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EVENTS 2.10 – 7pm TALKS BACK: A SCREENING PROGRAM The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Miller Gallery and the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University FREE; Registration suggested; visit warhol.org

2.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: VALERIE JUNE Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) This performance is co-presented with Calliope: The Pittsburgh Folk Music Society. Tickets $20/$15 members & students

2.12 – 11am VINTAGE VALENTINES WORKSHOP AT ACE HOTEL Ace Hotel – Gym (East Liberty) Ace Hotel Pittsburgh is The Warhol’s official hotel sponsor. FREE

2.18 – 8pm SOUNDS SERIES: HYPERCUBE The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Free parking in The Warhol lot. Tickets: $20/$15 students; visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

3.4 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: FIDELIO TRIO The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Free parking in The Warhol lot Tickets: $20/$15 students; visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

2-17 — 5-21 Inspired by lineages of black resistance in works primarily of female subjects, Báez’s Bloodlines utilizes the history of social movements in the United States and the Caribbean to address contemporary issues with race and identity politics. Firelei Báez: Bloodlines is organized by Pérez Art Museum Miami Assistant Curator María Elena Ortiz. The Pittsburgh presentation is coordinated by Jessica Beck, The Warhol’s associate curator of art. Support for the Pittsburgh presentation is generously provided by Karen and Jim Johnson, Vivian and Bill Benter, Michele Fabrizi, and Kiya Tomlin. Firelei Báez: Bloodlines and its presentation at the Pérez Art Museum Miami was made possible by BNY Mellon with additional support from Chloé.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Image: Firelei Báez, Sans-Souci (This threshold between a dematerialized and a historicized body), 2015, collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum, purchase with funds provided by Leslie and Greg Ferrero and Rose Ellen Meyerhoff Greene

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LET S GET ’

02.01/02.08.2017 VOLUME 27 + ISSUE 05

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[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Associate Editor AL HOFF Web Producer ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Interns JOHN HAMILTON, KATEY LADIKA, AMANI NEWTON, ALONA WILLIAMS

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Remembering Karl Hendricks. PAGE 18

[ARTS]

“It was a different sense of gratification than I’d have had if I had this success at age 30.” PAGE 25

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“The British did this to us before our revolution. This idea is central to this country’s identity.” PAGE 13

News 06 Views 16 Weird 17 Music 18 Arts 25 Events 28 Taste 32

Screen 36 Sports 38 Classifieds 41 Crossword 42 Astrology 44 Savage Love 45 The Last Word 46 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2017 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“I’VE HEARD REPORTS OF CAR CRASHES AND CAR-PEDESTRIAN ACCIDENTS FOR YEARS.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Last week, President Donald Trump signed executive orders related to immigration and refugees. Read our story on how they will impact Pittsburghers and check out our blog on local protests over the weekend at www.pghcitypaper.com.

A postcard-writing event was held as part of the 10 Actions/100 Days campaign. On page 46, find out what people wrote to their Congressional representatives about, and check out more photos from the event at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Our Soundbite podcast returns this week with a look at the book Pittsburgh Drinks: A History of Cocktails, Nightlife & Bartending Tradition. Listen online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO BY MARANIE STAAB}

Paul Heckbert stands at the intersection of South Braddock Avenue and Sanders Street.

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T 8:33 P.M. on Jan. 17, Davor

Wagner was struck by two vehicles at the intersection of South Braddock Avenue and Sanders Street, in Regent Square. The man was hit by one vehicle, and the force propelled him into the path of another vehicle, where he became pinned under a tire. “It was pretty traumatic. I just heard screaming, and not normal screaming, like a blood-curdling scream,” says Christopher Powell, who provided assistance to Wagner when he was pinned under the car. “I ran over and a woman

was screaming, ‘The car’s on top of him, the car’s on top of him.’ To see the tire on his back — he was pinned down — was pretty gruesome.”

A dangerous intersection in Regent Square has residents and businessowners calling for action {BY REBECCA ADDISON} But this is far from the first pedestrian accident on this busy stretch of South

Braddock Avenue. In 2004, 33-year-old Evelyn Wei was killed while crossing at a different intersection, and in 2012, 72-year-old Sue Clapper was seriously injured while crossing at yet a third intersection. Two weeks after the Jan. 17 accident, Wagner was out of the hospital and recovering at home. (He communicated with City Paper by email but declined to comment for this story.) “It’s been a problem for many years,” says Paul Heckbert, who lives eight blocks from the intersection. “I’ve heard reports of car crashes and car-pedestrian CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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TRAFFIC SOLUTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

accidents for years.” Regent Square includes portions of the city of Pittsburgh and the boroughs of Edgewood, Swissvale and Wilkinsburg; responsibility for the Sanders Street intersection is shared by Edgewood and Swissvale. Various intersections along South Braddock Avenue have been under a microscope in years past, with municipal officials and traffic experts working together to find solutions to make the roadway safer for pedestrians. Now, concerned residents say it’s time to focus on the intersection at South Braddock and Sanders. A number of residents have called for a crosswalk there, which they believe will force drivers to slow down. It’s situated in a popular area of Regent Square’s business district — right near D’s Six Pax & Dogz — where pedestrian traffic has been increasing. “There needs to be something to let people know that pedestrians are crossing, and they have the right of way when they’re crossing,” says Powell, whose chiropractor office is located on South Braddock near Sanders. But a crosswalk might not be the solution many hope. Wei, the pedestrian killed in 2004 while crossing South Braddock Avenue, was in a crosswalk when she was hit. Officials from Edgewood and Swissvale are looking at several options. They acknowledge something must be done to make the intersection safer; a new traffic study is currently being conducted. “It’s definitely a high priority. People are becoming more aware of the importance of pedestrian safety. We have more people walking and biking,”

Crosswalk supporters oppose current plans to add signs telling pedestrians not to cross at the intersection.

says Mark Magliotti, co-director of University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure. “So I really believe Edgewood and Swissvale are doing the right thing to try to improve pedestrian safety, but it does take some time and some funding to implement. But it’s important.” Safety concerns along South Braddock Avenue have persisted for years. The road leads to Edgewood Towne Centre and connects nearby to the Parkway East, and residents say drivers there tend to travel at high speeds. “Braddock Avenue itself is a problem. Braddock gets a lot of heavy traffic,” Heckbert says. “It’s a high flow of cars, and fast-moving cars going right through a business district.”

Heckbert is a member of the committee on traffic and safety of the Regent Square Civic Association. He emphasizes that the organization has not endorsed placing a crosswalk at the Sanders Street intersection; rather, he has been advocating for the safety measure on his own. His petition for the crosswalk has received 1,026 signatures. Many have been sharing stories of nearly being hit at the intersection. “Hearing all these stories convinced me that there’s a serious issue here,” says Heckbert. “If we can get the cars down to the speed limit of 25 mph, that would help.” Heckbert blames intergovernmental bureaucracy for the delay in addressing safety concerns. “If the boroughs wanted to do some-

“IT’S DEFINITELY A HIGH PRIORITY.”

thing inexpensive that they could pay for themselves, they have the authority to put in the crosswalk themselves,” says Heckbert. “But if they use state money or federal money, the boroughs are required to get [Pennsylvania Department of Transportation] approval. PennDOT requires a traffic study.” Right now, the boroughs plan to install signs prohibiting the crossing of South Braddock Avenue at Sanders Street. But Heckbert says that since foot traffic to nearby businesses has increased, many pedestrians might not want to walk an extra block to cross at an intersection with a crosswalk or stop signal. “That seemed just impractical to us. Even if you put up such a sign, many people would ignore it and cross the street anyway,” says Heckbert. “We need cars to slow down, so when a pedestrian does want to cross, they can do that without fearing for their life.” For chiropractor Powell, the Jan. 17 car-pedestrian accident solidified the importance of improving safety at the intersection. But he says he has frequently witnessed people driving erratically at the intersection. “I sit here and see people driving like idiots,” Powell says. “Drivers don’t slow down. They don’t stop to let pedestrians go. There’s a lot of distracted driving going on. I can see out the window and see people on their cellphones, texting while they’re driving.” In 2014, Edgewood and Swissvale boroughs were part of a road-safety audit that was conducted by the Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission. It looked at South Braddock Avenue in its entirety CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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TRAFFIC SOLUTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

from the portion in the city of Pittsburgh to the Kenmawr Bridge. According to Julie Bastianini, borough manager of Edgewood, “that road-safety audit suggested some improvements that could be made to the corridor.” Then in 2015, when the SPC had funding for pedestrian and bicycling improvements, the two boroughs decided to jointly apply for a grant to carry out some of the audit’s recommendations. They were ultimately awarded $479,000. But other than installing curb cuts compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act at South Braddock and Sanders, the intersection would not see safety improvements from the grant. “That intersection was looked at as part of the road-safety audit, and it was looked at in previous traffic studies as well,” says Bastianini. “The grant proposal was to update existing crosswalks.” But thanks to the petition started by Heckbert, borough officials have since solicited a traffic study to look specifically at the feasibility of a crosswalk. The data collection for that study has been completed and is being analyzed by a consultant. A completed report is expected by the end of February. “Our previous reports have shown

us that is not a safe place to cross South Braddock Avenue. There is a safe signal cross one block away at West Hutchinson Avenue, and we encourage everyone to cross at that intersection,” says Bastianini. “However, some time had passed since we’d done a traffic study that looked at that intersection in particular. So council decided it was time to see if anything had changed at that particular intersection. I think they heard the request of the residents.” While Bastianini admits it’s important to address safety concerns at that intersection, she says she’s not confident a crosswalk is the solution. “We look to PennDOT standards for crosswalks. We don’t want to encourage people to cross somewhere where there might not be driver visibility to see them at a crosswalk. If we are encouraging you to cross somewhere, we want to make sure it is a safe place to cross,” Bastianini says. “In the past, it’s been about visibility and height distance. There is a hill there, so the concerns have been

even if you paint the street, a driver cannot see a pedestrian crossing. We rely on the experts, so that’s why we have hired traffic engineers to look and see are there are ways we can optimize safety at that intersection.” But Mark Magliotti, of The Center for Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure, says a c rosswalk there makes sense. “I don’t see why you wouldn’t put a crosswalk there. It’s an intersection,” Magliotti says. “Pedestrians have to cross and there’s no traffic signal. A crosswalk always provides some additional measure of safety for pedestrians, because it’s there mainly for the visibility of the driver so they know that’s a place where pedestrians are going to cross.” In addition to a crosswalk, Magliotti says there are other kinds of pedestrian warning devices that can be installed to improve pedestrian safety and alert drivers that pedestrians are crossing.

“PEOPLE ARE BECOMING MORE AWARE OF THE IMPORTANCE OF PEDESTRIAN SAFETY.”

These include lights that are imbedded in the pavement that flash when drivers come toward the crosswalk. A few have been installed at locations in Sewickley and Mount Lebanon. Mount Lebanon also has flashing lights that are activated by pedestrians before they cross that flash at drivers to alert them someone is about to cross in the crosswalk. But all of these measures are more costly than a crosswalk. “It all depends on the community, what they can afford or what funding sources they have for something like that,” Magliotti says. “The two communities, Edgewood and Swissvale, would have to share the cost of what something like that would be.” But increasing safety can also be a simple matter of reminding drivers of the rules of the road. “Obviously, when you have a traffic signal, that’s probably the safest situation because the traffic has to stop, and they have crossing indications and things like that,” Magliotti says. “But pedestrians always do have the right away whether there’s a traffic signal there or not.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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TAX BEAT How does Pittsburgh’s amusement tax impact small local music venues? {BY RYAN DETO} A FEW WEEKS ago, the tax man came to Howlers, a bar and small music venue in Bloomfield, asking for three years in back taxes. Those back taxes were the result of Pittsburgh’s amusement tax, which charges performers 5 percent on what is collected at the door. Mary Jo Coll is the booker at Howlers and Hambones, in Lawrenceville. She said she was familiar with the tax and doesn’t object to it, but didn’t realize it applied to small venues like hers since artist takeaways at Howlers are pretty small. Technically, performers pay the tax, but the venues collect it to pay to the city. “As long as it’s being applied across the board, we’ll deal with it,” says Coll. “It’s only hard to make the transition from a place that never takes a room fee from the bands, to telling every show they have to cough up a few bucks from a door that sometimes is barely $50. ... Some of these bands are kids traveling around sleeping in vans just trying to make enough cash to get gas to the next city.” Pittsburgh’s amusement tax is not new. It has been on the books for at least 20 years, and news reports mention it going back to at least 1994. And the tax provides substantial revenue for the city. (The 2017 budget estimates the city will bring in $18 million from the tax this year.) When country artist Luke Bryan played at Heinz Field in 2014, the amusement tax amounted to

{CP PHOTO BY MARANIE STAAB}

Steve Frankowski, owner of the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, pays the entertainment tax for performers.

$500,000 in city revenue, according to a TribLive article. However, some smaller venue owners and artists take issue with the tax. They say it cuts into their already meager earnings from club shows, and creates additional barriers to a thriving local performing-arts scene, one that’s distinct from the large touring acts. “I don’t know that it hurts the venues so much, other than it’s just one more damn thing to have to worry about,” says Coll. “But small artists, yeah, it hurts them.” One of those local artists is Miguel Sague. He plays in the Latin-music band Guaracha, as well as Miguel’s Mariachi Fiesta. Sague says that when he plays club shows, he and his bandmates sometimes

“AS LONG AS IT’S BEING APPLIED ACROSS THE BOARD, WE’LL DEAL WITH IT.”

earn as little as $60 each, even before the amusement tax. “What [the tax] does is that it leaves us, in terms of making money, in a desperate situation,” says Sague. “This tax places an additional burden on how we put food on our tables and provide for our families.” Since playing clubs offers low payout, Sague generally avoids playing them, instead opting for private events where he and his band can earn up to $100-200 per performance each. (Private events are excluded from the tax.) Mandy Kivowitz-Delfaver, a local jazz singer known by her stage name Phat Man Dee, avoids playing cover-charge club shows altogether, instead demanding to be paid up front. She describes a typical scenario from when she used to play clubs that charged a cover. “If you get 50 people in the venue, that’s like $500. You pay for the sound

man, you pay for the door person, and like $175 is gone. Then you have $325 left to split between 15 performers. Then you have to worry about the tax on top of that.” But avoiding club shows, which are open to the public, hardly increases the liveliness of the city’s music scene. Kivowitz-Delfaver is still in favor of the tax, but suggests some of that tax revenue should support small local acts. Paul Leger, of Pittsburgh’s Department of Finance, which collects the amusement tax, says the city enforces this tax fairly across all venues. The department determines who to tax by looking at ads for shows, information about performers and previous tax records of venues. To show support for artists, Steve Frankowski, owner of Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, just pays the tax himself, instead of taking it out of the performers’ take, to avoid complication and ensure artists are making as much as they can. “I know the bands aren’t going to pay it, so I have been paying it,” says Frankowski. He considers the amusement tax and other taxes at his bar, such as Allegheny County’s drink tax, “just the cost of doing business.” Frankowski says his venue does four or five shows a month, and typically brings in about $1,000 in covers; that amounts to $50 in amusement tax per month. Frankowski added that last month he discovered the city was investigating his possible underpayment of the amusement tax. As a result he’s been more careful with headcounts. He has no issue with the tax’s existence, but does worry it could be harming the growth of smaller acts. He says Bloomfield Bridge was one of the earlier venues to host Pittsburgh’s world-music fusion band Rusted Root, and that six months after the band played there, it was playing Three Rivers Stadium. “I want to support bands,” says Frankowski. “Playing venues like this is how a lot of them got started.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NO ENTRY What do Trump’s executive orders mean for Pittsburgh’s immigrants and refugees? {BY RYAN DETO} PRESIDENT Donald Trump issued three sweeping executive orders between Jan. 25 and 27 to overhaul the country’s immigration and refugee policies. Most of these target larger cities with significant immigrant populations like Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia. But some affect every corner of the country, including Pittsburgh. According to data compiled by the Pennsylvania Immigration and Citizenship Coalition (PICC), Allegheny County has about 8,000 undocumented immigrants, which is less than 1 percent of the total county population. There are even fewer refugees; the county has taken in about 4,000 between 2003 to 2015. But even with such small numbers, some actions by Trump will immediately affect Pittsburghers. JBM Legal immigration attorney Ashley Lively says Trump’s new priorities for immigration enforcement will become official when his Department of Homeland Security secretary signs a memo to immigration officers. When that occurs, undocumented immigrants in Pittsburgh can be detained if they “commit a chargeable criminal offense,” even if charges aren’t filed or immigrants aren’t convicted. Marc Reisman, of Downtown’s Gelman & Reisman Law Offices, says something as minor as “disorderly conduct” can be considered a criminal offense. Additionally, immigration officers now have the power to detain an individual, if they merely ascertain that undocumented immigrant poses “a risk to public safety or national security.” Brenda Green works with refugees and immigrants at Jewish Family & Children’s Services in Squirrel Hill. She’s concerned that Trump’s orders are attacking the right to due process. “As Americans, we should be concerned with the suspension of due process,” says Green. “The British did this to us before our revolution. This idea is central to this country’s identity.” Trump’s order will also publicize when the Allegheny County Jail doesn’t honor an Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainer request, in an effort to “better inform the public.” But Sundrop Carter of PICC says this is intended to pressure counties nation-

{CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

On Jan. 29, in Oakland’s Schenley Plaza, protesters rally against Trump’s orders on immigration and refugees

wide to heed detainer requests, even if those requests don’t include criminal warrants. Carter says more than half of the counties in Pennsylvania don’t honor detainers without warrants due to liability concerns. In 2008, Ernesto Galarza, a U.S. citizen, spent three nights in Lehigh County jail on an ICE detainer. He sued Lehigh County and the federal government, and settled for a combined $145,000. Carter realizes lawsuits are a strong factor in jails denying ICE detainer requests, but says Trump’s pen can be just as powerful: “Just as quietly as they stopped holding detainees, many will quietly start to reinforce detainers. Only those municipalities with public pressure will stand up to it.” Allegheny County Jail currently denies ICE detainer requests without warrants. However, Allegheny’s warden, Orlando Harper, says ICE officials can check inmates’ immigration status through a database, and has already had “[ICE] staff come into the facility several times a week to review inmate’s immigration status.” In terms of the jail changing its policy, Harper says, “We will review the president’s executive order with our law department to determine if changes should be made to our policies and procedures.” Trump’s orders could also negatively impact the region’s refugees. Trump has indefinitely banned all people from Syria, and has barred any entry into the U.S. for people from six other predominantly Muslim countries (Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia,

Sudan and Yemen) for 90 days. Green says the Pittsburgh area has received only about 30 Syrian refugees since 2015, but has received more than 1,000 refugees from Iraq, Somalia and Sudan combined since 2003. Green says many Iraqi refugees (about 700 call Pittsburgh home) are highly educated and were teachers, dentists, engineers and other professionals in Iraq. She says Iraqis and Syrians have assimilated very quickly to life in Pittsburgh and have taken jobs as housecleaners to provide for their children. Green says Trump’s orders are sending them a conflicting message. “They are raising their kids to be Americans, and what is happening right now is undermining that,” says Green. She adds that JFCS currently has refugees in the pipeline from Colombia, Bhutan and West Africa, who have been held up because of Trump’s order. (All refugees coming to America are on hold for four months.) Green says that for some refugees, another “four months is significant,” because some refugee camps are overcrowded, lack food and have high rates of violence. Trump’s orders could have also have repercussions for certain Pittsburgh job sectors, including academia, tech and health care. Pittsburgh resident Katrina Finn, who attended a Jan. 28 rally against Trump’s policies, works in health care and said the travel ban could hurt her industry since many doctors and technicians come from the banned countries. Additionally, Jackie Martinez, of JBM Legal, says many of Trump’s orders are likely to face litigation and could be struck down in court. For this reason, PICC’s Carter says Trump is “using the bully pulpit to increase xenophobia.”

