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EVENTS 10.13 – 8pm TAKAO KAWAGUCHI: ABOUT KAZUO OHNO The Warhol theater Co-presented with Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania and The Asian Studies Center of the University of Pittsburgh FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

10.25 – 4:30pm ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Registration is required; visit warhol.org. Tickets $10 (door)

11.4 – 8pm NARCISSISTER The Warhol theater Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Andy Warhol, Elvis 11 Times [Studio Type], 1963, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., ELVIS™ and ELVIS PRESLEY™ are trademarks of ABG EPE IP LLC. Rights of Publicity and Persona Rights: Elvis Presley Enterprises, LLC. © 2016 ABG EPE IP LLC , elvis.com 11.17 – 6pm MY PERFECT BODY: 21+ SIP AND SKETCH FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15/$12 Members

Night of 1,000 Elvises 10.22 – 7pm VIP, 8pm General Admission

11.18 – 8pm DARKMATTER: #ITGETSBITTER Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art and Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for Arts & Society and School of Art Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Tickets VIP $250/General $50/$45 Members visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

El Vez, the self-proclaimed “Mexican Elvis,” headlines The Warhol’s second annual fundraiser and community celebration! This year’s theme “Night of 1,000 Elvises” invites you to dress up as your favorite Elvis. The museum’s seven floors are open to explore, and spaces are activated by a DJ, dancing, and an underground VIP “Viva Las Vegas” lounge, complete with casino games. The evening features a DJ set and special musical performance by El Vez. We’ll also have free Elvis-inspired temporary Tattly tattoos available throughout the night to complete your look. VIP tickets include access to the VIP lounge in the underground studio, unlimited drinks, and hors d’oeuvres. General admission tickets include hors d’oeuvres. Cash bars are available. Wigs, glasses, and other iconic Warhol- and Elvis-themed items are available for purchase in The Warhol Store. NEWS

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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10.05/10.12.2016 VOLUME 26 + ISSUE 40

[EDITORIAL] Editor CHARLIE DEITCH News Editor REBECCA ADDISON Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Web Producer ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, CELINE ROBERTS Interns STEPHEN CARUSO, MEGAN FAIR, IAN FLANAGAN, LUKE THOR TRAVIS

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THIS WEEK

“MY WORK IS NOT DONE UNTIL A CURE IS FOUND.”

ONLINE

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Sure, with their sub-.500 record, the Pittsburgh Pirates were already the walking dead last week. But they weren’t the only zombies roaming PNC Park. Check out our photo slideshow of the Pirates’ Zombie Night on our Blogh at www.pghcitypaper.com.

The November general election is coming up sooner than you think, but not fast enough, to be sure. Check out all the latest candidate news on our Politicrap blog online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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Martín Esquivel-Hernandez traveled more than 5,000 miles to be with his family, but five years later, he faces deportation. Read his story in our new online-only longform feature at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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Our featured Lines photo from last week is by instagrammer @a_song_to_nature. This week’s theme is Letters. Tag photos of letters around town with #CPReaderArt and we just may re-gram you.

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Pittsburgh Steelers DeAngelo Williams: “The pink dreads are definitely a tribute that I will keep for as long as I am in the league.”

CHARGING FORWARD O

CTOBER IS A busy time for any NFL

football player. But for Pittsburgh Steelers running back DeAngelo Williams, it’s even more so. Every October, for the past several years, NFL teams wear pink all month to raise money for the American Cancer Society. The inspiration for this program was actually Williams’ mother, Sandra Hill. Hill lost her battle with the disease in May 2014; four of her sisters shared the same unfortunate fate. Williams says his mother found out about the disease too late, and he wants to do his part to help other women with early detection through his DeAngelo Williams Foundation. The program pays for mammograms for uninsured and under-insured women. To help that cause, a portion of the revenues from this issue’s advertising sales will be donated to Williams’ foundation.

Despite his schedule, Williams took time for an email interview with City Paper to talk about his mom and his quest to tackle breast cancer once and for all.

Pittsburgh Steeler DeAngelo Williams fighting breast cancer head on {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} YOU LOST YOUR MOTHER AND FOUR AUNTS TO BREAST CANCER. HOW DO THEIR MEMORIES DRIVE YOU TO DO THIS FOUNDATION WORK? I founded The DeAngelo Williams Foundation in 2006 upon first entering the NFL. At that time, I had lost three of my aunts to breast cancer. I lost another aunt

and my mother between then and now. Their memory continues to drive me in my foundation work because I want their legacy and story to always be told. Their fight, struggle, strengths and weaknesses throughout their battles can benefit those going though the same situations now. I have daughters, a wife, sisters, cousins, friends ... so many other people who this disease could possibly still take. My work is not done until a cure is found. My mother was a very strong-minded woman. I get a lot of my strong will from her. I will not stop until a cure is found. WHAT KINDS OF SERVICES ARE YOU ABLE TO PROVIDE THROUGH THE MONEY RAISED BY YOUR FOUNDATION? WHAT ARE THE FOUNDATION’S GOALS? We started a program called “53 Strong CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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CHARGING FORWARD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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for Sandra” in 2014 after my mother passed away. We provide 53 free mammograms to uninsured and under-insured women. We named it that because my mom was 53 when she passed away; all of her sisters passed away before 50. She always said she felt like she stole three years of life because she lost her sisters before the age of 50. The amazing thing is that with every event we have done, we have found one woman with breast cancer. It may not seem like a lot, but those women were given a fighting chance because we were able to provide a mammogram that she would have put off, or not gotten at all, because she couldn’t afford it! That’s big! Our goal is to eventually bring “53 Strong for Sandra” to every state.

We would also like to eventually have the funds to sponsor our own mobile mammogram unit. BECAUSE YOU LOST SO MANY LOVED ONES TO THIS DISEASE, IS SEEING ALL OF THE PINK THIS TIME OF YEAR A PAINFUL REMINDER, OR ARE YOU ABLE TO TURN THE SYMBOL INTO SOMETHING POSITIVE? It is hard, but the greatest thing about it is that my mom was the inspiration for the NFL allowing players to wear pink cleats back in 2009. Pink in the NFL has grown to so much more since that year. So it has become a positive knowing that so many people have become aware of our “pink message.” If there is just one person out there watching a

“REASSURE THEM THAT THEY ARE NOT FIGHTING THIS ALONE.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

You can support the DeAngelo Williams Foundation locally by buying a “Pittsburgh Is Stronger Than Cancer” T-shirt for $29.99 from local shop Steel City. One hundred percent of the proceeds go to the DeAngelo Williams Foundation. Last year in October, sales of the shirts raised $14,000 for the foundation. The Pittsburgh Steelers will also wear these shirts in preseason warmups before they face the New York Jets on Sun., Oct. 9 at Heinz Field. See “Pittsburgh Strong” on page 9 for a Q&A with Steel City’s Brandon Grbach.

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Celebration

PITTSBURGH STRONG {BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

and

Blessing of Animals

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDON GRBACH}

Brandon Grbach with his grandmother

When Brandon Grbach heard DeAngelo Williams’ story on ESPN’s SportsCenter last October, he grabbed his sketchbook and sketched out “Pittsburgh Is Stronger Than Cancer.� He put it on a shirt and messaged Williams to ask whether his Tshirt company, Steel City, which he started with his wife, Carly, in 2011, could sell them to help benefit Williams’ charity. “Within 30 minutes, he responded and asked me to bring a box to the training facility, and he’d make sure the team got them. That Sunday during warmups, the entire Steelers team was wearing my shirt. I put them up for sale on our site, and orders came flooding in. ESPN was calling, the news wanted to come to my house that night, and just like that, wildfire happened,� Grbach says.

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WHAT DOES THE DESIGN MEAN TO YOU PERSONALLY? I lost my Gram four years ago to breast cancer. And when I heard the NFL wasn’t allowing DeAngelo to wear pink all season long, it upset me. In a league that has so many players that hurt women, here’s a player trying to save women’s lives by providing free mammograms. I thought it was really unfair. I’m born and raised in Pittsburgh, and if you’ve lived in Pittsburgh for any length of time, you know there’s an unspoken rule that if you mess with one of us, you mess with all of us. And since DeAngelo wore the Steelers jersey, that made him family. So I decided that if DeAngelo can’t wear pink all season long, then Steelers Nation will wear it for him.

Bring your well-behaved pets to receive Interfaith blessings O Many pet vendors, face painting, activities and giveaways O Animal Psychic Readings O

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IT MUST HAVE BEEN EXCITING TO WORK WITH WILLIAMS. ARE YOU A BIG SPORTS FAN? Absolutely! I grew up watching the Steelers. It’s been awesome working with DeAngelo and his wife, Risalyn. They are such genuine people. The entire Steelers organization has treated me like gold. They invited me to training camp and afterward, to eat with the players. The whole experience has been surreal.

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You can read a longer version of our Q&A online at www.pghcitypaper.com NEWS

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CHARGING FORWARD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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game that thinks, “Hmm, I haven’t had a mammogram yet,” and goes out and does it, then we have succeeded at changing a life and increasing awareness and the rate of early detection. So although it is tough at times, we have to keep fighting to find a cure so that one day no one will lose their mother or aunts, sisters, cousins and daughters. WHAT WAS YOUR MOM LIKE? IS THERE A STORY YOU CAN SHARE THAT DESCRIBES HER PERSONALITY OR THE RELATIONSHIP THE TWO OF YOU HAD? You had to really know her to even begin to understand her personality and just how she was. My mother was fierce and feisty, she would debate with anyone

just for good conversation; no topic was untouchable. This may be where I get the inability to hold my tongue. She would scream and cheer at football games — trust me, I would hear her on the field A portion of the proceeds from this issue will be donated to the DeAngelo Williams Foundation.

TO DONATE: WWW.DEANGELOWILLIAMS34.ORG

sometimes. She would fight at football games, but she would be at church every Sunday when she was home. She was the most gentle she could be when she was

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with her grandkids. She loved her family with everything in her and she would do anything for them. As far as our relationship, we talked every day. We were goofy together; it was just us. IS THERE A STORY YOU CAN SHARE ABOUT YOUR MOM, MAYBE A MOMENT THAT THE TWO OF YOU HAD DURING HER FIGHT WITH THIS DISEASE THAT SHOWS HER STRENGTH AND RESILIENCE? Looking back now, during her last few days, I really saw her strength and resilience in her interactions with my children. My kids are nonstop, bouncing off the wall, in constant motion. When they had called in hospice, my kids didn’t understand and would climb up in the bed with her and jump around, and I would want to tell them to stop or be careful in fear that they would cause her pain. She didn’t care. Of course, she would do absolutely anything for her grandchildren, and that held true to her last day. We have pictures with her and all six of her grandchildren laying in a hospital bed with her. She was absolutely her strongest when it pertained to her family.

LAST YEAR YOU WERE FINED FOR WEARING PINK IN HONOR OF YOUR MOTHER. DO YOU THINK THE LEAGUE IS TOO STRICT IN ENFORCING UNIFORM RULES LIKE THIS? IS THE PINK HAIR SOMETHING YOU’LL ALWAYS KEEP AS A TRIBUTE? I do not think the NFL is too strict in enforcing the uniform rules, however they do need to do a better job at enforcing the rules the same way across the board. If you make exceptions for some but not others, then it is hypocritical. Yes, the pink dreads are definitely a tribute that I will keep for as long as I am in the league. WHAT WORDS OF ENCOURAGEMENT WOULD YOU OFFER FAMILIES WHO ARE GOING THROUGH THIS FIGHT RIGHT NOW? Just be involved and be there for your family member or friend going through this fight. They need a strong support system. Go to appointments with them, go to chemo with them, just do anything you can to reassure them that they are not fighting this alone. CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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{CP PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Meghan Koziel with her dog Tizzy

THINK PINK

Little consensus exists over breast-cancer ribbon and branding {BY REBECCA ADDISON} T-SHIRTS, PINS, flags, bookmarks, notepads

and bandanas. If it has a pink ribbon on it, there’s a good chance Pittsburgh-area resident Meghan Koziel has received it. In the year since she was diagnosed with breast cancer, Koziel says she’s been overwhelmed by the amount of pink-ribbon merchandise she’s received. It’s not that she’s ungrateful; Koziel just doesn’t find the breast-cancer symbol comforting. “When I was diagnosed, everyone wanted to send me things with the pink ribbon on it,” Koziel says. “It was in my face constantly to the point that I felt suffocated by it. It’s wonderful to get gifts when you’re sick, but I have a box at home and everything with a pink ribbon on it, went in that box.” Koziel isn’t the only one bugged by the popular symbol. The breast-cancer ribbon and the color pink have come under fire in recent years after advocates started questioning how money collected from pinkribbon merchandise was being used. But that won’t stop the barrage of pink

Meghan Koziel during a radiation session on June 7, as shown on her blog shesparklessheshines.wordpress.com

clothes, grocery-store items and advertisements Americans are exposed to in October for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, in addition to personal statements such as

men dying their beards pink. (In years past, Pittsburgh even colored the waters of the Point State Park fountain pink.) Despite advertising efforts that present a united front, there’s little consensus within the breast-cancer community about the controversial ribbon and pink branding. Some organizations, like the American Cancer Society, embrace the pink movement full on. Other cancer organizations, like local nonprofit Glimmer of Hope, have never branded themselves under the pink label. And as for Koziel, while she might not be a fan of the breastcancer ribbon, the color pink has always held a special place in her heart. “My favorite color’s pink, so pink for me doesn’t really have a negative connotation,” she says. But all agree on the need to ramp up the battle against breast cancer. An estimated 246,660 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and an estimated 40,450 will die from the disease this year.

In April 2015, 25-year-old Koziel found a tumor in her breast. At the time, she was told she was too young to have breast cancer, but returned to the doctor after it continued to grow and she continued to experience pain. At 26, she was officially diagnosed, and since then she’s documented her journey on social media. “When I was Googling mastectomy or breast cancer, you get all these scary, horrendous pictures of people that had all these terrible things go wrong,” says Koziel, who posted pictures of her naked chest on her blog and social media. “I feel like my scars tell my story, and I want other women to feel empowered by my posts, and not to be ashamed if maybe they don’t have nipples or they have mastectomy scars.” But a lot of people weren’t happy with Koziel’s posts. The bubbly woman was subjected to vicious comments on the photos she posted on Instagram from people she’s never met. “When I first came out with my first mastectomy picture, I had people write horrendous things about me — that I was ugly,” says Koziel. “But I think there are other upsetting things about cancer, not the scars that saved my life.” And Koziel has received a lot of positive feedback as well. She set up a GoFundMe page to help pay for her treatment and has raised $21,709 to date. She recommends supporting those living with the disease in ways like this, instead of donating to nonprofits. “It’s wonderful that the money is supposed to go to research, but there’s no way to track it,” says Koziel. “I don’t make donations, and I don’t recommend people to make donations to those types of companies. You should be raising money for people who are sick, to make it through life.” FOR MORE THAN a decade, breast-cancer organizations and pink-ribbon merchandisers have been under scrutiny from activists questioning how funds are used. Among them is Breast Cancer Action, founded in 1990 by women living with and dying from cancer, who were dissatisfied with the inadequate treatment choices they had. “A quarter of a million women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, just like last year and unfortunately probably next year. About 40,000 women die of the disease each year,” says Karuna Jaggar, Breast Cancer Action executive director. “We’ve just seen far too little progress for the billions and billions of dollars spent on pink-ribbon products, and far too little progress for the focus on awareness. We need action.” According to Jaggar, the ribbon was originally created by 68-year-old Charlotte Haley who was using them to call attention CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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Need another reason to eat at Burger 21? We’ve got two words for you: Pink. Straws. Burger 21 is partnering with the National Breast Cancer Foundation during the month of October to donate $0.21 cents from each sale of fountain drinks, signature and classic shakes, retro floats, kids’ drinks and kids’ shakes. Any beverage that sports a pink straw applies! Proceeds will help support early detection, education, support services and research for those affected by breast cancer – a disease that more than 240,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with each year. Support pink and get a drink, as we raise funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation all month long! See you soon. Burger 21

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THINK PINK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

to inadequate funding for research into the root causes of breast cancer. She turned down corporations looking to partner with her, so companies released a breast-cancer ribbon of their own in the pink hue seen most commonly today. “From an early stage, the pink ribbon was a corporate co-optation of an activist’s peach ribbon,” says Jaggar. “They did these focus groups that found that pink was cheerful and soft and nonthreatening, everything that breast cancer is not. And the result was that when these companies turned the peach ribbon pink, they also shifted the focus from prevention to just empty awareness.” Breast Cancer Action launched the Think Before You Pink campaign in 2002 to shine light on issues in the pink-ribbon industry. The campaign asks the public to consider where money collected from pinkribbon products is going. The campaign also highlights pinkwashing, such as when a company whose products or services contribute to increased breast-cancer risk sells pink-ribbon products. “That was really in response to the overwhelming number of pink ribbons flooding the market and concern in the breastcancer community about what we had to show for all these pink-ribbon products,” says Jaggar. “Anyone could put a pink ribbon on anything, and they certainly do. Where is that money going? A lot of times corporations put pink ribbons on products, and no money goes to any breast-cancer organization. Or they put a pink ribbon on products, and pennies on the dollar go to breast-cancer organizations.” Jaggar says companies put pink ribbons on merchandise because data shows it leads to higher sales and greater customer loyalty. And she says breast-cancer-awareness advertising from corporations presents an incomplete image of the disease and tends to overly sexualize women. “Companies are selling these cheerful stories that are inspiring and appeal to people. They’re making breast cancer feel like it is, on the one hand, an urgent threat that everyone needs to care about — a little fear-mongering,” says Jaggar. “And on the other hand, they’re making it seem like there’s an easy answer. If you just donate, more people will be aware. You can’t find anybody who isn’t aware of breast cancer. Awareness alone is insufficient to turn the tide on the epidemic.” STILL, JAGGAR acknowledges that there are

many living with breast cancer and those impacted by the disease who are comforted by the pink ribbon and pink products. Among them are 12 local men who are participating in the American Cancer So-

O} JOHN COLOMB

BY {CP PHOTOS amberlain “Ya Jagoff” Ch an, with John ar Pink” podcast event Al vid Da r ne Fashion desig Tumas at a “Real Men We Jerome Bettis Grille 36 aig , at and co-host Cr on Fri., Sept. 30

ciety’s Real Men Wear Pink campaign. According to the campaign, in Pennsylvania alone, 11,310 women will be diagnosed this year, and 1,940 will die from the disease. “A lot of men are affected by breast cancer — having moms and aunts and grandmas who passed away, or who have dealt with and fought breast cancer in their lives. I think all of us have a cancer story, unfortunately, in their family,” says Allegheny County Councilor Tom Baker, one of the participants. “My dad passed away when he was 39 from cancer, and my mom at exactly my age, 37, became a single mom.” The campaign includes nine events from Sept. 30 to Oct. 18 to raise awareness about the disease, as well as funds for the American Cancer Society. “All of us guys have mothers. Many of us have sisters, aunts, grandmothers, close female acquaintances that are like family,” says Todd McCurdy, of Watts Water Technologies. “You love them with all your heart, and to see them go through this challenge and this struggle is so heartbreaking. You feel so helpless.” McCurdy’s wife is a breast-cancer survivor who also works for the American Cancer Society. He says he hopes the campaign will be of comfort to people living with the disease and can better educate the public about resources available to them. “When you look at my wife’s family tree, there’s cancer up and down my wife’s

