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OPENING JUNE 11

SEE DETAILS INSIDE!

Visit KillerHeelsFrick.org

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EVENTS 6.17 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: ALISON KLAYMAN, DIRECTOR AND PRODUCER OF AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY The Warhol theater FREE

7.8 – 7pm SENSORY-FRIENDLY EVENT FOR ADULTS (21+) To register please contact Leah Morelli at morellil@warhol.org or call 412.237.8389. FREE

7.9 – 10am SENSORY-FRIENDLY EVENT FOR TEENS AND YOUNG ADULTS To register please contact Leah Morelli at morellil@warhol.org or call 412.237.8389. FREE

8.6 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS Factory Studio This monthly silkscreen printing activity for families with children ages 1 to 4 years old takes place the first Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon. Free with museum admission

Andy Warhol, Elvis 11 Times [Studio Type], 1963, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., ELVIS™ and ELVIS PRESLEY™ are trademarks of ABG EPE IP LLC. Rights of Publicity and Persona Rights: Elvis Presley Enterprises, LLC. © 2016 ABG EPE IP LLC , elvis.com 9.14 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: YO LA TENGO WITH SPECIAL GUEST LAMBCHOP Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with WYEP. Tickets $20/$15 Members & students

Night of 1,000 Elvises 10.22 – 7pm VIP, 8pm General Admission Tickets $50/250 VIP visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

Join us for The Warhol’s second annual fundraiser and community celebration! This year’s theme Night of 1,000 Elvises invites you to dress up as your favorite Elvis! Our seven floors are open to explore, and spaces are activated with DJs, dancing, and an Underground VIP “Viva Las Vegas” lounge, complete with casino games and a special musical guest the infamous El Vez. NEWS

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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JUNE 11 – SEPTEMBER 4 Visit KillerHeelsFrick.org Explore fashion’s most provocative accessory. From 18th-century silk slippers to the glamorous stilettos on today’s runways and red carpets, this exhibition of nearly 150 objects looks at the high-heeled shoe’s rich and varied history and its enduring place in our popular imagination.

Admission: $12 Members free. Hours: Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Friday 10:00 a.m.– 9:00 p.m.

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe is organized by the Brooklyn Museum.

The Pittsburgh presentation is made possible through the generous support of UPMC Health Plan.

SUMMER FRIDAYS at the Frick JUNE 17 – SEPTEMBER 2 Plan to spend Friday evenings at the Frick this Summer! OPEN UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

tFree Performances t8JOF#BS t'PPEBOE'BTIJPO5SVDLT JUNE 17 Meeting of Important People with Working Breed 'SBOLUVBSZBOE44##2 food trucks; Vintage Valet fashion truck

JUNE 24 The Kardasz Brothers: Classic Hits of the 60s-70s Frick Creates—Staff Art Sale Nakama and Stickler’s Ice Pop Co. food trucks; Highway Robbery fashion truck Visit TheFrickPittsburgh.org for details SUPPORTED BY

Additional support is provided by PNC.

Rem D. Koolhaas (designer). United Nude. “Gaga Shoe,” 2012. Leather, metal. Courtesy of United Nude. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn.

THEFRICKPITTSBURGH.ORG

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Major exhibition program support is provided by the Richard King Mellon Foundation.

412-371-0600

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7227 REYNOLDS STREET

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PITTSBURGH, PA 15208


06.08/06.15.2016 VOLUME 26 + ISSUE 23

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Web Producer ALEX GORDON Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Interns MEGAN FAIR, TYLER DAGUE, WILLIAM LUDT, LUKE THOR TRAVIS

{ART} {COVER PHOTO BY BILLY LUDT}

[MAIN FEATURE]

celebrate Pittsburgh’s wide selection 24 We of watering holes and libations with an epic bar crawl in our special drink issue

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

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Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

“To my knowledge, not one person who was critical of their actions has been reached out to.” — Anne Lynch of Three Rivers Community Foundation on the Delta Foundation’s handling of last year’s Pittsburgh Pride protests

[NEWS]

very excited, and also nervous 12 “Iandamanxious.” — Deedee Mizrahi on the June 18 Ball on the Bridge