“AS AMERICANS, WE SHOULD BE CONCERNED WITH THE SUSPENSION OF DUE PROCESS.”

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“This is less about the policy, and more about signaling that he will uphold violence and the targeting of immigrant communities,” says Carter. “The real power is not the content of the order, but really about empowering the anti-immigrant and anti-refugee community.” Carter says three anti-immigrant bills have already been introduced in Pennsylvania’s legislature. One was co-sponsored by state representatives Daryl Metcalfe (R-Cranberry) and Dom Costa (D-Stanton Heights), although Costa later asked to be removed as a sponsor. It proposes that law enforcement and employees of colleges and universities assist in immigration enforcement. But Pittsburgh is fighting back. Over the weekend, more than 300 rallied at the Pittsburgh International Airport, and more than 400 protested at Schenley Plaza against the orders. Omar Musso, a member of Pittsburgh’s Muslim community, spoke to the crowd at Schenley on Jan. 28. He said Muslims, immigrants and refugees will stand united in the face of Trump’s policies. “Mr. Trump, by signing these orders, you are not protecting the people, you are hurting us,” said Musso. “Any legislation intent on dividing us, for many, that is not American.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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BETWEEN THE ISSUES

anything else, whether as slaves or as lowwage workers at the most grueling jobs.” She adds, “With this election, many white women are experiencing, for the first time, a fraction of the burdens that trans and gender-nonconforming people, Latinx, black women, Muslims, refugees and immigrants have carried in this country for years, and it’s scaring the hell out of them. White women, we’re long overdue. Start listening. Show up. Support the voices of those least heard in the feminist movements. Criticism will help us grow.”

A quick look at the stories we’ve been covering online at www.pghcitypaper.com {COMPILED BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Homeowner fatally shot by police News Editor Rebecca Addison talked to local activists in the aftermath of a Larimer man’s death at the hands of police. On Jan. 22, 57-year-old Christopher Thompkins was shot and killed by Pittsburgh police responding to a burglary in his home. Thompkins was an African-American man, living in Larimer, a predominantly black neighborhood, and the incident has sparked the usual tensions between the black community and police. “My initial reaction was, ‘here we go again,’ because there’s been a narrative across our country that when black people call the police for help, they end up killed, and it has happened many times,” said Brandi Fisher, director of the Alliance for Police Accountability. “And sometimes or most times, it’s because of that bias that some officers have who assume the black person is the criminal.” But there has been something different about this officer-involved shooting. Usually Fisher struggles to find out information in the wake of a controversial police incident and can’t get the police to return her calls. This time, however, the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police called her. “I don’t know how many cities can really say that when there’s a police shooting, the police are reaching out to grassroots organizations that fight police brutality,” said Fisher. “It was a testament to the relationship I think we have built, and a testament to our work as well.” Officials are still sorting out the facts of the Jan. 22 death. The two officers involved,

Uber donates $10,000 to the Women’s Center and Shelter {CP PHOTO BY REBECCA ADDISON}

Uber pledged $10,000 last week to the Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh to offset transportation costs.

whose names have not been released, are on paid administrative leave, and the Allegheny County District Attorney’s office is investigating. But according to the police-bureau statement on the incident, “Officers were in the process of attempting to gain entry into the residence, a male inside of the home began firing shots in the direction of officers who were on the front porch. The officers returned fire and the 57-year-old homeowner was shot.” Twenty-three-year-old Juan Brian Jetter-Clark, believed to be the burglar, was taken into police custody and charged with criminal trespass. The investigation continues.

CP writer says feminist movement in U.S. must be intersectional While we devoted quite a bit of space in last week’s issue to coverage of women’s marches locally and in Washington, D.C., staff writer

Celine Roberts shared why she was initially hesitant to attend. Like a lot of people, Roberts, who went to Washington with her mother, was unhappy about how the march failed to connect with many women of color. “Women of color have long been left behind by the feminist movement in this country, which has historically” benefited white women,” she wrote. “Examples are easy to come by if you are willing to dip just below the shiny surface of the limited amount of feminist history most people know. The women’s suffrage movement fell far short of being a sunny, sisterly lovefest between all American women. In reality, it was extraordinarily divided by racism. So while women technically received the right to vote in 1920, African-American women were unable to freely exercise this right until the ’60s. This discrimination applied to other women of color as well, and until the ’50s, some states still barred Native Americans from the vote. While white women were fighting for the right to work outside the home, women of color had never known

Each year, the Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh spends an average of $10,000 on transportation for its clients, CP’s Rebecca Addison reported last week, and now ride-hailing company Uber has donated $10,000 to offset the cost. In turn, the shelter will request rides for its clients using the Uber ride-hailing application. “Affordable and reliable transportation is especially important for the Women’s Center’s clients,” said Shari Shapiro, senior public-affairs manager for Uber Pennsylvania. “At this moment in their life, they are under extraordinary stress, their worlds have been turned upside down, and the last thing we want them to have to worry about is how to get to the shelter, or how to get to the many appointments they need to put their lives back together.” Asked by City Paper if Uber would pay the difference if the cost of the shelter’s 2017 Uber rides exceeds the $10,000 donation, Shapiro said, “We’ll have to jump off that bridge when we come to it.” Pittsburgh City Councilor Dan Gilman said, “As Pittsburgh moves to a new economy and brings in new economic partners, we have to work together to also realize the importance of corporate and social responsibilities, and make sure we’re reaching out to the people of our communities when they need it most.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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WELL PLAYED Video game Night in the Woods tells a mysterious, inspired tale of Western Pennsylvania {BY BILLY LUDT} SCOTT BENSON and Bethany Hockenberry

were waiting in the checkout line at a Sheetz gas station in Moon Township some time ago and noticed a young woman standing in front of them. Though they hadn’t met her before, she was familiar to Benson and Hockenberry because, as they put it, she was the human version of their video game’s main character. “I wanted to be like, ‘You’re in our video game!’” Benson says. Night in the Woods is an indie video game being developed by game studio Infinite Fall. The whole studio, however, consists only of Benson, Hockenberry and indie-game veteran Alec Holowka. The game began development after a successful Kickstarter campaign in late 2013, when the team raised its required funding in about 24 hours. Benson (animator, co-writer, co-director) and Hockenberry (researcher, cowriter) are currently residents of Pittsburgh, and have lived either in Western or Central Pennsylvania for decades. Holowka works on the game’s code and musical score remotely from Winnipeg, Manitoba. His previous indie-game work includes titles like Aquaria, Towerfall Ascension and Offspring Fling. Night in the Woods, which will be released on Feb. 21, is centered on Mae Borowski, an anthropomorphic 20-year-old cat who returns to her hometown of Possum Springs after dropping out of college. Wayward and unsure of what the future holds for her, Mae explores the town and hangs around with her friends. But she soon starts to realize that the town her parents urged her to leave has more secrets than she knew. “Perfect characters or aspirational characters are kind of boring,” Benson says. “A lot of games, particularly if they have young women as the protagonist, they’re always just very, very cool or badass or whatever. Mae can’t hold her life together. She doesn’t shower throughout the entire game and that’s on purpose.

{VIDEO GAME STILL COURTESY OF INFINITE FALL}

It’s not that we just don’t depict it. Mae’s just this kind of dirtball kid from around the block who went to college and then dropped out, and is back hanging out, doing nothing.” Night in the Woods’ gameplay replaces the puzzle-solving aspect of traditional adventure games and invests in exploration, relationships and story. Players will navigate Possum Springs and the nearby woods by completing various actions, including talking to townsfolk, reconnecting with friends, shoplifting from the mall, smashing fluorescent lights behind a convenience store, walking on power lines and (hopefully) figuring out what the heck is causing all this strange stuff to happen after the sun sets. Benson’s striking visual style, developed as an animator, applies perfectly to a video-game format. The game’s point-of-view is fixed straight on, making everything appear two dimensional at first glance. Buildings, townspeople, power lines and the sky seem to exist on a single, flattened plane — like construction paper neatly cut and arranged in a frame to depict all of these objects. Once Mae begins to move, however, the visual depth of the game becomes apparent. Leaves tumble down the street, cars

pass by, residents stand and chat with one another, squirrels run along power lines, and the light shining from behind buildings shifts bringing Night in the Woods to life. For some Pennsylvania gamers, Night in the Woods could feel familiar. Possum Springs takes a lot of visual inspiration from towns like Lewistown, Altoona, Pittsburgh, Johnstown, Nanty-Glo and Bolivar; the characters are combinations of Hockenberry, Benson and the people they knew growing up — almost archetypes of small-town residents. If Possum Springs sprang up out of the ground and all the residents changed from animals to humans, it would pass as a Pennsylvanian city.

“PERFECT CHARACTERS OR ASPIRATIONAL CHARACTERS ARE KIND OF BORING.”

Night in the Woods will be released on Feb. 21 on Playstation 4, Mac, PC and Linux. For computer platforms, the game is available for purchase and pre-order on Steam and Itch.io.

“People who play it will go, ‘Oh, there’s bits of this that look really familiar,’” Benson says. “A lot of [the game world has] issues like other places; like malls that have declined and kind of emptied, and main streets where big, huge brick buildings that are mostly vacant or they only have a Subway in them.”

A post-industrial town like Possum Springs is an uncommon setting for a video game. It’s a place familiar with a down-turning economy, high unemployment rates and substance abuse, among other blights. However, it’s not a wasteland, as the gamer will come to understand. The job opportunities aren’t quite the same since the coal mines shut down, or the flood came to town, but Possum Springs is still ripe with life. “A lot of people look at our game and say it looks so desperate and sad,” Hockenberry says. “And we have people who live out here, or live where I grew up, that say this is just like their town. It’s really weird meeting or hearing from people that aren’t from here that immediately think this is some horror.” Benson continued: “We show the game, and most video games are made in San Francisco or L.A. or New York City, or maybe Boston or Toronto or something. It’s really localized around these urban centers of culture and capital. When we make a game that’s based more on where we’re from, people don’t know how to interpret it necessarily. People look at Mae and go like, ‘Wow, what a hipster.’ She bought her clothes from, like, Walmart and the shirt she’s wearing is something she made in home-ec class in high school.” She adds, “People sometimes can’t tell the difference between a hipster and a country kid with no fashion sense.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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THE REAL THREAT {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} WHEN I WAS a kid, I once knew a guy who might or might not have been a relative who spent some time in the U.S. military, and he was always quick to offer his suggestions on how to deal with foreign aggressors. In Vietnam, for example, he felt the U.S. erred in not using “them big nukes we got.” During the first Gulf War, he suggested a strategy of “laying down a couple nukes and then grabbin’ all the goddamned petrol.” And if memory serves, “a couple nukes here and there” was his solution to curing famine around the globe. This person had very little military experience, about four years, but that little bit of time, he thought, qualified him to make the “tough decisions,” especially against cultures that were different from his own. That person reminds me a lot of Steve Bannon. Bannon is the former CEO of Breitbart News, an alt-reich, I mean alt-right, online “news” source, who is now the righthand man of our commander in chief, Donald Trump. Bannon was named Trump’s chief strategist and senior counselor. For those who might not know, Breitbart gives a voice to those on the fringe right. It’s an organization of which the Anti-Defamation League once said that under Bannon’s leadership, “Breitbart has emerged as the leading source for the extreme views of a vocal minority who peddle bigotry and promote hate.” For many people, having Bannon advise the president was bad enough. But over the weekend, Trump named Bannon a member of the National Security Council. Trump then realigned the council to put Bannon on the Principals Committee, and ordered that the national director of intelligence and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff attend meetings only when “issues pertaining to their responsibilities and expertise are to be discussed.” This move isn’t sitting well with a lot of people, from intelligence experts to Democrats to Republicans, who are occasionally starting to show a backbone when Trump signs his bat-shit-crazy executive order of the day. They worry that Trump is introducing a partisan-political animal into a habitat where partisan politics has no place. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that those opposed to

this move are making a big deal out of nothing. “Steve has an extensive military background, extensive background in geopolitical affairs,” Spicer said. Many media sources, including USA Today and several bios on Bannon, show that he served seven years in the U.S. Navy. According to USA Today, citing the Military Times, Bannon “did stints as a surface warfare officer and as a special assistant to the Navy’s top admiral at the Pentagon.” That’s only three more years than the guy I knew who wanted to unleash nuclear warheads on everybody. Now, I am slightly exaggerating, of course. Bannon also has a master’s degree from Georgetown in national-security studies. And while that makes him slightly more qualified than the guy in the above example, does it really make him more qualified than the chairman of the Joint Chiefs? Spoiler alert: The answer is “Fuck no.” And as far as his other education, Bannon reminds me of the guy who wears a rumpled dress shirt under a trench coat and hangs around the library reading volumes of material on military strategy and then regales you with his thoughts every five minutes, spouting the information he’s only read from books. At his base, that’s what Bannon is. He’s a guy from the fringe right with crazy ideas on what is and what isn’t a threat to national security. CNN reports, for example, that Bannon was the key force behind the travel ban this weekend that affects seven countries with majority-Muslim populations. The order was written against the advice of the Department of Homeland Security. Add to that Breitbart’s inflammatory anti-Muslim coverage under Bannon’s leadership and it makes for a scary proposition. It really is like having your loudmouthed uncle, or the guy at the bar who tells you how to handle ISIS, running things. That’s who Steve Bannon is and, unfortunately, he’s also now on the National Security Council. It makes you wonder what other dangerous, divisive bugs he’ll be planting in Trump’s ear. Because it’s clear to me that Trump is Bannon’s Muppet, and Bannon has his hand up the president’s ass working him like Elmo to bring his closed-minded views on national security to fruition.

STEVE BANNON HAS HIS HAND UP THE PRESIDENT’S ASS WORKING HIM LIKE ELMO.

C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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News of the Weird

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RTH L IN K. N E T O R W W W. N E W S O FTH E W E IRD. CO M

{BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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Schools’ standardized tests are often criticized as harmfully rigid, and in the latest version of the Texas Education Agency’s STAAR test, poet Sara Holbrook said she flubbed the “correct” answer for “author motivation” — in two of her own poems that were on the test. Writing in The Huffington Post in January, a disheartened Holbrook lamented, “Kids’ futures and the evaluations of their teachers will be based on their ability to guess the so-called correct answer to [poorly] made-up questions.”

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Sometime in 2006, a photographer on assignment roamed a Chipotle restaurant in Denver, snapping photos of customers. Leah Caldwell was one person photographed, but says she refused to sign the photographer’s “release” — and was surprised, nevertheless, to see a photo of herself in a Chipotle promotion in 2014 and again in 2015 (and on her table in the photo were “alcoholic beverages” she denied ever ordering). In January, Caldwell said the misuse of her image is Chipotle’s fault for ignoring her non-“release,” and thus that she is entitled

organization Oxfam reported, to an astonished press, that eight men — six Americans, headed by Bill Gates — have the same total “net worth” as the 3.6 billion people who comprise the poorest half of the planet.) An organization that tracks “high net worth” investors (Spectrem Group of Lake Forest, Ill.) reported recently that, of Americans worth $25 million or more, only about two-thirds donate $10,000 or more yearly to charity. And then there is Charles Feeney, 85, of New York City, who in December made his final gift to charity ($7 million to Cornell University), completing his pledge to give away almost everything he had — $8 billion. (He left his wife and himself $2 million to live on, in their rental apartment in San Francisco.) A January New York Times profile noted that nothing is “named” for Feeney, that the gifts were mostly anonymous, and that Feeney assiduously cultivated his low profile. A “disturbingly large” (according to one report) number of smartphone apps are available devoted to calculating how much the user has “earned” per day and per year during restroom breaks answering nature’s calls while at work. Australia’s News Limited’s rough calculation estimated $1,227 for someone making $55,000 a year, but results might vary since there are so many apps: Poop Salary, ToiletPay, Log-Log, Paid 2 Poo, Pricy Poop, Poop Break and perhaps others.

to all of the profits Chipotle earned between 2006 and 2015: $2.237 billion.

