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400 Live Music! Local Food! 125+ Breweries!

February 24-25

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Kid Koala: Nufonia Must Fall

EVENTS

3.16 – 8pm 3.4 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: FIDELIO TRIO The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Free parking in The Warhol lot Tickets: $20/$15 students

Media sponsors for Strange Times.

Presented with Carnegie Nexus, as part of the Strange Times series.

3.10 – 7pm WHAT COUNTS AS HUMAN? A DISCUSSION WITH CHRISTOPHER FYNSK, URSULA HEISE, AND ILLAH NOURBAKHSH The Warhol theater Presented with Carnegie Nexus, as part of the Strange Times series. FREE; Registration suggested.

Dungen 3.18 – 8pm The Warhol theater Tickets $20/$15 members & students

3.19 – 2pm ACTIVIST PRINT: ARTISTS IN DIALOGUE The Warhol theater FREE; Registration suggested.

Bang on a Can: Field Recordings 3.25 – 8pm

3.26 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ARDITTI QUARTET & ELLIOTT FISK The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets: advance $15/$10 students; door $20/$15 students; visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Presented with Carnegie Nexus, as part of the Strange Times series and the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music, and the Pittsburgh Humanities Festival. Tickets $15/$12 members & students Media sponsors for Strange Times.

Presented with Carnegie Nexus, as part of the Strange Times series.

4.1 – 10am-12pm HALF-PINT PRINTS The Factory Free with museum admission

412.237.8300 www.warhol.org

Mark Eitzel and Howe Gelb

117 Sandusky St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212

4.11 – 8pm The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

The Warhol theater | Tickets $15/$12 members & students

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02.22/03.01.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 08

Spay-ghetti & No Balls Dinner

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Web Producer ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Interns JOHN HAMILTON, AMANI NEWTON, ALONA WILLIAMS

[ART]

February 27 4:00 - 8:00pm

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER ILLUSTRATION BY JOE MRUK}

[COVER STORY]

“There always has to be The Next Place to Go, or the Best City You’ve Never Heard Of.”

[ADVERTISING]

East End Shelter 6926 Hamilton Ave Pgh, PA 15208

Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representative BLAKE LEWIS Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

$10 for adults, $5 for kids 10 & under

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“Once you play at a high level, you don’t want to play with people who aren’t competitive.” PAGE 40

Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing Assistant THRIA DEVLIN

M enu:

[ADMINISTRATION] Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

Spaghetti with Red Sauce Bread and Butter

[PUBLISHER] EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

[MUSIC]

“I wanted these lyrics to be punk as fuck.” PAGE 18

News 06 News of the Weird 12 Music 18 Arts 28 Events 31 Taste 34

Screen 38 Sports 40 Classifieds 42 Crossword 42 Astrology 44 Savage Love 45 The Last Word 46 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

Dessert

Buy your tickets at the door (while dinners last)

Takeout available! Dinner donated by: Community Supermarket & Delallo Foods

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THIS WEEK

“TRAVEL WRITING, LIKE POP MUSIC, ABHORS A VACUUM.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

President Trump thinks the media is your enemy. But editor Charlie Deitch, well, let’s just say he strongly disagrees. Read Pittsburgh Left exclusively online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

In a continuation of our last podcast, City Paper hosted a date in our studio between advertising executive Blake Lewis and a woman he met on the dating app Bumble. Listen in online at www.pghcitypaper.com to hear how it went.

{CP ILLUSTRATION BY

Did you hear? Pittsburgh was just named the No. 1 city for wearing overalls. Just kidding, though we have topped countless other lists. To learn more about those eye-roll-inducing lists, check out the latest CP Longform online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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JOE MRUK}

MOST LISTABLE CITY I

N NOVEMBER of last year, Pittsburgh was profiled in a Vogue article titled “5 Industrial Cities Making America’s Rust Belt Shine Again.” In the piece, author Michaela Trimble explained this new shine with a slew of familiar talking points: mentions of Google, Andy Warhol, Ace Hotel, Uber and Conflict Kitchen; the transition from steel town to tech hub; and the word “eats” as a synonym for food. For many Pittsburghers, this wasn’t breaking news. Media recognition of modern Pittsburgh has become routine. It seems like every other month Pittsburgh is being lauded with new superlatives and praised for its perceived renaissance. The word “grit” often makes an appearance. Though not much different in tone or content from similar articles, the Vogue piece was unique in its recommendation

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

to “take a drive outside the city to Braddock for chef Kevin Sousa’s Superior Motors.” While the author nailed certain details here — Sousa does own a restaurant in Braddock called Superior Motors — the restaurant isn’t actually open. It’s been soon-to-open since 2015 and remains that way today.

Travel blogs paint a pretty Pittsburgh, but the reality isn’t so simple {BY ALEX GORDON} The flub was mocked on social media, and the mention was removed (the author declined to comment for this story). It’s not exactly PizzaGate, but the mistake feels emblematic of a larger issue surrounding this

type of touristic cheerleading. At best, it reveals the flimsy research behind these lists — the Superior Motors website does display fancy dishes that could give the impression that food is being served, but the controversy over the slow opening isn’t exactly a secret. At worst, it provides another example of clickbait that prioritizes going viral over truth. “Travel writing, like pop music, abhors a vacuum,” Michael Meyer, author of several books on travel and associate professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh, wrote in an email to City Paper. “There always has to be The Next Place to Go, or the Best City You’ve Never Heard Of. If it’s not Baltimore or Greenpoint or St. Paul, then it’s Pittsburgh.” For the past 10 years or so, Pittsburgh has filled that vacuum. It’s been praised


for its livability, resilience, safety, youthfulness, intelligence, food scene, bikability, affordability,literacy,ballpark,urbanhiking, startup-friendly culture and, according to a poll from Gawker, having the ugliest accent in America (maybe “praise” is the wrong word, there). But despite the accolades, many segments of the population continue to suffer, and the actual impact of these lists remains negligible. The first “most livable” nod came from Rand McNally in 1985, a year in which the unemployment rate here was just over 9 percent and more than 42,000 residents left the region. In a Los Angeles Times article from that year, Pittsburgh City Controller Tom Flaherty reflected on the designation, saying, “This will be one more giant step to change the city’s image that it’s a smoky steel town. … Pittsburgh is not utopia, but where is utopia?” Pretty poetic. Author Melody Warnick studied how and why people feel attached to the places they live in her book called This Is Where You Belong: The Art and Science of Loving the Place You Live. She says that despite the touristic bent of these lists, they are actually more for the benefit of residents. “Pittsburgh has been on so many of those clickbait-y sort of lists,” says Warnick. “I think they are mostly for the people who live in the city. I think it’s rare that outsiders look at those lists and think, ‘Hey I’m gonna move to Pittsburgh because it’s a great town for beer drinkers, or whatever.’ I think the people who already live in Pittsburgh, you click on those links, you read those articles because you want confirmation that you’re right. You live in a fantastic city. “I think they are kinda clickbait-y, but … there’s a higher purpose, making current residents of the city feel good about where they live.” The phenomenon of loosely researched, exaggerated content feels symptomatic of the current state of affairs in the age of alternative facts and fake news. Reading these kinds of articles, it’s hard not to recognize President Donald Trump’s penchant for exaggeration and extreme adjectives. But travel writing actually has a storied history of exaggeration and positive spin, often with economic motives. Andre and Edouard Michelin, the founders of the Michelin Tyre Company, debuted their Michelin Guide in 1900. It offered information about travel routes, petrol stations, places to eat and things to do across France. Encouraging travel helped grow the burgeoning automobile industry.

More travel meant more roads, more cars and more tires. AAA’s TourBooks and Rand McNally’s travel guides were other early instances of using tourism information to promote commerce, but it’s long been a significant factor in travel writing. Today in Pittsburgh, websites like NEXTPittsburgh and health blog Fittsburgh seem to be carrying on this tradition with content celebrating the city. NEXT receives funding from many sources, including Port Authority of Allegheny County and Pittsburgh’s Urban Redevelopment Authority, and Fittsburgh is sponsored by the UPMC Health Plan — all organizations that have a vested interest in the city’s advancement. Their Pittsburgh-centric content contributes to the tapestry of pieces singing our praises. “Zagat naming Pittsburgh ‘the No. 1 Food City’ has had a remarkable effect on Pittsburgh tourism,” Tom Loftus, vice president of communications at VisitPittsburgh, wrote in an email to CP. Asked if there’s a downside to all this attention, Loftus wrote, “None. Although we never want to rest on our accolades. We always want to be doing everything we can to promote Pittsburgh to the world.” While the response to these kinds of articles and Pittsburgh’s accolades vary from satisfied validation to eye-rolling and nausea, there seems to be a consensus among critics that much of the growth being praised has a cost, and that communities of color disproportionately pay it. In July 2013, shortly after George Zimmerman was found not guilty of the murder of Trayvon Martin, a local group called Pittsburgh for Trayvon staged a protest at the Allegheny County Courthouse demanding, among other things, that Mayor Luke Ravenstahl renounce Pittsburgh’s title as “Most Livable City” until relations between police and communities of color improved. In 2014, Damon Young, editor-inchief of the digital magazine Very Smart Brothas, penned an op-ed in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette titled, “Oblivious: Black people love Pittsburgh, too, but can’t help but wonder how much Pittsburgh loves them.” In it, Young expressed his ambivalence about the growing trend of Pittsburgh praise. “Even as we boast about living in America’s ‘Most Livable’ or ‘Most Welcoming’ city, we question whether it is truly livable for and welcoming to us,” he wrote. “This is largely due to the fact that Pittsburgh’s relationship with its Yinzers of

“I HAVE NO REASON TO BELIEVE THAT THESE CHANGES FOR THE BETTER ARE WITH PEOPLE OF COLOR IN MIND.”

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MOST LISTABLE CITY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

color has always been, for lack of a better and inequality don’t negate the city’s transformation since the 1970s, but they term, complex.” Asked if he feels any different three do illustrate a sort of city-wide cogniyears later, Young says, “I’m probably tive dissonance regarding the nature of a bit more pessimistic, but not totally. those changes. There’s truth to both narI have no reason to believe that these ratives, but it’s important to consider the sources: the celebratory narrative from changes for the better are with people financially interested parties, the of color in mind, and are bencritical narrative from acaefiting people of color that are demic studies and first-hand in Pittsburgh.” e Read th art accounts from residents In fact, a 2015 study by as p ry to s full -only e n li affected by the changes. the nonprofit, Washington, n o r of ou form Moving forward, the city D.C.-based Urban Institute CP Long ww. tw series a aper will be tasked with ensurfound that despite the city’s p ty pghci ing the shine from all the improvements, the differ.com praise thrown at Pittsburgh ence in quality of life between doesn’t blind them to the needs black and white Pittsburghers of the residents who live here. remains sharply disparate. “In the last census, we actually The “Barriers and Bridges” study cited the contradiction, stating, “Pittsburgh has lost population,” says Young. “So all of been rated the most livable city in the these initiatives and redevelopment, United States (The Economist 2011), but you wonder who it’s helping. Forget research depicts two very different cities. about people of color, black people, Employment, homeownership, neighbor- whatever, but who is coming to the city? hood and school quality, and quality of There’s a giant apartment building that life differ starkly for African-American takes up three entire blocks in East Libresidents and non-African-American resi- erty … where the community center used to be, across the street from the Target. dents, most of whom are white.” These competing narratives of livability Who is that for? Who’s gonna live there?” A L E X G ORD ON @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN

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*Certain restrictions apply.

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We’ve made it simple! Riding Port Authority is now faster, simpler and easier than ever before. Starting March 1st, riders will have the option of exiting the front or rear doors when the situation is appropriate.* Riders will continue to pay when entering the front door of the bus regardless of travel direction or time of day. *Some exceptions may apply.

.......................………………simple.PortAuthority.org NEWS

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PROVIDING CARE Meet an Iranian-American doctor dedicated to serving rural Pennsylvanians {BY RYAN DETO} PROVIDING HEALTH care in rural Pennsylvania isn’t easy. Over the years, primary-care doctors have been leaving rural towns due to a shrinking patient base and greener pastures at growing medical centers in cities like Pittsburgh. This rural health-care drain has also occurred as health problems increase in rural counties, thanks to the growing opioid epidemic. But somebody has to provide care to the 2.7 million rural Pennsylvanians. One such doctor is Dr. Sima Assefi. She was born in Iran and became a U.S. citizen in the 1990s. For the past four years, she has been working with a temporary-doctor agency, driving hundreds of miles across Pennsylvania to serve rural communities. Assefi came to the U.S. in 1981 to work and to attend George Mason University, in Virginia. Before Assefi came to the U.S., her family sent her to boarding school in England, to avoid conflicts

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHAN TERRILL OF CONSILIUM STAFFING}

Dr. Sima Assefi (left)

erupting out of the 1979 Iranian revolution, when the Islamic Republic replaced the Pahlavi dynasty. When her visa expired in the ’80s, she spent seven years working as a waitress and taxi dispatcher to save up for medical school. With help from her brother in Iran, she attended medical school in the Dominican Republic, eventually returning

RREESSEEAARRCCHH SSTTUUDDYY

Borderline Pe r s o n a l i t y D i s o r d e r The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, difficulty controlling anger or frustration, mood swings, self-destructive or impulsive behaviors, or history of self-inflicted pain or injury. Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality traits and will be compensated up to $125 upon completion of the interviews. Some participants may also undergo an fMRI scan. There is no cost for this procedure. Participants are compensated $50 upon completion of the fMRI. For more information, call 412-246-5367.

to the U.S. to earn her medical license and complete her residency. Assefi’s first permanent position was as a family-medicine doctor, providing care for Latino mushroom farmers in Southeastern Pennsylvania. (She speaks Spanish, Turkish, Persian and English.) Unfortunately, she left that position after being diagnosed with cancer and wasn’t able to practice medicine until treatment was completed. Now, cancer-free at 54 and based in a Philadelphia suburb, Assefi works as a traveling physician at urgent-care centers across the state, staying in nearby hotels for weeks at a time. She serves towns like Somerset, Greensburg, Hermitage and Johnstown, seeing up to 45 patients a day by herself. Assefi says she treats most conditions that don’t require immediate hospitalization, such as lacerations, nonserious bone fractures and sprains. “I go to the areas that have a hard time maintaining physicians,” says Assefi. “There are hardly any physicians that live and work in these areas. Many primarycare physicians have closed their practices. This is a huge problem, as patients have lost their care.” Her dedication is such that her agency, Consilium Staffing, awarded its first-ever Distinguished Service Award to Assefi in February. “[Assefi] has spent more than 4,000 hours treating patients,” wrote Landon Webb, of Consilium, in a press release, “and the facilities at which she worked have consistently sent glowing reviews about her competence, warmth, and attention to care for every patient.” Consilium functions as a temp agency for physicians. It locates clinics or hospitals that need doctors and then fills those positions with its doctors. Lisa Fiorentino is the director of the Center for Rural Health Practice at the University of Pittsburgh Bradford, in McKean County. She concurs with Assefi that it’s hard to find doctors to serve rural areas, and adds that some rural hospitals are offering to pay off med-school debt just to retain physicians. “What [Assefi] is doing is wonderful,” says Fiorentino. “You have to have people with high energy to do that.” Assefi is among only a handful of doctors willing to drive long hours and sleep in hotels to serve rural towns. But she says it hasn’t always been easy because of confrontations that sometimes transpire because of her accent and native land. “It has been definitely challenging because it’s Middle America and I am Persian

from Iran,” says Assefi. “As soon as I open my mouth and start talking, [patients] realize the accent and their attitudes immediately change as soon as they find out where I am from. I hear a lot of remarks and some aren’t very nice.” Many of the counties Assefi serves voted for President Donald Trump in record numbers. (For example, voter turnout in Trumpdominated counties like Clarion and Somerset was up more than 8 percent in 2016.) During his campaign, Trump called for a “complete and total shutdown of Muslims entering the United States” until further security measures were in place; Iran was among the seven majority-Muslim counties subjected to his controversial travel ban. Assefi says some patients tell her she should “go home” and some ask her “why do you hate us?” “At the beginning, it made me upset, I would cry and get angry,” says Assefi. “I wanted to tell my agent I’m not going to come back to these areas. But I have learned to be a better human being. I have learned patience.” Now, Assefi sees herself not just as a doctor, but as messenger, spreading the word about how many Iranians love America. “Every city I go to, although very small, they have their own culture and their own people. It’s amazing. I love the people, I love the middle of America,” says Assefi. “I am here because I love serving [rural patients], and I am glad to have the opportunity one by one to make a change.” Assefi’s patience and kindness are paying off. After patients and clinic staff have interacted with her for a few weeks, Assefi says some have apologized for misjudging her. Assefi believes this is because she might have more in common with native Pennsylvanians than they realize. While Assefi isn’t religious, she says, she believes in God. She identifies most with Catholicism, because she attended Catholic school during her youth in Iran. “I had to go to chapel every morning and read hymns,” says Assefi. “I am more familiar with Catholicism than Islam. My grandmother drank Johnnie Walker Black and played gin rummy.” She hopes her work in rural Pennsylvania not only improves the health of the community but also combats xenophobia. “Sima, you are here to educate and broaden their horizon,” Assefi tells herself. “I am very happy with myself and very proud of myself. I am not planning to retire, I am planning to work.”

