIF, only a small number of women — less than a quarter — can get off from vaginal intercourse alone, a.k.a. PIV. “Most women require clitoral stimulation to have an orgasm, and often the mechanics of penile penetration just don’t produce the right kind of friction,” said Gunter. “It’s possible that the subtle anatomical changes post-childbirth have altered the friction mechanics of your coupling. Introducing a vibrator during sex might help.” And while we’re on the subject of clits, CLIF… We abbreviate sign-offs around here, as everyone knows, and like PIV for your wife, CLIF, your sign-off didn’t quite get you there. You could’ve gone with “Climaxing Liberally Is Terrific” or “Tremendous” or “Totally Spectacular,” but you didn’t. Perhaps it was an innocent brain fart — perhaps I’m reading too much into this — but if you didn’t spot the near-CLIT staring you in the face in your sign-off, CLIF, it seems possible that you may have overlooked your wife’s clit, too. Also possible: Your wife wasn’t actually having orgasms “through intercourse” before she gave birth to your last child. You’re clearly invested in climaxing together — just like in the movies and porn and other fictions — and your wife, like many women, may have been faking orgasms to please a male partner. Tired of faking orgasms, your wife seized on the birth of your last child to explain why she “suddenly” couldn’t come from PIV alone anymore. What about your wife’s constant sensation to pee during intercourse? “That’s something to be looked at,” Gunter said. “After childbirth (and sometimes just with age), women can develop an overactive bladder or pelvic-muscle issues, and these could be exacerbated during penetration, making a woman feel as if she needs to empty her bladder. Worrying about peeing during sex might be holding her back. It might be worth a visit to a pelvic-floor physical therapist and/or a urogynecologist if this sensation to pee during sex is bothering her. But if neither the lack of orgasm with penile penetration nor the urgency to pee is bothering her, and she is having orgasms other ways and is happy with that, I would be happy with it, too. After all, it’s her orgasm, and stress or pressure to orgasm a particular way might negatively affect her party.” Follow Gunter on Twitter @DrJenGunter. Do it: She’s amazing and hilarious, and she kicks right-wing, anti-choice, sex-negative ass up and

down Twitter on a daily basis. I’m a 29-year-old man who desires a monogamous relationship. I’m currently in an LTR with a 29-year-old woman. Despite my feelings about monogamy, I’ve sought attention from women and men on dating apps. I’ve gotten caught doing this more than once. I have never met up with anyone in real life, and my girlfriend has yet to find out about the use of gay dating apps. After some soulsearching, I realized that my bisexuality is a huge issue in our relationship. I’ve never discussed it with her, and while I don’t think she would react negatively, I’m scared of how it would affect our relationship. I’m not sure whether to go to therapy, bring it up with my girlfriend, or do some combination of the two. I’d love some advice about having this discussion in a way that won’t end my relationship. I’m not really interested in an open relationship, and I would like to stay with my girlfriend, but I’m confused because I don’t know if a monogamous relationship will still be what I want once I open up about my sexuality. It seems like a no-win situation — stay in the closet and no one knows but I keep wanting outside attention, or tell her the real reason I’ve used dating apps and probably lose the relationship.

HER EXPLANATION IS THAT SHE HAS THIS CONSTANT SENSATION TO PEE.

BISEXUAL REELING ABOUT CLOSETED ETHICAL DILEMMA

The use of gay dating apps isn’t the issue — it’s your use of them. And while I’m nitpicking: It’s not “outside attention” you want, BRACED, it’s cock. Backing way the hell up: Lots of partnered people — even contentedly monogamous people — dink around on dating apps for the attention, for the ego boost, for the spank bank. Fakes and flakes annoy the people who are looking for actual dates on those apps, of course, but apps are the new pick-up bars, and partnered people were strolling into pick-up bars to harmlessly flirt with strangers before heading home to their mates, all charged up, long before apps came along. The dangers and temptations of app-facilitated flirtations are greater, of course, because unlike the person you briefly flirted with in a bar, the person you flirted with on an app can find you again — hell, they come home with you, in your pocket, and you can easily reconnect with them later. But the real issue here isn’t apps or flirting along the harmless/dangerous spectrum, BRACED, it’s closets — specifically, the one you’re in. The closet is a miserable place to be, as you know, and the only relevant question is whether you can spend the rest of your life in there. If the answer is no — and it sure sounds like it’s no (you sound miserable) — then you’ll have to come out to your girlfriend. If you don’t think monogamy will be right for you once you’re out, then monogamy may not be right for you period. Find yourself a queer-positive therapist, come out to your GF with that therapist’s help, and allow her to make an informed choice about whether she wants to be with you. Worry less about the right words, BRACED, and more about the truthful ones. On the Lovecast, a comprehensive rundown on anal lubes: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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This past weekend, visitors to the Rex Theater went through Hell, courtesy of Morose & Macabre’s annual Atrocity Exhibition. This year’s show told a 20th-century version of Dante’s Divine Comedy through a series of dark-themed cabaret, burlesque and sideshow acts from around the country. See more photos by John Colombo online at www. pghcitypaper.com.

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Volume 27 Issue 20

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