Cancer survivo

rs Kimberly Bo oh Cancer Society er and Laura McCurdy from in “Yinzers We ar Pink” shirtsthe American at the event

family tree, so it wasn’t a matter of if, it was a matter of when,” says McCurdy. “A buddy of mine said it best: It’s one thing to believe in hell, but it’s something else to meet the devil face to face.” Each of the participants is responsible for collecting $2,500, and the campaign’s overall fundraising goal is $30,000. The men have already raised more than $37,000 to date. “I want my donations to go toward education and research,” McCurdy says. “But there’s got to be that financial incentive for those who work with the organization to help carry on that message. Being that my wife works for American Cancer Society, I’m going to tell you, you’re not going to get rich working for a nonprofit. The donations, the research grants, the stuff American Cancer Society has really been at the forefront of, you can tell most of the money is going toward what the mission is.” Like many of the men in the American Cancer Society project, Diana Napper was inspired to get involved in the breastcancer fight after her best friend, Carol Jo Weiss Friedman, died of the disease in 1990. But unlike them, she doesn’t identify with the pink brand. “Glimmer of Hope has never been a pink organization, even before all the controversy” says Napper. “Especially with the young women, they’re very frustrated with

“SOME WOMEN MIGHT FIND GREAT COMFORT IN PINK, AND OTHER WOMEN FIND NO COMFORT IN IT.”

the pink ribbon and products. But I truly won’t turn down money from anything that’s pink. Because our bottom line is, the money we gave away last year, I’d like to double that.” Napper’s foundation funds cancer research and programs that focus on premenopausal breast cancer. This year, her foundation will distribute over $500,000 in Western Pennsylvania to breast-cancer programs and equipment purchases. The foundation has given more than $3 million for breast-cancer projects to Allegheny Health Network, Magee Women’s Research Institute, the Hillman Cancer Center and Allegheny General Hospital. “We have an effective program. I think our transparency and the effectiveness of our program has allowed us to triple in size,” says Napper. “I want this fixed. I have two daughters. The incidence of breast cancer is too much, so I have got to find a way to help these patients get better. And [get] newer drugs, or make their treatment more tolerable, which in the end will improve outcomes, because when you’re less stressed and have less anxiety, those people tend to do better.” Right now, Napper is working on partnering with researchers to develop a drug to treat metastatic breast cancer. She says she’d rather focus on helping the women she works with than the controversy over pink ribbons and pink branding. “I don’t have breast cancer. Some women might find great comfort in pink, and other women find no comfort in it,” says Napper. “I always say who am I to judge. I support these women.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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SPEND THE WEEKEND AT THE AUGUST WILSON CENTER! T H E

P I T T S B U R G H

C U L T U R A L

T R U S T

P R E S E N T S

THIS FRIDAY! OCTOBER 7 • 8 PM

THIS SATURDAY! OCTOBER 8 • 8 PM TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 NEWS

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

Join us at the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center for ongoing workshops in October as we continue programming on architecture, history, design, urban planning, and other topics related to how cities function and historic preservation as a tool of community development.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

WORKSHOP: CHOOSING COLOR FOR YOUR HOME ROSA COLUCCI: Color consultant Join PPG Paints Color Consultant Rosa Colucci for a colorful evening as we explore global design trends and paint colors. See how color can make your home uniquely you. You will also learn about historic color palettes and how to find the right one for your home.Bring your inspiration pieces for a color consultation. Workshop participants will receive a coupon for one free gallon of Manor Hall paint. About the presenter: Rosa Colucci is a color consultant and educator for PPG Paints. She is also a features writer for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and covers trends in home design, products and color for the home.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15 • 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

WOODWORKING: IF IT LOOKS GOOD IT IS GOOD REGIS WILL: Carpenter & craftsman, Vesta Home Services Tips and tricks for carpentry on older houses From over 15 years of experience come tips and tricks for doing carpentry and trim work that looks good and works well in vintage homes where things can be less than ideal when it comes to straight and square. This workshop will also tie in some of the handwork skill that can be needed on various practical projects. ALL PROGRAMMING IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG

RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

412-471-5808

{CP PHOTO BY BRIAN CONWAY}

Big crowds at Thrival Festival meant long lines.

WATER SHORTAGE At this year’s Thrival Festival some were left high and dry by long lines {BY BRIAN CONWAY} BY MANY MEASURES, this year’s Thrival

Innovation + Music Festival was the most successful one yet. Now in its fourth year, a record-breaking 9,600 people descended upon Rankin’s Carrie Furnaces on Sept. 23 for the first night of Pittsburgh’s largest music festival. Many were drawn in part by EDM headliners The Chainsmokers, whose track “Closer” sat atop Billboard’s Hot 100 chart in the weeks leading up to the event. But it turns out festival-goers were in for a bumpy night. Friday at Thrival brought out not only the biggest crowds, but also the biggest lines, with attendees complaining of waits that stretched upward of an hour for food, beer and, most critically, water, which was being sold for $2 a bottle. And unlike last year’s festival, there was no free water station on site Friday. Dozens turned to social media to complain. “Water bottles are sold out at different locations,” festival-goer Elizabeth Warren wrote on Thrival Festival’s Facebook page that evening. “Hydration is key in this heat! [I]t’s disappointing enough to not see water stations, but those still willing to fork out $2 a bottle still need it!” “Um, lack of water is bullshit,” wrote Beckie Ardinger Seibel. Water sales Friday were limited to two beverage stands operated by the festival, each with two point-of-sale

systems apiece. Outside food trucks and vendors were prohibited from selling water and other beverages, and both empty refillable bottles and factorysealed water bottles were confiscated by security upon entry. “All [I] wanted was a fucking water, and after [I] was told they were all sold out, I was supposed to wait in another hour-long line just for tokens to buy said water? And then stand in the water line for another hour?” Mike Farinelli wrote the following day. Exacerbating matters was a payment system that required patrons to pay with cash or credit card for food and alcohol, and with tokens for water and other nonalcoholic beverages. This meant patrons had to wait in one line to purchase tokens and then a separate line to purchase water, at which point many discovered that water was temporarily unavailable, on a day when temperatures reached 87 degrees. This was the experience of Hugh Dunn, who told City Paper that at 7:30 p.m. he waited in line for about 30 minutes to buy tokens for water. Then, he says, after waiting in the water line a short time, “The vendor told me they and the only other vendor had no more water.” Dan Law, executive producer for Thrival Festival, says the event always had plenty of water on hand and that any gaps in service stemmed from the time it took


to transport the water from where it was stored to the two beverage stands, a process that took about 30 minutes in a frenzied festival environment. He says that a massive influx of people began arriving around 6 p.m., before the headlining bands performed, pushing the first-time festival venue’s capacities to the limit. “Both [stands] eventually temporarily ran down its stock of water, and they both needed to be replenished,” says Law. Furthermore, he is emphatic that at least one stand always had water on hand throughout the evening. From 9:45 to 10:15 p.m. Thrival organizers left several replies on their Facebook page telling frustrated commenters that they were in the process of bringing more water out to vendors. When the water arrived, staff members began to walk through the crowd and pass out free water to attendees, especially to those in front of the crowd. On Saturday, restrictions on outside water bottles were lifted and a 2,500-gallon water tank was brought in to provide free water. Law calls the decision not to provide free water on Friday “a simple mistake.” “We should have had free water on site at all times,” he says. Thrival is an initiative of Thrill Mill, an East Libertybased 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to supporting early-stage startups and regional entrepreneurial growth. The two-day music festival is preceded by three days of panels and discussions about technology, culture, entrepreneurship and more. UPMC Enterprises is the presenting sponsor. Asked for comment on Friday’s water shortages, a UPMC spokesperson directed all questions back to Thrival. “Thrival has two main purposes,” says Law. “The first is obviously to raise the profile of Pittsburgh as place that is a hub of creativity and ingenuity, of start-ups and ideas, but it is also a revenue-driving mechanism for Thrill Mill as a nonprofit. So when we do charge for vending services, it is not because we are greedy misers, it’s simply because we are trying to make the festival and the organization revenue-positive.” Law says a handful of people were treated by on-site medical staff for a variety of issues, but none were deemed medically dehydrated. Seven people were taken away by ambulance Friday for issues related to alcohol intoxication, a figure that was confirmed by Swissvale Fire Chief Clyde Wilhelm.

Lauren Paige Zabelsky was one of the first to comment on water problems on Thrival’s Facebook page. Contacted by CP, she reaffirmed a post she wrote from the festival stating that she saw teenagers drinking from the non-potable handwashing station. “Even if they weren’t drinking or on drugs, they were outside and it was hot and they were dancing. They needed water. Being a teen librarian, being responsible for kids is something I can’t turn off,” she says. Ashley Corts was at Thrival as a vendor for Black Forge Coffee House. She estimates that around 50 people, primarily young adults, stopped by throughout the day to ask for water, which they (and other food vendors) were prohibited from selling. “They were literally begging us for this lukewarm coffee-flavored water that sat in our percolator,” she says. “I felt awful.” Asked why food vendors were not allowed to sell beverages, Law pointed to security concerns. “We have no ability to monitor the amount of product they sell, or what kind of product they sell, and the type of receptacle that they are issuing. And that is a major security concern,” he says. One attendee, Chuck Cramer, says he went to Thrival to see Chvrches and Metric specifically, and that he would have paid the cost of his entire festival ticket to see just one of those bands perform live. He waited in line for about 20-30 minutes to buy tokens and another 20-30 minutes to buy water. Nevertheless, he believes that festival organizers “definitely did a really good job with addressing almost every major concern overnight.” Cramer’s sentiments echoed that of many online commenters who were frustrated with services the first night, only to express thanks to the organization for addressing the shortcomings and providing a much improved experience the second evening. On Saturday morning, Thrival organizers took to Facebook to apologize to those who were disappointed and to reassure everyone that they took the complaints very seriously. “We want to build something that the city as a whole can be proud of, something that shines a positive light on this amazing city,” one post said. “We’re still growing and learning and hope that you’ll stick with us through the messy patches that come with that growth. Thank you!”

“THE VENDOR TOLD ME THEY AND THE ONLY OTHER VENDOR HAD NO MORE WATER.”

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[GUEST OPINION]

FINAL EDITION {BY DENNIS RODDY} THE PITTSBURGH Tribune-Review is now

receding into the past, its most talented staff dispersed, top editors handed their walking papers, and its sprawling offices in the D.L. Clark Building resembling the aftermath of a plague. All the equipment is where it belongs. The people have vanished. As a journalist I can find nothing good about the disappearance of even a bad newspaper, much less one so simultaneously luminescent and toxic as was the Trib. I began my career in daily newspapers at The Tribune-Review when it was entirely a Greensburg, Westmoreland County, newspaper. Richard Mellon Scaife, the legendarily right-wing publisher, had already established a reputation for imperiousness and messing with news content. That is to say that Dick Scaife was like every publisher I ever met. A.J. Liebling long ago observed that, “Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one.” A generation ago, that was true. It was equally true that everybody has to start somewhere, and the Tribune-Review of the 1980s was fertile ground for young ambi-

{CP PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s Pittsburgh edition will cease publication next month.

tions. Some of my best work was done at the Trib, as was some of my worst. The magic of the place was that it allowed ambitious young reporters to fail as well as succeed. Scaife treated me very well, and his conservatism did not alarm me. I was, in those days, much under the spell of

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

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the conservative intellectual movement, drawn to it mostly by the fact that it was offering new ideas and theories where liberalism had become a set of rote and narrow formulas. What I could not stand was his inability to distinguish between news and opinion, which often led the Trib into petty vendettas. When I left in 1986, I appreciated the opportunities the Trib had given me and regretted only that its publisher’s high-profile politics and occasional outbursts meant that while it would always be an interesting newspaper, it would never be a great one. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review was conceived in a fit of pique, when Scaife was blocked from purchasing The Pittsburgh Press at the end of the strike that killed the latter paper. An angry billionaire can be an entertaining spectacle, but a disruptive one. The plain fact is that Dick Scaife hated the Block family. That is why there was a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. The problem with the Tribune-Review was that it wished its stories to be true. Often they were. In the case of reporters such as Carl Prine, Andrew Conte and its renowned state Capitol correspondent, Brad Bumsted, the stories were not only true but excellent. In the 24 years of its existence, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review broke important stories, and in the past decade, it frequently embarrassed its more established crosstown rival, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. This is how the work of legitimate reporters ran in the same paper that carried the overwrought conspiracy theories of Christopher Ruddy, who made the Trib famous for outlandish suggestions that Bill Clinton aide Vince Foster and U.S. Secretary

of Commerce Ron Brown were murdered. The editorial page became a fetid sinkhole of hate and stupidity. Sam Francis, a selfdescribed “white nationalist,” was given a weekly spot. Insults became more important than insights. Attention-seeking seemed to be the operative policy. Opinion editor Colin McNickle once got into a “literary feud” with the editors of the Mount Lebanon High School student newspaper. From an editorial implying that Katherine Graham, publisher of The Washington Post, murdered her husband to Eric Heyl’s artless insult of Wilkinsburg’s displaced high school students, the page was one vast overreach — both unfounded and unfunny. The good work of legitimate journalists was forced to reside in the same smelly stable with Ruddy, McNickle and the anonymous authors of the Whispers column. Too often, people were buying the paper for the wrong reasons. This is understandable. Its owner was publishing it for the wrong reasons. My reporting nine years ago – for which Scaife had me hauled into court – showed what everyone suspected all along. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review might have championed the creative destruction of the free market, but its billionaire owner had been born free of the laws of supply and demand. The paper lost tens of millions annually, and Scaife’s death proved that, in some cases, you can take it with you when you die. The Pittsburgh edition will now become a bureau. Circulation, long sustained by budget-pricing gimmicks, will drop. The Trib will, once again, be a Greensburg paper. The retrenchment was inevitable and regrettable. Ordinarily, when a rambunctious publisher dies, the paper trims its course and moves on. Robert McCormick died and The Chicago Tribune matured into a great paper. Likewise, when the elder Chandlers passed, the Los Angeles Times transformed from a so-so regional money factory to a publication of national import. The difference here is that these publishers were wealthy because of their newspapers. Scaife was wealthy in spite of his. With that difference now laid bare, the experiment ends. It ends in an era in which freedom of the press now means little more than having an opinion and owning a laptop computer. We now have freedom of the press. We just don’t have the press to go with it. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Dennis Roddy is a former reporter with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and TribuneReview. He also served as a spokesperson for Gov. Tom Corbett.


[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

PINK ISSUES

Discover an Active Retirement!

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} A FEW YEARS ago, my wife and I decided to take up golf. We weren’t sure whether we’d like the game, so we started cheap. I bought a used set of clubs from a garage sale and then cobbled her together a set from garage sales and thrift stores. I was able to find just about everything she needed except a driver. So I went to a store and was scouring the scores of clubs on the racks when I saw a red price tag for $14 covering up a price that said $40, which covered another for $79.99. I was so excited by the bargain that I didn’t notice that the club was pink or that it had a pink ribbon on it. But while I quickly recognized that this item had been pinked-up for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, all I cared about was its price, and I bought it despite the fact that it was pink. Pink products in America have become as commonplace as products made in Central America or China. It’s become both a symbol of life-or-death struggle and a symbol of the corporate exploitation of human emotion for profit. Of course, a portion of the proceeds goes to cancer charities, but you’re never really quite sure which one, or how the money is spent. And a lot of us will buy these products because, after all, who’s against breast-cancer research and patient services? But in recent years, “pinkwashing” — when a corporation that promotes a pink-ribbon product also produces, manufactures and/or sells products that are linked to the disease — has become a major concern of environmentalists and health activists. The biggest target of these claims has been the well-known Susan G. Komen Foundation. Komen came under fire for defunding Planned Parenthood under pressure from conservatives in Congress, and for engaging in pinkwashing. The most famous example was accepting $100,000 from a drilling company in exchange for the right to produce and use pink drillbits; there is an established link between some ingredients in fracking fluid and cancer. When these controversies were at their height, clear lines were drawn in the sand between pink organizations and non-pink ones. However, today, I don’t think pink is necessarily linked to the Komen Foundation. It has transcended the controversy by quite a bit and, as news editor Rebecca Addison’s excellent story on page 12 of this issue examines, even those who are

Call 412-329-6523 today to schedule a visit.

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fervently against pink products say that if they provide someone struggling with breast cancer some solace, how can you tell them that it’s wrong? That brings me to the big pink elephant that you’re currently holding in your hands. For the first time, City Paper, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, is being printed on pink paper. The practice is one that our new owners have done at their other papers in the past. I, and most of CP’s editorial staff, weren’t so sure about the idea. We’ve covered the controversies in the past several years, and we know that a lot of our readers are in the anti-pinkwashing camp. But while I can’t speak for the entire staff, I want to explain why I have reached a pretty good comfort level with this issue. First, a portion of this week’s advertising revenues will be donated to the DeAngelo Williams Foundation. You can read all about Williams’ foundation elsewhere in this issue, but the money the Steelers running back raises goes to mammograms for uninsured or under-insured women in memory of his mother, Sandra Hill. It was a foundation that I chose because Williams has an interesting story to tell, and I know how the money will be spent. Next is Addison’s critical examination of the “pink” issue, including comments from those who like it, those who don’t, and those who’ve survived the disease. And finally, we’re a free publication. We’re not asking our readers to pay for our Pink Issue, but to read it, and learn from the people we talk to about the disease. If you’re moved by their stories and if you want to help, then make a donation to the cancer charity of your choice that promotes prevention, early detection or research. Because whether you’re pro-pink or anti-pink, cancer doesn’t care; it doesn’t discriminate.

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Pgh, PA 15217 • 412-421-2909 pittsburgh.colormemine.com

301 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE Pgh, PA 15241 • 412-854-1074 southhills.colormemine.com

WHETHER YOU’RE PRO-PINK OR ANTI-PINK, CANCER DOESN’T CARE; IT DOESN’T DISCRIMINATE.

Do You Shop at Convenience Stores? Have you ever purchased energy drinks, cookies, or cigarettes from a convenience store? If so you may be eligible for a research study. The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to learn about what ADULTS, ages 18-65, buy at convenience stores. Participation requires completion of a 10 minute phone or internet survey, one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center, and a short follow-up phone call. People who complete the study will be compensated for their time and effort with $75 in gift cards. Parking or bus passes will be provided. If you are interested and want to learn more about the study, please call 412-204-7353, e-mail adult-cstore-study@rand.org or visit us at www.rand.org/storestudy. The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Weird Pittsburgh

SEND YOUR LOCAL WEIRD NEWS TO INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

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A judge has upheld Pennsylvanians’ constitutional right to cuss out their elected officials at public meetings. Johanna Boratko, a mother of two middle-schoolers, brought her concerns about bullying to a March meeting of the board of the Greater Johnstown School District. When a board member tried to cut off her comments and demanded she be “dismissed,” Boratko, 41, declared, “I’ll dismiss myself because yinz are a bunch of fucking assholes.” She then stormed out of the room. Boratko was charged with and convicted of disorderly conduct. She appealed, with help from the American Civil Liberties Union. The newscast of WJAC reports that Cambria County Court Senior Judge F. Joseph Leahey overturned her conviction. The judge cited the legal definition of “disorderly conduct” and stated that it could not be proven that Boratko intentionally caused “inconvenience, annoyance or alarm” to any of the fucking assholes on the school board. Leahey also said the f-word is not “obscene” under current statutes unless it is used in a sexual context. (He did not rule on whether or not it is obscene to still say “yinz.”)

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Joseph Bauer lost his manager position at the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation for “blatantly violating the sexual-harassment policy he was supposed to be enforcing,” according to PennLive.com. Bauer, a one-time roadway-programs coordinator in Harrisburg, allegedly targeted a clerk. When she wore hoop earrings, he “place[d] his finger through the opening” and said, “I am touching your hole,” according to an internal investigation. He also reportedly offered to unhook her bra during CPR training and asked her how much she would charge for sex with him and with an animal. After an investigation, PennDOT offered to transfer Bauer to a nonmanagerial position. He refused, leading to his termination. He has since taken the matter to court twice, first to receive unemployment benefits (which he was denied), and then to get his job back. In the second case, Bauer “admitted to his behavior” in paperwork “but argued that it was appropriate and explainable,” reports PennLive.com. Judge Rochelle Friedman didn’t wait to hear the explanation before dismissing Bauer’s case.