“I GO TO THE AREAS THAT HAVE A HARD TIME MAINTAINING PHYSICIANS.”

RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Watch the Pens outdoor game at Heinz Field Saturday at these fine North Shore locations.

CLARK BAR

BETTIS

Enjoy Labatt Specials!

TEQUILA COWBOY

MC

SOHO

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News of the Weird

S E N D YO UR WE I R D N E WS TO W E I RD N E W S @ E ART HL I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

{BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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San Francisco’s best-paid janitor earned more than a quarter-million dollars cleaning stations for Bay Area Rapid Transit in 2015, according to a recent investigation by Oakland’s KTVU. Liang Zhao Zhang cleared almost $58,000 in base pay and $162,000 in overtime, and other benefits ran his total income to $271,243. He worked at San Francisco’s Powell Street station, a hangout for the homeless, who notoriously sullied the station 24/7 (urine, feces and needles, especially), necessitating overtime hours that apparently only Zhang was interested in working. In one stretch during July 2015, he pulled 17-hour days for two-and-a-half straight weeks.

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An Abbotsford, British Columbia, burglar was successful in his Feb. 7 break-in at a home, but his getaway was thwarted by a snowfall that blocked him in on a roadway. He eventually decided to ask a passerby for help — and inadvertently picked out the man (of the city’s 140,000 residents) whose house he had just broken into (and who recognized him from reviewing his home’s security-camera footage). The victim called police, who arrested the man (and reported that it was the second residential break-in that night in which the snowfall had foiled a burglar’s getaway.)

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Legislators in Iowa and Florida recently advanced bills giving women who receive legal abortions up to 10 years (or longer, in Iowa) to sue the doctor if the abortion winds up causing them “emotional distress.” (Doctors in all states are already liable, of course, for actual “negligence” in their practice.) In the Iowa version (which the Des Moines Register reported would likely face amendments), even a signed consent form by the patient would not immunize the doctor (but might mitigate the amount of damages awarded).

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German art collector Rik Reinking paid the equivalent of about $138,000 in 2008 for a resplendent, complex drawing by Belgian artist Wim Delvoye, but it was one created in ink on the skin of (the still-alive) tattoo-parlor manager Tim Steiner — to be delivered only upon Steiner’s death, when his skin will be displayed in Reinking’s collection. (The deal also requires that, in the meantime, Steiner personally showcase his back at galleries three times a year, and BBC News recently caught his latest appearance.)

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Higher Math: The first robots to have survived journeys close to the “core” of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan (which melted down in a 2011 earthquake) returned a reading of 530 “sieverts” per hour. (Some scientists label just four sieverts an hour fatal to half the people exposed to it.) Since the robots stopped short of the actual nuclear fuel, and since they only visited one of the three cores, the true danger of Fukushima remains unknown. (On a more optimistic note, scientists in February said they have developed a computer chip that would survive

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on the surface of Venus for 21 days, eclipsing the old record of two hours — long enough to send back meaningful data, including the temperature. The current estimated temperature is 878 degrees Fahrenheit.)

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In January, a New York City judge dismissed the original indictment of John Kennedy O’Hara, 55, who had been convicted in 1996 of the crime of “felony voting” — the only person convicted under that state law since Susan B. Anthony, who cast a ballot in 1872 even though females were barred from the polls. O’Hara was indicted for voting in 1992 and 1993 after registering in Brooklyn elections from a “bogus” address — a basement apartment that was considered uninhabitable. (A judge in 2017 determined that the apartment “could” have been habitable.) O’Hara paid $15,000 in fines and did 1,500 hours of community service.

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Recurring Themes: Once again, in January, curiosity got the better of a

perp. Adriana Salas, 26, allegedly stole a truck in Jonesboro, Ark., and drove it to Fort Smith, 260 miles away, but then could not resist stopping by the local sheriff’s office to ask whether the truck had been reported stolen. (It had; deputies, taking a look outside, read Salas her Miranda rights.)

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The Passing Parade: (1) Belgium’s federal parliament decided to keep supplying free beer and wine during legislative sessions (over the objection of its ethics committee) because, since drinkers would continue to drink off-premises anyway, serving the items on-premises would at least improve attendance. (2) On Jan. 30, as police, with a search warrant, approached the front door of child-porn-possessing suspect Brian Ayers, 57, they spotted him inside, hatchet in hand, pounding away at his tablet computer. Ayers, of Florence, N.J., was free at the time, pending sentencing in another New Jersey court on earlier counts of distributing child porn.

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MPS

Assemble

Assemble's STEAM Summer Camps keep kids engaged, inquisitive, AND learning! Think science, technology, engineering, art, and math camp ALL rolled into one for STEAM! Open to kids ages 6-13, all skill levels are welcome! For more information on pricing and scholarships, check out http://assemblepgh.org/summer-camps-2017 or call 412-661-6111.

Camp Deer Creek Camp Deer Creek is a family owned and operated traditional summer day camp for boys and girls ages 4-15. Our 3D PRINTING CAMP June 19th-23rd Grades 5th-9th ZOOLOGY CAMP June 26th-30th Grades 5th-9th SEAPERCH CAMP July 10th-14th Grades 5th-9th MICROBIOLOGY CAMP July17th-21st Grades 6th-10th

Museum summer camps deliver the world! The entire museum campus is a field for discovery and creativity, where kids investigate Earth, art, dance, science, and more through behind-the-scenes experiences, handson encounters, and exciting activities. Weeklong half- and full-day camps accommodate children from Pre-K through high school. 412.622.3288 or www.artandnaturalhistory.org/camps

18 acre layout allows plenty of room for our activities that include swimming in our heated pool, horseback riding, zip lines, rope courses, nature, archery, crafts, music, drama and field games. We also provide transportation from many areas and lunch.

Camp Spirit of the Game Camp Spirit of the Game is a summer day camp for boys and girls ages 7-14 that uses the fast-moving game of ultimate frisbee as a way to teach 5 core values: Respect, Teamwork, Integrity, Enthusiasm, and Dedication. Choose from 6 weeks! Each camp is 5 full days: 9:00am – 3:30pm.

Carnegie Science Center Full-day and half-day camps for ages 4-14. Register at CarnegieScienceCenter.org or call 412.237.1637. Investigate careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. Campers will step into the shoes of video game creators, astronomers, scientists, and robotic engineers. Learn about labs,

Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History

visit an escape room, explore nature, concoct crazy chemistry, or learn the coding and creation of robots. Even explore “maker” technologies and game design.

Chatham University Chatham University, rooted in history and growing has provided the community with summer programs for 60 years. We offer music, art, sport, and traditional camp activities for campers entering prek-9th grade! Extended care, lunch and private lesson options available. Activities include but are not limited to: art, music ensembles,

Close to home and in your budget!

Join The Citizen Science Lab this summer at one of our amazing summer camps!

DAY CAMPS SUMMER SCHOOL

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thecitizensciencelab.org/events/

ShadySideAcademy.org/Summer

Science + Technology + Engineering + Art + Math ion nto act Swing i ps ay Cam D C C J t a f Early Bird ntage o Take adva h February 28 ug rates thro

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CAMP SPIRIT OF TH E

GAME

sports, dance, yoga, musical theater, swimming, nature exploration and more!

Citizen Science Lab Join Pittsburgh's first and only community life sciences laboratory this summer for four separate amazing camps! In our hands-on laboratory inquisitive minds and science-enthusiasts can become: 3D Printing experts at our 3D Printing Camp; Zoologists at Zoology Camp; SEAPERCH engineers at SEAPERCH Camp; even Microbiologists at Microbiology Camp!

Color Me Mine Summer workshops registration begins April 1! Color Me Kids is a unique program for boys and girls age 6 to 13 designed to enhance each child's un-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

derstanding and appreciation of art. During each session we will focus on a different theme and teach different ceramic painting techniques. Enroll for a one week session and save 20% on the daily rate! Little artists can bring lunch/snacks Monday - Thursday and we will provide pizza for lunch on Fridays! Class sizes are limited to 15 children.

Gaynor Cooking The theme for our Kids “R” Cooks Summer Camps is to “HAVE FUN WITH FOOD.” Our week long programs are for ages 6-18 June 19 and run throughout the summer. We offer both Cooking and Baking camps. See a complete schedule and register your child at our website www.gaynorsschoolofcooking. com or call us at 412 325 2703


Explore art, science, architecture, and nature all in one place.

Camps ďŹ ll up fast. Register today! PITTSBURGH CENT ER FOR THE ARTS

Luminari Alternative summer camps designed especially for TEENS. Share in a sense of community, learn new skills, and explore new activities. Registration is underway for camps in Diplomacy/ Leadership, Writing, Public Speaking and Cooking. Luminari is a Pittsburghbased nonprofit fostering activities that broaden minds, inspire innovations and promote community involvement.

Goddard School

Hatch Art Studio Transform ideas into works of art this summer at Hatch, a new children's art studio in Point Breeze. We'll explore a new theme each week, emphasizing creativity and trying new techniques like fabric dyeing, printmaking, and building giant sculptures with campers ages 5-10. Visit hatchpgh.com for more info!

SUMMER CAMPS 2017

JCC Day Camps Your child will have the best summer, EVER, at Jewish Community Center Day Camps. Campers ages 2 to 16 swim, climb, zip-line, explore nature and STEM, hone sports skills and

camps.artandnaturalhistory.org

CRAYON C

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AY ON

At the Goddard School located in Downtown Pittsburgh, our summer camp curriculum incorporates STEAM learning (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) into exciting and fun experiences for your child every day! We offer a broad

range of programs and mini-camps to pique the interest and curiosity of every child.

RA YO N N CRAYO

The Goddard School's Summer Camp offers a broad range of programs and mini camps crafted to pique the interest and curiosity of every child; there is something for everybody! Call today to enroll!

SS. IS SS I

From building robots, to exploring the science of the city, to discovering roller coaster physics, Carnegie Science Center’s summer camps will keep the learning going all summer long! CarnegieScienceCenter.org

JUNE 5 - SEPTEMBER 1 • 1 YEAR - 9 YEARS

NOW ENROLLING! PITTSBURGH (DOWNTOWN) • =:;S"-!S.0'/ • 412-515-1997S

Sponsored by:

GoddardSchool.com The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Š Goddard Systems, Inc. 2017.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER NEWS

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learn archery, stage a musical, make friends. Programs include traditional day camps and performing arts and specialty camps at our 100-acre Family Park in Monroeville and in Squirrel Hill and the South Hills.

Pittsburgh Cultural Trust From June 26 - July 28 the Cultural trust offers 3 separate camps – CEEMI Music Production explores music and technology and ways of connecting through music-making. StarMakers provides a bridge to the arts and celebrate the diversity of dance. Green Artists & Writers includes interdisciplinary learning, artmaking and writing. TrustArts.org/Education or 412471-6079

SUMMER DAY CAMPS IN D DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

RA L TR US T AR T CIT Y

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts PF/PCA Summer Art Camps are committed to offering creative outlets from painting and sculpture to video and more. Campers, ages 4 through 18, can expect elevated art experiences in the ten professional fine art studios and media labs. Create, explore and learn with friends.

River Hounds Four day camps in the evening coached by current and retired Hounds pro players. Age-appropriate curriculum in an enjoyable training environment. All campers get a Nike T-shirt and ball. Sign up online at riverhounds.com.

Shady Side Academy Shady Side Academy offers afford-

CEEMI MUSIC PRODUCTION JUNE 26-30 | 9-4:30PM | AGES: 8-12 ARTIST EDUCATOR: GIL TEIXEIRA This week long camp will explore the intersection between music and technology. Students will gain technical skills and dispositions integral for success in the music production industry. No prior musical experience is required.

STARMAKERS JULY 10–21 | 9-4:30PM | AGES: 8-12 (FINAL PERFORMANCE JULY 22) ARTIST EDUCATOR: GREER REED StarMakers will provide a bridge to the arts and celebrate the diversity of dance. The program is structured to be artistically challenging, while fostering the greatest level of individual artistic development. No audition is required, just a love of dance.

GREEN ARTISTS & WRITERS

Register Online: TrustArts.org/ArtCity | 412-471-6079 Presented By:

All Camps Take Place at:

Trust Arts Education Center 805/807 Liberty Avenue in the Cultural District

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JULY 24-28 | 9-4:30PM | AGES 8-12 ARTIST EDUCATORS: ALISON K. BABUSCI & JULIE ALBRIGHT In the mornings, students will try their hand at fiction and poetry and find new stories and inspirations. In the afternoons, we will sculpt, weave, paint and print using recyclables from everyday life in combination with traditional art materials.


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THE CITIZEN SCIENCE

able, fun summer programs for kids ages 3-18 on its three campuses in Fox Chapel and Point Breeze. Offerings include day camps, sports and specialty camps, and summer school. Lunch provided, before and after care available. Busing from the North Hills and East End available. www.shadysideacademy.org/summer

Sunburst Camps at Sunburst are weeklong extravaganzas of music and art with each camp exploring a different theme, artist, time period or project. This year our campers will create a hamilton-esque hip hop rock opera, start a DIY punk tour and write and record an album! Sign up at sunburstmusic.com/camps or (412) 475-8280.

3 Lakes Golf Summer Camps

LAB

CARRNEGIE MUSEUMS

HAVE FUN WITH FOOD!

3 Lakes Golf Summer Camps: June 26-30, July 17-21, & August 14-18. Monday-Friday 9 to 12:30 campers play on-course with professionals for safe, healthy and fun. Juniors age 1016 see improvements, make friends & feel more confident! Includes a hat, balls, bag tag, workbook, hole-design art supplies & daily lunch.

Chatham Music & Arts Day Camp One-week, three-week, and sixweek camps with a focus on the arts, music, or sports for boys and girls from pre-school through ninth grade at our Shadyside Campus.

Wheel Mill The Wheel Mill Indoor Bike Park’s Summer Camp is for all skill levels, offering a variety of biking classes from beginner to expert. Classes are a week long with a full or half day option. Taught by local professionals, your rider will gain confidence and have fun on the bike. To registrer: TheWheelMill.com.

309 East Carson Street

Pgh, PA 15219 • 412.325.2703

gaynorsschoolofcooking.com

• Spring Break Cougar Camp April 10-13 • Summer camps offered between June 12 and August 4

www.chatham.edu/daycamp

•Crafts •Summer Fun •Keeping Cool •Ceramics •Games •Making Friends

Camp Deer Creek . . . since 1933

5887 FORBES AVE. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-2909 • cmmpgh@gmail.com pittsburgh.colormemine.com .........................................

Pittsburgh’s Oldest & “Finest” Children’s Day Camp June 18 - August 11 • Ages 4-15 • Transportation provided in many Pittsburgh areas 412-767-5351 • www.campdeercreekonline.com NEWS

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301 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE Pittsburgh, PA 15241 412-854-1074 • colormemineshv@gmail.com southhills.colormemine.com +

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LOCAL

“I WANTED THESE LYRICS TO BE PUNK AS FUCK.”