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

sweet-potato waffle fries were 20 The deeply colored, crisp and light.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Pig Iron Public House

[MUSIC]

wouldn’t think that an influence 35 “You like Jimmy Page or Angus Young of AC/ DC would fit into The Mavericks, but somehow it does.” — The Mavericks’ guitarist Eddie Perez on his rock ’n’ roll roots

[SCREEN]

because something is low-hanging 43 “Just fruit doesn’t mean it shouldn’t get picked.” — Al Hoff reviews Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping

[ARTS]

hiding from myself.” 46 “I—was Dorit Sasson on her struggle to write Accidental Soldier

[LAST PAGE]

Steel City Grammers take you on 63 The a photographic tour of McKees Rocks

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} WEIRD PITTSBURGH BY NICK KEPPLER 14 CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 16 CITY PAPER 25 17 EVENTS LISTINGS 50 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 61

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MARIA SNYDER Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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{ADMINISTRATION} Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} EAGLE MEDIA CORP. GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2016 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“DELTA HAS COMPLETELY MISSED THE POINT.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Drink rink up! FFollow our epic bar crawl (see page 24) on an interactive map at www.pghcitypaper.com.

The Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival is upon us, and we captured the scene Sunday night when local reggae act The Freedom Band and FrenchCuban duo Ibeyi performed. www.pghcitypaper.com

Musician Emily Rodgers plays a few beautiful, haunting tunes in studio for us and talks about her new album, Two Years, which drops on June 10. Listen at bit.ly/citypaperpodcast or subscribe on iTunes.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Instagrammer @state_of_mon captured the West End, 1950s style, as August Wilson’s Fences is being filmed. Tag your Instagram images from around the city as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you. Add us on Snapchat: pghcitypaper!

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Roots Pride attendees protest Pittsburgh Pride last June

LINGERING QUESTIONS A

S PRIDE EVENTS around the country

mark the anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Inn riots, Pittsburgh’s largest LGBT celebration will culminate with a Pride in the Street parade on June 12, the conclusion of week’s worth of programming by the Delta Foundation. But the local LGBT community has seen some fracturing since last year’s Pride Fest, when Delta was heavily criticized for choosing Iggy Azalea as its headliner despite what many considered her racist and homophobic views. Azalea eventually backed out of the appearance and was replaced by Nick Jonas, but not before some long-simmering resentment of Delta bubbled to the surface. The organization has focused too much on social events at the expense of outreach, its critics charge, and fails to include the entire LGBT community.

“Queer and trans people of color finally got fed up enough with Pittsburgh’s very white gay culture, which frequently ignores the rest of the LBTQIA+ population, too,” says Anne Lynch, operations manager at Three Rivers Community Foundation, which

A year after protests and criticism that it wasn’t inclusive, has anything changed about Pittsburgh Pride? {BY KIM LYONS} supports LGBT and other organizations. Bringing in Azalea “was just the final straw.” And despite its pledges to work toward inclusion going forward, those who spoke out against Delta a year ago say little has changed.

“Delta has completely missed the point,” said Michael David Battle, founder of Roots Pride. He and his partner, Joy KMT, started Roots Pride last year, in response to what they viewed as Delta’s narrow focus, one that did not include them. “I don’t see that they’ve made any progress. Trans folks are standing up and saying, ‘We’re not taking this anymore.’” The incident with Azalea sparked a larger conversation about inclusion in Pittsburgh’s LGBT community. For example, Pittsburgh City Council President Bruce Kraus, the only openly gay member of city council, said in a statement last June that he had reservations about “the long-term vision of Pride’s leadership team. I have serious concerns about the direction of the Delta Foundation and the exclusionary choices it is making. Those CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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concerns have only deepened through conversations with former members of the foundation’s board.â€? Founded in 1996, the Delta Foundation was incorporated as a nonproďŹ t “for the purposes of uniting and fostering good fellowship and social interaction among LGBT residents in the metropolitan Pittsburgh area,â€? according to its website. In addition to Pride Fest, it holds several other events throughout the year, including the Pittsburgh(Red) ball on World AIDS Day, in December. This year’s performers at Pride in the Street, a Sat., June 11 party Downtown, will be the pop singer Kesha and Angel Haze, a hip-hop performer who identiďŹ es as pansexual and agender. After last year’s protests, Delta pledged to reach out to others in the LGBT community to address the inclusion issues. Battle says he has not heard from Delta. Neither has Jason Landau Goodman, the Pittsburghbased founding executive director of the Pennsylvania Youth Congress, a statewide LGBTQ youth-advocacy organization. “They claimed they met with hundreds of community members, but my organization hasn’t had any outreach from Delta to us. I don’t know who they met with.â€? Lynch says her organization attempted to contact Delta last year to outline its concerns, sending a certiďŹ ed letter. “A few months later we got it back — they refused to even sign for it,â€? she says. “They claim to have talked to hundreds of people since June of last year, who all have a different idea of how Pride should be celebrated. Of