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A McKeesport police officer was fired after less than one week on the job due to a Snapchat post using a racial slur. A onetime friend shared an image that former officer Melissa Adamson created, combining a selfie of herself in uniform and the caption, “I’m the law today nigga.” Adamson, who is white, apparently took the photo when she worked for the Pitcairn Police Department, and it resurfaced after McKeesport hired her. She was apologetic to WTAE, explaining, “I’m not a racist. That’s not how I want to portray myself.”

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Police say that Jeffrey Earl Davis was bicycling through New Castle, “high on pills” with, for some reason, a small stick

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of dynamite in his backpack. This, predictably, did not end well. Davis, 25, allegedly thought it would be “funny” to light the explosive and toss it onto the hood of a parked car. Police told the New Castle News that he stood and watched the blast, which caused $2,300 worth of damage; he pedaled away only when police arrived and was later identified.

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You know that post-break-up meeting with your ex to trade hairbrushes, T-shirts, books and other stuff left at the other’s place that forces you to make sad, awkward small talk? Shane Thomas Horton, of McKean County, apparently wasn’t gonna have that. Instead, Horton, 27, allegedly broke the lock of his ex-girlfriend’s Smethport apartment, took his stuff and left some of hers, according to the Bradford Era newspaper, leading to burglary and trespassing charges.

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For weeks, police in Sweden Township, Potter County, received complaints of a woman sneaking onto private property with a cat trap. According to the Potter LeaderEnterprise, they cuffed 69-year-old Mildred Williams on alleged cruelty to animals and other charges after she had a run-in with a homeowner. Police are asking for residents who encountered Williams to come forward as they put together a case.

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An unknown person viciously pranked the Route 148 Car Wash in McKeesport and its customers by driving through the wash bays with open cans of paint in the back of his truck. Water jets splattered the paint onto equipment and the ceiling and it sprayed onto the two vehicles that next went through the wash, reports WTAE. One customer reported white splatters on her black, $50,000 2016 Lincoln MKX.

WAYNOVISION


DONNIE IRIS

FOREVER MOTOWN

AND THE CRUISERS

Sunday October 16 7 PM

Friday, October 14 Ŷ 8 PM 7 PM TIM WOODS TRIO Doors Open 5 PM

Doors Open 5 PM This 12 member, non-stop, high energy show from Las Vegas features former members of the Coasters, Drifters, The Spinners and The Marvelettes. Listen and dance to Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, Gladys Knight, The Temptations, The Supremes, Lionel Richie and the entire Motown roster of stars.

Ŷ Cash Bars Ŷ Dining Options Inside The Center Ŷ Club-Style Tables & Chairs Seating Ŷ Come Early And Have Dinner Before The Show!

ORDER TICKETS 3 WAYS: ŶONLINE simoneventmanagement.com ŶBY PHONE

800-838-3006

ŶPurchase at the door when you arrive

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LOCAL

“I’M STILL PROCESSING THAT ONE.”

BEAT

{BY MEG FAIR}

DYI DEVOTEE

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ALL-SCENE ENTERTAINMENT FESTIVAL 4 p.m. Sat., Oct. 8. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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POISON PEN {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FABILOA CARRANZA}

Dan Bejar a.k.a. Destroyer

Brian Howe as Sikes {PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK PREZIOSO/LET’S BE ANIMALS PHOTOGRAPHY}

Brian Howe can’t count the projects he’s involved in on one hand. Between a hosting a podcast that’s now 100 episodes deep, fronting two bands and managing the graphic design and shipment department of Get Hip Records, Howe doesn’t have time for much else. But somehow he also manages to facilitate a monthly anime club and make appearances at more shows in a week than most make it to in a month. “I can’t even remember everything that I do,” Howe laughs. The lifelong Pittsburgh resident is the vocalist for heavy metal band Greywalker, and he’s also the alternative rapper Sikes, performing lately as a live-band version called Sikes and the New Violence. He acts as a utility player for both projects — designing and ordering merchandise for both bands, booking shows, and editing music videos. He even spends time meticulously designing and creating handassembled packaging for Sikes releases. Start the Beat is the podcast that Howe produces, and he uses it as a platform to talk to — and find inspiration from — other artists, entrepreneurs and musicians. It seems odd to hear phrases like “networking” and “maximizing productivity” in a conversation with someone most would consider a punk, but Howe has always been this way. He lives by his Google calendar, even putting socialization on his to-do lists. It’s the networking and careful organization that has earned Sikes a slot for the third year in a row at the All-Scene Entertainment Festival, a benefit for Mr. Smalls’ nonprofit Creative.Life.Support. The festival takes place at Mr. Smalls on Sat., Oct. 8. Each year he’s spent time talking to the organizer; this time around, he was asked to have a hand in the early stages of festival planning and booking. “All these things happen because I put myself out there,” says Howe. When asked if he’s ever taken a break from this full plate of art and music, he admits that there were two years where — thanks to some redirection from outside influences — he slowed down creatively. When that phase ended, however, he had the biggest creative outpouring of his life. “This is all I know how to do, it’s all I want to do, and I don’t have an interest in doing anything else.”

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HEN TALKING about music that inspired him, Dan Bejar — who has released 10 thought-provoking albums and a few EPs under the name Destroyer — mentions the equally distinctive vocalist Scott Walker. That Ohio native first found fame as half of the blueeyed soul duo the Walker Brothers, before embarking on a solo career marked by experimentation and unique lyrical musings. Bejar mentions Walker’s orchestrated ’70s albums as favorites. “I have a pretty obsessive relationship with those records,” he says. “I’ll spend my life trying to get around those records. Even when I’m not listening to it, I’ll find myself just thinking about it, being in the middle of a conversation with someone about groceries and I’ll be like, ‘What about that song?’” Destroyer albums can arouse the same feelings. Each sounds vastly different from what preceded it. While Thief has the guitars/bass/drums instrumentation of an

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

indie rock band, Your Blues relies heavily on synthesizers to accompany Bejar’s reedy voice. Kaputt has an understated quality similar to Roxy Music’s Avalon, while last year’s Poison Season arguably moves furthest from anything resembling rock, relying heavily on strings and horns.

DESTROYER

WITH ZACHARY CALE 8 p.m. Mon., Oct. 10. Club Cafe, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

The one constant is Bejar, who comes across as a postmodern troubadour, delivering lyrics that often read like poetry. When he shapes his ideas into repetitive choruses, they’re often too abstract for a singalong. (Destroyer lyric sheets often print the verses as paragraphs.) Sometimes he gently croons the words, sometimes he sounds like he’s

on the brink of insanity. Whatever the delivery, it can be engrossing, and not easy to grasp in a few listens. Even he, when talking about Poison Season, admits, “I’m still processing that one.” The Vancouver resident might be equally well known for his work in the New Pornographers, but he first began recording as Destroyer more than 20 years ago. “I was like a hungover college dropout — borrowing his friend’s four-track and learning how to play guitar and sing and [record] songs,” he says by phone from his hometown. “That’s what turned into the first Destroyer record, [which] I think I made in early 1995. September of 1995 was the very first Destroyer show. For a couple years it’d go back and forth between just being me by myself or me with my roommates, who had no idea how the songs went and just played a bunch of noise behind me.” With each record, things became a little more refined. Along the way, he helped


his friend Carl Newman with a recording project that eventually became the New Pornographers’ debut, Mass Romantic. Bejar has contributed three songs to each of their albums, but often stayed in the background, not touring with them in the early days. He jokingly describes his role in the band as like “a villain, an Iago character or if Richard III was a minor character in Richard III. I’ve always been given free rein to come and go as I please. So I just use that. It’s always been kind of a comforting thing to return to. I’m more relaxed as a singer and rock ’n’ roll songwriter in that context.” The style of his writing might link him to rock songwriting, and makes him easy to detect in either band. But the arrangements in Destroyer toy more with musical conventions. He recalls with a laugh that he recently told an interviewer that the atmospheric keyboards and mellow sax lines of Kaputt evoked “‘an older dude, in his late 30s, trying to be cool at the ’80s wine bar watching Live Aid on TV.’ That’s kind of silly,” he says, “but it’s kind of a misconjuring of an era. Which I think is how memories work.” Poison Season was made with the same musicians who recorded Kaputt — and who also toured as Destroyer — but it included the close help of an arranger, and a professional string quintet. “It was the most intense two days I’ve ever spent in the studio,” Bejar says. “I think part of it was, maybe, the dread that it wasn’t going to work out. And I had no real idea what it would take for it to happen.” Since he began recording, Bejar has received more than his fair share of comparisons to David Bowie, perhaps due to his knack for shifting styles frequently. “What got me really excited and kind of obsessive about doing [music] was English glam rock from the early ’70s. And if push comes to shove and I’m forced to do rock music, that’s my camp,” he says. “And I never thought it was Bowie in specific. In fact I always thought of myself more as like an Ian Hunter type [in] Mott the Hoople, kind of like an English Dylan style, [in a] bar band.” For its Pittsburgh performance, Destroyer consists solely of Bejar and his guitar. In addition to nearly 150 Destroyer songs that can be pulled from his back catalog, he has a handful of new ones, which he hopes to record following this tour. With that much material to choose from, it’s understandable that he isn’t attempting to strip down his more recent releases in this setting. “With Poison Season, they weren’t really written on guitar and are not really intended for that kind of …” He pauses. “I mean, I don’t know what the songs are intended for.” And therein lies the intrigue and allure of Destroyer: the intention might be unclear but it keeps pulling you back. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

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MUSIC

CURVING LINES {BY IAN THOMAS}

On Steve Gunn’s latest, Eyes on the Lines, the singer-guitarist keeps his lyrics vague and his narratives sparse. To search for meaning or specifics in them is to miss the point entirely. On this album, released in June on Matador Records, Gunn means to convey a mood rather than tell a story. Inspired in part by writer Rebecca Solnit’s 2005 essay collection “A Field Guide to Getting Lost,” Eyes on the Lines is an exercise in meandering exploration. While it evokes the open road, as the title might suggest, it is not weighed down with lofty purpose, unlike, say, the road novels of Jack Kerouac, which are defined by their sense of seeking. If Gunn is searching for anything, it is for the happy accidents that emerge in unfocused moments. This is best reflected in his band’s looseness. The prolific Gunn, who counts the Grateful Dead among his many musical influences, is most at home as a collaborator, and the chemistry with his band is strong. The album is marked by extended tracks of well-executed interplay between Gunn’s bright guitar work and sprays of lap steel, Wurlitzer and flute. The ethos of the album is best captured on “Full Moon Tide.” “Out on the road, they just don’t care / All kinds of heads will roll back there / Take what you see, you’ll always know / Out on the road, there’s nowhere to go,” he sings. Above all, Eyes on the Lines succeeds on the strength of Gunn’s confidence. As with Kurt Vile, to whom he is often compared (and with whom he played in Vile’s backing band, the Violators), it would be wrong to peg Gunn a slacker. There is intention to Gunn’s exploration, even if he can’t name it at the outset. He trusts that, in the exploration, it reveals itself. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

STEVE GUNN with DINOSAUR JR 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 9. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com +

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This direct-to-web series spotlights our region’s talented, innovative and diverse artists. ED! RECE NTLY POST

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLLY ANDRES}

Esperanza Spalding, at left

A MORGAN E R IN Go to wqed.org/sessions THANKS to Live Nation and Pittsburgh City Paper for their underwriting support.

POP CULTURED {BY BILL KOPP} CROSS-GENRE sensation Esperanza Spalding is something of an anomaly — albeit a welcome one — on today’s pop-music landscape. A fine singer with an impressive range, she’s also a supremely accomplished composer and musician, one with a thundering command of her primary instruments: upright bass and electric bass guitar. Spalding and her band will appear at Pittsburgh’s August Wilson Center on Oct. 7. Emily’s D+Evolution is Spalding’s fifth album, and songs like “Earth to Heaven” showcase a dizzying yet highly appealing synthesis of rock, funk, soul and jazz. As the youngest person ever to join the faculty of the prestigious Berklee College of Music upon her 2005 graduation, she went on to become the first jazz artist to win the Grammy Award for Best New Artist in 2011, famously besting pop idol Justin Bieber. In a phone interview, Spalding takes issue with the suggestion that the music on Emily’s D+Evolution could serve as a kind of “gateway drug,” drawing listeners into a new appreciation for jazz. For example, “If somebody heard [1970s jazzfusion group] Weather Report and didn’t like it, that’s fine,” she says. “That’s where they’re at, and I don’t think that my record is somehow going to open up their faculties.” She laughs and adds, “When I first heard Weather Report, I didn’t like it!” But once she began to appreciate that group’s music — a combination of pop-friendly melodies and intense, high-level instrumental interplay — she was hooked. “When I came to it, it was like nothing else in the world.” In retrospect, Spalding’s childhood in Portland, Ore., provided some clues to the path she would eventually pursue. She

was a prodigy, a self-taught violinist by age 5. By 15, she was concertmaster with the Chamber Music Society of Oregon. A musical omnivore, she was influenced early by artists as varied as Felix Mendelssohn, LL Cool J and Stone Temple Pilots. Describing her own music, she admits that some of it “would raise the eyebrows of a pop listener, but my overarching sentiment about making music is: Do whatever you want. It’s a common language.” Spalding continues on this theme: “When I am making music with other people, and I lay out a language or structure for a project, then I like to explore and find what the music can do.” The way to do that, she believes, is “via trial and error and experimentation with my fellow musicians. And if nothing else, that spirit — that playful, exploratory spirit — makes its way into the music.”

ESPERANZA SPALDING 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 7. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $55-65. 412-471-6070 or www.trustarts.org

But Esperanza Spalding’s music has it both ways: it’s ambitious and accessible. Listeners who want challenging arrangements, knotty vocal harmonies and intelligent lyrics will find plenty to enjoy on Emily’s D+Evolution, but those who ask for nothing more than catchy tunes with indelible hooks will be equally impressed. She notes that some engineers or “sound designers” might have tried to make her music sound like a jazz record, “but I knew that couldn’t happen,” she says. “Because the music is bigger, it’s fatter and it’s livelier. It’s a lot of things.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016


Bridge into wellness

Recovery programs created BY women for women!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DEBORAH ANDERSON CREATIVE}

Left to right: Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman

IN THE AFFIRMATIVE {BY BILL KOPP} THE HISTORY of progressive-rock giant Yes began in the late 1960s. The British group enjoyed its greatest success in the first half of the 1970s, with another peak at the height of the MTV era. In 2016, three of its most celebrated former members have come together again. Vocalist Jon Anderson sang on 18 of Yes’ 21 studio albums. Virtuoso musician Rick Wakeman played keyboards on the group’s most celebrated 1970s albums. And guitarist Trevor Rabin was a key factor in Yes’ resurgence of popularity in the ’80s. Anderson Rabin Wakeman (ARW for short) plays Heinz Hall on Oct. 12. The idea for the ex-Yes members to collaborate has been simmering for nearly a quarter-century, says Wakeman in a phone interview. The three were part of Yes’ mammoth 1991 Union tour, with an eightman lineup that featured musicians from throughout the group’s history. Wakeman describes that run of dates as “a completely mental tour, but I loved it; it was great fun.” He recalls that on the last day of the tour, “Trevor and I looked at each other and said, ‘You and I, we really have got to go out and play together, do some more.’” Rabin left Yes in 1994 for a successful career in film scoring. Wakeman left and rejoined twice more, finally leaving in 2004. Anderson quit in 2008, also ending the prospect of the keyboardist ever returning. “I would not go out [onstage] without Jon singing,” Wakeman says. In the ensuing years, he and Anderson collaborated on several projects. With the 2015 death of bassist Chris

Squire, Yes (which still tours as a separate entity from ARW) lost its last original member. That sad event — Squire was 67 when he succumbed to leukemia — was the catalyst for Anderson, Rabin and Wakeman to make time to play together. “We were all suddenly very, very aware of our mortality,” says Wakeman. “And music mortality, you could say.” So the three made a commitment to do this tour, with more to follow. “We’re all genuinely, really excited about it,” says Wakeman.

ANDERSON RABIN WAKEMAN 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 12 Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $48.50-128.50. All ages. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

Suboxone Treatment, Subutex Medication

The periods of Yes history represented by one, two or even all three of the musicians mean that there’s a wealth of material from which to choose for “an evening of Yes music and more.” Wakeman explains: “We want to do classic stuff, [but] we want to treat the music a bit differently as well. We want to keep all the elements that the songs have got, but maybe take things to a new level.” He says the goal is to employ different ideas while keeping the elements that make the songs what they are. Wakeman is a bit more circumspect when asked about the group’s long-term plans. Might “more” mean an album? “We’re saying, ‘No, hold on a minute.’ We don’t have to rush into this. Because we want to play together, learn a bit more again about each other,” Wakeman says. And in doing that, ARW will simultaneously be reintroducing a whole new generation of concertgoers to the thrill and spectacle of the music of Yes.

Please check out our website and see if one of our area locations works for you!

www.bridgeintowellness.com

Bridge Wellness Center Erie, Pa & Waynesburg, Pa

Call 1-800-820-3101 to schedule your appointment today!

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Proudly Presents

The New Silver Eagle Band

Saturd Octoberay 1 7:30PM 5

Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen

& Special Guest Dan Casne, the “Blonde Elvis” of Pittsburgh

310 Allegheny River Blvd. • Oakmont, PA 15139 Tickets available at theoakstheater.com [BAROQUE POP] + SAT., OCT. 08 Following an instrumental album recorded inside the Coyote Gulch canyons in Utah, and a collection of Handsome Family covers, Andrew Bird’s latest, Are You Serious, feels like both a return to form, and a barer-than-usual peek at the man himself. In the last few years, the multi-instrumentalist — known for his unique violin style and Dylan-esque lyrical riddles — got married and had a kid. Bird has said that marriage has changed his writing style in some ways, but where some might settle into the banalities of family life, he taps into the intensity. See performs ee him tonight when he p erform erf o s or at the Byham am Theater, r and read our Q&A &A with Bird at FFW>>, the music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com. typaper.com. Margaret Welsh. 8 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. owntown. $42.7549.75. All ages. ges. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org ustarts.org

[EXPERIMENTAL] MENTAL] + SUN., OCT. T. 09 For two decades, cades, Joan of Arc — the well-loved ved experimental al project of Tim Kinsella ella and Andrew a cast of rotating tating musicians — has Bird made eclectic, tic, genre-melting ng albums thatt loop, riff and twinkle nkle in unexpected d ways. Tonight, the e band brings its 20 0th anniversary tour to Brillobox. Opening are Pittsburgh’s own Boys and Highdeaf: eaf: Boys, much h like Joan of Arc, create a a distinctly noisy oisy experience experie ence e that will pull ll you between n air-guitaring g and thrashy head-banging. ng. Highdeaf, f in turn blends mathy metal with noodling riffs ffs and a dash of blues.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

Meg Fair 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10-12. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[AMERICANA] + TUE., OCT. 11 Singer/songwriters Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen have been friends since 1976, when both were students at Texas A&M University. The two would sit on the porch of a rental house and play music. They collaborated on a song about that porch, which Lovett recorded on his first record under the title “This Old Porch.” Keen did the same and called it “The Porch Song.” Listen to both and you’ll notice that, while the words are the same same, each song is distinct. And you might get to he hear both versions live when the two men get to together for an acoustic show at Greensburg’s Pala Palace Theater; most certainly you’ll get to hear a story about it. After all, that’s the point of the tour: two old friends sitting down with their guitars, singing songs t and swapping stories. stor Charlie Deitch 8 p.m. Otterman St., Greensburg. 21 West Otterm $48-88. All ages. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheatre.org www.the

[GRIM POP] + [GRIMY WED., OCT. 12

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ADDIE JUELL}

THEATER

CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF TKO MARKETING}

GU AND GALS, BREAK OUT THOSE BOO GUYS BOOTS O AND HATS!