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In December, Ashlynd Howell, age 6, of Little Rock, Ark., deftly mashed her sleeping mother’s thumbprint onto her phone to unlock the Amazon app and order $250 worth of Pokémon toys. Mom later noticed 13 email confirmations and asked Ashlynd if something was amiss. According to the Wall Street Journal report, Ashlynd said, “No, Mommy, I was shopping.”

+ Leading Economic Indicators:

The British think tank High Pay Centre reported in January that the average CEO among the U.K.’s top 100 companies (in the Financial Times Stock Exchange index) earns the equivalent of around $1,600 an hour — meaning that a 12-hour-a-day boss will earn, by mid-day Jan. 4, as much money as the typical worker at his firm will earn the entire year. (Around the same time, the anti-poverty

WAYNOVISION

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“Every major event in my life has been about insects,” Aaron Rodriques, 26, told The New York Times in December, home in New York City during a winter break from his doctoral research at Purdue University on the “sweet tergal secretions” of German cockroaches, and on his way to buy a supply of crickets and hornworms. (“Hornworms,” he said, have an “amazing defense” where they “eat tobacco for the nicotine, which they exhale as a gas to scare away predators.”) “When I’m feeling stressed out,” Rodriques said, he might take one out to “calm me down.” He met his first girlfriend when she was attracted to his pet giant African millipede (as long as a human forearm), but admits that “for the vast majority” of time in school, “I was alone.”

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Two years ago, News of the Weird updated previous entries by noting that China’s Ministry of Culture had cracked down on the centuries-old tradition of festively overthe-top funerals (ceremonies to assure the family that the deceased did not die “faceless”) — by arresting the song-and-dance people (including strippers and pole-dancers) peddling their services to mourners. Even though that ban has been working, nostalgic Chinese can still see great funeral pole-dancing — in Taiwan — according to a January report on the death of Chiayi county official Tung Hsiang, featuring 50 “scantily clad” entertainers. (Pole-dancing, itself, is still big in China, where the national pole-dancing team recently performed its annual outdoor show, wearing shorts and halter tops, in the country’s northernmost village, Beiji — where the temperature was minus 33 Celsius.)

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LOCAL

“KARL HAD ABSOLUTELY NO ATTITUDE AND NO PRETENSION. AND THAT WAS RARE.”

BEAT

{BY MEG FAIR}

In an abandoned house in Braddock, there is a room with incredible natural reverb. The sunlight drifts into the upstairs room that most likely once served as a bedroom, but now the paint on the doors is cracked and peeling. It feels familiar and full of life for being an empty house on a quiet road. But it’s not exactly empty — this is where the Secret House Sessions have found a home. The Secret House Sessions are a video series of stripped-down performances from musicians who fill the room with their music. Guests so far have included Petal, the Afterglows, Try the Pie, All Dogs, and Girlpool. Filming with one camera in a single take, the shoot captures an intimate moment in time, as if you’re in the room sitting on the floor watching someone perform just for you. Cassie Staub and Katie Krulock are the best friends and co-conspirators behind the sessions. Staub, who discovered the location, brings the musicians in to perform, and Krulock films and edits the footage captured at the Secret House. “Originally we were imagining more elaborate shoots with multiple cameras and different angles, but we keep coming back to wanting it simple,” explains Krulock. Most videos are filmed in the morning or afternoon, so the sunlight does all the work of a light kit. Green Dreams’ nighttime session was lit by an abundance of tea candles. The natural lighting gives each video a warm feeling, but the lack of electricity is largely non-negotiable. “But we like it that way,” Staub says. “It makes the performances as simple and intimate as possible.” Moving forward, Krulock and Staub hope to make the series more focused on local musicians, especially Pittsburgh’s large pool of talented female artists. “There are so many women in Pittsburgh who are very quiet and really good musicians,” says Krulock. “We want to showcase them. This is an allinclusive project.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Videos are available at www.secrethousesessions.com.

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Try the Pie {PHOTO COURTESY OF SECRETHOUSESESSIONS.COM}

SECRET SONGS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICO GAGLIANO}

Karl Hendricks at Lollapalooza ’93

KARL HENDRICKS {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

K

ARL HENDRICKS was only 46 years

old when he passed away on Jan. 21, after a three-year battle with oral cancer. But during his lifetime, he touched many people within the city and beyond, as a musician, record-store employee, author, teacher and family man. The Karl Hendricks Trio became one of the most talked-about bands in the city’s burgeoning indie-rock scene in the early 1990s. The leader’s wall of power chords were balanced by lyrics that combined pa-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

thos and subtle humor, touching listeners with emotion and honesty. KH3 gained recognition nationally through tours and releases on labels like the national indies Merge Records and Comedy Minus One. But in addition to making music, Hendricks spent most days selling and talking up other people’s music. He took a job at Bloomfield’s Jim’s Records in 1989 — two bus rides away from his childhood home in Port Vue — while attending the University of Pittsburgh; he essentially stayed there for

27 years. It changed to Paul’s CDs in 1993, and in 2012, Hendricks took a leap of faith and bought the business from Paul Olszewski, rechristening it Sound Cat Records. Last summer, health issues caused him to step down, though the location continues on as Juke Records. Along the way, Hendricks also received an M.F.A. in English, became an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, and began writing short stories that mined the same incisive writing skills he displayed in his songs.


It’s probably safe to say that everyone who came in contact with the understated but assured Hendricks has their own anecdotes about him. (Full disclosure: I briefly played drums in a duo with him and appeared on his second cassette, Where the Dogs Run Free.) Corey Laymen, who played bass in the Trio from 2004 through the final album, The Adult Section (2012), was a college freshman when he met Hendricks at Paul’s CDs. “He was so down-to-earth and personable,” Layman says. “He would be willing to talk to a young kid like me who wasn’t from a big city, and was still trying to find and discover music. Karl had absolutely no attitude and no pretension. And that was rare.” For the past 10 years, drummer Jake Leger played in the Trio, following in the footsteps of his brother, Noah. Hendricks, he says, “had that Pittsburgh work ethic put to music: not taking yourself overly seriously, putting your head down, having a great creative output. You usually see that in working-class culture, but I think he defined that. He was very nononsense, but also his creativity was undeniably there.” His bandmates repeatedly mention how Hendricks always knew exactly how he wanted his music to sound, coming to practice with papers mapping out song structures. Local artist and Pittsburgh City Paper contributor Wayno provided cover art for Hendricks’ releases since the guitarist was in the pre-Trio band, Sludgehammer. Even back as far as 1990, the focus was there. “We’d meet and he’d have detailed notes. Sometimes he would draw a little sketch with thumbnails and stick figures,” says Wayno. “He had a really clear vision of everything, and he trusted me to do it. It was great. He was really organized and professional even as a young guy.” Wayno’s illustrations became synonymous with the music, offering subtle humor to temper the realistic, literate tales of heartbreak. The unnamed cat (seen on this week’s CP cover illustrated by Wayno) appeared regularly. “I’m still trying to decide if the cat was a mascot, a fourth member of the trio, or a Karl surrogate,” Wayno says, adding that the artwork, “wasn’t what might be an obvious reinforcement of the lyric content. He used it for comic relief. Maybe [he was] letting listeners know, ‘Yeah, [this is how I feel], but I’m alright.’” Rico Gagliano — a one-time writer for the former InPittsburgh Newsweekly, who now co-hosts the radio show The Dinner Party Download — recalls the impact the band had on an audience at the CMJ Music Marathon in 1993. In his notes from the show, he scrawled, “Re: KH girl sobbing

Created by illustrator Wayno, this unnamed cat regularly appeared on Karl Hendricks’ album covers, and is featured on this week’s CP cover, also illustrated by Wayno.

behind me. ‘I love him but he makes me so sad.’” “It’s true,” he says on the phone from Los Angeles, “a girl was actually crying behind me.” Something else impressed Gagliano that night. “When Karl started playing [the song] ‘Baseball Cards,’ somebody in the audience that wasn’t even from New York threw baseball cards onto the stage. It was like the indie-rock version of The Beatles being pelted with jelly beans. I was just amazed by that.” Following that show, which came a few months after KH3 played the Second Stage at Pittsburgh’s Lollapalooza, Hendricks seemed destined to break out on a larger scale. But other things were factoring into the equation. He and wife Megan had a daughter, Maeve, in 1995, followed by second daughter, Nell, a few years later. Dan Allen, a close friend who organized a benefit in 2014 to raise funds for Hendricks’ medical bills, had many passionate conversations about music with Hendricks. But Hendricks’ life with his daughters affected Allen in a whole new way. “I’ve really looked at what he and Megan did as they transitioned to becoming parents, when I was transitioning to becoming a parent. It wasn’t in the front of my head ever, but in thinking about him and him being gone, that really came out very strong — watching them raise their daughters. If I had one more chance to see him, that’s what I’d tell him.” Thanks, Karl. We miss you. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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LIFE CHOICES {BY TROY MICHAEL} SUCCESS IN the music business is nothing new for Lacey Sturm. In the early 2000s, she was the frontwoman of Flyleaf, an alt-rock outfit out of Belton, Texas. After three EPs, the band was signed in 2004 by Octone Records and began touring with bands like Stain’d, Disturbed, Breaking Benjamin and Three Doors Down. The group enjoyed great success, charting three times on the Billboard Top 100 and many more times on the alternative, hard-rock and Christian charts. In particular, the band’s 2009 album Memento Mori hit No. 8 on Billboard, and No. 1 on the alternative, Christian and hard-rock charts. The band’s hard-driving rhythms were led by Sturm’s vocals, which mixed angelic melodies with chilling and even blood-curdling screams. After the band’s third release, New Horizons, however, Sturm — who was born in Florida, raised in Texas and now lives in Pittsburgh — left the band to concentrate on her marriage and motherhood. “Looking back, I know that leaving Flyleaf to figure out motherhood was one

Life Screams: Lacey Sturm

of the most difficult and best decisions I’ve ever made,” Sturm tells City Paper. “I can’t say I have any regrets, because even the difficult parts of that have taught me

so much. I’m thankful to learn and grow from the kind of pain that comes with making the right choice for my heart and my family.” But life after Flyleaf didn’t mean Sturm would stop working. Last February, she released a debut solo album, Life Screams. Her tour in support of the record is a 36-day odyssey that began in Florida and will wrap up here on Feb. 14, at Diesel, on the South Side.

LACEY STURM

WITH PALISADES, LETTERS FROM THE FIRE AND STITCHED UP HEART 7 p.m. Tue., Feb. 14. Diesel Club Lounge, 1601 E. Carson St., South Side. All ages. $18. 412-431-8800 or www.dieselpgh.com

“We are so excited to play Pittsburgh. I feel so at home,” she says. “I like the cold much better than the hot summers. I like to visit the South, but I love the cold winters. I am a fan of snow and fireplaces and cozy old-man sweaters.” Besides working on her music, Sturm also began writing, authoring two books — The Reason: How I Discovered a Life Worth Living, in 2014, and The Mystery: Finding True Love in a World of Broken Lovers. In her writing, she talks about her troubled past and how finding comfort and solace in the church saved her life. While not explicitly a Christianrock act, Sturm (now and with Flyleaf) is

deeply rooted in her faith. “When I know who I am through my faith and relationship with God, then I am such a better wife. When my marriage is strong, my kids are more secure and at peace. When I feel that freedom as a mom, I overflow with creativity and can’t hold it in. I respond to the life blooming around me with songs and words,” Sturm says of her creative outlets. “I heard this quote one time that goes, ‘Lovers out-work workers.’ Whatever I am doing, if I am operating out of love, my capacity to create and serve is supernatural.” Sturm’s solo project features her husband and guitarist, Josh Sturm, along with Tom Gascon on drums and Ben Hull on bass. Skillet’s Korey Cooper and ex-Evanescence member David Hodges also contributed to the record. With Life Screams, Sturm became the first female solo artist to top the Billboard hard-rock albums chart. The record is pure hard rock, but offers a few welcome surprises. A lot of songs, like “Soldier,” “I’m Not Laughing,” “Life Screams” and “You’re Not Alone,” will more than satisfy Sturm’s fans from the Flyleaf days. But others, like “Rot” and “Vanity,” break the mold of what should be included on a hard-rock record. While technically two tracks, the songs, starting with “Vanity,” transition into one. “Vanity” is a mostly spoken-word track where Sturm argues with a male voice (hip-hop performer Propaganda); it’s not an argument between a couple, it’s an inner struggle of a person trying to do the right thing, but being pulled back into dangerous behaviors. It bleeds directly into “Rot,” where the pounding rhythms provide the perfect canvas for Sturm’s vocals, which seem simultaneously desperate and hopeful: “So infatuated by the darkness and so surrounded by the light / Oh my God, save my soul / And still I want what’s pure and want what’s right / But I need another fix tonight / Oh my God, save my soul.” It’s almost like a mini-concept album on its own. And despite the complexity of the subject matter that Sturm deals with on Life Screams, preparing the record was a labor of love, without the labor. “Life Screams was the easiest process. It felt like hanging out with my family and doing what we love,” Sturm says. “If other people appreciate what we did on Life Screams, then that is an amazing bonus. There were no expectations for anything [beyond] just getting to be honest on the album. The amazing response we got — for just doing what we love — is such a beautiful gift to our hearts.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Steve ’N’ Seagulls

[FOLK] + FRI., FEB. 03

[HILLBILLY HEAVY METAL] + SUN., FEB. 05 Read reviews of Brothers in Farms, the latest release from Finland-based band Steve ’N’ Seagulls (pun intended), and you’ll see two words a lot: guilty pleasure. But the thing is, you don’t need to feel guilty because you love watching/hearing five Finnish hillbillies play “Thunderstruck” on a banjo, mandolin, drums, upright bass, accordion and anvil. In fact, that’s the kind of thing we as music-lovers should be proud to say we enjoy; it’s new and familiar at the same time. The band became an internet sensation in 2014 playing the aforementioned AC/DC tune. Tonight at the Rex Theater, the Keller group is likely to play that, as well as other Williams metal and hard-rock covers from bands like Metallica, Megadeth and Guns N’ Roses. Charlie Deitch 7 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., FEB. 03 Show Pittsburgh-based artists MoonSpeaker and Spacefish some love tonight at Mixtape during Unblurred, Penn Avenue’s First Friday Gallery Crawl. Moonspeaker will serenade the crowd with symphonic flute solos and folk-infused jams. The band recently received the Up and Comin’ mini-grant which helped create the Songs of Paradise EP. A good track from the project is “Naked in the Sun” — the title alone provides some great imagery, don’t you think? Joining MoonSpeaker is SpaceFish, whose darker, gothic sound complements Moonspeaker’s vibrant harmonics. Alona Williams 9 p.m. 4907 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. 412-661-1727 or www.mixtapepgh.com

NEWS

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“A BREAKTHROUGH SAGA FOR A NEW GENERATION.” — THE LA TIMES

THE ROYALE

[JAZZ] + WED., FEB. 08 DK Anderson’s style of jazz is what you might call conceptual. With his band DK Anderson’s Cypher, he makes fluid, moody music that’s somehow heavy and playful at the same time. His latest, the excellently produced 8th Window, features both a twisted version of Jimi Hendrix’s “Manic Depression” and a relatively straightforward take on the Super Mario Bros. theme. Anderson’s tenor sax does most of the talking, but the album is bolstered by a top-notch rhythm section, which includes Dave DiStefano on guitar. Catch them at James Street Gastropub tonight. Alex Gordon 8 p.m. 422 Foreland St., North Side. $5. 412-904-3335 or jamesstreetgastropub.com

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[ JAN 21 – FEB 1 2 ]

In the late 1960s, Leo Kottke released 6- and 12- String Guitar on John Fahey’s Tacoma Records, and has spent the following decades securing his place as one of the most innovative and distinctive finger-picking-style guitarists outside of the legendary Fahey himself. Kottke’s idiosyncratic tunes radiate humor and intimacy. Over the years, his penchant for blending blues, jazz and folk has allowed him to run in some perhaps-slightly-less-obvious circles: In the early 2000s, he recorded two records with Mike Gordon of Phish (but don’t hold that against him). See Kottke for yourself tonight as he joins another veteran of the jam-band world, Keller Williams, for the Shut the Folk Up and Listen Tour, at the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. Margaret Welsh 8 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $21.75-49. 412-462-3444 or www. librarymusichall.com

BY

Marco Ramirez

DIRECTED BY

Stuart Carden

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! Use code CITYCITY to save $5 on single tickets 412.431.CITY (2489) | CityTheatreCompany.org | South Side +

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STAGE RIGHT PRESENTS:

SATURDAY 2/18 7:30pm

FEB. 10-12 $15 ADULT

$22

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

$12 STUDENT

MARCH 3-12

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

MARCH 18-26 Pendemer Productions Presents:

$15 ADULT $12 STUDENT & SENIOR

222 MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN IRWIN 724-367-4000 • LAMPTHEATRE.ORG

ROCK/POP

REX THEATER. Steve ‘N’ Seagulls. South Side. 412-381-6811.

THU 02

MON 06

CLUB CAFE. Flux Capacitor w/ Chillent. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. UNDERCOVER. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. G. Love & Special Sauce w/ RIPE. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Lespecial, Vibe & Direct. South Side. 412-381-6811. WALLACE’S TAP ROOM. War on the Workers: A Tribute to Anne Feeney. CD release. East Liberty. 412-665-0555.

