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EVENTS 10.25 – 4:30pm ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Registration is required; visit warhol.org. Tickets $10 (door)

11.4 – 8pm NARCISSISTER The Warhol theater Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.17 – 6pm MY PERFECT BODY: 21+ SIP AND SKETCH FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15/$12 Members; visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

11.18 – 8pm DARKMATTER: #ITGETSBITTER Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art and Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for Arts & Society and School of Art Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.19 – 7pm MY PERFECT BODY: JOHN GIORNO AND FLAMING CREATURES SCREENING Carnegie Museum of Art Theater (Oakland) Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Andy Warhol: My Perfect Body. FREE

DISCOVER ANDY’S LIFELONG FIXATION WITH BODY, BEAUTY AND SHAME. ONLY AT THE WARHOL.

Andy Warhol: my perfect body

October 21 - January 22 The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Image: Edward Wallowitch, Andy Warhol with Face in Hands, 1957–58, © Estate of Edward Wallowitch. All rights reserved. Andy Warhol: My Perfect Body is generously supported by Cadillac and UPMC Health Plan.

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SIMPLIFACT 3 #

It’s so much easier to be upfront. Starting 1/1/17, you’ll board through the front door of the bus and pay when you enter. Every time, everywhere. So, get your ConnectCard today, and get ready for all of the changes to make your ride faster, simpler and easier in 2017.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

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10.19/10.26.2016 VOLUME 26 + ISSUE 42

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Web Producer ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Interns STEPHEN CARUSO, MEGAN FAIR, IAN FLANAGAN, LUKE THOR TRAVIS

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See how your favorite local restaurants, bars, shops and people fared in our 2016 Best Of Pittsburgh Reader’s poll. PAGE 29

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representative BLAKE LEWIS Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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“At their core, most survivors just don’t want anyone else to go through this.”

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News 06 Views 14 Music 21 Arts 85 Events 90 Taste 94 Screen 98

Sports 101 Classifieds 104 Crossword 105 Free Will Astrology 107 Savage Love 108 The Last Word 110 NEWS

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“WHILE YOU’RE BEING RAPED, YOU TELL ME IF YOU KNOW WHAT A STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS IS.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Looking for refreshing discourse on topics like Donald Trump’s latest snafu? Check out our weekday talk show with Lynn Cullen. Listen live from 10-11 a.m. at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Last week we wrote about a new tailgating game called 7 Birds. Check out our video and learn the rules online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{CP PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

Every weekk we recommendd music i to listen to while you work.

PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

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I Our featured city steps photo from last week is a shot of steps leading up to Troy Hill by instagrammer @leolad1975. Tag your Pittsburgh photos with #CPReaderArt and we just may re-gram you.

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F YOU LOOK at the legislation that

Pennsylvania state Rep. Mark Rozzi has sponsored over the past year, you’ll notice a theme. In February, Rozzi (D-Berks County) proposed a resolution designating April 2016 as “Sexual Assault Awareness Month.” In March, he co-sponsored a bill to add child sex abuse as an exception to sovereign-immunity laws. And his current fight to pass House Bill 1947 would eliminate the criminal statute of limitation on child sexual-abuse cases. For Rozzi, sexual assault isn’t just another legislative issue. It’s the reason he ran for office in 2012. Rozzi was molested by an Allentown Diocese priest when he was 13.

After being molested, in the 1980s, Rozzi did his best to move on from the trauma. But he was spurred to take action in 2009 after a second childhood friend committed suicide; both of them had been molested by the same priest.

Adult child-abuse victims and allies are fighting to eliminate the statute of limitations {BY REBECCA ADDISON} “When that happened, it triggered something in my life. I just couldn’t function anymore,” Rozzi says. “It came down to continuing where I was or standing up

and fighting. I decided I’m going to do what I can, that I would expose my story to help others.” But Rozzi found there were few resources for victims to expose their abusers. Under current state law, a survivor of child sex abuse that occurred after 2002 has until age 50 to file criminal charges, and until age 30 to initiate a civil suit. For victims like Rozzi, who were abused before 2002, there is no recourse. “I had two years civilly and five years criminally to come forward. I was 13 years old,” Rizzo says. “Put yourself in my place. Put yourself in that shower. You close your eyes and think for a second — while you’re being raped, you tell me if you know what a statute of limitations is.” CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

HB 1947 would eliminate time barriers to file criminal and civil cases for those abused after the bill becomes law. Key in this fight is a retroactivity portion of the bill that would give adults today the chance to challenge their abusers from long ago. But time is of the essence. The last day of Pennsylvania’s legislative session is Oct. 26. If HB 1947 isn’t passed by then, advocates say, it will die. The legislation is being challenged by a number of state groups like the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference and the Insurance Federation of Pennsylvania, who say it’s unconstitutional. “We do share concerns along with the business community and the Pennsylvania Senate about how a retroactive measure will conflict with the Pennsylvania Constitution,” Amy Hill, spokesperson for the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference, said in a statement. Supporters of the legislation say the constitutional argument is a smokescreen. They claim groups like the Catholic Conference are opposing the legislation because they could be financially burdened by civil lawsuits. But for adult victims of child sexual abuse, their fight isn’t about the money; it’s about protecting others. They say too many abusers are allowed to continue hurting children because their victims are too young to understand what is being done to them and to speak out. The key to ending such abuse, they say, is to ensure that victims are given the power to identify their abusers as adults. “They’ve taken away my right to protect children and that makes me angry,” says Shawn O’Mahony, who was molested as a child. “It’s been very frustrating. And I’m sure my story is just like so many others.” O’Mahony is a Pittsburgh-area resident who was molested starting at age 10 by a

neighbor. As a gay man, he says that as a child he didn’t come forward because his abuser made him feel embarrassed about his sexual orientation and what was being done to him. “I was molested for years. He tried to make me feel inferior,” says O’Mahony. “At that point in time, there were people making statements that gays and child molesters are the same. This is how it was back then.” It took O’Mahony years to have the courage to come forward, but by then the statute of limitations had passed. At age 49, he says, he’s seen his abuser interacting with other children for years and believes they are being molested. For years he has notified police of his concerns, but says his worries have not been taken seriously. “I’ve seen children being abused without being able to help them over the years,” says O’Mahony. “I’ve seen people in adulthood who had been molested for years by this person who overdosed on drugs. I’ve just watched this over the years and no one believed me.” O’Mahony says his abuser’s actions went unchecked until evidence emerged that the man, who worked for decades as a teacher, was sending sexually explicit text messages to a student. He pled guilty to child-endangerment charges and was sentenced to seven years’ probation. O’Mahony was barred from getting involved in the case because he could be sued for defamation for any comments he made about the man. “I’m not allowed to have any freedom of speech, any right to protect myself, any right to call attention to something bad to help other kids be protected,” says O’Mahony. “At this point, I’ve gone through lots of years of therapy. It affects

“THEY’VE TAKEN AWAY MY RIGHT TO PROTECT CHILDREN AND THAT MAKES ME ANGRY.”

Martín Esquivel-Hernandez traveled more than 5,000 miles to be with his family, but five years later, he faces deportation. Read his story on City Paper ’s new online-only longform feature at www.pghcitypaper.com.


you for the rest of your life. That is what’s being done to these children. They’re afraid, they don’t know where to turn to, no one believes them.” That’s why the Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse has been working on this issue for 12 years. The group says that HB 1947 will give victims the ability to prevent more children from being abused, in part by extending the deadline for filing civil suits to age 50. “This bill will not help me in anyway. I’m almost 70,” says Marie Whitehead, communications coordinator for The Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse, who was abused as a child. “For people 50 or under, some of their perpetrators are still out there, and because they couldn’t be charged and they couldn’t be named in a civil lawsuit, a victim cannot get up in public and say ‘so-and-so abused me.’ They could be sued themselves and in other states some perps have done that. There’s no way to identify them.” According to Whitehead, the opposition to the bill from groups like the Insurance Federation of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Catholic Conference is purely financial. “It’s just about the money for them. They don’t have any high moral ground here,” says Whitehead. “In other states where this was passed, payments for settlements in civil suits have been shared by [the party] and their insurance company.” Whitehead says abuse survivors often need a lot of resources for things like therapy due to declining coverage for mental health around the country. But the potential for monetary awards from civil suits isn’t why she and many others are fighting to see the legislation passed. “At their core, most survivors just don’t want anyone else to go through this and will do anything they can do to help prevent that, as they’re strong enough,” says Whitehead. “And a lot of them aren’t strong enough to get up in front of the media or even speak out at a support group. There’s such shame. So, the few of us who can, we do.” When it was originally proposed, HB 1947 did not include the retroactive portion of the legislation. Rozzi amended the bill to include it and it was passed in the house by a vote of 180 to 15. But when the legislation went to the senate, the retroactive portion was eliminated due to pressures from the opposition groups. Advocates say the retroactive portion is what will prevent abusers from hurting more children, but it’s this portion of the bill that lobbyists oppose.

Third Thursday: EDEN Third Thursday at CMOA is the museum's monthly party with music, open galleries, and good times.

October 20, 2016 8–11 p.m.

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PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

TU RREESS E A A RRCCHH S S T DUYD Y

SEEKING He a lt hy C ont rol Su bje c t s UPMC Health System seeks healthy men and women ages 18-45 to take part in a biologic research study of mood and personality. To be eligible you must have no history of medical or psychiatric problems. The study includes participation in psychosocial interviews and MRI scan. Participants will be compensated $150 upon completion. For more information, call 412-246-5367.

A letter signed by the Hospital & Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania, Insurance Federation of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Business Council, Pennsylvania National Federation of Independent Businesses and Pennsylvania Manufacturers’ Association outlines the reason some oppose the bill. “Retroactively extending the statute of limitations is a dangerous precedent for any business that manufactures, sells, stores or transports any kind of product, as well as for any institution that is an insurer or creditor of any such business. The General Assembly should not increase the risks of doing business by changing the rules retroactively. If the General Assembly crosses this threshold, the costs and problems for businesses and insurers will increase — not just because of this bill, but because of the precedent it sets to ignore the constitutionality of other statutes of limitations,” the letter says. Now the bill returns to the House rules committee, where Rozzi says he will again amend it to include language to make the change in the statute of limitations retroactive. The representative says

he will not compromise. “People are trying to tell me I have to accept the deal, that we aren’t going to get any more, that I have to accept a half a loaf for the children of the commonwealth that only helps future victims,” says Rozzi. “My message is I will never compromise the children of this commonwealth ever. If we’re going to help one section, we’re going to help all sections —past, present and future.” This year, the Pennsylvania attorney general’s office released a 147-page report on a years-long investigation into clergy sexual abuse within the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown. The report details the stories of hundreds of children abused by about 50 priests. For Shaun Dougherty, another Pennsylvanian molested as a child, the report shows just why Rozzi’s bill is needed. “Before I really knew and everything sunk in about what happened to me, before I really came of age to figure out I could do something, the statue of limitations had run out on me,” says Dougherty. “Now that we have the attorney general’s report, we know that my scenario has played out countless times.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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JENSORENSEN


Congratulations to the winning teams of the 2016 Fine Awards

ALLEGHENY VALLEY HOSPITAL Project Team: Preventing falls on a geriatric behavioral health unit

The Fine Awards recognize Western Pennsylvania healthcare professionals on the front lines working together as a team to improve patient care, safety, and efficiency.

Logan Almasy Amy Arduino Esther Atwood Elaine Detman Bill Englert David Goldberg Jeremy Huth Debra LiVorio Margaret Meals Joyce Schultz Lori Stuchell Jane Thomas Kelley Wasicek Ronald Westlake

EXCELA HEALTH

UPMC SHADYSIDE

Project Team: Preventing bloodstream infections in patients with an intravenous catheter

Project Team: Reducing facial pressure ulcers in orally intubated patients

Nik Asher Kim Beck Mary Jo Bellush Carol Fox Melanie Fritz Lisa Hayden Kate Rosatti Beverly Smith Allison Thomas

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Project Team: Increasing HPV vaccination rates to prevent cancer

Amber Dickson Staci Mamula Carol Mathews Lindsay McNally Nicole Metzenbacher Nicolette Mininni Deborah Panos Breen Smith

Mary-Lou Arscott Danyelle Coleman Kristin Hughes Andrea Karsh Trish Klatt Nathan Lamberton Ann McGaffey Donald Middleton Nicole Payette Jason Siegel Yujing Zhao

THE OPEN DOOR, INC Project Team: Improving health outcomes for chronically homeless individuals living with HIV/AIDS Dana Davis Christina Farmartino Mary Hawk Derrick McClain Nathaniel Williams Yvette Williams

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FLASHES O F FIRE Have you ever been so ticked off at work or frustrated by what’s happening in your life that you just want to quit and start over?

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{CP PHOTO BY JOHN ALTDORFER}

Erin McClelland

CONTRAST IN STYLES Incumbent Rothfus and challenger McClelland in stark contrast in 12th District race {BY RYAN DETO} LOOK FOR ED LIPSMAN’S FLASHES OF FIRE ON AMAZON.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

AN OCT. 6 debate in Monaca, Pa., between state Rep. Keith Rothfus (R-Sewickley) and his Democratic opponent Erin McClelland showcased stark differences between the two candidates in their rematch for Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District. Rothfus spoke softly and his answers were short, rarely using all of his allotted time. Conversely, McClelland spoke loudly with passion and drew several ovations. But that’s not the only difference the candidates have demonstrated in their battle for the district, which serves Beaver, northern Allegheny and Cambria counties, as well as smaller sections of other counties, stretching all the way to Johnstown. Press access is different, too. McClelland met with City Paper for more than an hour to talk about her plans. Rothfus didn’t respond to multiple requests for an interview. (When CP wrote about the race in 2014, Rothfus actually scurried away from a CP reporter at a campaign event when confronted.) Rothfus has been sticking to his typical low-key strategy of small meetings at coffee shops during the day, walking in parades and occasionally going door-to-door to meet constituents. In contrast, McClelland is running an aggressive campaign:

attending large events across the district, speaking with any press outlet and even shaking hands with Donald Trump supporters at rallies. “I am really looking forward to doing what I have always done,” said McClelland at the Oct. 6 debate. “And that is [to] stir things up, get people thinking outside the box … and really bring this district, and this country, into the 21st century.” Can McClelland’s energy and Rothfus’ lack thereof make a difference and switch the district from red to blue? So far little attention has been paid to the race, and pollsters place the district as a safe Republican victory. McClelland, who is from Lower Burrell and works as a health-care professional, feels Rothfus’ low-key strategy has made him an absentee representative. “[His absenteeism] tells me that Keith Rothfus has no idea who he is or what he is doing here,” McClelland said when she met with CP. “He has no idea what is going on in his district.” In February, when steelworkers were locked out due to contract disputes with Allegheny Technologies Inc., McClelland felt Rothfus failed his constituents. McClelland’s campaign took video

“THE RACE HAS NO ZIP TO IT. IT’S NOT ON ANYONE’S RADAR.”


testimonials of workers from United Steelworkers Local 1196. One worker said, “I met Keith Rothfus out in McCandless, and I asked him what he was going to do for us while we were locked out, and he told us, ‘not a thing.’” McClelland is also critical of the manner in which Rothfus does meet with constituents. “He has his coffee [meetings] during working hours, so he gets to go talk to three senior citizens,” said McClelland. “[But he hasn’t] held a single town hall after working hours, so working people can show up.” McClelland feels Rothfus is avoiding the difficult work of being a representative because of a belief in limited government. “I don’t think he likes his job,” says McClelland. “He came in with the Tea Party wave, and that wave is literal destruction from within. If you hate the U.S. government, then don’t go and work there.” But Allegheny Republican Committee vice chair Dave Majernik believes Rothfus has a constant presence in the district. “I think he is always around,” says Majernik. “He was in three different places that I have heard of, and that was just in one day.” Majernik also says that Rothfus holds town-hall-style conference calls

said a vote for McClelland is a vote for the status quo. However, Rothfus’ campaign falls more in line with the status quo of big-money politics than McClelland’s. According to recent quarterly campaign-finance reports, McClelland has averaged about $500 per donation, mostly from retirees, teachers, lawyers and utility workers. Rothfus has averaged close to $1,000 per donation, mostly from doctors, bankers and CEOs He has also received $432,000 from PACs, about 20 times the amount McClelland has received from PACs. G. Terry Madonna, political pollster and professor at Franklin & Marshall College, says the advantages Rothfus has in this race are overwhelming, including his support for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. “The big [advantage] might be the strong support for Trump in the [12th] district,” Madonna wrote to CP. “[Rothfus] does not have to worry about the downballot effect. Also, the race has no zip to it. It’s not on anyone’s radar.” The district was redrawn after the 2010 election, and Rothfus has held the seat ever since; in 2014, he defeated McClelland by more than 18 percentage points. The new district, which traverses

{CP FILE PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Keith Rothfus

where constituents are allowed to call in. And Majernik feels that Rothfus’ low-key personality is what the district wants: someone with a small ego, who will keep government off constituents’ backs and will stand up for big issues in Washington, D.C. During the Monaca debate, Rothfus

six counties, now resembles a snake crossed with a hammer. Initially, the giant district was gerrymandered to be a dumping ground for pockets of Democratic voters in other Republican strongholds, making surrounding Republican districts more safely conservative. However, it didn’t make the 12th District more Democratic as presumed, since it has now become more Republican. This year, Trump has a strong presence in the 12th where he has packed rallies and his yard signs are a common sight on district lawns. But this isn’t a new phenomenon. Mitt Romney beat Barack Obama there by 17 points in 2012. And in 2008, when the district’s congressional seat was clearly in Democratic hands, the district chose Republican John McCain over Obama by nearly 10 points. Even though the odds are against her, Braddock Mayor John Fetterman, who has been campaigning with McClelland, hopes she can pull off an upset. “She can stand in front of group of steelworkers covered in soot, wearing high heels and get them cheering like I have never seen it,” says Fetterman. “[McClelland] is so charismatic and committed, and can get those Republicans to cross over to vote for someone like her.” RYA N D E TO@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

SMART GROWTH {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} ONCE, THE five-acre patch of Mercer County land looked like a “farm”: corn — just corn — in long, straight rows. But when Darrell Frey was through, the cornstalks were scaled back and his Three Sisters Farm had a pond, fruit trees, contoured garden beds, chickens, a bioshelter (passively heated greenhouse) and more. And instead of $500 worth of corn, he was selling up to $40,000 in produce that included a coveted salad mix featuring wild edibles. Frey is a nationally known expert on permaculture, the practice of doing agriculture sustainably, using minimal outside resources, and mimicking and working with rather than against nature. On sabbatical from Three Sisters, which he started in 1983, he’s now living in Pittsburgh and managing another local experiment in permaculture: Garfield Community Farm, 2.5 acres of largely wooded green space in the middle of Pittsburgh. Permaculture follows commonsense (if not universally practiced) rules like eliminating waste and using renewable resources — mulching instead of watering heavily, for example. But in practice, Frey says, it’s mostly about observing the land to see what works, and designing small man-made ecosystems to get the most from that land while renewing the soil and other resources, rather than depleting them like conventional farming does. A permaculture forest garden, for instance, might include large fruit and nut trees for shade; a layer of smaller fruit trees; a shrub layer (currants and berries); an herbaceous layer (herbs, etc.); root vegetables; the soil surface (ground cover, strawberries); a vertical layer (vines); and fungi for soil health. That’s no conventional orchard. But it echoes the traditional practices of subsistence farmers, from whom pioneers like the late Bill Mollison adapted the principles of modern permaculture starting in the 1970s. Frey’s farm was named for the “three sisters” of Native American agriculture: cornstalks provided trellises for beans that hold nitrogen in the soil, and squash kept weeds down. Frey believes that we need small-scale, local permaculture farming to ensure food security and restore the health of the environment. “Be in tune with nature while being productive,” says Frey, author of the 2010 book Bioshelter Market Garden and a board member of the Permaculture Institute of North America. The Permaculture Worldwide Network identifies about 2,300 permaculture projects globally, including nearly 500 in the U.S. alone. Since 2011, Frey himself has certified more than 100

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN CREASY}

Darrell Frey (at right) and volunteers at Garfield Community Farm

students in his course Permaculture Design, taught through Phipps Conservatory. On a recent Saturday, about 15 students attended a day-long Urban Permaculture Intensive with Frey and Garfield Community Farm director John Creasy. In the hills above Penn Avenue, participants toured the herb garden (which doubles as a meditation labyrinth), where some “weeds” are left alone because they attract beneficial insects, including pollinators, and serve as ground cover. The students witnessed the dynamic form of composting known as hugelkultur: raised beds filled with nutrient-rich, waterretaining rotting wood. Elsewhere on the farm, careful co-plantings — like garlic, basil and marigolds with tomatoes — repel pests without toxic chemicals. And then there’s the farm’s own off-the-grid, solar-powered, rainwater-collecting bioshelter (modeled on the larger example at Three Sisters), where chickens cohabitate year-round with dwarf banana trees, and with micro-greens that sell to local restaurants for $3 an ounce. Attendee Madelaine Dusseau volunteers on the farm and had previously taken permaculture classes with Creasy. She’s replacing her Swissvale lawn with other plants, from ligonberries to squash, but acknowledges that doing it right takes time. “The idea of observing and being patient … is definitely a permaculture concept,” she says. Creasy runs Garfield Community Farm as part of his job as a pastor at nearby Open Door Church; he works with farm manager Frey, part-time staffer A.J. Bisesi and dozens of volunteers. Creasy founded the farm in 2008 to provide fresh organic produce to neighbors who have little access. His team reclaimed the overgrown lots from invasive knotweed; the farm now operates a mobile farmstand and runs youth and educational programming. Creasy says that what excited him about permaculture was the symbiosis of community values and ecological stewardship. In permaculture, he says, “caring for the earth and caring for people becomes really the same thing.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

EASY CHOICES {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} TALKING TO FRIENDS the other day, I made the comment that I would rather do anything else in the world before I would vote for Donald Trump. Then I started thinking about it. Would I actually rather do anything else? So I started naming things I would rather do than vote for Donald Trump. My only rule: I wouldn’t risk anyone else’s life. For example, if the Russian mob, or whatever the Russian equivalent to Navy Seals are, threatened to kill my neighbor if I didn’t vote for Trump so they could have an inept yes man to foreign powerbrokers in the White House, I would have to vote for Trump to save them; well, most of them. I figure if you’ve got a Trump sign in your yard, you’ve already got a death wish. So, here’s what I would rather do despite the danger and shame that could befall me:

• Despite a nervous bladder, I would

Do You Shop at Convenience Stores? Have you ever purchased energy drinks, cookies, or cigarettes from a convenience store?

• I would rather vote for George H.W. Bush,

George W. Bush. Jeb Bush, Barbara Bush and Gavin Rossdale from the 1990s rock band Bush.

If so you may be eligible for a research study. The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to learn about what ADULTS, ages 18-65, buy at convenience stores. Participation requires completion of a 10 minute phone or internet survey, one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center, and a short follow-up phone call. People who complete the study will be compensated for their time and effort with $75 in gift cards. Parking or bus passes will be provided.

• I would rather slather my feet in bacon

grease and then ride the top of the P1 bus like a surf board.

• I would rather work on a Liberty Bridge welding crew.

• I would rather … dear lord … vote for Tom Corbett.

• I would rather go up on Mount Washington

rather drink a gallon of water and walk through the Scarehouse.

If you are interested and want to learn more about the study, please call 412-204-7353, e-mail adult-cstore-study@rand.org or visit us at www.rand.org/storestudy.

and not take a selfie.

• I would rather put on a Ray Lewis Baltimore Ravens jersey and walk into Primanti Brothers at 1:30 p.m. on a Sunday and yell: “Crabs rule and Hines Ward was an overrated pass catcher and a sub-par ballroom dancer.”

• I would rather vote for Luke Ravenstahl • I would rather build a second tunnel under the Allegheny River to the North Shore.

• I would rather not brake before I entered

a tunnel.

• I would rather drive on the Parkway North in the morning directly into the “sun glare” without sunglasses.

• I would rather get a sandwich at a Wawa. • I would rather box Sammy Velasquez. • I would rather wrestle Kurt Angle and

Bruno Sammartino at the same time.

• I would rather steal a sandwich from

• I would rather go to the Dirty O and not order fries.

• I would rather go back to college and

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

get a degree in physics and mechanical and electrical engineering, and I would build a time machine. I would then trade a box of old pinball parts to the Libyans for plutonium to power the time machine. I would then take the time machine back to 1996 and convince Kevin McClatchy not to buy the Pittsburgh Pirates, thus allowing them to leave town.

• I would rather invite Donald Trump to a

locker room for some “locker room talk” and instead, make him listen to a six-hour seminar on anger management, what constitutes violence against women and respecting the personal space of others. Full disclosure: I also plan to lock him in one of the lockers and flush the key.

• I would rather tell Bill Peduto that bike lanes “are for suckers.”

the plate of former Steelers lineman Casey Hampton.

• I would rather call John Fetterman

• I would rather play first base for the Pirates

• I would rather find different Libyans, buy

“shrimpo” or “small fry” to his face.

knowing that I was destined to fail and be sent down to Indianapolis, and while I was there, I attend the Indianapolis 500 and there is a crash that sends a tire flying into the crowd, and I am hit in the face with that tire.

• I would rather vote for Tom Cruise, Ted

Cruz, Ted the bear from the Ted movies, Ted Lange, who was Isaac from The Love Boat, the guy who played Gopher on The Love Boat and probably just a regular gopher.

• I would rather tell James Harrison that I

think participation ribbons are a valid tool in providing small children with positive reinforcement and a sense of accomplishment.

I would rather tear down the beloved Richard Caliguiri statue.

more plutonium, get back in my time machine and travel to 2005. I would then kidnap Mario Lemieux, disguise myself as Mario Lemieux and draft Bobby Ryan over Sidney Crosby.

• I would rather vote for Ivana Trump, Ivanka

Trump, the blond Trump son, what’s-his-name, the Trump whose mother is Marla Maples and Marla Maples. Also, I would vote for a bottle of maple syrup as long as it didn’t plan to build a wall to keep the other condiments out of the refrigerator and force grape jelly to pay for it.

• And finally, I would rather vote for an

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orange. Unless, of course, the orange was really Donald Trump in disguise.

*Certain restrictions apply.

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Weird Pittsburgh

SEND YOUR LOCAL WEIRD NEWS TO INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has a healthy lead in polls of Pennsylvania voters, but one wouldn’t guess that from assessing the tool sheds and front lawns of the state’s rural areas. “The [Donald] Trump phenomenon finds anecdotal expression in material artifacts — hats, and in Pennsylvania in particular, yard signs,” wrote a Wall Street Journal reporter in a dispatch from York. “They’re everywhere.” But as repugnant comments from the Republican candidate pile up, Trump supporters are struggling to protect their yard signs from thieves and vandals, even in conservative-leaning areas. State police issued an alert for a serial Trump-sign thief in Fulton County. Trump supporters in Johnstown told reporters for WJAC they continually replace stolen signs. One said a 7-foot banner was torn from his shed. In St. Marys, a police officer stopped Kalie Anne Schmader for an alleged traffic violation and reportedly found 14 Trump signs in her car, including a handmade “Democrats for Trump” sign whose creator had reported it stolen from his lawn. Schmader, 23, admitted to snatching the signs from yards and public spaces out of disdain for Trump, police told the Courier Express of Dubois. In York County, Karen Kocher and Donald Peters tried to stop thefts by nailing their Trump signs to 4-by-8-foot pieces of plywood, according to The Evening Sun of Hanover. When they found one of the pieces of wood thrown into a retention pond, they installed a motion-detecting camera, nailed the boards together and booby-trapped the mass of wood with a wire that rings a cowbell if it’s moved.

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In July, this column noted the Penn Hills School District’s banning of hoodies, due to “safety concerns” and the garment’s supposed use as a face-hiding technique for criminals. As the district enforced its poorly conceived new policy, 100 students were suspended for “wearing clothing that included a hood” by early October, the school board president told TribLive. com. Due to disruption caused by the suspensions, administrators have temporarily lifted the ban. Hoodies are apparently still a sore subject: When a KDKA film crew tried to interview parents and students about the policy at a football game, school officials reportedly asked them to leave school grounds. (Despite its anti-hoodie stance, the Penn Hills School District allows online shirtmaking businesses to license its sports teams’ logo for hooded sweatshirts.)

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Alan DeSanzo entered a Homewood Borough municipal garage and heard a rustling sound. DeSanzo, the council president of the Beaver County town, feared he had walked in on a burglary. Then he saw a large buck standing in the garage, he told the Beaver County Times. DeSanzo looked up at a

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

hole in the roof and realized the animal must have jumped off the Homewood Bridge. This meant it fell 40 feet and crashed through the roof of eight-inch plywood to hit a concrete floor. Shockingly, the deer seemed mostly unhurt. When DeSanzo opened the garage door, it scampered off. The council president added, “It ran quite well.”

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Following a call about an erratic driver, a Latrobe police officer stopped a car to reportedly find a 12-year-old boy behind the wheel, his mother in the passenger seat and four other children (ages 4 through 12) in the vehicle. Carrie M. Geyer reportedly explained that she told her son to drive because he “needed to be the man of the house” and “learn some responsibility.” TribLive.com reports that Geyer, 33, faces an endangeringthe-welfare-of-children and reckless endangerment charge for each kid in the car.

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Forty-five-year-old Ryan Paul Frame allegedly threw a brick through the glass door of the McKean County SPCA at about 1 a.m., entered the Bradford animal shelter with a flashlight, and found and retrieved his dog, which police had taken from his truck and to the shelter after arresting him on DUI charges the prior night, according to the Bradford Era newspaper. The incident generated several new charges for Frame. The fee to get the dog back legally: $25.

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Teddi Mae Renee Randolph reportedly entered a Meadville man’s home through a window while he was snoozing on the couch. Randolph, 45, allegedly fished $30 out of his back pocket, reports the Meadville Tribune, and took some salami sandwiches and “six to nine” Budweisers from his fridge.

WAYNOVISION


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Beacon Hotel 15+ ACRE Haunted Corn Maze and House for only $15.00 per person. The Haunting begins Fridays and Saturdays at Dusk. The last wagon leaves @ 10pm or until all victims have ridden! Sunday’s “No Scare� Family Days: 1:00-4:00 $8.00 per person. This includes Hay rides, Corn Maze, Scavenger Hunt, Pony Rides, and a Petting Zoo. Extra Fun Kids Activities with Knoch Softball Girls. TEXT 91944 for Spooky specials. Open Every Weekend thru October 31!