BEAT

{BY MEG FAIR}

Strangeways is a dance night that’s hard to pin down. Every fourth Friday of the month, it showcases music from the 1960s through today with a focus on indie, psych, post-punk and Brit pop, but there are always surprises in store. Jesse Ley and Jeff Van Fossen began Strangeways after attending a bunch of dance nights themselves. Ley decided it would be fun to start one where they could showcase the music they loved. They approached the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, and the event was a success. As the number of regulars grew, the DJ duo sensed the event needed a room with a larger capacity. The dance night moved to Spirit, in Lawrenceville, and that move also gave them the ability to play with visual elements. They recruited visual artist Marie Mashyna to create a reel for the event. The first was a stop-motion promo clip. Since then, her work for Strangeways has expanded from original videography in the form of dreamy vignettes, to editing and compiling found footage for each event’s reel. In April, Strangeways turns 3 years old. As the event has grown, Ley and Van Fossen have been asked to create spin-off events. They’ve started Friday Night Fights, which pits two iconic artists against each other, bouncing between the music of each. Most nights feature an undercard “fight” and a main event, like Smiths versus The Cure, or Oasis versus Blur. At a spin-off night at Belvedere’s — showcasing all femme-fronted music and entitled Babeways — there was a wonderful assembling of Pittsburgh’s wide range of creatives, poets, visual artists and musicians across the DIY spectrum, along with their supporters. The group filled the floor in an amorphous blob, weaving in and out of each other’s spaces, dancing with friends and strangers. The unity was tangible. And there was merch: CDs, vinyl and tapes filled the DJ table. These inclusive moments are what Ley dreamt of when he and Van Fossen started Strangeways. “We want to cultivate an environment that draws a lot of different crowds and creatives,” Ley says. “We want it to feel much bigger than just hanging out a bar.” “When we started Strangeways,” he says, “it was a fun way to gather all our friends. We’ve now crossed the threshold where it’s more strangers than friends, and that’s a really strange and exciting feeling.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

STRANGEWAYS DANCE NIGHT 10 p.m. Fri., Feb. 24. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. www.facebook.com/strangewaysusa/

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Perfect Strangers: Jesse Ley, left, and Jeff Van Fosen

STRANGE MOVES

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY JOHNSON}

Jeff Rosenstock

STILL FREE {BY MEG FAIR}

J

EFF ROSENSTOCK is an anomaly. In the

mid-2000s, long before Bandcamp and streaming services became standard, Rosenstock was heading up a revolutionary, amorphous punk collective called Bomb the Music Industry! (BTMI!). He sent free CDs to promoters around the country, booking full U.S. tours independently and giving away all the group’s music for free online. This ethos of accessibility — presented in all-ages venues with tickets at $10 or less — set the underground music scene’s tone in the face of an impending industry shift. As the music industry leaned ever harder into artists with gimmicks and brands, Rosenstock managed to carve a successful career by just being himself. For all intents and purposes, the Brooklyn-based Rosenstock is a refreshingly normal human being with hopes, dreams and fears. On his first proper solo full-length, We Cool?, Rosenstock explored

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

everything from themes of mental illness to apprehensions about getting old. His latest release, Worry., presents the musings of a lifelong New Yorker with concerns about gentrification and police brutality.

THE MENZINGERS, JEFF ROSENSTOCK, ROZWELL KID 8 p.m. Tue., Feb. 28. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $19. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

“Festival Song,” a single from Worry., tackles the corporate-sponsored landscape of the music-festival industry that seems to expand each year. His anti-capitalist lyrics assailing “department store crust-punkchic” and the cooptation of art for corporate profit sounds shockingly natural entwined with the power-pop hooks sustaining them.

Veering from his usual path, Rosenstock signed with SideOneDummy Records, but he stuck by his model of free digital releases. Luckily, SideOneDummy supported his desire to give away digital downloads of his release on his own donation-based record label, Quote Unquote Records. “I knew I’d have a reach with SideOneDummy Records that I didn’t have on my own, so I wanted these lyrics to be punk as fuck, to reflect that same feeling that reading the lyrics of Operation Ivy gave me when I was a teenager,” says Rosenstock. “I guess I wanted to make teenage me proud,” he adds with a chuckle. Although Rosenstock keeps in step with his earliest punk sensibilities, naturally some things have changed since his early 20s and the days of hustling free CDs at all-age spaces around the country. SideOneDummy takes care of the release and distribution of merch and physical copies of


his music in order to give him more time to work on the music itself. His longtime friend, Greg Horbal, helps book his tours, but he still maintains an email booking address specifically for small venues and amateur promoters. “I really like playing outside of cities, in suburbs, in a random town in Iowa or Montana,” he says. And while he still loves touring, it’s a bit harder than it was when he started 15 years ago. “My body is not the same body it was touring as 20-year-old,” he says. “Two years passed between BTMI! and the first tours with Antarctigo Vespucci, and in that time my body forgot, I guess. When we started touring again, my body was not having it.” When asked how he keeps healthy now on long tours, he chuckles again, “I wouldn’t say I’m exactly healthy.” Just like most Americans with New Year’s resolutions, he has high hopes of eating lots of leafy greens and trying to go for a run every day during his tour with the Menzingers and Rozwell Kid. But this has its challenges. “When you’re on tour, your job starts in the evening and ends at 2 a.m. Most of your time is spent sitting still in a van, so it’s hard to jolt your body into being active besides the time you spend on stage putting your everything into a performance,” Rosenstock says. At the moment, he’s between tours and keeping busy. “If I have a month off from touring, I’m fine for the first week, but after that I feel like I’m just sitting around doing nothing,” he says. In the weeks leading up to this tour, he’s had his hands full with writing and recording new Antarctigo Vespucci music, producing albums, and putting out an amusing Lost-focused podcast called Back2theIsland with his Antarctigo Vespucci bandmate, Chris Farren. The last time Rosenstock played Mr. Smalls, he was a vocalist, guitarist and saxophonist with Arrogant Sons of Bitches (ASOB), a high-energy ska band born in the mid-’90s. ASOB opened for Mustard Plug there in 2003. “It’s one of the very few venues that I haven’t been back to in over a decade,” he says. Rosenstock will return to Pittsburgh with his old friends the Menzingers, a band that BTMI! often discussed touring with but never had the chance to. “It’s awesome to come back, not only because our bands are doing really well right now, but because it’s building on the past,” he says. “People seem so eager to abandon the past, but it’s so special to build on it. It feels like a continuation of what we were doing in our 20s.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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diesel C LU B | LO U N G E

NEW RELEASES {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

UPCOMING CONCERTS

2/23 | 8:00 PM | AA

2 /24 | 8:00 P M | 2 1 + CLEDUS AND THE CADILLACS ONE MAN WRECKING CREW (SELF-PRODUCED)

3/7 | 7:00 | AA

3/8 | 7:00 | AA

3/9 | 7:00 | AA

3/ 13 | 7:00 | AA

3/21| 7:00 PM | AA

3/23 | 8:00 | AA

3/24 | 7:00 | AA

4/ 11 | 7:00 | AA

OF THE MISFITS

4/ 14 | 7:00 | AA

for tickets visit LIVEATDIESEL.COM or Dave’s Music Mine (southside) 1801 e. carson st | pittsburgh |412.481.8800

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

In a press release accompanying One Man Wrecking Crew, the debut release from local country band Cledus & The Cadillacs, the band’s lead singer cautions the listener that this is not a mainstream-country outfit. Rather, the group has a “decidedly Southwestern Pennsylvania rock-and-roll feel.” Now as one who despises modern country, I was fine with the first part. But as a connoisseur of the roots/Americana/ Ameripolitan sound, I was a little nervous. Because when I think about “Southwestern Pennsylvania rock-and-roll” that appeals to a wide audience. Luckily, this record has enough of the former but not too much of the latter to make for a solid freshman outing. The band, made up of Ryan Macel (guitar, vocals), Joe McGuire (bass, vocals), Mike Hegarty (drums, vocals) and Dan Macel (keyboard, vocals), features four strong musicians. The band does have a country feel, but it’s more of the Bakersfield sound that came from artists like Buck Owens, Dwight Yoakam and Freddie Hart — strong pickers on electric guitars with a pronounced backbeat. There’s also an undeniable blues-rock influence. The disc features eight original tracks — five written and sung by Ryan Macel and three written and performed by McGuire. McGuire’s tunes border on classic-rock/ blues, while Ryan Macel’s have more of that honky-tonk spirit. However, the title cut, written by McGuire, is easily one of the record’s best and has a traditional country vibe. McGuire is also the superior vocalist, but Macel holds his own. “Leave That Stuff Alone,” for example, is his best effort and one of the album’s top tracks. That song also features a smile-inducing keyboard break from Dan Macel. The record also kicks off with Macel’s “Lonely Night in Texas,” which is pleasantly reminiscent of the Dave Dudley classic “Six Days on the Road.” One Man Wrecking Crew is a respectable debut from a four-piece that started out playing country covers live. It’s not without its flaws, though. While you want the tracks to have a natural flow from song to song, some suffer from being too similar musically, especially on the front half of the record. But that’s a minor complaint given the enjoyability of the album as a whole. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


All in: Dennis Gagné (right) as Peter Gabriel

FROM THE BEGINNING {BY BILL KOPP} TRIBUTE BANDS are all the rage these days;

the trend started in the late 1970s with the traveling Beatlemania troupe. Today, nearly every classic act of the rock era has at least one modern-day performer reproducing its look and sound on stages across North America. Among the most unlikely successes in the tribute-band universe is Montrealbased group The Musical Box. Its chosen path is recreating the experience of an early-1970s Genesis concert. Not the MTV-popera “We Can’t Dance” Genesis, either. The Musical Box focuses exclusively on early Genesis, a time when Phil Collins remained behind the drum kit and enigmatic front man Peter Gabriel was the group’s singer.

THE MUSICAL BOX 8 p.m. Fri., March 3. Palace Theatre, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $45-70. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheatre.org

Though they’re now held in high regard, on initial release, those early Genesis records didn’t sell very well. Epic tunes like “Supper’s Ready,” from 1972’s Foxtrot, might have won over fans of ambitious progressive rock, but that album didn’t even make the charts in the United States. But in the wake of Genesis’ later success — a success that was much more poporiented, and eventually featured only three of the earliest members — the group’s early material was rediscovered, taking its rightful place among the best-loved

albums of that era. In addition to intricate musical interplay, stage props, lighting and Peter Gabriel’s bizarre costumes were all integral to the Genesis concert experience. The Musical Box faithfully recreates this vibe. Vocalist Denis Gagné is uncanny in his Peter Gabriel persona; with lavish headdresses and masks — and a voice that’s a dead ringer for Gabriel’s — he holds audiences spellbound through the story-songs of 1973’s Selling England by the Pound, including the U.K. hit single, “I Know What I Like (in Your Wardrobe).” The rest of the band refrain from going to extreme lengths to look like their Genesis counterparts. Guitarist Sébastien Lamothe plays left-handed, but he does use a custom Rickenbacker double-necked instrument (bass and six-string guitar). Keyboardist Guillaume Rivard uses a vast array of vintage instruments to recreate Tony Banks’ signature sounds. And if one peers over the massive drum kit of Marc Laflamme, a musician in white overalls — Phil Collins’ early-’70s trademark — can be seen. Six- and 12-string guitarist François Gagnon is positioned stage right, seated, just as Steve Hackett was in his years with Genesis (1971-77). While all members of The Musical Box sing, none, save Gagné — who remains in character the entire time — speaks to the audience during the performance. The Musical Box has fans in high places, including Hackett, the sole Genesis alum who still performs some of the group’s early progressive material in his own concerts. “I jammed with The Musical Box when they played in London, and once in Switzerland,” he tells City Paper. “I think keeping that music alive is important.” With expert playing and top-notch visuals, The Musical Box excels at achieving that goal. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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$77

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS SULLIVAN}

CRITICS’ PICKS +tax

er cus tom w e n al* -

Potty Mouth

i - spec

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $77 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $89 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

Join us at the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center for ongoing workshops as we continue programming on architecture, history, design, urban planning, and other topics related to how cities function and historic preservation as a tool of community development.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

WORKSHOP: REMODELING FOR FIRST TIME HOME OWNERS IAN MILLER Join us for a workshop on how to plan a construction project in your home, from concept, through to design and planning, and to construction. This workshop will give you an overview of the general phases of a construction project; what to measure and what to expect. ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Ian Miller has been a general contractor since 2003 with projects ranging from changing a doorknob to building a $1.5 million house for fifteen retired nuns. He is the owner of Zambano & Sons, a residential remodeling company, as well as partner in the HL2M Group, a design/build firm focused primarily on modular and shipping container construction. Ian and his family live in a 100-year old house in Friendship.

THIS WORKSHOP IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NON-MEMBERS: $10. RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED: MARYLU@PHLF.ORG OR 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

412-471-5808

[GARAGE ROCK] + THU., FEB. 23 There’s hardly a shortage of fuzzy, retro garage rock out there. But France’s Weird Omen manages to stand out with a healthy dose of punk primitivism, an almost avant-garde noisiness and a knack for clever instrumental touches (check out “Transcontinental” and “Saturday Nights Are Gone,” from the record Breakfast Before Chaos, for some prime examples). Tonight, the band kicks off its first-ever U.S. tour at Spirit, with a show presented by Get Hip Records. Pittsburgh garage-rock fixtures and Get Hip artists The Nox Boys open, along with Some Kind of Animal (who recently signed to Get Hip’s new Folk Series imprint). Margaret Welsh 9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

that makes punk rock feel like something bigger than a genre. Throughout the band’s catalog, three femmes sound like seven — from the early days of Hell Bent’s punk attitude to the band’s latest single, “Smash Hit,” a grunge-laced, radio-ready bop. Earlier influences like Hole and That Dog come in loud and clear in the trio’s sound, but Potty Mouth takes it further with a grunge-meetspop-punk facelift. Joining Potty Mouth at the Smiling Moose is Partybaby, a sonically large pop-punk band that blends indie sensibilities with classic pop-punk hooks, and Tennis System, a densely noisy, dreamy pop band. Local talent will be provided by upand-coming grunge duo Hearken. Meg Fair 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[PUNK] + SAT., FEB. 25

[HIP HOP] + WED., MARCH 01

Punk has always been political. But at a time when civil and human rights are under constant attack, Pittsburgh-based group Peace Through Strength aims to make the punk scene a powerful and effective vehicle for activism. Benefit shows, literature distribution, community-building and awareness-rising are a few of the steps organizers anizers are taking. Tonight at The Shop, the band nd will release the first Peace Through Strength cassette compilation, which benefits the queer-youth arts organization ganization Dreams of Hope, and d features tracks by Eyeroll, Hypocondriax, pocondriax, Silence, Peace Talks, N thing and many others. Pick ck up your own copy, and mosh to sets by SUBMACHINE, S.L.I.P L.I.P. and Unreliable Narrator. MW 8 p.m. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. mfield. $5. All ages. www.facebook. ook. com/peacethrough strengthpittsburgh

Cleveland-based rapper King Chip, the artist formerly known as Chip tha Ripper, has a unique quality. Trap lyricism delivered over synthy R&B production puts him on the same plane as long-time friend and collaborator Kid Cudi. (Their song, 2013’s “Just What I Am,” is a personal favorite.) King Chip’s delivery is relaxed, but the lyrics are raw. King Chip recently released a project with legendary producer Big Duke, of the hip-hop group Psycho Realm. Catch King Chip with Miami-based rapper Bernz tonight at Stage AE. Alona Williams 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $18. 412-229-5483 or www. stagepittsburgh.com

[PUNK ROCK] + MON., FEB. 27 Potty Mouth possesses ses a remarkable energy; y; a kind of je ne sais quoi uoi

King Chip


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 23 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny Smith & Larry Siefers. Monroeville. 724-733-4453. BRILLOBOX. Reign Check, King Fez, Weird Corners. Benefits Planned Parenthood. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. The Marcus King Band. South Side. 412-431-8800.