Haybab makes the kind of music Haybaby you’d w want to listen to while having a quaint picnic in Allegheny Cemetery Cemet on a temperate fall afternoon. The Brooklyn-based aftern band released Sleepy Kids last year on the label Tiny Engines, and the record is a careful blend of sludge and honey. Tracks s like the noisy “Edelweiss” and “Her,” with its grooving brightness, show the b spectrum of Haybaby’s s songwriting. It is quietly so smart, simple and thoughtful. sm Opening this all-ages party at Op the Mr. M Roboto Project are space rockers YRS, experimental postpunk band Rainbow Machine and b twinkle-folk ensemble Yes Yes a twink Thousand Times Yes. MF 8 p.m. T us Tho 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. ages. www.robotoproject.org All ag


AND

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

PRESENT

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} PALACE THEATRE. Gordon Lightfoot. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

ROCK/POP THU 06

SAT 08

BRILLOBOX. After Funk. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Hoots & Hellmouth w/ Tom Breiding. South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Michael McDermott, Matthew Ryan. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Radio Birds w/ Jeremy Colbert. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

StoryCorps Pittsburgh 2016

Block & Tackle, Sorry, I’m Dead. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

SUN 09

BRILLOBOX. Joan of Arc, Boys, Highdeaf. Bloomfield. BYHAM THEATER. 412-621-4900. Andrew Bird w/ Sinkane. PALACE THEATRE. Downtown. 412-456-6666. KC and the Sunshine DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Band. Greensburg. Wine & Spirits. 724-836-8000. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FUNHOUSE HOLLYWOOD @ MR. SMALLS. LANES. King’s Thalia Zedek Band, Ransom. Dormont. ww. r w Emily Rodgers 412-563-7655. pe ghcitypa p Band & Zack Keim OAKS THEATER. .com (of Nox Boys). The Fabulous Millvale. 412-821-4447. Gemtones. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. PITTSBURGH WINERY. DIESEL. Islander, Bad Seed Rising. The End of America and Ari Hest. South Side. 412-431-8800. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE R BAR. Chrome Moses. Dormont. 412-942-0882. BRILLOBOX. Please The Trees, RIVERTOWNE BREWING Middle Children, Scott Fry COMPANY. Lenny Smith & Experience. Bloomfield. The Instant Gators. North Side. 412-621-4900. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. GOOSKI’S. Freedom Hawk. T-Tops, Bwak Dwagon, Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS. Working Breed, Absolutely Not, Gentle Brontosaurus & Soda Club. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Rumourz. A tribute to Fleetwood Mac. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

StoryCorps oral history project will be in residence at the Senator John Heinz History Center

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 07 565 LIVE. Brian Belonzi. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. HAMBONE’S. The Love Letters, Old Soles & Seedy Players, Will Simmons & the Upholsterers. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. KENDREW’S. King’s Ransom. Moon. 724-375-5959. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Brett Staggs, Barrels to Beethoven. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

October 13–November 11 Reservations open starting September 29

TUE 11

More information at wesa.fm/storycorps

WED 12

StoryCorps: the conversation of a lifetime

MP 3 MONDAY SPACEFISH

DJS THU 06 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. Millvale. 603-321-0277. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 07

{PHOTOS CO UR OF ED TANG TESY ERINE}

Each week we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s track comes from far-out indie-rock group Spacefish. The band releases its new record Earth Jokes, on Oct. 15 at Delaine’s Coffee in the Southside. Stream or download the title track — and check out the more-than-slightly dizzying video for the song — at FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. THE R BAR. KAR-E-O-KEE. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERS CASINO. DJ NIN. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

S TO R YC O R P S ’ P I T T S B U R G H R E S I D E N C Y S P O N S O R E D BY

Sendell

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

SAT 08 DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Feeling Without Touching. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

SUN 09

Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254.

SAT 08

MOONDOG’S. Lil’ Ed & The Blues Imperials. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 07

HIP HOP/R&B

THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta. Reggae & dancehall. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820.

WED 12

FRI 07 1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight:

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. TABLE 86 BY HINES WARD. RML Jazz. Mars. 412-370-9621. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

THU 06

SAT 08

TUE 11

THU 06

BLUES

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Eggs N’ Breakin. North Side. 412-904-3335.

JAZZ

1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Blues Orphans. Speakeasy. Melinda Colaizzi w/ Grandadchilds. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. MOONDOG’S. Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials. CD Release Party. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris-Gris w/ Jimmy Adler. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The Bo’Hog Broters. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

FRI 07

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Redeemers. North Side. 412-904-3335.

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CIOPPINO RESTAURANT & CIGAR BAR. Roger Barbour Band. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry: Tomas Fujiwara & The Hook Up. North Side. 412-383-0278. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Organ-I-Zation. Speakeasy. Tony Campbell Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazzhappening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. THE SUPPER CLUB. Erin Burkett and Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 09 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Spencer Geer. Oakland. 412-622-3114. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry: Thumbscrew. North Side. 412-323-0278. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454.

WED 12

www.MELLINGERSBEER www. MELLINGERSBEER.com .com 412.682.4396 like us on Facebook! 28

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

CHATHAM BAROQUE. Mein Freund ist Mein: J.S. Bach’s Wedding Cantata and Music of his German Forebears. Campbell Memorial Chapel, Squirrel Hill.

OTHER MUSIC THU 06 The Districts

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 08

RIVERS CASINO. Jessica Lee & Friends. North Side. 412-231-7777.

Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR. The Music of Downton Abbey. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-926-2488.

SUN 09

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Pianist Harry Cardillo & vocalist www. per a Charlie Sanders. p pghcitym .co Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. CITY OF ASYLUM @ ALPHABET CITY. Jazz Poetry: Mary Halvorson (Solo). North Side. 412-323-0278. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004.

BE06 SEMPLE STREET 402-4

EARLY WARNINGS

SPEAL’S TAVERN. Shot O’ Soul. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322. {PHOTO COURTESY OF FAT POSSUM RECORDS}

SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Lawrenceville. 412-621-4900.

{SUN., DEC. 11}

The Districts

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side {FRI., JAN. 27, 2017}

Twenty One Pilots Consol Energy Center, 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown {THU., MARCH 30, 2017}

Daya Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

WALNUT GRILL-ROBINSON. RML Jazz. Robinson. 412-370-9621.

WORLD

ACOUSTIC

NALC 84 LETTER CARRIER’S HALL. Mike Stout & The Human Union. Album Release Party. North Side. 724-787-5890.

THU 06 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Acoustic with Scott & Roseanne. 412-489-5631. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

FRI 07 THE SOUTH SIDE BBQ RESTAURANT. Tony Germaine Singer/Guitarist. South Side. 412-381-4566.

SAT 08 DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. The Redlines. Mars. 724-553-5212. DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Dwayne Lewis. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8181.

SUN 09 HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 12 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Ian Ethan Case. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 08

REGGAE FRI 07 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY TUE 11 PALACE THEATRE. Lyle Lovett & Robert Earl Keen. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

CLASSICAL FRI 07 CHATHAM BAROQUE. Mein Freund ist Mein: J.S. Bach’s Wedding Cantata and Music of his German Forebears. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 412-835-6630.

SAT 08 CHATHAM BAROQUE. Mein Freund ist Mein: J.S. Bach’s Wedding Cantata and Music of his German Forebears. Calvary

1139 PENN AVE. Midland, Ladymonix, Jose No. VIA Festival After Party Hot Mass. Downtown. ACE HOTEL PITTSBURGH. Chino Amobi, Rabit, Seth Graham, Xuan Rong. VIA Festival Main Showcase. East Liberty. 412-361-3300. PALACE THEATRE. Ace Frehley. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RIVERS CASINO. Chris Higbee Acoustic. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 07 ACE HOTEL PITTSBURGH. ESG, Empress Of, Ghost Cop, Negative Gemini, Ginger Brooks, Takahashi. East Liberty. 412-361-3300. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Spednar x Morgantics, Russ Hoffman, Easy Bake Oven, Henry Mallard, Cornelius F Van Stafrin III, Echo Lightwave Unspeakable, OM-BOT. VIA Festival Satellite: Noise showcase. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. RIVERS CASINO. Hewlett Anderson Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 08 PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass. Presenting “Haunted Classics”. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RIVERS CASINO. Rick Purcell and Shari Richards. North Side. 412-231-7777. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Bo’Hog Brothers. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 09 PITTSBURGH WINERY. Gina Rendina. CD release. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

MON 10 HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 12 THE FUNHOUSE @ MR. SMALLS. Korby Lenker, Rachael Kilgour, Brad Yoder. Millvale. 412-821-4447.


What to do

PPAID PAI AID AI A D ADVERTORIAL ADVE DVERTO RTORIA RTO RIALL SPONSORED RIA SPON SPON PONSOR SO ED SOR ED BY BY

IN PITTSBURGH

Oct 5 -11 WEDNESDAY 5

Diary of a Madman and Poe's Last Night

800-745-3000. 7p.m.

59th Annual Springs Folk Festival

Ben Folds and a Piano

SPRINGS PA. Tickets: spring spa.org or 814-442-4594. Through Oct. 8.

NEW HAZLETT THEATER North CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. Side. Tickets: madman2016. Tickets: ticketfly.com or tix.com. Through Oct. 16. 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 6

Wonderheads: Multiple Choice Non-Verbal Edition AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Reel Q Pittsburgh LGBT Film Festival HARRIS THEATER Downtown. Tickets: reelq.org. Through Oct. 15.

FRIDAY 75

TRUTV Impractical Jokers ‘Santiago Sent Us’ Tour CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or

NEWS

Some Assembly Required MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY Oakland. All ages show. Tickets: attacktheatre.com/sar. Through Oct. 9.

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Legends in Concert WVU CREATIVE ARTS CENTER Morgantown WV. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Through Oct. 8.

MUSIC

livenation.com. 8p.m.

La traviata BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org/ traviata. Through Oct. 16.

The River ASPINWALL RIVERFRONT PARK Aspinwall. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com. Through Oct. 30.

SUNDAY 9

SATURDAY 8

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL Oakland. Tickets: calliopehouse.org. 7p.m.

Taj Mahal Trio

Autumnfest - Pumpkin

Esperanza Spalding presents: Emily’s D+Evolution

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SEVEN SPRINGS. Tickets: 7springs.com or 866-437-1300. 11a.m. Through Oct. 9.

MONDAY 10 This Wild Life Low Tides Tour

River City Brass Haunted Classics

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 11 David Sedaris

Rickey Smiley AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

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412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org or

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Beacon Hotel 15+ ACRE Haunted Corn Maze and House for only $15.00 per person. The Haunting begins Fridays and Saturdays at Dusk. The last wagon leaves @ 10pm or until all victims have ridden! Sunday’s “No Scare” Family Days: 1:00-4:00 $8.00 per person. This includes Hay rides, Corn Maze, Scavenger Hunt, Pony Rides, and a Petting Zoo. Extra Fun Kids Activities with Knoch Softball Girls. TEXT 91944 for Spooky specials. Open Every Weekend thru October 31!

Cheeseman Fright Farm Plan an evening with a bonfire with fami-

ly and friends. Start a new family tradition, take a hay ride to our pumpkin patch and pick out this year’s holiday decoration. Cheeseman Fright Farm is open for our 17th year of fear new this year 3D Apocalypse, HUGE corn maze, CLOWN ASYLM and BUTCHER ROOM.

Conneaut Lake Park FALL into family Fun at Conneaut Lake Park, PA. Fall Pumpkin Fest - Three days of rides, giant pumpkin drops, artisans, crafters, a bluegrass & arts festival - take a ride on the Barbara J Sternwheeler. Ghost Lake – terrifying attractions: the House of Evil, Zombie Nightmare, Purple Haze, The Cabin in the Woods, Clown Town, The Funeral Home, Haunted Hotel Conneaut, the Last House on the Left, The 3-D Carnival of Fear, Demon House, The Devil’s Den & Blue Streak Ghoster Coaster.

Costume World Your year-round retail and rental costume store. We carry a huge selection of masks, wigs, make up, jewelry and accessories including licensed characters for children, adults and plus sizes. Costume World is located at 17th and Smallman in the Strip District. Call us at 412-281-3277 or visit www. costumeworld.com

dungeon of horrors and north walk Located inside the former West Virginia

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th

Experience the Scariest Place

HELLS HOLLOW HAUNT

West Virginia

“GONNA SCARE THE HELL OUTTA YA!!!”

PENITENTIARY

THREE SCARES IN ALL!!!

&

THE BLOODY BARN THE HAUNTED HAYWAGON OF HORROR THE FRIGHTENING FIELD OF CORN NIGHTS SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER UNIONTOWN, PA

Penitenitiary in Moundsville, it’s the scariest place behind bars. Experience the fright of being locked in a cell, lost in a maze, paranormal activity, a ride in a casket, and much more. More information and tickets available online at wvpentours.com.

Haunted Expedition This October, Haunted Expedition will take you back to a 1950’s post-apocalyptic America! Be ready to be face to face with the creatures created by the fallout! Lifelike interactive horror experience. Admission includes a haunted hayride and walk through attraction for one price. Can you survive the Haunted Expedition? Located at Shenot Farms, off Wexford Exit, www. TRI-COUNTY ATV RECREATION & RESCUE HAUNTED RIDERS PRESENTS

HOLLOW OF HISTORY HAUNTED RIDE OCT. 15, 22 & 29

TRI-COUNTY ATV • 632 TOWER HILL RD.

The Dungeon Of Horrors WEEKENDS IN OCTOBER MOUNDSVILLE, WV

ADULT COMBO PASS $20.00 • KIDS 12 & UNDER $13.00 COUPONS AVAILABLE AT WWW.HELLSHOLLOWHAUNT.COM CALL FOR GROUP PRICING (13+) 724-662-1999

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE ONLY AT

wvpentours.com

340 BESTWICk ROAD MERCER, PA. 16137

$20 PER PERSON • RIDE STARTS AT DUSK

Admission includes: Haunted Ride, Drive In Movie, Meal Deal & Treats for Kids under 15

FOR FAQ AND ADDITIONAL DETALS: W W W. H A U N T E D R I D E . C O M

1 - 8 7 7 - W E 1 2 AT V ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 9 3 1 - 2 2 8 8 )

1690 Smallman St., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

hauntedexpedition.com

HAUNTED HILLS ESTATE Spice up your weekend and visit HAUNTED HILLS ESTATE, in Uniontown, Pa. Two hours of unique and original haunted entertainment! Break the CURSE on the Challenge Trail, check into the Legends Hotel for a killing experience and silently creep into the Twisted Nightmare Escape Room for a clowning around good time, or NOT!

Haunted Hills Hayride Haunted Hills Hayride and the Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (17th Annual); N. Versailes, PA. Journey through the woods at our two haunted attractions by wagon or foot for a factor

Pumpkin Fest 2016 OCTOBER 1- 30 SAT & SUN • 11AM-5PM

$4 per person (2 and under FREE)

Fright farm FRI, SAT & SUN SEPTEMBER 23 - OCTOBER 30 $20 per person ($15 on Sunday). Not recommended for young children. 12 & under must be accompanied by an adult.

Field Trips OCTOBER 1- 31 MON - FRI • 9AM-3PM Amazing concessions, now featuring wood fired brick oven pizza!

Private bonFIres available! Off US Route 19 on Cheeseman Road, Portersville, PA For details, directions & reservations call 724/368-3233 or email jen@cheesemanfarm.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

of fright and fear. Karaoke/DJ, live bands; Benefits the Autism Society of Pittsburgh. For more info visit: hauntedhillshayride. com/ 724-382-8296; Facebook: Haunted Hills Hayride.

Hell’s Hollow Haunt Hell’s Hollow Haunt, located on a creepy back road in mercer, pa. Is “gonna scare the hell outa ’ ya’”. Three scares in all, the bloody barn has three levels of terror and the haunted haywagon of horror takes you thru the hell’s hollow forest and swamp. Thrown in for shitz and giggles is the frightening field of corn. Combo pass for adults is $20.00 And kids 12 and under are $13.00. Coupons available at www.Hellshollowhaunt.Com. Call fror group pricing (13+) 724-662-1999


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Hundred Acres Manor Hundred Acres Manor named “Pittsburgh’s Best Haunted House” by HauntWorld Magazine has been featured on The Travel Channel, USA Today, Forbes, LA Times and named “One of The Best Haunted Houses in America.” Featuring six haunted attractions for one low price and two multi-room escape rooms.

Palace Theatre In celebration of The Palace Theatre’s 90th Anniversary, we revisit vaudeville. October 25, Adam Trent blends innovative illusions and charming wit to create a show that is part magic, part concert, and part stand-up. October 28, Haunted Hollywood features three silent films by

Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin and Harold Lloyd accompanied by Paragon Ragtime Orchestra.

Kennywood Phantom Fright Nights Phantom Fright Nights returns for its 15th terrifying season! Recognized as one of the nation’s best Halloween events, darkness, fog and fear envelop the park. Hundreds of terrifying monsters roam the grounds, filling seven haunted houses and three scare zones. Experience Kennywood’s legendary coasters and thrill rides like never before! www.Kennywood.com/PFN

ScareHouse Save on ScareHouse tickets when you buy from scarehouse.com. Named as Ameri-

THIS OCTOBER, HAUNTED EXPEDITION1950’S TO A WILL TAKE YOU BACK AMERICA! IC PT POST-APOCALY

face with Be ready to be face to the fallout! by d te the creatures crea horror experience. Life-like interactivea haunted hayride Admission includes tion for one price. ac & walk through attr

CAN YOU SURVIVE TION? THE HAUNTED EXPEDI

SHENOT FARMS, OFF WEXFORD EXIT

WWW.HAUNTEDEXPEDITION.COM NEWS

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ca’s Scariest Haunted House by ABC and one of America’s best Halloween attractions by Travel Channel, USA Today, and director Guillermo del Toro . Open select dates through October 30th, free parking and shuttle service at the Pittsburgh Zoo.

Zombies of the Corn STOP ZOMBIES NOW! Board our zombie battle wagons and shoot live zombies that cant shoot back! If you dare, walk through our 12,000 square foot Zombie Compound and maze. Stay for ghost stories by the bonďŹ re, movies on the big screen, face painting, and taste treats from Grandma zombies kitchen! All ages welcome.

CELEBRATING 90 YEARS WITH THESE CLASSIC

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VAUDEVILLE-STYLE SHOWS! HALLOWEEN MAGIC STARRING ADAM TRENT

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

TUE • OCT 25 • 7PM

$32, $26, $20 Adam Trent, star of Broadway’s The Illusionist, delivers a positive family-friendly, Halloweenthemed magic spectacular packed with original magic, music, comedy and audience participation.

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

FRI • OCT 28 • 7:30PM

Adults $25, $16; Students $12, $8 Three ghostly silent films featured - Buster Keaton’s The Haunted House, Charlie Chaplin’s The Adventurer, and Harold Lloyd’s Haunted Spooks, accompanied live with original orchestral scores and sound effects.

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!