Cheeseman Fright Farm Plan an evening with a bonďŹ re with fami-

ly and friends. Start a new family tradition, take a hay ride to our pumpkin patch and pick out this year’s holiday decoration. Cheeseman Fright Farm is open for our 17th year of fear new this year 3D Apocalypse, HUGE corn maze, CLOWN ASYLM and BUTCHER ROOM.

Eons Eons Fashion Antique, celebrating 30 years, offers a complete line of original vintage clothing from the 1900’s - 1980’s for men & women to create your period Halloween fantasy. 20’s Gatsby to 70’s disco & more. Choose from suits, tuxedos, dresses, vests, bow ties, neckties, jewelry, cufinks, hats, western shirts & boots, shoes, & leather. Why rent when you can own for less?

Costume World Your year-round retail and rental costume store. We carry a huge selection of masks, wigs, make up, jewelry and accessories including licensed characters for children, adults and plus sizes. Costume World is located at 17th and Smallman in the Strip District. Call us at 412-281-3277 or visit www. costumeworld.com

HAUNTED ATV Ride The Haunted Ride Oct. 22, 29 merges family fall favorites, hayrides, festivals and Haunted houses to make a unique

experience for off road riders. At Tri-County ATV for an inclusive LOW price you will enjoy a haunted ride, movie, dinner, treats and doorprizes. Complete Details at www.hauntedride.com. SCARE YOU THERE! www.hauntedride.com

Haunted Expedition This October, Haunted Expedition will take you back to a 1950’s post-apocalyptic America! Be ready to be face to face with the creatures created by the fallout! Life-like interactive horror experience. Admission includes a haunted hayride and walk through attraction for one price. Can you survive the Haunted Expedition? Located at Shenot Farms,

HELL’S HOLLOW HAUNT “GONNA SCARE THE HELL OUTTA YA!!!�

THREE SCARES IN ALL!!!

THE BLOODY BARN THE HAUNTED HAYWAGON OF HORROR THE FRIGHTENING FIELD OF CORN ADULT COMBO PASS $20.00 • KIDS 12 & UNDER $13.00 COUPONS AVAILABLE AT WWW.HELLSHOLLOWHAUNT.COM CALL FOR GROUP PRICING (13+) 724-662-1999

NIGHTS SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER

HALLOWEEN ATTITUDE COSTUME GEAR HATS TUX TIES DISCO

VINTAGE ORIGINALS WOMEN’S AND MEN’S STYLES

TRI-COUNTY ATV RECREATION & RESCUE HAUNTED RIDERS PRESENTS

HOLLOW OF HISTORY HAUNTED RIDE

face with Be ready to be face to the fallout! by d te the creatures crea horror experience. Life-like interactivea haunted hayride Admission includes tion for one price. ac & walk through attr

OCT. 22 & 29

TRI-COUNTY ATV • 632 TOWER HILL RD.

CAN YOU SURVIVE TION? THE HAUNTED EXPEDI $20 PER PERSON • RIDE STARTS AT DUSK

E O N S

FA S H I ON A N T I Q U E

5 8 5 0 E L L S W O RT H AV E N U E                  NEWS

THIS OCTOBER, HAUNTED EXPEDITION1950’S TO A WILL TAKE YOU BACK AMERICA! IC PT POST-APOCALY

UNIONTOWN, PA

340 BESTWICk ROAD MERCER, PA. 16137

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Admission includes: Haunted Ride, Drive In Movie, Meal Deal & Treats for Kids under 15

SHENOT FARMS, OFF WEXFORD EXIT

FOR FAQ AND ADDITIONAL DETALS: W W W. H A U N T E D R I D E . C O M

WWW.HAUNTEDEXPEDITION.COM

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off Wexford Exit, www.hauntedexpedition.com

HAUNTED HILLS ESTATE

Spice up your weekend and visit HAUNTED HILLS ESTATE, in Uniontown, Pa. Two hours of unique and original haunted entertainment! Break the CURSE on the Challenge Trail, check into the Legends Hotel for a killing experience and silently creep into the Twisted Nightmare Escape Room for a clowning around good time, or NOT!

Haunted Hills Hayride

Haunted Hills Hayride and the Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (17th Annual); N. Versailes, PA. Journey through the woods at our two haunted

attractions by wagon or foot for a factor of fright and fear. Karaoke/DJ, live bands; Benefits the Autism Society of Pittsburgh. For more info visit: hauntedhillshayride. com/ 724-382-8296; Facebook: Haunted Hills Hayride.

Hell’s Hollow Haunt

Hell’s Hollow Haunt, located on a creepy back road in Mercer, PA. Is “gonna scare the hell outa’ ya’”. Three scares in all, the bloody barn has three levels of terror and the haunted haywagon of horror takes you thru the hell’s hollow forest and swamp. Thrown in for shitz and giggles is the frightening field of corn. Combo pass for adults is $20.00 And kids 12 and under are $13.00 Coupons available

Pumpkin Fest 2016 OCTOBER 1- 30 SAT & SUN • 11AM-5PM

$4 per person (2 and under FREE)

Fright farm FRI, SAT & SUN SEPTEMBER 23 - OCTOBER 30 $20 per person ($15 on Sunday). Not recommended for young children. 12 & under must be accompanied by an adult.

Field Trips OCTOBER 1- 31 MON - FRI • 9AM-3PM Amazing concessions, now featuring wood ¿red brick oven pizza!

Private bonFIres available! Off US Route 19 on Cheeseman Road, Portersville, PA For details, directions & reservations call 724/368-3233 or email jen@cheesemanfarm.com

www.cheesemanfarm.com 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016


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at www.Hellshollowhaunt.Com. Call fror group pricing (13+) 724-662-1999

Hundred Acres Manor

Hundred Acres Manor named “Pittsburgh’s Best Haunted House” by HauntWorld Magazine has been featured on The Travel Channel, USA Today, Forbes, LA Times and named “One of The Best Haunted Houses in America.” Featuring six haunted attractions for one low price and two multi-room escape rooms.

Palace Theatre

In celebration of The Palace Theatre’s 90th Anniversary, we revisit vaudeville. October 25, Adam Trent blends innovative illusions and charming wit to create

a show that is part magic, part concert, and part stand-up. October 28, Haunted Hollywood features three silent films by Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin and Harold Lloyd accompanied by Paragon Ragtime Orchestra.

Rich Farms

This year Rich Farms presents “Another World”. Entering its 27th season, Fright Farm is Pennsylvania’s premier professional attraction with five distinct attractions; Haunted Hayride, Frightmare Mansion, Hallow Grounds, Terror Maze and Paranoia 2.0. State of the art special effects, custom digital sound tracts and talented actors make Fright Farm a truly frightening experience. www.frightfarm.com

MASKS • MAKE-UP • WIGS JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES

RENTAL & RETAIL

CHILD, ADULT & PLUS SIZES

WWW.COSTUMEWORLD.COM 1690 Smallman St, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 NEWS

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Kennywood Phantom Fright Nights

Phantom Fright Nights returns for its 15th terrifying season! Recognized as one of the nation’s best Halloween events, darkness, fog and fear envelop the park. Hundreds of terrifying monsters roam the grounds, filling seven haunted houses and three scare zones. Experience Kennywood’s legendary coasters and thrill rides like never before! www.Kennywood.com/PFN

ScareHouse

Save on ScareHouse tickets when you buy from scarehouse.com. Named as America’s Scariest Haunted House by ABC and one of America’s best Halloween

CELEBRATING 90 YEARS WITH THESE CLASSIC

VAUDEVILLE-STYLE SHOWS!

HALLOWEEN MAGIC STARRING ADAM TRENT

THE PARAGON RAGTIME ORCHESTRA

TUE • OCT 25 • 7PM

FRI • OCT 28 • 7:30PM

$32, $26, $20 Adam Trent, star of Broadway’s The Illusionist, delivers a positive family-friendly, Halloweenthemed magic spectacular packed with original magic, music, comedy and audience participation.

Adults $25, $16; Students $12, $8 Three ghostly silent films accompanied live with original orchestral scores and sound effects. A great family event. Come dressed for Halloween. Children’s Costume Contest!

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS! 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

attractions by Travel Channel, USA Today, and director Guillermo del Toro . Open select dates through October 30th, free parking and shuttle service at the Pittsburgh Zoo.

Zombies of the Corn

STOP ZOMBIES NOW! Board our zombie battle wagons and shoot live zombies that cant shoot back! If you dare, walk through our 12,000 square foot Zombie Compound and maze. Stay for ghost stories by the bonfire, movies on the big screen, face painting, and taste treats from Grandma zombies kitchen! All ages welcome.


LOCAL

JOYCE MANOR MADE ITS NAME AS A POP-PUNK BAND FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

ON THE AIR

ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

STANDARD BROADCAST with NATIVE ALLOYS 10:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 21. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $5. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com NEWS

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAN MONICK}

Joyce Manor (Berry Johnson, far right)

Standard Broadcast {PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIN JAY}

“Opposites,” the lead single from Standard Broadcast’s forthcoming debut album, is a fitting, thoroughly catchy introduction to the indie-rock four-piece. It’s an upbeat, piano-driven four-chorder topped off with some nice vocal interplay between vocalist/pianist Nathan Jay and guitarist Holly Fromlak, a sound familiar to anybody who listened to pop-rock in the 1990s. The band’s style is clean and affable, and despite lacking a bassist, it’s dynamic and surprisingly well rounded. It’s all the product of trial and error, experimentation and adjustment. Jay met cellist Leland Shaw playing in The Lucky Devils, which transitioned to the two of them playing as a cello-piano duo. That drew the attention of Fromlak, who joined on the drums before switching over to guitar, replaced by Jeff Skaylo, a drummer they found via Craigslist. It’s a mouthful of a history. But judging from their output so far — a four-song EP called All Comes Back to You and a few already released songs from the forthcoming debut — all that shifting around has paid off. An early fan favorite from the EP was “Me Without You” (which will also appear on the debut). At first it sounds like one of Bach’s cello suites and unfolds into a sweet, cleverly arranged love song. It’s hard not to hear traces of Eddie Vedder and other ’90s vocalists in Jay’s husky, low-toned delivery, but the song, and the group in general, doesn’t really feel like a nostalgia trip. It’s more that the band shoots for a strain of accessible, earnest pop music that today tends toward electronic instrumentation or rustic, banjo-fied folk. Yet, Standard Broadcast is neither of these things. The nine-song eponymous LP, produced by Jake Hanner of Donora, splits songwriting duties among the group, with Jay arranging most of the lyrics (“a big pot of collaboration” is what he calls it). Shaw and Fromlak both come from classical backgrounds, whereas Jay had less formal training (he majored in art education). That collaboration, those different perspectives and several genres all housed under one roof is a big part of why Standard Broadcast succeeds. Standard Broadcast is out on Sat., Oct. 22, following a release show this Friday.

TO THE MANOR BORN {BY SHAWN COOKE}

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HEN I CALL UP Barry Johnson in early October, it’s a busy news day. The band he fronts, Joyce Manor, is currently driving to San Francisco for its first U.S. tour date with The Hotelier and Crying. Earlier that day, the band released a music video for “Last You Heard of Me” which rivals Tarantino in body count, and all but forces you to consider a more literal interpretation of its title. And on that coming Friday, the world would finally be able to hear Joyce Manor’s great fourth record, Cody. But first, I have to ask him about Billie Joe Armstrong. In an interview with NME earlier that morning, Armstrong, who also had a new record to promote, opened up about his 2016 New Year’s resolution “to destroy the phrase ‘pop-punk’ forever.” Armstrong knocked the term for ignoring the diversity of sound that can exist within a music scene. “I’ve always hated the phrase ‘poppunk.’ I think it’s a contradiction in terms. Either you’re punk, or you’re not,” Armstrong said. “It’s just that it’s too singular a term for my tastes.”

In some ways, he’s right: All three bands on the Joyce Manor tour have been called pop-punk at one time or another, but you wouldn’t know it from listening to their latest releases. It’s a well-rounded bill of three rock bands that share little beyond a common belief in the guitar as a force for good. Joyce Manor’s going to throw an all-out party, interspersed with

JOYCE MANOR, THE HOTELIER, CRYING 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 24. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $16-18. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

the nagging fear of growing up and getting your shit together. Hotelier believes in expunging personal trauma with group shout-alongs and finding a way to keep going in the face of it all. And the Crying promises a sensory overload of a new album, with Rush, Van Halen and Thin Lizzy as reference points. But Johnson doesn’t share Armstrong’s

trepidation about the phrase, though he acknowledges how it can generalize scenes. He uses it liberally throughout our talk to describe Joyce Manor, and says that he doesn’t see it as a derogatory term. Joyce Manor made its name as a pop-punk band from humble beginnings — the band comes from Torrance, Calif., a town which Johnson describes as a “gee shucks” sort of place with no freeway access. He isn’t keen on abandoning the genre that got the band going, even as it moves closer to so-called “mature indie rock” on Cody. Any band that’s more indebted to blink-182 than say, Pavement, exists in a space where a devout, young fanbase can seem easier to attain than music-blog cred. After 2014’s Never Hungover Again, Joyce Manor finally got a healthy taste of both. Cody has drawn even more favorable press thus far and looks like the second wave of a commercial breakout, but Johnson doesn’t try to think much about either audience when he’s writing songs. “I’m not really that concerned with whether it’s energetic enough for kids to respond to live, and I’m CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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TO THE MANOR BORN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists. ED! RECE NTLY POST

MEETING OF LE OP IMPORTANT PE Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

also not really worried about if it’s going to be cerebral enough to make an impression on people,” he says. Cody isn’t quite a cerebral record, but it contains sharp observations and moments of careful perception by the dozen. These songs don’t deal with particularly challenging or important subject matter, and Johnson assures me that he was going through the opposite of a difficult period when writing them. As a songwriter, he’s displaying more intuition than ever before. Several times on the record, he employs road-tested narrators who seem to know from the beginning how a situation might end. “Last You Heard of Me” forecasts the inevitable heartbreak and loneliness of a relationship’s aftermath. “Angel in the Snow” finds a narrator who can’t find excitement or meaning in much of anything. And if you know one line of Joyce Manor’s, it’s probably the cutting send-up of over-thetop music coverage from “Fake I.D.”: “‘What do you think about Kanye West?’/ ‘I think that he’s great, I think he’s the best’/ ‘Yeah, I think he’s better than John Steinbeck’/ ‘I think he’s better than Phil Hartman.’” Aside from the subject matter, these songs push themselves into more conventional territory. An early Joyce Manor song would rarely squeak past the two-minute mark; Cody has some comparative epics that run for three to four minutes. For the ambitious song lengths, they owe part of the credit to renowned producer Rob Schnapf (Elliott Smith, Guided By Voices), and fun’s Nate Ruess, who lends backing vocals to “Angel in the Snow.” Johnson says he and Ruess got drinks and talked songwriting, which eventually turned into exchanging demos and iPhone voice memos, sparking the idea to include a chorus on “Angel.” Going forward, Johnson doesn’t think they’ll make a full return to the blinkand-miss-it song structures. “I wouldn’t see us just intentionally having songs that are a minute-thirty when we know full well how to get more out of the songs.” With involvement from Schnapf and Ruess, Joyce Manor’s making the kind of moves that would have constituted a major leap 15 years ago, in a more rock-friendly music industry. It might’ve meant graduating from clubs to amphitheaters and small arenas, a move which seems damn near unattainable for a band operating in this genre today. But for now, Johnson’s more than fine with what the group has accomplished. “It would be cool to play an arena — like not even us — to open for a band that plays an arena,” Johnson said. “But that’s like so bonus-round shit that I’m not gonna be bummed on my deathbed, like ‘if only I got to play in an arena.’ Everything from here on out is extra stuff.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

L.A. STORY {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NICOLE ANNE ROBBINS}

Bleached (Jennifer Clavin, middle)

Growing up in the San Fernando Valley, sisters Jennifer and Jessie Clavin spent a lot of time driving into Hollywood, soaking up all the music and people they discovered on the way. Mulholland Drive still holds a particular allure for Jennifer. “You can drive through it and on the left will be these insane L.A. views, on the right will be these insane Valley views,” says the lead vocalist/guitarist of Bleached. “And it’s kind of cool: looking down at the city and realizing everybody has their own story. There’s just, like, so many people out there. And it’s cool that there are so many famous people with different stories, from Marilyn Monroe to Charles Manson, and it happened all in L.A.”

THE SONGS COME ACROSS AS BOTH CATHARTIC AND REFLECTIVE. Welcome the Worms, the most recent release from Bleached, finds Clavin tapping her own stories, occasionally pining for the simplicity of those youthful days. The band, which includes Jessie on lead guitar, bassist Micayla Grace and new drummer Nick Pillot, churns out heavy power chords, while Jennifer sings in a voice that combines grit and upbeat pop, accentuated by her bandmates’ harmonies. She wrote the album following the end of an abusive relationship, and the songs come across as both cathartic and reflective. It begins with the self-explanatory “Keep On Keepin’ On” and ends with the thoughtful “Hollywood, We Did It All Wrong.” The latter song “brings it back to Hollywood, where I first got into music. Now I’m still here playing music and I guess I was also thinking, after the innocence of just listening to music and [the fun of] staying out too late went away, it started becoming more about partying,” she says. “Maybe we should’ve just stuck with the music. But that’s life — life is about a lot of challenges and what happens and the lessons we learn.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BLEACHED with BEACH SLANG 6:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 22. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $16-18. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com


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diesel C LU B | LO U N G E

UPCOMING CONCERTS

1 0/20 | 9:00 P M | 18+

10/22 | 7:00 PM | AA

10/25 | 7:00 PM | AA {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN DIESCHER}

Ike Willis (left) and Andre Cholmondeley

1 0/29 | 8:00 P M | 18+

GROUP PROJECT {BY BILL KOPP}

1 1 /3 | 9:00 P M | 18+

1 1 / 1 0 | 9:00 P M | 18+

11/ 11 | 7:00 PM | AA

11/ 12 | 7:00 PM | AA

11/ 14| 7:00 PM | AA

1 1 / 1 7| 7:00 P M | 21+

11/ 19 | 7:00 PM | AA

1 1 /23 | 8:00 P M | 21+

for tickets visit LIVEATDIESEL.COM or Dave’s Music Mine (southside) 1801 e. carson st | pittsburgh |412.481.8800

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

IT WAS AROUND 1989 or ’90 that guitarist Andre Cholmondeley started his popular Frank Zappa tribute group Project/Object. “I thought, ‘Yeah, we’ll do this for fun. We’ll do it once a year on Frank’s birthday.’ But I never had the concept that it would be a group involving musicians who had played in Frank Zappa’s bands,” he says. In short order, however, that’s the direction that the group took. After meeting Ike Willis, a guitarist/ vocalist with Zappa from 1978 to ’88, Cholmondeley sent Willis a tape of his band. The Zappa alumnus enthusiastically joined the group. “And from that moment on, it transcended being just some guys getting together,” he says. “We had this legitimacy; a real authenticity came about.” “There have been over a dozen different alumni who have either toured with us or popped up onstage,” Cholmondeley says. The resulting tours feel more like reunions than tributes: “I’ve brought guys together who haven’t played gigs with one another since the ’70s,” he says. The group’s current tour features Willis and Don Preston; the latter was Zappa’s keyboardist for nearly the entire period of 1966 to 1974. Cholmondeley sees Project/Object as something quite different from a cover band. “With tribute bands, you’re trying to paint that picture, evoke the music, trying to do as well as possible,” he says. “What I have is some of the people who actually recorded these songs. So I don’t have to have my singer sound like the guy; I’ve got the guy.” The group makes the most of the talents

of Willis and Preston. When creating a set list, Cholmondeley says, “I ask myself, ‘What is the highlight album that they’re known for?’ And I work backward from there, making sure that we have a couple of tracks from that record.” In Preston’s case, that might be We’re Only in It for the Money (1968) or the 1974 double live LP Roxy and Elsewhere. For Willis, it almost certainly means Zappa’s 1979 album Joe’s Garage, but the set might include tunes from 1981’s topical You Are What You Is. Cholmondeley describes the result as a kind of “Zappa fantasy camp. But then you also get to hear a best-of, with all kinds of cool stuff.”

PROJECT/OBJECT: THE MUSIC OF FRANK ZAPPA 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 20. The Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $14-17. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

Cholmondeley says that his group “splits the difference” between note-perfect readings of tunes from Zappa’s 50-plus albums, and the off-the-wall arrangements that Zappa himself often delivered onstage. “We’re fortunate that with an artist like Zappa, the audience is completely comfortable with different versions,” he says. Musical in-jokes were always a major component of Zappa albums and concerts, and Project/Object proudly carries on that tradition. “At heart, I’m a Zappa freak,” Cholmondeley says. “And fans love it when we play some games, pulling out a 1973 version of ‘Peaches En Regalia,’ and gluing it up to a 1988 version. Fans get the joke as it’s happening.” Through it all, Cholmondeley plays a part that fits him perfectly: “the role of Zappa fan.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEROEN MYLLE}

Oathbreaker

[HARDCORE, ETC.] + THU., OCT. 20

[RAP] + MON., OCT. 24

Show Me the Body is a fiery and inventive outfit that blends the sensibilities of hardcore with hip hop and punk. The music is primal but groovy, often forcing you to consider whether you want to dance or crowdkill everyone around you. Its latest album, Body War, is 30 minutes of vicious social commentary. Anti-police-brutality is a theme throughout the record, best expressed in “Death Sounds 2” and the biting “Chrome Exposed.” The lineup for this Roboto show has something for everyone, so if HxC isn’t your thing, dive into the indie-meets-punk goodness of Long Island’s Oso Oso. Opening this mixedgenre gig are locals Choir and Skull Kid. Meg Fair 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. www. robotoproject.org

Rae Sremmurd (comprised of brothers Khalif “Swae Lee” Brown and Aaquil “Slim Jxmmi” Brown) burst onto the scene a couple years back with tracks like “No Type” and “No Flex Zone” — perfect tunes to blast while kicking back on the porch, surrounded by empty Solo cups. The duo represents for ATL with its latest, SremmLife 2, an album that features Lil Jon and Juicy J. Joining Rae Sremmurd at Stage AE is fellow Atlanta rapper Lil Yachty. He teeters between supremely weird and ready to ramp up the party, which is a recipe for an unpredictable and unique performance. Eearz, Bobo Swae and Impxct round out the lineup. MF 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $35. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[BOUNCE] + THU., OCT. 20

Big Freedia

Better bow down, the Queen of Bounce did not come to play. Tonight, her majesty Big Freedia performs New Orleans bounce that is destined to make your booty work, work, work. Local opening acts Moon Baby (who blends captivating pop music and performance art) and DJ SMI (who blends genres to create danceable eletronica), will certainly warm you up, so don’t worry about pulling a muscle. It all goes down in Spirit’s Psychedelic Creep Show Vault, a “sound-responsive, audiovisual, architectural installation” created by local visual artist Ian Brill. If you can’t make it out to see Freedia, Spirit will be hosting shows and other events in the vault nightly through Oct. 31, so you’ll have plenty of chances to lose yourself in the immersive, interactive space. Check the full schedule at Spirit’s website. MF 9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $20. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

NEWS

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[METAL] + TUE., OCT. 25 Long hair don’t care? Love to circle headbang and/or two step? Cattivo’s got you covered with a sampling platter of what’s good in heavy music right now. Tonight’s lineup features Ohio’s powerviolence champions Homewrecker, and Oathbreaker, a haunting black-metal-meets-post-hardcore outfit imported from Belgium and signed to Deathwish, Inc. Thrash supergroup Iron Reagan brings its unrelenting punk and thrash crossover music, offering a slightly more old-school sound. Topping things off is Skeletonwitch, whose sound was deemed by Disney’s House of Blues in Florida to be “unfit to associate with Disney.” That’s metal. MF 5:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $16-18. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 20 HOWLERS. Elephant Stone, The Tilt Room, One Day Steady, Paul Labrise. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. PROJECT/ OBJECT. The Music of Frank Zappa w/ Ike Willis & Don Preston. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 21 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Old Soles, Seedy Players w/ Brash Teeth & The Funky Mudbugs. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Those Gorgeous Bastards, The Dirty Charms & Radioactive. South Side. 412-431-4090. OAKMONT TAVERN. Right TurnClyde. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. NeverWake w/ Silk 9. CD release party. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

TUE 25

FRI 21

DIESEL. Shallow Side, Rachel Lorin. South Side. 412-431-8800.

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. THE R BAR. KAR-E-O-KEE. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERS CASINO. Lee Alverson. North Side. 267-932-8760. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Lawrenceville. 412-621-4900.

WED 26 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. McLovins & Mister F. North Side. 412-904-3335. REX THEATER. Eric Krasno Band w/ Steeltown Horns. South Side. 412-381-6811. THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Dave & Duane Keogh w/ Danny Rectenwald. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

DJS THU 20 DIESEL. Vanic. South Side. 614-446-6527. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. Millvale. 603-321-0277. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

SAT 22 565 LIVE. The Rockers. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. CATTIVO. Horus Maze, Goonland, The Gossamer Project, Big Atlantic, Mamas Madness & Van Waylon. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. Artwork. South Side. 412-431-8800. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Blue Bombers. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELLWOOD CITY MOOSE. Bo’Hog Brothers. Elwood City. 724-758-9254. THE HOP HOUSE. Mr. Clean Band. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. HOWLERS. Erika Hughes & the Well-Mannered, The Crew of the Half Moon, Old Game. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. Washington. 724-225-5221. MOUSETRAP. Waiting for Ray. Beaver. 724-796-5955. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Gathering Field. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RIVERS CASINO. Right TurnClyde. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 23 HOWLERS. Tsushimamire, We Are The Asteroid, The Fuckies, Sorry I’m Dead. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

MP 3 MONDAY BLUE SOUL TEN

Each week we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Blue Soul Ten, a project of composer/producer Claye Greene, which blends jazz, soul and electronica. Stream or download “Daydream,” from The Fearless Warrior, for free at FFW, the music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.


HEAVY ROTATION

FRI 21

SAT 22

OAKS THEATER. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie Granati & Joe Munroe. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Jesse Denaro & Sofia Talvik. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RIVERS CASINO. Artistree, Jeff Jimerson & Airborne, On The Level. North Side. 412-231-7777. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Antoni Maiovvi, Variar, Morpheus Laughing, Cutups. Lawrenceville. 412586-4441.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Travlin’. Ballroom. Tony Campbell Jam Session. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. 412-728-4155.

These are the tracks Pittsburghbased hip-hop artist Charon Don can’t stop listening to: “Who Knows”

Protoje feat. Chronixx

TUE 25 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Stevee Wellons. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

“Pour It Up”

SUN 23

ACOUSTIC

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. CMU Bhangra. Oakland. 412-622-3114. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Phat Man Dee w/ Lilith DeVille, The Mad Muse & Amoeba Knievel. EP release. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

THU 20 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Charlie Barath & Chris Sutton. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

Mali Music

FRI 21 565 LIVE. The Blues Orphans. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. SEA SHELL RESTAURANT. Eclectic Acoustics. Moon. 412-262-1980. THE SOUTH SIDE BBQ RESTAURANT. Tony Germaine, singer/guitarist. South Side. 412-381-4566.

“Nas Album Done”

DJ Khaled feat. Nas

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Dance Crush. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. Lee Alverson. North Side. 267-932-8760. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. FINESSE: EYEJAY & Paizley. Lawrenceville. 412-726-0061.

SUN 23 THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644.

FRI 21 ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE & WINE CELLAR. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-7699.

SAT 22 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Billy Price Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE R BAR. Will E. Tri. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

JAZZ

TUE 25 THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

WED 26 SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Weird Paul Wednesday in the Vault w/ Middle Children. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

WED 26 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 21 1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254.

SAT 22 1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254.

NEWS

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist Charlie Sanders. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Victor Provost. album release. North Side. 412-904-3335.

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MUSIC

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PIANO

D WAY NE D OLPHIN

GUITAR

NOVEMBER 5, 2016

DAVE M Ɯ MU RRAY

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL • 7:30 P.M.

SAXOPHONE

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

S . EPATHA MERKERS ON ACTOR/HOST

DRUMS/VOCALS

OTHER MUSIC

FRED WES LEY

THU 20

TROMBONE

RIVERS CASINO. Sully n Roc. North Side. 412-231-7777. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Big Freedia, DJ Simi, Moonbaby. Lawrenceville. 412-486-4441.

CAS S AND RA WILS ON

JAZZ SEMINARS: OCT. 31–NOV. 4

VOCALS +

TASTE

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE AT MUSIC.PITT.EDU/TICKETS OR BY CALLING 412-624-7529. ORCHESTRA SEATING $30 IN ADVANCE, $35 AT THE DOOR; GENERAL ADMISSION $25 IN ADVANCE, $30 AT THE DOOR; STUDENT TICKETS $10 IN ADVANCE AND AT THE DOOR (VALID STUDENT ID IS REQUIRED)

JAMIS ON ROS S

THE CLUB BAR & GRILL. The Flow Band. Monroeville. 413-728-4155.

EVENTS

CONCERT

PERRY HU GHES

FRI 21

+

@MellingerBeer

PittJazz

BASS

REGGAE

ARTS

46th ANNUAL

GERI ALLEN

SAT 22

FRI 21

like us on Facebook!

TRUMPET

FULL LIST ONLINE .com

www.MELLINGERSBEER.com www. .com 412.682.4396

AMBROS E AKIN MU S IRE

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. www. per a p 412-224-2273. pghcity

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

30 Pack $ 20 49+ TAX 0.4

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

WED 26

THU 20

Molson Canadian & Canadian light

HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Paz and Ukulele Eddie & The OHM Project. Regent Square. 412-247-1870. DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Brian Belonzi. Mars. 724-553-5212. DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Bridgewater Station Acoustic. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8181.

BLUES

With over 550 Beers in stock, couuld you go g wrong? how could

MON 24

SAT 22 SAT 22

stock it, Iff we don’tr iit for you! we’lll orde PORT Pittsburgh’s 1st IM tributor and craft Beer Deisbe and still th st!

THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. River Whyless & Jeremy Caywood. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

RIVERS CASINO. Kevin Howard Trio. 1-877-558-0777.

“Ready Aim”

MPLE S 402-406 SE

SAT 22

WED 26

Rihanna

. INLC . T S I D N A BEER TREET OAK D

F O R LO C A T I O N S : M U S I C . P I T T. E D U / J A Z Z- S E M

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What to do IN PITTSBURGH

Oct 19 -25 WEDNESDAY 19 Colbie Caillat “The Malibu Sessions Acoustic Tour” CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 20 Letters From The Fire HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Emo Night SPIRIT Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

COLBIE CAILLAT ILLAT CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL OCT 19

Tickets: greyareaprod.com 8p.m.

FRIDAY 21 215

Bill T. Jones / Arnie Zane Company

LLucero MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millville. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Rae Sremmurd

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 22.

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

LANY: The Kinda Tour

Joyce Manor

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millville. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Garden

TUESDAY 25

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

1964 The Tribute PROJECT/OBJECT. The Music of Frank Zappa w/ Ike Willis & Don Preston

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show.

Kip Moore

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PAID ADVERTORIAL PAI ADV DVE VEERT RTO TO ORIA RIAL SPONSORED SPON PON PO NSOR SORED SO E BY

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through Nov. 20.

SATURDAY 22

David Ramirez: Bootleg Tour

LESTER HAMBURG STUDIO South Side. 724-836-8000.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/

Feeding the Dragon

SUNDAY 23

opusone. 8:30p.m.

MONDAY 24

Cirque Mechanics presents Pedal Punk BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7p.m.

Halloween Magic starring Adam Trent THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7p.m.

Yelawolf REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


NOW

OPEN!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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On the cover: Dallas Sauers, owner of your choice for Best Nail Salon, Dallas Beauty Lounge CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

Best Dance Company ................................8 Best Local Theater Company ....................8 Best Gallery for Local Artists ....................8 Best Literary Event ...................................8 Best Local Visual Artist .............................8 Best Local Stage Production .....................8 Best Local Comedian............................... 10 Best Local Comedy Troupe ..................... 10 Best Local Cartoonist .............................. 10 Best Local Photographer......................... 10 Best Local Writer .................................... 10 Best Local Poet ....................................... 10 Best Local Annual Convention ................ 10 Best Pop/Rock Band ............................... 10 Best Metal Band...................................... 12 Best Local Hip-Hop Performer to be the Next Mac Miller ............... 12 Best Alt-folk/Alt-country / y Band ............... 14 4

Best Jazz/Blues Band or Performer ................................... 14 Best Local Music Venue........................... 14 Best Place to See a Local Band ............... 14 Best Music Festival ................................ 14 Best New Bar (as of June 2015)................ 14 Best Bar (DOWNTOWN) .......................... 14 Best Bar (NORTH) .................................... 16 Best Bar (SOUTH) .................................... 16 Best Bar (EAST) ....................................... 16 Best Bar (WEST) ...................................... 16 Best Sports Bar ....................................... 16 Best LGBT Bar ......................................... 16 Best Place to Take a First Date ................ 16 Best Place to Take a Tinder Date ............ 18 Best Place to Dance ................................ 18 Best Place to Take Out-of-Towners ............................... 18

Best Cocktail List..................................... 18 Best Bartender ........................................ 18 Best Club................................................. 18 Best Bar to Pregame ............................... 18 Best Bar to Day-Drink ............................ 20 Best Strip Club ....................................... 20 Best Dive Bar ......................................... 20 Best Trivia Night .................................... 20 Best Karaoke Night ................................ 20 Best DJ................................................... 20 Best Place for a Girls’ Night Out ............ 20 Best Place for a Guys’ Night Out............ 20 Best Haunted Attraction ........................ 20 Best Place for an Adult Birthday Party ...................... 20 Best Distance Race...................................21 Best Independent Movie Theater ............21 Best Street Festival ..................................21

Best Bank............................................... 24 Best Best Local Bookstore ............................. 24 Best Place to Buy Musical Instruments ..... 24 Best Local Store to Buy Music ................ 24 Best Record Store .................................. 24 Best Place to Pimp Your Ride ................. 24 Best Local Store to Buy Furniture .......... ?? Best Local Place to Buy Vintage Clothing .... 26 Best Antique Shop ................................. 26 Best Place to Buy Yourself Happiness ..... 26 Best Locally-based Etsy Store ................ 26 Best Card Store ...................................... 26 Best Bridal Shop .................................... 26 Best Outdoor Wedding Venue ............... 30

Best Indoor Wedding Venue .................. 30 Best Best Florist............................................. 30 Best Local Jewelry Store........................ 30 Best Hair Salon ...................................... 30 Best Nail Salon ....................................... 30 Best Barber Shop ................................... 30 Best Massage Therapist......................... 30 Best Fitness Center ................................ 32 Best Spa................................................. 32 Best Bicycle Shop................................... 32 Best Yoga Studio.................................... 32 Best Adult Store..................................... 32 Best Tattoo Shop ................................... 32 Best Body-Piercing Shop........................ 32

Best Place to Get a Tattoo Removed...... 34 Best Best Vape Shop...................................... 34 Best Cigar Shop ..................................... 34 Best Beer Distributor ............................. 34 Best Garden Shop / Nursery .................. 34 Best Local Pet Store ............................... 34 Best Doggy Daycare .............................. 34 Best Place to Adopt a Pet .......................35 Best Neighborhood Market.....................35 Best Farmers Market...............................35 Best Thrift Shop......................................35 Best Place to Take the Kids for an Afternoon .....................35 Best City Tour .........................................35

AN OFFICIAL BEER SPONSOR OF THE PITTSBURGH STEELERS GREAT BEER GREAT RESPONSIBILITY® ©2016 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


PRESENTING THE WINNERS OF OUR ANNUAL BEST OF PITTSBURGH READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS! Best New Restaurant (as of June 2015)............................ 38 Best Restaurant (DOWNTOWN) ............. 38 Best Restaurant (NORTH)....................... 38 Best Restaurant (SOUTH)....................... 38 Best Restaurant (EAST) .......................... 38 Best Restaurant (WEST) ......................... 38 Best Chef .............................................. 38 Best Indian Restaurant .......................... 39 Best Japanese Restaurant ..................... 39 Best Italian Restaurant .......................... 39 Best Thai Restaurant ............................. 39 Best Chinese Restaurant........................ 39 Best Middle-Eastern Restaurant ............ 39 Best Mexican / Latin American Restaurant ............ 39 Best Contemporary American Restaurant ....................40 Best Vegan / Vegetarian Restaurant ....40 Best Restaurant to Take the Kids ...........40 Best Steakhouse ....................................40

Best Seafood .......................................... 41 Best Sushi ............................................... 41 Best BBQ................................................. 41 Best Mac & Cheese ................................. 41 Best Sandwich ........................................ 41 Best Burger ............................................. 41 Best Pizza ............................................... 41 Best Wings ............................................. 41 Best Taco ............................................... 42 Best Hot Dog ......................................... 42 Best Buffet ............................................ 42 Best Coffeehouse .................................. 42 Best Tea Shop ........................................ 42 Best Desserts ........................................ 42 Best Candy Store ................................... 42 Best Bakery ........................................... 43 Best Ice Cream ....................................... 43 Best Sunday Brunch............................... 43 Best Downtown Lunch Spot .................. 44 Best Take-Out ....................................... 44 Best Service / Wait Staff ....................... 44

Best Outdoor Dining ..............................44 Best Happy Hour ...................................44 Best Rooftop Bar ...................................44 Best Hotel Bar........................................44 Best Late-Night Menu ............................44 Best Pub-Grub .......................................44 Best Food-Delivery Service....................44 Best Gluten-Free Menu ..........................46 Best Place to Eat at the Bar ...................46 Best Local Beer ......................................48 Best Restaurant Wine List .....................48 Best Restaurant Beer List ......................48 Best Bloody Mary ..................................48 Best Margarita .......................................49 Best Martini ...........................................49 Best Locally Made Spirit ........................49 Best Food Truck .....................................49 Best New Food Truck (as of June 2015) ............................49 Best Juice/Smoothie Bar .......................49 Best Food Festival .................................49

Best Local Celebrity to Take a Selfie With .......................... 52 Best Nonprofit ....................................... 52 Best Local Instagram Account................ 52 Best Local Twitter Account .................... 52 Best Local Blogger ................................. 52 Best Local Podcast ................................. 52 Best Activist .......................................... 52 Best Local Radio Personality ..................53 Best On-Air Sports Personality ..........................53

Best Philanthropic Pittsburgh Steeler ..........................53 Best Philanthropic Pittsburgh Pirate ............................53 Best Philanthropic Pittsburgh Penguin .........................53 Best Bike Path.........................................53 Best Animal at the Pittsburgh Zoo .........53 Best Television Weather Personality...... 54 Best Television News Anchor ................ 54 Best Pittsburgh Couple .......................... 54

Best Hiking Trail..................................... 54 Best Public Bathroom ............................ 54 Best Local Political Commercial ............. 54 Best Public Art ....................................... 54 Best Bridge ............................................ 54 Best City Steps .......................................55 Best Scenic Drive ....................................55 Best Neighborhood to Raise a Family ............................55 Best Neighborhood for Young Professionals .......................55

* VIEW SECOND + THIRD PLACE BEST OF PITTSBURGH WINNERS ONLINE AT WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM *

TURN THE PAGE FOR MILLER LITE SPECIALS DURING ALL STEELERS GAMES AN OFFICIAL BEER SPONSOR OF THE PITTSBURGH STEELERS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

5


VISIT ONE OF THESE PARTICIPATING RETAILERS FOR MILLER LITE® SPECIALS DURING ALL STEELERS GAMES: PITTSBURGH 1311 (Southside) $2.00 Lite Bottles

Brewski’s (Southside) $3.00 20oz Lite Drafts

Hog’s Head $2.50 20oz Lite Drafts

Steel Towne Inn -

Monaca Drafthouse $2.00 Lite 20oz Drafts

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Perry Towne Draft House -

All-Star Bar & Grill

$3.00 20oz Lite Drafts

Courthouse Tavern $3.00 20oz Lite Drafts

Pope’s Place $2.50 Lite Bottles

Pleasure Bar $2.00 Lite Bottles

Social -

SOUTH and EAST $2.50 16oz Lite Drafts

$5.00 Lite 48oz Pitchers

(Harrison City) $2.50 16oz Lite Drafts

Guntown (Canonsburg) $3.50 22oz Lite Drafts

William Penn Tavern $2.50 20oz Lite Drafts

$2.00 Lite 16oz Drafts and $6.00 48oz Lite Pitchers

NORTH

Mr. Mikes Pub and Pizza (Irwin) -

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

BLVD Pub and Kitchen

Frankie I’s (Washington) $2.50 Lite Aluminum Bottles

$2.50 16oz Lite Drafts

Scooby’s Pub (Greensburg) $2.75 Lite Aluminum Bottles

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$3.00 22oz Lite Drafts

Johnny’s Wife’s Place 2

Mulligans (West Mifflin) -

AN OFFICIAL BEER SPONSOR OF THE PITTSBURGH STEELERS

(Canonsburg) -

(Canonsburg) -

Arena Sports Grill (Irwin) -

$2.00 16oz Lite Drafts

Barking Shark $2.00 20oz Lite Drafts

$2.00 Lite Bottles

McGrogans Tap Room (Canonsburg) -

$2.00 Lite 16oz Drafts

The Last Call (Canonsburg)$6.00 Lite 48oz Pitchers

IT’S MILLER TIME® ©2016 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI


MARS JACKSON BEST LOCAL HIP-HOP PERFORMER TO BE THE NEXT MAC MILLER CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Adam and Nicole Kulik, winner of Best Couple and owners of The Goldmark, winner of Best New Bar; Adam, a.k.a. DJ Nugget, also won Best DJ.

BEST DANCE COMPANY

ATTACK THEATRE 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District www.attacktheatre.com • • • • • • • •

In its 22nd season, Pittsburgh’s longest-running contemporary dance company is still going strong with high energy, choreographic smarts and a highly developed sense of fun that often incorporates audience input into shows.

BEST LOCAL THEATER COMPANY

CITY THEATRE 1300 Bingham St., South Side 412- 431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org • • • • • • • •

Housed in an old church off the main drag, City Theatre is a

perennial Best-Of favorite. The focus here is on new plays by both established writers and rising stars, and the current 2016-17 schedule boasts works by Sharon Washington, Marco Ramirez and City Theatre favorite Jessica Dickey.

BEST GALLERY FOR LOCAL ARTISTS

SPACE

BEST LITERARY EVENT

THE MOTH www.themoth.org • • • • • • • •

The nationally known storytelling series (true stories, no notes) has three incarnations here: a monthly StorySlam; an annual Grand Slam, for StorySlam winners; and The Moth Mainstage, which showcases talented touring tellers to sold-out houses at the Byham Theater.

812 Liberty Ave., Downtown 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org • • • • • • • •

It’s hard to miss this gallery as you walk — the letters S, P, A, C and E are writ huge on its large windows — and it easily draws in passersby from Cultural District hangouts. This gallery offers new artists a highly visible space to display their artwork and reach new viewers.

primarily works with aerosol paints and hand-made stencils, and his paintings have found homes with Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, Talib Kweli and others.

BEST LOCAL VISUAL ARTIST

DURTY ART www.durty1.com • • • • • • • •

The love for ’80s hip hop that Bob Freyer, a.k.a. Durty-1, has is heavily reflected in his street-style art. He

BEST LOCAL STAGE PRODUCTION

MOROSE & MACABRE’S ATROCITY EXHIBITION www.moroseandmacabre.com • • • • • • • •

This annual showcase of the bizarre, the dark, the disturbing, held at the Rex Theater, is no traditional play: It’s more a blend of burlesque, sideshow, drag show and goth pageant, with a thematically apt crafts bazaar for good measure. CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


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412-621-4900

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

BEST LOCAL COMEDIAN

DEREK MINTO www.derekminto.com • • • • • • • •

A pioneer of Pittsburgh’s resurgent comedy scene, Minto has starred in local comedy festivals, and opened for the likes of Hannibal Buress and Jim Breuer. His excitable persona’s a hoot, whether he’s talking about taking revenge on 8-year-old hecklers or confirming that it’s a good idea to keep your plasma.

Post-Gazette, taking the prize here. For two decades he’s spurred conversations (and, more recently, lots of Facebook shares) with his thoughtful perspectives on pressing political and social issues, as well as thoughts on day-to-day life.

BEST LOCAL POET

TERRENCE CHIUSANO • • • • • • • •

BEST LOCAL COMEDY TROUPE

SECONDHAND SKETCH www.youtube.com/channel/ UCy6eahjStG5hevumiKBk-ow • • • • • • • •

This group, made up of comedians Krish Mohan, Derek Minto, Rob Speer, Mindy Cooper, Andy Roos, Ashley McKinney, Ian McIntosch and Zack Roach, does a combination of live and video sketches. Delving into culture, media and society, their performances include skits, musical numbers and monologues.

With a debut poetry collection out last year, Chiusano has burst onto Pittsburgh’s poetry scene with tremendous success. The Pitt grad’s On Generation & Corruption blends narrative with word-play, multi-parted forms and provocative language to tackle existential themes.

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST BALLOON ARTIST

WEIRD ERIC

BEST LOCAL CARTOONIST

ROB ROGERS www.robrogers.com • • • • • • • •

With more than three decades of experience under his belt, the Pittsburgh Post Gazette editorial cartoonist has highlighted issues like gun violence and satirized the likes of presidents Bush and Clinton. We’re still fans of his depiction of former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl as a juice-box-carrying child.

Reason: “The man can make ANYTHING out of balloons and is exceptionally entertaining for kids and adults alike.” BEST LOCAL ANNUAL CONVENTION

ANTHROCON www.anthrocon.org • • • • • • • •

BEST LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER

DAVE DICELLO PHOTOGRAPHY www.davedicello.com • • • • • • • •

Downtown by night. Downtown lit by fireworks. The three rivers at dawn. The city ignited by lightning strikes. The city from the air. DiCello is a wedding photographer, but he’s also widely social-media’d for his iconic images of the town he calls home.

For one wacky weekend in July, Downtown Pittsburgh is invaded by a large-scale menagerie of furry characters. There are wolves, cats, bears, foxes, dogs and more — but not the four-legged kind. This convention celebrates twolegged furries, folks who dress as anthropomorphic animals from art and literature.

BEST POP/ROCK BAND

NEVADA COLOR www.facebook.com/NevadaColorMusic

BEST LOCAL WRITER

TONY NORMAN • • • • • • • •

It’s no surprise to see Norman, a long-time columnist for the Pittsburgh

• • • • • • • •

Indie pop, as it’s done by Nevada Color, is an airtight, winsome thing. With two releases since 2013 — and a much-anticipated follow-up forthcoming — this CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


the doer

CHRISTMAS at CASS the giver

Ride our newest CASS train!

The Elf Limited Holiday

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KIDS! It’s Santa’s JR ELF TRAINING SCHOOL Train Ride! Many Dates available in late November to December 11th.

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BOOK YOUR TRIP AND GET A MAGICAL GIFT FROM SANTA!

the dreamer JOIN US FOR FALL VISIT DAYS 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Lower School: November 15 December 6

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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celebrating 90 years of entertainment magic 1964 THE TRIBUTE halloween starring adam trent

FRIDAY • OCTOBER 21 • 8PM

tuesday • OCTOBER 25 • 7PM

and the band plays on!

BEST OF CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

the paragon ragtime orchestra’s

friday • OCTOBER 28 • 7:30PM

the world famous

free glenn miller home orchestra a country christmas

tuesday • november 1 • 6PM

goo goo dolls

t sold ou saturday • november 5 • 7:30PM

friday • November 11 • 7:30PM

ffri/sat fri /sat sat • nov nov 11818/19 8/19 • 7:7:30PM :30P 30 M& M &&susun sun • no nov2 novv 2200 • 2PMM

friday • november 25 • 11aM fr

christmas brasstacular

& THE NEW CHORDETTES

saturday • november 12 • 8PM

sunday • november 13 • 7:30PM

wayne newton up close & personal

cornell gunter’s coasters, the drifters & the platters

saturday • november 26 • 7:30PM

thursday • december 1 • 7:30PM

“ holiday hop ”

the nutcracker

THE FOUR PREPS

kenny rogers the gambler’s last deal PalacePA

saturday • december 3 • 7:30PM

tuesday • december 6 • 2PM

sat • dec 10 • 2pm/7PM & sun • dec 11 • 2pm

wednesday • december 14 • 7:30PM

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS

.50

$

2 20 oz

Coors Light drafts

during all Pens games

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Monthly Pens Ticket giveaways.

Anthrocon, winner of Best Local Annual Convention

Point Park University-bred five-piece has grown into one of Pittsburgh’s most reliably catchy and energetic acts.

BEST LOCAL HIP-HOP PERFORMER TO BE THE NEXT MAC MILLER

MARS JACKSON BEST METAL BAND

DETHLEHEM www.dethlehem.com • • • • • • • •

$ .50

2

20 oz Coors Light drafts during all Pens games

Monthly Pens Ticket giveaways!

Those magnificent armor-wearing bastards have done it again. The fantasy-metal band, whose members dress like knights and sell personalized foam swords on their website, are again the best metal band in the city. Lift your glasses in jubilation! Huzzah!

www.misrarecords.com • • • • • • • •

Jackson, who grew up in the Hill District, is a proud Pittsburgh hip-hop artist. You can hear it in his rhymes, you can see it on his videos, and you can hear it when he talks about the local hip-hop scene: “If I can do my music and live here at the same time and touch people, that’s what I’m gonna do.” CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


Thank you, Readers! Best Photographer in Pittsburgh “Second Place” www.paulfalavolito.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

BEST ALT-FOLK/ ALT-COUNTRY BAND

JUSTIN FABUS BAND www.justinfabus.com • • • • • • • •

There’s no denying the roll that 29-year-old Justin Fabus and his band are on. (They are currently touring.) They might sound a bit mainstream country, but that can’t hurt: The band signed a record deal in February and played at the CMA Fest, in Nashville.

BEST JAZZ/BLUES BAND OR PERFORMER

PHAT MAN DEE www.phatmandee.com • • • • • • • •

Phat Man Dee is a force on stage. She often croons her playful songs in collaboration with other Pittsburgh artists, burlesque dancers and drag performers. She also uses her low tones to perform classic jazz tunes, as well as songs she pens from her life experiences.

BEST LOCAL MUSIC VENUE

STAGE AE 400 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-229-5483 • • • • • • • •

This relatively new concert venue brings in popular acts across the musical spectrum. The facility, which has spaces to accommodate both small and mid-size shows, also has a reversible stage, so in nice weather, fans can enjoy the show in the open air. Another plus: no traffic jams; walk or take the T.

BEST PLACE TO SEE A LOCAL BAND

CLUB CAFÉ

offers an all-day, mostly local lineup of musicians. Nearby businesses such as Park House, James Street Gastropub and the Modern Café help host, while food trucks and kids’ activities make it a family event.

BEST NEW BAR (AS OF JUNE 2015)

THE GOLDMARK 4517 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-688-8820 or www.thegoldmark.com • • • • • • • •

The latest addition to Lawrenceville’s nightlife scene is owned and operated by Pittsburgh favorite DJ Nugget (a.k.a. Adam Kulik) and features a rotating list of DJs on the turntables. But with good food, cocktails and an inventive beer and shot list, this is more than your average bar.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PITTSBURGH ICON

“CHILLY” BILLY CARDILLE Reason: “He was a loyal Pittsburgher and a fixture in so many different media realms. Thousands rallied around him when he needed prayers of healing, and he was always there for kids, especially children with muscular dystrophy.”

56 S. 12th St., South Side 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com • • • • • • • •

While it’s perhaps Pittsburgh’s most intimate venue for touring acts, this South Side institution is also ideal for getting up close and personal with talent from just around the corner, from local legends like Billy Price to scene stalwarts like Gene the Werewolf.

BEST BAR (DOWNTOWN)

BUTCHER AND THE RYE 212 Sixth St., Downtown 412-391-2752 or www.butcherandtherye.com • • • • • • • •

BEST MUSIC FESTIVAL

DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL www.deutschtownmusicfestival.org • • • • • • • •

This two-day festival on the North Side

Butcher and the Rye has been a go-to destination for expertly made cocktails since 2013; it was a semifinalist in the James Beard Outstanding Bar Program award two years in a row. There is an intimate upstairs bar, plus a downstairs bar with a “Whiskey Wall” featuring more than 600 whiskeys. CONTINUES ON PG. 16

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

BEST BUFFET AND

BEST PLACE FOR AN ADULT BIRTHDAY PARTY The excitement never ends at Rivers Casino.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be 21 years of age or older to be on Rivers Casino property.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Jillian Swisher and Theresa Peranteau at Perle, winner of Best Place for a Girls’ Night Out

BEST BAR (NORTH)

THE PARK HOUSE 403 E. Ohio St., North Side 412-224-2273 or www.parkhousepgh.com • • • • • • • •

This is the only place in town where you can knock back a glass or two from a variety of craft beers and throw your peanut shells on the floor. Head there early on Wednesday nights if you want a seat for the live bluegrass jam.

BEST BAR (SOUTH)

ACACIA 2108 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-1800 or www.acaciacocktails.com • • • • • • • •

The barely marked entrance on busy East Carson lends a speakeasy vibe to this Prohibition-themed lounge. But there is nothing nondescript about the cocktail program here, where patrons enjoy handcrafted potions in a quiet bar

that’s a respite from the raucous South Side scene. Stay hep with a gin fizz.

BEST BAR (EAST)

SPIRIT

242 51st St., Lawrenceville 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com • • • • • • • •

Cheap beer, good pizza, fancy (but not too fancy) cocktails: This woodpaneled Moose Lodge-turnedultra-hip-bar has it all. Drop in for a slice and a drink, a DJ night, or to see next year’s hottest indie band or hip-hop artist.

expanse of chains. The craft-beer selection is great; Wednesdays feature 45-cent wings; and the homemade pepperoni rolls are no joke — soft, chewy, piping hot with a side of marinara, and worth a drive through the tunnels.

BEST SPORTS BAR

REDBEARD’S BAR & GRILL 201 Shiloh St., Mount Washington 412-431-3730 or www.redbeardspgh.com • • • • • • • •

BEST BAR (WEST)

DOWNEY’S HOUSE 6080 Steubenville Pike Road, Robinson 412-489-5631 or www.downeyshouse.com • • • • • • • •

This local spot is an oasis in Robinson’s

Perfecting the time-tested marriage of good bar food and hometown sports, this Mount Washington go-to offers fried-food classics, seafood and a robust beer selection, to accompany every Steelers and Penguins game on the tube.

BEST LGBT BAR

BLUE MOON 5115 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-781-1119 • • • • • • • •

The bar can be a comfy neighborhood dive one minute, and then an excitement-filled drag catwalk in the next. It’s consistently unpretentious and inclusive for anyone who wants a drink. Inexpensive drinks range from mixers to beer, and, of course, there is plenty of Blue Moon on tap.

BEST PLACE TO TAKE A FIRST DATE

PNC PARK 115 Federal St., North Side www.pittsburghpirates.com • • • • • • • •

The stadium is gorgeous, and the city skyline is a good conversation-starter. The game ends eventually, in case the CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

MUST CLOSE OCTOBER 16!

extended through oct. 2 2

HAND TO GOD BY

ROBERT ROBE ASKINS DIRECTED BY TRACY BRIGDEN DIRE

date gets awkward or boring. And if you go on the right night, you could get a concert, fireworks or a Josh Harrison bobblehead.

BEST PLACE TO TAKE A TINDER DATE

BLUSH 135 Ninth St., Downtown 412-281-7703 or www.blushexotic.com • • • • • • • •

Given Tinder’s focus on matching people with mutual interests, presumably you’ll go somewhere you’re both into. But if your date might dig dancers the likes of Romi Rain and Natasha Nova, a VIP lounge, bottle service, or maybe the sports bar upstairs, Blush is for you.

BEST BARTENDER

RICHIE WALTER, CAVO 1916 Smallman St., Strip District 412-918-1068 or www.cavopittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

For the third year in a row, Richie Walter has been recognized for his charisma and kindness. With more than a decade of experience behind the bar, Walter provides customers with excellent and efficient service, whether he’s serving up shots or a classic cocktail.

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PLACE TO DANCE

CAVO 1916 Smallman St., Strip District 412-918-1068 or www.cavopittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US THE

BEST LOCAL THEATRE COMPANY FOR 10 YEARS! COMING UP NEXT

Bright lights, private alcoves, high ceilings and a large dance floor make this the ideal nightclub to get your groove on. You’ll hear all the latest hits while you dance to DJs on Saturday nights. On Friday nights, shake it to salsa music.

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS

MOUNT WASHINGTON • • • • • • • •

World Premiere

FEEDING THE DRAGON WRITTEN AND PERFORMED BY SHARON WASHINGTON OCTOBER 22 – NOVEMBER 20, 2016

For maximum effect, catch one of the inclines up (and back down) — but any way you get there, the panoramic view of Downtown’s skyline, the rivers, the stadiums and the hills beyond says “Welcome to Pittsburgh” like nowhere else.

The Star of The Lion

BEST COCKTAIL LIST

BENJAMIN SCHEUER: LIVE IN CONCERT! NOVEMBER 11 – 13, 2016

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN 4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com • • • • • • • •

City Paper fans always save $5 on single tickets with code: CITYCITY

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org / SOUTH SIDE

Whether you’re aiming to impress a date or just want a damn good drink, this old bank-buildingturned-bar will do the trick. The menu is seasonal; skilled bartenders mix classic American potions with cutting-edge twists; and the atmosphere is cozy, not stuffy.

BEST PLACE TO HAVE A BEER BY THE WATER

THAT ABANDONED BOAT BY THE HEINZ LOFTS ON THE NORTH SIDE Reason: “It’s great. Climbing a tree to get onto a boat and look out over the river. Just as long as you don’t drop your beers.”

BEST CLUB

CAVO 1916 Smallman St., Strip District 412-918-1068 or www.cavopittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

With its warm, sophisticated décor — think exposed brick and red curtains — Cavo is an inviting night-onthe-town destination. Stop by for a DJ night and boogie on the dance floor; grab dinner and drinks; or, if high-rolling, book the space for a private event.

BEST BAR TO PREGAME

PREGAME 1501 Sarah St., South Side www.facebook.com/ pregame.southside • • • • • • • •

With specials like $2 beers and $3 mystery shots, it’s easy to see why this is the perfect spot for getting lit before a big night out or an CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

important sporting event. But in this TV-filled bar, you might just feel like sticking around for the big game.

BEST BAR TO DAY-DRINK

LOCAL BAR + KITCHEN 1515 E. Carson St., South Side 412-308-5183 or www.localpgh.com • • • • • • • •

Three things are essential to day-drinking: a good selection of drafts and spirits; a menu with tasty booze-soakers, like nachos; and something to watch besides daytime TV. So yeah, grabbing a pint and a triple-decker reuben, and getting a window seat to watch East Carson Street stroll by seems like a good day.

BEST STRIP CLUB

CHEERLEADERS 3100 Liberty Ave., Strip District 412-281-3110 or cheerleaderspittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

More than just your average titty bar, this gentlemen’s club also boasts an extensive food menu, with selections like the “chocolate mousse eruption.” Stop in on Tuesdays for the two-for-one lap-dance special, and check the website for special upcoming acts.

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Zumba during July’s OpenStreets PGH, winner of Best Street Festival

BEST KARAOKE NIGHT BEST DIVE BAR

GOOSKI’S 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill 412-681-1658 • • • • • • • •

This dark, narrow bar is a favorite of those in search of cheap drinks and no-nonsense service. (Most regulars will pledge their undying love to long-time bartender Tim Quinlan.) Head to the back room for live music, which could be a touring punk band or local noise artists (or both).

BEST TRIVIA NIGHT

BRILLOBOX 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield 412-621-4900 or www.brilloboxpgh.com • • • • • • • •

Trivia nights abound at local watering holes, but at nearly a decade old, Brillobox’s Pub Quiz is among the liveliest and longest-running. Wednesday nights, don your thinking cap and improve your memory for factoids by indulging in the ’Box’s well-curated drafts list.