FRI 24 565 LIVE. Bleach Fuzz. 90s grunge & alternative tribute band. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. CLUB CAFE. Jacob Klein, Chris Sabatino & Eastend Mile. South Side. 412-431-4950. DIESEL. Led Zeppelin 2. South Side. 412-431-8800. HOWLERS. Live Band Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

SAT 25 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Dancing Queen. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

BALTIMORE HOUSE. SpinCycle. MOONDOG’S. The SPUDS Alternative Facts Guinness Toast. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. CLUB CAFE. Royal Wood SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk w/ Diana Chittester Balloon Night. South Side. 412-439-5706. Ride Fantasy, LoFi Delphi & The Silver Thread. South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB CAFE. Bad Pop. THE HOB NOB LOUNGE. South Side. 412-431-4950. King’s Ransom. West Mifflin. DIESEL. Badfish, Fayuca. 412-461-8541. South Side. 412-431-8800. HOWLERS. Mardi THE R BAR. Billy Gras w/ Employees of The Kid & the Funk & Chase The Regulators. Dormont. Barons. Bloomfield. 412-942-0882. 412-682-0320. www. per KISKI AREA pa pghcitym .co HIGH SCHOOL. Chris CLUB CAFE. Airpark. Jamison w/ Nick Barilla. South Side. 412-431-4950. Benefits the Kiski Area MR. SMALLS THEATER. Band programs. Vandergrift. The Menzingers. Millvale. 724.845.2219. 412-821-4447. LOOKING FOR GROUP. Doping The Void, Crooked Cobras, Super Funtime CLUB CAFE. Frontier Ruckus. Awesome Party Band. Brookline. South Side. 412-431-4950. 774-482-1264. KEYSTONE BAR. The Bo’Hog LUANNE’S ROUTE 68. Brothers. Sewickley. 724-758-4217. Hellin Back Band. industry. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Louis 724-643-6508. The Child. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

SUN 26

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 28

WED 01

MP 3 MONDAY CLEDUS AND THE CADILLACS

DJS THU 23 BELVEDERE’S. Classic Material. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 24 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. THE R BAR. KAR-E-O-KEE. Dormont. 412-942-0882. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

Each week, we post a song from a local artist, for free online. This week, it’s Pittsburgh-style honkytonk from Cledus and the Cadillacs. The best way to describe the band’s sound? Take Dwight Yoakam’s “Guitars, Cadillacs,” a touch of George Jones’ “Your Heart Turned Left,” a dash of Dave Dudley’s “Six Days on the Road” and a splash of blues guitar, and you’re in the ballpark. The band’s “Lonely Night in Texas” is a nice intro to its sound. Stream or download it for free at FFW>>, the music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

SAT 25 BELVEDERE’S. Drake Night w/ admc Down N Derby. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. MIXTAPE. DJ Antithesis. ‘The 1990s (& a bag of chips)’ dance party. Garfield. 412-661-1727. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017


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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

M CG

J A Z Z

P R E S E N T S

Lewis Nash Ensemble with special sp guest Roger Humphries

Satu Saturday, February 25 6:0 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. 6:00 Lewis Nash Drums Jeremy Pelt Trumpet Renee Rosnes Piano Bill Pierce Saxophone Jay Ashby Trombone Peter Washington Bass

PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Tenova. ladies night. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Dance Crush. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

HEAVY ROTATION

MON 27

CAFE. Wood & Wire. Here are four songs that Pittsburgh CLUB South Side. 412-431-4950. singer, actress, poet and artist CLASSICAL Jacquea Mae can’t stop listening to: SAT 25 ANNELIES. Hear the innocence and hope in young Anne Frank’s words in Annelies, a full choral work by British composer James Whitbourn with libretto compiled by Melanie Challenger from The Diary of A Young Girl. Soprano soloist Amelia D’Arcy, the Mendelssohn Choir, and instrumentalists give voice to the girl whose emotional story has inspired millions and who remains the most well-known heroine of the Holocaust. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-926-2488.

TUE 28 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

“Shaolin Monk Motherfunk”

Hiatus Kaiyote

WED 01 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

“Might Be”

Anderson Paak

HIP HOP/R&B SUN 26 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Bones Thugs-n-Harmony. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

OTHER MUSIC

“Johnny”

THU 23

Yemi Alade

BLUES

LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Lee Alverson. North Side. 412-231-7777. ZENITH. Crawling for Culture: Angela Autumn, Millgroves Crossing, Different Places In Space, The Uptown Woods. South Side. 412-481-4833.

FRI 24

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412-322-0800 | MCGjazz.org 412-322-08

ELWOOD’S PUB. Jack of Diamonds. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. HOP FARM BREWING. Still Not Sober. Lawrenceville. 412-408-3248. MOONDOG’S. Curtis Salgado. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ

Drinks HAPPY HOUR $2$$1 Well Domestic Bottles DAILY SPECIALS $3 Fireball Shots All day everyday $6 Pitchers (select)

KARAOKE Tuesdays • 9pm-12am

$1 Tacos / $2 tequila shots / $4 Margaritas —Also AvailabLe—

HOCK EY SPECI A LS

328 Atwood wood ood od Str Street r t • Oa Oak Oakland 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

FRI 24

SUN 26

WED 01

ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell & the Jazz Surgery. McKees Rocks. 412 - 857- 5809.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. WHEELFISH. Jason Born. Ross. 412-487-8909.

THU 23

MON 27

EIGHTY ACRES KITCHEN & BAR. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters feat. Eric Susoeff. Monroeville. 724-519-7304. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 24

10% OFF FOOD ITEMS (Excludes specials)

J-Jon

SAT 25 565 LIVE. The Monday Blues Revue. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Jimmy Adler Band. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322.

In Oakland NOW OPEN!

“Statistics”

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The Mark Strickland Quartet. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 25 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Tony Campbell Saturday Afternoon Jazz Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

WED 01 THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters feat. Eric Susoeff & Mike Tomaro. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Surgery w/ Tony Campbell. Feat. Antonio Croes, Miles Jackson, Ben Sherman & Paul Keys. North Side. 412-435-1110.

ACOUSTIC THU 23 MJ’S STEEL CITY. The Eclectic Acoustics. Robinson. 724-227-3051.

FRI 24 PARADISE PUB. The Eclectic Acoustics. Monaca. 724-888-2346.

SAT 25 DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Right TurnClyde. Mars. 724-863-8181. FLIP FLOPS. The Eclectic Acoustics. West View. 412-301-0051. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Bill Couch. West End. 412-458-0417.

LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lake Street Dive w/ Joey Dosik. Millvale. 412-821-4447. RIVERS CASINO. Hewlett Anderson. Drum Bar. Marty Ashby Quartet w/ Dwayne Dolphin & Ken Kimery. Levels. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Mardi Gras Celebration. McKees Rocks. 412 328 5446.

SAT 25

REGGAE

ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Mardi Gras Celebration. McKees Rocks. 412 328 5446.

THU 23 PIRATA. The Flow Band. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

SUN 26

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Purple CAPRI PIZZA AND Bamboo performs traditional & BAR. Bombo Claat contemporary Chinese w/ VYBZ Machine Intl music, feature Ai-Lin Sound System. East ape p ty ci h g p Chen on the guzhen, .com Liberty. 412-362-1250. Kai Liu on the dizi & Mimi Jong on the erhu. The troupe has recently been joined by CLUB TABOO. Original Junior world-class pipa virtuoso, Jin Yang. Holt, Brian “1,000 Volt” Holt & Oakland. 412-622-3175. Bamm Holt. John Holt Celebration. ROCKS LANDING BAR & Homewood. 412-980-3275. GRILLE. Mardi Gras Celebration. McKees Rocks. 412 328 5446.

FRI 24

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w. r

SAT 25

COUNTRY FRI 24

NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe, Jane West & Texas Tex. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SAT 25 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Shovels & Rope w/ John Moreland. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

TUE 28 ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Mardi Gras Celebration. McKees Rocks. 412 328 5446.

WED 01 THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Baby Dee & Phat Man Dee: A Benefit for Proud Haven. Millvale. 412-448-6891.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do Feb

IN PITTSBURGH

22 - 28

WEDNESDAY 22 Scott Pemberton Band

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY North Side. 412-904-3335. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

PITTSBURGH WINTER BEERFEST DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER FEB. 24 & 25

Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Braddock Brothers, Walker & the Rebellion. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 23. Disney on Ice: Dream Big

PPG PAINTS ARENA Downtown. All ages event. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Through Feb. 26.

FRIDAY 24 245

Northside Mardi Gras MULTIPLE LOCATIONS North Side. For more info & schedules visit pittsburgh northside.com/mardigras. Through Feb. 28.

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band HARD ROCK CAFE Station

NEWS

DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER Downtown. Over 21 event. Tickets: pittsburghbeerfest. com. Through Feb. 25.

Ms. Lauryn Hill BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Rhapsody in Blue HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Feb. 26.

SATURDAY 25

PITTSBURGH OPERA Strip District. 412-281-0912. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. Through Feb. 26.

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Feb. 26.

MUSIC

THE WHEEL MILL Homewood. 412-362-3693. For more info visit thewheel mill.com/winter-welcomejam -2017. 1p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. With special guest TheShacks. Over 18 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Shovels & Rope MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guest John Moreland. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

Lewis Nash Ensemble

Black Bottom Film Festival

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Winter Welcome Jam

Khruangbin

As One

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Potty Mouth + Partybaby

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Tennis System & Hearken. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest

Gregory Porter

MONDAY 27

MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD North Side. With special guest Roger Humphries. Tickets: mcgjazz. org or 412-322-0800. 6p.m. & 8:30p.m.

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Bone Thugs-n-Harmony

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MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guests Kipp-E & SRMG/DBE, Pet Zebra, & Norman Dean. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 28 The Menzingers

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4447. With special guests Jeff Rosenstock & Rozwell Kid. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

JARED & THE MILL CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. With special guests Ferdinand the Bull & The Lone Pines. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

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Leroy Sanchez – Man of the Year Tour REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS

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[DANCE]

“IT WOULD BE GAY TO LOOK AT A GUY’S BUTT ALL DAY.”

SHOWCASE {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY AT POINT PARK UNIVERSITY Thu., Feb. 23-Sun., Feb. 26. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. $10-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.org

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[ART]

HACK/ MOD/ REMIX {BY AMANI NEWTON}

A

NGELA WASHKO is your next role

Point Park University dancer Aysia Pollock in “Traverse” {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

Point Park University’s dance department has long had a reputation for turning out talented dancers. So when looking at the program, it’s easy to focus on its distinguished performing alumni and overlook the talents of the teaching staff. In the department’s annual Conservatory Dance Company at Point Park University production, the spotlight will turn on five staff members as they showcase their choreographic skills in new works created for student troupe the Conservatory Dance Company. The program has five performances, Feb. 23-26 at the university’s George Rowland White Performance Studio. Former Dallas Black Dance Theatre star Garfield Lemonius’ latest creation, “Traverse,” is a contemporary dance work in three sections, each containing very different movement energy. Lemonius says that the work’s 10 dancers travel “in different spatial patterns and formations, embracing the ways one may move through space.” Former Broadway dancer Mark Burrell says he channeled jazz-dance icon Bob Fosse’s movement for his new work, “Close Your Eyes and Listen,” set to music by South American contemporary tango band Bajofondo. The group piece, says Burrell, “is a personal and political story.” Uncertain about the direction the current U.S. leadership is taking the country, Burrell says “it is the first time in my life I have been scared as an openly gay man.” In the work, Burrell seeks to allay his fears using the heartbeat of tango as a metaphor for a path forward to love and understanding. Keisha Lalama is a choreographer whose light is currently burning brightly on the national stage. She’s choreographed for feature films (The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Sorority Row) and for companies including Giordano Dance Chicago and Dayton Contemporary Dance Company, and she has a potential Broadway production in the works. Her latest work for CDC, “Flicker ’n Flow,” explores the human struggle to fully ignite that creative light she’s found and that burns inside all of us. Rounding out the program are Susan Stowe’s ballet “Don Quixote Suite” and dance-department chair Rubén Graciani’s contemporary dance work “Tethers, Capsules, and Collisions” — an exploration, he says, “of that which connects us and that which pushes us in directions unforeseen.”

model. The assistant professor of .art at Carnegie Mellon University is devoted to introducing women’s voices into the male-monopolized worlds of video games, the media and the tech industry. “Women are taught early on that this is an inherently male industry, that math and science are not their strong suits, that they’re inherently not inclined towards those fields,” Washko says during a discussion about the decline of women in the computer sciences. “When you don’t have a lot of role models in those industries, there’s a [ripple] effect, because you can’t imagine you belong there.” She’s right. So I nominate her. Washko has already assembled a copious body of work and serious professional recognition. A Pennsylvania native, Washko received her undergraduate degree at Temple University. She spent a few years working with the Flux Factory Collective in New York City, lived abroad in Finland, Denmark, Italy and Germany, and earned her master’s of fine arts at University of California-San Diego. At age 30, she’s on a tenure track. In the exhibit she curated for CMU’s Miller Gallery, Hacking/Modding/Remixing as Feminist Protest, Washko gathered over 40 years worth of work from women artists operating at the intersection of art and technology. Suzie Silver, an artist and CMU professor whose 1993 video “Freebird” is featured in the show, emphasizes the breadth of the artwork amassed. “The show goes back [from] as far the ’70s to works that were made very recently,” says Silver by phone.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

{CP PHOTO BY KATEY LADIKA}

Angela Washko

HACKING/MODDING/ REMIXING AS FEMINIST PROTEST continues through Sun., Feb. 26. Miller Gallery, CMU campus, Oakland. 412-268-3618 or www.millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu

“It provides a really inclusive overview of the field. I think it’s an incredible show, I think it should be touring all over the country. If it was a show in New York or Los Angeles, people would think it was just the

best thing and incredibly important.” The exhibit is arranged into two categories. Hacking/Modding focuses on artists who modify existing electronics and software, like Rachel Simone Weil, whose “Hello Kitty Land,” from 2002, hacks the original 1985 “Super Mario Bros.” so that Kitty’s the hero. The piece questions how things might look if the game had shipped with Kitty’s console instead of Mario’s. Remixing focuses on artists working with film, television and advertising, to create critical commentary about those fields. For instance, Dara


Birnbaum’s 1979 piece “Kiss the Girls and Make them Cry” edits footage from the old Hollywood Squares game show, contrasting the gestures of the celebrity guests. The women gesticulate wildly for the camera, tossing their hair or grinning dementedly. The men do not. What’s revealed is the domination of human behaviors by ideology. It’s real-world evidence that we’re performing our genders, all the time. Performing gender is an idea Washko tackles as a solo artist. In 2012, she created The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft, entering the online game and engaging other players in dialogue about gender roles, as a performance piece. In one part, she asks male players why they use female avatars. They respond, “I’d rather look at a girl’s butt all day,” “because it would be gay to look at a guy’s butt all day” and so on. When Washko asks an obvious follow-up question, whether these men are attracted to their avatars, they reply “no.” Which suggests what they’re really doing is holding tight to masculine ideology, even during fantasy game-play. Exposing the ways Americans constantly re-affirm the biases in our culture, and unnecessarily recreate them on the internet and in popular entertainment, is one of the ways in which Washko enriches our understanding of feminism. What elevates her work is her insistence on going beyond the echo chambers of liberal-arts circles. In 2015 she debuted “BANGED: A Monopoly on Truth,” a two-hour conversation with a notorious leader in the online seduction community that examines his detailed rationale for men’s-rights activism. Watching “BANGED” is a rare opportunity to experience real-world diplomacy. (That’s not to imply sympathy for Washko’s interlocutor’s opinions: Diplomacy negotiates hostilities, after all.) “In a time when so many people have such stratified opinions and stakes in what women are supposed to do and be, it’s important to speak up against one-dimensionality and support a much wider and radical spectrum of what we as people are allowed to be, become and identify as,” she writes via email. I asked her to articulate why she makes feminist art, and her answer illustrates what I respect so much about her work: “In [my] work, I try to learn about the motivations of those who feel threatened by women’s liberation (while also looking at the intersections of misogyny, racism, ecological injustice, transphobia, homophobia, ableism, xenophobia and classism) and create platforms for visualizing those motivations while ultimately hoping to share tactics for fighting back.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[BOOK REVIEW]

MEMORY MINED {BY FRED SHAW} In his six-part poem “Welcome to Warren,” poet Jim Daniels writes of his suburban Detroit hometown, saying, “The Land of Big Ideas / exists in a different tax bracket. / Big ideas sound like whining to us.” Though the Rust Belt population is often forgotten until it figures in presidential elections, Jim Daniel’s 15th book of poetry, Rowing Inland (Wayne State University), gives a needed voice to the region’s blue-collar ethos, in 114 pages emphasizing the personal, not the polemical. Daniels, a Carnegie Mellon University English professor, has long used his childhood neighborhood and its cast of characters as the backdrop for his work. It’s a winning formula that feels fresh even as he mines memory in the face of aging family and the city’s changing landscape. In “Beware of (My Grandfather’s Fake) Dog,” he writes of “His shrunken street, tight with menace and doubt / his busted jaw and memory bank, convinced us / to move him out. We got him a real dog / for his new house …” The details of the canine ruse read both quirky and poignant. This perceptiveness continues in “‘School’s Out,’ Alice Cooper, 1972,” a record infamous for its “black vinyl sheathed in sky-blue panties.” The album acts as totem, allowing a grown speaker to describe the frustrations of growing up in a dead-end town. He writes of “A guy named Alice with the face / of cartoon death. Surly mascara barked / from the coffin of my speakers. / The song blew up school. School as prison — / a metaphor made quaint by factories / in our future that offered no graduation.” The image and analysis conjure an angst still felt by many. While poems like “Soft Side of the Moon” and “Economic Fairy Tale: The Cement House” feel less intimate and strive for edginess, there’s a tenderness in poems about parents that’ll move many readers. In “Prayer Above the Washer,” Daniels writes, “She sent me down to find something, / bring it back up. I scratch my nails into a bar / of cracked yellow soap. They have just sold / this house of my childhood. / I read the prayer / she taped beneath the window. Should it too / be removed, packed?” It’s a question answered in compassionate ways throughout Rowing Inland, allowing Daniels to craft the sometimes-mundane into something notable. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JIM DANIELS with novelist SHARON DILWORTH. 7 p.m. Wed., March 1. Cohon University Center, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. www.cmu.edu/dietrich/news

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[ART REVIEW]

TELLING POINTS {BY NATALIE SPANNER}

[ART REVIEW]

LINES ON CLAY {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} EDWARD EBERLE Retrospective, at Con-

temporary Craft, is one of the more beautiful solo exhibits I’ve seen in recent years. Eberle is a nationally recognized, Pittsburgh-based ceramacist best known for his architecturally shaped works in porcelain, embellished with images in black and white terra sigillata. The show traces three decades, from his early works with mostly figurative imagery on more traditionally shaped vessels to later, larger and increasingly abstract images and forms.