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[ART]

IT’S AN AGGRESSIVELY APOLITICAL TESTIMONY TO WONDERMENT

NEW REALITIES If you think that virtual reality, like video games, is all about guys playing first-person shooter, get into Weird Reality. The VR salon, part of this year’s VIA Festival, aims, in part, to disentangle the medium from what VIA co-founder and artistic director Lauren Goshinski calls “tech-bro culture.” The free salon (held in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University’s Frank-Ratchye Studio for Creative Inquiry) takes place at East Liberty’s Ace Hotel the first three days of the four-day festival. Weird Reality features experimental films, games and artist projects using Oculus Rift, HTV Vive, Microsoft Hololens and Google Cardboard by about 15 national and international artists. Offerings include Milica Zec and Winslow Porter’s installation and VR film Giant, which puts users into the experience of living in a war zone, expanding their potential for empathy. “We’re not just exploring the artistic potential of VR, but topicality,” says Goshinski. New Yorkbased studio Scatter presents CLOUDS, its interactive documentary on art and computer code (with each viewer’s actions creating a unique viewing experience). The Kokoromi collective debuts SUPERHYPERCUBE, a spatial-reasoning game in 3-D. On the absurdist side, there’s Laura Chen’s “communal bathroom experience” Poop. And on Oct. 8, Brooklyn artists Salome Asega and Ayo Okunseinde present the VR version of Iyapo Repository, their resource library for artifacts that “affirm and project the future of peoples of African descent.” While VIA is known for its ticketed music showcases, a host of other cuttingedge performances and exhibits are either free or pay-what-makes-you-happy. At the East Side Bond building, see the exhibit Exquisite Donut, a code-based take on the old game Exquisite Corpse in which artists extend each other’s “digital drawings” on computer monitors sight unseen. On Oct. 7, at the Alloy Studios, see Brooklynbased performance duo FlucT, who use the female body as tool for resistance and exploring power in society, and Houston’s Lisa E. Harris, whose compositions and performances are pushing boundaries in opera. On Oct. 8, on the grounds of East Liberty Presbyterian Church, Baltimore’s Hoesy Corona presents two performances of Nobodies Gala, a short work inviting viewers to join in “nobodying,” the act of “making somebody, nobody.” Oct. 8 also brings the premiere screening of Underground — Afronaut(a), the fourth of local artist Alisha B. Wormsley’s anthologies of experimental and futurist short films “representing a diverse array of racial, sexual and national identities and perspectives.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VIA FESTIVAL Thu., Oct. 6-Sun., Oct. 9. Various venues. www.via-festival.com

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What you might look like playing Kokorimi’s SUPERHYPERCUBE

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Sound thinking: A close-up of the dial on Richard Pell’s Specific Radio.

[ART REVIEW]

EXTRAORDINARY, INDEED {BY AMANI NEWTON}

I

N THE MYTH of the Great Outright Extraordinary!, Richard Pell offers us a space to resist the obvious. In a world where we are so often called upon to divide and conquer ourselves, in which we must stand as either Democrat or Republican, conservative or liberal, Pell’s Artist of the Year show at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts is an aggressively apolitical testimony to wonderment, to thinking about things above and beyond ourselves, to having an answer but insisting on still asking questions. Bring the kids. Pell is a Carnegie Mellon University art professor and co-founder of The Institute for Applied Autonomy, a science and arts collective. He is also founder of the Center for PostNatural History, his nationally publicized, Garfield-based storefront museum exploring phenomenon like genetically modified organisms. But while it has some

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

elements of a contemporary museum, The Myth of the Great Outright Extraordinary! is (as its faux-hype title implies) very carnival sideshow-esque, abandoning most stodgy gallery conventions in lieu of a fully engaging experience. It’s a small exhibit, limited to three rooms, affording the audience plenty of time to interact with and peruse the displays.

THE MYTH OF THE GREAT OUTRIGHT EXTRAORDINARY! continues through Oct. 30. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pfpca.org

Begin with “Don’t Call Me Crazy on the Fourth of July,” Pell’s half-hour 2005 documentary about dearly departed local

eccentric Robert Lansberry. (Here is where I almost wish the show were bigger, with a room dedicated to the viewing. As is, you must stand and watch with headphones attached to the wall.) For three decades, Lansberry could be seen on the streets of Downtown, wearing a sandwich board requesting the return of his mail and the end of mind control. Pell takes what seems like a cut-and-dried subject — a mentally ill and societally neglected war veteran — and veers unexpectedly. It turns out the government (did? has always?) intercepted the mail of millions of civilians, and also conducted many experiments exploring mind control, some on subjects unaware of their participation. Lansberry’s FBI file is revealed to be hundreds of pages long, most of it cruelly redacted. The film is an amazing introduction to the larger exhibit — a kind of Vimeo MC, heralding


“The most popular opera in the world.” A compelling tale of love, intrigue, money, and power in 19th century France.

Photo: David Bachman

the astonishment to follow. Next, step right up to the Specific Radio, a multimedia installation featuring a variety of interviews and song snippets. Soak in and appreciate its design: The radio is mounted on a column like the bottom half of a Victrola, with a flat dial in place of the crank. As you turn the dial, a star-chart wall projection turns with it, each story presented visually as a constellation in the universe of Pell. It’s no wonder he was awarded Artist of the Year. There might have been a million garish or boring ways to present the audio, but Pell found the exact right one. A highlight is “Tom Stone,” about a man whom Pell interviewed while wandering around Indonesia as a college kid. Stone was six years into an eight-year journey to walk across the world, something I didn’t know was possible until I tuned into Specific Radio. (Stone’s travels ended when he was killed by friendly fire while serving as a medic in Afghanistan, a story worthy of its own doc.) The centerpiece of Great Outright Extraordinary is Pell’s Cabinet of Ambiguities. Enter the dark center gallery, and encounter a grand, monolithic, polygonal phone kiosk at the center of the room. Pick up any of the 13 receivers and the corresponding cabinet light will illuminate an object of autobiographical interest to the artist. There’s the small journal once owned by his grandmother as a teenager; listen as Pell tells the tale of her study-abroad encounter with Adolf Hitler. Move on to the homemade 45 that Pell collected and which conceals in its placid vinyl grooves the soul-quaking timbres of loved ones singing to a too-young woman on her deathbed. Afterward, enjoy a cleansing laugh perusing one of Pell’s many Hubbard electrometers, lie detectors used by Scientologists, more ridiculous in person than what you’ve heard. In the corresponding audio (which grows more marvelously distorted as it goes on), Pell informs you that this early model was actually designed after an old carnival game. It’s no contradiction to say that this show, which is largely autobiographical, is focused on looking above and beyond oneself. In an age where the art world is plagued with embarrassing candor and vanity, Pell utilizes his life as a way of exposing our society’s increasingly narrowing thought processes. Here are things he thought he understood, but which reveal themselves anew each time he encounters them. Like the greatest artworks, it is both timeless and of its age, personal and culturally relevant. There is a sister standard for it in literature, Auto-Fiction, manifested at maximum in the global blockbusters of Knausgaard and Ferrante. Pell’s show can be conceived of as Auto-Art.

OCTOBER 8, 11, 14, 16 ǦŠ“Š‰š’Š“™Š— ǦŽˆŠ™˜˜™†—™†™ȖȜȝ ǦȟȜȝǂȟȠȡǂȡȡȡȡ Ǧ•Ž™™˜‡š—Œ”•Š—†ǀ”—ŒǠ™—†›Ž†™† UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD! Sung in English with texts projected above the stage. Season Sponsor

Tuesday Night Sponsor: Ambridge Regional Distribution & Manufacturing Center

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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LET S GET ’

S CIAL )ROORZXVWRƓQGRXWZKDWōVKDSSHQLQJ @PGHCITYPAPER Ř FACEBOOK.COM/PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER METROPOLIS THEATER PRESENTS TWO SOLO PERFORMANCES IN ONE SHOW

“The energy that Hayden projects to the audience is beyond all limits as he draws you in....”

— Robert Heller, Arts Atlanta Scene

“Superb writing and a mesmerizing performance put this in the highest echelons of storytelling....”

— Jonny Sweet, TV Bomb

{PHOTO COURTESY OF AYUMI SAKAMOTO}

Takao Kawaguchi in About Kazuo Ohno

[DANCE]

HOMAGE {BY STEVE SUCATO} THE DANCE FORM known as butoh is built on the idea of a performer finding the soul of the dance within himself. So when Tokyo-based dancer/performance artist Takao Kawaguchi premiered his solo program About Kazuo Ohno in 2013, to honor revered butoh co-founder Kazuo Ohno by literally copying his performances, it stirred controversy within the dance world. Some even viewed it as sacrilege.

Diaryof a POE’S Madman LAST NIGHT Don’t miss this Suzi Bass Award-Nominated performance of Gogol’s mad masterpiece.

Join Edgar Allan Poe as he flees mysterious pursuers and shares his beloved works.

OCTOBER 5–16, 2016 | NEW HAZLETT THEATER TICKETS: MADMAN2016.TIX.COM INFO: MADMAN2016.COM

TAKAO KAWACHUCHI PERFORMS

ABOUT KAZUO OHNO 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 13. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $12-15. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Kawaguchi brings the production to The Andy Warhol Museum’s Warhol Theater on Oct. 13. Kawaguchi, who studied mime-based physical theater and was a member of Kyoto artist collective Dumb Type, says he neither studied with nor saw Ohno perform live, but was struck by Ohno’s performances on film and video. Ohno, who with Tatsumi Hijikata helped launch butoh in Japan in the 1960s, passed away in 2010, at the age of 103. Ever-changing and difficult to define, butoh encompasses diverse moti-

vations, movement and imagery. It is traditionally performed in white body makeup using slow, highly controlled motion. Kawaguchi says About Kazuo Ohno was sparked by his performances of dance and theater works that focused on external relationships between him and the environment. “I was interested in looking within and thought Kazuo Ohno was the best model for that,” says Kawaguchi by phone from Hudson, N.Y., the second stop on a seven-city U.S. tour that ends in Pittsburgh. The 110-minute production in two parts begins with “The Portrait of Mr. O,” Kawaguchi’s own improvisational work inspired by 1970s avant-garde films Ohno made. The second part finds Kawaguchi embodying Ohno in excerpts from masterworks including Admiring La Argentina (1977), My Mother (1981) and 1985’s The Dead Sea, Ghost and Wienerwaltz. Fortunately, Ohno’s debut performances in those works were filmed, and Kawaguchi has recreated Ohno’s movements. He also performs to the original soundtracks. More than mimicry, Kawaguchi says he sees About Kazuo Ohno as a way for him and audiences to engage the great master. Kawaguchi has written: The viewer layers the reminiscence of Kazuo Ohno onto my body, and those who don’t know Ohno’s dance, their imagination of it. The multiple images of Ohno and myself merge, surface and recede in turn. “About Kazuo Ohno” is, in a sense, a duet I dance with the illusory image of Kazuo Ohno. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016


LISTEN UP! You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

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NEXT WEEK!

Star of stage, screen and television in his hugely acclaimed cabaret show from New York’s legendary Café Carlyle

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN MERRIMAN}

Michael Greer (left) and Nick LaMedica in Hand to God, at City Theatre

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2016 BYHAM THEATER

TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412.456.6666 • GROUPS OF 10+ TICKETS: 412.471.6930

ASPINWALL RIVE RFRO NT PARK

O CTO BE R 7–30, 2016

THE RIVER BY JEZ BU TTE RWO RTH ADIL MANSOOR

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

PUPPET REGIME {BY TED HOOVER} SUBLIMATION MIGHT not be healthy, but

it sure is entertaining. At least that’s the message behind Robert Askins’ Hand to God, making its Pittsburgh premiere at City Theatre. Jason is a teenager with problems. He lives in a small, evangelically Christian Texas town, his father has recently died and his mother, Margery, is barely hanging on. The pastor, to help distract her from her grief, asks Margery to stage a student puppet show. It starts out well but soon the puppet Jason creates, Tyrone, becomes the vehicle he uses to express his pain and rage, and everyone becomes a target of Tyrone’s extremely foul-mouthed and blasphemous rants and physical attacks.

HAND TO GOD Part mystery, part gothic thriller, and 100% homage to the art of trout fishing quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

YOU CAN NEVER GO BACK

[PLAY REVIEWS]

continues through Oct. 16. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-37.50. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Askins’ 2015 play is a swift and adrenaline-driven dark comedy which never slows its steady stream of trenchant gags. I think Askins might mean Hand to God to be more than just an extended skit about people making dirty jokes; he attempts to say something about our genetic need to create devils and saviors. But when all’s said and done, Hand to God really is just an extended skit in which the humor purposely goes “too far” … and you know what? That’s not

a bad thing by any means. Tracy Brigden directs with the same pedal-to-the-metal mentality as Askins’ writing. The story’s events could seem a bit silly, but Brigden’s momentum, and expert hand at comedy, never provides an opportunity to stop and think — she straps us in for the ride and sends us hurtling down the track. Nick LaMedica plays Jason — who plays Tyrone — and does a terrific job differentiating between the two; when Jason and Tyrone have a conversation, we find ourselves looking back and forth as though there are two actors on stage. Lisa Velten Smith pulls out all the stops for Margery. It’s a broadly written role with not much nuance, but Smith makes us care for the character. Tim McGeever plays the pastor with the right tone of smug solicitude, while Maggie Carr and Michael Greer, as peers of Jason’s, find comedy gold in sexual excess. Seeing Hand to God could send you straight to Hell, but you’ll be laughing the whole way down. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

POWER PLAYS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} WHEN IT COMES to blood, gore and seriously nauseous mayhem, nobody beats the Bard. Cup-A-Jo Productions and Studio SixTHreeFouR re-imagine Shakespeare’s early play Titus Andronicus in a deceptively cozy outdoor space with live music and literally buckets of blood. It’s difficult to see Titus as a true tragedy,


given that the title character is a dick from the get-go. A ruthless and successful conqueror for ancient Rome, he is nonetheless self-effacing in refusing to seize Caesar’s power, thus engendering distrust among the elites. Equally dim as a patriarch, Titus sacrifices, kills and bad-mouths his scores of kids until there are only two left — both in deep doodoo (as a former U.S. president would have it). Given the widely apportioned shares of arrogance, even among the victims, Titus doesn’t really have any truly sympathetic characters, and has so many nasty ones that there is considerable competition for the title of villain. The front-runner, master schemer Aaron the Moor (coolly played by Christopher S. Collier with a chilling sense of humor), both suffers and proves the racism around him. In a close second, the vengeful Tamora (Samantha A. Camp gone a-vamping), easily manipulates the evil but clueless emperor (the dependably stern Everett Lowe).

TITUS ANDRONICUS continues through Oct. 7. Cup-A-Jo Productions at Studio SixTHreeFouR, 634 N. Sheridan Ave., East Liberty. $10-20. cupajoproductions.com

And our hero? Brett Sullivan Santry enjoyably chews the scenery as Titus descends into a madness that is more efficacious than his original sanity. Also notable are Connor McNelis and Andy Hickly as Tamora’s loathsome spawn; Jessie Wray Goodman as the beauteous, piteous Lavinia; and Bruce Story-Camp as a series of nice but quickly dead guys. Cup-a-Jo founder Joanne Lowe directs her original adaptation with an eye toward contemporary relevance. Choreography by Liz Tripoli nicely bookends the tightly paced show. Kim Barry of Studio SixTHreeFouR, as both art director and executive producer, showcases her studio and her historic family home, built in 1896. Much applause for original jazz-oriented rock composed and conducted by Michael Kolczynski. Written by a young Shakespeare for his bear-baiting-loving 16th-century audiences, Titus Andronicus is short on logic but long in stagecraft and action, and most amenable to its latest iteration. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

STRAIN CHECK

lacking the vitality of language to raise it to such standards, resorts to gratuitous fbombs and homophobic vitriol to conjure a sense of passion. The dialogue sounds like Edward Albee and Arthur Miller tossed into a blender with rocks, and set on frappé. The plot, concerning an aging, alcoholic playwright has-been and his daughter, a theatrical wannabe, reeks of predictability. Martin Giles (David) valiantly tries to free his character from the tendentiousness of the script, and creates some inspired scenes, but Feiffer keeps the players too shackled to her devices to surprise us. From the outset, we can guess how the story will end, and it does. For some reason, Cathryn Dylan (Ella), is given a cartoonish persona during the first act, nodding hyperbolically to David’s ravings like a chittering sidekick. Ella is all grown up in Act II, five years later, but her evolution, and David’s, happens entirely off-stage, leaving us largely without empathy. Imagine Hamlet with the middle three acts removed. What we do get is a lot of trash-can slamming, drinking and drugs, all of which feel like cheap props used to substitute for what stronger writing normally provides. Stephanie-Mayer Staley (scenic design) and Dan Kendgia (light design) acutely evoke the avocado-and-dirty-orange patina of the 1970s in which David’s apartment is frozen, much like his talent. He is dying in this space, as anyone would.

atre’s production of Luv, an absurdist comedy by Murray Schisgal. The setup is simple, if not frantic: Harry Berlin (a perfectly manic Art DeConciliis) is ready to leap to his death from a pedestrian bridge when his former best friend Milt Manville (a cheerfully hapless Greg Caridi) happens upon the scene and stops him. Despondent over the way their lives have turned out, the two men bond and bicker until Milt comes up with a seemingly ingenious solution to their problems: The lonely Harry will elope with Milt’s restless wife, Ellen (scene-stealer Mary Meyer), freeing Milt to pursue other interests (i.e., his mistress). But as these schemes often go, nothing works out quite how the men plan. Little Lake’s former artistic director Sunny Disney Fitchett helms this production, and she slips back into her behindthe-scenes role with ease. The three-person cast works well together, and while none of the characters is particularly likable, their overwrought interactions never fail to generate a laugh. The set design is also top-notch. Although Luv

THEIR OVERWROUGHT INTERACTIONS NEVER FAIL TO GENERATE A LAUGH.

takes place in New York City, the stage — which is fashioned into an understated yet beautiful suspension bridge — has a decidedly Pittsburgh flavor, a choice that makes this show Little Lake’s own. The biggest detriment to Luv is time itself. The play was first produced in 1964, and many of the references sprinkled throughout the show, while whipsmart and relevant half a century ago, will be lost on most modern audiences. Additionally, a crux of the first act is the difficulty Milt faces in pursuing a divorce from Ellen; these days, in an era when couples marry and divorce on a whim, this rings a little hollow. Luv is the sort of play that might have been daring and bawdy in its time, but is rather quaint and antiquated in retrospect.

LUV continues through Oct. 15. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $13.75-21.75. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

Nevertheless, the cast is winning, and the laughs just keep on coming, so any shortcomings soon become easy to overlook. Luv might not be all you need, but it is certainly a fabulous journey. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

I’M GONNA PRAY FOR YOU SO HARD continues through Oct. 16. The REP at Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-29. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Director Robert Turano starts the play with David’s volume at 10, and Ella’s at one. These levels will reverse, but the arc of the drama is warped: The first act is 30 minutes too long and the second is 30 minutes too short. Again, the fault is the author’s, not the cast and crew’s. This is still an entertaining show, as we do come away feeling the pathos of these two lives. But we can only pray for Ms. Feiffer that her next work will better fulfill her potential as an accomplished playwright. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY STUART SHEPPARD} I’M GONNA PRAY For You So Hard (at Point

Park’s REP) is a 2015 play that desperately wants to be a mid-20th-century American drama. But the playwright, Halley Feiffer, NEWS

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THREE PLAY {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} ROMANCE IS IN the air at Little Lake The-

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.06-10.13.16 Full events listed online at www.pghcitypaper.com Originally commissioned by the Carnegie Museum of Art in 1995 for its Made in America exhibit, Some Assembly Required is one of Attack Theatre’s oldest and most reprised productions — yet it’s new every time. It has been performed throughout Pittsburgh, nationally and internationally. On Oct. 7-9, Attack returns to Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery to reprise the audience-interactive program. The idea behind Some Assembly Required is for Attack’s dancers

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA RIAL}

Peter Kope and Michele de la Reza of Attack Theatre

and musicians, along with attendees, to co-create an original work inspired by an art exhibition — in this instance, Architecture With and Without Le Corbusier, showcasing work by architect José Oubrerie, professor emeritus at the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University. The exhibition of books, videos, sketches, paintings, photos and models of Oubrerie’s architectural works runs through Nov. 13. Attack’s 75-minute program will feature the troupe’s five dancers, a trio of musicians including Ian Green and Cello Fury’s Simon Cummings, along with Attack directors Michele de la Reza and Peter Kope. The performers will engage with the audience in conversations and improvisations to create, in real time, an original dance work for a one-time performance.

{ART (DETAIL) BY TODD PINKHAM}

^ Sat., Oct. 8: Laughing While Levitating

friday 10.07

BY STEVE SUCATO

6 p.m. Fri., Oct. 7; 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 8; and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 9. CMU campus, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Admission is “Pay what moves you.” Reservations suggested at www.attacktheatre.com/sar.