20

NICO’S RECOVERY ROOM 178 Pearl St., Bloomfield 412-681-9562

BEST PLACE FOR A GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT

PERLE 25 Market Square, Downtown 412-471-2058 or www.perlepgh.com

BEST HAUNTED ATTRACTION

SCAREHOUSE 118 Locust St., Etna 412-781-5885 or www.scarehouse.com • • • • • • • •

Every Saturday night from 9:30 on, Nico’s is full of dedicated karaoke fans. The welcoming atmosphere and supportive crowd are enough to make newbies want to take the mic. Drinks are cheap and spirits are high, so bring friends and sing your heart out.

This champagne lounge features tasty drinks, a chic atmosphere and music to dance to. Every Saturday is ladies’ night — enjoy a free drink — and on Thursdays, you can grab your gals and learn to dance the bachata with DJ Bobby D.

With top-notch production values and outside-the-box premises — horror Christmas, anyone? — this nationally known haunted house has been scaring the bejabbers out of locals and visiting celebrities alike for years. And for true fear-seekers, there’s always the no-holds-barred attraction The Basement …

BEST DJ

BEST PLACE FOR A GUYS’ NIGHT OUT

BEST PLACE FOR AN ADULT BIRTHDAY PARTY

BLUSH

RIVERS CASINO

• • • • • • • •

DJ NUGGET www.djnugget.com • • • • • • • •

Though he’s lately focusing more on his Butler Street bar, The Goldmark, Nugget (a.k.a. Adam Kulik) remains one of the city’s hottest DJs. His seamlessly grooving mixes, which run the gamut from rock and reggae to house and hip hop, have earned him dozens of credits at clubs and events nationally.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

• • • • • • • •

135 Ninth St., Downtown 412-281-7703 or www.blushexotic.com

777 Casino Drive, North Side 412-231-7777 or www.riverscasino.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Blush has evolved in the past year or so. In addition to the exotic dancers, Blush also offers a pretty sweet sports bar on the third floor. There are 10 big-screen TVs, and plenty of food and drink, including wings, sandwiches, burgers and steaks.

You needn’t like slots or blackjack to spend your b-day here. Rivers boasts multiple bars, DJs, live music and dining options from casual to fine. Bonus: Visit on your actual birthday and qualify for a free lunch or dinner at the Grand View Buffet.


BEST DISTANCE RACE

PITTSBURGH MARATHON www.thepittsburghmarathon.com • • • • • • • •

Most locals would call this city-spanning marathon THE distance race. Runners gather from near and far — there were 39,000-plus participants this year — but if you’re not up for 26.2 miles, there are other ways to get in on the fun, even if that just means cheering from the sidelines.

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST BAND COSTUME CHANGES

AMOEBA KNIEVEL

Reason: “Maybe it should be most, or even, worst.” BEST INDEPENDENT MOVIE THEATER

ROW HOUSE CINEMA 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com • • • • • • • •

This newer but cozy movie theater has quickly become a favorite place to screen classic and cult films, as well as the occasional new movie. Kids’ shows, theme nights and easy access to malted craft beverages at the adjacent Bierport Tap Room make this a neighborly place to catch a film.

BEST STREET FESTIVAL

OPENSTREETS PGH www.openstreetspgh.org • • • • • • • •

For three Sundays this past summer, Pittsburghers took the streets, as a couple of major thoroughfares were closed to automobiles. Instead of traffic, there were bikers, walkers, yogis, dancers, skaters and giddy kids enjoying the asphalt. We loved it in 2015 and 2016, and hope Open Streets returns in 2017.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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Grow Lamps • Starter Kits • Hydroponic Systems • Fertilizers Advanced Nutrients • Hydrofarm • General Hydroponics AAd c cs We Gorilla Grow Tents • Current Culture • And Many Moree Ma G y r e iv tch Del le Prices Availab 419 NINTH STREET, NEW KENSINGTON, PA 15068 al ll le egheny yhyd dropo oni nics cs.com m

724 4-212-1 -119 90

PITTSBURGH HISTORY & LANDMARKS FOUNDATION Renewing Communities: Building Pride.

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING & RECEPTION: THROUGH THE PLACE, SHOWING AT THE BYHAM THEATER.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 • 5:00 PM – 7:30 PM INDEPENDENT CRAFT BREWING

Join us at the historic Byham Theater in Pittsburgh’s Cultural District for a reception and screening of Through the Place, a documentary about PHLF’s leadership role in the development of the nation’s historic preservation movement. Through the Place documents five decades of PHLF’s work and will inspire anyone interested in renewing historic neighborhoods and urban communities. Discs of the film will be available for purchase: DVD: $20, Blu-ray: $25 THIS FILM IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG

RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527

BYHAM THEATER 22

101 6TH ST, PITTSBURGH, PA 15222

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

Pairs well with The Best of Pittsburgh Vecenie Dist. Co. beersince1933.com


TEAM NUTZ TECHNOLOGIES BEST PLACE TO PIMP YOUR RIDE CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

23


{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Jerry’s Records, winner of Best Record Store

BEST BANK

PNC BANK Multiple locations www.pnc.com

volumes, rare and antiquarian books, and new books by local independent authors and poets. Too many books already? Stop in to sell some of your own.

• • • • • • • •

With 2,600 branches in 19 states and even offices overseas, PNC is hardly Pittsburgh’s alone. But its roots are in the pre-Civil War Golden Triangle, and with dozens of branches and hundreds of ATMs in the region, you’ll be forgiven for thinking the “P” still stands for “Pittsburgh.”

BEST LOCAL BOOKSTORE

AMAZING BOOKS 929 Liberty Ave., Downtown, and 2030 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill www.amazingbooksandrecords.com • • • • • • • •

This book-and-record store offers a curated selection of gently used

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY MUSIC

DAVE’S MUSIC MINE 1210 E. Carson, St., South Side 412-488-8800

institution, which boasts a collection of more than a million records. Everything’s here to build a “basics” collection of classic vinyl, plus loads of rarities and oddball picks.

• • • • • • • •

BEST PLACE TO BUY MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

PITTSBURGH GUITARS 1305 E. Carson St., South Side 412-431-0700 or www.pittsburghguitars.com

Stroll down Carson Street and be drawn into Dave’s Music Mine. Racks of new and used vinyl, CDs and movies will provide hours of entertainment, and a perhaps a long-coveted purchase or two. Follow Dave’s on Facebook to stay on top of ticket and music giveaways.

BEST PLACE TO PIMP YOUR RIDE

TEAM NUTZ TECHNOLOGIES 3287 Library Road, Castle Shannon, and 1366 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel www.teamnutztechnology.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Avoiding the big-box chains is but one of the great reasons to shop at Pittsburgh Guitars. Offering a range of new and used gear, the shop — which has been around since 1979 — also provides repairs and lessons, and boasts an attentive, knowledgeable staff.

Is that old bucket you’re driving a little too past its prime? Team Nutz can make it a show-stopper, offering upgrades including detailing, new rims, upholstery, suspension and lighting effects, and more. And if your ride is a boat or RV, they can work with that, too.

BEST RECORD STORE

JERRY’S RECORDS 2136 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-421-4533 or www.jerrysrecords.com • • • • • • • •

It’s easy to get lost in the maze of vinyl at this internationally recognized

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


BUY, SELL & TRADE

Doggonee you y d did it again!

NEW AND USED!

GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

Thank you, Pittsburgh, for voting us “Best Music Store” three years in a row!

Thanks Pittsburgh for voting AnimalFriends the Best Place

MON-THU 11AM-8PM FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

Linda Mitzel c

to Adopt a Pet (six years running!) and the second Best

Non-Profit.

AnimalFriends

562 Camp Horne Road | Pittsburgh, PA 15237

11305 305 E E. C CARSON ARSON S ST. T•S SOUTH OUTH S SIDE IDE

412.847.7000 | ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org

412.431.0700 • PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

AGES

5-ADULT SERIES

AND CLOSE GET UP ME FULLY O BEC EVEN E D AS S IMMERS BATS PUSH ACRO L HYSICA THEIR P OUT H IT W LIMITS E. RESERV

Gravity & Other Myths (Australia)

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 12 • AUGUST WILSON CENTER S TRUSTARTS.ORG/BRIDGE BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 TR Funded through the Mid Atlantic Tours program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF GOODS + SERVICES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY FURNITURE

LEVIN FURNITURE

meerkat. This shop stocks fun and funky cards, housewares, jewelry, accessories and more, including items from local artisans.

Multiple locations www.levinfurniture.com

BEST LOCALLY BASED ETSY STORE

• • • • • • • •

Founded in Westmoreland County nearly 100 years ago, the furniture retailer now has large stores throughout the Pittsburgh and Cleveland regions, as well as smaller outlets specializing in mattresses. When you need a new bed, sofa or coffee table, support a Southwestern Pennsylvania original.

BEST LOCAL PLACE TO BUY VINTAGE CLOTHING

Salon Ivy Best Hair Salon

EONS FASHION ANTIQUE 5850 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-361-3368 • • • • • • • •

This Shadyside vintage spot is a go-to for fashion-forward thinkers in the market for throwback flair. It offers high-quality clothing for the everyday, as well as more adventurous and flamboyant fare. Find styles from the past 100 years, as well as a solid selection of jewelry, haberdashery and sartorial knickknacks.

BEST ANTIQUE SHOP

WHO NEW? RETRO MOD DECOR 5156 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-781-0588 • • • • • • • •

Tired of cheap pressboard furniture that you have to assemble? Boring knick-knacks from big-box stores? Take a gander at last century’s offerings at this cozily packed shop. From space-age-ish floor lamps to sturdy wooden end tables, from colorful dishware to artwork, this gently used good-quality stuff needs a new forever home.

We want to take the opportunity to thank our amazing clients. Your unwavering support and patronage is why we do what we do! To the Salon Ivy staff, you ladies are truly gifted and have really earned this award. A special thanks to East Coast Salon Services for our top of the line products and continuing education.

BEST PLACE TO BUY YOURSELF HAPPINESS

WILDCARD 4209 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-224-2651 or www.wildcardpgh.myshopify.com • • • • • • • •

www. saloniv y. net 1213 E Carson St | Pittsburgh PA 15203 | 412-488-4488 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

Banish the sads with a Pittsburghthemed T-shirt, a hand-screened print, a colorful bracelet or, perhaps, just a teeny-tiny inch-high plastic

GARBELLA www.garbelladesign.com • • • • • • • •

A “p is for pierogi” onesie?” How about a “be yourself” zipper pouch? Or all manner of T-shirts, scarves, throw pillows and shopping totes screen-printed by hand with deceptively simple original mottos and images? Founder Amy Garbark’s designs are a hit at craft shows, retail outlets and, of course, online.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST POLITICIAN

JOHN FETTERMAN Reason: “He has made equality, environmental protection, gay rights, immigration and marijuana legalization major campaign issues.”

BEST CARD STORE

WILDCARD 4209 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-224-2651 or www.wildcardpgh.myshopify.com • • • • • • • •

Browse a fantastic selection of small-batch cards, some hand-screened or letter-pressed. Choose from whimsical (dreamy cats), snarky (“You’re old. That’s sad.”) or otherwise aesthetically pleasing. Everybody deserves a birthday card with a sweet goat on it.

BEST BRIDAL SHOP

GLITTER AND GRIT 5300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-781-2375 or www.glitterandgritpgh.com • • • • • • • •

With a carefully curated collection from name designers like Nicole Miller and Daalarna Couture, and trunk CONTINUES ON PG. 30


FALL FLOWER SHOW AND GARDEN RAILROAD OPEN NOW

TAJ MAHAL

phipps.conservatory.org

INDIAN RESTAURANT

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us Best Indian Restaurant in Pittsburgh

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

7795 McKnight Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 412-364-1760

tajmahalinc.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

27


CELEBRATE WITH THE U.S. GYMNASTICS TEAM AS THEY RETURN FROM RIO!

PPGPAINTSARENA.COM Tickets available at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Box Office at ppg paints arena, Ticketmaster.com, or charge by phone at 800-745-3000. PPGPAINTSARENA

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

PPGPAINTSARENA

SUNDAY OCTOBER 23 TICKETS ON SALE NOW


Featuring Musical Performances by

Musselman’s Apple Sauce Family Skating Tribute, featuring figure skating stars Olympic gold medalists Scott Hamilton, two-time Olympic medalist Nancy Kerrigan, and Olympic silver medalist Paul Wylie, along with many others. Hosted by Kristi Yamaguchi.

SCHEDULED TO APPEAR: • 4-time World Champion and four-time Canadian champion Kurt Browning • World Champion and 6-time U.S. champion Todd Eldredge • European Champion Bronze Medalists and 7-time British ice dance champions (and siblings) Sinead & John Kerr • 5-time Italian Champion Silvia Fontana & World Bronze Medalist & 3-time U.S. pairs champion John Zimmerman • 2-time Canadian pairs Bronze medalists, Jodeyne Higgins & Sean Rice

OCTOBER 30, 2016

PPGPAINTSARENA.COM

PPGPAINTSARENA

PPGPAINTSARENA

Tickets available at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Box Office at PPG Paints Arena, Ticketmaster.com, or charge by phone at 800-745-3000. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF GOODS + SERVICES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

BEST HAIR SALON shows for variety, Erin Szymanski’s by-appointment-only boutique earns high marks from brides-to-be looking for a personalized experience — and that unique, nontraditional dress.

SALON IVY 1213 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-4488 or www.salonivy.net • • • • • • • •

Whether you’re stopping in for your regular touch-up or getting ready for a big night out, for more than a decade, the roster of diverse stylists at this salon has been helping customers keep up with the latest hair and makeup trends.

BEST OUTDOOR WEDDING VENUE

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS

BEST NAIL SALON

1 Schenley Park, Oakland 412-622-6914 or phipps.conservatory.org

DALLAS BEAUTY LOUNGE

• • • • • • • •

Phipps’ lush outdoor gardens provide ample space for ceremonies of all sizes. With a verdant backdrop and palatial layout, it’s a perfect spot to tie the knot in the company of the most vibrant and colorful flora in town.

609 Washington Pike, No. 13, Bridgeville 412-552-0307 or www.dallasbeautylounge.com • • • • • • • •

BEST INDOOR WEDDING VENUE

THE PRIORY 614 Pressley St., North Side 412-231-3338 or www.thepriory.com • • • • • • • •

Get your marriage off to a classy

{CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

Wedding dresses at Glitter and Grit, winner of Best Bridal Shop

start by booking your ceremony at this beautifully restored 19th-century former monastery, located on a quiet street in the North

Side. It’s classical romance, with pressed-tin ceilings, arched windows and even a garden courtyard with a fountain.

BEST FLORIST

HEPATICA 1119 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square 412-241-3900 or www.hepaticapgh.com • • • • • • • •

WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS 355 FIFTH AVENUE | SUITE 1500 | DOWNTOWN | 412.281.3546 990 ROLAND ROAD | PITTSBURGH, PA 15221 | 412-823-5252

MYPITTSBURGHDENTAL.COM 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

BEST BARBER SHOP

MISTER GROOMING AND GOODS 4504 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-326-5964 or www.mistergroomingandgoods.com • • • • • • • •

Anybody can stick flowers in a vase, but with Hepatica, the flowers look more like art than just a standard arrangement. Each order is tailored for the individual customer, whether it’s for an anniversary, a birthday gift, or large-scale wedding or event.

What’s not to like about a cold beer and a clean shave? This chicly decorated Lawrenceville salon for men offers everything from straight-razor cuts to hand massages to manicures. For cuts before noon, the PBR can be subbed out for espresso.

BEST LOCAL JEWELRY STORE

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST

HENNE JEWELERS 5501 Walnut St., Shadyside 412-682-0226 or www.hennejewelers.com • • • • • • • •

IMPLANTS | INVISALIGN | WHITENING WE OFFER SEDATION OPTIONS | SAME-DAY EMERGENCY VISITS

Are you seeking the maximum amount of likes on your latest manicure photo on Instagram? Look no further. These nail technicians — up on the latest nail-art styles and using high-quality products like gel polish — will keep you on trend.

If you were in the market for an everose gold-and-diamond Rolex, this is your handy stop. But Henne also provides more affordable “basics” like engagement rings and wedding bands. Don’t miss the selection of vintage and estate jewelry for unique selection of fine pieces seeking new wearers.

JULIE DEVINE, DEVINE TOUCH MASSAGE 4900 Hatfield St., Lawrenceville 412-680-9900 or www.devinetouchmassage.com • • • • • • • •

Are you suffering from tension or sore muscles, or perhaps rehabbing from an injury? Submit to the soothing hands of Julie Devine, a highly trained and certified massage therapist. Devine’s warmly decorated facility is located conveniently in central Lawrenceville. CONTINUES ON PG. 32


HOME PROTECTION

NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD LEARN TO SHOOT ONE ON ONE CLASSES AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

AS LITTLE AS 1 DAY NOTICE

STEELERS GAME

3 or more people in a class for $60 each ($20 SAVINGS)

SPECIALS $2.50 LITE DRAFTS $12 LLITE BUCKETS

2 $ .25 3 $

.50

20 OZ LITE DRAFTS 22 OZ LITE DRAFTS

& SHOOTING CENTER

TIME TO BUY! Prices are at their lowest! B U Y- S E L L - T R A D E FIREARMS

FREE RANGE PASS

Free range time or gun rental your choice expires 11/30/2016

VISIT OUR INDOOR SHOOTING RANGE - OPEN 7 DAYS 2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M

[DAILY RUNDOWN]

A newsletter you’ll actually want to read. SIGN UP AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

31


BEST OF GOODS + SERVICES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

BEST FITNESS CENTER

LA FITNESS Multiple locations www.lafitness.com

with a hip-hop soundtrack. Co-creators Karen Conley and Sean Conley launched Amazing in 2000, well ahead of the yoga boom.

• • • • • • • •

With seven locations dotted throughout Allegheny County, this national chain has worked (out) its way into Pittsburgh’s health scene. The Bakery Square locale has it all, including basketball and racquetball courts, a sauna, an indoor pool and a juice bar.

BEST SPA TIE: ESSPA AND SEWICKLEY SPA

ESSPA KOZMETICA AND SALON

BEST ADULT STORE

ADULTMART 346 Boulevard of the Allies, Downtown, and 4611 McKnight Road, Ross www.adultmart.com • • • • • • • •

The Downtown location is hidden in the way you might want an adult shop to be hidden: through a barely marked door, then up a narrow staircase. While it might not scream “welcome,� AdultMart supplies all your needs, including toys, costumes, protection, lubes and loads of porn.

17 Brilliant Ave., Aspinwall 412-782-3888 or www.esspa.net • • • • • • • •

** NEW IN SOUTH SIDE FLA

TS ** '('*$ARSONT$b*'(#*)'#+ )./ g 8g $ b

In the world of skin care, the Hungarian facial is apparently not to be missed. It’s a combination of facial massage and skin treatment with just the right product tailored to a person’s specific needs. While Esspa offers a full menu of services, the facial is its specialty.

SEWICKLEY SPA 337 Beaver St., Sewickley 412-741-4240 or www.sewickleyspa.com • • • • • • • •

A perennial top choice for CP readers, this day spa offers a whole host of treatments, from manis and pedis to facials and massages. If that’s not full-service enough for you, you can get just about every hair on your body waxed off, if that’s your pleasure.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

�

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PITTSBURGH NOVELTY ITEM

PITTSBURGH: A COLORING BOOK Reason: “It’s a unique item that represents our city well. It’s an interactive novelty item for any age!� BEST TATTOO SHOP

ARTISAN TATTOO BEST BICYCLE SHOP

THICK BIKES

62 S. 15th St., South Side 412-390-3590 or www.thickbikes.com • • • • • • • •

The staffers here are all about bikes, whether it’s gear, a repair or setting you up with your next metal steed. Bikes to buy range from kids’ wheels to something gnarly for rugged trails. By their admission, it “Gets super bikey around here.�

5001 Penn Ave., Garfield 412-661-0503 or www.artisanpittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

Ask around for tattoo-artist recommendations and you’re bound to hear the name of this perennial Best Of winner, opened by Jason and Meliora Angst in 2011. Jason and the other resident artists offer a range of styles, but whatever you get will be a work of art.

BEST BODY-PIERCING SHOP BEST YOGA STUDIO

AMAZING YOGA Multiple locations • • • • • • • •

Vinyasa power yoga is the specialty of Amazing Yoga, whose mini-chain of heated rooms in four venues offer 100 classes per week, including $8 community classes and sessions

HOT ROD PIERCING COMPANY 95 S. 16th St., South Side, and 115 Oakland Ave., Oakland www.hotrodpiercingcompany.com • • • • • • • •

At Hot Rod, they customize your body. Want a diamond chip in your nose or a ring through your lip? CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

BEST PIZZA!

PITTSBURGH ARTISTS. PAY WHAT YOU WISH. #PITTSBURGHPERFORMS

Squirrel Hill

FULL SERVICE BAR NOW OPEN 2128 Murray Ave.

Mt. Lebanon

713A Washington Rd.

344-9467 344-9468

521-9864 521-2053

VOTED BEST PIZZA IN PITTSBURGH FOR OVER 38 YEARS PASTAS • PIZZA • HOAGIES • PARTY TRAYS & MORE We FedEx Pizzas anywhere in the U.S.

www.mineospizza.com

SUN-THUR 11:00 AM - 1:00 AM & FRI-SAT 11:00 AM - 2:00 AM

STRENGTHENING AND ENHANCING THE COMMUNITY THROUGH MUSIC

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 7:00 PM

KASSIA ENSEMBLE 7 of Pittsburgh’s top female musicians, breaking gender and musical barriers

2815 Penn Ave, Pittsburgh PA 15222

rgh.org icpittsbu mbermus a h .c w w w 24-4129 • ed • 412-6 ir u q e R s Ticket

ESTED) G G U S 0 1 $ ( U WISH! O Y T A H W PAY

CHOOSE YOUR STYLE. CHOOSE OUR STYLISTS. 2981 W. LIBERTY AVE.

|

PITTSBURGH, PA 15216

|

412-344-6696

| WWW.SERGIOSSTYLE.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF GOODS + SERVICES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

October 22, 7:30-10pm

Th e Masquerade Soirée & Benefit An unforgettable evening celebrating & enriching lives locally and globally Connect with community veiled or unveiled while supporting Polaris polarisproject.org & Organic Growers School organicgrowersschool.org

6800 Brighton RD • Pittsburgh, PA 15202 • beyogaandmovement.com • 412-865-7090

They’ll do it. The employees are certified and up on all the latest health and safety regulations, an absolute must when getting a hoop on your hoo-haw.

BEST PLACE TO GET A TATTOO REMOVED

DISAPPEARING INK 106 Nelbon Ave., Eastwood 724-972-7734 or www.disappearinginkltr.com • • • • • • • •

Wish you could get rid of the tattoo of your ex’s name on your chest? Trying to erase the mistake you made on a wild, drunken night out? This shop uses laser tattooremoval treatments to help you forget the past.

BEST VAPE SHOP

DRIP LOUNGE 749 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown 412-224-2707 • • • • • • • •

Bursting onto the vape scene, Drip Lounge combines all the latest hardware and juices that vapers are looking for, in a club-like atmosphere that also offers live entertainment. Yet another multi-faceted venue added to Allentown’s rebounding business district.

BEST CIGAR SHOP

LEAF & BEAN 2200 Penn Ave., Strip District, and 3525 Washington Road, McMurray www.leafandbean.com

CITY GROWS 5208 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-781-2082 or www.citygrowspgh.com • • • • • • • •

City Grows carries only certified organic plants; other products, like flowerpots, are made from recycled materials. The store also boasts that its products are right-sized for city living, a.k.a. they’ll fit on your stoop or kitchen windows.

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST DRESSED DOOR GUY

MARK DOBOSH, SPIRIT

Reason: “He has not worn the same outfit twice for nearly a year.” BEST LOCAL PET STORE

PETAGOGY 5880 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-362-7387 or www.petagogy.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Petagogy supplies the best quality foods, toys and supplies for your pet. Most of their products are sourced from family-owned companies and made from natural ingredients. The shop hosts adoption events, a “yappy hour” for dog-owners and serves as a drop-off location for a pet-food pantry.

BEST BEER DISTRIBUTOR

BEST DOGGY DAYCARE

SAVE-MOR BEER & POP WAREHOUSE

THE DOG STOP

• • • • • • • •

It seems like you can find craft beer anywhere you turn these days and, certainly, Save-Mor is no exception. They have more than 500 varieties from 21st Amendment to Wild Blue

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

BEST GARDEN SHOP / NURSERY

The original location, in McMurray, opened in 1999, followed by the Strip District venue in 2003. The Strip locale especially is known for its convivial atmosphere, Key West North-style décor — and a nice cup of coffee, hence the “bean.” At either spot, though, you’ll find a humidor to adore.

4516 Browns Hill Road, Beechview 412-421-8550 or www.savemorbeer.com

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Blueberry Lager. But it also carries more than 250 imports and close to 20 gluten-free beers.

Multiple locations www.thedogstop.net • • • • • • • •

The first Dog Stop opened in 2009, with the goal of creating a fun and safe environment for dogs, and now there are six locations in the Pittsburgh area. In addition to boarding and day care, the Dog Stop also offers grooming, walking and in-home training.


BELVEDERES

ULTRA-DIVE FOR THANK YOU TOP IN VOTING US LUBS 3 DANCE C GH. OF PITTSBUR JOIN US EACH THURSDAY FOR 80S NIGHT AND ROTATING DANCE PARTIES FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

4016 BUTLER STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-687-2555 WWW.BELVEDERESULTRADIVE.COM

East Liberty Farmers Market, winner of Best Farmers Market

BEST PLACE TO ADOPT A PET

ANIMAL FRIENDS 562 Camp Horne Road, North Hills 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org • • • • • • • •

Animals Friends provides temporary shelter for cats, dogs and rabbits that need permanent homes. The no-kill organization also provides classes for pet behaviors, wellness, therapy and more. Volunteers are accepted to help with their mission.

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET

52ND STREET MARKET

601 52nd St., Lawrenceville 412-408-3798 or www.52ndstreetmarket.com • • • • • • • •

This small shop provides everything from staples like peanut butter, eggs and bread to hyper-local produce from the nearby community garden. They also have a deli counter that serves prepared foods. Or grab some coffee and read the paper.

BEST FARMERS MARKET

EAST LIBERTY FARMERS MARKET Station Street and North Euclid Avenue parking lot, East Liberty pittsburghpa.gov/ citiparks/farmers-market • • • • • • • •

Run by the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation, vendors at this weekly event sell farm-fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheeses and baked goods, from May to November. Also look for the occasional selection of flowers, small gifts and gardening items.

BEST THRIFT SHOP

GOODWILL Multiple locations www.goodwill.org

BEST PLACE TO TAKE THE KIDS FOR AN AFTERNOON

PITTSBURGH ZOO AND PPG AQUARIUM One Wild Place, Highland Park 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org • • • • • • • •

One of only six U.S. institutions to offer both land and water wildlife under one … er … roof, this 100-plus-year-old zoo puts a priority on diversity. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the aquarium, three distinct forests, a “Kids Kingdom,” as well as two open-water exhibits.

BEST CITY TOUR

JUST DUCKY TOURS

• • • • • • • •

Station Square, South Side 412-402-3825 or www.justduckytours.com

Whether you’re de-cluttering your garage or attic, looking for wellseasoned cast-iron skillet or just in the market for some galoshes on the cheap, this nonprofit thrift shop is a resource for the frugal. Shop for clothes, books, furniture, appliances and just about every household (and other) object you can carry.

The best way to tour a town known for its handsome city center framed by three rivers? Why, by amphibious vehicle, of course. This fun- and fact-filled tour via a World War II-type Duck lets visitors cruise through Downtown and a river or two. Plus, quacking is encouraged.

LOCATIONS IN BLOOMFIELD AND GREENTREE WE HOST PARTIES AERIAL SILKS AND CIRCUS CLASSES FOR AGES 5-ADULT

• • • • • • • •

Pittsburgh Aerial Silks 412-681-0111 412 681 0111 011 PITTSBURGHAERIALSILKS.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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Thank You

for voting us Best of PGH!

What does your child buy at convenience stores? SarrisCandies.com • 1-800-255-7771 Join the Conversation!

 The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to learn about what children, ages 11–17, purchase at convenience stores. Participation requires one 20 minute phone/internet survey and one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center.  Children who complete the study will be compensated for their time and effort with $50 in gift certificates. Parking and travel compensation is provided.  If you are interested and want to learn more about the study, please call 412-545-3005, e-mail c-storestudy@rand.org or visit us at www.rand.org/storestudy.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

C O R P O R AT I O N


MILLIE’S BEST ICE CREAM CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Morcilla, winner of Best New Restaurant

BEST NEW RESTAURANT (AS OF JUNE 2015)

MORCILLA 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-652-9924 or www.morcillapittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

Inspired by chef Justin Severino’s trips to Spain, this small space brings authentic Spanish flavors and ambiance without overkill. Get there early, sip a gin and tonic, and sample montaditos in the standing-only bar, before indulging in smoked pork ribs, roasted chicken or marinated octopus.

BEST RESTAURANT (DOWNTOWN)

GAUCHO PARRILLA ARGENTINA 1601 Penn Ave., Strip District 412-709-6622 or www.eatgaucho.com • • • • • • • •

The grilled meats might be the

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initial draw, but only a fool would overlook the delicious side dishes, including potatoes, corn, sweet potatoes and empanadas. Meats come as sandwiches or full entrees; it’s the best-priced steak in town. Everybody knows it, so come prepared to wait in line.

BEST RESTAURANT (NORTH)

BELLA FRUTTETO

BEST RESTAURANT (SOUTH)

BISTRO 19

BAKN

711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon 412-306-1919 or www.bistro19.com

335 E. Main St., Carnegie 412-275-3637 or www.eatbakn.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

This modern yet cozy restaurant is rightly a popular destination in the South Hills. The menu, which offers elevated American cuisine expertly curated and executed by chef Jessica Gibson Bauer, focuses on local and seasonal.

This welcoming Carnegie spot has a laser focus on two things: breakfast and bacon. Using these two inspirations, chef Randy Tozzie, a Carnegie native, has created a menu that makes breakfast an all-day affair, with spins on pancakes, eggs and breakfast sandwiches.