FRI 03 CLUB CAFE. Gasoline Genes w/ Douglas & the Iron Lung. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Nightly Standard & The Buckledowns. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS. Love Dumpster, Jackals of Botswana, The Hexman & Two Wheeled Idiot Machine. Bloomfield. 412-682-0302. MR. SMALLS THEATER. As Ladders, Some Kind Of Animal, Aris Paul, Bindley Hardware Co., Northern Gold. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE ROOTS CELLAR. The Six. Shadyside. 412-361-1915. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Hearken & Soft Gondola w/ Late. Lawrenceville. 412-420-0992. THE PARK HOUSE. Avi Diamond w/ Ferdinand the Bull. EP Release Party. North Side. 412-224-2273.

CLUB CAFE. Sarah Borges & the Broken Singles w/ The Shiners. South Side. 412-431-4950.

TUE 07 CLUB CAFE. Astronoid & Moon Tooth Astronoid, Moon Tooth w/ Atlas Decay. South Side. 412-431-4950. REX THEATER. Greensky Bluegrass w/ Fruition. South Side. 412-381-6811.

WED 08 CLUB CAFE. That 1 Guy. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The GRID. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. REX THEATER. Greensky Bluegrass w/ Fruition. South Side. 412-381-6811.

DJS THU 02 BELVEDERE’S. NeoNoir Dark 80s w/ Erica Scary. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 03 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Pittsburgh All-Stars DJs Pittsburgh All Stars DJ’s. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. THE R BAR. KAR-E-O-KEE. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Nugget. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

MP 3 MONDAY CHOO JACKSON

SAT 04 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. SWITCH Band. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. MaxXouT & Those Gorgeous Bastards. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CLUB CAFE. Absolution Key w/ The Rents, The Tilt Room Ugly Blondes w/ There You Are. South Side. 412-431-4950. CRAFTHOUSE STAGE & GRILL. Totally 80s. South Hills. 412-653-2695. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Arcane Haven w/ I Set My Friends On Fire, Greywalker, Polterguts & Onyx Eye. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

SUN 05 THE R BAR. Billy The Kid & the Regulators. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

Each week, we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s is “Camo,” from Choo Jackson’s latest, Choo, Where U Goin? The album’s a beast. He’s got a full-length forthcoming, but in the meantime, stream or download “Camo” for free at FFW>>, the music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.


HEAVY ROTATION

SAT 04 BELVEDERE’S. Sean MC & Thermos. 90s night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

Stephen Schultz (baroque flute), and Andrew Appel (harpsichord). Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 412-687-1788.

These are tracks that City Paper music intern Alona Wiliams can’t stop listening to:

SAT 04 CHATHAM BAROQUE: PASSION AND RAGE IN BAROQUE FRANCE. Experience the splendor, decadence and amour of the French courts of Louis XIV and XV. Major works include the gripping cantata Médée by Louis-Nicolas Clerambault; a delicious sonata for violin by Elizabeth Claude Jacquet de la Guerre; and a rarely heard quartet for flute, violin, viol, and continuo by Louis-Gabriel Guillemain. With Pascale Beaudin (soprano), Stephen Schultz (baroque flute), and Andrew Appel (harpsichord). Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-687-1788.

FKA Twigs

“Good to Love” Fatima

TUE 07

“La Neta”

THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

WED 08

SUN 05

Jimmy Wopo, Hardo and Wiz Khalifa

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

CHATHAM BAROQUE: PASSION AND RAGE IN BAROQUE FRANCE. Experience the splendor, decadence and amour of the French courts of Louis XIV and XV. Major works include the gripping cantata Médée by Louis-Nicolas Clerambault; a delicious sonata for violin by Elizabeth Claude Jacquet de la Guerre; and a rarely heard quartet for flute, violin, viol, and continuo by Louis-Gabriel Guillemain. With Pascale Beaudin (soprano), Stephen Schultz (baroque flute), and Andrew Appel (harpsichord). Campbell Memorial Chapel, Squirrel Hill. 412-687-1788.

“Today’s a Good Day”

BLUES FRI 03

Tame Impala

CLUB CAFE. The Blue-Hots w/ Ronni Weiss. South Side. 412-431-4950.

“Love/Paranoia”

JAZZ THU 02 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

SUN 05 ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell & the Jazz Surgery. McKees Rocks. 412 - 857- 5809.

FRI 03

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane, Charlie Sanders. Fox Chapel. Ronnie Weiss & Tom Boyce. Jazz 412-967-1900. Standards, showtunes & GRILLE ON SEVENTH. blues. Lawrenceville. Tony Campbell 412-681-4318. & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. JAMES STREET HARD ROCK CAFE. www. per pa GASTROPUB & The N-Motion Band pghcitym o .c SPEAKEASY. DK feat. Wayne Barber & Anderson w/ Julz Powell, Delana Flowers, DJ Mike Arnold Stagger & Joshua Ben. the Punisher. Station Square. North Side. 412-904-3335. 412-567-2804. RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & SWEETWATER CENTER Friends. Downtown. 412-391-5227. FOR THE ARTS. The Thoth Trio feat. Ben Opie. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

MON 06

FULL LIST E N O LIN

WED 08

ACOUSTIC

SAT 04

THU 02

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Jr & Anthony Ambroso. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CIOPPINO RESTAURANT & CIGAR BAR. Lucarelli Jazz feat. Peg Wilson. Strip District. 412-281-3090. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Tony Campbell Saturday Afternoon Jazz Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Scott & Roseanna. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. MJ’S STEEL CITY. The Eclectic Acoustics. Robinson. 724-227-3051.

NEWS

FRI 03 WALNUT GRILL, BRIDGEVILLE. Eclectic Acoustics. Bridgeville. 412-564-5746.

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SUN 05 HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

OTHER MUSIC

WED 08

THU 02

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

LINDEN GROVE. Karaoke. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

FRI 03 FRIDAY FAITH CAFE. Chrisagis Brothers. Washington. 724-222-1563. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Rick Purcell & Shari Richards. North Side. 412-231-7777.

REGGAE THU 02 PIRATA. The Flow Band. Downtown. 412-323-3000.

FRI 03

RIVERS CASINO. Etta Cox Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Shrouded In Neglect, It Is Written, Ember’s Fall & Fallen Kingdom. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

CLASSICAL FRI 03 CHATHAM BAROQUE: PASSION AND RAGE IN BAROQUE FRANCE. Experience the splendor, decadence and amour of the French courts of Louis XIV and XV. Major works include the gripping cantata Médée by Louis-Nicolas Clerambault; a delicious sonata for violin by Elizabeth Claude Jacquet de la Guerre; and a rarely heard quartet for flute, violin, viol, and continuo by Louis-Gabriel Guillemain. With Pascale Beaudin (soprano),

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EVENTS

Lewis Nash

SAT 04

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

ARTS

Etienne Charles

Rufus Reid

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Alternative Souper Bowl feat. Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers, Brooke Annibale & The Buckledowns. Help tackle homelessness in our community before the Super Bowl. Please bring a non-perishable donation for HEARTH, providing shelter & support for families in SWPA. Oakland. 412-381-9131.

TASTE

Etienne Charles

with featured guests Jazzmeia Horn & Melissa Aldana

SUN 05

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February 4, 2017

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SCREEN

February 10 & 11, 2017

Rufus Reid

Tribute to Ray Brown with the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

February 25, 2017

Lewis Nash Quintet

with featured guest Roger Humphries All concerts are held at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild. For tickets, please call 412-322-0800 or visit mcgjazz.org. +

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do Feb

IN PITTSBURGH

1-7

WEDNESDAY 1

Falling In Reverse, Issues, & Motionless In White STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Dangerkids & Dead Girls Academy. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-462-3444. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 2 Lespecial & Vibe & Direct

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. Over 21 show. Free event. 8p.m.

All ages show. Tickets:ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Through Feb. 5.

Woody’s Order!

Arcane Heaven

THE STUDIO AT PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse. com. Through Feb. 19.

FRIDAY 35

Pittsburgh’s Very Own ft. As Ladders, Some Kind Of Animal & more MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4777. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Shut the Folk Up and Listen CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-462-3444. With special guests Keller Williams & Leo Kottke. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 4 MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4777. With special guests Greywalker, Polterguts & Onyx Eye. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

Etienne Charles & Creole Soul

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-421-4777. With special guest RIPE.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org.

MANCHESTER CRAFTMAN’S GUILD North Side.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest The Shiners. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 7

Astronoid / Moon Tooth CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Atlas Decay. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Absolution Key

Midori!

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-1681. All ages show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Sarah Borges and the Broken Singles

NEW HORIZON THEATER Oakland. Tickets: brownpaper tickets.com or 412-431-0773. Through Feb. 12.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests The Rents & The Tilt Room. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 6:30p.m.

Steve’n’Seagulls Stev St eve’ e’n’ n Se Seagulls

MONDAY 6

JOSH: The Black Babe Ruth

G. Love & Special Sauce

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ETIENNE CHARLES & CREOLE SOUL MANCHESTER CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD FEB 4

With special guests Jazzmeia Horn & Melissa Aldana. Tickets: mcgjazz.org or 412-322-0800. 6p.m. & 8:30p.m.

Vendor & Craft Show WASHINGTON COUNTY FAIR GROUNDS. Donations welcome. 10a.m.

SUNDAY 5

Twelfth Night: A Comedy by William Shakespeare O’REILLY THEATER Downtown. Tickets: ppt.org or 412-316-1600. Through Feb. 26.


[ART]

“THE NOVEL PRETTY QUICKLY BECOMES SOMETHING ELSE ENTIRELY.”

BIG REASONS When Jason Sauer says he’s looking for the next big thing, he means it literally. After all, his art projects have included transporting a gaudily painted car to Queens, N.Y., only to drop a two-ton safe on it. Twice. So it’s no surprise that, even after a decade on Penn Avenue, Sauer and his wife, Nina, say their lively gallery, Most Wanted Fine Art, has outgrown its current location. They’ve put the three-story brick building up for sale and plan to construct, pending city approvals, a spacious gallery and museum on an empty lot a few blocks up the hill, on Hillcrest Street near Garfield’s Healcrest Farms. The museum will house a studio/ garage so Jason Sauer can pursue his singular passion for making fine art out of demolition-derby cars, and for exhibiting similarly largescale works by him and other artists. Most Wanted will continue its mission as “a communityservice organization disguised as an art gallery” with ongoing artist-in-residence programs; a program that teaches construction skills to men recently released from prison; and education initiatives like a women-only car-diagnostics class. The Sauers, who live over their Penn Avenue space with their 5-year-old son, Rowdy, will move into a house they are renovating near the planned new gallery. Garfield’s stretch of Penn has changed significantly since Most Wanted joined the burgeoning arts district, in 2007; even after the city’s years-long street reconstruction, which drastically reduced traffic to the neighborhood, it’s got fewer vacant storefronts and a somewhat sleeker vibe. “I’m going to miss my 18 feet of Penn Avenue,” says Jason Sauer. And Penn will miss Most Wanted’s presence as one of the corridor’s more established venues, especially during the monthly Unblurred gallery crawls. “In some ways it will be a loss for the avenue,” says Rick Swartz, executive director of the Bloomfield-Garfield Corp., a communitydevelopment group for which the garrulous Sauer works part time as an events and volunteer coordinator. Local artists, hundreds of whom Most Wanted has hung, will miss the monthly shows there, as Sauer moves to a quarterly exhibition schedule at the new space. Most Wanted’s final scheduled event at 5015 Penn is the Fri., Feb. 3, Unblurred, featuring art by Joshua Hogan and Kyle Ethan Fischer. Pop-up events will continue there until the building is sold. “We’ve had a good run here,” says Jason Sauer. But while he remains dedicated to Garfield, he adds, “I’m ready for bigger stuff.”

Jason Sauer and Nina Sauer at Most Wanted Fine Art {CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAUDE HURLBERT}

Author Daniel Lowe

[BOOKS]

TELLING {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

I

N 1981, Daniel Lowe came to the University of Pittsburgh to study creative writing as a grad student; he went on to teach. But while his poetry and short stories have been widely anthologized and published in literary journals, he’d never published a book-length manuscript. Then, in 2015, Lowe earned a six-figure advance from Flatiron Books for his novel All That’s Left to Tell. The book (290 pp., $25.99) comes out Feb. 14, just months short of Lowe’s 60th birthday. All That’s Left to Tell concerns Marc Laurent, an American businessman kidnapped in Pakistan who develops an unlikely relationship with one of his captors — a woman whom he never sees because he’s blindfolded. Marc is divorced and so socially isolated that he did not attend the funeral of his own murdered daughter,

Claire; his captor is unable to extract useful ransom information. Instead, the mysterious though apparently Western woman who calls herself “Josephine” forces him to listen to her stories about the life of an imaginary adult version of Claire, one who

ALL THAT’S LEFT TO TELL BOOK-LAUNCH with Daniel Lowe 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 17. White Whale Bookstore, 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-4847 or www.whitewhalebookstore.com

survived the attack that in reality killed her. Lowe’s novel has elements of a psychological thriller and echoes of The Arabian Nights, and edges into metafiction: At one point, another of Josephine’s imaginary

characters tells to the equally chimerical Claire the story of a future Marc who was never kidnapped. Lowe, a Michigan native, lives in McCandless with his wife, the writer Erin Cawley. He’s a professor of English at the Community College of Allegheny County, where he’s taught since 1991. Lowe recently spoke with City Paper. YOU STARTED OUT AS A POET? I came to fiction-writing very late in my undergraduate years. … It’s almost hard to talk about “my writing career” as such, because with family obligations and work obligations, my writing was kind of spotty. … There was a 10-year period where I wrote almost nothing. Back when I was about 45 years old, I returned to it with some urgency. … In 10 to 12 years, I wrote a novel

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NEWS

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TELLING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

Celebrating our 25th Anniversary Season

JOSH: Written by Michael A. Jones

THE BLACK BABE RUTH Directed by Charles Dumas

The story of Negro League Baseball Player Josh Gibson, whom some say died of a broken heart. As his good friend, pitching legend Satchel Paige, tries to shed light on the business of baseball, Josh is determined to make it in the big leagues and show that he can rival the greats like Joe DiMaggio and Babe Ruth.

February 3rd - 12th EVENING PERFORMANCES: February 3, 4, 10, 11, 12 @ 7:30 PM MATINEE PERFORMANCES: February 4, 5, 11, 12 @ 3:00 PM February 6 @ 10:30 AM

THE FALK SCHOOL/UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 4060 Allequippa Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Parking across the street at V.A. TICKETS: call (412) 431-0773 or visit Dorsey’s Records on Frankstown Ave. or visit brownpapertickets.com $20 General Admission $15 Senior rates for persons 65 years and older. Group rates of 10 or more available. For more info visit newhorizontheater.org

manuscript, a collection of short stories, another novel manuscript, another collection of short stories, and then this novel, which was actually taken. WHAT WAS DIFFERENT ABOUT THIS BOOK? I actually think that part of the appeal of the novel is that it is set, at least initially, in Pakistan. That has a kind of motif of an American being kidnapped by a group that could be or probably are terrorists, or terrorist-affiliated. … But the novel pretty quickly becomes something else entirely, and there is some drama for readers in trying to find what happens with Marc, what happens with the storytelling …, what happens with his daughter, that propels the story more vigorously forward than in some of my other work. HOW DID IT FEEL WHEN THE MANUSCRIPT WAS ACCEPTED? I almost couldn’t believe it. I was astonished. … It was a different sense of gratification than I’d have had if I had this success at age 30, where I had another 20 or 30 years in front of me where I could produce novels and perhaps publish them. … It was almost a sense of relief that I was writing something that other people could [appreciate]. WHAT INSPIRED THE BOOK’S PREMISE? I actually started writing this before the rise of ISIS, so that whole thing was not part of the conception of the novel at all. … At the same time, my eldest daughter, she had gone to acting school at the University of Minnesota, so I probably was experiencing a little bit of empty-nest syndrome.

themselves, rather than having a traditional narrator. SOMEWHAT UNEXPECTEDLY, MARC’S TALKS WITH JOSEPHINE CAN SUGGEST THERAPY SESSIONS. I have [had] my share of therapy, so I understand how that works. I think what is therapeutic, or comforting at least, is [Marc] really doesn’t have the opportunity to work out his issues, but he does have the opportunity to have someone else listen to them, and then take them and put them in a form of her own.

“IT’S KIND OF WHAT CAN BE THE REDEMPTIVE POWER OF STORIES, HAVING EXPERIENCED SOME DEEP FORM OF GRIEF.”

DID YOU INTEND ANY GEOPOLITICAL RESONANCE? That’s a carrot in the early stages of the novel. I think if there’s any kind of geopolitical statement — and in the era of ISIS, I would be reticent about making it — it’s that the people we see in the novel … have all experienced a deep grief of their own. THERE’S NOT MUCH “PRESENT ACTION” IN THE BOOK; MOST OF IT IS DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE CHARACTERS OR STORIES THEY’RE TELLING. That’s a quirk of mine. It is difficult for me to get enough distance to not be aware that I am writing … and so to get some of that distance, I will often put a significant portion of the storytelling in the hands or the mouths or the minds of the characters

IN TELLING STORIES ABOUT THE IMAGINARY FUTURE OF A MURDERED YOUNG PERSON, WERE YOU CONSCIOUS OF AVOIDING SENTIMENTALITY? I knew that was a real danger. I try to avoid writing in sentimental ways all the time. In fact, Josphine challenges [Marc] on that, and says, “I’m not going to be making this sweet and easy and nice on you.” JOSEPHINE’S DAILY STORYTELLING ALSO SUGGESTS SCHEHERAZADE. It’s interesting, but I never even thought of that until my agent brought it up! And then I was like, ‘Oh, yeah!” There’s no question. YET JOSEPHINE’S PERSONAL DETAILS REMAIN MURKY. WHAT MOTIVATES HER? It’s kind of what can be the redemptive power of stories, having experienced some deep form of grief. And that the stories that one tells or imagines or creates, having experienced that grief, can ultimately be constructive, but they can also be destructive. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017


BELL CANTO

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RING CYCLE

{BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

{BY TED HOOVER} THOUGH HE’S largely forgotten now, in

the early 1900s, boxer Jack Johnson was (according to Ken Burns) “the most notorious African-American on Earth.” With The Royale, City Theatre and playwright Marco Ramirez show why. Johnson wasn’t just a boxer, he was one of the greatest boxers ever. But virulent racism meant that black fighters weren’t allowed to compete against whites for the world heavyweight title. Johnson, however, taunted the retired white champion, Jim Jeffries, into the “fight of the century.” When Johnson beat him, white anger erupted into riots in 50 cities across the country, leaving a reported 20 dead. Johnson’s story has been told in the Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Great White Hope, which made stars out of James Earl Jones and Jane Alexander. Ramirez has fictionalized the tale — Jack Johnson is now Jay Jackson – and The Royale is “suggested by” Johnson’s life rather than a retelling. Ramirez uses the events to make a passionate case for trailblazing, but is equally fervent forcing us to consider the cost. Racism isn’t just about keeping people down, but also the lethal reaction toward the whole community when one person stands up.