The month month-long long festival for art u using repurposed materials wraps this weekend with events including Oct. 7’s Fashion Extravaganza; Stephanie Senge’s Food Mandala and an Artisan and Farmers’ Market, both Oct. 8, in Market Square; Oct. 9’s public-art walking tour of the Hill District; and more. A complete schedule is at www.renewfestival.com.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

ART “Abstraction through decay … architecture in collapse.” The phrases reflect both the collaboration between artists Seth Clark and Jason Forck and its products. After a year-long Idea Furnace residency at Pittsburgh Glass Center, collage artist Clark and glass artist Forck present Dissolution. The exhibit showcases innovative work including large-scale blown-glass collages and architectural installations of wood, metal and glass. See what these two up-and-coming artists have cooked up at tonight’s opening reception, part of Penn Avenue’s monthly gallery crawl, Unblurred. Bill O’Driscoll Reception: 6-9 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Jan. 16. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-365-2145 or www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

MUSIC City of Asylum wraps its inaugural Jazz Poetry Month with three different free programs of avant-garde jazz, all incorporating acclaimed guitarist Mary Halvorson. Tonight, it’s a solo show by Halvorson, whom the Jazz Journalists Association recently named Guitarist of the Year. On Saturday, the City of Asylum tent hosts Thomas Fujiwara

& The Hook Up, a five-piece including Halvorson. And on Sunday, the month-long series concludes as Halvorson and drummer Fujiwara join bassist Michale Formanek to perform as Thumbscrew. BO Halvorson solo: 8 p.m. Fujiwara & The Hook Up: 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 8. Thumbscrew: 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 9. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. www.alphabetcity.org

STAGE The River is about a man, two women and fishing. Or is it? Part of the lure of this 2014 work by acclaimed British playwright Jez Butterworth is that the fisherman in whose remote cabin it’s set keeps both the women and the audience guessing what he’s about. Quantum Theatre (which previously produced Butterworth’s Parlour Song) stages the Pittsburgh premiere on the banks of the Allegheny, in the (indoor) dry dock of brand-new Aspinwall Riverfront Park. Adil Mansoor directs Andrew William Smith, Daina Michelle Griffith and Siovhan Christensen. The first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 30. 285 River Ave., Aspinwall. $18-51. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com ^ Fri., Oct. 7: Dissolution {ART BY SETH CLARK AND JASON FORCK}


CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER presents

Join us Oct. 14 for our next NO-KIDS night! Celebrate the Halloween season, discover the science of re-animation, and sing along with Rocky Horror classics! {PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER MULL}

Live music, cash bars, lots of science fun, and no kids!

^ Fri., Oct. 7: The River

saturday 10.08

Cost: $10 in advance $15 at the door

TALK While he’s a long-serving congressman from Georgia, John Lewis remains best known as a key leader of the civil-rights movement, with pivotal roles in the March on Washington and 1965’s Bloody Sunday protest in Selma, Ala. Lewis is also co-author, with Andrew Aydin and illustrator Nate Powell, of March, the acclaimed, bestselling trilogy of graphic novels about the Movement. With book three newly out, the ToonSeum presents today’s A Conversation with Congressman John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, a free event at the August Wilson Center. And tonight, Sweetwater Center for the Arts hosts a ticketed event, with a cocktail reception, booksigning and talk by the three authors; the $50 ticket includes one book from the series. BO 2-4 p.m. (August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown; free). Evening event: 7-10 p.m. (Sewickley Academy, 315 Academy Dr., Sewickley; $50). 412-741-4405 or www.sweetwaterartcenter.org

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

FESTIVAL It’s gone way beyond bathrobes and White Russians: Pittsburgh Abides, {PHOTO COURTESY OF SANDI VILLARREAL} that annual homage to all ^ Sat., Oct. 8: A Conversation with Congressman things The Big Lebowski, keeps John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell upping the ante. This year’s event, Obviously You Are Not a Golfer, takes over both floors of Spirit Lounge with video projections, Lebowski-themed décor and people dressed as the Dude, Walter and what have you. The immersive environment comes complete with zipline, iron lung, trivia, In-N-Out-style burgers, costume contest and dancecycle competition. And because the Coen brothers’ cult classic provides endless material, new attractions include a mini-golf course with holes designed by local artists; live music by The Fucking bEagles Brothers (for heckling) and Charlie Hustle and the Grifters as the Dude’s Tape Deck; and a contest for performances of your two-minute version of the film. BO 3 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $18-20. pghabides.com CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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SHORT LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

^ Sat., Oct. 8: La Traviata

$5 TICKETS 21 + EVENT FRIDAY, OCT. 7TH AT 9:00 PM Excuses Bar & Grill

2526 East Carson St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 WWW.ARISPAUL. COM arispaulmusic

Presents

ART Todd Pinkham’s paintings are “caught between characteristics of the Pop Artists and the Abstract Expressionists.” His new show, Laughing While Levitating, at BoxHeart Gallery, promises works “rich with imagery of heroes, deities and monsters” and which “act as translators for all the things his conscious mind cannot grasp.” Pinkham is a professor at California University of Pennsylvania. The opening reception is tonight. IF 5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 4. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

OPERA

Written and Directed by Layon Gray Inspired by the 1939 Harlem Rens Basketball Team

•••S H O W T I M E S••• Friday, October 14 • 7:30PM Saturday, October 15 • 3:00PM Saturday, October 15 • 7:30PM Sunday, October 16 • 3:00PM Tickets: All Seats $40 Senior rates available for persons 65 or older. Group rates of 10 or more available. Email newhorizontheater@yahoo.com, call (412) 431-0773 or visit Dorsey’s Records on Frankstown Ave. or visit brownpapertickets.org

KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER 5941 Penn Avenue | Pittsburgh PA 15206 For more info visit newhorizontheater.org 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

La Traviata is the world’s most frequently performed opera. But in composing it, Verdi created a special challenge for whoever sings the lead role of Violetta. “It’s kind of written for two different voices,” says Danielle Pastin, the nationally known, Pittsburgh-based soprano who tackles the role in Pittsburgh Opera’s new production. But the Brighton Heights resident is prepared for both the first act’s rapid high notes and the more lyrical singing in acts two and three; after all, she’s sung Violetta before, with Syracuse Opera. Just as important, Pastin embraces Violetta herself. Verdi’s heroine, a famed courtesan, is ^ Sat., Oct. 8: Pittsburgh Abides a mature woman who doesn’t back down in defending her independence or her right to choose a partner. “I love the fight in her,” says Pastin. Pastin trained with Pittsburgh Opera as a Resident Artist and made her debut at the Met in 2011. She’ll sing Violetta opposite tenor Cody Austin as her lover, Alfredo, whose wealthy father opposes the match. The production at the Benedum Center is stage-directed by Chas Rader-Shieber, with the orchestra conducted by Christian Capocaccia. The opera will be sung in Italian, with an English translation projected above the stage. And Pastin promises that even those who’ve seen La Traviata before will enjoy a big surprise planned for Act III. BO 8 p.m. Also Oct. 11, 14 and 16. 237 Seventh Ave., Downtown. $12-159. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: City of Play’s Come Out and Festival in Schenley Plaza, Oakland CRITIC: Sharmaine Wilkinsburg WHEN: Sat.,

Play

Gamble, 30, from

[DAILY RUNDOWN]

Oct. 01

I think the point [of the festival] was to have a range of games for all ages. The games were very well thought out. For some of them the point of the game was to get children to be more active and interactive. I did Bad Neighbor, where the objective was to clear out and have the least amount of trash in your quadrant. Then I played Word Racers, where you basically got a three- to five-letter word and you ran back and forth to put the boxes in order according to the word that you got, and that was fun. The game I liked best was The Forger. It was two different artists and about how to tell who was the original artist of each illustration — it was pretty interesting. But I like the fact that it was just a lot of people from various backgrounds that came to one generalized location and just had fun with each other. B Y IAN F L ANAGAN

COMEDY With his first special on Comedy Central, Live from Radio City Music Hall, newly released, it’s safe to say Brian Regan has reached unprecedented popularity. He has had 27 performances on The Late Show With David Letterman and also a role in 2014’s Chris Rock film Top Five. Most recently Regan appeared on Jerry Seinfeld’s web show “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” and performed on The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon. The comedian stops by Heinz Hall tonight on his national tour. IF 8 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $45-50. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

thursday 10.13

A newsletter you’ll actually want to read.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FRIEDMAN-BERGMAN}

^ Sat., Oct. 8: Brian Regan

WORDS After penning young-adult novels including If I Stay, which was adapted for the screen in 2014, bestselling author Gayle Forman took a plunge into adult fiction with her latest work. Though her previous novels and writings for Seventeen magazine typically focused on youth, her acclaimed new novel Leave Me explores the challenges of motherhood. Forman’s national tour stops by the Penguin Bookstore, in Sewickley, tonight for a conversation with Jayne Adair, former executive director of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. IF 6 p.m. 417 Beaver St., Sewickley. A copy of the book ($26.95) is your ticket. 412-741-3838 or www.penguinbookshop.com

STAGE

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BASETRACK Live arrives in Pittsburgh after visiting 22 cities across the nation. Based on the real experiences of U.S. Marines deployed ^ Thu., Oct. 13: Gayle Forman in Afghanistan, this “multimedia fusion of performance, documentary film and an electro-acoustic score” has been praised as a powerful investigation into the effects of war on soldiers and their family. The New York Times named it a top-10 performance of 2014. Tonight’s show, presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust as part of the Cohen and Grigsby Trust Presents series, is at the Byham Theater. IF 7 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-36. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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WE’D ORDER THE TURTLE SOUP AGAIN FOR THE DELICIOUS BROTH ALONE

NEW DILL {BY MARGARET WELSH} By November, Pittsburgh Pickle Company will have moved production from the kitchen facilities of a Verona church to the former Victor Ravioli Company building, about a half-mile away. That commercial space has a storefront which owners (and brothers) John Patterson, Will Patterson and Joey Robl hope to turn into a deli. More space means more pickles. Their newest client, Giant Eagle, now carries Pittsburgh Pickle Company products in 80 stores. Varieties currently include the Pittsburgh Style Pickle, Fire & Smoke and Dill-Mill.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PICKLE COMPANY}

Pittsburgh Pickle’s Will Patterson, John Patterson and Joe Robl

Not bad for a company that started almost by accident. When the brothers opened their other business, The Beerhive, in the Strip District, they knew they wanted to serve fried pickles. But none of the pickles they found were quite right. “We started making pickles for ourselves,” John Patterson says. “The response was really great. People kept urging us to jar them. We saw potential for that business and it just kind of blossomed.” Pittsburgh Pickle Company officially launched in summer 2014, and has since sold approximately 30,000 jars. As for why the product has been a hit, Patterson notes that the pickles are vinegary rather than salt-heavy, which keeps them crisp, and free from the artificial preservatives used in other brands. Plus, the company’s serendipitous beginnings offer a certain freedom. “Since we didn’t [start out using] a 100-year-old family recipe,” he says, “we weren’t confined to the conventional rules of pickle-making.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more information, visit www.pittsburghpickle.com.

[CORRECTION] Last week’s story about Conflict Kitchen’s Haudenosaunee menu incorrectly classified Hodinöhsö:ni’ as a member of the Iroquois. Hodinöhsö:ni’ is another spelling of Haudenosaunee, which is synonymous with Iroquois.

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{CP PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Fried zucchini with marinara sauce

A WELCOME RETURN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

C

ARMODY’S Restaurant and Lounge operated for 62 years in Franklin Park, becoming the kind of institution that served as an extension of home to its regulars, or was impenetrable to outsiders, depending on your perspective. Carmody’s served veal scallopini, iceberg-lettuce salads and prime rib, and was renowned for its turtle soup. When it ladled its last bowl, in 2014, longtime customers wept. The two brothers who’ve opened Carmody’s Grill on Neville Island do not play to nostalgia; in fact, they’ve gone out of their way to present an updated appearance, complete with exposed brick, steel beams, chalkboards and barnwood. They’ve updated most of the menu, too, with items such as balsamic chicken flatbread and fish tacos. But a few things,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

along with the name (which rhymes with “comedy”), will be familiar to the turtle-soup crowd of yore. First among these, in fact, is turtle soup. The Creole-style broth is thick and hearty, deep auburn in color with a

CARMODY’S GRILL 4905 Grand Ave., Neville Island. 412-458-1813 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-midnight; Sun. noon-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $5-11; sandwiches and salads $8-16; entrees $10-20 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED glossy sheen; it had a tangy, mildly spicy flavor strangely — though not unpleasantly — reminiscent of Chinese egg-drop soup. The finely shredded turtle meat

was, frankly, tough and stringy, and vegetables sparse, but we’d order this soup again for the delicious broth alone. Another throwback, fried zucchini, was also pretty good. Broad planks were cut just thick enough to retain the zucchini’s vegetal character within a fluffy, crispy batter that coated lightly in some areas, but in others built up to a crunchy crust. This style isn’t unique, but we’ve rarely had it done so well. The marinara for dipping was a little overcooked for our tastes — we prefer something more brightly tomatoey with such a light vegetable — but the horseradish sauce had some real presence, and we appreciated that lemon wedges and a shaker of Parmesan were provided as a matter of course. Beyond the soup, and befitting its new suffix, Carmody’s Grill serves mostly


a straight bar menu of finger foods and sandwiches, although there are entrees: prime rib every night, plus two or three specials. We sampled the prime rib in a French-dip sandwich. The big Mancini’s roll — a golden-brown hoagie-style one — was an excellent choice, neither too crusty nor too insubstantial, and the jus was simply perfect. Jus is usually a failed balancing act between savory and salty, with robust beef flavor rarely keeping up with the punishing bite of sodium. But Carmody’s delivered clean beefiness in a clear jus so perfectly salted it was good enough to sip. Our only complaint about this sandwich — alas, a major one — was that there was not enough actual prime rib. Our other meat sandwich, the eightounce steak-blend burger, delivered on its promise of big, beefy flavor. The kitchen overshot our order of medium rare, resulting in less juiciness than we’d hoped for, but the meat remained tender, and the bacon on top added chew and smoke without hiding the burger’s flavor. The pretzel roll was toasted, improving its texture so that it presented its patty well. For vegetarians, Carmody’s black-bean burger is a solid option. Its creamy, nottoo-rustic texture played well with the buttery brioche bun, and dollops of mild tomato salsa and sour cream added tang and richness without actually pulling the flavors in a Mexican direction. Meatloaf contained more loaf than meat, with bread binder creating a texture that was not exactly smooth, but nowhere near the crumbliness of a burger patty. There was good herbal flavor, though, and the edges had developed a nice crust for an appealing contrast to the center. The gravy was perhaps too thick, and the mashed potatoes were lumpy. While this wasn’t an issue for us, it’s not a universal preference. Sides are a big part of the pub-grub experience, and Carmody’s acquitted itself well. Fries were standard pub-cut, but not especially greasy, and had a pleasing crispness at their edges. Onion rings appeared to be made with the same batter as the zucchini, with similarly pleasing results (although it worked best with the thicker rings; thinner ones got lost in the coating). And kudos to the kitchen for including “power slaw,” a hearty amalgam that incorporated au courant Brussels sprout slices and big hunks of red cabbage. But these items had traces of bitterness that a too-sweet dressing attempted to mask, rather than merely counterbalance. Carmody’s keeps a beloved name and tradition alive, while ably adapting to 21st-century standards and preferences. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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BENJAMIN’S

[PERSONAL CHEF]

WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR

bar • billiards • burgers

HONEY ALMOND GRANOLA {BY EMILY LEVENSON}

Featuring Our World Class Chef

When I think about breakfast, my first thought definitely isn’t honey almond granola. It is eggs, hashed browns, pancakes and other savory delicacies — all of the things that I can’t eat right now. I could very easily wallow in self-pity, but I’d rather enjoy this homemade granola. The first time I made it, I used whole almonds and ground them up in a blender. I was aiming to have some good chunks of almonds floating around in the granola, but ended up with more of an almond meal. Turns out, I preferred it that way — sans chunks. So the second time I made it (I’m on my second batch already), I skipped the almonds and went straight for the almond meal. I already had it on hand, and it saved me from washing more dishes — always a bonus. If you’re feeling frisky and want to liven things up, add in some fresh fruit, dried fruit (such as raisins, cherries or cranberries) or whatever else tickles your fancy. I’ll just be over here, pouring myself another bowl of this honey almond granola and smiling, because it’s seriously scratching every granola itch I’ve ever had.

Adan Morales John Marcinizyn (Latin Guitar)

Friday Nights 6:30-8:30pm.

MONDAY & THURSDAY $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________ TUESDAY Burger, Beer, & Bourbon $11.95 ____________________ WEDNESDAY Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________ FRIDAY Sangria $3 ____________________ SATURDAY & SUNDAY 10:30am-3pm Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm

900 Western Ave. North side 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com INGREDIENTS • 3 cups rolled oats • 1 cup almond meal (or crushed almonds) • ½ tsp. salt • 1/3 cup brown sugar (or coconut sugar) • 1/3 cup honey • 2 tbsp. oil • 1 tsp. vanilla extract INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a rimmed 9-by-13-inch baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, add oats, almond meal, salt and brown sugar, and stir to combine. In a small microwave-safe bowl, add honey and oil. Heat in microwave for 15-20 seconds, or until honey has become easier to pour; add vanilla extra. Pour honey mixture into oat mixture and stir until incorporated. Transfer to baking sheet and spread out evenly. Bake for 15 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Allow to cool completely. Break into smaller chunks and transfer to a large air-tight container. Can be stored in refrigerator for up to weeks. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Emily Levenson, of Mount Lebanon, is a therapist turned holistic health coach specializing in food sensitivities. www.emilylevenson.com WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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tcut to Mexico! The shor/

[ON THE ROCKS]

TOAST IN STYLE How to plan a successful wedding bar {BY DREW CRANISKY} I’VE REACHED that magical and over-

1000 SUTHERLAND DR. | PITTSBURGH, PA 15205 412-787-8888 • WWW.PLAZAAZTECA.COM

@nayburgh17

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LINES photos with us! This week’s #CPReaderArt theme is LETTERS. Tag your photos of letters from anywhere in Pittsburgh with #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram our favorites!

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whelming age where everyone I know has decided to tie the knot. My girlfriend and I have our wedding routine down pat: She digs up the invitation to find the address, we grab a card and stuff it with cash, and I hope the one shirt I like to wear isn’t still dirty from the last wedding. The past couple of years have been filled with cookie tables and joyous shrieks at the opening beats of “Love Shack.” Not surprisingly, I tend to pay special attention to the bars. And just as many couples are forgoing other trappings of “ traditional” weddings (I haven’t seen a painfully awkward gartertoss in years), bars are moving in all sorts of interesting directions. I’ve been to brunch weddings with Bloody Mary bars and farm weddings with signature beers brewed by the groom. Some couples opt for full-service bars with made-to-order cocktails, while others (like my cousin) just fill a couple wheelbarrows with Yuengling and Bud Light Lime. Having bartended a few weddings and attended quite a few more, I humbly offer a few suggestions to make your wedding bar memorable no matter what approach you take. Calculating how much booze to buy is tricky, even for the most experienced caterer. A good rule of thumb is to budget one drink per person per hour, and to dis-

tribute the total number of drinks evenly among beer, wine and cocktails. State stores will accept returns on unopened bottles of wines and spirits — so don’t be afraid to budget a little extra. The best wedding bars balance the personality of the couple with a drinks selection that has a wide appeal. If you’re planning an open bar (which seems to be the norm), don’t feel obligated to offer a huge selection: No one is picky when they’re drinking for free. One or two signature cocktails, a red and a white wine, and a couple of beers are all you need. Pick food-friendly, inexpensive wines and a few contrasting beers. If you do two cocktails, it’s nice to do one light and one dark — a gin punch and a Manhattan, for instance. And don’t forget about non-drinkers. When I bartended an outdoor June wedding, the fresh peach iced tea was more popular than beer. On that note, remember seasonality as you plan your bar. Though not everyone drinks with the seasons, you can bet that milk stout will go untouched at a summer wedding. Ultimately, however, your wedding should be filled with the people and things that make you happy. So whether you have a dozen craft beers or a few pitchers of margaritas, choose drinks that mean something to you. And make sure there’s plenty of them.