Franklin Village, 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford 724-940-7777 or www.bellafrutteto.com

BEST RESTAURANT (EAST)

• • • • • • • •

5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-252-2595 or www.curepittsburgh.com

From its signature apple ravioli to its Sunday Sauce dinner (down-home rigatoni, meatballs and sausage), this casual Italian restaurant with a full bar ranges from modern to traditional, with stops for meatloaf burgers and brown-rice penne. The patio overlooks Soergel’s Orchard, hence the restaurant’s name.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

BEST RESTAURANT (WEST)

CURE • • • • • • • •

The small menu here focuses on locally sourced Mediterranean-style food. A six-course tasting menu lets diners sample the chef’s specialties like hanger steak, while an a la carte menu offers lighter fare like oysters, pasta, soups, salads and cured meats.

BEST CHEF

JUSTIN SEVERINO,

MORCILLA AND CURE Morcilla (3519 Butler St.) and Cure (5336 Butler St.), Lawrenceville. • • • • • • • •

Justin Severino has a knack for executing international cuisine with regional flair. With a focus on locally sourced ingredients and


season-shifting menus, Severino’s inventive, Mediterranean-style dishes have played a vital role in Pittsburgh’s growing food scene since Cure opened in 2011.

thanks for voting us best desserts

BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT

CHINA PALACE 5440 Walnut St., Shadyside 412-687-7423 or www.pittsburghchinapalace.com • • • • • • • •

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

TAJ MAHAL 7795 McKnight Road, North Hills 412-364-1760 or www.tajmahalinc.com • • • • • • • •

Offering a large menu representing cuisine from across India, house-made yogurt and cheeses, and a fully stocked bar, Taj Mahal is well worth the trip. The popular (and vast) lunch and dinner buffets are highly recommended — just make sure to bring your appetite.

This restaurant boasts excellent service, friendly staff and modern takes on classic Chinese dishes. But you’ll still find longtime favorites such as fried rice, lo mein, General Tso’s chicken — for eat-in, takeout and delivery. Don’t forget your fortune cookie.

BEST MIDDLE-EASTERN RESTAURANT

ALADDIN’S Multiple locations www.orderaladdins.com • • • • • • • •

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT

NAKAMA 1611 E. Carson St., South Side, and 10636 Perry Highway, North Hills www.eatatnakama.com • • • • • • • •

Whether enjoying the showy preparation at the hibachi grill, or grabbing an egg roll on the go from the food truck, Nakama is a reliable favorite for Pittsburghers seeking tasty Japanese fare. Besides sushi, the menu offers a variety of inventive items like crispy salmon fritters and sea-scallop lettuce wraps.

This restaurant uses Lebanese staples like olive oil, nuts, vegetables, yogurt and lean meats in more than 100 different vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free and meat dishes. Expect seasonings like mint, parsley, oregano, garlic, nutmeg and cinnamon. Specialties include Mediterranean shish kabob and shawarma.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

PICCOLO FORNO 3801 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-622-0111 or www.piccolo-forno.com • • • • • • • •

Since 2005, this BYOB Tuscan Italian restaurant has specialized in wood-fired pizzas and fresh hand-made pasta, served in such traditional dishes as lasagna, tortelli and ravioli. Panini and appetizers, like bruschetta and beef and pork meatballs, make for lighter fare.

BEST THAI RESTAURANT

NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN 903 Penn Ave., Downtown, and 856 Western Ave., North Side www.nickysthaikitchen.com • • • • • • • •

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen holds a special place among lovers of Thai food. Grab a quick lunch at the Downtown location, or a slow-paced summer dinner in the North Side location’s beautiful back garden. Bring your own bottle to sip while you dine.

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

SSERENDIPITY ER REEND NDIP IPITTY SSwiss wissss Ic wi IIce ce C Creamery reaam re m mery erryy ery e

BEST WAY TO SATISFY YOUR INNER VOYEUR

HAYS EAGLE CAM Reason: “Whether birds are your thing or not, it’s super-awesome to spy on these scary-ass creatures that rip apart small animals.” BEST MEXICAN/LATIN AMERICAN RESTAURANT

MAD MEX Multiple locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

Specializing in Cal-Mex, this locally based chain is a favorite with Pittsburghers. Popular items include the enchiladas smothered in guajillo chile or roasted tomatillo salsa, and the barbacoa beef stuffed into a burrito or taco. In the fall, try the Gobblerito, a Thanksgivingstyle turkey burrito. CONTINUES ON PG. 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF FOOD + DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

Thanks for Voting Us

BEST SUNDAY BRUNCH! JJoin oiin uss every e er S Sunday ndda 9am-3pm 9am 3pm for our fabulous award winning brunch buffet.

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Burgatory, winner of Best Burger

BEST CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN RESTAURANT

ELEVEN 100 West Station Square Dr. • GrandConcourseRestaurant.com

1150 Smallman St, Strip District 412-201-5656 or www.elevenck.com • • • • • • • •

The menu at Eleven changes with the seasons, but it’s a yearround destination for Pittsburghers seeking sophisticated, upscale eats, in an unpretentious atmosphere. The fare here ranges from pub grub like braised veal burgers and calamari to wild Alaskan halibut and smoked lamb belly.

Thank you

PITTSBURGH For voting

The prices are reasonable enough to take the whole family, and the atmosphere is low-key. A free Smiley cookie or apple awaits each child at the end of the meal.

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST-KEPT SECRET

SWISSHELM PARK BEST VEGAN/ VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT

B52 CAFÉ

5202 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-408-3988 or www.b52pgh.com

Reason: “It’s an accessible, safe, family-oriented, well-kept neighborhood.”

• • • • • • • •

HOUGH’S TA P R O O M & B R E W P U B

Top trivia & top sports bar

The days of vegan meaning simply “salad” are long gone. B52 offers vegan fare with Middle Eastern flair. Dishes include: moussaka (with cashew cheese), seitan kebabs and spinach pie. Salad is still available, but it comes with pickled turnips and falafel.

BEST STEAKHOUSE

HYDE PARK PRIME STEAKHOUSE 247 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-222-4014 or www.hydeparkrestaurants.com • • • • • • • •

Happy hour MON-FRI 4-6 75 CENT WINGS $ 4 D R A F TS

houghspgh.com 40

october

brewery of the month

Trivia night

BEST RESTAURANT TO TAKE THE KIDS

E V E R Y T U E S D AY S TA R T S AT 7 : 3 0

EAT’N PARK Multiple locations www.eatnpark.com • • • • • • • •

563 greenfield ave

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

The kids’ menu (for those 10 and under) offers lots of healthy, simple options for even the pickiest eater.

This may be a small regional chain with spots in Ohio and Pennsylvania, but there’s nothing more Pittsburgh than a hunk of meat cooked perfectly. You can get everything from a 22-ounce porterhouse to imported Wagyu beef to an 18-ounce New York Strip that’s been dry-aged for 40 days.


BEST SEAFOOD

MONTEREY BAY 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington, and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville www.montereybayfishgrotto.com • • • • • • • •

Both locations offer fresh fish that is flown in daily from around the world; the fish board at Monterey Bay is like a geography lesson. It’s also known for its top-notch crab cakes. For pure swank, hit up the Mount Washington location, with some of the best views of the city.

BEST SUSHI

UMAMI

202 38th St., Lawrenceville 412-224-2354 or www.umamipgh.com • • • • • • • •

Classified as an izakaya — a casual Japanese gastropub — this unassuming bar and restaurant serves up simple but rich options for sashimi, nigiri, onigiri and temaki (a coneshaped roll wrapped in nori), paired with great cuts of fish such as tuna, fluke and Spanish mackerel.

BEST BBQ

UNION PIG & CHICKEN 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty 412-363-7675 or www.unionpgh.com • • • • • • • •

Everything you’d expect from a BBQ joint: ribs, chicken, pulled pork, brisket … and tofu. That’s right: Your vegan friends can have dinner with you, while you eat copious amounts of smoked meats and fried chicken.

BEST MAC & CHEESE

HARRIS GRILL 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-362-5273 or www.harrisgrill.com • • • • • • • •

It’s hard to go wrong with the classic cheese-and-carb combo, but Harris takes this bar-menu favorite to the next level. Ask for the original version, made with a cheddar Mornay sauce, or up the fanciness and order it with lobster and lump-crab meat.

chicken, pork — or vegetable to be cooked over the wood-fire grill, before being stuffed between thick slices of cibbatta bread. It’s a mess, but don’t scrimp on the chimichurri sauce. You can also order these sammies deconstructed as a plated meal.

THANKS FOR VOTING US

BEST BURGER

BURGATORY Multiple locations www.burgatorybar.com • • • • • • • •

Burgatory is everything you could want in a burger joint: a variety of patties, plus milkshakes. Be adventurous with a Piggy Butter and Jelly, with bacon, peanut butter and habañero jelly. Or pick your own meat and toppings. The milkshakes come with or without booze.

ONE OF THE BEST

The Abbey on Butler Street • 4635 Butler St.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LOCAL CAT

PATSY MITTINGTON

COME HANG WITH US

HALLOWECOESTNUMWE ECOENTKESET FRNIDDAY OCT 28 We are an old funerall hhome across the street from the cemetery!

Reason: “Adorable, thumbs, a milk mustache, a winning personality.” BEST PIZZA

MINEO’S 2128 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill, and 713A Washington Road, Mount Lebanon www.mineospizza.com • • • • • • • •

This perennial-favorite pizzeria keeps the oven hot, and the pizza hotter, whether you order a slice or a whole pie. Try the Sicilian — a perfect cross between pizza and a grilled-cheese sandwich. The Squirrel Hill location has an attached bar, where pizza-lovers can add an ice-cold beer.

BEST WINGS BEST SANDWICH

GAUCHO PARRILLA ARGENTINA 1601 Penn Ave., Strip District 412-709-6622 or www.eatgaucho.com • • • • • • • •

Choose a meat — various cuts of beef,

BIGHAM TAVERN 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington 412-431-9313 or www.bighamtavern.com • • • • • • • •

They got ’em big and juicy — and seasoned with a variety of sauces (30 in all!). Purists can stick with original, and show-offs can head to “Atomic” CONTINUES ON PG. 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF FOOD + DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

or “Cluckin’ Hot.” Experimenters can latch on to “Dingo,” “Hyena” or “Jackal.” Wednesday is Wing Day (44 cents/wing), but expect crowds.

BEST TACO

TAKO 214 Sixth St., Downtown 412-471-8256 or www.takopgh.com • • • • • • • •

If you’re easily bored by the threemeat taco menus, the tacos here should pique your interest. Octopus, pork butt, duck confit and wagyu short rib are among the protein fillings, and the seasonings and vegetable add-ins are influenced by Mediterranean, Asian and Middle Eastern flavors.

BEST HOT DOG

FRANKTUARY 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville, and 115 Forbes Ave., Downtown www.franktuary.com • • • • • • • •

Franktuary has perfected serving creatively topped hot dogs, with great sides like poutine and craft cocktails. Pick from a grass-fed beef or vegan hot dog, and consider combos incorporating bacon, pineapple, coleslaw and pierogies. If you’re on the go, look for the Franktuary food truck.

BEST BUFFET

GRAND VIEW BUFFET AT RIVERS CASINO 777 Casino Drive, North Side 412-231-777 or www.riverscasino.com • • • • • • • •

Buffets live by variety, and Rivers’ ranges from barbecue to Italian and Asian fare; lunch, dinner and Sunday brunches feature a crab-legs add-on. Steelers home games are accompanied by Eat the Enemy, with delicacies including clam chowder (New England, Oct. 23) and beefbrisket quesadillas (Dallas, Nov. 13).

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Bantha Tea Bar, winner of Best Tea Shop

top notch. Espresso serves sustainable coffees sourced from high-quality roasters like Counter Culture, Forty Weight, Commonplace and others.

BEST COFFEEHOUSE

ESPRESSO A MANO

BEST TEA SHOP

3623 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-918-1864 or www.espressoamano.com

BANTHA TEA BAR

• • • • • • • •

People love Espresso a Mano, and with good reason. The atmosphere is cozily hip, the baristas are knowledgeable and friendly, and the beverages are

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5002 Penn Ave., Bloomfield 412-404-8539 or www.banthateabar.com • • • • • • • •

This little oasis on Penn Avenue used recycled materials in its construction, as well as tapping solar power. The tea

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

is ethically sourced, and Bantha works extensively with local partners to create its menus. Enjoy a steaming mug while you view the frequently changing art exhibitions.

BEST DESSERTS

LA GOURMANDINE 4605 Butler St., Lawrenceville and 300 Cochran Road, Mount Lebanon www.lagourmandinebakery.com

breads, breakfast pastries and quiches. Dessert favorites include classic pastries such as chocolate éclairs, tartes au citron (lemon tarts), cream puffs, fresh berry tarts and flan. For a dinner party, try a chocolate mousse cake.

BEST CANDY STORE

SARRIS CANDIES 511 Adams Ave., Canonsburg 724-745-4042 or www.sarriscandies.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

This authentic French bakery sells

Inspired by the old-fashioned soda


fountains of founder Frank Sarris’ youth, this chocolate factory and ice-cream parlor — which boasts a 1,500-pound handmade chocolate castle — will make you feel like a kid in … some kind of store. Stock up on chocolate-covered pretzel sticks.

BEST BAKERY

OAKMONT BAKERY 531 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont 412-826-1606 or www.oakmontbakery.com • • • • • • • •

This perennial favorite draws Pittsburghers from all corners up the Allegheny River to Oakmont. Cakes, cookies, breads, donuts and any other baked good you can think of fills the substantial display cases here. Enjoy your pastries in the spacious dining room or on the patio.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST STREET ARTIST

JEREMY RAYMER Reason: “Dude does massive bold pieces all over the city. His whole house is a public piece.” BEST ICE CREAM

MILLIE’S

Istanbul Sofra Lounge Available for Private events, meeting and more. You’re planning a wedding, celebrating a graduation or getting together for a family reunion, you need at a price you can afford. Let us help you, book and celebrate your special event today.

232 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside 412-404-8853 or www.millieshomemade.com • • • • • • • •

Made from milk and eggs from Western Pennsylvania farms, Millie’s sells several varieties of ice cream at local grocery stores and from their scoop shop. Flavors change seasonally, but favorites include chocolate, vanilla and salted caramel.

BEST SUNDAY BRUNCH

GRAND CONCOURSE 100 W. Station Square Drive, South Side 412-261-1717 or www.grandconcourserestaurant.com • • • • • • • •

This is a fancy brunch in a location so historic you feel like you’re going to run into the Jay Gatsby at the donut station. This buffet is upscale, with options ranging from a carving station to omelets made-to-order.

Engagement party • Sports banquet • Bridal shower • Graduation party Rehearsal dinner • Anniversary • Wedding ceremony • Retirement party Honeymoon • Family reunion • Baby shower Meetings with Wi-Fi, Flip chart and markers & LCD projector

7600 Forbes Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15221 412-727-6693 • www.Istanbulsofra.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF FOOD + DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

BEST DOWNTOWN LUNCH

UMBRELLA CAFÉ 951 Liberty Ave., Downtown 412-391-8500 or www.theumbrellacafepgh.com • • • • • • • •

It’s only been open for a little over a year, but Umbrella Café has already secured a place in our hearts (and stomachs). This friendly breakfast-and-lunch spot shows equal respect to meat-eaters and vegans, and offers fresh juices and baked goods alongside yummy daily specials.

BEST TAKE-OUT

SPAK BROTHERS 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield 412-362-7725 or www.spakbrothers.com • • • • • • • •

Grab-and-go staples like pizza, hoagies and chicken wings can be found here at very reasonable prices at this no-frills shop. Vegan and vegetarian options are available too. While waiting for your order, get in a game or two of pinball.

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Bakn, winner of Best Restaurant (West)

BEST HAPPY HOUR

MAD MEX BEST SERVICE/WAIT STAFF

ELEVEN 1150 Smallman St., Strip District 412-201-5656 or www.elevenck.com • • • • • • • •

The waiters and waitresses here fulfill the classic requirements of what a wait staff should be: attentive, polite and informed about the food and drinks menu. Nor are they overly obtrusive, so that diners at this high-end restaurant can enjoy their meals and conversations without unnecessary interruption.

BEST OUTDOOR DINING

ROUND CORNER CANTINA 3720 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412- 904-2279 or www.roundcornercantina.com

Multiple locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

Impressive drink discounts highlight the “Happy Hora” menu at Mad Mex, available between 4 and 6 p.m. Patrons can imbibe half-off drafts or enjoy a $2.50 discount on house margaritas. To complement the boozy specials, the restaurant also offers platters of regular wings at half the cost.

IL TETTO 942 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-281-2810 or www.siennapgh.com/mercato • • • • • • • •

With a retractable glass roof, spacious bar and funky lighting, the perch atop this three-storied restaurant complex is a year-round destination for rooftop drinking. The people-watching views of the Cultural District and the action on Penn Ave below are unrivaled.

THE ACE HOTEL 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty 412-626-3090 or www.whitfieldpgh.com • • • • • • • •

Known as The Whitfield, this bar

BEST PUB GRUB 1830 E. Carson St., South Side 412-381-2447

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND BEST PLACE FOR A POKÉMON GO! EXCURSION

SQUIRREL HILL Reason: “Businesses to window-shop, you always see someone to talk with, lots of Poké-Stops.”

• • • • • • • •

Can you get beer at Pub Chip Shop? Yes! But unlike many South Side establishments, the focus here is on food. The impressive British-inspired menu offers everything from fish-and-chips and Scotch eggs to perch tacos and fried Mars bars. A range of savory baked goods are also available.

BEST FOOD-DELIVERY SERVICE

WHEEL DELIVER 412-421-9346 or wheeldeliver.net

BEST LATE-NIGHT MENU

MAD MEX BEST HOTEL BAR

of those and everything looks good, but many Mad Mex locations also offer late-night specials on select food items.

PUB CHIP SHOP

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST ROOFTOP BAR

• • • • • • • •

Sure Lawrenceville has gotten a bit see-and-be-seen, but what if you want to hang out in a hip space away from prying eyes? Nothing beats Round Corner’s interior patio, a fenced-in getaway where one can sip on cocktails and munch on veggie tacos in peace.

checks all the hipster-chic boxes: white walls, lack of clutter, reclaimed-wood bar, and a dynamite local twist on the Manhattan, called the East Liberty. It’s a perfect start to a night on the town, or settle into the vintage furniture with friends and a board game.

Multiple locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

The exclusive late-night draw for after-hours dining is the $7 special on 22-ounce margaritas from 10 p.m. to midnight. A couple

• • • • • • • •

With service to the East End, Regent Square, Edgewood, Mount Washington, Downtown and South Side, this multi-restaurant delivery service gives at-home diners access to the menus of 30 restaurant partners. And users can even order from more than two restaurants at once. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


an urban bistro in the heart of mt. lebanon

711 washington rd. mt. lebanon

412.306.1919 www.bistro19.com

Thank You City Paper Readers For Voting Us:

Apple Ravioli

Best Restaurant B R - North N h (FIRST PLACE)

Best Gluten-Free Menu

Locally Owned a nd Ope p and Operated Accepting r fo Reservations

HOLIDAY PARTIES

(SECOND PLACE)

Gluten Free and V ns Vegetarian options

----- Mo M Monday, o October 24th ---

Beer Dinner Seating is limited, make your reservations today! 724-940-7777.

Largest wine and spirits selection in the North Hills!

More information including menus and features can be found online at www.bellafrutteto.com

The Chocolate Bomb

2602 BRANDT SCHOOL ROAD - WEXFORD PENNSYLVANIA - ONLY 15 MILES FROM DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH - OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF FOOD + DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

Thank you Pittsburgh!

For voting us best takeout food 2016! @spakbrothers

Penn Ave. • GarFIeld www.spakbrothers.com

Strip District

{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Meat and Potatoes, winner of Best Bloody Mary

THANK YOU 412-622-0111 www.piccolo-forno.com Follow us:

@piccoloforno

@piccolofornopgh

Grapperiapgh.com

FOR VOTING US BEST ITALIAN

RESTAURANT Congrats to our very own Lou DiDonato for being voted one of Pgh’s Best Bartenders.

3801 Butler Street • Lawrenceville 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

BEST GLUTEN-FREE MENU

EDEN 735 Copeland St., Shadyside 412-802-7070 or www.edenpitt.com

BEST PLACE TO EAT AT THE BAR

TAKO 214 Sixth St., Downtown 412-471-8256 or www.takopgh.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

An oasis for diners with dietary concerns, Eden offers healthful seasonal fare, prepared raw, that is allergy conscious, vegan and gluten-free. It is also a great spot for adventurous diners, who can appreciate lasagna made with flax noodles or a farm-fresh beet salad.

Warm lighting, a laid-back atmosphere, and an ample margarita and cocktail list make this Downtown hotspot a good pick for quick, on-the-go dining. Warm weather offers extra bar-sidelike seating, with five sidewalk stools peering into the lively kitchen. CONTINUES ON PG. 48


u o y k n T ha g n i t o v r fo BEST B EST RESTAURANT RESTAURANT T O TAKE TAKE THE THE KIDS! KIDS! TO Proud to Support the 2016 Shadrack’s Christmas Wonderland!

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen Downtown

Northside

903 Penn Ave Pittsburgh, 15222 412-471-8424

856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, 15233 412-321-8424

North Hills 1026 Mt. Nebo Road Pittsburgh, 15237 COMING SOON!

Meet. Eat. Repeat.

Thank you, Pittsburgh!

Lunch Mon. - Sat .

Dinner Every Day

THANK YOU!!! For voting us BEST THAI RESTAURANT in Pittsburgh! Breakfast. Lunch. Dinner. Cocktails. Craft Beers. Happy Hour.

www.nickysthaikitchen.com Visit us Online for Hours!

335 E. MAIN STREET CARNEGIE, PA 412.275.3637 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF FOOD + DRINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Driftwood Oven, shown here at Smoketoberfest, winner of Best New Food Truck

BEST LOCAL BEER

EAST END BREWING COMPANY 147 Julius St., Larimer, and 102 19th St., Strip District 412-537-2337 or www.eastendbrewing.com • • • • • • • •

Since 2004, this brewery has been making beer right here. It now brews about 35 types of beer a year, including seasonal offerings and year-round favorites such as Big Hop IPA, Monkey Boy Hefeweizen and Fat Gary Nut Brown Ale. Stop by for a tour or sample a pint at Pittsburgh bars.

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BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST

BEST RESTAURANT BEER LIST

SONOMA GRILLE

SHARP EDGE

947 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-697-1336 or www.thesonomagrille.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

With over 90 bottles of wine served by the glass, Sonoma Grille has the curious wine drinker covered. Try a curated wine flight, or make your own. If you’re looking for a recommendation, the little wine glass icons on the menu mark staff favorites.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

Various locations www.sharpedgebeer.com

Lots of bars have forests of taps and warehouses of bottles. But the venerable Sharp Edge — each of whose five locations boasts dozens of drafts and 150 or more bottled varieties — remains esteemed for its connoisseurship, especially of the cornucopia of flavors offered by the prized beers of Belgium.

BEST BLOODY MARY

MEAT AND POTATOES 649 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-325-7007 or www.meatandpotatoespgh.com • • • • • • • •

In Pittsburgh as elsewhere, Bloody Marys have become an art form, and Meat and Potatoes scores with its brunchtime Bloody Mary bar, where $7 buys access to the acclaimed house mix, plus your choice of pickled and raw vegetables, hot sauce, and even charcuterie and cheeses.


BEST MARGARITA

MAD MEX Multiple locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

Nothing says “I’m ready to drink and have a good time” like a margarita, and locally based Mexican-food chain Mad Mex offers several options, including a sage-infused cranberry variety. To truly embrace one’s inner “good time” spirit, try the frozen margaritas that are spinning in the machines.

BEST NEW FOOD TRUCK (AS OF JUNE 2015)

DRIFTWOOD OVEN www.facebook.com/Driftwoodoven • • • • • • • •

It’s a wood-fired pizza oven on a trailer. They can drive it anywhere, set up and cook wonderfully crispy and full-flavored pizzas. It’s no wonder Driftwood was named this year’s best new food truck. Use Twitter to find out where it will be: @driftwoodoven.

BEST MARTINI

OLIVE OR TWIST 140 Sixth St., Downtown 412-255-0524 or www.olive-twist.com • • • • • • • •

Sometimes, a night out at the theater isn’t complete without a nightcap. Olive or Twist, in the heart of the Cultural District, offers a menu of daily and seasonal selections. Go with a traditional martini, or be adventurous with a “Black and Gold Martini.”

BEST LOCALLY MADE SPIRIT

WIGLE WHISKEY 2401 Smallman St, Strip District 412-224-2827 or www.wiglewhiskey.com • • • • • • • •

Since Wigle opened in 2012, the family-owned craft distillery has enjoyed nearly nonstop acclaim. It’s been the most-awarded craft whiskey in the country for the past two years, succeeding with classics like rye and bourbon, as well as more adventurous spirits like ginever and white whiskey.

BEST FOOD TRUCK

PGH TACO TRUCK

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST NEIGHBORS

NORTH SIDE Reason: “A wonderful mix of working class and professionals where the homes are reasonable and kids can walk to school.”

5115 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15201

412-781-1119

BEST JUICE/SMOOTHIE BAR

PITTSBURGH JUICE COMPANY 3418 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville 412-586-5060 or www.pittsburghjuicecompany.com • • • • • • • •

In the mood for a healthy boost? Stop in for a cold-pressed juice, smoothie or snack (think spinach crisps and vegan cheesecake). Everything is raw, vegan and gluten-free, and made with fresh, organic ingredients. You can even stop in for a class at the adjoining yoga studio.

BEST FOOD FESTIVAL

PITTSBURGH VEGFEST www.pittsburghvegfest.org

www.pghtacotruck.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

This outdoor summer festival celebrates vegetarian food and sustainable living with live music, wellness vendors, educational speakers, yoga and cooking demonstrations. The day-long event is hosted by Justice For Animals, a Pittsburgh-based animal-rights nonprofit organization.

At this mobile taqueria, the menu is (almost always) gluten-free; the corn tortillas are layered two-deep; and the tacos are rich, simple and unfussy. The filling options rotate, but favorites like Thai peanut chicken and spicy jerk chicken are safe bets on most days.

Family n o o M e lu B e h T -

Thank You!

1st Place - BestWings • 2nd Place - Best Sports Bar

Eat. Tweet. Like. Follow. @bighamtavern www.bighamtavern.com

321 Bigham Street | Mount Washington PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

49


ThAnK Yo U ! vOtEd 3rD BeSt bAr SoUtH

We ThInK We’Re PrEtTy GrEaT ToO, BuT We MiGhT Be A LiTtLe BiAsEd.

2518 EaSt CaRsOn St. PiTtSbUrGh, pA • 412-381-3698 oTbBiCyClEcAfE.cOm fOlLoW uS oNlInE:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016


RANDYLAND BEST PUBLIC ART CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Sue Kerr, winner of Best Local Blogger

BEST LOCAL CELEBRITY TO TAKE A SELFIE WITH

RICK SEBAK • • • • • • • •

The local chronicler of all things Pittsburgh (past, present and deepfried) is frequently out and about, and judging by the tags on social media, is generous with his snap-happy fans. Nothing says “Rick Sebak is my homeboy” quite like your beaming mug paired with his.

BEST NONPROFIT

HELLO BULLY 412-235-1997 or www.hellobully.com

and a halfway house for homeless pit bulls.

BEST LOCAL INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT

KEEP PITTSBURGH DOPE @keeppittsburghdope • • • • • • • •

Chancelor Humphrey uses his Keep Pittsburgh Dope account to showcase the people and vibe of Pittsburgh. With clean, bright portraits, he tells an individual’s story. His subjects range from adorable children to chic twentysomethings to elders in the community.

• • • • • • • •

Hello Bully is a pit-bull-terrier rescue group that hopes to educate the public and repair the dogs’ reputation. This nonprofit relies on volunteers to help them in their operations. It offers classes, adoptions, a fostering program

52

BEST LOCAL TWITTER ACCOUNT

PITTSBURGH DAD @Pittsburgh_Dad • • • • • • • •

Curt Wooton and Chris Preksta are

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

the co-creators of Pittsburgh Dad. The Twitter account offers a sitcom-style portrayal of the typical yinzer. The feed keeps fans abreast of new videos, comments on daily news and the continuing adventures of this well-known character.

BEST LOCAL BLOGGER

SUE KERR

BEST LOCAL PODCAST

DRINKING PARTNERS www.epicastnetwork.com • • • • • • • •

With a just-chillin’ vibe, and a stash of craft beers and spirits, local comics Ed Bailey and Day Bracey have chatted up everyone from local comedians to Mayor Bill Peduto. Now they’re a virtual institution themselves, with their 100th episode due in November.

www.pghlesbian.com • • • • • • • •

Born and raised in West Mifflin, Sue Kerr has been blogging since 2005. She founded Pittsburgh Lesbian Correspondents and serves as its editor-in-chief. She also blogs for The Bilerico Project and BlogHer, and has begun a new project, Amplify, to document LGBT voices in Western Pennsylvania.

BEST ACTIVIST

JULIA JOHNSON • • • • • • • •

She’s only in her mid-20s, but Johnson’s passion for community organizing has made her, for many, the face of activism in Pittsburgh. Last year, she told City Paper: “It’s important for me to do my best, and to fight, not only for


myself, but for others around me, and to leave a better world for the next generation.”

BEST PHILANTHROPIC PITTSBURGH PENGUIN

BEST LOCAL RADIO PERSONALITY

www.mariolemieux.org

MARK MADDEN, WXDX www.wxdx.com • • • • • • • •

Being loud and occasionally obnoxious isn’t usually a recipe for success, but WXDX’s Mark Madden has turned that combo into a winning talk-radio formula. His no-nonsense conversations with listeners, even when he’s hitting them with verbal roundhouses, have made him a favorite.

MARIO LEMIEUX • • • • • • • •

Lemieux was stricken by Hodgkin’s lymphona in 1993, the prime of his career. He has been cancer-free for more than two decades, but he still raises funds through his Mario Lemieux Foundation to help find a cure for cancer.