EDWARD EBERLE RETROSPECTIVE continues through March 11. Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org

Characteristic figurative works feature humans in procession around the vessels’ sides or circumference, as in ancient Greek pottery. Drawn with clean, sensual lines, Eberle’s figures — male, female, animal, sometimes human-animal hybrids — overlap and intertwine; partly because most of his humans are either naked or in medieval or ancient dress, many seem to be enacting some cryptic parable or other. While a few works (like 1992’s “Eros and King”) have telltale titles, the overall effect is dreamlike, with

an odd mixture of unease and unconcern. In later works, like 1995’s “Twentyfive Years in Barcheland,” the vessels’ planar or rounded sides yield to fabric-like folds and pouches. “Extramural” (2000) puckers open at one seam to reveal an occultish spheroid inside. “Whiplash II Revised” (2005) moves fully into deconstruction, with its feet like a lunar module, its upper parts twisted and exploded into 3-D geometry. Eberle, born in Tarentum in 1944, worked for years in Millvale, and since 2012 has occupied a studio in Homestead. (The exhibit includes a large photo of his studio and a display of his brushes.) Some of his latter-day works suggest completed pieces cracked apart then reassembled in different configurations. Some are much larger than his earlier, tabletop-scaled works. The 4-foot-tall “Time” (2013) handily (if dizzyingly) summarizes his career, with its deconstructed figurative pieces topped by an array of abstract forms. But there’s still room for quips like 2016’s eggcup-sized “California Water Jar (ironic).” The exhibit’s 45 works receive ample breathing room in Contemporary Craft’s spacious gallery. Included are three of Eberle’s recent large paper cylinders, of which “Cylinder 1121” is especially brilliant with color and gorgeous shapes, some reminiscent of Miro. Eberle’s individual mastery of ceramics and drawing is rare enough. This show — his first career retrospective — is a chance to appreciate his rarerstill ability to blend those talents into a fascinating whole. DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

Richard E. Miller’s 1915 painting “Reflection” is part of The Stories You Tell.

Edward Eberle’s “Whiplash II Revised”

The Stories You Tell, a relatively small exhibit in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s Forum Gallery, would be easy to glance through or even walk past. The museum has so much to offer that it would be understandable if you wanted to speed through a small room featuring a dozen works where hand-written notes from casual patrons supplanted the traditional tags bearing historical context. If this setting overwhelms or irritates you; if you feel blind without the medium, date and artist; or if you roll your eyes at the simplicity of the exercise — well, your reaction is valid. But it’s also possible that you’ve merely lost your sense of fun. Next to each work is a magnetic dry-erase board, where guests post their version of the artwork’s story. These interpretations come in a few formats: six-word stories, collaborative stories by multiple authors, and emoji magnets. The stories might be droll, obnoxious or nonsensical. Some are evocative, desperate or political. As I circled the space, I was unsurprised by the more negative responses on the walls, but curious why the museum had kept them up. Nothing highly offensive remained (as the docent assured me, citing increased vigilance after this show opened during election season last November). But subtle malcontentedness lingered. In Rana El Nemr’s photograph “Metro #10,” an Egyptian woman sits cross-legged on a subway; are comments about her weight necessary? For Richard Boseman’s “Digging Out,” an adult man is bent over with his shovel, digging his car out of the snow. This painting had the most comments, but why were so many about hating inclement weather? However, there were just as many, if not more, poignant and insightful stories. My personal favorite was a response to Sue Abramson’s photograph “Grant Street,” authored by 19-year-old Sophie in Fox Chapel: “They never stopped dreaming in color.” Eventually, the truth hit me: Sure, bored negativity is a mindset unlimited by age or experience, but it definitely betrays a lack of creativity. Stories does not discredit anyone’s perception of pain or discomfort. However, by inviting all viewpoints, and letting us compare them, it demonstrates that creativity is the key to transformation. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE STORIES YOU TELL continues through March 26. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org


FOR THE WEEK OF

02.23-03.02.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ISTANBUL SALON IKSV NOLMUS}

The singular singer-songwriter Baby Dee is coming through town on her nine-city North American tour. While it’s far from her first visit to Pittsburgh, it is her first with what she calls her “family band,” consisting of herself on accordion and nephew Blake Norris on guitar. “It’s kinda nice to have [a] fucked-up family act — for fucked-up families!” Dee jokes via Skype from her home, in the Netherlands.

Dee, a Cleveland native, is a former street performer and church organist who started playing Coney Island and touring with sideshow troupe The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus after she began transitioning into a woman. She’s gone on to record six studio albums, work with artists including Antony and the Johnsons and Andrew WK, and tour with the re-formed Swans. Her sixth album, I Am a Stick, came out in 2010. Singing in a supple, powerful voice, beneath a pile of flaming red hair, Dee ranges from somber, cabaret-style numbers to more rollicking tunes — and from “sweet songs” about robins to “So Bad,” about Jesus beating up the singer’s mom. “People like music they can relate to,” she says, laughing. All door proceeds from An Evening with Baby Dee, at the intimate Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, will benefit Proud Haven, a local organization serving homeless and unstably housed LGBTQ+ youth. The show is sponsored by the Positive Health Clinic, a comprehensive HIV primary-care clinic for HIV-positive persons, and presented by Phat Man Dee (no relation, but a longtime friend) and the queer nuns of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence’s Steel City Sisters Mission House. Baby Dee jokes that for the March 1 show, Proud Haven is changing its name to The Baby Dee Home for Bad Hermaphrodites. Then she notes, “I’m familiar with being a homeless queer.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ALTDORFER}

^ Thu., Feb. 23: Big Love

thursday 02.23 WORDS East End Poets: Songs for America in a Post-Truth World is an hour-long reading at PointBreezeway benefiting the ACLU. Local poets reading include Charles W. Brice, Judy Brice, Ann Curran, Judith Dorian, Sheila Kelly, Mike Schneider, Robert Walicki and Arlene Weiner. Along with the songs in verse, there’ll also be some pre-reading fiddle tunes by Devilish Merry’s Jan Hamilton. The ACLU gets the proceeds from donations and book sales. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.). 7113 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. www.facebook.com (“east end poets songs for america”) ca”)

STAGE Big Love, opening this weekend at Point Park University’s Conservatory Theatre e Company, doesn’t have to do with the old HBO series about polygamy. Rather, Charles L. Mee’s ’s frequently staged 2000 play updates Aeschylus’ us’ circa-470 BCE The Suppliant Women. Fifty brides es flee Greece to avoid marrying their 50 cousins, setting etting the stage for a wild showdown at an Italian n villa, complete with questions of love, gender and nd equality — not

BY BILL O’DRISCOLL

8 p.m. Wed., March 1. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15 suggested donation (donations of warm winter clothes in excellent condition also accepted). www. ticketfly.com (“baby dee proud haven”) NEWS

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> Fri., Feb. 24: Showcase Noir Artist and Designer signer Exhibit and Sale {ARTWORK ARTWORK BY MARY MARTIN}

forgetting the contemporary pop tunes, or the helicopter ambush. Reginald L. Douglas directs the student cast; the first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 26, and March 9-12. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

friday y 02.24 4 SCREEN This year’s Oscar nomi nominations suggest (let’s hope) that Hollywood is a bit more aware of African Americans’ contributions to cinema. This weekend, the first annual Black Bla Bottom Film Festival takes you deeper. The T Pittsburgh Cultural Trust event at the August Wilson Center features screenings and discussions exploring scre themes of black life in America. t Tonight’s program includes indie shorts, Jamal Joseph’s feature film Chapter & Verse, and Post Racial Cinema: Black Film in The Obama Age, a discussion with Reelblack Podcast co-hosts Mike D. and Charles Woods. co Saturday’s highlights include an afternoon Sat talk and a evening awards ceremony with pioneering bl black director Michael Schultz; screenings include two o of Schultz’s best-known films, Cooley High (1975) a and the 1977 Richard Pryor vehicle CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

{JACKSON POLLOCK’S “NUMBER 8, 1949”; COLLECTION NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART; PHOTO BY JIM FRANK, COURTESY OF AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS}

^ Sat., Feb. 25: When Modern Was Contemporary: Selections from the Roy R. Neuberger Collection

Which Way Is Up? More screenings follow Sunday, including Destination: Planet Negro!, a 2013 science-fiction satire by Kevin Wilmott (CSA: The Confederate States of America); a still from that film is pictured. BO 5 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 25. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Single-day pass: $15; festival pass: $35. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

EVENT:

Pittsburgh Bleed Black & Gold Tattoo Expo,

EXPO The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust presents the 2017 Showcase Noir Artist and Designer Exhibit and Sale, taking place all this weekend at the August Wilson Center. The annual bazaar, in its 14th year, welcomes emerging and established artists from all over the country whose work embodies the diversity of the African diaspora. Paintings, sculpture, photographs, jewelry, pottery and more will be on display and available for sale. Live music and artist demos will complement the showcase throughout the weekend. Amani Newton 5:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 26. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

Station Square, South Side CRITIC:

Jared Griggs, 27, of Robinson WHEN:

Sat., Feb. 18 It’s amazing, there’s so many great artists around here, and so much great work. It really makes you want to get a lot of tattoos. I saw part of the tattoo-off [contest] last night. I didn’t do the weekend pass; tonight was kind of impromptu. I was only gonna come yesterday, but I ended up getting an appointment for tonight. I’m getting one done here by Don Peddicord. He was actually on [TV’s] Ink Master on season 5. I already have two half-sleeves, my side done, and the bottom half of my back. I am getting a neo-traditional rose with a knife through it with a skull right in the center of the rose.

WORDS

Pittsburgh Poetry Collective hosts weekly slams here, but tonight’s something different: the annual Battle of the Slams Regional Poetry Slam. At the brand-new Alphabet City, on the North Side, watch our own Steel City Slam MUSIC squad face teams from ^ Fri., Feb. 24: Black Bottom Film Festival The 27-year-old Israeli Buffalo, Cleveland and conductor Lahav Shani will Columbus for not only make his debut with The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra bragging rights, but the chance to qualify for the 2017 tonight, leading Rhapsody in Blue, a program celebrating National Poetry Slam, in August, in Denver. The show is American works honoring the city of New York. Opening the all-ages. BO 7 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. $10. night will be Charles Ives’ The Unanswered Question, from 1906, www.alphabetcity.org and Kurt Weill’s Symphony No. 2, from 1934. Then pianist Jon Kimura Parker (pictured) joins the orchestra for the title piece, George Gershwin’s 1924 jazz concerto. The show MUSIC closes with a performance of Leonard Bernstein’s Symphonic Quince and Alia Musica Pittsburgh join forces again, Dances from West Side Story. AN 8 p.m. Also 2:30 p.m. continuing their shared mission of exposing audiences Sun., Feb. 26. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-94. to contemporary classical music, composed by living 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org artists. Tonight, at Chatham University, the Chicagobased, all-female vocal ensemble will perform two works: 1988’s “From the Grammar of Dreams,” by Finnish ART composer Kaija Saariaho, and 2012’s “love fail,” by Opening tonight at the Westmoreland Museum of American the Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer David Art is When Modern Was Contemporary: Selections from Lang. “Dreams” is inspired by the work of Sylvia Plath;

sunday 02.26

saturday 02.25

B Y A MA NI NEWTO N

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the Roy R. Neuberger Collection. Discreetly tucked away on the campus of New York’s Purchase College, The Neuberger Museum is a tiny hidden gem, holding a remarkable selection of American modern masters, assembled by the late financier Roy R. Neuberger. Selections brings 52 works from this influential collection to the Pittsburgh area, including pieces by Max Weber, Georgia O’Keeffe and Willem de Kooning, and one of Jackson Pollock’s large drip paintings. The opening reception is set for Sat., March 4, from 6:30-8 p.m. AN 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 21. 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. $10-15 suggested donation (free for children under 18, students and military families). 724-837-1500 or www.thewestmoreland.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017


{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK ABRAHAMS}

^ Tue., Feb. 28: Narcissister

“love fail” is a meditation on the timelessness of love, inspired by the medieval myth of Tristan and Isolde. AN 7:30 p.m. James Laughlin Music Hall, Chatham campus, Shadyside. $12-15. www.aliamusicapittsburgh.org

tuesday 02.28 TALK

What have you always wanted to know about Pittsburgh?

If you want to hear the truth, to paraphrase Oscar Wilde, give someone a mask. Acclaimed Brooklyn-based performance artist Narcissister always wears a stereotypically “female” plastic mask in her photographic, video and live works that employ wild handmade costumes, dance, humor and pop music to deconstruct gender, racial identity and sexuality. Narcissister, who’s performed nationally and internationally, has embodied characters like an 1980s fitness guru (“Self-Gratifier”) and an 18-headed Marie Antoinette. Today, she’s the guest at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Art’s Visiting Artist Lecture Series. The talk is free. BO 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. 412-268-2409 or www.art.cmu.edu

“WHY DOES PITTSBURGH HAVE AN H IN IT?” “IS A PARKING-SPOT CHAIR LEGALLY BINDING?” “WHAT IS SLIPPY?” Mike Wysocki has the answers. (well...sorta)

SUBMIT YOUR PITTSBURGH QUESTIONS AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

wednesday 03.01 TALK Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures New & Noted series brings {PHOTO COURTESY OF TARA_MCMULLEN} Christina Baker Kline to ^ Fri., Feb. 24: Rhapsody in Blue Pittsburgh with her new novel, A Piece of the World. In World, Kline imagines the life of Christina Olsen, the New England woman who served as the unlikely muse for painter Andrew Wyeth’s 1948 masterpiece, “Christina’s World.” Born in 1893, Olsen suffered from a progressive bone disease which limited her mobility. Seemingly destined for an uncelebrated life, instead Olsen became the subject of one of the best known American paintings of the 20th century. Kirkus Reviews called Kline’s conjuring “painterly, sensuous, and sympathetic.” AN 7 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $33. 412-622-8866 or pittsburghlectures.org

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EIGHTEEN’S PASTRAMI IS MADE FROM CURED SALMON

CSA DAY Community-supported agriculture (CSA) has taken off in the past decade. Subscription services for weekly, in-season bundles of fresh produce mean healthy, locally grown food for customers and, for farmers, much-needed winter revenue. The Pittsburgh area alone has a couple dozen CSAs. But in selling what Simon Huntley calls “food people can feel good about,” CSAs face competition — everyone from Whole Foods and farmers’ markets to online ingredientand-recipe delivery service Blue Apron. So in 2015, Huntley’s Pittsburgh-based firm Small Farm Central created CSA Day, an annual lateFebruary reminder about the importance of directly supporting local growers. Huntley was raised on a small farm in the region and in 2006 employed his information-technology degree to found a tech outfit that provides marketing support for farms, including website-creation and an online CSA membership platform. Small Farm Central now has 1,000 customers in North America. But Huntley, author of the 2016 book Cultivating Customers: A Farmer’s Guide to Online Marketing, says that the growth rate of “mature” CSAs — those with more than 100 members — is slowing. CSA Day can raise awareness, especially if farmers advertise and hold tie-in events (whether on-farm or on Facebook). But, Huntley adds, “I think we are at a transitional point with [CSA] programs. … We need to innovate.” One Small Farm Central customer is Art King, of Valencia, Pa.’s Harvest Valley Farms. Though most of Harvest Valley’s sales come at its own roadside farm market, it runs a sizable CSA of 493 subscribers and growing. In most CSAs, each subscriber receives the same selection of produce; King’s innovations include letting subscribers at his drop-off points choose what they want each week. King also benefits from CSA Day: In 2015, on that day alone, he signed up 42 subscribers. Last year, the figure was 54. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More info, including an online directory of CSAs, is available at www.csaday.info.