DISTRIBUTE THE TOTAL NUMBER OF DRINKS EVENLY AMONG BEER, WINE AND COCKTAILS.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016


. t a e p e .R t a E . t Mee 335 E. Main St. • Carnegie, PA 412.275.3637 • EatBakn.com NEWS

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S T H G G I N I L FRRIV

BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, we order the same cocktail at two different bars for a friendly head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste them both and tell us what you like about each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, at celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: DIRTY MARTINI

A AILY D

VS.

Kelly’s Bar & Lounge

Element

6012 Centre Ave, East Liberty

5744 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside

INGREDIENTS: Hendrick’s gin, dry vermouth, olive brine, two green olives OUR TAKE: The firm green olives and healthy dose of salt from the olive brine make this martini refreshing and complex. Hendrick’s falls on the softer, more floral side of gins, and makes for a good choice for (almost) straight drinking. Served ice-cold and with no frills, this is exactly the kind of martini Don Draper would choose.

INGREDIENTS: Hendrick’s gin, dry vermouth, lime juice, olive brine, three green olives OUR TAKE: The lime juice gives the botanicals in the gin a lift, bringing out the rose- and cucumber-infused flavors. The acid in the citrus also balances the saltiness of the olives. Using dry vermouth makes this cocktail, served ice-cold, booze-forward but not too harsh. Extra olives are always a nice treat after a strong drink.

With 22 craft breweries, locally grown hops, and the freshest great lake in our backyard, it’s a wonder you didn’t

BREWCATION

This week on Five Minutes in Food History: Part two of the history of Isaly’s, a once-beloved local chain of dairies and delis. www.pghcitypaper.com

wet your whistle sooner. Come see what’s on tap.

BEERINBUFFALO.COM

BIG DITCH BREWING CO.

O Bordeaux, One One Scotch, One Beer O Illahe Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley Retail Price: $20/glass, $80/bottle It’s very drinkable and fruit-forward. You get the blackberries right up front, plus it’s got sexy legs. It’s my favorite on the wine list, and we have 90 bottles that we sell by the glass.” — RECOMMENDED BY ELIZABETH JOSEFOSKI, BARTENDER AT SONOMA GRILLE

RHEA ANNA

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

Illahe Pinot Noir 2014 is available by the glass and bottle at Sonoma Grille, Downtown.


A

A

Building vibrant communities and supporting environmentally responsible practices. Put your values where your mouth is. Sustainable Pittsburgh Restaurants is a program of Sustainable Pittsburgh. [ Details at sustainablePGHrestaurants.org [ 412.258.6647 [

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ORIGIN STORY {BY AL HOFF}

THE FILM IS AN INTIMATE AND COMPELLING ACCOUNT OF A MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE

The release of Nate Parker’s docudrama The Birth of a Nation is well timed in that there is currently a lot of public discussion about race relations in this country. And no thoughtful discussion can ignore the institutional racism of America’s past. Parker reaches back nearly 200 years to tell the story of Nat Turner, a Virginia slave who in 1831 led a successful two-day slave rebellion. (It was “successful” in that it happened at all; the uprising ended badly, and any fruits of the event would be years in ripening.)

Nat Turner (Nate Parker) speaks some truth.

CP APPROVED

Parker, as well as directing, producing and co-writing Birth, also stars as Nat Turner. The film begins with a lengthy prologue suggesting Turner was a chosen one, destined to be a visionary and a prophet; more prosaically, it establishes that as a child, Turner was taught to read, primarily the Bible. As an adult, Turner earns extra money for his cash-poor master (Armie Hammer) by preaching to slaves at nearby plantations. In particular, he is tasked to select portions of the Bible that reinforce the slaves’ submission. But the visits to other farms show Turner the scope of slavery, and how other workers are treated even worse than he is, with grotesque physical abuse. But the film makes an effort to relate all manner of pain, including the dissolution of slave families, and the psychic impacts of being treated as property and having no agency or personal freedom. The film is best when it is a straightforward docudrama. Attempts at lyricism and some of the “visionary” material are more clunky than inspiring. (The less said about the angel the better.) In fairness, it’s easier to depict and make a case for an awakening rooted in anger, rather than religiosity, even if both can manifest in righteous violence. Birth has some good performances, including Aja Naomi King, as Parker’s wife, and some of the smaller moments really deliver emotionally, be it horror, sweetness or sadness. (Most of these could have stood on their own, without the intrusive and obvious musical score.) It’s an American story that deserves recounting, which occurs here, despite some of Parker’s missteps. Starts Fri., Oct. 7

The young men of Beautiful Thing

A GAY TIME {BY AL HOFF}

T

tional Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, now known as Reel Q, runs Thu., Oct. 6, through Sat., Oct 15. It features 17 feature-length narrative and documentary films, three programs of shorts, and opening- and closing-night parties. The opening-night film is Strike a Pose (7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 6), Ester Gould and Reijer Zwaan’s documentary catching up with the six surviving dancers from Madonna’s 1990 Blonde Ambition tour. (You might have also seen the men in the film Truth or Dare.) Twenty-five years later, the men recount the thrill of that experience, before sorting out how things went wrong after their brush with fame. Some battled drugs and depression, others diagnoses of HIV. Their moves are still great, the memories are still candid, and maybe pack a hanky or two. Keep the tissues handy for Jonathan (5:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 15), a German drama from Piotr Lewandowski about a young man who, while tending his dying father, discovers his dad is gay. This truth is at the root of some messy family history,

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HE 31ST ANNUAL Pittsburgh Interna-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

and complicates further the already distant relationship between the two men. But decent folk have a tendency to rally, even in the face of — or perhaps because of — difficult emotional times. A film about sickness — and healing. Healing is a steep mountain to climb in Deborah Esquenazi’s documentary Southwest of Salem (6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 8). It recounts how four Latina lesbians were convicted for a sexual assault on two young children whom they were baby-sitting. Much of the 1994 case turned on the women’s “deviant” sexuality, as well as the still-smoldering “satanic panic” of the late 1980s. Firstperson interviews with the women, their families and their legal advocates make this an intimate and compelling account of a miscarriage of justice. In Burn, Burn, Burn (4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 9), from Chanya Button, two thirtysomething women take the ashes their deceased friend on a prescribed tour of Great Britain; their late pal narrates from prerecorded videos. Turns out that this journey is less about him and more about his

attempts, from beyond the grave, to prod the gals to get their acts together. A funny, sad-sweet look at modern friendship, with great performances from Chloe Pirrie and Laura Carmichael (a.k.a. Lady Edith from Downton Abbey). Also screening at the festival is a revisit with two pioneering films from 1996: the black lesbian drama Watermelon Woman and the working-class romance Beautiful Thing. The closing night feature is Justin Kelly’s King Cobra, a new docudrama about porn star Sean Paul Lockhart, and the scandals that unfolded around his career; the film features James Franco and Christian Slater. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

All films screen at Harris Theater, Downtown. Single tickets are $9. Opening night is $15 and includes a party at Bricolage Productions. Closing night is $15 for film and dancing at the Pierce Studio (805 Liberty Ave.). Passes and student discounts are also available. See www.reelQ.org for complete schedule and more information.


GR O S S

FILM CAPSULES CP

HI L ARIO U S ,

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

,

has to be experienced to be believed.” – Consequence of Sound

GIRL ASLEEP. In Rosemary Myers’ new adaptation of the stage play, a 15-year-old Australian girl in the 1970s isn’t anxious to grow up. Starts Fri., Oct. 7. Regent Square

PHANTASM: RAVAGER. David Hartman directs this final installment of the Phantasm saga. Reggie, Mike and The Tall Man all return for more horror thrills. Starts Fri., Oct. 7. Hollywood

REPERTORY DONNIE DARKO. Writer/director Richard Kelly’s 2001 debut is a hard-to-categorize tale about a doomed teen. Over 28 days, Donnie (Jake Gyllenhaal) struggles to understand his suburban world, which is tilting toward madness, steered by a giant rabbit named Frank. Kelly excels at capturing Donnie’s dread with verve, yet he and Gyllenhaal ground this anxiety so firmly in the confusion and inarticulateness of ordinary adolescence that there’s no easy fantasy loophole. A hybrid of time-travel treatise, ’80s snapshot, troubled-kid drama and dark comedy. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 5. AMC Loews Waterfront (Al Hoff)

CP

,

w e i r d at heart.

If Barton Fink was made by John Waters, this is the sort of movie he’d write.”

THE GREASY STRANGLER. Jim Hoskins directs this new hoping-to-be-cult-fave horror comedy, in which a father and son, who give “disco walking tours,” fall for the same woman. Also, there is an oily weirdo who is stalking people at night. 11:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 7, and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 8. Hollywood MIDDLE SCHOOL: THE WORST YEARS OF MY LIFE. How fun would it be to break every rule in school? Find out in Steve Carr’s comedy starring Griffin Gluck. Starts Fri., Oct. 7

DISGUSTING deviant and pleasurably

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN. Tate Taylor directs this adaptation of the recent popular thriller, in which a woman becomes obsessed with her former husband’s domestic life. Emily Blunt, Haley Bennett and Justin Theroux star. Starts Fri., Oct. 7

The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant late 1960s with a textbook boy-meets-girl-thenloses-girl plot energized by Beatles tunes, most delivered in elaborate song-and-dance set pieces. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 6. Melwood

– Indiewire’s The Playlist

Martín Esquivel-Hernandez traveled more than 5,000 miles to be with his family, but five years later, he faces deportation. Read his story on City Paper ’s new online-only longform feature at www.pghcitypaper.com.

THEY WILL HAVE TO KILL US FIRST. Johanna Schwartz’s recent informative documentary follows several Malian musicians who have been forced to flee Timbuktu and regions in the north after instability leads to an Islamist takeover. There, under newly imposed Sharia law, all forms of entertainment are banned. The performers — who include both a group of young men with a more modern sound and older women who perform traditional music — bemoan the state of things (“If you take away music, Mali is dead”), while refusing to give up. Some performers travel to the U.K. to raise awareness; others lead songs in refugee camps. An eventual return to Timbuktu is bittersweet: The city has been hard hit, but a hastily arranged street concert underscores how deeply music is felt in this culture. Sembène – The Film & Arts Festival, in partnership with City of Asylum, presents the film; Dr. Jean-Jacques Sène, of Chatham University, will lead the Q&A. In French and other languages, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 6. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free with RSVP at www.alphabetcity. org (AH)

©THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE / GREASY STRANGLER LLC 2016

Starts Fri. 10/7

HOLLYWOOD THEATER DORMONT

1449 POTOMAC AVE, (412) 563-0368 PITTSBURGH

“BEAUTIFUL AND POWERFUL”

DO THE RIGHT THING. Spike Lee’s 1989 dramedy explores various tensions — racial, social, generational, economic — playing out on one Brooklyn street on a hot summer’s day. 9:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 5, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 6. Hollywood

“A RALLYING CRY OF A FILM”

TRICK ’R TREAT. Michael Dougherty’s 2007 spooker weaves together five tales that all take place on one block on Halloween night. Dylan Baker and Anna Paquin are among the cast. 7 p.m. nightly, Fri., Oct.7; Sun., Oct. 9; and Oct. 11-13. Hollywood

“A NEW LANDMARK IN AMERICAN CINEMA”

M. Fritz Lang’s gorgeously shot 1931 film details a working-class Berlin community’s search for a child-killer, in which the horror of the crime causes police and criminals to work together. Peter Lorre is indelible as the predator, his portrayal both horrifying and pitiable. In German, with subtitles. Oct. 7-9, Mon., Oct. 10, and Thu., Oct. 13. Row House Cinema (AH)

“POTENT AND STIRRING”

CP

Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life AFRONAUT(A) 3.0. In conjunction with the Re:NEW festival, Alisha B. Wormsley curates a collection of short films and videos that represents science fiction and alternate realities from culturally diverse perspectives. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 5. Harris ACROSS THE UNIVERSE. Julie Traymor’s candycolored 2007 musical fantasia combines a TVmovie-style précis of tumultuous youth in the

RUN LOLA RUN. In this 1999 thriller from Tom Tykwer, Lola (Franka Potente) has 20 minutes to find and deliver 100,000 Deutsche marks to her boyfriend waiting across town, or he’ll incur the probably fatal wrath of his gangster boss. Yet Tykwer spins out a clever and entertaining

CP

CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

Film Kitchen thriller. With a frenetic mix of media — film, video, still photography, animation, techno music — and technique (slow motion, jump-cuts, split screens, color tinting), Lola’s short foot-pounding journey through the Berlin streets is presented three times. Three identical beginnings are altered slightly (Lola trips in one version) so that subsequent events occur on a different timeline and culminate with three wildly different conclusions. Run Lola Run has great fun inverting how thrillers — even arty European thrillers — are expected to end. In German, with subtitles. Oct. 7-9 and Oct. 11-12. Row House Cinema (AH) THE BITTER TEARS OF PETRA VON KANT. Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s 1972 melodrama examines the emotionally turbulent life of fashion designer Petra von Kant (Margit Carstensen), especially after she takes on a new young lover (Hanna Schygulla). In German, with subtitles. Oct. 7-10 and Oct. 12-13. Row House Cinema THE LIVES OF OTHERS. In Florian Henckle von Donnersmarck’s well-crafted and compelling 2007 drama set during the waning days of the German Democratic Republic, East Berliner and playwright Georg Dreyman (Sebastian Koch) lives relatively blissfully until the secret police put him under the surveillance of its best agent, Capt. Weisler (Ulrich Mühe). The film knits several strands — political critique, treatise on the responsibilities of artists, the slippery nature of human behavior — into a broody thriller-cum-psychological drama. Like atomic particles in reaction, the observers and the observed find themselves inextricably colliding and transforming. As such, Lives’ two entwined protagonists — Dreyman and Weisler — move out of their carefully constructed comfortable niches, and chose provocative action over glib loyalties. The film’s sentimental coda is presented somewhat clumsily, yet for all the criticism of the GDR and its failures, von Donnersmarck also wants Lives to be about reconciliation and what light survived in the darkness. In German, with subtitles. Fri., Oct. 7, and Oct. 9-13. Row House Cinema (AH)

CP

PSYCHO. Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1960 film is a thriller and treatise on troubled mother-son relationships. Embezzler-on-the-run Janet Leigh picks the wrong motel to catch some rest, though the proprietor seems friendly enough … Psycho remains a textbook of masterful editing, and Bernard Hermann’s score is as creepy as ever. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 8. Manor (AH)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.05/10.12.2016

WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY. Mel Stuart’s 1971 adaptation of

Roald Dahl’s story is heartwarming without being gooey and still deliciously weird. It’s a slow set-up while we wait out all the winners of the trip into Wonka’s secret candy factory — but once inside, the wonder, wackiness and even danger begin! The sets are wonderful color-saturated structures, free from the dumb special effects that date other older fantasy films. As Wonka, Gene Wilder is a delight, warm yet somehow malevolent. He doesn’t seem to care at all when bratty kids disappear. Sure, he says, they’re coming back … What wicked pleasure to see irksome kids just vanish into psychedelic machinery. 9:30 a.m. (with cereal) and 5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 8. Row House Cinema (AH) BUSTER KEATON SHORTS. See a selection of 1920s silent comedies from actor, director and master of the deadpan Buster Keaton. The Thoth Trio will provide live musical accompaniment. 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 9. Hollywood THE INVISIBLE MAN. Claude Rains stars as a scientist who discovers a way to become invisible, but it also makes him insane. James Whale directs this 1933 horror film adapted from the H.G. Wells story. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 9. Regent Square FILM KITCHEN. The monthly series for local and independent artists screens recent short work by three filmmakers. Highlights include “Underdog: The Devin Tate Story,” Barry Rothbart’s amusing parody of heartwarming sports documentaries. Premise: A 9-year-old who happens to have the body of bearded, 32-year-old couch potato is determined to make the 10- to 11-year-olds’ basketball squad. Also featured are shorts by Marcus Morelli, including the cute Star Wars riff “The Christmas Awakens” and “A Fortnight in Europe,” a visually appealing travelogue with Morelli himself and two friends. Film Kitchen, curated by Matthew R. Day, also showcases parts one and two of “The Porcelain Vessel,” shorts by recent Carnegie Mellon University grad Christin Bongiorni. In part one, a young woman’s stylized tweezing of her pubic hair seems to comment on body image and grooming culture. In part two, a quirkily costumed young woman silently runs through a series of emotions, intercut with a surreal animated image that grows each time it is glimpsed. 8 p.m. Tue., Oct. 11 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5. www.pfpca.org (Bill O’Driscoll) POLTERGEIST. In Tobe Hoper’s 1982 thriller, a family is initially amused by the presence of ghosts in the home … until somebody disappears. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 12. AMC Loews


LINEUP CARD {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

I REMEMBER AN IMMENSE SADNESS SEEING OTHER KIDS TEASED BECAUSE OF THEIR CLOTHES

We’ve all been complaining about our lack of fall weather, but the cooler temps are finally on the way. And what better way to get out and enjoy the weather than going on a run? But you don’t have to jog alone — here are a few upcoming road races that you might want to lace up for.

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The 21st running of the Fineview Step Challenge will take place at 8:30 a.m. on Sat., Oct. 8. The event is the biggest fundraiser for the Fineview Citizens Council. According to the group’s website, the race is a “five-mile urban trail challenge ascending Fineview’s hills, streets and staircases.” Among the steps are Pittsburgh’s largest stairset. That’s 337 steps, in case you were wondering. www.fineviewpgh.org

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The Emmaus Community of Pittsburgh will hold its Spirit Run, a 5K run or one-mile walk on the Three Rivers Heritage Trail, at 8:30 a.m. Sat., Oct. 15. Runners are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes, and there will be food, activities and entertainment afterward in South Shore Riverfront Park. www.emmauspgh.org

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Do you want to be a fireman? No? Well, do you want to do all the cool stuff firemen do without actually risking your life? If so, the Stop, Drop and Run 5K to benefit the Monaca Volunteer Fire Department is probably for you. There’s a regular 5K run, as well as an obstacle-course run. The event takes place at 9 a.m. Sat., Oct. 15. www.monacafire.com

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On Sun., Oct. 16, take part in a 6.6K run to benefit the Mario Lemieux Foundation. The distance — 6.6 kilometers — honors the jersey number of the Pittsburgh hockey legend. At the height of his career, in 1993, Lemieux was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. He has been cancer-free for more than two decades, and all the proceeds from this race benefit cancer research and patient care. www.mariolemieux.org

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Pittsburgh Pirates infielder Josh Harrison

CLOTHING OPTIONS {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

I

T WASN’T anybody’s fault that I didn’t

get Josh Harrison’s phone call to my office last week. The Pirates were on the road as we were trying to connect to talk about the upcoming gala event to benefit the Josh and Brittney Harrisons for Hope Foundation. We never had a solid time confirmed. He thought he was supposed to call, and I didn’t think he was. Just one of those missed connections. But since I didn’t get to talk to Josh on the phone, I thought, I’ll write about the event next time. This year’s Base Ball fundraiser, according to the press release, raised more than $130,000 for the cause — providing clothing to low-income children from “cradle to college.” That made me realize something that I should have thought of a lot earlier: The story is not about the event, it’s about the purpose of the event. As kids, my brothers and I probably fit

the definition of “low-income children,” even though our parents did their best to make sure we noticed as little as possible. Thanks to budgeting, and the savior known as the Hills Department Store layaway department, while we didn’t have a lot, we had what we needed. Occasionally, there’d be teasing about brand names, but never too much or, truer still, more than I could handle. However, I always noticed when others were teased. Even as a child, I remember an immense sadness seeing another kid teased because of their clothes. And even when kids tried to laugh it off, you could see the pain and embarrassment in their eyes. Maybe I could see it because it happened once or twice to me. Maybe I was bothered because I knew it was something the child couldn’t help. I think that’s why I wanted to talk to Josh about the charity. He has celebrity

status; he and his wife could be raising money for anything, but they chose this and I’m hard-pressed to think of a better cause. “We want to let these kids know someone cares about them and wants to see them succeed. We’ve been blessed by the Pittsburgh community, and are grateful to call this city home. We feel it’s our responsibility to give back,” Josh Harrison said in the press release. His wife, Brittney, added that the goal of foundation programs like Back to School and Project Princess is “to give children the clothing they need to succeed and feel confident in school and in their daily lives.” It’s tough out there for kids, and that’s why I decided to write about the charity even after the event. After all, you can still donate to the cause at www.joshharrison5. org. I still wish I could’ve talked to Harrison a bit about the charity. I wish we could’ve connected. Although in a way, maybe we did.