Thank you to everyone who voted! Pumped to keep yyinz coasting into 2017!! 2515 Penn Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 • Phone: (412) 471-2656

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST ON-AIR SPORTS PERSONALITY

MARK MADDEN, WXDX www.wxdx.com • • • • • • • •

Yes, he’s gruff and loud, and yeah, he can be meaner than a shithouse rat, but WXDX’s Mark Madden knows his sports. He talks football and baseball with ease, and he’s maybe the best guy in the city on Penguins hockey.

BEST PHILANTHROPIC PITTSBURGH STEELER

CHARLIE BATCH

BEST VIEW

DEAD CENTER OF THE 40TH STREET BRIDGE Reason: “You can see literally everything.” BEST BIKE PATH

GREAT ALLEGHENY PASSAGE www.gaptrail.org • • • • • • • •

With his Best of the Batch Foundation, the Homestead-born former QB now spends his post-NFL career improving the lives of underserved youth in Pittsburgh, with a focus on reading, computer literacy, sportsmanship and athletic facilities.

Affectionately known as the GAP trail, this paved/gravel path starts at Point State Park and traverses the Appalachian Mountains all the way to Cumberland, Md., car-free. Sections within the city offer stunning glimpses of the Monongahela River and former and still-operating steel mills.

BEST PHILANTHROPIC PITTSBURGH PIRATE

BEST ANIMAL AT THE PITTSBURGH ZOO

www.batchfoundation.org • • • • • • • •

ANDREW MCCUTCHEN www.pittsburghpirates.com

We’re truly honored and will keep working to stay the best! As a token of our appreciation, mention this ad and receive...

5208 Butler Street | Pittsburgh PA 15201 | 724-781-2082

Soulful Sounds of Christmas

FEATURING WILL DOWNING

+ NAJE NAJEE

POLAR BEAR One Wild Place, Highland Park 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

It might be easier to name causes the Pirates centerfielder doesn’t give to or raise money for. McCutchen and his Cutch’s Crew foundation provide money for Make-a-Wish, Children’s Hospital and many other charities. He raises money annually for the youth baseball league where he got his start. And most importantly, he’s always willing to give his time.

Hard to imagine that penguins were beat out in a town where they’re the mascots of hockey champions, but Pittsburgh’s polar bears, the world’s largest carnivorous land mammal, do wow zoo visitors. The bears frequently dive in the blue water of their exhibit, giving zoo-goers a cool underwater view. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

BYHAM THEATER | NOVEMBER 30TH | 8 PM TICKETS: TRUSTARTS.ORG or 412.456.6666 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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BEST OF PEOPLE + PLACES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

BEST TELEVISION WEATHER PERSONALITY

The Best Body-Piercing Shop In Pittsburgh.

STEPHEN CROPPER, WPXI • • • • • • • •

PitatlsBboudyrPgiehr’scing

Origin

Pi er ci ng Co.

OA LA OAKLAND 115 Oakland Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 1 412-687-4320

SOUTHSIDE

For nearly two decades, the amiable Cropper has been the voice of calm in the frequent storms of local weather hysteria. The chief meteorologist at WPXI keeps it steady and upbeat: If it’s raining tonight, well, it should be sunny by tomorrow.

importantly, yards away from the potentially bladder-inspiring Point State Park fountain), it’s no surprise this is a reader favorite. The facilities are clean and spacious, and it’s a heck of a lot easier than pretending to buy something at Starbucks.

BEST LOCAL POLITICAL COMMERCIAL

JOHN FETTERMAN BRIDGE AD • • • • • • • •

BEST TELEVISION NEWS ANCHOR

95 S 16th St, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-6077

KEN RICE, KDKA

www.hotrodpiercingcompany.com

Longtime news anchor Ken Rice is a reliable guide to newsworthy happenings of “KD Country.” If you’re a super newsie, you might also know Rice as a moderator of local political debates. If you’re a super Pittburgher, you treasure his appearance in Striking Distance, a.k.a. the best Pittsburgh movie ever.

• • • • • • • •

BEST PITTSBURGH COUPLE

ADAM AND NICOLE KULIK • • • • • • • •

Owners of Lawrenceville bar The Goldmark, the newlywed couple has given Pittsburghers a new favorite late-night hang-out. Adam, a.k.a. DJ Nugget, has created a space for local DJs to spin, and Nicole helped design the lounge so dancers feel comfortable when the beat drops.

Long before Pittsburghers were hit with the unexpected closure of the Liberty Bridge, this ad by Braddock Mayor John Fetterman — then running for U.S. Senate — highlighted the disparity between funding for infrastructure repairs like bridges and the big money that goes into political campaigns.

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST BEST-OF LIST

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER Reason: “Because I believe in pandering.”

BEST PUBLIC ART

RANDYLAND BEST HIKING TRAIL

FRICK PARK Point Breeze • • • • • • • •

Abundant green space is one of Pittsburgh’s best attributes. But at 644 acres — the first 151 of which were bequeathed by Henry Clay Frick in 1919 — this is the largest of our historic regional parks. Hit the expansive and varied wooded trails, and forget you’re in the middle of the city.

BEST PUBLIC BATHROOM

POINT STATE PARK • • • • • • • •

Located along the popular biking/ running/strolling route (and most

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

1501 Arch St., North Side 412-342-8152 or randy.land • • • • • • • •

It’s technically private art that is free and open to the public, but the vibe is absolutely welcoming. Randy Gilson has turned the courtyard of his North Side home into a crazy-collage display of colorful art and fun objects. Even after hours, you can admire the art-packed fence along the sidewalk.

BEST BRIDGE

ROBERTO CLEMENTE BRIDGE • • • • • • • •

No disrespect to its (nearly identical) neighbors, but there’s just something immensely satisfying about taking the Roberto Clemente


Castle Shannon Volunteer Fire Department 3600 Library Road, Castle Shannon, PA 15234 • 4 miles south of Downtown Pittsburgh

SUNDAY OCTOBER 30 • 9AM TO 5PM C.S.V.F.D. Memorial and Firemen’s Halls Rt. 88 & Grove Roads (3 lights south of Rt. 51) Admission $6 • 12 & Under Free

THREE HALLS! 200 Tables of Trains for Sale & Exclusive Parts Dept 8ft Tables $20 each

5 Operating Displays • ATM on site • Full Kitchen all day Family Train Activities & Train Rides Expanded History Center of Western Pennsylvania Railroading General & Dealer Info Fred Molly - Fire Fighter 412-833-4441 TCA# 91-32584

CSVFD Business Office 412-884-7913 9am - 3pm • Mon.-Fri. or at our website www.CSVFD.org

This show Sponsored by & for benefit of the C.S.V.F.D.

THE MARKETPLACE FOR: The Discerning Collector • The Avid Operator • Train Loving Families {CP PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Andrew McCutchen, winner of Best Philanthropic Pittsburgh Pirate

Bridge on foot to PNC Park to see the baseball team he represented so well for more than 15 years.

inclines, and hop on a downbound funicular to complete the viewing experience.

BEST CITY STEPS

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD TO RAISE A FAMILY

SOUTH SIDE SLOPES • • • • • • • •

The hill above East Carson Street is a step-trekker’s dream, its steep slopes offering sets of steps from as few as two to as many as a couple hundred. This is urban hiking at its best, and the views of Downtown and beyond make the burning calves worth every step.

BEST SCENIC DRIVE

GRANDVIEW AVENUE Mount Washington • • • • • • • •

Be careful driving, as you are likely to be distracted by the postcard views of Downtown Pittsburgh and the North Side hills. So once there, why not park and walk? Stop at either of the two historic

SQUIRREL HILL • • • • • • • •

Whatever the qualifiers for this category, the density of schools, food, culture and green space in this neighborhood is a big plus. With a leafy suburban vibe and a short shot to Downtown, Squirrel Hill offers the best of both worlds.

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

LAWRENCEVILLE • • • • • • • •

The first stop for visiting travel writers looking to make their bones, Lawrenceville is home to some of Pittsburgh’s trendiest restaurants, bars and shops. Coffee shops with WiFi are stationed every few blocks for getting work done, and the sprawling Allegheny Cemetery offers quality outdoors time for when you’re done.

SAVE-MOR Beer & Pop Warehouse

6.99 1 Ballast Point 16.99 FlyingPaDckog

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2016

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C O H E N

&

G R I G S B Y

T R U S T

P R E S E N T S

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24 • 7 PM

BYHAM THEATER

TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE • 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

S E R I E S


[DANCE]

WAR STORIES

PAIN BECAME THE FIFTH VITAL SIGN

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE COMPANY PERFORMS ANALOGY/DORA: TRAMONTANE 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 20, and 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 21. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-60. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org NEWS

+

[BOOKS]

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company’s Analogy/Dora: Tramontane {PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL B. GOODE}

Dancer I-Ling Lu stood with her back pressed to a wall, slowly and deliberately moving her stiffly pointed index finger from above toward the outstretched palm of her other hand like a dagger. Steps away on the stage of The University of Akron’s E.J. Thomas Hall, fellow dancer Jenna Riegel achingly voiced the words of Dora Amelan, recounting the death of her 20-year-old sister from an infection caused by a botched abortion during World War II. Lu embodied the cold anguish felt in Amelan’s words, her dark eyes a window into a woman who had seen untold horrors, perhaps none as haunting as the memory of this moment. The heartbreaking scene was one of many played out in Bill T. Jones/ Arnie Zane Company’s Analogy/Dora: Tramontane (2015), performed by the company Oct. 9 in Akron, Ohio. The show’s national tour visits the August Wilson Center Oct. 20 and 21 courtesy of Pittsburgh Dance Council. The show is based on a riveting oral history that artistic director/choreographer Bill T. Jones conducted with his now 96-year-old French-Jewish mother-in-law in 2002. In Amelan’s own words and those of Jones, the 90-minute intermissionless dancetheater work tells of her harrowing experiences escaping the Nazis and serving as a nurse/social worker in occupied France. Set to a masterfully crafted original score sung and performed live by its composer, Nick Hallett, and pianist Emily Manzo, the piece, in 25 chapters, fully embraced the “theater” in dance theater. The combination of the dancers skillfully voicing dialogue (often while dancing), Hallett’s powerful score and Jones’ abstract yet illustrative choreography made for a deeply moving experience that drilled into the core of our humanity, producing swells of disparate emotions and entrancing us with marvelous storytelling. It’s sure to be one of this dance season’s most memorable productions. Perhaps Analogy’s only shortcoming is that the music and dialogue sometimes overshadowed the dancing in dramatic impact. When all the elements did come together — such as in a scene when Amelan recalled a female co-worker saying goodbye to her husband who was being sent to a concentration camp, and a happier one depicting a visit from her entertainer cousin Marcel Marceau — it was pure theatrical magic.

WAKING UP IN DREAMLAND

From the front cover of Sam Quinones’ book Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic

{BY JAMES LANIGAN}

M

ORE PEOPLE IN the United

States are now dying from drug overdoses than from either car accidents or firearms. It has been this way since 2008, according to federal statistics, and the gap has widened each year. It’s an epidemic — with heroin and other opiates causing the majority of these deaths. In his State of the Union address this year, President Obama called heroin a public-health crisis. Sam Quinones’ 2015 book Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic tells the frightening story of how this problem has evolved over the past 40 years. In Dreamland, the former Los Angeles Times reporter — who speaks here Oct. 26 at a fundraiser for Gateway Rehabilitation Center — seeks to uncover the roots of this epidemic, about which his book’s title suggests that there is a false tale. But indeed, many observers’ chief culprit — prescription painkillers like OxyContin, which eight of 10 heroin addicts start out by using — isn’t so much a false story as it is only a fraction of the complete story. “It needed to be brought together in

Sam Quinones

a coherent narrative, that’s what had not happened,” says Quinones in a phone interview. Dreamland argues that the true beginning of the epidemic isn’t in 1996, with the commercial release of OxyContin, but almost two decades earlier, when the medical community changed its attitude toward the treatment of pain. This story starts in 1979, when a doc-

tor at Boston University named Hershel Jick grew curious about addiction rates in patients treated with painkillers. He and a graduate student named Jane Porter searched a university database. It was not a true medical study, nor was it meant to be. Jick sent his findings in a handwritten letter to the editor at the New England Journal of Medicine. Shortly after, this statistic appeared as a one-paragraph blurb on page 123 of the journal: Out of nearly 12,000 hospitalized patients treated with opiate painkillers, only four had become addicted. “Porter and Jick,” as the study became known, effected a dramatic shift in the medical community’s attitude toward the treatment of pain. It calls to mind Mark Twain’s saying that “there are lies, damned lies, and statistics.” Jick’s data came from information collected haphazardly, with no follow-through as to the status of patients after dismissal — which is really the only time when addiction would appear. Simply put, this data misled. Doctors were actually already aware of this. Before the 1980s, doctors had been averse to prescribing opiates simply CONTINUES ON PG. 86

MUSIC

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ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

TASTE

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SCREEN

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SPORTS

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CLASSIFIEDS

85


WAKING UP IN DREAMLAND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 85

301 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE Pgh, PA 15241 • 412-854-1074 southhills.colormemine.com

SAM QUINONES: “AMERICA’S OPIATE EPIDEMIC AT YOUR DOOR” 6:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 26. Fairmount Hotel, 510 Market St., Downtown. $150. www.gatewayrehab.org

Brooktree Health Services A Holistic Approach to Drug & Alcohol Treatment

Specific treatment programs offered by Brooktree Health Services include: • Partial Hospitalization Program • Intensive Outpatient • Outpatient Services • Evening IOP Hours

Recovery is a journey, not a destination.

Brooktree Health Services 6500 Brooktree Road Wexford, PA 15090 724-935-0460

Today, the epidemic might be a national crisis, but Pittsburgh has been on the frontlines from the beginning, says Quinones. “There’s a place where this stuff started, and it’s not far from Pittsburgh.” Indeed, in 2014, our city made national news when 22 people died from overdoses in one week. In the past few years, it’s been hard to watch the evening news without coming across a story about heroin. Between the daily arrests and frequent warnings about overdoses from contaminated heroin, it’s become an unavoidable issue that directly affects many people and indirectly affects us all. And the Pittsburgh region has become one of the hardest-hit areas in the country. According to 2014 statistics from the Centers for Disease Control, Pennsylvania has the eighth most overdose deaths in the country (West Virginia was first and Ohio fifth), while Pittsburgh ranks 18th among American cities. Quinones’s book does offer a silver lining: our resilience in the face of tragedy. He recounts how small towns like Portsmouth, Ohio, ravaged for years by drugs, formed organizations, charities and school programs to fight back. “Dreamland,” in fact, is the name of the community pool that was the center of social life in Portsmouth until the 1980s. Quinones connects the dots between mistakes made decades ago and the problems communities face today. But if the first step to solving any problem is admitting it exists, maybe the second step is learning from those mistakes to help heal from them. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[BOOKS]

SHOW AND TELL {BY ANDREW MOOORE}

Clare Beams {PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

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because of how addictive they knew them to be. But Quinones deftly explains how Porter and Jick’s findings were used as “evidence” to overturn the prevailing and conservative stance on pain. “The linchpin is the pain specialists,” Quinones said when I asked him how so many doctors were swayed. It was pain specialists who argued that doctors were missing out on a chance to help patients because of their fear of addiction. To not treat pain was cruel. Pain became the fifth vital sign. And state by state, legislation was passed to protect doctors from prosecution if they prescribed opiates for pain. Enter OxyContin. It was in this climate that Purdue Pharma released the drug and doctors began to prescribe it wildly beyond anything that any doctor would have imagined a decade earlier.

In Clare Beams’ debut story collection, We Show What We Have Learned (Lookout Books), characters struggle with change, loss and rejection, in settings including a plagueravaged Europe, a secretive all-girl boarding school, and the mysterious healing waters of New England. Joyce Carol Oates has called Beams “[a] female/feminist voice for the 21st century.” Beams’ book-launch party is Oct. 25 at White Whale Bookstore (formerly East End Book Exchange). Beams spoke with CP by phone from her home in Edgewood. YOU’VE BEEN COMPARED TO ALICE MUNRO, SHIRLEY JACKSON AND MARGARET ATWOOD. HOW DID YOU REACT? I couldn’t believe it. Those are books and stories that shaped me not just as a writer but the way that I look at the world. So that just felt like a really huge gift. MANY OF YOUR STORIES HAVE SURREAL ELEMENTS. YET THOSE WITH REGULAR HUMAN EMOTIONS AND SITUATIONS CAN BE JUST AS HAUNTING. WHAT DOES THAT SAY ABOUT YOUR CHARACTERS, AND ALSO ABOUT REALITY AND IMAGINATION? I don’t think of myself as exclusively a surreal writer. But I do feel there has to be something that feels sort of magical — whether that’s in the setting, or the actual place, or the time period, or … the extremity of the situation that the characters find themselves in. I think life is pretty strange enough. IN ONE OF YOUR STORIES, A CHARACTER SAYS, “[WORDS CAN] CHANGE YOU, IF YOU LET THEM … IF YOU WANT THEM TO.” HOW DO WORDS AFFECT CHARACTERS IN YOUR BOOK, AND HOW HAS WRITING THESE STORIES CHANGED YOU? In “The Renaissance Person Tournament,” the teacher character ends up telling this dramatic lie to this student that she loves in order to try to save her. And I think that the telling of that lie changes her, and makes her see herself in a different light. In terms of the way that the stories have changed me — when I write … you’re almost dreaming while you’re doing it. It’s not exactly the rational part of your brain in charge. I will look back and read something that I wrote and be like, “I do think that. That is a thing I think about the world.” The stories perhaps change me in that they make me look at things that I probably always thought, or always knew, but never acknowledged. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CLARE BEAMS 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 25. White Whale Bookstore, 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www.whitewhalebookstore.com


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Amy Landis and Ken Bolden in An Accident at Off the Wall

[PLAY REVIEWS]

BEDSIDE MANNER {BY GERARD STANLEY HORNBY} IN AN ACCIDENT, the visceral road to recovery is led by Amy Landis’ compelling eyes and intense monologues, holding the audience pinned from the start, steadied by the beep of a heart monitor. Landis’ Libby is bound in a hospital bed after a car crash, exploring what parts of her body she can feel and what parts of her life she can remember. Between scenes, our own eyes shift to see the intense guilt-wringing of Ken Bolden’s Anton — the man responsible — outside her room and by her bed, his stiff body pierced by a pain almost equal to that residing in the bed he stares at.

AN ACCIDENT continues through Oct. 29. Off the Wall Productions at Carnegie Stage, 25 W. Main Street, Carnegie. $25-40. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

I dare the audience not to prickle at director Linda Haston’s enclosing staging, a minimalist set enhanced only by the clinical detail of the hospital bed. The bed is the focal point of some emotionally fervid scenes, charged in erotic revelation. But these displays are pulled off in such a way by the actors and director that the audience neither squirms nor snorts, but is instead entranced and impressed at such brutally honest moments. There are instances of wit to temper the emotion, as the multilayered implications of guilt, disaster and disability are explored by the two, sometimes to unexpectedly hilarious effect. Their shared accident puts all of life on hold for this unlikely pair. And for 75 minutes, the audience feels that way too, sharing the physical and psychological struggles of responsibility and recovery. The play ends in a characteristically ambiguous image, with “What now?” the obvious question, and yet with both a definite and indefinite sense of a full circle being completed.

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The 2010 play, Lydia Stryk’s emotional testament to the power of dialogue, invites us into some shadowy moments of intimacy and ambiguity as we learn more about Libby’s strangled resentment in coming to deal with her temporary paralysis, and the haplessness of divorced history teacher Anton, whose principal pastime is reading military histories.

TOXIC FUN {BY TED HOOVER} YOU’VE GOT two choices with the Pitts-

burgh CLO production of The Toxic Avenger: Sit in your chair rolling your eyes at the non-stop silliness — or climb aboard for CONTINUES ON PG. 88

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an evening of goofy fun, and don’t worry whether culture has died. This 2008 Off-Broadway show is a nutty musical inspired by the 1985 cult-favorite film about a young man in New Jersey, Melvin, who loses his nerdiness when he falls into a vat of industrial waste and emerges as a deformed superhero ready to rid his town of crime. Book-writer Joe DiPietro uses just the basic plot from the movie, so fans should not expect a faithful adaptation. This Toxic is really about two things — milking every last joke out of New Jersey’s reputation as the armpit of the East Coast, and celebrating the possibilities of theater. It’s a cast of five playing at least five times as many characters, and the evening is an endless array of dialects and split-second costume changes. (At one point an actress, playing two characters, sings a duet with herself.) David Bryan, whom you might know as a Bon Jovi band member, wrote the score, while he and DiPietro co-wrote the lyrics. Bryan’s music is a loopy homage to the ’80s (especially those power ballads!) and neither is DiPietro not above making cracks about that decade. Evan Ruggiero is a non-stop entertainment force as Melvin/Monster, and Katie Sexton is bitchy-funny as his blind librarian

girlfriend. The two have a quirky chemistry which helps considerably when the show runs out of gas in the second act. Caroline Nicolian is a whirling dervish of fun as a very corrupt and evil mayor, while Quinn Patrick Shannon and Billy Mason pull out all the stops playing a whole platoon of lunatics. And all five are blessed with powerhouse voices.

THE TOXIC AVENGER continues through Dec. 18. Pittsburgh CLO at The Cabaret at Theater Square, 237 Seventh Ave., Downtown. $42-59.75. 412-325-6766 or www.clocabaret.com

Wes Grantom’s direction is a bit unfocussed, and this kind of broad comedy needs a much sharper playing style than it has now. But it’s early in the run and, considering the talent on stage, The Toxic Avenger will more than likely find its way. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

TIMELESSNESS {BY TED HOOVER} TRY TO REMEMBER a time in September

when The Fantasticks wasn’t playing

somewhere in the world. To do that, you’d have to go back to 1960, when the show began its 42-year Off-Broadway run. The Pittsburgh Public Theater weighs in with its own version, directed and choreographed with grace and dispatch by Ted Pappas, with precise musical direction from Douglas Levine. It’s very easy to be bitchy about this intimate musical which has been performed, at least twice, by every theater in the Pittsburgh area. With music by Harvey Schmidt and book and lyrics by Tom Jones, this purposefully tiny show could, to the unfeeling, seem quaint and corny. But I happen to enjoy The Fantasticks (which, considering how many times I’ve sat through it, is lucky). Schmidt and Jones employ a style which has become, in the ensuing years, timeless. And to rout out any trace of quaint corniness, they’ve perfumed the show with melancholy and a certain bittersweet yearning. Two young kids are tricked into falling in love when their fathers pretend to feud and build a wall between their houses. (Nothing is more appealing than the thing we can’t have.) They hire a traveling band of players to stage an abduction

of the girl … with the goal of making the boy seem like a hero when he rescues her. Complications arise when the romance of love curdles into the reality of love and everyone learns that life is both the light and the dark. It’s a lovely cast of engaging performers at the Public. Jamen Nanthakumar and Mary Elizabeth Drake are so cute as the lovers you wanna hang them on a Christmas tree. Gavan Pamer and Daniel Krell get their laughs as the duplicitous dads, while Josh Powell, Noble Shropshire, Tony Bingham and Jason Shavers bring fun and texture in assorted roles.

THE FANTASTICKS continues through Oct. 30. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-66. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

I didn’t get, however, why everyone was pushing so hard. The Fantasticks is absolutely a show designed to slowly, almost imperceptibly bewitch you. This production’s got a little too much manufactured “musical theater” pizzazz going on. But if the worst thing you can say is that everyone’s too professional, that’s really not all that bad. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Join Doctors Without Borders at our new interactive exhibition about the global refugee crisis.

FORCED FROM HOME

Schenley Plaza, Pittsburgh, PA, October 27-31 le arn more at

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© Luca Sola

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[COMEDY]

LOVE HATE

The opera that shocked the world!

{BY SAMUEL LEONARD}

Nemr Abou Nassar {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIA ABOU NASSAR}

When he was 2, civil war in Lebanon forced Nemr Abou Nassar’s family to immigrate to San Diego, where they discovered standup comedy. Nemr eventually returned to Lebanon and worked as both producer and entertainer while essentially creating the Middle Eastern standup industry. Nassar, who makes his Pittsburgh debut on Oct. 27, spoke with City Paper by phone. WHAT IS THE STANDUP SCENE LIKE IN THE MIDDLE EAST? When I started it out back in 2001, it was completely unheard of. Because so many people have been displaced by war, and because American culture is huge all across the Middle East, it wasn’t much of a stretch for people to be receptive. But to get venues and infrastructure set up, and to get people to get used to the concept that it can be local and not international — that took years. It’s a revolution by every meaning of the word. WHAT’S IT LIKE TOURING AMERICA AS A MIDDLE EASTERNER DURING A PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN SO FULL OF ISLAMOPHOBIA? In my show I talk about how when Donald Trump says, “the majority of Muslims hate America” — which couldn’t be further from the truth — you can’t just dismiss that as racism. You need to acknowledge that it’s a problem that a lot of people agree with him, because it means we [the Middle East] are not doing good job of communicating what we’re about. DO YOU ENCOUNTER BIGOTRY AND RACISM EVEN THOUGH YOU’RE A CHRISTIAN? Here’s the thing: Racism is a beautiful emotion. If you can walk up to someone who doesn’t know you and just by introducing yourself they automatically hate you, well, I tell those people, “I love you too, man.” It’s beautiful because there’s a lot of passion there. All I have to do is find out how to redirect that passion. You have to understand that we’re all human beings who want to love and be loved, so there will always be common ground. But how we are going to find that common ground? I don’t like the cliché answer, “It’s all about love, man. Spread the love!” No. that’s the lamest thing I’ve heard in my life. It’s about hate. It’s about understanding and embracing hate, and using that hatred to overcome our differences.

NOVEMBER 5, 8, 11, 13 ǦŠ“Š‰š’Š“™Š— ǦŽˆŠ™˜˜™†—™†™ȖȜȝ ǦȟȜȝǂȟȠȡǂȡȡȡȡ Ǧ•Ž™™˜‡š—Œ”•Š—†ǀ”—ŒǠ˜†‘”’Š UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD! Sung in English with texts projected above the stage.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NEMR ABOU NASSAR 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 27. Pittsburgh Improv, 166 E. Bridge St., Homestead. $20-35. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com NEWS

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.20-10.27.16 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KAYLIN HORGAN}

For her latest work, The Gaslight … Who killed Mr. Volney Davis?, dancer/ choreographer Kaylin Horgan uses the concept of “gaslighting” – a manipulation of someone by psychological means into questioning their own sanity – and applies it to a murder mystery. The hour-long multimedia dance-theater piece at Point Breeze’s The Space Upstairs was created in collaboration with London-based writer Jazmine Reynolds. The action is set in a St. Louis tavern in the 1940s. Horgan, a Point Park grad and a founding member of The

Pillow Project now living in Chicago, says The Space Upstairs will be transformed into a working tavern, and audience members will be patrons observing and interacting with a cast of five colorful characters including workaholic waitress Phyllis and barfly Martha. Danced to original music by singer/songwriter Grace Wong, the piece uses dialogue by the performers and contemporary dance movement to tell its story, and plays out like an immersive game of Clue. Questions will be asked, motives uncovered, accusations made, and the characters will gaslight one another and the audience in an effort to disguise who really killed Mr. Volney Davis.