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Simon Huntley of Small Farm Central

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Dizengoff hummus platter

BEYOND THE KOSHER DELI {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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N SOME WAYS, Squirrel Hill’s identity as a Jewish neighborhood seems to be fading, at least along restaurant-lined Forbes and Murray avenues. One by one, we see kosher markets and delis replaced by Asian eateries targeting foreign students. But Pinsker’s, Murray Avenue’s venerable purveyor of Judaica, is betting that there’s still a hunger for kosher cuisine. Specifically, in this era of foodies, global cuisine, and Jewish celebrity chef Yotam Ottolenghi, Pinsker’s bets that a broader approach to kosher food will appeal to Pittsburghers ever in search of unique dining experiences. In this spirit, Eighteen, a kosher wine bar and sit-down restaurant located in the storefront adjacent to Pinsker’s retail space, offers a variety of dishes not traditionally associated with Jewish culture, such as butternut-squash

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

ravioli, pomegranate-glazed salmon and sushi, alongside classic Jewish-deli fare like bagels with lox and Israeli favorites such as hummus and shakshuka.

EIGHTEEN CAFÉ 2028 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-3033 HOURS: Sun., Mon., Wed. lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Tue. and Thu. lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m., dinner 5-9 p.m.; Sat. 8:30 p.m.-midnight PRICES: $7-20 LIQUOR: Kosher wine bar

CP APPROVED The common thread, aside from being prepared under the supervision of a rabbi, is fish. Aside from eggs, it is the only animal protein on the menu. Eighteen’s pastrami is made from cured salmon, its reuben is made with smoked beets,

and there’s even a cheeseburger — with a house-made veggie patty. It all adds up to a menu unlike any other in town. The space is distinctive as well. One could wait for a table in the front room for hours, if need be, and never get bored: The walls are lined with old local newspapers. Stained-glass windows from a synagogue in West Virginia hang, jewel-like, in the main dining room. We were seated in a charming, porch-like room-within-a-room strung with twinkle lights. It was busy the night we went, with a single, valiant and increasingly frazzled server hard at work. He recommended the Dizengoff hummus, arrayed with olives, tahini, stuffed grape leaves, cucumber salad and a poached egg, served with a thick, pillowy, house-made pita, still warm. The platter


was a great way to enliven the hummus — which, to be clear, was creamy and tasty on its own — with a range of complementary flavors and textures. The only flaw was that the egg had a sort of skin; for a moment, we thought it might actually have been cooked and served in plastic wrap. Shakshuka, that wonderful dish of eggs poached directly in a spicy tomato sauce, was available in traditional, Greek (with feta and spinach) and Mexicali (with shredded cheese and jalapeño) varieties. We chose Greek, and it was wholly satisfying. Served directly in the hot, cast-iron skillet in which it was cooked, it showcased the simple pleasure of perfectly compatible ingredients heightened by a few, just-right seasonings and a restrained approach to innovation. The feta melted gently into creamy, salty pools in the hot tomato stew, while the spinach added color and subtle vegetal flavor. Also served in its own cast-iron skillet, spicy Moroccan fish consisted of two filets of haddock stacked in the center of a tomato-based stew that was populated with chickpeas and potatoes. Jalapeños enabled this dish to live up to the “spicy” component of its name, but like the shakshuka, its seasonings were well balanced so that the whole dish sang in delicious harmony. From the deli menu, we tried the reuben. It wasn’t bad but, in our opinion, didn’t quite work. First, the cheese, a fairly thick slice of Swiss, wasn’t well melted, and so formed a chewy, not gooey, chunk in the middle. But the real problem was the thinly sliced smoked beets. While they offered a pleasingly firm and substantial, if not actually meaty, texture, they were simply too sweet, with scant smokiness. The flavor of beets is not one that can masquerade as anything else, and it threw off the flavor balance of the whole sandwich. Butternut-squash ravioli was described on the menu as coming “in brown butter sauce with raisin and walnut OR spinach in pesto cream.” This was confusing; brown butter sauce, on its own, is a lovely complement to autumnal ravioli. The pesto cream we chose was tasty, but there seemed more than enough of it for a double order of ravioli, and completely obscured any delicate brown butter that may have graced this dish. Hardly a kosher cliché, sushi featured pretty good fish and well-seasoned rice that was pleasingly chewy without being gummy. However, the nori wrappers were chewy as well, as if they hadn’t been toasted in advance and then became sodden in the rice. Eighteen offers a unique menu and memorable food that stand out in an increasingly homogenized dining scene of barnwood-clad, Edison-bulb-lit gastropubs. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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SIMPLE RED SAUCE

OAXACAN CUISINE

{BY JESSICAROBYN KEYSER, EDGEWOOD} I remember being vaguely disappointed after inviting him over for dinner. It was early in our relationship, and Josh is a champion of memorable dates; he’d already taken me to Kennywood, a bar full of taxidermied polar bears, and for my first taste of Gus & YiaYia’s ice balls. Feelings of inadequacy weren’t helped by the thinly veiled looks of alarm he was tossing at the pot on the stove. I held out hope. When I offered him a tasting spoon, he interrupted his robotic autoreply of “It’s good,” with “Whoa, that’s actually REALLY good.” And he was right. I told you that story so that I could tell you this one: Marcella Hazan’s simple recipe for tomato sauce reads like a lazy effort toward nothing special, but is proof that, like our fourth date, less is sometimes truly more. Her original recipe is outstanding as is, and everyone should give it a shot at least once. This variation, while a little different, is just as good as the original — and as taxidermied polar bears.

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HAPPY HOUR

INSTRUCTIONS Heat ghee in large skillet over high heat. Quickly sauté onions until they begin to brown at the edges, taking care not to burn them. Add fennel and continue to cook. Add the butter and, once melted, both cans of tomatoes with juices. Lower heat and bring to a simmer. Allow to cook for about 45 minutes until the juices have reduced and the fennel is meltingly tender. Use a wooden spoon to break up the tomato chunks as you cook; you can also choose to leave them intact, or briefly hit the sauce with an immersion blender if you prefer a smoother final product. Salt to taste. I like to poach Chilean sea bass in this sauce, but it’s also excellent with the addition of lemon for lamb meatballs, or with olives and spooned over grilled chicken. It’s really best, though, as Marcella intended: atop a very fresh pile of pasta.

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Korean BBQ Buffet

LIVE MUSIC LATIN GUITAR

INGREDIENTS • 2 28-oz. cans San Marzano tomatoes (one whole, one crushed ) with their juices (or a brand of similar quality) • 12 tablespoons salted butter. That is not a typo. • 1 scant teaspoon of ghee (or a flavorless cooking oil with a high smoke point) • 1½ cups white or Spanish onion, finely diced • 1 cup of diced fennel, with core and stem, fronds removed

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: WHITE RUSSIANS

{CP PHOTO BY DREW CRANISKY}

Southern Tier Brewing Company Pittsburgh

[ON THE ROCKS]

SOUTHERN TIER, FURTHER SOUTH New York craft brewer opens a brewpub near the stadia {BY DREW CRANISKY}

Blue Dust 601 Amity St., Homestead DRINK: Chai White Russian INGREDIENTS: House-infused chai vodka, Kahlua, cream OUR TAKE: Cardamom and clove add warmth to this creamy, mild classic. The spices bring out the coffee flavors in the Kahlua. Best served ice-cold but undiluted, this drink is almost too easy of a sipper.

VS.

NOW THAT FOOTBALL season is over, it’s time to count down to opening day at PNC Park. And if you plan on catching a game this season, but the idea of paying nine bucks for an I.C. Light doesn’t sit well, you’re in luck. There are more nearby options than ever, including recent additions like The Foundry and Local Brewhouse. And after months of anticipation, Southern Tier Brewing Company has joined the fun, giving Pittsburghers new access to an already popular brand. “It made sense for us to find a space down here,” says head brewer David Harries, nodding to the city’s well-established relationship with the Lakewood, N.Y., brewery. “Without the Pittsburgh market’s

support, we wouldn’t be the brewery we are today.” With its central North Shore location, the new brewpub will undoubtedly appeal to visitors as well. “We’re able to now have the chance to reach people who

SOUTHERN TIER BREWING COMPANY 316 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-301-2337 or www.stbcbeer.com

come here for a Pirates game or a concert or a football game,” notes Harries. “It allows us to reach people who wouldn’t ordinarily come to Lakewood.” The Pittsburgh location, which opened

in late January, offers that experience in an attractive package. Reflecting the aesthetic of the Lakewood brewery, the space is filled with natural wood, and chandeliers made from old barrel staves. Thirty taps line one wall, serving up Southern Tier’s signature hop bombs and dessert beers as well as a few offerings from Victory Brewing (its sister brewery under holding company Artisanal Brewing Ventures). Eventually (hopefully by opening day), the brewpub will boast a beer garden, more than doubling its capacity. But the focal point is undoubtedly the gleaming new Steinecker Krones brewing equipment. The 8.5-barrel system will allow Harries to brew pub exclusives, as well as pilot test batches that could make their way to Lakewood for larger-scale production. Though none of Harries’ beer is currently on tap, he’s got a blonde ale, an oatmeal porter, an English-style bitter and an IPA in the fermenters. When those beers go on draft (within a month, Harries hopes), they will be piped directly from the serving tanks, guaranteeing the freshest possible beer. I stopped by for lunch on a busy Saturday afternoon. The menu, populated with game-day favorites like smoked wings and a pastrami Reuben, was well executed and reasonably priced. The beer selection was equally impressive, ranging from standards like 2XIPA to one-offs like Pittsburgh Speed Date (a winter warmer brewed in collaboration with more than two dozen local brewers). But above all, Southern Tier wowed with service. Though the pub was busy and chaotic (and likely to remain so for quite some time), the service was warm, friendly and attentive. That’s no accident. “We want to make high-quality beer and food,” says Harries. “But at the end of the day, the name of the game is hospitality: making people feel welcome and comfortable.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

This week on Sound Bite: Cecil Usher explores the folklore and history behind the green veil of absinthe. www.pghcitypaper.com

Murray Avenue Grill 1720 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill DRINK: White Russian INGREDIENTS: Vodka, Kahlua, heavy cream OUR TAKE: The classic recipe makes this cocktail a smooth, rich drink, with no alcoholic heat and a strong resemblance to the texture and flavor of heavily creamed coffee. No wonder the Dude liked it so much.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Hibiki Suntory Japanese Harmony Blended Whisky $64.99/750 ml Hibiki Suntory is the perfect whiskey for bourbon enthusiasts who would like to start drinking something a bit more bracing on the whiskey spectrum. The light golden color is appealing to the eyes and the smooth, slightly woody notes are pleasing to the tongue. RECOMMENDED BY CELINE ROBERTS

Hibiki Suntory Japanese Harmony Blended Whisky is available at Pennsylvania Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores.


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MARCH 20-26 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER PRESENTS PITTSBURGH PIZZA WEEK, A WEEK THAT WILL BE ENTIRELY DEVOTED TO EVERYONE’S FAVORITE FOOD.

Slice On Broadway City Oven Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza

Potenza Pizza Pastoli’s Pizza Pasta & Paisans Donte’s Pizzeria

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THE FINAL SHOWDOWN PITS LADY BEAST AGAINST LADY WARRIOR

TAKE YOUR DAD TO WORK {BY AL HOFF}

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German director Maren Ade explores the frayed relationship between an older dad and his adult daughter in the dramedy Toni Erdmann. Ines (Sandra Huller) works in Bucharest as a business consultant, hoping to secure a deal with a Romanian oil company. Her father, Winfried (Peter Simonischek), at loose ends, decides to visit her. She grudgingly takes him to a couple of company get-togethers — she has no life or relationships beyond work — and it’s awkward. Winfried is out of his depth, and an inveterate prankster whose feeble jokes fall flat in this highly prescribed world of globalized dealmaking and double-speak. (It’s secondary to the main plot, but the international machinations occurring in this post-Soviet Bloc state are both fascinating and a source of sly comedy.)

Sandra Huller and Peter Simonischek, in Toni Erdmann

So Winfried pretends to return to Germany, but instead re-surfaces in Ines’ life, as the bizarrely wigged and somewhat nutty “Toni Erdmann,” who claims to be the life coach of Ines’ boss. This gains him social entry with Ines’ colleagues, and Ines is forced to include the increasingly unpredictable “Erdmann” in her business dealings. All of this takes place at a leisurely pace over nearly three hours. The film has been pegged a comedy, but it’s less a laugh-out-loud affair than a wry, slightly cringey take on a fractured relationship that is being repaired in an offbeat fashion. Both lead actors are good, with Huller especially adept at depicting how mechanically Ines buries so much frustration, loneliness, anger and desire beneath her all-business exterior. Watching her gradually emerge from her hard shell, spurred on by “Erdmann’s” bizarre gambits, is the film’s real smileworthy and ultimately heartfelt pleasure. The film is nominated for Best Foreign Picture at this year’s Academy Awards, and reputedly an American remake starring Jack Nicholson and Kristen Wiig has been greenlit. There is much about the European sensibility of this film (not to mention the forthright nudity) that will likely not translate well, so be sure to see the original now. In English, and German, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 24

Team members Jing Tian, Matt Damon, Andy Lau and Cheney Chen

MONSTER SQUAD {BY AL HOFF}

T

as bad as the trailer makes it look. Zhang Yimou’s actioner The Great Wall turns out to be pretty entertaining (in a basic man-vs.-monster fashion), beautiful to look at and — contrary to anxious pre-hype — not a white-manas-savior embarrassment. The story — noted upfront as a legend — takes place about a thousand years ago in China. We drop in on European mercenaries searching for a new weapons. The group is attacked by … something, and when the dust clears, only William (Matt Damon), Tovar (Pedro Pascal), a magnetic rock and a freaky clawed appendage are left. “I’ll take the hand with me … so somebody can tell me what I just killed,” muses William. In short order, the pair reach the Great Wall, manned by tens of thousands of soldiers, and are promptly taken prisoner. But the claw turns out to be a life-saver: The wall is built to hold back monsters, and the mercenaries’ escape from said monsters earns

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HE BIG NEWS: This film isn’t nearly

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

them a spot on the front lines. The rest of the film is simply humans teaming up to defeat the beasties. Given the increasing length and narrative bloat of action films, there’s something to be said for a quickly paced 103-minute film with an uncomplicated premise. The (literally) quickly sketched origin story of the monsters is so silly it truly doesn’t matter: They’re here now and somebody has to deal with them.