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

NET GAIN {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} HOCKEY HAS returned. It seems like we

only just crammed 400,000 screaming fans into Downtown to celebrate the return of Lord Stanley. The Pirates’ three-year run of playoffs ended on Sunday, and now we need something to watch in between Steelers games. Hockey doesn’t match the popularity of football, basketball, baseball or even auto racing and soccer. It does have the two things we like the most — speed and violence — but outside of hockey enclaves, America just won’t get on board. We get it here in Pittsburgh, of course. Perhaps there’s just a national prejudice against Canadians, which might also explain why the metric system and poutine also can’t gain footing in this country. But one thing that other team sports can learn from hockey is how to do conduct a preseason. Baseball players take four to six weeks to get ready for the year. They show up in late February and hang out until early April in Florida or Arizona. They ease their way into the regular season after enjoying four or five months off. They drag out the exhibition season playing 30 to 40 games, which is roughly a quarter of the regular schedule. Football’s preseason takes four or five weeks in the brutal heat. Teams play four games, which like baseball is about onefourth of the normal season. Football camp also starts after the players have had five or six months off to recover. Both sports schedule too many meaningless games because they can make preseason money, which does count. That’s where hockey gets it right. Players get three weeks of practice and six or seven exhibition games, then it’s time to go. Not only that, if you’re the defending Stanley Cup champions, you just played barely four months ago. If you’re an elite player, you don’t have to play most of the exhibition games. For example, this year most of the stars are representing their countries in the World Cup. This new season brings us a full year of bragging rights. No fan of any other team can talk trash on Pittsburgh until at least June. The New York Rangers have had that luxury one time in the past 76 years; I hope they took full advantage of it. The Flyers had trash-talking rights once in the past 41 years. Meanwhile, the Capitals have no

{CP PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS}

Marc-Andre Fleury at Penguins practice on Sat., Oct. 1

idea what it feels like. The Penguins look to become the first team to repeat as champs since the 1997-98 Detroit Red Wings. Those Wings beat the Caps and Flyers to extend their respective miseries. On the roster, not much has changed for the champs, except that we say goodbye to Beau Bennett and Ben Lovejoy, who are now semi-proud members of the New Jersey Devils. And we say hello again to David Warsofsky, who comes back to the Pens after a stint with the Devils. Other than that, the rest of the gang is back, save for goalie Matt Murray, who will miss the beginning of the season with a broken hand. The 22-year-old went 15-6 in the postseason and has more Stanley Cups than Curtis Joseph, Ron Hextall, Roberto Luongo, Henrik Lundqvist and Olaf Kolzig combined. Not bad for a guy who started kindergarten in 1999, so he was due for a little bad news. The Pens will have to rely on Marc-Andre Fleury. MAF has a Cup himself, and in the entire history of the NHL, only 17 goalies have won more games than him. The last preseason game is Oct. 8 against perennial nobodies the Columbus Blue Jackets. That game is free to all kids. I’m thinking about getting a fake ID that says I’m 10, so I can get in for nothing. Seriously, the free game is a classy move, and it’s a lead that other teams and sports should follow. Baseball lets dogs in for free, but not children. The regular season starts Oct. 13 at home against the Cup-less and much-hated Washington Capitals. A week later, it’s a re-match of the finals, as the San Jose Sharks bring their silver medal to town. So unveil the Pens’ fourth championship banner, and enjoy a year of strutting around like we own the place. Because we kinda do.

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YOU SEE?

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. Song conclusions 6. Dirty air 10. Mourn aloud 14. Tom’s of Maine alternative 15. “Luther” star 16. Port in many TVs 17. Comedic dinners for the Mounties? 19. “Beat you!” 20. Peer group member 21. Like Buffalo vis-à-vis New York 23. Red lingerie? 26. 42-Across’s opposite 27. Chill 28. Little shavers 29. ___ mattress 30. Art house house 32. “Make Donald Drumpf Again” or “I’m Withered,” e.g. 33. Group behind text-scanning tech.? 35. Where you might sleep off your angel dust trip? 39. Buffoon 40. Flop 41. August baby 42. 26-Across’s opposite 44. Alley-___ (pass) 45. “Ri-i-ight!” 46. Skull down payment? 50. “Try this!” 51. Historian Primo

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52. “I say, gov’nor” 53. Reverse course ... or what you must do one time in each of the theme answers 58. Brownbagging boozer 59. Energy units 60. Top part of a form 61. PDF image 62. Edge windows, e.g. 63. Five-paragraph homework assignment

DOWN 1. “Down On The Corner” band, briefly 2. D&D thug 3. Tim Kaine’s party: Abbr. 4. Element 5. Sneaker part with velcro 6. Jewelry with a signet 7. DC United league 8. Thick-headed 9. Audibly shocked noises 10. Colorful name for a termite 11. Whistleblower Snowden 12. Overdoes it on stage 13. Loblollies and larches 18. Space ball

22. Plank alternatives 23. In vogue 24. Raiders QB Derek 25. Kind of inhibitor 26. Eastern philosophy 30. “Othello” lieutenant 31. November winners 32. Metro ___ (mobile carrier) 34. Narrowed the gap, as in an election year 35. Like some pedicure chairs 36. K-12 letters 37. Smart home thermostat 38. As well

40. Like some 60’s fashion 42. Ill-fated 43. City where the Buena Vista Social Club was based 44. Golfer Mark 45. “Currently” 46. Gnaws with the teeth 47. Not fulfilled 48. Shepherd’s pie veggie 49. Small egg, biologically 54. Federal Security Service predecessor 55. Wee ___ (tots) 56. New Deal inits. 57. Rejecting vote {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.05-10.12

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “It isn’t normal to know what we want,” said psychologist Abraham Maslow. “It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.” He wasn’t referring to the question of what you want for dinner or the new shoes you plan to buy. He was talking about big, long-term yearnings: what you hope to be when you grow up, the qualities you look for in your best allies, the feelings you’d love to feel in abundance every day of your life. Now here’s the good news, Libra: The next 10 months should bring you the best chance ever to figure out exactly what you want the most. And it all starts now.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Practitioners of the Ayurvedic medical tradition tout the healing power of regular self-massage. Creativity expert Julia Cameron recommends that you periodically go out on dates with yourself. Taoist author Mantak Chia advises you to visualize sending smiles and good wishes to your kidneys, lungs, liver, heart and other organs. He says that these acts of kindness bolster your vigor. The coming weeks will be an especially favorable time to attend to measures like these, Scorpio. I hope you will also be imaginative as you give yourself extra gifts and compliments and praise.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The coming weeks will be one of the best times ever for wrestling with God or tussling with fate or grappling with karma. Why do I say that? Because you’re likely to emerge triumphant! That’s right, you lucky, plucky contender. More than I’ve seen in a long time, you have the potential to draw on the crafty power and unruly wisdom and resilient compassion you would need to be

an unambiguous winner. A winner of what? You tell me. What dilemma would you most like to resolve? What test would you most like to ace? At what game would you most like to be victorious? Now is the time.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Are you grunting and sweating as you struggle to preserve and maintain the gains of the past? Or are you smooth and cagey as you maneuver your way toward the rewards of the future? I’m rooting for you to put the emphasis on the second option. Paradoxically, that will be the best way to accomplish the first option. It will also ensure that your motivations are primarily rooted in love and enthusiasm rather than worry and stress. And that will enable you to succeed at the second option.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Do you believe that you are mostly just a product of social conditioning and your genetic make-up? Or are you willing to entertain a different hypothesis: that you are a primal force of

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nature on an unpredictable journey? That you are capable of rising above your apparent limitations and expressing aspects of yourself that might have been unimaginable when you were younger? I believe the coming weeks will be a favorable time to play around with this vision. Your knack for transcendence is peaking. So are your powers to escape the past and exceed limited expectations.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In one of your nightly dreams, Robin Hood may team up with Peter Pan to steal unused treasure from a greedy monster — and then turn the booty over to you. Or maybe you’ll meet a talking hedgehog and singing fox who will cast a spell to heal and revive one of your wounded fantasies. It’s also conceivable that you will recover a magic seed that had been lost or forgotten, and attract the help of a fairy godmother or godfather to help you ripen it.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): At a recent party, a guy I hardly know questioned my authenticity. “You seem to have had an easy life,” he jabbed. “I bet you haven’t suffered enough to be a truly passionate person.” I didn’t choose to engage him, but mused to myself, “Not enough suffering? What about the time I got shot? My divorce? My five-year-long illness? The manager of my rock band getting killed in a helicopter crash?” But after that initial reaction, my thoughts turned to the adventures that have stoked my passion without causing pain, like the birth of my daughter, getting remarried to the woman I divorced and performing my music for excited audiences. I bring this up, Aries, because I suspect that you, too, will soon have experiences that refine and deepen your passion through pleasure rather than hardship.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s the Frank and Focused Feedback Phase, Taurus — prime time to solicit insight about how you’re doing. Here are four suggestions to get you started. 1. Ask a person who loves and respects you to speak the compassionate truth about what’s most important for you to learn. 2. Consult a trustworthy adviser who can help motivate you to do the crucial thing you’ve been postponing. 3. Have an imaginary conversation with the person you were a year ago. Encourage the Old You to be honest about how the New You could summon more excellence in pursuing your essential goals. 4. Say this prayer to your favorite tree or animal or meadow: “Show me what I need to do in order to feel more joy.”

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Many of my readers regard me as being exceptionally creative. Over the years, they have sent countless emails praising me for my original approach to problem-solving and art-making. But I

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suspect that I wasn’t born with a greater talent for creativity than anyone else. I’ve simply placed a high value on developing it, and have worked harder to access it than most people. With that in mind, I invite you to tap more deeply into your own mother lode of innovative, imaginative energy. The cosmic trends favor it. Your hormones are nudging you in that direction. What projects could use a jolt of primal brilliance? What areas of your life need a boost of ingenuity?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Love wants more of you. Love longs for you to give everything you have and receive everything you need. Love is conspiring to bring you beautiful truths and poignant teases, sweet dispensations and confounding mysteries, exacting blessings and riddles that will take your entire life to solve. But here are some crucial questions: Are you truly ready for such intense engagement? Are you willing to do what’s necessary to live at a higher and deeper level? Would you know how to work with such extravagant treasure and wild responsibility? The coming weeks will be prime time to explore the answers to these questions. I’m not sure what your answers will be.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Each of us contains a multiplicity of selves. You may often feel like there’s just one of you rumbling around inside your psyche, but it’s closer to the truth to say that you’re a community of various characters whose agendas sometimes overlap and sometimes conflict. For example, the needy part of you that craves love isn’t always on the same wavelength as the ambitious part of you that seeks power. That’s why it’s a good idea to periodically organize summit meetings where all of your selves can gather and negotiate. Now is one of those times: a favorable moment to foster harmony among your inner voices and to mobilize them to work together in service of common goals.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Pike’s Peak is a 14,115-foot mountain in Colorado. It’s not a simple task to trek to the top. Unless you’re well trained, you might experience altitude sickness. Wicked thunderstorms are a regular occurrence during the summer. Snow falls year-round. But back in 1929, an adventurer named Bill Williams decided the task of hiking to the summit wasn’t tough enough. He sought a more demanding challenge. Wearing kneepads, he spent 21 days crawling along as he used his nose to push a peanut all the way up. I advise you to avoid making him your role model in the coming weeks, Virgo. Just climb the mountain. Don’t try to push a peanut up there with your nose, too. What is the best gift you could give your best ally right now? Testify at www.FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

A question on your favorite topic, Dan. Just kidding, it’s a question about my vagina. I’m having a problem with the microbiome of my vulva and vagina. I’ve been going to my gyno for the last six months for recurrent bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections. She shrugs, gives me a script, the symptoms go away for a week or so, then they come back. I understand the infections are likely due to an imbalance in my vaginal pH, but I don’t know what to do to fix this. I’ve used probiotic suppositories to boost the amount of lactobacillus and these help more than anything else, but the problem remains. I also wear loose-fitting cotton undies and practice good hygiene and never douche or use anything scented. There’s tons of sites online talking about this problem, but no one has a solution that I’ve found. How the hell can women with this problem fix their pH?! Thanks a ton if you read this far, and thanks a million tons if you or one of your experts has any ideas to help. VEXED UND LACKING VAGINAL ANSWERS

“I love that she used the word ‘vulva,’” says Dr. Debby Herbenick, a research scientist at Indiana University, a sexual-health educator at the Kinsey Institute, and the author of Read My Lips: A Complete Guide to the Vagina and Vulva and numerous other books. “Most people have no idea what that even is!” Herbenick recommends seeing a “true vulvovaginal health expert” (TVHE) about your problem, VULVA, and your gynecologist presumably qualifies as a TVHE … right? “Not necessarily,” said Herbenick. “Gynecologists know far more about vaginal and vulvar health issues than most health-care providers, but many gynecologists haven’t received deep-dive (pun not intended) specialized training in difficult-to-treat vulvovaginal health conditions. And if they have, it was likely when they were in med school — so years ago. They might not be up to date in the latest research, since not all doctors go to vulvovaginalspecific conferences.” Is there a fix for that problem? “Yes! If everyone lobbied for their doctors to go to events like the annual conference of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD),” says Dr. Herbenick, “we would live in a country with millions more happy, healthy, sex-interested women and others with vaginas and vulvas, too, like trans men.” As for your particular problem — a tough case of bacterial vaginosis — Herbenick, who isn’t a medical doctor but qualifies as a TVHE, has some thoughts. “There are many different forms of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and different kinds of yeast infections,” says Herbenick. “These different kinds respond well to different kinds of treatment, which is one reason home yeast meds don’t work well for many women. And all too often, healthcare providers don’t have sufficient training to make fine-tuned diagnoses and end up treating the wrong thing. But if VULVA’s recurrences are frequent, I think it’s a wise idea for her to see a true specialist.” A TVHE is likelier to pinpoint the problem.

Even so, Herbenick warns that it may take more than one visit with a TVHE to solve the problem. “I don’t want to over-promise, since BV remains a challenging diagnosis and often does come back at some point,” says Herbenick. “There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to BV, which is also why I think VULVA is best off meeting with a health-care provider who lives and breathes vaginal-health issues. The ISSVD is full of healthcare providers like that — they’re the Sherlock Holmes of vaginas and vulvas, none of this ‘shrug and here’s a script’ business. VULVA can check out ISSVD.org for more information.”

[DAILY RUNDOWN]

I have a question about biking and female genitalia. I’m a woman in my 40s, and I love biking! My husband and I often go for long rides on the weekend. Unfortunately, this makes various parts of my crotch sore, especially the clitoris. Certain bike seats are better, but none eliminate the soreness. Two years ago, we had a baby, which not only made my crotch more prone to soreness, but makes it a lot less likely that we’ll have sex except on weekends, often after biking. The sore clit makes sex more painful, but it also increases sensitivity, so the whole thing can be an alternating experience of “Ow!” and “Wow!” Am I causing my clit any permanent damage by the biking and/or the post-bike poking? Any suggestions for decreasing crotch soreness?

“ALL TOO OFTEN, HEALTH-CARE PROVIDERS DON’T HAVE SUFFICIENT TRAINING TO MAKE FINE-TUNED DIAGNOSES.”

BIKE RELATED INJURY TO CLIT; HELP EASE SORENESS

“I love biking, I love vulvas, and I love babies (mine, and I’m sure I would adore BRITCHES’s baby, too!),” says Herbenick, “so I appreciate being asked to chime in on this question. That said, there’s not a ton of research on female genital health in connection with cycling.” There’s far more research on men and cycling, due to the risks of bike-seat-related erectile dysfunction specifically and our society’s tendency to prioritize boners generally. “The few studies that have been conducted on women and cycling — generally cisgender women as far as I can tell — found that cutout seats are linked with a higher risk of genital symptoms, as are handlebars that are lower than the saddle,” says Herbenick. “So broader saddles and higher handlebars may be the way to go. Some of the research notes higher rates of genital symptoms among people who go on longer rides, spending hours in the saddle.” To decrease your risk of un-fun genital symptoms, BRITCHES, Herbenick recommends mixing it up. “Go biking some weekends and try other activities on other weekends — maybe hiking or swimming? You might also take Dan’s ‘fuck first’ Valentine’s Day advice and apply it to your weekend rides. And if you’re prone to post-intercourse semen leakage (and, really, who isn’t?), use a condom or have him come elsewhere pre-ride, so you don’t have the semen seepage issue to contend with on a long ride. I hope this helps!” Follow Dr. Debby Herbenick on Twitter @debbyherbenick.

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On the Lovecast, Dan talks guns and spit with the “Liberal Redneck” Trae Crowder: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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BEYOND PINK {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

EVERY OCTOBER, the entire country rallies around Breast Cancer Awareness month. There’s pink as far as the eye can see, and to be sure, working toward prevention, early detection and a cure is extremely important. The very pages you’re reading are, as I’m sure you’ve noticed, pink, and our news section hopefully gave you diverse stories and information about the fight to prevent and cure breast cancer. But breast cancer is just one of the many issues and conditions facing Americans, and October is actually the awareness month for several other important causes that could also use your financial donations. C DE IT C H @PGH C IT YPA P E R. C OM

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH Statistics say that 1 in 3 women will be a victim of domestic violence in

day is Latino AIDS Awareness Day. The day is meant for Latino communities to raise awareness of the disease, to encourage testing and to help those afflicted to stay in treatment. Donate to the Pittsburgh Aids Taskforce at www.patf.org.

her lifetime. According to United Nations statistics, women ages 15 to 44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria. Several Pittsburgh-area organizations deal with the issue, including the Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh. www.wcspittsburgh.org

WORLD FOOD DAY Oct. 16 is a national day of action against hunger around the world.

NATIONAL DOWN SYNDROME AWARENESS MONTH According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in 7,000 babies is diagnosed with the condition yearly. The Down Syndrome Association of Pittsburgh provides support to new families coping with Down syndrome, and also provides resources to the Down Syndrome Center at Children’s Hospital. www.dsapgh.org

NATIONAL LATINO AIDS AWARENESS DAY Hispanic Heritage month runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, and the final 62

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Events are planned for 4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 16, in Market Square, but you can always donate to local food pantries and kitchens. The Greater Pittsburgh Area Food Bank (www.pittsburghfoodbank.org) helps supply food pantries; donations can be made directly to these organizations as well, and the Food Bank has a searchable list of providers on its website.

Other conditions also marking an awareness month, week or day in October are: + Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month + National Dental Hygiene Month + Mental Illness Awareness Week, Oct. 2-8 + National Stuttering Awareness Day, Oct. 22 + Respiratory Care Week, Oct. 23-29


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Suboxone, Subutex A and R Health Services Pittsburgh, Pa

Serving Western Pennsylvania

www.suboxonehelps.org

1-800-817-4053 www.aandrsolutions.com

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

The Pink Issue - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 40 10/5/2016

The Pink Issue - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 40 10/5/2016