THE ROYALE continues through Feb. 12. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-64. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Desean Kevin Terry attacks the role of Jay with an intensity as controlled as it is ferocious; intelligence, fury, pain and a surprisingly detached bemusement surface and dive continually throughout. Tim Edward Rhoze and Andrew William Smith sharpen the play’s edges with danger and complexity as two of Jackson’s cohorts. Bernard Gilbert and Bria Walker provide a powerful reminder of the risk and pain at stake. On Brian Sidney Bembridge’s breathtaking set, director Stuart Carden creates a very theatrical event (following Ramirez’ lead), and the evening, at a brisk 75 minutes, is precise and hugely absorbing. In hoping to draw out contemporary parallels, Ramirez has perhaps lost sight of the period — not one of his characters feels as if he or she were born in the late 1800s. NEWS

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISI JAN HOOVER}

Left to right: Bernard Gilbert, Tim Edward Rhoze, Desean Kevin Terry and Andrew William Smith in The Royale, at City Theatre

And, too, he attempts far too much in the final 10 minutes, resulting in an ending which feels unfocused and forced. But those are minor concerns, and thanks to Ramirez, Carden and this cast, The Royale is an enthralling evening of theater.

shrewdly gilds the intensity by interspersing live-camera, microphone and musical effects — which does whip up the audience. It’s crass excitement, just as the wrestlers are crass showmen, projecting cliché personae such as the “good” Billy Heartland (Jared Bajoras), and the “bad” Fundamentalist (Nicola Slade). They, and Javon Johnson, as Chad Deity, are utterly convincing in their beefy roles. Thanks to consultant Shane Douglas, the wrestling scenes, complete with body slams and rope moves, are brilliantly performed, and fascinating to watch. (The play is staged in the gym of East Liberty’s Ace Hotel.) But the dialogue is shallow and hyperbolic, while the narration becomes so tedious that one viewer had to shout “louder!” to rouse an actor from the lethargy of his monologue.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PIN BALL {BY STUART SHEPPARD} THE ELABORATE Entrance of Chad Deity, presented by barebones productions, is a play that desperately wants to be a movie. Not merely because of the live and recorded video projections thrown onto screens above the stage throughout the show, but because of the way Kristoffer Diaz has written this 2009 work. In this mashup of the films Rocky and The Wrestler, Diaz uses his characters, especially Mace (Gil Perez-Abraham), to narrate events as they are unfolding. This is an effective cinematic device, but unsuited to theater, as it constantly freezes the action, literally, and kills the energy of an otherwise ebullient production. Mace, a sincere but opportunistic Puerto Rican wrestler, is the only character who is not a caricature in this comedy, which tries to send up the scam pro-wrestling industry, but is really a didactic metaphor for commercial entertainment in America. He works for unctuous promoter Everett K. Olson (Patrick Jordan) as a professional fall guy, hired to make other performers look good in staged matches. Jordan, who is also the director,

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THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME continues through Sun., Feb. 5. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $17.75-54.75. 412-456-6666 or pittsburghmusicals.com

This show is good, boisterous fun, and perhaps that’s all it’s meant to be. The audience seemed to enjoy it as only a weekend crowd allowed to drink in their seats can, laughing a bit too quickly at the white-guilt jokes and booing the bad guys. But as Mace finally says, “I should just stop tryin’ to narrate, right?” If only the playwright had listened to his character.

On the somewhat more lighthearted side, the 10 actors who play the gargoyles are an absolute delight as they offer advice to the often indecisive Quasimodo. A standout performance comes from Brady David Patsy, in the dual roles of King Louis and one of the gargoyles; he effortlessly steals scenes with his every line and slightest mannerism. The play, of course, hinges on the eponymous outcast, and actor Quinn Patrick Shannon is up to the challenge. As the heart and soul of the show, Shannon captures the pathos and longing of one of literature’s greatest characters. And wow, can he sing. However, for all the production’s strengths, many of the same criticisms leveled against the Disney cartoon can be cited here — namely, the glossing over of the novel’s more nuanced themes, as well as the insensitive treatment of Gypsies as having made a freewheeling lifestyle choice rather than as possessing a unique ethnic identity. In particular, it’s profoundly disappointing that the show did not cast more actors and actresses of color in these roles. Such serious shortcomings mar what would otherwise be a perfectly dazzling way to spend an evening.

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I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

THE ELABORATE ENTRANCE OF CHAD DEITY continues through Sun., Feb. 4. Ace Hotel, 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. $35-40. 888-718-4253 or www.barebonesproductions.com

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THESE DAYS, virtually every Disney animated feature is getting its due on the stage. This time around, it’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame, making its regional premiere at Pittsburgh Musical Theater. The production aims to blend both the Victor Hugo novel and the 1996 Disney animated feature film, but a few key scenes aside, it more closely mirrors the latter, utilizing many of the same songs and snippets of dialogue. The show features music and lyrics by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz, respectively. For PMT, Ken Gargaro and Colleen Doyno direct a talented cast against the backdrop of a beautiful cathedral set, and there isn’t a weak voice in the house. Particularly, as the chilling and pious priest Dom Claude Frollo, Allan Snyder maintains a notable degree of humanity that the analogous Disney character decisively lacks, elevating what could have been a one-note performance into something truly transcendent.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

02.02-02.09.17 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com Iris Van Herpen’s fashion makes me think of The Hunger Games, and Rachel Delphia agrees. “It’s very futuristic; there’s a sinister undertone, absolutely,” says the Carnegie Museum of Art’s curator of decorative arts and design on the eve of the new exhibition Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion. “These garments have the potential to make us imagine alternate realities and futures. There’s a lot of interesting ways to get into the ideas and concepts of these clothes.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEAN BAPTISTE MONDINO AND IRIS VAN HERPEN}

But Delphia emphasizes that the exhibit, which opens Sat., Feb. 4, is about more than clothes: “She’s interested in the relationship between technology and the body, the natural and the man-made.” One particular dress prompted the Hunger Games reference. Part of the collection titled Radiation Invasion, it’s a metallic gold sheath garnished with undulant tulle and gold-foil pleats. The wearer appears to be emanating rays, a comment on the modern world’s constant flow of transmitted data. Van Herpen, who’s Dutch, is just 32 and already on her way to becoming an industry legend. After interning with Alexander McQueen, she debuted in Paris in 2011, and was among the first to send 3-D-printed dresses down the runway. She’s dressed celebs like Beyoncé, Lady Gaga and Bjork. Last year she was featured in Anna Wintour’s Metropolitan Museum of Art gala. The theme was “Manus x Machina: Fashion in the Age of Technology.” “That was a bunch of designers across the 20th century, and Iris had a half-dozen garments in that exhibition,” Delphia says. Transforming Fashion, van Herpen’s first solo show, and its national tour, were organized by the High Museum of Art, in Atlanta. Accompanying the exhibition is an array of related events, among them a Feb. 4 drawing workshop led by Pittsburgh-based fashion designer Tereneh Mosley and architect Philip Beesley, a van Herpen collaborator. Beesley gives a separate talk earlier in the day.

{ART (DETAIL) BY JOSH MITCHEL}

^ Fri., Feb. 3: A Collision of the Second Self and Hidden in Plain Sight

thursday 02.02

BY AMANI NEWTON

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 1. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.9519.95. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

TALK Was it a Scottish physician who inspired a young Arthur Conan Doyle to create Sherlock Holmes? Michael Sims makes the case in his new book Arthur and Sherlock: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes (Bloomsbury). Sims, a Pittsburgh-area resident, is the widely praised author of such nonfiction works as Adam’s Navel and The Story of Charlotte’s Web; Arthur and Sherlock has drawn praise from no less than the singularly Holmes-centric Baker Street Journal. Tonight, his book tour takes Sims to Sewickley’s Penguin Bookshop for a talk about the writing process titled “Making a Movie in Your Head.” Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. 417 Beaver St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-3838 or www.penguinbookshop.com

STAGE Actress and Pittsburgh native Ann Talman was conceived after her 8-yearold brother, Woody, non-verbal and living with cerebral palsy, pointed at his parent’s mid-sections and ordered them to make him a sibling. Talman wrote her whimsical origins, and other tales from her life, into her new onewoman play Woody’s Order!. The world-premiere play, produced by Point Park University’s REP Professional Theatre Company, gets its first performance tonight,

in the Pittsburgh Playhouse’s Studio Theatre. An American Sign Language performance will be held Feb. 18 at 2 p.m. Amani Newton 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 19. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-29. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

friday 02.03 ART For the first time, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust runs twin exhibitions by a single artist in the 707 Penn and 709 Penn galleries. Both A Collision of the Second Self and Hidden in Plain Sight explore the disunion of the artist’s interior and exterior personas. Though the works are in part autobiographical, Pittsburgh-based Josh Mitchel addresses tensions that are universal and ubiquitous. His photo-realistic figurative paintings explore the psychological conflict of the ego and the id, coming together on canvasses like the visual version of literature’s magical realism. The shows open tonight. AN Opening reception: 5:30-10 p.m. Exhibits continue through April 9. 707 and 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412- 325-7017or www.trustarts.org ^ Thu., Feb. 2: Michael Sims {PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA SLOAN PATTERSON}


{ART BY ASHRAF HANNA}

^ Fri., Feb. 3: Unblurred

ART At the latest Unblurred, the big news on Penn Avenue’s arts corridor is the planned pending move of 10-year mainstay Most Wanted Fine Art to a new building up the hill (see page 25). And indeed, this might be your last chance to catch MWFA on the gallery crawl in its current location, as it showcases works by Joshua Hogan and Kyle Ethan Fischer. But there’s plenty more to see at some 20 venues. Pittsburgh Glass Center, for instance, opens Emerge/Evolve 2016, a showcase for “rising and evolving talents in kiln-glass” organized by Portland, Ore.-based Bullseye Glass Company. Bunker Projects debuts Colorbound, a multi-media exhibit by Zhiwan Cheung. And the Irma Freeman Center holds a closing reception for Dreamworlds, with work depicting oneiric realms by Jen Cooney and Teresa Martuccio. BO Unblurred: 6-10 p.m. 4100-5400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield. Free. www.pennavenue.org

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Nearly 200 photographers from 16 countries applied for Silver Eye Center’s International Award and Keystone Award (the latter for Pennsylvania-based artists). Tonight, the winners’ shows open at Pittsburgh Filmmakers Galleries (Silver Eye’s exhibition {PHOTO COURTESY OF NANCI GOLDBERG} ^ Sat., Aug. 20: Steel City Mods vs. Rockers space while its new headquarters is completed). Michigan-based Kris Sanford’s Through the Lens of Desire repurposes vintage family snapshots to create “an imaginary queer past.” And Pittsburgh-based Francis Crisafio offers HOLDUP in the HOOD, {ART BY FRANCIS CRISAFIO} his series documenting a ^ Fri., Feb. 3: Silver Eye Center long-running after-school arts program in which kids in the Manchester neighborhood created self-portraits using recycled photos and images from current magazines. Tonight’s opening reception for Fellowship 17: Kris Sanford & Francis Crisafio begins with a talk by the artists. BO 7-9 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. www.silvereyecenter.org

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^ Fri., Feb. 3: Josh: The Black Babe Ruth

MUSIC Violin superstar Midori returns to Heinz Hall for the first time since 2004 to perform with the Pittsburgh Symphony y Orchestra tonight and Sunday. The Japanese virtuoso, a United Nations Messenger of Peace, made her debut with the New York Philharmonic at age 11. This weekend she’ll dazzle the audience with Mendelssohn’s ohn’s Violin Concerto in E Minor. A pre-concert talk, open to all ticketholders and led by Andrés Franco, will occur on stage one hour before each concert. AN 8 p.m. Also 2:30 p.m. Sun., Feb 5. 600 Penn Ave.,, Downtown. $20-94. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org

DANCE For several years in the 1990s, Nick Daniels’ DANA A Movement Ensemble was a notable presence on n local stages. Now Daniels is bringing DANA out of retirement, irement, and its first steps include Take My Hand … I Am Here, e a work in progress about the love and loss of one’s e’s parents that’s performed tonight as part of the Kelly-Strayhorn ayhorn Theater’s KST Presents series. Choreographer Daniels niels and composer Tom Luketich mined inspirations including ncluding Butoh and contemporary dance. The show’s at the he Alloy Studios. BO 8 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. ship. Admission is pay-what-makes-you-happy. 412-363-3000 63-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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Perhaps Denzel Washington’s film version of Fences nces whetted your appetite for Josh: The Black Babe Ruth. Fences is August Wilson’s play about a fictional retired tired Negro Leagues baseball slugger whom racism barred from m the majors; Michael A. Jones’ 2008 work portrays Josh Gibson, the legendary real-life Negro Leagues catcher who belted tape-measure asure homers but died of a stroke, at age 35 — 70 years ago, o, and just months before baseball’s color line was broken. Gibson grew up partly in Pittsburgh and played for the Homestead Grays ys and Pittsburgh Crawfords; in Josh, Gibson and his friend, famed med pitcher Satchel Paige, sort out life and baseball. Jones, an actor and writer now based in New York, also grew up here. This PittsburghghFri., Feb. 3: Midori >


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Multiple Choice: Underground Hip Hop, at the August Wilson Center, Downtown CRITIC: Charlie Okonkwo, 29, an electronics technician from Penn Hills WHEN: Sun.,

[DAILY RUNDOWN]

Jan. 29

The whole night was very energetic, very high-energy, while very spontaneous at the same time. My favorite part was getting invited on stage to beatbox. I’ve never beatboxed for anyone before, especially not for anyone famous. I just do it at home when I’m bored. I came down as part of the Get Down Gang. I started dancing with them in 2006-2007. That’s when we formed. We’ve done a lot of performances over the last few years. We’ve gotten to perform with a lot of old-school legends; we opened for KRS-One and Rakim. The [Multiple Choice] coordinator Randal [Miller] invited us here. I was actually very late getting down here. They texted me and they told me a friend from Ohio was coming down. He was wondering when I was coming. I was like, “Yeah, I’ll be there. What time is everybody heading down there?” They were like, “We’re already here!” B Y AMANI NE WTO N

premiere production, staged at the University of Pittsburgh’s Falk School, continues New Horizon Theater’s 25th-anniversary season. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Feb. 12. 4060 Allequippa St., Oakland. $15-20. www.newhorizontheater.org

saturday 02.04 WORDS Each year, the African-American Read-In promotes literacy and diversity in literature with events around the country. Pittsburgh’s 28th annual read-in, presented by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and the United Black Book Clubs of Pittsburgh, takes place today at the Homewood branch. Pittsburgh Black Media Federation hosts volunteers who read aloud short passages from favorite works by African-American, Caribbean or African authors. Audience members can register at eventbrite.com; readers register in person today on a first-come, firstserved basis. BO 1-4 p.m. 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. 412-731-3080 or www.carnegielibrary.org

A newsletter you’ll actually want to read.

thursday 02.09 WORDS U.K.-born author Peter Ho Davies built his reputation on works like his 2007 novel The Welsh Girl, and story collections like The Ugliest House in the World and Equal Love. Now he’s getting raves for his second novel, The Fortunes (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), composed of four linked stories centered on real historical figures in Chinese America, including Hollywood’s ^ Thu., Feb. 9: Peter Ho Davies first Chinese movie star and a hate-crime victim whose death mobilizes Asian Americans. Davies, who’s currently teaching at the University of Michigan, visits Alphabet City tonight for a free reading from The Fortunes, courtesy of City of Asylum’s International Fiction Series. BO 8 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. RSVP at www.alphabetcity.org.

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THE MEATBALL HOAGIE WAS WELL ADORNED WITH MARINARA AND MELTED PROVOLONE

JUICE BOX {BY ALEX GORDON} Pittsburgh food is not known for being particularly healthy. A “Pittsburgh” version of a dish usually means adding French fries, meat or lots of shredded cheese. Reed & Co., the bright blue juice bar which recently opened in Lawrenceville, is aiming to change that. At least a little. Its New Pittsburgh Salad — the “classic” one is known for its steak or chicken, French fries and ranch dressing — gets a makeover with avocado-oil potato chips, nutritional yeast and vegan ranch dressing. Even Reed & Co.’s sweeter fare — like chocolate-avocado pudding or sweet raw oatmeal — opt for fresher, less caloric ingredients. Owner Reed Putlitz worked for years as a fashion designer in New York City, and noticed his daily dependence on three spots: a juice bar, a cafe and a bodega. Thus, he was inspired to open Reed & Co., which attempts to combine the healthiest fare of all three, in a casual grab-and-go fashion. The cold-pressed juices come in four flavors: red, green, orange and white. The red and orange are pleasantly sweet, while the green (made with a bevy of veggies) has more of an earthy vibe. The white — what Putlitz calls a “healthy milkshake” — is made with cashews, dates and vanilla. In addition to juice, salad and snacks, Reed & Co. carries Commonplace Coffee, Gryphon’s tea and baked goods from Gluten Free Goat. A sandwich menu is planned, and other expansions are in the works, but for now, Putlitz is focused on settling into the daily rhythm of running his three-in-one business.