^ Fri., Oct. 21: ChemFest Celebration

thursday 10.20 MUSIC Alia Musica begins its season with celebrated New York guitarist Jordan Dodson. Premiering Federico Garcia-De Castro’s Romanza for Guitar, Dodson (pictured) will also perform Mario Davidovsky’s Synchronisms for guitar and electronics, and a solo written especially for him by Jason Eckardt. The performance is tonight at Jason Simon’s Sculpture Studio, in Uptown. The season’s second recital is Oct. 27, at Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, where pianist Frederic Rzewski will perform “a cycle of solo piano works inspired by revolutionary songs” from the 19th and 20th centuries. Ian Flanagan Dodson: 7:30 p.m. 305 Gist St., Uptown. $15 ($10 students/seniors). 412-427-6717 or www.aliamusicapittsburgh.org

BY STEVE SUCATO

8 p.m., Sat., Oct. 22. The Space Upstairs, 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. $10 donation at the door. www.thespaceupstairs.org

In her 2015 book Eye of the Beholder,

Laura J. Snyder explored how Johannes Vermeer and scientist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek changed the way we see the world. Tonight, the historian, philosopher and storyteller gives a TED-style talk about the connections between the natural sciences, philosophy, arts and letters as part of the University of Pittsburgh’s Year of the Humanities in the University. 6 p.m., Thu., Oct. 20. Carnegie Museum of Art theater, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free

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EXHIBIT Get hands-on with chemistry today and tomorrow at the Carnegie Science Center. The annual ChemFest Celebration, this year themed Solving Mysteries Through Chemistry, explores crime-scene chemistry (learn to detect forged documents and visualize fingerprints), biology (extract DNA from strawberries) and more. Local companies,

colleges and universities will be on hand to discuss their work in STEM fields. Bill O’Driscoll 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., Oct. 22. Free with regular admission ($11.95-19.95). 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

ART Around age 30, Andy Warhol started going bald. How this affected his artwork is just one facet of Andy Warhol: My Perfect Body, a new exhibit at The Andy Warhol Museum and “the first comprehensive look at Andy Warhol’s engagement with the body.” The more than 200 artworks, many never shown during his lifetime, range from student drawings from 1940s Pittsburgh to paintings from the 1980s. “This exhibition reveals how the body in Warhol’s work becomes a subject for trauma, torment, shame, desire, transformation and manipulation,” says the Warhol’s Jessica Beck, who curated the show, which opens today. BO 10 a.m.-10 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20 (half-price after 5 p.m.). 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org ^ Thu., Oct. 20: Alia Musica


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^ Fri., Oct. 21: Andy Warhol: My Perfect Body

STAGE It’s a classic literary property made new, in a new setting that harks to the past. Starting tonight, Steel City Shakespeare Center offers seven performances of Marsha Mayhak’s stage adaptation of Pride & Prejudice at Heathside Cottage, a 19th-century home and events venue in Fineview. The troupe specializes in fast-paced, small-scale productions of classics in nontraditional spaces; in this one, directed by Alan Irvine, you follow Jane Austen’s five Bennett sisters and that dashing Mr. Darcy throughout the Cottage. BO 7 p.m. Continues through Oct. 30. 416 Catoma St., Fineview. $15 suggested donation (Fineview residents: $10 suggested donation). www.steelcityshakespeare.weebly.com

SATURDAY, A OCTOBER 29 3101 PENN AVENUE (FORMERLY 31ST STREET PUB)

COMEDY The multitalented Louis C.K. — director, writer, star and sometimes even editor of his FX series Louie — visits Pittsburgh as part of his current national tour. In 2015, he became the first comedian to sell out Madison Square Garden three times in one tour. His direct-to-consumer model of selling tickets, standup specials and the only season of his latest series, Horace and Pete have all influenced how other comedians ^ Fri., Oct. 21: Louis C.K. do business. He also starred in American Hustle, Trumbo and lent a leading voice to The Secret Life of Pets. C.K. hits the Petersen Events Center tonight. IF 8 p.m. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. $50. 412-648-3054 or www.louisck.net

saturday 10.22 STAGE City Theatre presents the world premiere of writer and actress Sharon Washington’s solo show Feeding the Dragon. City Theatre worked with Washington on her script; Washington herself stars in this semi-autobiographical coming-of-age story about a girl who grows up at a branch of the New York Public Library, where her father, the live-in custodian, must feed the coal furnace every night. The production in the intimate Lester Hamburg Studio Theatre, is directed by Maria Mileaf, and the first performance is tonight. IF 5:30 p.m. Continues through Nov. 20. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-59. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org CONTINUES ON PG. 92

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^ Sun., Oct. 23: 2016 Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

WORDS The Bloomfield storefront formerly known as East End Book Exchange was recently relaunched as White Whale Bookstore, but new owners Jill and Adlai Yeomans seem intent on continuing the space as a literary hub. For instance, today Chatham University hosts the Conversations and Connections Writers Conference, whose panel talks include Poetic License Revoked: Poetry as NonFiction. Tonight, that panel’s seven participants — Jason Baldinger, Sheila L. CarterJones, Kristofer Collins, Kamala Gopalakrishnan, Lori Jakiela, Jonathan Moody and Scott Silsbe — reconvene at White Whale to read their poetry. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www.whitewhalebookstore.com

BOOKS The pleasant inconvenience of a flat bike tire on the way to work. The weird mystery of a late-night visit to the cavernous, empty reaches of a Home Depot. This is the stuff of Daily Geology, John Peña’s five-years-and-running series of daily comics about moments in his life. Tonight, at Copacetic Comics, the Carnegie Mellon professor and nationally exhibited artist holds the book launch for his second collection of Daily Geology strips. BO 7-9 p.m. 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. 412-251-5451 or www.copaceticcomics.com

sunday 10.23

{ART BY JOHN PEÑA}

^ Sat., Oct. 22: John Peña

SPORT The 2016 Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions arrives today at the CONSOL Energy Center. As with the other stops on the 36-city tour, local gymnasts are expected to join selected members of the 2016 U.S. Olympic team, in addition to athletes from the 2012 Olympic team, for skills exhibitions ranging from floor exercises to the rings. Touring cast members (not all of whom will appear at each stop) include Simone Biles, Gabby Douglas and Chris Brooks. VIP packages include a pre-show Olympian Chalk Talk, led by 2008 Olympic champion Nastia Luikin, and an autograph session following the show. IF 5 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $27.50-284.75. 800-745-3000 or www.ppgpaintsarena.com

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Fourth Annual Howloween Bash, Cattivo Bar, Lawrenceville CRITIC: Steven Mital, 46, a warehouse worker from Lawrenceville WHEN: Fri.,

Oct. 14

[Cattivo Holwoween Bash is] a gathering of great local bands who are putting on different acts for this evening in order to raise money for charity. The local [musicians] … have fun doing cover bands. It’s two nights this year and a lot more bands. It’s a night out for a good cause and lots of good music. Last year was bouncing between upstairs and downstairs. This one was more of a hard-rock night. The members of Lady Beast, Mud City Manglers, Molasses Barge and Motorpsychos performed as Twisted Sister and really got into the spirit of being another band for the night. So did Crooked Cobras as Spinal Tap. They didn’t just sound the part, they went out of their way to look it as well. All the guys from Broughton’s Rules, Del Rios, Cumplete Basturds and Dreadeath performed as Metallica — that was the top collaboration of the evening for me. B Y IAN F L ANAGAN

monday 10.24 STAGE Cirque Mechanics’ show Pedal Punk incorporates elements of steam-punk aesthetics, cycling-based circus acrobatics and mischievous humor in order to explore the relationship between man and machine. Creative director Chris Lashua spent a decade in bicycle freestyle competitions and performances before taking part in Cirque du Soleil shows Fascination and Quidam in the ’90s; he founded Cirque Mechanics in 2004. The Las Vegas-based troupe, which visits the Byham Theater tonight as part of the Cohen & Grigsby Presents series, promises “shows that blend realism with American ingenuity.” IF 7 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $25-45. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

tuesday 10.25 ART Once, seeking economic opportunity, Philippines-born Xyza Cruz Bacani was employed as a domestic worker in Hong Kong. There she took up photography, and began documenting how foreign domestic workers are often mistreated. Bacani is now internationally acclaimed (as a 2015 Magnum Foundation Human Rights Fellow, among other honors). Her exhibit Modern Slavery, featuring 12 images of domestic workers, is new in the gallery of Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild. Supplemental programming includes a public reception and artist talk on Dec. 14. BO 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Jan. 6. 1815 Metropolitan St., North Side. Free. 412-322-1773 or www.mcgyouthandarts.org

thursday 10.27

^ Thu., Oct. 27: Yemanjá

SCREEN The Color Purple author Alice Walker is among the guests for tonight’s Pittsburgh premiere of the new documentary Yemanjá: Wisdom from the African Heart of Brazil, at Chatham University. Walker narrates the hour-long film, which explores the African-derived Candomblé spiritual culture in Bahia, Brazil, through the stories of its elder women. The screening is followed by a panel discussion featuring Walker; the film’s director, Pittsburgh-based Donna C. Roberts; and Rachel Elizabeth Harding, an author, scholar and Candomblé priestess based in Colorado. The free event takes place in Chatham’s Campbell Memorial Chapel, with an overflow screening in the Eddy Theater. BO 6:30 p.m. Chatham campus, Squirrel Hill. Free. www.justfilmspgh.org

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THE BRISKET WAS BURSTING WITH SMOKY FLAVOR

SHAKE IT OFF

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

314 Fifth Ave., Downtown, and 1705 E. Carson St., South Side. www.themilkshakefactory.com

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Bananas Foster milkshake

Stroll the Fifth-Forbes corridor and cry all you want for the late, lamented Candyrama and its many inexpensive treats like penny candy. The area has been rehabbed, and with the shiny new buildings come fancier and pricier ways to indulge one’s sweet tooth. Like a $7 milkshake. And judging by the steady stream of customers at The Milk Shake Factory’s new Downtown outpost in the equally new Tower at PNC Plaza, that’s not a problem. The milkshakes here are made to take back to your cubicle, or to enjoy on site. The sit-down space is a vintage-inspired mix of subway tile, reclaimed ceiling panels and sodafountain chic. Warning: You’ll be eye level with the Factory’s selection of loose and boxed chocolates, which is another temptation. There are 10 classic shakes (vanilla, chocolate malted) offered at $5, and another 10 “signature” and slightly fancier flavors, such as salted caramel and mocha java for $6. (Free marketing idea that’s impossible to enact: milkshake flights; choose six.) But the eye-catchers are the $7 gourmet shakes, which offer exotic flavors (like Chocolate-Covered Bacon) and add-ins ranging from fresh fruit to liege waffles. The Bananas Foster milkshake, inspired by the famous New Orleans dessert, is topped with a crispy caramelized slice of banana. Not to be outdone by the season, the Factory is currently offering a Pumpkin Fudge shake (pumpkin ice cream, hot fudge, cinnamon, whipped cream). Also on the menu: fancy sundaes — the Chocolatier has five kinds of chocolate treats in it— ice-cream sodas and even New York-style egg creams. By its very nature, a milkshake has to be made fresh, just for you, every time. It’s an indulgence worth paying for.

{CP PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

{BY AL HOFF}

{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

The Yinzer burger with American cheese, bacon, fries, cole slaw, fried egg, hot sauce and mayo

SMOKE SIGNAL {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

ARBECUE COMES with a certain

mythos: imagery of roadside shacks, billowing smoke, and country folk in rustic garb. None of that really pertains to our local urban barbecue restaurants, with the possible exception of billowing smoke, but that doesn’t stop them from trying. On the South Side, Twelve on Carson Whiskey Barbecue is full of weathered barnwood, vintage signage and porcine silhouettes. But collaged together with subway tile, corrugated metal and Edison bulbs — signifiers, all, of a certain brand of hip so ubiquitous, we wonder if it can possibly be hip anymore — the message seemed to be less about the iconography of barbecue than about the decor preferences of the target demographic. At least that was the vibe we were

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.19/10.26.2016

getting as we sat to order. The menu was stripped down, with barbecue front and center, flanked by non-barbecue appetizers, wings and burgers. Four kinds of smoked meat — chicken leg, pulled

TWELVE ON CARSON 1222 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-742-4024 HOURS: Daily 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: Appetizers, wings and burgers $6-14, barbecue $12-25 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED pork, brisket and ribs — were offered with a half-dozen traditional sides, plus salad and pickle on a stick. The options were tight enough that our family of four managed to sample just about everything.

Loaded nachos came with a choice of smoked chicken or pulled pork. Knowing there was going to be plenty of pork to come, we went with chicken here, and found it juicy and well flavored with grill smoke. The other toppings — cheese, pico de gallo, lettuce, jalapeño and sour cream — were par for the nacho course; they were heavily heaped upon the top chips, as is ever the case with nachos, leaving the bottom ones bare. Fried green tomatoes made for a suitably Southern option, and the kitchen did a credible job with them. A uniformly crunchy, not shaggy, coating surrounded nice, thick slices. A Cajun remoulade was unnecessarily sweet, but not cloyingly so. Whenever we see a dozen wing sauces, we never know which ones are housemade, but here at least a couple stood


out, including the “Bee Stinger.” With honey, lime and chili, this was more Thai-style than strictly barbecue, but we appreciated the subtle yet satisfying way the sweet honey was balanced against tangy citrus and savory soy. The wings themselves were just so-so: on the small side and crispy outside, but not especially juicy within. A buffaloblue burger brought a good, beefy patty, but too little hot-and-cool buffalo-blue cheese flavor. It was once the main meats came out that we began to reconsider our assumptions. They were legit. Pulled pork — available on a plate or a bun — was good, with both shreds and meaty chunks, but the brisket and ribs were great. The brisket was, in places, a bit salty, but it was also bursting with smoky flavor, and the texture was perfect, with soft, fatty edges and juicy, luscious meat. In the best ribs, the meat falls off the bone, but isn’t mushy; it’s meaty, but not tough. Twelve hit this elusive sweet spot and, because the ribs hadn’t been heavily basted during cooking, the pork’s flavor came through even when they were sauced. As for that sauce, its thick, dark character looked worryingly like ultra-sweet Kansas City style, but revealed much greater depths to our palates. Whiskey provided a flavor backbone, sweetness faded and a slow burn developed without ever overpowering the smokiness of the meat. Insofar as Pittsburgh does have a barbecue tradition, it tends toward sweet, tomatoey sauces; this was similar yet much, much better. Jason used waffle fries to scrape some off his brisket, and the sauce worked with the fries as well. Sides were pretty good, led by a newto-us item: KC cheesy corn. It’s essentially macaroni-and-cheese with corn in place of pasta. But at least as made at Twelve, that substitution makes all the difference, because the bright, sweet, juicy corn lightened the cheesy sauce where macaroni thickens it. Southern baked beans consisted of pintos and black beans with smoky bits of pork, hardly any sugar, and a bit of zing from barbeque sauce. Cole slaw benefited from Cajun flavors. Ultimately, Twelve may look like another trendy bar with a half-hearted barbecue theme, but its commitment to the cuisine goes deeper than its barnwood veneer. The menu and ingredients were compiled with care. And while smoke may not have been billowing from the kitchen, it was present where it counted: in the meat. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

Open Tuesday-Friday 7am-7pm Sunday 7am-4pm

WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR

bar • billiards • burgers

WARMING UP WITH SHAKSHUKA {BY CELINE ROBERTS} I’ll be the first to admit this is a pretty bastardized version of shakshuka. The dish is attributed to a lot of places and cultures, including Northern Africa, the Middle East and, most often, Israel, where it’s served as a breakfast food. Since it’s already integrated into so many food cultures, this Italian-leaning iteration doesn’t strike me as a reach; besides, I’ve never had a version I didn’t like. This recipe is the result of a beautiful, late-summer afternoon with a friend who is a baker. His sourdough needed an equally delicious companion, and how better to eat bread than by using it to scrape homemade sauce out of the bottom of a bowl? ?

MONDAY & THURSDAY $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________ TUESDAY Burger, Beer, & Bourbon $11.95 ____________________ WEDNESDAY Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________ FRIDAY Sangria $3 ____________________ SATURDAY & SUNDAY 10:30am-3pm Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

INGREDIENTS • 3 tbsp. butter • 2 large shallots, minced • 1 tbsp. garlic, minced ced • ¼ cup red wine • 1 tsp. smoked paprika a • 1 tsp. chili powder • 1 tbsp. sp fresh oregano, o, de-stemmed de-st • 1 tbsp. fresh basil, ribboned • 28 oz. can plum tomatoes, chopped (or 3 large fresh tomatoes, chopped) • 6 eggs • salt and pepper, to taste • good quality Parmigiano-Reggiano • 1 loaf sourdough bread • Optional: 1 tsp. cayenne powder, added with the chili powder and smoked paprika

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm

900 Western Ave. North side 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

Gas Station Grilled Cheese

Two slices of thick toasted bread packed with chili, crushed nacho tortilla chips, oozing with nacho cheese, and a side of fresh cut French fries.

3536 Saw Mill Run Boulevard Brentwood, PA 15227

412-885-0600 www.mtgcheese.com

INSTRUCTIONS Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Drop butter into cast-iron skillet over mediumlow heat. Add the shallots and cook until translucent. Add garlic and cook for one to two minutes. Add smoked paprika and chili powder, and stir for one minute. Add wine, oregano and basil, and simmer until slightly reduced. Stir in tomatoes, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Reduce until the sauce has thickened and remove from heat. Crack eggs, without breaking the yolks, on top of the sauce and transfer skillet into oven. Bake until the eggs are set and the whites are opaque. While eggs are baking, drop butter into a hot pan on the stove and toast slices of sourdough in it until they are golden brown. Grate ParmigianoReggiano over the top of eggs and garnish with basil. Serves six. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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Formerly the

Tin Angel

Book Your Holiday Parties NOW! {CP PHOTO BY DREW CRANISKY}

A neighborhood place: inside Allegheny City Brewing

Diningg with a

[ON THE ROCKS]

LOCAL HAUNT Allegheny City Brewing offers creative beers on the North Side {BY DREW CRANISKY}

1200 GRANDVIEW AVENUE • MT. WASHINGTON 412-381-1919 • VUE412.COM

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

tcut to Mexico! The first The shor/ hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. 1000 SUTHERLAND DR. | PITTSBURGH, PA 15205 412-787-8888 • WWW.PLAZAAZTECA.COM 96

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I’VE BEEN WATCHING a lot of Cheers lately. I’ve learned a few things in my hours of bingeing, like the fact that Ted Danson makes a martini suspiciously quickly and that 1980s studio audiences were extremely giggly. But mostly I’ve noticed that, although the series premiered more than three decades ago, the culture and importance of the neighborhood bar has hardly changed. Though there may be more screens and taps now, folks still need a place to unwind, shoot the breeze and meet new friends. Allegheny City Brewing is Pittsburgh’s latest watering hole to provide just that. Al Grasso, Matt Yurkovich and Amy Yurkovich opened the brewery in the North Side’s Deutschtown section late last month. They dreamt up the idea when they were living in craft-beer-soaked Colorado. Like many homebrewers, they would kick around ideas about the spot they might someday open. But according to Grasso, it was Amy (Matt’s sister and Grasso’s significant other) who really lit the fire. “She said, ‘Do it or shut up,’” says Grasso, laughing. The three Pittsburgh natives moved back home and got to work. Allegheny City Brewing is the result. The name references the North Side’s former identity as a sister city to Pittsburgh, which annexed it (despite protests by most Allegheny City residents) in 1907. The name recalls this interesting bit of history, but it also tags Allegheny City Brewing as a place that is very much by and for the North Side. “We want to be a neighborhood

place,” explains Grasso. “Somewhere you can play games, listen to music and get to know your neighbors.” The small space is divided into two sections. One side houses the seven-barrel brewhouse, where everything from refreshing sours to barrel-aged imperial stouts are born. “One great thing about being a smaller brewhouse, we can change things up all the time depending on what’s available,” notes Grasso. In a few weeks, for instance, they will debut a serviceberry sour, a beer made with fruit foraged earlier this year from Pittsburgh’s abundant serviceberry trees. The other side is a cozy taproom filled with rustic wooden fixtures and nods to the neighborhood’s past, like an old Duquesne Light spool painted with the Allegheny City seal. Eight taps pour a mixture of rotating seasonals and flagships, which are still being determined (an imperial grapefruit IPA and a graham-cracker porter are early contenders). Beer is available in flights and full pours, or you can grab a growler to bring home. And though the brewery doesn’t serve food, you are welcome to bring your own or get a bite from the occasional visiting food truck. A wise man once said, “Making your way in the world today takes everything you’ve got.” I have a hunch that a cold beer from Allegheny City Brewing sure would help a lot. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

507 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3732 or www.alleghenycitybrewing.com


Follow us on

BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste them both and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

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Ramen Bar

OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Japanese Cuisine

Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

THE DRINK: MOSCOW MULE

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VS.

Oakland 414 South Craig St. AM PM Mon-Sat 11 -9 Sun 12PM-9PM

Squirrel Hill 5874 1/2 Forbes Ave. AM PM

Ten Penny

Wallace’s Tap Room

960 Penn Ave., Downtown

123 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty

DRINK: Garden Mule INGREDIENTS: New Amsterdam basil-infused vodka, Barrow’s Ginger liqueur, lime juice, ginger beer, basil garnish OUR TAKE: The basil garnish added a lovely, strong note to the nose of the drink. Each sip was spicy and herbal, with the ginger bringing significant heat to the cocktail. The vodka helped the flavor profile stay light and clean, and kept the drink from being overly sweet.

5860 Forbes Ave, 15217 • Squirrel Hill CALL (412) 521-5138 521-5899

DRINK: Moscow Mule INGREDIENTS: Smirnoff vodka, ginger beer, ginger syrup, lime, bitters, lime wedge OUR TAKE: Citrus ruled the flavor profile for this bracing rendition of a Moscow Mule. The lime juice’s acidity and the spice of the ginger made the drink an excellent choice for adding some pep to a cold evening. Opting to stay classic makes this Mule a reliable quaff for those who love the cocktail canon.

Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

412-421-9529 412-421-2238

RESERVATION • TAKE-OUT FREE DELIVERY • CATERING

The 5th Judicial District of

This week on Five Minutes in Food History: A final five minutes with Brian Butko and the story of Isaly’s. www.pghcitypaper.com

Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer

make the right choice,

Stoli Doli Cocktail Sto

don’t drink & drive.

Price: $13 Price “We take Stoli S vodka and soak it with Dole pineapples for seven tto 10 days on the bar. It’s served shaken over served up in a martini glass. We go through tons ice and ser cocktails.” of these co — RECOMMENDED BY KATIE PAGE, BARTENDER AT THE CAPITAL GRILLE

The Stoli Doli is available at The Capital Grille, Downtown. The chain has been serving it since 1990.

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OVE IS AT ODDS WITH CONTEMPORARY SWEDEN

BAD NUMBERS {BY AL HOFF} Gavin O’Connor’s crime thriller The Accountant is a head-scratching swingand-a-miss of a movie, and I can’t even talk about some of the odder aspects without giving away a plot twist or two. But let’s start with the premise, which has a sort of Mad Libs quality: Christian Wolff (Ben Affleck) is a boring tax accountant working in a boring strip mall in a boring part of the Midwest. In his

A head for figures: Ben Affleck

spare time, he does black-books accounting for cartels and other organized crime groups around the globe. He also works as an assassin. And he’s autistic. Motivations and backstory are a bit of a muddle, but the film suggests his autism is beneficial to his proficiency with both numbers and military-style assault rifles. The film juggles three main stories. 1. Wolff takes a forensic accounting job at a robotics firm and meets a sympathetic junior number-pusher (Anna Kendrick); this leads to a tentative friendship and two bloodbaths. 2. A Treasury Department agent (J.K. Simmons) is trying to track Wolff down; a bloodbath from the past is recalled in vivid detail. 3. Wolff grows up as an unhappy child, with a fight-happy dad; there are increasingly ugly brawls. It’s all enough to make one turn to something low-key, like accounting. The problems with this film are legion, from its convoluted plot and its ill-advised non-linear structure to its deep moral ambiguity: When did loner assassins become such sympathetic figures? AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

The rat’s-nest hair, the denim suits, the boorish behavior: U.S. Rep. James Traficant, from Youngstown, Ohio, sure made an impression. Eric Murphy’s new doc, Traficant:

The Congressman an of Crimetown, tracks his life, from football player er at Pitt to workingclass hero, and from jail ail to his farmrelated death in 2014. Starts tarts Fri., Oct. 21. 1. Parkway, McKees Rocks

Ove (Rolf Lassgård) on patrol in his street

GRUMPY OLD MAN {BY AL HOFF}

I

F YOU’RE LOOKING for something to

take your mind off the non-stop vitriol and negativity that is Election 2016, you might find some uplift in Hannes Holm’s Swedish dramedy A Man Called Ove. Ove (Rolf Lassgård) is a retired 59-yearold widower who spends his day in a rigid routine. He checks the signs and garage locks in his housing development. Yells at his neighbors for minor infractions. Visits the grave of his recently deceased wife, Sonja. Rails against the assorted bureaucrats who ruin everything. Ove is just genc erally content to be generally miserable. e Or not. He plans to “join” his dead wife, but no viewer will be surprised to w find his suicide attempt thwarted by a doorbell he’s obliged to answer. Turns out d he h has new neighbors, a family headed by b an Iranian immigrant, Parvaneh (Bahar h Pars), who could both use some help and a be helpful. A Man Called Ove offers the familiar set-up, execution (here come some i

cute kids!) and feel-good resolution of many similar works about cranky people who need to lighten up. Yet none of the film’s expected beats should detract from one’s enjoyment.

A MAN CALLED OVE DIRECTED BY: Hannes Holm STARS: Rolf Lassgård, Bahar Pars, Filip Berg, Ida Engvoll In Swedish, with subtitles Starts Fri., Oct. 21. Regent Square

CP APPROVED The film is grounded by a stellar performance from Rolf Lassgård as the older Ove, who represents a traditional, sturdy, nonnonsense, orderly Nordic type, given to neither messiness nor exhibitions of joy. He’s at odds with contemporary Sweden, with its immigrants, gays and people who greet life’s irritants with a cheerful shrug. But to fill in Ove’s current disconnect, the film flashes back to his past, rolling out

scenes to illustrate how Ove became who he is. We learn that social interaction was always difficult for Ove, a trait he likely inherited from his taciturn dad, who found tinkering with his Saab the easiest way to impart life lessons. (The Saab is also a setup for a comic riff later in the film.) And hands down, the best thing that ever happened to the younger Ove (Filip Berg) was meeting Sonja (Ida Engvoll), the bubbly schoolteacher who sees Ove’s good spirit and emotionally vulnerability despite his bumbling and often off-putting ways. We only need to see Sonja interact with Ove once to know how devastating her absence in his life must be. (“It’s just chaos when you are not here,” he tells her headstone.) Thus, the character of Ove grows increasingly sympathetic as the film runs through Ove and Sonja’s life together, their union by turns sweetly romantic and heartbreaking. But fear not: This sentimental crowd-pleaser should leave you with a smile. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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might simply be amused by the mish-mash of it all. Shay (Daniel Huttlestone) is a dutiful suburban kid who gets woke to punk and the wild world of London when he meets a manic pixie dream girl named Vivian (Nell Williams). She lets him listen to The Clash on her anachronistic Walkman, and browbeats him into being cool. Soon, the pair is off doing nutty things like stealing cabs (with Shay dressed as a woman) and — groan — organizing a musical benefit with The Clash. There is a slot for a film about a lonely kid who, like many in real life, finds meaning in a band; there’s another for a stardust-sprinkled teen romance with silly quests; and there’s still a third for illustrating the gritty but vibrant pushback against the impending Thatcher times. But to combine all these in this manner is illadvised. Starts Fri., Oct. 21. Harris (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN. A bunch of ghosts, zombies and assorted paranormal beasties make the mistake of trying to attack Madea on Halloween night. Tyler Perry directs this comedy. Starts Fri., Oct. 21 DENIAL. The existence of the Holocaust goes on trial in Mick Jackson’s straightforward but wellacted docudrama about a 2000 British court case. A well-known British Holocaust denier, David Irving (Timothy Spall), sues an American history professor, Deborah Lipstadt (Rachel Weisz), for libel after she avers his claims are wrong in her book. This prompts a lawsuit, where under British law, the accused must prove her case, which here rests on the broader question of whether the Holocaust actually occurred. Lipstadt’s legal eagle is the somewhat plodding Richard Rampton (Tom Wilkinson), who initially seems primarily bemused by the case. Denial is of note for those interested in the peculiarities of the British legal system, and the film’s essential argument is remarkably timely given our increasingly posttruth election season. Irving holds a lie to be a truth and has built his reputation on it. That can be a devilish thing to undo both within the legal system and in the court of public opinion. Starts Fri., Oct. 21 (Al Hoff) DO NOT RESIST. Using 2014’s street protests in Ferguson, Mo., as a framing device, Craig Atkinson’s documentary looks at the growing militarization of America’s police force. He checks in with small towns that are snapping up surplus military equipment, including massive armored personnel carriers and high-tech body armor. (The glut of this war-ready material is a byproduct of our ramp-down in Iraq and Afghanistan.) But it’s not just equipment: Atkinson’s film suggests that certain training programs create an us-against-them mentality that further emphasizes the “war” mentality of policing. One for-hire trainer explains to a room full of law-enforcement personnel that “[superior] violence is your tool.” But not always, as we see in a disturbing raid on one man’s house, where the extreme amount of force hardly matches the

OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL. In Los Angeles 1967, some scam artists add a new wrinkle to their fake séances and — whoops! — inadvertently summon an actual demonic spirit. Mike Flanagan directs this thriller. Starts Fri., Oct. 21

Miss Hokusai crime in question. Fri., Oct. 21, through Tue., Oct, 25. Melwood (AH) HARRY AND THE SNOWMAN. Ron Davis’ documentary tells the story of Dutch immigrant Harry DeLeyer, who, after World War II, bought a horse off the slaughterhouse wagon and trained it to be a prize show-jumper. Starts Fri., Oct. 21 JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK. Investigator Jack Reacher (Tom Cruise) has to clear his name while on the run. It’s going to get done, believe it! Edward Zwick directs this thriller. Starts Fri., Oct. 21 MISS HOKUSAI. As expected in Keiichi Hara’s anime about 19th-century Japanese artists, the visuals are quite lovely. The story, inspired by real people, centers on a young woman named O-Ei who lives with her well-known artist father, Katsushika Hokusa (you know his “Great Wave” woodblock). O-Ei is herself an accomplished artist, and she occasionally collaborates with her father. Besides erotica, they work on paintings designed to thwart various supernatural figures. There isn’t much of a plot — the film adopts a sliceof-life vibe, showing O-Ei putting up with her dad’s boorish friends, or taking her blind younger sister out on picnics. Implicit, but never stated, is how impossible it would be in 1814 Edo (now Tokyo) for a young, in-

dependently minded single woman to have a career as an artist. Though she does paint in secret, O-Ei’s reward for her artistic soul is more existential — drawing pleasure from the world’s beauty, which doesn’t escape her sensitive eye. Screens in both Japanese, with subtitles, and English-dubbed versions. Oct. 21-22 and Oct. 24-26. Row House Cinema (AH) KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES. Oh dear. Time again for suffering through that movie — you know, the one with the overplayed, worn-out premise that you hope might be salvaged by a good cast and a director, Greg Mottola, you recall from better-thanaverage genre efforts, like Adventureland. Here comes a nice-but-bland suburban couple (Zack Galifianakis, Isla Fisher) who discover that their new neighbors (Jon Hamm, Gal Gadot) are spies. And sad to say, there are few laughs — everybody’s charms are hemmed in by one lame and wholly predicatble setup after another. No need to keep up with this one. Starts Fri., Oct. 21 (AH) LONDON TOWN. Derrick Borte’s coming-of-age comedy is like some long-lost feel-good TV movie that manages to combine wholesome teens, wacky adventures and family drama with the socio-economic and political dramas of 1978 Britain and The Clash. Does it work? Not in the least, but the generous-hearted

THE RACE. This locally produced mockumentary skewers both political campaigning and the films that document it. See what’s up in the mayoral race for Fort Faible. A Q& A with director Dave Rodkey follows the Thu., Oct. 20, screening. 7:30 p.m. nightly, through Thu., Oct. 20. Harris REELABILITIES. This festival of five recent films and one shorts program that celebrate the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with disabilities runs from Thu., Oct. 20, through Wed., Nov. 2. The opening-night film is Michael Barnett’s documentary Becoming Bulletproof (Thu., Oct. 20), about a group of artists who get together annually to make a movie. On Sat., Oct. 22, catch Margarita With a Straw, Shonali Bose’s feature about a young Indian woman with cerebral palsy who travels to New York City for school, where she begins a relationship with a female activist. Luke Terrell’s documentary Gabe (Tue., Oct. 25) profiles a disabled man who after beating a misdiagnosis of life expectancy embraces new experiences. The exploitation of disabled laborers is examined in Jordan Melograna’s documentary Bottom Dollars, on Wed., Oct. 26. For the complete schedule, see Pittsburgh. reelabilities.org. All films screen at 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $12-15 ($8 student)

REPERTORY PSYCHO. Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1960 film is a thriller and treatise on troubled mother-son relationships. Embezzler-on-the-run Janet Leigh picks

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Denial the wrong motel to catch some rest at, though the proprietor seems friendly enough … Psycho remains a textbook of masterful editing, and Bernard Hermann’s score is as creepy as ever. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 19. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 (AH) BIOPHILIC DESIGN: THE ARCHITECTURE OF LIFE. Bill Finnegan’s recent hour-long documentary looks at how designing buildings and infrastructure thoughtfully can integrate the built environment with natural spaces for the benefit of people and nature alike. CMU professor Vivian Loftness will lead a panel discussion after the screening. The film screens as part of Phipps Conservatory’s monthly environmental film series. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 21. Phipps Conservatory, Schenley Park, Oakland. Free with regular admission. phipps. conservatory.org

of Dr. Caligari, the 1920 masterpiece of German Expressionism and somnambulant murder (6:40 p.m.) Sun., Oct. 23. Row House Cinema. $10 for all-day pass THE WOLFMAN. Even a man who is pure in heart and says his prayers by night may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright. See how in George Waggner’s 1941 classic horror film starring Claude Rains and Lon Chaney Jr. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 23. Regent Square HOCUS POCUS. Three witches get re-animated in the present day in Kenny Ortega’s 1993 comedy. 5:35 p.m. Tue., Oct. 25, and 7:35 p.m. Wed., Oct. 26. Row House Cinema

HALLOWEEN. The original is still the best: Bite your knuckles as Jamie Lee Curtis takes the worst babysitting job ever, in John Carpenter’s 1978 horror film. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 21; 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 22; and 9 p.m. Sun., Oct. 23 (Hollywood). Also, twice daily Oct. 21 and Oct. 22; and 9:40 p.m. Oct. 24 (Row House Cinema). Also, 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 26 (AMC Loews Waterfront). DELICATESSEN. Things are quite odd at this French apartment building in Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s dark, surreal post-apocalyptic 1991 comedy. Oct. 21-22 and Oct. 24-27. Row House Cinema THE CAT AND THE CANARY. Paul Leni’s 1927 silent spooker finds an assortment of relatives holed up in a haunted house for the reading of the will. To be accompanied by live music played on a theater pipe organ by Jay Spencer. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 22. Keystone Oaks Auditorium, 1000 Kelton Ave., Dormont. www.pittsburghtheatreorgan.com. $20 IT FOLLOWS. In this recent indie-horror thriller from David Robert Mitchell, death stalks folks who’ve had sex … until they sleep with somebody else and make them the target. Midnight Sat., Oct. 22. Manor YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN. Mel Brooks’ loving spoof of the classic film Frankenstein features Gene Wilder as Dr. Franken-STEEN, Teri Garr as his comely assistant, Peter Boyle as the creature, and the incomparable Madeline Kahn as the doctor’s taffeta-clad fiancée. 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sun., Oct. 23. Hollywood SILENT HORRORS. Get creeped out by an all-day-allnight run of silent horror films. Flickering in spooky black-and-white for your thrills are: Vampyr, the moody 1932 Danish vampire tale (1:15 and 10 p.m.); Nosferatu, F.W. Murnau’s classic 1922 tale of a bloodsucker (3 and 8:15 p.m.); Faust, the 1926 drama of the devil and one man’s soul (4:50 p.m.); and The Cabinet

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Keeping Up With the Joneses YEMANJA: WISDOM FROM THE AFRICAN HEART OF BRAZIL. This new documentary from Pittsburgh filmmaker Donna Roberts and Donna Read examines the Candomblé spiritual culture in Bahia, Brazil, a vibrant African-derived tradition which evolved from the ways of enslaved Africans in the New World. To be followed by a panel discussion featuring co-director Roberts, author Alice Walker (who narrates the film) and professor of indigenous spiritual traditions Rachel Elizabeth Harding. 6:45 p.m. Thu., Oct. 27. To be shown simultaneously in Chapel and Eddy rooms, Chatham University, Shadyside. www.justfilmspgh.org. Free PRIDE. Based on real events, Matthew Warchus’ 2014 feel-good film tells of an unusual alliance born in 1984 Britain between striking coal miners in Wales and a group of gay-rights activists in London. The film concludes a monthly series of films about economic, labor and social-justice issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 27. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront St., Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomestead.org


“THAT IS THE BEST PART, MAKING MY FAMILY PROUD.”