THE GREAT WALL DIRECTED BY: Zhang Yimou In English, and Mandarin, with subtitles In 3-D in select theaters

Zhang, who began in arthouse fare (Raise the Red Lantern) before moving onto to action (Hero, House of Flying Daggers), melds a Chinese action spectacle with a Western buddy film and CGI monsters. It’s an awkward marriage at times — the gorgeous precision of the Chinese battalions

(each costumed in color-coded gear, with sumptuous satin capes) is undercut by cheesy digital effects. More fun than the monsters — which resemble lizard-hyena hybrids — are the kicky array of weapons (screaming arrows, flaming stones) and fighting styles (warriors on bungee cords). The film is visually resplendent. It’s shot amid “Western movie” scenery, with canyons and hills carved from red and gold sandstone. There is a thrilling scene set in the fog; another’s in a tower of stained glass. And mid-film, an arresting funeral for a fallen warrior is replete with drums, choral music, white robes and floating lanterns. Also, I’m pleased to report that the boss of the story isn’t Damon’s character, but a woman, Commander Lin (Jing Tian). Similarly, the monsters are led by a queen, and the final showdown pits lady beast against lady warrior, though that hunk of magnetic rock is MVP of the anti-monster crusade. Again, the why of this pretty silly — just accept it and enjoy the show. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS. It’s back to Hogwarts for Harry and his magical compatriots, despite a warning that terrible things are going to happen. Chris Columbus directs this 2002 film, starring Daniel Radcliffe. Feb. 22-25 and Feb. 27. Row House Cinema

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HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN. Harry Potter is ready to return to school with his wizard pals, but learns that the dangerous wizard Sirius Black has escaped from prison and is probably coming after him. Alfonso Cuarón directs this 2004 outing. Feb. 22-23, Feb. 25 and Feb. 27-28. Row House Cinema

BITTER HARVEST. George Mendeluk’s film is an old-fashioned melodrama set amid a tumultuous historical time, the Holodomor, in 1930s Ukraine. Under Stalin’s direction, the region is being forcefully brought into the Soviet fold. Family farms are collectivized, religion is being stamped out (though valuable icons are happily seized) and most of the local produce is confiscated. Resistance brings further hardship, or even death. One family of notable fighters is caught in the struggle — the lionized grandfather (Terence Stamp) fumes and plots in the increasingly desperate village, while his artistic grandson (Max Irons) looks for work in Kiev and pines for the village beauty (Samantha Barks) he left behind. Eventually he gets woke to the terrible situation (a stay in a gulag is quite convincing), and returns home to fight for Ukraine. It’s the sort of historical melodrama that is often well served by the epic treatment — such as A-list actors, spectacular cinematography and a meaty script that takes the time to create emotional involvement. None of that happens here, so while Mendeluk’s film is well intentioned and mildly intriguing, it falls well short of grandness. Starts Fri., Feb. 24. AMC Loews Waterfront (Al Hoff) FIST FIGHT. The education system is something of a metaphorical punching bag these days, and there is the potential to mine some sharp comedy out of its oft-beleaguered state. Say, a couple of teachers in a failing, underfunded public school grow so fearful of losing their jobs that each would resort to any crazy scheme to not be the one laid off. Why, it could end in a giant fist fight in the parking lot, the time-honored solution of misbehaving high schoolers. Well, this isn’t that movie. Sure, that’s the basic plot of Richie Keen’s comedy, but it suffers from being pretty witless, with half-hearted performances, few jokes and a mind-deadening barrage of profanity. (Speaking of school, somebody should teach a class in Hollywood called “The F-Word Is Not a Punchline.”) Charlie Day and Ice Cube play the feuding teachers; Dean Norris is the grumpy principal; Tracy Morgan portrays the school’s disconnected sports coach; Jillian Bell is the inappropriately sex-and-drugsobsessed guidance counselor; and Christina Hendricks just floats through in a skin-tight dress. It’s all a waste, and at best, I hope these actors learned to pick better films in the future, lest they lose their jobs. (AH) GET OUT. Jordan Peele directs this horror film in which a black man visits his white girlfriend’s family, and finds their home to be not-so-welcoming to folks of color. Lakeith Stanfield and Allison Williams star. Starts Fri., Feb. 24 THE RED TURTLE. A castaway washes up on the shore of a small tropical island in Michael Dudok de Wit’s lyrical and dialoguefree animated feature. The man explores the island; he is alone but for curious sand crabs, but finds fruit and water. He makes several attempts to leave on bamboo rafts, but is thwarted just offshore by a large sea turtle. Enraged, he later confronts the turtle on land, but in a bit of unexplained magic, the turtle transforms into a woman. Thus does the story shift, focusing not on the man escaping the island, but on how now, with companionship, he embraces his new life on it. There is not a lot of plot — lest we forget that simply living is its own story — with the film instead growing increasingly existential and

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HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE. In Mike Newell’s 2005 film, Harry and the gang compete in the Tri-Wizard Tournament, and the wizarding world expands to track events beyond Hogwarts. Feb. 22-23, Feb. 25, Feb. 27-28 and March 1. Row House Cinema HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX. In David Yates’ 2007 film, Harry’s lifelong nemesis — the evil wizard Lord Voldemort — has been restored to his corporeal form. It’s all hands on deck. Feb. 23, Feb. 25-26, Feb. 28 and March 1-2. Row House Cinema

Bitter Harvest

Fist Fight

even experiential (the exquisite animation and sound design is quite transporting). It’s a short work, at less than 80 minutes, and it should hold kids who can sit through a slower-paced film (though it is probably best for older children who can manage some sad parts and scenes of peril). The Dutch director’s film is the first non-Japanese work to be produced by the renowned Studio Ghibli; it has also been nominated for Best Animated Feature in this year’s Academy Awards. Starts Fri., Feb. 24 (AH)

Vito, while another thread flashes back to trace Vito’s (Robert DeNiro) journey to America and the start of his gangster career in New York’s Little Italy. Critics hailed Part II as a deeper film and a more insightful look at the corruption of the myths of family and the American Dream than its 1972 predecessor. 6:15 p.m. Wed., Feb. 22. AMC Loews Waterfront. $10 for double feature

ROCK DOG. Ash Brannon directs this animated comedy in which a Tibetan mastiff leaves home to pursue his dreams of being a rock star. Luke Wilson and Eddie Izzard are among those who lend their voices. Starts Fri., Feb. 24

ONGOING OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORT FILMS. There is still time to catch the Oscar-nominated short films. The Live Action and Animated shorts play daily at Regent Square Theater, through Thu., March 2. Among the live-action works is a Spanish charmer about two people working in a parking garage; other films tackle refugees, conformity, racial prejudice and growing old. A 35-minute nourish tale of a frustrating friendship, “Pear Cider and Cigarettes,” heads up the animated program (five nominated films, plus three bonus shorts). Also on the slate is the winsome Pixar short about a young sandpiper. The Documentary program, screening at Melwood, offers two films about refugees, another about rescuers working in the Syrian city of Aleppo, a look at life-or-death hospital decisions and one uplifting piece about a violin that finds a new home. (Docs: 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 24; 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 25; and 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 26.)

REPERTORY THE GODFATHER, PARTS I AND II. Catch this double feature of two of the most enduring and influential American films of the late 20th century on the big screen, where Francis Ford Coppola’s multigenerational mafia family drama and perversion of the American Dream writ large belongs. Coppola continues the saga of the Corleone family in 1974’s Part II. One thread follows Michael Corleone’s (Al Pacino) rise to power after the death of his father,

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HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE. A young boy learns he’s a wizard and heads off to Hogwarts School. Chris Columbus’ 2001 film is the start of an epic magical journey. Feb. 22 and Feb. 24-25. Row House Cinema

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1. In David Yates’ broody 2010 adaptation of the seventh Potter book, Harry frets about his upcoming and inevitable one-on-one showdown with evil wizard Voldemort. Feb. 24, Feb. 26 and March 1-2. Row House Cinema HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2. “The boy who lived, come to die.” Fourteen years, more than 4,000 pages and nearly 20 hours of movie all boil down to this critical meeting, when Harry goes wand to wand with his sneering nemesis, Lord Voldemort, in David Yates’ 2012 film. Feb. 24, Feb. 26 and March 2. Row House Cinema HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE. Harry, Hermione and Ron strengthen the bonds of their friendship — and work to prevent real catastrophe — in David Yates’ 2009 adaptation of the penultimate book in the series. Feb. 26, Feb. 28 and March 1-2. Row House Cinema

BLACK BOTTOM FILM FESTIVAL The festival’s inaugural season focuses on African-American film, with screenings, discussions and an award presentation for longtime filmmaker Michael Schultz (Car Wash, Krush Groove). Feature-length films, to be screened at the August Wilson Center, include:

Chapter & Verse. In this 2015 drama, a man returns to Harlem from prison and finds work and meaning delivering meals for a food bank. Jamal Joseph directs. 8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 24

Like Cotton Twines. Leila Djansi’s recent documentary profiles a young African-American who takes a teaching job in a remote Ghanaian village, and must reconcile modern education with religious traditions. 4 p.m. Sat., Feb. 25

Cooley High. Michael Schultz’s 1975 ensemble film is a coming-of-age story set among a group of high school friends on the North Side of Chicago in 1964. Includes reception and award ceremony for Schultz. 6:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 25

Which Way Is Up? Richard Pryor, playing three roles, stars in Michael Schultz’s 1977 comedy about a laid-off worker who moves to Los Angeles, juggling women and jobs. 10 p.m. Sat., Feb. 25

Spirits of Rebellion: Black Cinema from UCLA. Zeinabu Irene Davis’ new documentary profiles several filmmakers (including herself) associated with the “L.A. Rebellion,” a group that from the late 1960s through the late 1980s created alternative black cinema. 1 p.m. Sun., Feb. 26

Destination Planet Negro! In this 2013 satire from Kevin Willmott (CSA), W.E.B. DuBois and George Washington Carver hatch a plan to go to Mars, but wind up in a modern-day Midwestern city. 2:15 p.m. Sun., Feb. 26

Two Trains Runnin’. The search for two forgotten blues singers in Mississippi during the civil-rights era forms the heart of Sam Pollard’s new documentary. 5:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 26 There are also two programs of short films (6:15 p.m. Fri., Feb. 24, and 11 a.m. Sat., Feb. 25). Fri., Feb. 24, through Sun., Feb. 26. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15 for single-day pass; $35 for festival. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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ART OF THE GAME

“THERE WERE TWO MEN’S TEAMS IN OUR AREA, AND I WANTED THAT SAME KIND OF OUTLET FOR WOMEN.”

Despite being widely considered a much better baseball player than Jackie Robinson, and one of the greatest hitters of all time, Pittsburgh Negro League legend Josh Gibson has always lived in Robinson’s shadow. Gibson was blocked from the majors by the league’s unwritten segregation. By the time Robinson got into the league, in 1947, Gibson had died at 35. Robinson’s story has been told and retold on television, in film and even in a musical. But on April 29, Gibson is being honored in way that Robinson never was: with an opera. “I’m friends with Jackie’s daughter, Sharon, and I told her that we were getting ready for an opera about Josh Gibson’s life,” says Sean Gibson, the late star’s greatgrandson and executive director of the Josh Gibson Foundation. “She said, ‘How’d you get an opera?’ and I said, ‘Sharon, Jackie’s already more famous. He got the first movie. Let Josh go first for once.’” Gibson laughs when he thinks about the call he got 10 years ago from a composer in Maine named Daniel Sonenberg. “I told the family a guy in Maine wants to do an opera and they weren’t sure, but I said, ‘Let’s not say no, because you never know.” The result is The Summer King — The Josh Gibson Story, an opera that Gibson says tells not only of his great-grandfather’s career, but also of his life outside of baseball. He said it will open up the Josh Gibson story to a whole new audience, and also open up opera to a brand-new audience as well. “You never know,” Gibson chuckles again. “There could be opera fans in tuxedos and nice suits, and fans in baseball jerseys and caps. We’re so excited for this. We hope it does well, and we can take this show to other cities ... and tell Josh’s story.” Pittsburgh Opera and the Josh Gibson Foundation will hold three community roundtables featuring Sean Gibson, talking about Josh Gibson and the Negro Leagues, and members of the opera’s cast. The first two events will feature Alfred Walker, who will portray Gibson, talking about the opera; he will also perform arias from the show. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 22. Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St., North Side. RSVP: www.pittsburghopera.org/Pgh Project or 412-321-1678 x536. 7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 23. Steel Valley High School, 3113 Main St., Munhall (reservations not required). 7 p.m. Mon., Feb. 27. Hill House Kaufman Center, 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. RSVP: www.pittsburghopera.org/ hillhouse or 412-392-6479. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For reduced-price tickets to The Summer King — The Josh Gibson Story, go to www.pittsburghopera.org/JGF and use the promo code: pojgf.

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Josh Gibson {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JOSH GIBSON FOUNDATION}

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHEILA RODGERS}

On the field with Steel City FC

PLAYING AT

A HIGH LEVEL {BY BILLY LUDT}

F

OR MANY ATHLETES, there aren’t al-

ways options to continue competitive play after college graduation. For women seeking soccer leagues in Pittsburgh, recreational games might not provide the level of competition they seek. That was Stephanie Harrison’s situation, and she decided to do something about it. “There’s some really fun pickup [games] around, but nothing like the high level I was competing at,” says Harrison, founder and general manager of Steel City Football Club, a women’s minor-league soccer team. “I looked around and I saw that there were two men’s teams in our area, and I wanted that same kind of outlet for women.” In 2015, Steel City FC was officially sanctioned in the Women’s Premier Soccer League. The WPSL is an independent league consisting of more than 100 teams in North America. Steel City plays in the Great Lakes Division, composed of teams

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

from Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, New York and Pennsylvania. “It’s so awesome, especially for me,” says Steel City defender Jordan Daloisio, who attended Clarion University. “For me, I had been out for a couple of years after

STEEL CITY FC TRYOUTS 8-10 p.m. Fri., March 10. The Neighborhood Academy, 709 N. Aiken Ave., East Liberty. Shin guards, soccer cleats or indoor soccer shoes required. www.steelcityfc.com

playing in college. You still have that want to play. Once you play at a high level, you don’t want to play with people who aren’t competitive.” The WPSL takes competition to a level higher than college play. Players have moved up to professional teams after playing with WPSL clubs. “It’s defi-

nitely more competitive than in college,” says Steel City goalkeeper Laura Saussol, another Clarion alum. “Girls are faster and more skillful as a group, whereas in college, teams had players that tended to be individually skilled.” Beyond league play and training, Steel City FC, and all WPSL teams, are involved with community outreach, including assisting with youth soccer programs. “I liked the mission and values of the league, so it’s nice to be a part of something bigger than just soccer,” Daloisio says. For its first two seasons, Steel City played at the Ellis School in Shadyside, but growing attendance has led to a search for a new venue. The 2017 season begins in May. Open tryouts begin March 10, and Harrison says the team is searching for “players who love the game” and says new players will be “welcomed and challenged.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


[THE CHEAP SEATS]

HOOP SCOOPS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} AS THE 2016-17 college-basketball season heads toward its conference tournaments, the regular-season report cards are in. And looking at the scene as a whole, one thing is clear — Pittsburgh needs to step up its collegebasketball game. Carlow, Robert Morris, Point Park and Duquesne all have losing seasons. Pitt is around .500, but its final five games are against two ranked teams; three of those games are on the road; and the five teams they’ve yet to play have a record of 91-39. We live in an upside-down sports world where two of the four world champs are a team from Cleveland and the Cubs. In Pittsburgh, the two best teams in college basketball this season are the Carnegie Mellon Tartans and the LaRoche Redhawks. The natural order of things is topsy-turvy. Starting from the bottom, the Carlow Celtics get a pass because their program is still in its infancy. They’re only 3 years old, so don’t make fun of them. But a 4-24 record is tough to look at no matter what your age. The Celtics did manage a win over Point Park to produce the highlight of the season. The low point was a season-opening 47-point drubbing at the hands of hated Mount Vernon Nazarene University. The Robert Morris Colonials’ biggest win was over Duquesne, right after Duquesne’s biggest win, over Pitt. Robert Morris has struggled, but it’s not afraid to play much bigger schools. Penn, DePaul, Richmond, Kansas State and Virginia were all on the Colonials’ non-conference schedule. They didn’t win any of those games, but Bobby Mo will be better in the long run for having faced that competition. Not much better news comes out of Point Park. A three-point win over No. 7 (in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Division 1 rankings) Indiana University East was the best game for the Pioneers; there were few others. The low point was an unholy 46-point beating at the hands of Ohio Christian University, and a forgettable season was summed up by a loss against Carlow. The two most exciting college-basketball players to watch both play at the

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

The Duquesne Dukes might have peaked too early by beating Pitt at the beginning of the season.

Palumbo Center. Mike Lewis II and Isiaha Mike are the kind of players who can move Duquesne to the next level. But, the Dukes can’t seem to find their way up the standings of a very competitive Atlantic 10 division. Duquesne wants to be where Virginia Commonwealth and Dayton are. Dayton is led by coach Archie Miller of the Blackhawk-area Millers — his brother Sean is the head coach at Arizona — so you’re welcome, Ohio. By the way, Mike and Lewis II are only freshmen. A team of recruits playing for a guy who didn’t recruit them, while learning a new system in the ACC, is not a blueprint for a great season. That’s what the Pitt Panthers are facing. It was a confusing season marked by losing the City Game, but beating a very good Virginia Cavalier team. Then came the Louisville massacre — no relation to the Bowling Green Massacre, because this one really happened — where Pitt lost by 55 points. Coach Kevin Stallings is an unenviable position; the ACC is relentless and it will take time to implement his system. I’m sure Pitt fans will be patient. The good news, finally, is that coach Tony Wingen’s Carnegie Mellon Tartans are hot right now. For the third consecutive season, the Tartans have set a new team record for three-pointers. At least

somebody is making it rain in Oakland these days. Wingen won his 300th game in January, and holds the school record for most wins by a basketball coach.