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Italian eggrolls: Italian meats and cheeses, served with marinara

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4113 Butler St., Lawrenceville. www.reedand.company

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It’s that time of year when more exotic oranges turn up in the grocery. Navel oranges are a fine fruit, butt try out some of these varieties: cara cara, Valencia, Seville (their bitterness is preferred for marmalade), mandarins, murcotts, or even the hybrid tangelo, that marries a tangerine with a grapefruit, and looks like an orange.

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{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

G

OODFELLAS, A restaurant and

tavern in Swissvale, is a modern throwback. Though it opened only last year, its nondescript, singlestory building, spacious suburban parking lot and sprawling interior, with bar, dining room and anachronistic smoking room — not to mention its mobsterinspired name — took us back to the 1970s. Not that the ’70s had a lock on organized crime, but something about the first two Godfather movies being made in that era has forged a link in our cultural memories, which Goodfellas plays up with a wall-size mural of Hollywood-style mafiosos. The mafia association also suggests Italian food and a dark, vaguely dangerous-though-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

decorous atmosphere. Freshly painted with a proverb about family and love on another wall, Goodfellas’ decor appeared inhospitable to vice; even the brightly lit bar looked squeaky-clean.

GOODFELLAS 1915 McCague St., Swissvale. 412-351-6551 HOURS: Daily 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, and salads $4-12; sandwiches, burgers and entrees $9-15 LIQUOR: Full bar

The menu has plenty of traditional pub grub and Italian-American food, which, in Pittsburgh, are categories already heavily fused: burgers, fried finger foods and pieor-

gies don’t come from Italy, but they’re perfectly at home on a menu with wedding soup, Italian hoagie and, of course, pizza, which is so assimilated it’s hardly even Italian anymore. Goodfellas also offers a handful of decidedly health-conscious, post-Little Italy updates, such as a quinoa veggie burger, as well as pasta and parm (as in chicken or eggplant) entrees that push the menu toward the restaurant more than the tavern experience. Fresh-cut chips struck us as a good place to start: updated, fundamental tavern fare, yet harder to get right than their simplicity implies. Goodfellas’ were excellent, falling just a couple not-quitecrisp chips short of perfection. We tried


them with the GoldFella sauce, a take on honey mustard with cider-vinegar undertones that really set it apart from more typical, overly sweet preparations. Beans and greens was made with spinach in place of the traditional escarole, but this cooked up mushy instead of tender, and there weren’t enough beans to provide the creamy texture that distinguishes the best versions of this dish. For seasoning, this one seemed to rely mainly on salt. We loved the idea and execution of the antipasto roll, like a pepperoni roll but filled to bursting with ham, salami, onions, banana peppers and olives. The pale gold crust could have used a bit more substance and browning, but the only real shortcoming was the olives. Canned black slices didn’t add much flavor, but somehow there were still too many of them. The accompanying cup of marinara was a saving grace, with big chunks of tomato and just a hint of sweetness to balance all those peppers and salty meat. A slightly tweaked version of this would be a huge success, and though it is on the appetizer menu, it is big enough for a meal. If the antipasto roll was a touch underbaked, Goodfellas’ pizza crust was as pale as a February suntan. This could be forgiven had the dough been hearty enough, but it lacked any of the characteristics of a great pizza crust: little chew, no crustiness, no yeasty depth, no olive-oil richness. Beyond that, the sauce was bit scant, the cheese and toppings unremarkable. Goodfellas’ burger, served on a nice bun with a bit of chew, was extraordinarily juicy, not only in the sense of running juices, but in that the meat itself was plump and pleasing. But it was bland: If there was salt, we couldn’t detect it. Especially on a thick patty like this, at the table is too late for seasoning. Fries on the side looked great, a russet brown, but they leaned toward too soft and not crisp enough. The meatball hoagie was well adorned with marinara and melted provolone, but here the meat was far too salty. This was a shame, because the texture was nicely balanced between tender and meaty, and the first bite revealed pleasing herbal and cheese elements. But there was no denying the sodium building with each subsequent bite. A pasta special — cheese tortellini with spinach in creamy alfredo sauce — sounded great but wasn’t. An excess of bland sauce broke up on the plate, leaving an oily slick on the bottom while the grainy-textured cream pooled atop and amid the tortellini. At its best, Goodfellas delivers well-prepared contemporary tavern fare that could pass at a more ambitious gastropub. It just wasn’t at its best quite often enough. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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OAXACAN CUISINE

[PERSONAL CHEF]

SPICY MEXICAN SOUP

Friday, February 3

FRIDAYS-SUNDAY 4-9PM • CHICKEN/ BEEF BULGOGI • • PORK, BEEF SHORT RIB • • SCALLOPS, SHRIMP •

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{BY REBECCA LABEL, LAWRENCEVILLE} This is my favorite soup to make. It’s so easy, spicy, filling and delicious! It started as a chicken tortilla soup, but turned into a spicy, thick vegetable soup that I make year round. The golden hominy really makes it. Golden hominy is like a starchy ball made from whole corn kernels. This small addition turns it from a traditional vegetable soup and into an impressive side or main dish, good for family meals as well as a standout potluck dish. Another advantage: This is a one-pot soup. In the summer, it pairs well with a salad, and you can use extra cilantro for a matching dressing. In the winter, I like to pair it with cheesy quesadillas or baked nachos, which are always a hit. Also, it freezes really well for up to two months. If you’ve got a small household, you can still make a whole batch to reduce food waste.

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INGREDIENTS • 1 white onion • 5-10 jalapeños (depending on how spicy you like it) • 4-6 cloves garlic • 1 28-oz. can crushed tomatoes • 2 yellow squashes, sliced • 1 12-oz. can black beans • 1 12-oz. can golden hominy • 3 cups vegetable stock • 1 fistful of cilantro, chopped • 1-3 tsp. cumin, or to taste • 1-3 tsp. coriander powder, or to taste • Garnishes, like cheese, sour cream, tortilla chips

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INSTRUCTIONS Dice the garlic, jalapeños and the onion, and add to a pot with a few teaspoons of olive oil. Sauté the vegetables es until they start to sweat, weat, then add the crushed ed tomatoes and vegetable t bl stock. t k While it cooks, drain and rinse the black beans and golden hominy. Add to the pot and allow to cook. Meanwhile, cut the squashes into slices, then add to pot along with the cumin and coriander. Stir to combine. Let simmer on low heat covered for about 20 minutes, adding more stock if you want a thinner soup. Before serving, add the chopped cilantro to the soup and save some for garnish.

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{CP PHOTO COURTESY OF HOP CULTURE}

Garrett Oliver, brewmaster at Brooklyn Brewery, pours a beer during an interview with Hop Culture.

[ON THE ROCKS]

DEEPER INTO BEER Pittsburgh-based online magazine about craft beer launches for a national audience {BY CELINE ROBERTS} THE POPULARITY of craft beer is rising more swiftly than ever, with about 5,000 breweries across the United States. Pittsburgh, the original home of the boilermaker, has embraced the trend wholeheartedly, with new breweries opening seemingly every week. Kenny Gould, editorin-chief of newly launched Pittsburghbased online magazine Hop Culture, saw a need for broader and more diverse coverage of the beer industry. Gould, a Pittsburgh native, and managing editor Travis Smith met at Gear Patrol, a men’s-lifestyle magazine in Manhattan, where both worked as writers. Gould had been writing about beer after he finished his assignments. “I thought, ‘This is fun. I get to write about something delicious,’” he says. His interest in beer developed in college, when he’d joined some friends in their “beer of the month club,” which he took over when the organizer graduated. Now, a few years and jobs and a master’s of fine arts from Chatham University later, Smith and Gould have teamed up to produce Hop Culture. After living in Pittsburgh for a year and freelancing for magazines like Craft Pittsburgh and TABLE, Gould was surprised to still be discovering breweries he hadn’t heard of. “I thought, ‘Why aren’t there more resources for [local craft beer],’ and that’s when I realized I should probably create that,” he says. “Fifty-seven percent of beer drinkers are millennials, according to the Brewer’s Association,” Gould says, “We’re a daily online lifestyle magazine for the

newest generation of drinkers.” The magazine, though based locally, has a national footprint and means to focus on what Gould calls “second wave” beer writing. This means focusing on profiles and more in-depth analysis of beer and the beer industry. “A lot of the writing we were seeing was more subjective than objective: reviews, opinions and thoughts. We’re more interested in stories,” says Gould. Hop Culture is also looking to expand the audience for beer writing. “Historically, beer has been written about for a very specific audience, typically white men,” says Gould. The publication plans to focus on inclusivity for groups that might not normally feel welcome in the craft-beer world and offer new perspectives. For instance, a post published three days after the soft launch details writer Caroline Southern’s experience with being pregnant and a beer-lover. This will be a 10-part series and ultimately Southern’s master’s thesis.

www.hopculture.com Other coverage from Hop Culture includes a daily piece on what’s happening in the craft-beer industry; beer travel guides; and “beer gear” like books and the latest tech. (Editor’s note: Hop Culture’s copy editor is On The Rocks columnist Drew Cranisky.) Gould and his team are excited to be based in Pittsburgh and to write about the local scene as well. “I wouldn’t have started this magazine in a different city,” he says. C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste both drinks and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: SAGE AND SAFFRON BOURBON

VS.

Apteka

Cure

4606 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville

DRINK: Bourbon with prune and sage INGREDIENTS: bourbon, pickled prune, sage OUR TAKE: Lift this drink to your lips, and the first aroma to note is the soft, green smell of sage. The pickled prune is emulsified, giving the cocktail a thick, jammy texture. There are underlying notes of caramel from the bourbon, and a raisiny finish.

DRINK: Crocus INGREDIENTS: bourbon, amaro, saffron, lemon twist OUR TAKE: A cleanly executed, middlesweet cocktail pulls depth from its saffron finish. The body of the drink is slightly bitter from the amaro, with caramel bourbon flavors to balance. Light citrus notes start and finish the drink.

What have you always wanted to know about Pittsburgh?

“WHY DOES PITTSBURGH HAVE AN H IN IT?” “IS A PARKING-SPOT CHAIR LEGALLY BINDING?” “WHAT IS SLIPPY?” Mike Wysocki has the answers. (well...sorta)

This week on Sound Bite: Veteran bartender Sean Enright and journalist Cody McDevitt, authors of Pittsburgh Drinks, talk about the history of local drinking. www.pghcitypaper.com

SUBMIT YOUR PITTSBURGH QUESTIONS AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Tincup American Whiskey $29/750 ml bottle “We’ve been getting a really good response with Tincup. I’m not a big whiskey drinker, but this is smooth for sipping and good for mixing, too.” — RECOMMENDED BY KELLY CAVANAGH, BARTENDER AT MATTEO’S

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Tincup American Whiskey is available at Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores.

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THERE ARE NO EASY ANSWERS, AND MANY COMPETING TRUTHS

A HOWLER {BY AL HOFF} There is no need to re-litigate the controversy that sprang up around the alleged mistreatment of a dog actor in this film. A Dog’s Purpose is lame enough that you should stay away regardless. The movie, directed by Lasse Hallström, adapts W. Bruce Cameron’s best-selling novel, which tracks the spirit of a dog across several decades, dogs, owners and experiences.

Woof: Tino and Kirby Howell-Baptiste

First up is Bailey (voiced, as all the dogs are, by Josh Gad), a retriever who grows up with a boy in the 1960s. Later, he is reincarnated as Ellie, a Chicago police dog; then Tino, a corgi; and finally, as a St. Bernard mix named Buddy. (Yup, that means there are three dog deaths here.) The four stories are a buffet of cardboard characters, plot contrivances and emotional clichés, set mostly in some idealized nostalgic small-town past (unironically called “Townsville”). It feels like a hoary 1970s Hallmark special, when feel-good TV movies were bland and studiously inoffensive. There are some very tame depictions of poverty, inner-city violence and alcoholism. (Bailey’s take on the mean-drunk father: “Dad always talked so loud when he smelled that way.”) In all, this film is an insult to the intelligence of humans, and the fact-based reality of how dogs are. From scene one, the dog(s) inexplicably struggle with the existential question of “what is my purpose?” because … humans can’t stop projecting themselves onto their pets. Dog No. 4 finally cracks it, and it’s about as illuminating as if a dog figured it out: “Be here now — that’s a dog’s purpose.” AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“There’s this video that

kills you seven days after you watch it.” F. Javier Gutierrez directs

Rings, another chapter in the saga of the videos that people shouldn’t watch but do anyway.

Locked up: Antonio, Jarad and Juan

CRIME AND TIME {BY AL HOFF}

A

MONG THE ISSUES that are currently having a moment are two seemingly incompatible ones: cracking down hard on violent crime, and various types of prison reform, including how to best deal with juvenile offenders who commit serious “adult” crimes, such as murder. Both issues get an examination in Ben Lear’s new documentary, They Call Us Monsters. The film isn’t a comprehensive look at these thorny issues; rather, Lear introduces viewers to three California teenagers and presents their stories, shedding light on how the existing legal system can impact young lives. The teens are being held in a jail within a jail, a high-security facility inside Sylmar Juvenile Hall, north of Los Angeles. We meet them, along with Gabriel Cowan, a filmmaker who has offered to teach a screenwriting class at the lock-up. On paper, the kids sound intimidating, and apt to be mired in desperation: Jarad, arrested at age 16, is facing 200 years for four attempted murders in a drive-by; Juan, also arrested at 16, is looking at a 90-tolife sentence for first-degree murder; and

Antonio, arrested at 14, is facing 90-to-life for two attempted murders. But the three are puppyish, wisecracking and eager to work on a script. Astutely, they gravitate toward “write what you know,” and use Juan’s account of a crush he once had on a girl to craft a coming-of-age tale about a 12-year-old boy from a tough neighborhood who starts sliding into trouble.

THEY CALL US MONSTERS DIRECTED BY: Ben Lear In English, and some Spanish, with subtitles 9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3; 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 4; 7 p.m. Tue., Feb. 7; and 7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 9. Hollywood

All are open to talking about their admittedly short lives. They have supportive families — Lear interviews them as well — but each has had a troubled upbringing, surrounded by street violence, drugs and fractured home lives. Despite facing life in prison, they speak hopefully of the future; one wants to be a Navy Seal. They even occasionally speak emotional truths.

There is less clarity on their reputed crimes — partly, one presumes, because each was still awaiting trial during the filming period — though they admit involvement. And the crimes are serious, very serious: Lear profiles one victim, and her story is heartbreaking. Running concurrent with the film production is proposed legislation in California to decrease juvenile sentences, in effect acknowledging that perhaps children and teenagers should not be treated as harshly as adults. Throughout the film, we see a law being debated that would institute parole hearings after 15 or 25 years into a life sentence. There are no easy answers, and many competing truths: Teens do commit terrible crimes and deserve punishment; poor families have few resources to mount legal defenses; kids don’t fully understand the legal system; some youthful offenders can be rehabilitated and released, while some cannot; and so on. These three lives presented offer unique circumstances, but Monsters is quietly provocative, illuminating some of those caught up in an imperfect system of imprisoning juveniles. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ROSEMARY’S BABY. Roman Polanski’s 1968 thriller about possible devil worship and satanic insemination is still pretty creepy. The quiet, contemplative, yet at times fevered tone of the film belies the uneasiness that builds: Are the next-door neighbors into the pentagram? Is Mia Farrow’s husband (John Cassavetes) just an arrogant actor, or has he crossed to the dark side? Could it be that Farrow is merely suffering from emotional stress only because of her difficult pregnancy? Polanski wisely keeps all such questions afloat, leaving the viewer deliciously confused and off-balance. 6:50 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1. Row House Cinema (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE COMEDIAN. There is an entire generation of people who now must associate Robert De Niro only with broad comedic performances, large and small, in a steady procession of middling movies. I’ve given up waiting for this “greatest actor” to return to meaty dramatic roles, and now just grade these funnyman roles on a sliding scale. No disrespect to De Niro: He’s a fine comic actor, but most of the films he chooses are just formulaic filler. In The Comedian, directed by Taylor Hackford, De Niro plays Jackie Burke, a washedup comedian, barely living on fumes from a decades-old sitcom. He’s bitter, profane and generally nasty to people, including: his agent (Edie Falco), his brother (Danny DeVito) and assorted colleagues (an impressive list of comic actors and standup performers). At his court-ordered job at a homeless shelter, he meets another worker, Harmony (Leslie Mann). She’s the madcap daughter of a mob guy (Harvey Keitel), and it’s not a great look either: Imagine a much-older manic pixie dream girl. The two hit it off; can a bumpy path to emotional growth and personal redemption be far off? Sadly, the script isn’t very original or funny — Burke’s standup routine is particularly forced, but since the rest of the film wasn’t very sharply written, I was unclear how intentional that was. As mentioned, there’s a raft of recognizable folks making cameos, including Charles Grodin, Hannibal Burress and Cloris Leachman, but oy — the material they get stuck with. Look, comedy is hard, and the business of it is brutal. It harbors lots of fascinatingly unhappy and screwed-up people. There’s the set-up here for something dark and exploratory, but we don’t need another witless movie that could have been secretly penned by Adam Sandler. You didn’t ask, but there is a sing-along about “making poopie.” Starts Fri., Feb. 3. AMC Loews, Manor (Al Hoff) HUNTER GATHERER. After getting out of prison, Ashley (Andre Royo, Bubbles from The Wire) scrambles to get his life — and maybe his old girlfriend — back. He befriends a young man named Jeremy (George Sample III), and the two trade help on their not-very-well-conceived schemes. Ashley is a perpetual optimistic loser despite his frequent setbacks, whereas Jeremy is simply too naïve to know better. Jeremy has his own money-making scheme, wearing magnets on his body for some sketchy medical-research project, but it’s cash he wants to raise to help out his ailing grandfather. Josh Locy’s dramedy appears to aim for a whimsical but bittersweet vibe, in which all these (very real) troubles around poverty, illiteracy and immature men are trappings for a study about an unlikely friendship. It’s a tricky tone to capture, but there are great performances from both actors. 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3; 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 5; 7 p.m. Mon., Feb. 6; and 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 8. Hollywood (AH) NERUDA. After a recent foray into American history (Jackie), Chilean director Pablo Larrain returns to his wheelhouse — the messy politics and culture of his homeland. His latest work is a fictionalized biopic depicting the travails of Pablo Neruda (Luis Gnecco) when, in 1948, the Communist politician and revered poet went on the run from the government. But first — a pissing contest (the film opens