LINEUP CARD The Pitt Panthers are off this week and the Steelers are playing the Patriots, and we all know how that’s come out the past few seasons. But there are plenty of sports on deck. Here’s our lineup card for Oct. 20-26.

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It’s the final week of City League football and the game of the week is clearly Brashear (3-1 in the conference; 3-4 overall) taking on University Prep (3-1; 3-4) at 7 p.m. at UPrep. The two teams are tied with Westinghouse in the league and their matchup will kick off this week’s slate of high school football games on Thu., Oct. 20. Westinghouse (3-1; 4-3) plays Carrick (0-4; 0-7) at 3:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 21, at Cupples Stadium.

{CP PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

A young asylum-seeker from Mexico is tallying sacks and living the dream in the North Hills {BY RYAN DETO}

Pregame: Carlos Jaromir Blanco Jr.

E

VEN WHEN living in Mexico City, the

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WPIAL football enters its penultimate week on Oct. 21 with a slew of games (all games at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted). Here are three you might not want to miss. At 7:30 p.m. Friday, undefeated West Allegheny (6-0; 7-0) travels to Woodland Hills (6-0; 7-1) in a powerhouse conference matchup of two teams heading to the postseason. Gateway (5-1; 6-2) travels to McKeesport (5-1; 6-1) and Aliquippa (3-1; 6-2) goes to Monaca to take on Central Valley (4-1; 6-2).

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The University of Pittsburgh volleyball team has spent the season amassing a pretty good record and is now in the thick of its Atlantic Coast Conference schedule. Coming off a loss Sunday to Florida State (7-1; 14-3), Pitt (5-3; 14-6) will take on heavy hitter Notre Dame (7-1; 16-4) on Fri., Oct. 21, at 7 p.m. at the Fitzgerald Field House. Then on Sun.. Oct. 23, Pitt hosts Louisville at 3 p.m.

GOT A TIP? Know of a local sport that isn’t getting the attention it deserves? Did a local athlete just do something incredible that warrants recognition? City Paper Sports wants to hear about it: info@pghcitypaper.com

Blanco family loved Steelers football. “Maybe all the American people think Latinos and Mexicans icans only play soccer, but we play football otball too,” says Carlos Blanco Sr. “Mexican can people love the Steelers for the blue-collar e-collar people. The people of Mexico are very similar.” Blanco now lives in Wexford, in the North Hills, with his two o sons, Carlos Jr. and Joshua, and his wife, Irma. Their apartment is covered red in black and gold: Steelers helmets, mets, Pirates pennants and Penguins posters. In Mexico City, Carlos Sr. owned and ran a restaurant. Starting in 2009, he joined a Steelers fan club b and fell in love with Pittsburgh when hen visiting the country to go to Steelers elers games in subsequent years. In 2012, Blanco received ived threats from a local arm of the Loss Zetas crimicrim minal syndicate; they demanded manded bribes from Blanco for protection ion and he refused. Sometime later, gang members attacked Blanco in his truck uck and said that his family was next if he didn’t pay up. The Blancos decided it was time to leave their home country, and they moved to Pittsburgh on tourist visas. (They are currently in the asylum-seeking process; Carlos Sr., Irma and Carlos Jr. have received work permits.) For Carlos Jr., Pittsburgh was a far different place than Mexico City. But he still had football.

“Honestly, I never had thought I would come here,” says Carlos Jr., who has been playing football since he was 8 years old in Mexico City. “There was a lot of violence and drugs in Mexico City.

Now, I stay out of trouble and focus more on school and football.” When he first moved to Pittsburgh, he played for Woodland Hills High School, but transferred when the family moved to CONTINUES ON PG. 102

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Wexford. He is in the middle of his senior season at North Allegheny High School. His natural position is linebacker (young Steelers phenom Ryan Shazier is his favorite player), but he has been playing defensive line for the North Allegheny Tigers, while he learns a new playbook. Carlos Jr. says Mexican-style football differs from the American brand. “Football in Mexico is much more smash-mouth style,” says Carlos Jr. “Here, it is very quick. You have to have technique and can’t just ‘hit somebody.’” So far, this American style has translated into success for Carlos Jr. His best game was against Penn Hills High earlier this month, when he tallied six tackles and three sacks in a North Allegheny win. Carlos Jr., though a bit undersized for a defensive lineman, uses his speed and quickness to avoid blockers and pursue the quarterback. (His sack-per-game average is the best on his team.) North Allegheny coach Art Walker, has praise for his D-lineman. “He has worked hard to learn our system. He brings toughness and great effort to our football team,” wrote Walker in an email to City Paper. Walker added that his player has a chance to play in a Division III college

program, but said he needs to “work hard academically in order to qualify and work hard on the field so colleges notice him.” On Oct. 15, Carlos Jr. went on a recruitment trip to Allegheny College in Meadville, which he says was promising. Walker added that Carlos fits perfectly into North Allegheny’s culture of inclusion and acceptance. “We talk all the time about how we are all from different backgrounds, races, religions, incomes and etc., and that we are all teammates regardless of our differences,” Walker wrote. “It is so very important to come together as a team and being a football family will have a great impact on our success.” Carlos Jr. says he hopes football can help him get an education and eventually a good job in Pennsylvania. He says his family has enjoyed life in Pittsburgh so far and the only thing they miss is an abundance of good Mexican food. Carlos Jr. says he will continue to play football in Western Pennsylvania because it makes his family proud. “I am just trying to get the job done and play well this year,” he says. “I feel really blessed, since some kids who have been here their whole life don’t get to start on the team. I feel proud. That is the best part, making my family proud.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

COACHING CHANGE

THANK YOU PITTSBURGH for voting us Best Sports Bar.

{BY MIKE WYSOCKI} IN 2003 WE LOVED American Idol, Survivor and the Lord of the Rings movies. The music of Evanescense, Chingy and 3 Doors Down filled the air. We hated the French so much that we called French fries, freedom fries. We hated them enough to rebrand them, but not to stop eating them. I hated the French so much that I would refer to old Steelers running back Frenchy Fuqua as Freedomy Fuqua. We were also forced to choose sides in the war between Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. Oh, and the University of Pittsburgh hired a new men’s basketball coach. Ben Howland had already turned Pitt’s program around, and when he left to coach UCLA, he handed his whistle over to Jamie Dixon, his well-coiffed young protégé. Dixon had the kind of hair you’d vote for in an election. He brought the Hollywood look to the Oakland Zoo and embarked on a 13-year run that netted 328 wins. He also led the Panthers to seven consecutive 20-plus-win seasons and an equal number of consecutive tournament appearances. For the first time in school history, Pitt sat atop the NCAA rankings in the 2008-09 season, and only a heartbreaker to Villanova prevented Dixon from taking the Panthers to the Final Four. But now he’s gone. Dixon parlayed that success into a contract worth more than $3 million a year as head coach of Texas Christian University. For the first time since the “Mission Accomplished” banner was unfurled, signifying kinda, sorta but not really the end of the Iraq war, Pitt has a new head coach. In addition to the aforementioned accolades, Dixon’s legacy includes an impressive list of players. Steven Adams, Lamar Patterson, Dejuan Blair, Sam Young, Chris Taft and Brandin Knight all had stellar careers at Pitt. But those days are over. It’s time to say hello to Kevin Stallings, the new man in charge. While the hair isn’t as good and neither is the record, Stallings led Vanderbilt for 17 seasons, and only one of them was a losing endeavor. He was essentially the Commodores’ Jamie Dixon. Vandy was never exceptional but always respectable in the Southeastern Conference. Stallings went up against teams like Kentucky, LSU, Florida and Arkansas. But that conference is a football powerhouse, whereas the

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

Atlantic Coast Conference specializes in basketball. Despite being an unglamorous SEC team, Stallings led his Commodores to the NCAA tourney seven times and twice made the Sweet 16. But now he follows in the footsteps of Dixon, who has raised fan expectations. The 2016-17 Panthers are one of 11 teams in the ACC that could reach the postseason — the conference is just that good. But one thing Pitt has that other teams don’t is Jamel Artis. The 6’7” senior forward has played in 67 consecutive games for the Panthers. He’s an extremely versatile player who dominates the paint and can drain them from the perimeter. There’s even talk of letting him play point guard this year. For now, he will team with Michael Young to form not only one of the best forward combos in the league, but in the country. Artis is so good that we forgive him for being from Baltimore. His relentless style of defense will please the Zoo faithful once again. Chris Jones and Sheldon Jeter are the other two returning seniors for Pitt. Jeter played for Stallings at Vanderbilt as a freshman before transferring to Pitt. Jeter is from Beaver Falls, and his Jerome Lane-like dunks rile up the student section. This is not a bad situation for Stallings to come into; he begins the new era with four returning seniors who are coming off a 21-11 record. Now Stallings will match moves with Hall of Fame coaches like Mike Krzyzewski, of Duke; Roy Williams, of North Carolina; Rick Pitino, of Louisville; and Jim Boeheim, of Syracuse. Sure, Stallings might look like Kevin from The Office, but let’s be patient with the new guy. At least he’s not French.

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PREPARED SPEECH

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. “He’s picking on me again!” 4. Urged (on) 9. Tablet with Game Center 13. High card 14. Most populous of the Greek Islands 15. Coach K’s school 16. Move onto a different subject 19. Simply the best 20. Atlanta university 21. Scholarship fund org. 22. With 49-Across, stop swearing 24. Blue blood 26. Summer Games org. 27. NBA star Gasol 28. Shipping co. with a shield logo 31. Congo neighbor, about 20 years ago 34. [Hey! ... Hey!] 37. Demonstrate great affection 40. Crisp of the Indians 41. 1970s singer Gray 42. Vinyl, in slang 43. Bothers 45. Aerosol spray chemical 47. Maker of the Hacky Sack 49. See 22-Across

54. Owner of the MAKERS vlog 55. Hoops 57. Florence river 58. Theme of this puzzle? 61. Poor part of town 62. Based on ___ story 63. Turningdown word 64. Rushes along in the past 65. In the ___ of 66. Duet number?

DOWN 1. Talking parrot 2. Choreographer Annabelle Lopez ___ 3. Financial resources 4. Ticker tape? 5. Non-citizen’s identifications 6. “You follow?” 7. Group belief 8. Hunter’s prey 9. “You bet ___” 10. Purina dog food brand 11. Japanese dog 12. Windshield sticker 17. Soda brand that sounds like a type of sock 18. Model Banks 23. Seep (out) 25. Test where handwriting doesn’t count

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27. Very careful and precise 28. Will Ferrell’s alma mater 29. Vietnamese soup 30. A wink or a nod 32. ___ Jima 33. Short item at a barbecue 35. Wrestler Marie 36. Enrique Peña Nieto is its pres. 38. Mezcal “ingredient” 39. Considerable size 44. Expensive kind of beef 46. WhatsApp conversation

MUSIC

47. Kate of TV’s “Fargo” 48. Google-like tech company on “Silicon Valley” 49. Cuban hero José 50. Prayer’s opening 51. Praying female figure, in art 52. International jurisprudence 53. City with the world’s busiest train station 56. Stoker of horror 59. Le Mans distances: Abbr. 60. Achieved {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.19-10.26

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the course of her long career, Libran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony. Years before all that glory poured down on her, she met playwright Charles MacArthur at a party in a posh Manhattan salon. Hayes was sitting shyly in a dark corner. MacArthur glided over to her and slipped a few salted peanuts into her hand. “I wish they were emeralds,” he told her. It was love at first sight. A few years after they got married, MacArthur bought Hayes an emerald necklace. I foresee a metaphorically comparable event in your near future, Libra: peanuts serving as a promise of emeralds.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Welcome to the Painkiller Phase of your cycle. It’s time to relieve your twinges, dissolve your troubles and banish your torments. You can’t sweep away the whole mess in one quick heroic purge, of course. But I bet you can pare it down by at least 33 percent. (More is quite possible.) To get started, make the following declaration five times a day for the next three days: “I am grateful for all the fascinating revelations and indispensable lessons that my pain has taught me.” On each of the three days after that, affirm this truth five times: “I have learned all I can from my pain, and therefore no longer need its reminders. Goodbye, pain.” On the three days after that, say these words, even if you can’t bring yourself to mean them with complete sincerity: “I forgive everybody of everything.”

Let’s imagine your life as a novel. The most recent chapter, which you’ll soon be drawing to a close, might be called “The Redemption of Loneliness.” Other apt titles: “Intimacy With the Holy Darkness” or “The Superpower of Surrender” or “The End Is Secretly the Beginning.” Soon you will start a new chapter, which I’ve tentatively dubbed “Escape from Escapism,” or perhaps “Liberation from False Concepts of Freedom” or “Where the Wild Things Are.” And the expansive adventures of this next phase will have been made possible by the sweet-and-sour enigmas of the past four weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the foreseeable future, you possess the following powers: to make sensible that which has been unintelligible … to find amusement in situations that had been tedious … to create fertile meaning where before there had been sterile chaos. Congratulations, Sagittarius! You are a first-class transformer. But that’s not all. I suspect you will also have the ability to distract people from concerns that aren’t important … to deepen any quest that has been too superficial or careless to succeed … and to ask the good questions that will render the bad questions irrelevant.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past 11 months, did you ever withhold your love on purpose? Have there been times when you “punished” those you cared about by acting cold and aloof? Can you remember a few occasions when you could have been more generous or compassionate, but chose not to be? If you answered yes to any of those questions, the next three weeks will be an excellent time to atone. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can reap maximum benefit from correcting stingy mistakes. I suggest that you make gleeful efforts to express your most charitable impulses. Be a tower of bountiful power.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1415, a smaller English army defeated French forces at the Battle of Agincourt in northern France. Essential to England’s victory were its 7,000 longbowmen — archers who shot big arrows using bows that were six feet long. So fast and skilled were these warriors that they typically had three arrows flying through the air at any one time. That’s the kind of highpowered proficiency I recommend that you summon during your upcoming campaign. If you need more training to reach that level of effectiveness, get it immediately.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the 1980s, two performance artists did a project entitled A Year Tied Together at the Waist. For 12 months, Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh were never farther than eight feet away from each other, bound by a rope. Hsieh said he tried this experiment because he felt very comfortable doing solo work, but wanted to upgrade his abilities as a collaborator. Montano testified that the piece “dislodged a deep hiddenness” in her. It sharpened her intuition and gave her a “heightened passion for living and relating.” If you were ever going to engage in a comparable effort to deepen your intimacy skills, Aries, the coming weeks would be a favorable time to attempt it.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Eighteenth-century musician Giuseppe Tartini has been called “the godfather of modern violin playing.” He was also an innovative composer who specialized in poignant and poetic melodies. One of his most famous works is the Sonata in G Minor, also known as the “Devil’s Trill.” Tartini said it was inspired by a dream in which he made a pact

with the Devil to provide him with new material. The Infernal One picked up a violin and played the amazing piece that Tartini transcribed when he woke up. Here’s the lesson for you: He didn’t actually sell his soul to the Devil. Simply engaging in this rebellious, taboo act in the realm of fantasy had the alchemical effect of unleashing a burst of creative energy. Try it!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planets have aligned in a curious pattern. I interpret it as meaning that you have cosmic permission to indulge in more self-interest and self-seeking than usual. So it won’t be taboo for you to unabashedly say, “What exactly is in it for me?” or “Prove your love, my dear” or “Gimmeee gimmeee gimmee what I want.” If someone makes a big promise, you shouldn’t be shy about saying, “Will you put that in writing?” If you get a sudden urge to snag the biggest piece of the pie, obey that urge. Describe what you’d be like if you were the opposite of yourself. Freewillastrology.com

get your yoga on!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming weeks would you prefer that we refer to you as “voracious”? Or do you like the word “ravenous” better? I have a feeling, based on the astrological omens, that you will be extra super eager to consume vast quantities of just about everything: food, information, beauty, sensory stimulation, novelty, pleasure and who knows what else. But please keep this in mind: Your hunger could be a torment or it could be a gift. Which way it goes may depend on your determination to actually enjoy what you devour. In other words, don’t get so enchanted by the hypnotic power of your longing that you neglect to exult in the gratification when your longing is satisfied.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When the wind blows at 10 miles per hour, a windmill generates eight times more power than when the breeze is five miles per hour. Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect there will be a similar principle at work in your life during the coming weeks. A modest increase in effort and intensity will make a huge difference in the results you produce. Are you willing to push yourself a bit beyond your comfort level in order to harvest a wave of abundance?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cuthbert Collingwood (1748-1810) had a dis-

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tinguished career as an admiral in the British navy, leading the sailors under his command to numerous wartime victories. He was also a goodnatured softie whose men regarded him as generous and kind. Between battles, while enjoying his downtime, he hiked through the English countryside carrying acorns, which he planted here and there so the “Navy would never want for oaks to build the fighting ships upon which the country’s safety depended.” (Quoted in Life in Nelson’s Navy, by Dudley Pope.) I propose that we make him your role model for the coming weeks. May his example inspire you to be both an effective warrior and a tender soul who takes practical actions to plan for the future.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Waiting to pay for my groceries at the market this evening, this guy, stinking of booze, says to my 9-year-old daughter, “Sweetheart, can you put the divider thing there for me?” First, why is some leering grown man calling my child “sweetheart”? He then thumps two huge bottles of vodka down on the belt. I move closer to my daughter; he then reaches his hand over me and wraps his hand around her arm, saying, “Now, you be nice to your Mommy, sweetie.” I pluck his hand off. “Do not touch my child,” I say. My other hand is pressed against my daughter’s ribs, and I can feel her heart POUNDING. “You have a beautiful daughter,” he says. The cashier, whom we know, a guy, looks at me, eyebrows up. I roll my eyes. So pissed. We leave. “I hated that man,” my daughter says once we get in the car. “He smelled bad, I wanted to hit him, if anyone ever does that to me again I’m going to scream.” Here we effing go: “Sometimes you have to be hypervigilant,” I tell my daughter, “because some gross men out there feel they are entitled to touch us.” And then I share my story: “When I was a little girl …” I don’t even remember the first time it happened to me. I don’t remember the last time some pervert rubbed up against me. But that’s what you have to deal with when you are a girl. We have to learn to brush this shit off, to make sure that this endless assault course of predators doesn’t take one bit of your pride, your confidence or your sense of peace as you walk through this world. I am so angry. We should call this the “Trump Talk.” The depressing conversation that every parent needs to have with their little girl about revolting, predatory, entitled men.

they were bringing this on themselves somehow, because they thought it wasn’t happening to anyone else, just them. So thank God you were there with your daughter, there to pull that asshole’s hand off of her, there to protect her from worse, and there to help her process the experience. And in that car ride home you inoculated your daughter with your message (you are a human being and you have a right to move through this world unmolested) before gross predators could infect her with theirs (you are only an object and we have a right to touch you). I want to live in a world where this sort of thing doesn’t happen to anyone’s daughter, but until we do: Every little girl should be so lucky as to have a trusted adult standing by ready to intervene when it does happen. I only wish the grocery-store clerk had intervened, too. Regarding your suggestion, I’ve received roughly 10 million emails begging me to do for Donald Trump what I did for Rick Santorum: My readers and I redefined santorum (“the frothy mixture of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex”) and some wanted us to do the same for Trump. People even sent in suggestions: trump is the streak of shit a large turd sometimes leaves on the bottom of the toilet bowl; trump is the snot that sometimes runs out of your nose when you’re giving a blowjob; a trump is a guy so hopelessly inept in bed that no woman (or man) wants him, no matter how rich he is. The suggested new meanings all struck me as trivial and snarky — and I don’t think there’s anything trivial about the racism, sexism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism and violence that Trump has mainstreamed and normalized, and I’m not inclined to snark about it. And, besides, “trump” already has a slang meaning: It means “to fart audibly” in Great Britain — and that definition is already in the Oxford English Dictionary. And it frankly didn’t seem possible to make Donald Trump’s name any more revolting than he already has. If I may paraphrase the amazing letter the New York Times sent to Trump after he demanded they retract a story about the women he’s assaulted: Nothing I could say in my sex column could even slightly elevate the feelings of disgust decent people experience whenever they hear his name. Mr. Trump, through his own words and actions, has already redefined his last name. But then your email arrived and I set aside the column I was already working on to rush your idea into print. Because your suggestion — that parents call the conversation they need to have with their daughters about predatory and entitled men the “Trump Talk” — is just as fitting and apt as the “frothy mixture” definition of santorum. It’s not trivial and it’s not snarky. It has gravitas, and here’s hoping “Trump Talk” isn’t just widely adopted, but universally practiced. Because no little girl who gets groped on a bus or in a grocery store or on a subway or in a classroom should ever have to wonder if she did something wrong.

I DON’T THINK THERE’S ANYTHING TRIVIAL ABOUT THE RACISM, SEXISM, XENOPHOBIA, ANTI-SEMITISM AND VIOLENCE THAT TRUMP HAS NORMALIZED.

MOTHER AND DAUGHTER DISCUSS ENRAGING REALITIES

I’m sorry about what happened to your daughter at the grocery store — I’m sorry about what was done to your daughter by that entitled asshole at the grocery store — but I’m glad you were there with her when it happened. The author Kelly Oxford, in response to Donald Trump’s horrific comments about sexually assaulting women, called on women to tweet about their first assaults under the hashtag #notokay. Oxford’s post went viral — more than a million women responded — and reading through the seemingly endless thread, I was struck by how many women were alone the first time they were assaulted. Oxford herself was alone the first time it happened to her: “Old man on a city bus grabs my ‘pussy’ and smiles at me. I’m 12.” A lot of women I know, including some very close friends, were your daughter’s age the first time it happened to them, but they were alone. Tragically, many assumed that they had done something wrong, that they had invited this on themselves somehow, and most didn’t go to their parents for fear of getting into trouble. And when it inevitably happened again, some became convinced they were indeed to blame, that

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with a law professor about advanced sexual directives: savagelove cast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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AIR APPARENT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

WHEN HE’S FLYING, David Grabowski has time to think. There are some

technical details to tend to — temperature gauges to check, a flight course to maintain, traffic to avoid — but between takeoff and landing, there’s time to think. The thoughts are hard to describe. He’s traveling at 50 mph, 3,000 feet above the ground in a one-person, open-cockpit aircraft. He’s exposed to the elements. He’s alone. There are the panoramic views of the landscape that even most commercial airline pilots will never experience. Then there are more concrete thoughts. His girlfriend’s having a baby in March. He’s running a marathon in November. He’s writing the score for a documentary about a guy flying across the country. He’s also the documentary’s subject; he’s the “guy.” Grabowski is in the midst of a 4,000-mile journey across the United States in a single-pilot trike — essentially a hang-glider attached to a motorized go-kart, steered by weight-shift. He’s flying from Sacramento to Brooklyn over 40ish days, across 70ish cities and 13ish states. That’s a lot of approximation there, and that’s because a trip like this

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ARINA BLÉIMAN}

Flying high: David Grabowski

The roots of Tilt Shift date back, as ideas like this often do, to a period of post-college malaise. Looking for a little direction, Grabowski discovered the story of Calbraith Perry Rodgers. In 1911, Rodgers, a Shadyside native, took off from Brooklyn and endured more than 15 crashes before arriving on the West Coast three months later. Less than a decade after the invention of the airplane, Rodgers became the first man to fly across the country. Grabowski, who had never piloted an aircraft in his life, was inspired. He moved to California and began training to get his pilot’s license. He spent the following years fundraising, gathering a team and coor-

“I’M JUST SORT OF TRYING TO ALLOW THE TRIP TO UNFOLD THE WAY IT WILL.” is built on a cascade of plans and backup plans, contingencies and last resorts. There are weather concerns, mechanical issues to upkeep, and airport schedules to maintain. But when CP spoke to Grabowski two weeks into his trip, everything seemed peachy. Aside from a mechanical problem a week prior to takeoff and some unseasonal weather early on, the trip is on track. “I have days where I’m like, ‘This is going a little too smooth, when am I gonna have a serious mechanical issue?’” Grabowski, a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, told CP from Tuscon on Sept. 30. “There’s no point in thinking like that. If it happens, it happens, but until then you just do your very best and that’s all you can do. I don’t really have any room for worry. I only have room for doing the best job that I could possibly do to ensure that I have a safe flight. And also finish it.” Grabowski’s trike, a borrowed North Win Scout X2 called Eddy (“Steady Eddy”), is equipped with a Ballistic Recovery System, which deploys a large parachute in case of an emergency. Eddy weighs 750 pounds with Grabowski and a 16.25-gallon fuel tank on board. Leaving extra fuel in case of in-air emergencies, 15 gallons allows for around four hours of flying a day. The rest of time, Grabowski and his ground crew, Stephen Tonti and Arina Bléiman, spend their days planning, blogging and shooting footage for their documentary about the trip, called Tilt Shift. Tonti, one of Grabowski’s best friends and a fellow CMU grad, is directing; Bléiman is the director of photography.

dinating his plan: to re-trace Rodgers’ flight 105 years to the day after it occurred and make a film about it. If it were somebody else, the story might feel a little contrived: the anniversary, the election-year crosscountry “road” trip, the Pittsburgh connection, the impending fatherhood. It’s almost too good of a story. But you don’t quit your job, go through arduous, costly, time-consuming training and risk your life on a lark. “The first time I told [my sister] I was going to do this,” says Grabowski, 27, “her first words were, ‘David, you can’t do that.’” Rodgers faced similar skepticism. “There’s not a machine in the world that wouldn’t vibrate itself to death in 1,000 miles,” said Orville Wright of Rodgers’ flight in 1911, according to an article in Air and Space Magazine. It’s easy to see why Grabowski was taken with the dude. The epitaph on Rodgers’ tombstone in Allegheny Cemetery reads “I ENDURE / I CONQUER.” After Grabowski and crew land at a small airport north of Pittsburgh on Oct. 25(ish), they plan to visit it, as well as other landmarks of Rodgers’ life. After that, it’s a stop in his hometown of Lancaster, Pa., and then on to Brooklyn, where the trip ends. “I’m just sort of trying to allow the trip to unfold the way it will, and it wants to,” says Grabowski, “and not be disappointed that it’s not the way I’d imagine it to be.” Tilt Shift is due out in fall 2017. AL E X GORD ON @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Best of Pittsburgh 2016 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 42

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