The Tartans will finish with a winning season; they just need some more attention. Other universities have former students who are celebrities draw notice by attending home games. Carnegie Mellon has lots of famous former students. Where are you Ted Danson, or Joe Manganiello, or George Romero, or Squiggy from TV’s Laverne and Shirley? The best report card goes to the LaRoche Redhawks: Coach Hermie Carmichael has his team 10 games over .500. In the less-celebrated City Game, LaRoche defeated Carnegie Mellon 66-61. Carmichael has coached the Redhawks to three conference tournament appearances in his first five seasons. Under him, they even appeared in the semifinals of the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference. At least somebody is winning college-basketball games in this town. Local teams won’t be making a lot of noise in the upcoming madness of March. But Pittsburgh is hosting the Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament from March 8-12 at the Paint Bucket. Go see Duquesne, VCU, Dayton, Richmond, George Mason and St. Bonaventure. All that good basketball will make you forget the bad stuff. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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WƌŽĚƵĐƚŝŽŶtŽƌŬǀĂŝůĂďůĞEŽǁ͊͊͊͊͊ ŽŶƚĂĐƚĂǀŝĚƵƌŶƐĂƚ KǀĞƌϰϬWŽƐŝƚŝŽŶƐEĞĞĚĞĚ͊͊͊͊ ϴϲϲͲϴϲϴͲϰϰϳϯdžƚϮϭϬ KƌĞŵĂŝů tŽƌŬĂƐĞĂƌůLJĂƐŶĞdžƚǁĞĞŬ͊͊͊͊͊͊͊ ĚďƵƌŶƐΛŝƐŐǁŽƌŬ͘ĐŽŵdŽ

PITTSBURGH NEEDS TO STEP UP ITS COLLEGEBASKETBALL GAME.

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WĂLJ/ŶĐƌĞĂƐĞƐĂĨƚĞƌϵϬĂLJƐ͊͊͊ ϴϲϲͲϴϲϴͲϰϰϳϯdžƚϮϭϬ hŶŝŽŶWŽƐŝƚŝŽŶ͊͊ KƌĞŵĂŝů ďůĞƚŽŝĚŽŶ,ŝŐŚĞƌtĂŐĞWŽƐŝƚŝŽŶƐƵƉƚŽ ĚďƵƌŶƐΛŝƐŐǁŽƌŬ͘ĐŽŵdŽ Ψϭϴ͘ϬϬŚŽƵƌ͘ ƐĞƚĂŶŝŶƚĞƌǀŝĞǁƚŽĚĂLJ͊͊ DĞĚŝĐĂůĞŶĞĨŝƚƐ͊͊͊͊ WĂLJ/ŶĐƌĞĂƐĞƐĂĨƚĞƌϵϬĂLJƐ͊͊͊ hŶŝŽŶWŽƐŝƚŝŽŶ͊͊ ďůĞƚŽŝĚŽŶ,ŝŐŚĞƌtĂŐĞWŽƐŝƚŝŽŶƐƵƉƚŽ Ψϭϴ͘ϬϬŚŽƵƌ͘ DĞĚŝĐĂůĞŶĞĨŝƚƐ͊͊͊͊

MI K E W YS O CKI IS A STA NDUP CO MED I AN. FO LLO W HI M O N TWI TTER: @I T SMIK E WYSO C K I

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on March 7, 2017, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for the following:

Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Science Labs & ADA Restroom Renovations General, Plumbing, Mechanical, Electrical and Asbestos Primes Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 ADA Stage Lift General Prime Pittsburgh Greenfield PreK-8 Replace PA/Sound Systems / Emergency Generator Electrical Prime Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on February 6, 2017 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

ACROSS 1. Residents of Japan’s thirdlargest city 8. Business lines? 15. Silicon or copper 16. Churchill’s portrayer on TV’s “The Crown” 17. Junior, e.g. 18. Thing left out 19. Building block 20. Just out 21. Stuff baked in some brownies 22. Not worth ___ 23. Leans to one side 25. Overindulges 27. Got some sack time 28. Oozes (into) 30. To and ___ 31. Writer Shelby who sounds like kind of a heel? 32. Need to pay back 34. Open insults 36. Extremist group, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 39. Never changing 40. Chemistry suffix 41. Madmen, in Mexico 42. “___ polar bear strolls into a bar ...” 44. Grazing matter 48. Brown-___ 49. Brooks from Tulsa

51. Literary lover 52. One on drugs 53. Tarot card 54. Pull-down target 56. Accusatory words 57. Symbol of a government’s insidious spread 59. “From my perspective” 61. Fossil fuel found on coasts 62. Big name in art glass 63. “The Matrix” film series, e.g. 64. Working hard

DOWN 1. Muscat residents 2. Crazy like a fox, say 3. “No, No, ___” 4. Twee instruments 5. Comic Killam 6. Unclothed 7. Whole lotta 8. Decline gently, as a hillside 9. Transports to the red carpet 10. Cry at the start of tag 11. Disappointed grunts 12. Follows after someone 13. Chocolate made with hazelnuts

14. Sheryl who was the first player signed to a WNBA team 24. Program supporter 26. Farm vehicle 27. Oklahoma natives 29. Tries to hit, as flies 31. “Breaking Bad” drug lord Gus 33. Letter from Crete 35. Day of the wk. albums come out 36. Screwdriver or WD-40, e.g. 37. Open to question

38. To an extreme degree 39. Least distant 43. “Finally!” 45. Somewhat 46. Cotton cloth 47. Putting on the map? 49. Soviet prison camp 50. Must 53. “Move it!” 55. Toy connected with a movie, e.g. 58. Org. protecting Standing Rock water protestors 60. John Cho character {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

02.22-03.01

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): What would your best mother do in a situation like this? Please note that I’m not asking, “What would your mother do?” I’m not suggesting you call on the counsel of your actual mother. When I use the term “your best mother,” I’m referring to the archetype of your perfect mother. Imagine a wise older woman who understands you telepathically, loves you unconditionally and wants you to live your life according to your own inner necessity, not hers or anyone else’s. Visualize her. Call on her. Seek her blessings.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): My astrological radar suggests there’s a spacetime anomaly looming just ahead of you. Is it a fun and exotic limbo where the rules are flexible and everything’s an experiment? That might be cool. Or is it more like an alien labyrinth where nothing is as it seems, you can hear howling in the distance, and you barely recognize yourself? That might be weird. What do you think? Is it worth the gamble? If so, full speed ahead. If not, I suggest a course correction.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Someone on Reddit.com asked readers to respond to the question, “What is the most liberating thought you’ve ever had?” Among the replies were the following six: 1. “If new evidence presents itself, it’s OK to change my beliefs.” 2. “I get to choose who’s in my life and who isn’t.” 3. “I am not my history.” 4. “You can’t change something that has already happened, so stop worrying about it.” 5. “I am not, nor will I ever be, conventionally

beautiful.” 6. “I don’t have to respond to people when they say stupid shit to me.” I hope these testimonies inspire you to come up with several of your own, Taurus. It’s a perfect time to formulate liberating intentions.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It has been a while since I told you that I love you. So I’m doing it now. I LOVE YOU. More than you could ever imagine. And that’s why I continue to offer these horoscopes to you free of charge, with no strings attached. That’s why I work so hard to be a playful therapist and an edgy mentor for you. That’s why I am so tenacious in my efforts to serve you as a feminist father figure and a kindly devil’s advocate and a sacred cheerleader. Again, I don’t expect anything in return from you. But if you would like to express your appreciation, you could do so by offering a similar type of well-crafted care to people in your own sphere. Now would be an excellent time to give such gifts.

get your yoga on!

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“I like the word ‘bewilderment’ because it has both ‘be’ and ‘wild’ in it,” says poet Peter Gizzi. I propose that you go even further, Cancerian: Express a fondness for the actual experience of bewilderment as well as the word. In fact, be willing to not just tolerate, but actually embrace the fuzzy blessings of bewilderment. In the coming weeks, that’s your ticket to being wild in the healthiest (and wealthiest) ways. As you wander innocently through the perplexing mysteries that make themselves available, you’ll be inspired to escape formalities and needless rules that have kept you overly tame.

I suspect you would benefit from acquiring a new bedroom name, my dear. But should I be the one to give it to you? I’m not sure. Maybe you could invite a practical dreamer you adore to provide you with this crazy sweet new moniker. If there is no such person to do the job (although given the current astrological omens, I bet there is), I’ll offer the following array of amorous aliases for you to choose from: Wild Face … Kiss Genius … Thrill Witch … Freaky Nectar … Boink Master … Lust Moxie … Pearly Thunder … Peach Licker … Painkiller … Silky Bliss … Slippery Diver … Swoon Craver.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are you familiar with psychologist Carl Jung’s concept of the shadow? It’s the unflattering or uncomfortable part of you that you would prefer to ignore or suppress. It’s the source of behavior about which you later say, “I wasn’t acting like myself.” Jungians say that the shadow hounds you and wounds you to the degree that you refuse to deal with it. But if you negotiate with it, it leads you to beautiful surprises. It prods you to uncover riches you’ve hidden from yourself. I mention this, Leo, because any shadow work you do in the coming weeks could generate rather spectacular breakthroughs.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yoga levels 1, 2 ashtanga yoga meditation

yin yoga prenatal yoga mommy & me yoga for kids

You could make a vow like this: “Between now and April 15, I will be relentless in getting my needs met. I will harbor a steely resolve to call on every ploy necessary to ensure that my deepest requirements are not just gratified, but satiated to the max. I will be a dogged and ferocious seeker of absolute fulfillment.” If you want to swear an oath like that, Virgo, I understand. But I hope you will try a softer approach — more like the following: “Between now and April 15, I will be imaginative and ingenious in getting my needs met. I will have fun calling on every trick necessary to ensure that my deepest requirements are playfully addressed. I will be a sweet seeker of unpredictable fulfillment.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): How would Buddha ask for a raise or promotion? How would Jesus tinker with his career plans as he took into consideration large-scale shifts in the economy? How would Confucius try to infuse new approaches and ideas into the status quo of his work environment? Ruminate deeply on these matters, dear Libra. Your yearning to be more satisfyingly employed may soon be rewarded — especially if you infuse your ambitions with holy insight. How would Joan of Arc break through the glass ceiling? How would Harriet Tubman deal with the inefficiencies caused by excess testosterone? How would Hildegard of Bingen seek more emotional richness on the job?

east liberty squirrel hill north hills

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Soon I’ll be off on my first vacation in 18 months. At first glance it might seem odd for an astrologer like myself to have selected two Sagittarians to be my housesitters. Members of your sign are reputed to be among the least home-nurturing people in the zodiac. But I’m confident that by the time I return, raccoons won’t be living in my kitchen, nor will my plants be dead or my snail mail stolen or my TV broken. The current astrological omens suggest that most of you Centaurs, at least for the foreseeable future, will display an uncommon aptitude for the domestic arts.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The near future will be mutable, whimsical and fluky. It’ll be serendipitous, mercurial and extemporaneous. You should expect happy accidents and lucky breaks. Your ability to improvise will be quite valuable. Do you believe in lucky numbers? Even if you don’t, yours will be 333. Your sacred password will be “quirky plucky.” The cartoon characters with whom you will have most in common are Bugs Bunny and Road Runner. The place where you’re most likely to encounter a crucial teaching is a threshold or thrift shop. Your colors of destiny will be flecked and dappled. (P.S.: I suspect that an as-yet-undiscovered talisman of power is crammed in a drawer full of junk.)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Treat your body like a sublime temple, please. And regard your imagination as a treasured sanctuary. Be very choosy about what you allow to enter in to both of those holy places. This strategy is always a wise idea, of course, but it’s especially so now, when you are extra sensitive to the influences you absorb. It’s crucial that you express maximum discernment as you determine which foods, drinks, drugs, images, sounds and ideas are likely to foster your maximum wellbeing — and which aren’t. Be a masterful caretaker of your health and sanity. Find a new person or institution you can eagerly and earnestly respect. Report on your triumph at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a straight married man. My wife and I have a 4-year-old and a 3-monthold. We’ve just started having intercourse again. For Valentine’s Day, we spent the night in a B&B while grandma watched the kids. We had edibles, drank sparkling wine and then fucked. It was amazing. After we came and while we were still stoned and drunk, my wife mentioned she was open to inviting others into our sex life. I asked about getting a professional sex worker. She said no. But maybe if we were in a bar (we’re never in bars) and met someone (a unicorn), she might be into it. Anal came up. She’s always said she’s up for trying anything once. I have a desire to experiment with anal. (Not just me entering her, but her pegging me as well.) I asked if she would use the vibrator we brought on me, just to experiment. She said she was too high to do anything. I felt let down. I feel she unknowingly teased me with fantasies I have, not knowing I actually have them. We have a good sex life, and I’m willing to write off the fantasies we discussed while high and drunk. It’s the teasing that drove me crazy.

So if you ever want to have that threesome or experiment with anal, HARD, you need to keep talking with your wife about these fantasies — and you need to tell her your fantasies too! Tell her you’re not pressuring her, of course, but let her know these are things you would actually like to do, and the more you talk about them, the more you want to do them. If she keeps talking with you about them, that’s a sign. Not a sign that she’s a cruel tease, HARD, but a sign that she’s inching closer toward pulling on a Team Realize jersey. P.S. If your wife doesn’t know you have these fantasies — and is consequently teasing you “unknowingly” — that’s your fault, HARD, not hers. I’m a 30-year-old straight woman who has been with the same guy (high school sweetheart!) for the last 13 years. We love each other deeply, best friends, etc. The problem isn’t that the sex isn’t good — he’s very good at making me come. But the sex is vanilla and routine, and I would like us to go beyond that. Nothing extreme, I just want to switch things up a bit. Talking about sex makes my husband REALLY uncomfortable. If I ask him what he’d like me to do to him while we’re having sex, he shuts down. He’ll say, “Everything you do is good,” and leave it there. In the very few conversations we’ve had about this stuff, he’s said that he feels intimidated and doesn’t know what to say. This is incredibly frustrating for me. How do I get him to loosen up and feel more comfortable about talking to me so that we can eventually progress to some new experiences?

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE SACK.

HAVING AND REALIZING DESIRES

P.S. I’m in no hurry. We just had a baby, and I don’t want to pressure my wife right now. My fear is that she may only like the idea of exploring our sexuality together and not the reality of it.

Some people think about, talk about and masturbate about certain fantasies without ever wanting to realize them. Let’s call them Team Fantasize. Some people think about, etc., certain fantasies and would very much like to realize them. Let’s call them Team Realize. There’s nothing wrong with either team. But when someone on Team Fantasize is married to someone on Team Realize, well, that can be a problem. Knowing your spouse is turned on by fantasies you share but rules out realizing them — or sets impossible conditions for realizing them — can be extremely frustrating. And sometimes a frustrated Team Realize spouse will say something like this to their Team Fantasize mate: “Talking about these fantasies together — this kind of dirty talk — it gets my hopes up about actually doing it. If it’s never going to happen, we have to stop talking about it, because it’s frustrating.” The problem with that approach? Swingers clubs, BDSM parties and the strapon-dildo sections of your finer sex-positive sex-toy stores everywhere are filled with couples who used to be on opposite teams — one from Team Fantasize, the other from Team Realize — but they’re both on Team Realize now. And what got them on the same team? Continuing to discuss and share fantasies, even at the risk of frustrating the Team Realize spouse.

WHY HUSBAND IS PRUDISH

Have you told him what you want? If you haven’t — if you’re as vague in your conversations with him as you were in your letter to me — you’re essentially asking your husband to guess at your undisclosed interests or kinks. Your husband is probably terrified of guessing wrong. He doesn’t know what to do, he doesn’t know what to say — but he’s told you he’s fine with whatever you want to do. So stop asking him what he wants to do to you, WHIP, and start doing whatever it is you want to do. Take the initiative, be the change you want to see in the sack, lean in or bend over or whatever. From your sign-off, WHIP, I’m guessing you’re interested in some type of BDSM play, most likely with you in the sub role. So lay your kink cards on the table and offer to dominate him first. A lot of subs do some topping, i.e., doing unto others as they would like done unto them, and some subs become tops exclusively. But take baby steps; it’s mild before wild. You gotta nail those junior-varsity kinks before moving up to varsity-level kinks, etc. On the Lovecast, a pro dom on being a sex worker and a single mom: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.22/03.01.2017


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February 22, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 8

February 22, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 8