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WEST SIDE STORY. It’s an American classic, based on the tempestuous but forever tragic tale of Romeo and Juliet. In Jerome Robbins and Robert Wise’s musical adaptation, the feuding Italian families of yore are replaced by New York City youth gangs. The enduring songs — “Somewhere,” “Jet Song,” “I Feel Pretty” — are by Stephen Sondheim and Leonard Bernstein, and the energetic cast includes Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn and Rita Moreno. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1. AMC Loews. $5

Things to Come

COOL HAND LUKE. Paul Newman gets put on a chain gang after assaulting some parking meters. No jailhouse can hold this feisty smart-ass, though — and Newman plans to bust out, in Stuart Rosenberg’s 1967 paean to homegrown anti-authoritativeness. 9:45 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1, and 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 2. Row House Cinema (AH)

CP

THE APARTMENT. In Billy Wilder’s melancholy 1960 comedy, the mild-mannered Jack Lemmon loans out his small apartment so his unctuous boss (Fred MacMurray) can enjoy assignations, including a bitter one with the sweet gal (Shirley MacLaine) whom Lemmon is fond of. 5 p.m. Thu., Feb. 2. Row House Cinema (AH)

CP

The Comedian

Neruda

in a very luxe men’s room) and a party, where the prankish Neruda, under the bemused eye of his artist wife (Mercedes Moran), cavorts with topless beauties, drag queens and assorted glitterati. But soon, the people’s poet is on the run, holing up in cramped apartments, scribbling new poems to be mailed to waiting colleagues, admirers and campesinos. In pursuit is the cartoonishly serious policeman Oscar Peluchonneau (Gael Garcia Bernal), who is consumed with his singular mission to locate Neruda. Peluchonneau trails close enough that Neruda taunts him, delivering volumes of crime fiction, the tropes of which are also incorporated by Larrain into the film’s narrative. Each man takes turns delivering voiceovers, explaining himself, and the meaning of the two lives finally intertwine in an almost-fantastical closing sequence. Larrain’s film is hardly a straightforward biography — the more you already know about Neruda and Chilean politics, the better off you will be. (Nibbling around the edges of this caperish tale is Chile’s impending political turmoil; blink and you’ll miss Augusto Pinochet’s cameo.) But it is marvelously acted and mostly entertaining, if you don’t mind a film that frequently criss-crosses lanes between historical, satirical and a bit self-consciously self-important. In Spanish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 3. Harris (AH)

a husband (also an academic); a charming house in town, another in Brittany; and two children. The only shadow is her depressive and demanding elderly mother (Edith Scob). Then, it all falls apart: Her husband leaves; the book deal dries up; the kids are grown; and so on. Beneath the rarefied French-arthouse-film patina — there are actually boozy arguments about philosophy at a goat-cheese farm — is a more universal story of a woman of a certain age who loses all the defining markers of her carefully crafted life. So what to do? Chazeaux lets her hair and guard down a bit, flirting with young men, taking in a cat, and learning to manage her newfound freedom. Things to Come is hardly action-packed, and much of it has the looser feel of disparate scenes that combine to form a whole rather than a plot-driven narrative. Huppert owns the role — and coming on the heels of Elle, this is the second of her films in so many months to find the French actress portraying a middle-aged woman taking charge of her destiny. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 3. Regent Square (AH)

A SPACE BETWEEN US. A teenage boy (Asa Butterfield), born and raised on Mars, comes to Earth, where he gets a tour of what our planet is all about from a street-smart teenage girl (Britt Robertson). Peter Chelsom directs. Starts Fri., Feb. 3 THINGS TO COME. In Mia Hansen Love’s drama, Nathalie Chazeaux (Isabelle Huppert) is well situated. She has longtime job teaching philosophy at a Paris university; a steady academic publishing gig;

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REPERTORY STRANGELOVE OR: HOW I LEARNED TO CP DR. STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB. The Cold War was never funnier than in Stanley Kubrick’s pitch-black 1964 satire. From the brilliant Peter Sellers’ three roles (including the titular doctor with a problematic artificial arm) to Sterling Hayden’s muttering about “precious bodily fluids” to Slim Pickens’ greatest ride, this mad rush to annihilation manages to be a sharply defined time capsule of early-’60s paranoia while remaining an hilarious all-purpose general indictment of military madness. 4:45 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1, and 10 p.m. Thu., Feb. 2. Row House Cinema (AH)

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10 CLOVERFIELD LANE. Dan Trachtenberg directs this compact thriller from last year about three people living in an underground bunker to stay safe from a chemical attack. Feb. 3-7 and Feb. 9. Row House Cinema DEADPOOL. Ryan Reynolds stars in 2016’s irreverent and bawdy actioner about a superhero who doesn’t take his job very seriously. Tim Miller directs. Feb. 3-9. Row House Cinema FINDING DORY. The forgetful blue tang is back, and now searching for her family at an aquarium theme park, in Andrew Stanton’s animated film from last year. Feb. 3-6 and Feb. 8-9. Row House Cinema HAIL, CAESAR! The Coen brothers put their spin on this 2016 comedic ensemble film about moviestudio goings-on in the 1950s. Feb. 3-5 and Feb. 7-8. Row House Cinema WAYNE’S WORLD. The two hosts (Mike Myers, Dana Carvey) of a public-access music show get a taste of the big time. This 1992 comedy from Penelope Spheeris returns to theaters for its 25th anniversary. Party on! Tue., Feb. 7, and Wed., Feb. 8. Check www.waynesworld25.com for participating local theaters and times. AMERICAN BEAUTY. Kevin Spacey and Annette Bening star in Sam Mendes’ 1999 melodrama about a mid-life crisis tearing up a suburban family. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 8. AMC Loews. $5 AMADEUS. Milos Forman directs this 1984 biopic that tells the story of 17th-century musical prodigy Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce), as recounted by his rival Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham), now held in an insane asylum. To be followed by a discussion with pianist and historian Tom Roberts. 7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 9. Melwood

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HERO DENIED

“IT’S REALLY AN ENTERTAINING AND A GREAT PRODUCT.”

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} When things start going haywire in this world, I start thinking that I’m the crazy one. When our president unleashes an executive order, restricting travelers from certain countries with majority-Muslim populations from entering the United States, I wonder if I’m the one who’s nuts for thinking it’s xenophobic fearmongering to placate the xenophobic, fear-mongering voters who put him in power.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WWE.COM}

Bruno Sammartino at his Hall of Fame Induction

Luckily, I’m able to quickly shake that feeling and remember that I’m on the side of righteousness. How can I be sure? Two words: Bruno Sammartino. The Italianborn Sammartino is one of Pittsburgh’s most famous residents, known for being one of the greatest professional wrestlers of all time. Sammartino was worshipped like a God in my house; my father thought that Sammartino had been touched by the hand of Zeus and given supernatural powers of strength and charisma. Sammartino has long been an important part of this city’s history; he was a big deal in wrestling when wrestling was really a big deal. But while he’ll always be a Pittsburgher, he was in fact born in Italy in 1935, four years before the start of World War II. During the war, Sammartino and his family hid out in the mountains of Italy when German soldiers invaded their village. In 1950, Sammartino was able to immigrate to the United States, and the rest was history. By now, everyone reading must know where I’m going with this and realize the only way some folks around here will listen to anything is to turn it into a sports conversation. Some will also say I’m oversimplifying the situation by comparing Italian immigrants or other European immigrants with the situation occurring now. But by closing our borders, we are closing ourselves off to opportunities. We are also preventing others from reaching a wealth of opportunities; these include people living in horrible circumstances, whose only solace is that someone is there to help them or take them in. That used to be us, and with the stroke of a pen, now we’ve shut some of those doors. Bruno Sammartino was my very first hero. It makes me sad to think that some future kid’s hero is being prevented from getting into this country because of fear.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL HETEL, NWHL}

Amanda Kessel, sister of the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Phil Kessel, comes to town for the NWHL All-Star weekend.

ICE TIME

National Women’s Hockey League All-Star Game comes to town {BY STACY KAUFFMAN}

L

AST WEEKEND, the National Hockey

League celebrated its 100th birthday as the professional hockey world descended on Los Angeles for the All-Star Game. But while it’s not as old, the National Women’s Hockey League (NWHL) is getting the chance to showcase its top talent right in our own backyard. The NWHL All-Star weekend takes place Feb. 11 and 12 at the UPMC Lemieux Sports Complex, in Cranberry Township. On Sat., Feb. 11, there will be a skills competition, followed by the game on Sunday. While the NWHL All-Star festivities won’t have all the pageantry of the NHL — the league is just two seasons old — the league’s best players will be there to

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

show off their skills. Pittsburghers might even recognize a couple of players, including the two team captains, Kelley Steadman and Amanda Kessel.

NWHL All-Star events begin at 4 p.m. Sat., Feb. 11, with the skills showdown. The puck drops for the All-Star Game at 3 p.m. Sun., Feb. 12. Tickets for each event are $30; a weekend pass to both events is $50. UPMC Lemieux Sports Complex, 8000 Cranberry Springs Drive, Cranberry Township. www.nwhl.zone/allstar

Steadman is the reigning NWHL AllStar MVP and a two-time gold medalist at the International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships with Team USA.

When she isn’t playing forward for the Buffalo Beauts, Steadman directs hockey operations at Robert Morris University. Kessel has a couple of connections to Pittsburgh, primarily her brother Phil, a key cog on the Penguins’ 2016 Stanley Cup championship team. Kessel is happy to have his sister and the NWHL in town, and says that bringing the women’s game to Pittsburgh is a nice opportunity for the sport. However, he won’t be here to watch his younger sister captain her team, as the Pens will be in Phoenix. “It always seems like I’m working,” the elder Kessel jokes when asked about the last time he saw Amanda play. And play she can. A silver medalist with Team USA at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, Kessel


won a gold medal alongside Steadman in the 2013 IIHF World Championships, and a national championship as a member of the Minnesota Golden Gophers that same year. She’s also received countless individual honors as a collegiate player. Her hockey career was in doubt after she missed two years with lingering concussion symptoms following Sochi. Fortunately, she found relief and recovery right here in Pittsburgh. Kessel was treated by UPMC’s Dr. Michael Collins, one of the country’s top experts on concussions, and was able to return to the game she loves. Now, after becoming the NWHL’s highest-paid player before this season, she will headline the All-Star Game. The New York Riveters forward can’t wait to showcase the nuances of women’s hockey for the region. “Fans will get to see how really skilled the girls are up close,” Amanda Kessel says. “Everyone playing in this game has a ton of skill. That’s what’s so great about the women’s game in general — you’re able to see that without all of the hitting. “We want people to come out and watch and see that for themselves that it’s really an entertaining and a great product.” Exposure is a challenge for the fourteam NWHL. Based in New York, Boston, Buffalo and Hartford, the league lacks backing from corresponding NHL franchises, as the WNBA did in its formative years from the NBA. Twenty years later, women are still getting paid to play basketball. Kessel isn’t sure her league will have the same longevity.

“I wish I could say that I was sure,” she says. “I think the hope is that we could be something similar to the WNBA, but we don’t have that same backing at this point.” The league is a startup, so investors don’t see the league as profitable, but it could be, says Kessel. “Once both leagues [NWHL and Canadian Women’s Hockey League] join and get support from the NHL, that’s when it can really take off,” she says. Pittsburgh is a prime market for a women’s hockey exhibition. The Penguins ardently support youth hockey for girls through the Pittsburgh Penguins Elite Amateur Hockey organization. Since 2005, the girls’ game has flourished in Western Pennsylvania, with registered participation increasing 82 percent. “Our goal has been to grow our footprint outside of our markets so the elite athletes of the NWHL can demonstrate their amazing talents before new crowds,” commissioner Dani Rylan said in a press release announcing the game in December. “Since we started the league last year, we have received a lot of support from women’s hockey fans in Pittsburgh, so taking our All-Star Game there was a natural choice and we’re thrilled about it.” Amanda Kessel says that if she knows anything about Pittsburgh, it’s that the fans sure love their teams. “I think the one thing that I learned is how passionate everyone there is about sports,” she says. “I was able to experience that, and that’s what I’ve loved about it so far.”

“FANS WILL GET TO SEE HOW REALLY SKILLED THE GIRLS ARE UP CLOSE.”

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

LOCAL PRODUCT {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} While the NWHL All-Star Game will give locals a chance to see some of the best female hockey players in the country, the opportunity to see top talent won’t disappear once the show leaves town. Robert Morris University doesn’t just have a women’s hockey team — it has a really good women’s hockey team. The Colonials are 17-3-6 and are ranked seventh in the NCAA. With just six regular-season games remaining, that will be an improvement over last year’s 17-16-5 record. There are still opportunities to see the team as the season winds down; four of the six final games are at home. The Colonials will host the Rochester Institute of Technology at 2:05 p.m. Fri., Feb. 10, and at 1:05 p.m. Sat., Feb. 11. The final two home games will take place a week later, Feb. 17 and 18, when RMU hosts Penn State. The team plays at the 84 Lumber Arena, 7600 Grand Ave., on Neville Island. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

EPIC LOSS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} MY FIRST VISIT to the Petersen Events

Center, on Jan. 24, was one for the history books. Rick Pitino’s Louisville Cardinals rolled into Oakland on a bus filled with the nation’s 12th-ranked team. The Pete was rocking and ready for a rematch with the team Pitt almost upset a couple of weeks earlier in Louisville. The Oakland Zoo, Pitt’s student section, had its paper torn up and ready for a confetti celebration with the first Pitt basket. Minutes after the confetti rained down, however, Pitt was losing 10-2. No reason to panic, though. The sharp-dressed Pitino looked like a high-priced lawyer on the Louisville sideline. Pitino is fourth on the wins list among active college basketball coaches. Incidentally, fifth on the list is Bob Huggins, known for his stylish track suits, who coaches down the road at West Virginia University. If Pitino were standing next to Huggy Bear, it would look like Pitino is the lawyer defending Huggins in a money-laundering case. The Zoo, normally pumped up in any situation, started quieting down when the score opened up to a 17-5 Louisville lead. Once the score hit 27-9, Louisville eased up on offense slightly by bringing in backup players. Guys that looked like 10th-graders came off the bench and drained every shot. The Cardinals defense was just as relentless, using a full-court press to disrupt any sense of stability the Panthers were trying to achieve on offense. Even Pitt standouts Jamel Artis and Michael Young couldn’t hit anything. Louisville would go on a 21-6 run, making it 48-15. On the bright side, Pitt hit 10 of 11 free throws in the first half. But that was no consolation as Pitt headed to the locker room trailing 51-18. It had been 48 years since Pitt was losing this bad at the half. In 1969, LSU had a 33-point lead thanks to Beaver County’s own “Pistol” Pete Maravich. The second half was a little better for the Panthers, as they added another 33 points to the scoreboard. But while Rozelle Nix, the 6’11”, 300-pound crowd favorite, got some playing time, the Cardinals never let up. Pitino was still in the face of players who were not in sync with his defense, despite

{CP FILE PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

The Pitt faithful suffered through the team’s worst loss since 1906.

the Cardinals leading by more than 40. The Cardinals had added 55 points by the time the buzzer went off to mercifully end the game with a final score of 106-51. So the moral of this story is, the first time I had the privilege of being at the Petersen Events Center, sitting right next to the court, the Panthers sustained their worst loss since 1906. That’s not just bad luck; that’s historic bad luck. In 111 years, Pitt has lost slightly more than 1,000 games and has won about 1,600. On this night, the Panthers suffered their worst loss since Teddy Roosevelt was president. Back then, I think, players still threw the ball underhanded into a peach basket and pulled a string to get it out. Live college basketball is so much fun to see. On a normal day, the Pete has all the enthusiasm, excitement and energy that is the trademark of ACC basketball. Future home games in February include Syracuse, Virginia Tech, Florida State and North Carolina. Not an easy schedule, but this is the team that upset Virginia, the ACC’s second-best team. Since lots of sports fans superstitiously equate team performance with something that they did, I promise never to sit in that particular press seat again. This kind of thing doesn’t happen every day; in fact it happens every 111 years, so don’t be discouraged from checking out Pitt basketball. Since the Panthers play in the ACC, you’ll see perhaps the most talented basketball players in the NCAA. Pitt just had one bad game, a really, really bad one; I blame myself. Man, I hate me so much!

THAT’S NOT JUST BAD LUCK; THAT’S HISTORIC BAD LUCK.

MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN. F O L L OW H I M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I

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HELP WANTED ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF DANCE

Point Park University in Pittsburgh, PA, seeks an Assistant Professor of Dance to teach at least 1 of the following forms at all technical levels: modern dance technique with emphasis on Horton and Limon techniques, and contemporary dance. Will also teach at least 1 of the following: cross-cultural dance studies, dance history, composition, improvisation, somatic practice, dance science, dance technology, &/or dance entrepreneurship. Principal duties incl. teaching, staging or choreographing works, serving on departmental & university committees, & significant advising on both academic & career goals. Must have Master’s of Fine Arts degree in Dance, Choreography, or rltd field + 2 yrs of professional dance exp. Exp. must incl.: 2 yrs of rlvnt teaching exp.; performance exp. at the national/int’l level; record of choreographic accomplishment outside of academia; & pedagogical expertise, which may incl. teacher cert at K-12 level. Please submit a letter of application, CV, statement of teaching philosophy, list of 3 professional references w/ contact info., & samples of creative work via URL to: Rubén Graciani, Chair – Department of Dance, Conservatory of Performing Arts, Point Park University, 201 Wood Street, Suite 625 LH, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 or by e-mail to: dancejobs@ pointpark.edu. If submitting your application by email, please note that the subject line MUST STATE the position for which you are applying.

Uber Technologies, Inc. has an opening in Pittsburgh, PA for the following: Software Engineer (Ref#9XUTT4) Design & implment advncd tracking algrthms for lidarbased systms. Refer to Ref#9XUTT4 & mail resume to Uber Technologies, Inc, Attn: M. Eckert, 685 Market St, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94105

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

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Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is seeking participants for a three-part research project. To participate, you must:

IN PERSON INTERVIEWS:

Familylinks is hiring direct care Teacher/ Counselors at our residential facilities in Plum, Verona, Uptown, McKeesport and Wilkinsburg. Opportunities include working with males and females between the ages of 12 and 21 years old with a mental health diagnosis. Hourly rates from $10.20 to $15.00 per hour based on location, having a degree and experience. Applicants must be 21 years old, have a valid driver’s license and access to transportation to and from the job site. A bachelor’s degree is preferred. Act 33, 34 and FBI clearances are required upon hire and applicants will be required to have a pre-employment drug screen and physical exam. If you’re looking for an opportunity at a nonprofit that helps families across western Pennsylvania, Familylinks is the place for you!

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FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 412-661-9750

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on February 14, 2017, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for the following:

• Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health, and speak fluent English • Be willing to fill out questionnaires, and to not smoke before two sessions.

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For more information, call (412) 624-8975 *Our laboratory is also seeking couples, where one or both people smoke.

Weekend appointments available. For more information, call (412) 648-2214

Pittsburgh Woolslair K-5 and Cupples Stadium Various Asphalt and Concrete Repairs General Prime

PARTICIPANTS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

Pittsburgh King PreK-8 and Pittsburgh Lincoln K-5 Various Asphalt and Concrete Projects General Prime

for a research project at Carnegie Mellon University examining physiological responses (heart rate, blood pressure) while individuals perform behavioral tasks. To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-30 yrs. old • In good health • Fluent in English You will earn $25 for your participation in this 2-hour study.

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on January 23, 2017 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

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We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us +

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ON-SITE TRANSFERS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. Lettuce variety 5. Biting menaces 9. One with highbrow tastes, probably 13. Actress Seehorn of “Better Call Saul” 14. Penthouse feature 15. “Moi?” 16. Engine’s sound 17. Lab burner 18. Order some GrubHub, say 19. Irving Berlin song about a President sharing his thoughts about a hotel? 22. Floor 23. “Ready for a hot ___?” 24. Military movement 27. Code Red and Kickstart soft drinks, for short 28. Office export, often 31. Stage name 32. Not as convincing 33. Third base 34. Fine Young Cannibals song about how a President is annoying? 37. No longer thinking about 38. Tattoos 39. Like some cereals 40. Castlevania game platform

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

41. Matt Ryan stat: Abbr. 42. Explorer Shackleton 43. Travel guide listings 44. Force felt on Earth, briefly 45. Beastie Boys song about causing self-doubt in a President? 51. ___ space 52. Hard-toignore feeling 53. New Mexican art colony/ski spot 55. Root beer treat 56. Rasputin’s ruler 57. Greased rod 58. Range that includes peaks known as the “four-thousanders” 59. Film scorer Zimmer 60. Knight’s company

DOWN 1. Reaction to the cold 2. Philly Cheese Steak Stacker restaurant 3. Loverboy 4. Winner of the first two Super Bowl MVPs 5. Thoroughfare 6. Warm, as the bench 7. “Milk” Oscar winner 8. Emergency units 9. Facebook action

10. “It was somebody else” 11. Leave off 12. Mercedes ___ 15. Payroll periods 20. Grammatically correct introduction 21. “Boyhood” actor Ethan 24. Old German 25. Martini garnish 26. Amusement park features 27. Work stations 28. Babble 29. Stuns 30. Hustler founder 32. Got worse 33. Fist-walking simian

35. Drummer Appice 36. Apple gizmo 41. Doing nothing 42. Does some journal writing 43. Stores that sell meatballs 44. Keytar cousin 45. Waiting room piece 46. Ship shape? 47. Above 48. ___ Major 49. Longish skirt 50. President who increased the U.S.’s size by a third 54. “Got me?” {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

02.01-02.08

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Who would have guessed that Aquarian Charles Darwin, the pioneering theorist of evolution, had a playful streak? Once he placed a male flower’s pollen under a glass along with an unfertilized female flower to see if anything interesting would happen. “That’s a fool’s experiment,” he confessed to a colleague. “But I love fools’ experiments. I am always making them.” Now would be an excellent time for you to consider trying some fools’ experiments of your own, Aquarius. I bet at least one of them will turn out to be both fun and productive.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In Shakespeare’s play Macbeth, three witches brew up a spell in a cauldron. Among the ingredients they throw in there is the “eye of newt.” Many modern people assume this refers to the optical organ of a salamander, but it doesn’t. It’s actually an archaic term for “mustard seed.” When I told my Piscean friend John about this, he said, “Damn! Now I know why Jessica didn’t fall in love with me.” He was making a joke about how the love spell he’d tried hadn’t worked. Let’s use this as a teaching story, Pisces. Could it be that one of your efforts failed because it lacked some of the correct ingredients? Did you perhaps have a misunderstanding about the elements you needed for a successful outcome? if so, correct your approach and try again.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Once upon a time, Calvin of the “Calvin and Hobbes” comic strip made this bold declaration: “Happiness isn’t good enough for me! I demand euphoria!” Given your current astrological

aspects, Aries, I think you have every right to invoke that battle cry yourself. From what I can tell, there’s a party underway inside your head. And I’m pretty sure it’s a healthy bash, not a decadent debacle. The bliss it stirs up will be authentic, not contrived. The release and relief it triggers won’t be trivial and transitory, but will generate at least one long-lasting breakthrough.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The coming weeks will be an excellent time to ask for favors. I think you will be exceptionally adept at seeking out people who can actually help you. Furthermore, those from whom you request help will be more receptive than usual. Finally, your timing is likely to be close to impeccable. Here’s a tip to aid your efforts: A new study suggests that people are more inclined to be agreeable to your appeals if you address their right ears rather than their left ears. (More info: tinyurl.com/intherightear)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here are your five words of power for the next

get your yoga on!

two weeks, Gemini. 1. Unscramble. Invoke this verb with regal confidence as you banish chaos and restore order. 2. Purify. Be inspired to cleanse your motivations and clarify your intentions. 3. Reach. Act as if you have a mandate to stretch out, expand and extend yourself to arrive in the right place. 4. Rollick. Chant this magic word as you activate your drive to be lively, carefree and frolicsome. 5. Blithe. Don’t take anything too personally, too seriously or too literally.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

The 17 th-century German alchemist Hennig Brand collected 1,500 gallons of urine from beerdrinkers, then cooked and re-cooked it till it achieved the “consistency of honey.” Why? He thought his experiment would eventually yield large quantities of gold. It didn’t, of course. But along the way, he accidentally produced a substance of great value: phosphorus. It was the first time anyone had created a pure form of it. So in a sense, Brand “discovered” it. Today phosphorus is widely used in fertilizers, water treatment, steel production, detergents and food processing. I bring this to your attention, my fellow Cancerian, because I suspect you will soon have a metaphorically similar experience. Your attempt to create a beneficial new asset will not generate exactly what you wanted, but will nevertheless yield a useful result.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yoga levels 1, 2 ashtanga yoga meditation

yin yoga prenatal yoga mommy & me yoga for kids

In the documentary movie Catfish, the directors, Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, present a metaphor drawn from the fishing industry. They say that Asian suppliers used to put live codfish in tanks and send them to overseas markets. It was only upon arrival that the fish would be processed into food. But there was a problem: Because the cod were so sluggish during the long trips, their meat was mushy and tasteless. The solution? Add catfish to the tanks. That energized the cod and ultimately made them more flavorful. Moral of the story, according to Joost and Schulman: Like the cod, humans need catfish-like companions to stimulate them and keep them sharp. Do you have enough influences like that in your life, Leo? Now is a good time to make sure you do.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The city of Boston allows an arts organization called Mass Poetry to stencil poems on sidewalks. The legal graffiti is done with a special paint that remains invisible until it gets wet. So if you’re a pedestrian trudging through the streets as it starts to rain, you may suddenly behold, emerging from the blank grey concrete, Langston Hughes’ poem “Still Here” or Fred Marchant’s “Pear Tree in Flower.” I foresee a metaphorically similar development in your life, Virgo: a pleasant and educational surprise arising unexpectedly out of the vacant blahs.

east liberty squirrel hill north hills

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.01/02.08.2017

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When he was in the rock band Devo, Mark Mothersbaugh took his time composing and recording new music. From 1978 to 1984, he and his collaborators averaged one album per year. But when Mothersbaugh started writing soundtracks for the weekly TV show Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, his process went into overdrive. He typically wrote an entire show’s worth of music each Wednesday and recorded it each Thursday. I suspect you have that level of creative verve right now, Libra. Use it wisely! If you’re not an artist, channel it into the area of your life that most needs to be refreshed or reinvented.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Many vintage American songs remain available today because of the pioneering musicologist John Lomax. In the first half of the 20th century, he traveled widely to track down and record obscure cowboy ballads, folk songs and traditional African-American tunes. “Home on the Range” was a prime example of his many discoveries. He learned that song, often referred to as “the anthem of the American West,” from a black saloonkeeper in Texas. I suggest we make Lomax a role model for you Scorpios during the coming weeks. It’s an excellent time to preserve and protect the parts of your past that are worth taking with you into the future.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The mountain won’t come to you. It will not acquire the supernatural power to drag itself over to where you are, bend its craggy peak down to your level, and give you a free ride as it returns to its erect position. So what will you do? Moan and wail in frustration? Retreat into a knot of helpless indignation and sadness? Please don’t. Instead, stop hoping for the mountain to do the impossible. Set off on a journey to the remote, majestic pinnacle with a fierce song in your determined heart. Pace yourself. Doggedly master the art of slow, incremental magic.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Who can run faster, a person or a horse? There’s evidence that under certain circumstances, a human can prevail. In June of every year since 1980, the Man Versus Horse Marathon has taken place in the Welsh town of Llanwrtyd Wells. The route of the race weaves 22 miles through marsh, bogs and hills. On two occasions, a human has outpaced all the horses. According to my astrological analysis, you Capricorns will have that level of animalistic power during the coming weeks. It may not take the form of foot speed, but it will be available as stamina, energy, vitality and instinctual savvy. Homework: Even if you don’t send it, write a letter to the person you admire most.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 26-year-old heterosexual European man. I have been for four years in a monogamous relationship with my girlfriend. Recently she cheated on me. When she told me what she did, I felt a very strong pain, even stronger than I expected. After a few days of pain, however, I found that the sexual attraction for my girlfriend, instead of decreasing, increased after her adventure. In particular, I am now having a cuckold fantasy. I would like that she tell me everything she did, without sparing any detail, while we have sex, or that we try to play an actual cuckold game where she has sex with someone else in front of me while I give her instructions and tell her exactly what to do. My problem is that I am not sure what her reaction would be if I ask her to play out these fantasies. She feels very guilty and witnessed my pain when she told me she cheated. I fear that talking to her about these fantasies would scare her. I also fear that, as she is feeling guilty, she would say yes, but without really wanting to do this. I also don’t want her to think I liked what she did when she cheated on me. I did not like it, but I would like to relive it in a playful way, in which I have complete control. How do you think I should approach this talk? Which reactions should I expect? How can I make sure that she is really into this if she says yes?

turn-on, FORTDA, share everything: this surprising new turn-on, your own confusion and your legit concerns (you don’t want her to agree to do it out of guilt; it’s not a license to cheat). She might freak out. She might be into it. She might freak out and then later be into it. (That’s the origin story of most cuckold couples: Husband/BF proposes it; wife/GF freaks out; weeks, months or years later, the wife/GF asks whether cuckolding is still on the table.) You can figure out the parameters later, if you decide to explore this at all, but it starts with a conversation. Good luck. English is not my mother tongue. Bear with me. I’m bisexual, age 26 — I always knew I was, but like many bi girls I ended up with guys. I had a long, serious relationship with a man when I was young and only started exploring my sexuality after I found the guts to leave him. Then I fell in love with a girl. She’s a lesbian, and after a long and hard-fought chase, I finally got her. It’s been two months, I came out to my parents (whom I live with; adults living at home is acceptable in my culture, don’t judge), and they did not exactly welcome the news. But all would seem to be going well: I love a girl, she loves me, my parents let us be. Problem is, I want cock. I want a man to grab me and have sex with me. I’ve had the chance to do it and didn’t, because I wanted to respect the exclusivity of my relationship. My girlfriend knows about my doubts, but says they are part of “questioning my non-heterosexuality.” I don’t want to leave her, because she’s my princess and my goddess, and I want to adore her for eternity. But I worry about bad judgment and impulses. Where do I go from here?

“SHE MIGHT FREAK OUT. SHE MIGHT BE INTO IT. SHE MIGHT FREAK OUT AND THEN LATER BE INTO IT.”

FEELING OBSESSED REPLICATING TREASON & DOMINATING ADULTERER

Cuckolding, like all fetishes and/or fantasies, is unique to the person and adaptable within particular relationships. But it’s erotic humiliation — of the person being cheated on — that distinguishes cuckolding from hot wifing/husbanding or swinging. The cuck’s partner, a.k.a. “the cheater,” is in control, and the cuck gets off on having his nose rubbed — sometimes literally — in the evidence of his partner’s cheating. (That’s the theory, anyway; I’ve gotten lots of letters from women — and some men — who are married to very controlling cucks.) Zooming out: Your reaction to learning you’d been cheated on — pain and shock, quickly followed by increased feelings of lust for your girlfriend — is not uncommon. It’s less common for the cheatee to eroticize the betrayal; a couple might reconnect sexually in the wake of an affair, but rarely does a couple wind up incorporating eroticized infidelity into their sexual repertoire. But in your fantasy, FORTDA, you would be calling the shots, giving instructions and telling your girlfriend what to do. That’s definitely not a cuckold fantasy, FORTDA, and it might be a revenge fantasy. But a cheating crisis presents a good opportunity for both parties to be completely honest with each other about what they want going forward. And that’s what you should do, FORTDA: Be completely honest. First, make sure your fantasy is an authentic impulse, i.e., it’s a genuine turn-on, unearthed by this revelation, not an excuse to punish your girlfriend for cheating. Make sure this isn’t a revenge fantasy. If it’s a genuine

WANTING A DICK

Those aren’t doubts, WAD. They’re desires. You know what you want: You want your girlfriend, you want cock, you want a man to grab you, and you want to continue questioning — and shaping and defining — your non-heterosexuality. The problem, WAD, isn’t that you don’t know what you want, it’s that you don’t know how to fuse all these wants into a coherent identity. (Possible answer: “bisexual, lesbo-amorous, likely non-monogamous.”) There are plenty of options you and your girlfriend can explore — together or separately. Get a fake cock and use it together. If that doesn’t slake your hunger for cock, maybe your girlfriend would be up for a threesome. If she’s not DTFAGWY (down to fuck a guy with you), discuss whether an open relationship is a possibility down the road. That said, WAD, you and the Princess Goddess you worked so hard to land have only been together two months. If you’re wrecked over your need for cock at this early stage — if you’re not able to focus on her alone at eight weeks — maybe sexual exclusivity isn’t the right choice for you. Listen to my weekly podcast, the Savage Lovecast, at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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Mary Brunner-Ferrese wrote to Sen. Chuck Schumer, Sen. Pat Toomey and Rep. Mike Doyle about health care. She is cancer-free after a year of treatment for breast cancer and is worried about pre-existing conditions.

Stacy Warnick-Hesse wrote to Sen. Bob Casey about her concern for LGBT rights. She is a married lesbian who is “very, very afraid right now.”

POSTCARDS OF HOPE

Pittsburgh residents concerned about the current administration wrote postcards to their senators and representatives at East End Brewing on Fri., Jan. 27. The event was part of the 10 Actions/100 Days campaign spurred by the Women’s Marches of Jan. 21. You can view more photos at www.pghcitypaper.com. {STORIES AND PHOTOS BY JOHN HAMILTON}

Elizabeth Garcia wrote to U.S. senators Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, of New York, her home state. She supported Gillibrand’s decision to vote no on Betsy DeVos’ confirmation for secretary of education. She wrote to Schumer to remind him to fight for reproductive rights.

Patty Sims wrote to Sen. Bob Casey, asking him to be true to his campaign values. She was mostly concerned about education, which she said is the “root of our problem.” She also wrote to Sen. Pat Toomey expressing her concerns about education.

Find addresses for your Congressional representatives at www.usa.gov/elected-officials. Send your message on any postcard, or print from the template at www.womensmarch.com/100.

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February 1, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 5

February 1, 2017 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 27 Issue 5