that, I have no doubt. However, and again, only to my knowledge, not one person who was critical of their actions has been reached out to.â€? Goodman also pointed out last year that the fee for a nonproďŹ t organization to have a booth at Pittsburgh’s Pride Fest was higher than any others in the state, at $450. According to Delta’s website, that fee is the same this year, and it has meant PYC can’t participate. “We can’t justify using our limited resources in that way, we just can’t afford that price,â€? Goodman says. “And we enable this structural deďŹ cit in the Pittsburgh community if we do pay.â€? To be sure, Pittsburgh’s LGBT community isn’t the only one dealing with internal strife surrounding Pride events. On May 31, members of the Greater Philadelphia Gay Officers Action League pulled out of their role as grand marshals for that city’s June 12 parade. Some in the community had raised objections to having police ofďŹ cers involved in a Pride event, given that the original Stonewall uprising was a direct response to a police raid on a gay bar. And in April, Boston Pride rescinded a police ofďŹ cer’s invitation to serve as its parade grand marshal, after he allegedly made racist comments on Facebook. Goodman says he’s hopeful that the ways the community responds to situations like these will, over time, lead to more awareness and diversity. “We need to create our own funding sources, and with the media being more aware, that gives the microphone to more

“TO MY KNOWLEDGE, NOT ONE PERSON WHO WAS CRITICAL OF THEIR ACTIONS HAS BEEN REACHED OUT TO.�

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

Got game? Explore the math behind a roll of the dice, learn the science behind what makes a Dungeon Master, and see if your high score still stacks up in classic video games. $15 in free slot play at Rivers Casino (while supplies last) /LYHPXVLFFDVKEDUVVQDFNVDYDLODEOHIRUSXUFKDVHIRXUçRRUV of exhibits, lots of science fun, and NO KIDS! Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for details and to register. $10 in advance / $15 day of the event

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

LECTURE: RESEARCHING YOUR HOUSE HISTORY KELLEY STROUP - House/Story Do you live in an old house? Ever wondered about the people who built it, and the lives that unfolded there before you? Find out about the people who inuenced the spaces in which your life takes place, and discover how your house ďŹ ts within the history and evolution of the surrounding neighborhood and the city. In this lecture, Kelley Stroup will discuss methods and sources that can be used to discover both the construction and personal history of a house. Included will be discussion of chain of title, historical documents and directories, maps, and public records searches, which help people tell the stories of their houses. This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Visit www.phlf.org to join! Non-members: $5.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016

THURSDAY, JUNE 9 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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organizations,” he said. “The more we do the work to bring the community together, the more it will help to showcase the diversity of the community.” Lynch adds that she doesn’t necessarily have a problem with Delta throwing parties with admission fees to celebrate the LGBT community. “But they then need to reconsider using the word ‘foundation,’” she says. “That implies they give the majority of the money raised back into the community in the form of grants. Openness and transparency are needed, and I have seen none of that in the year since this all went down.” According to its 2014 federal Form 990 filing, the most recent available, of its $921,379 budget, Delta gave out $17,058 in grants. Delta did not respond to numerous requests for comment, or to answer questions clarifying how the grant funds were disbursed and to whom. Roots Pride wants to put the focus on helping the trans community by addressing issues like safety and housing, Battle says. Many trans youth, especially those of color, end up couch-surfing or homeless, some as early as age 11 or 12, and many

are abused. “I want the other leaders to be ready to delve into these issues of systemic structural violence,” he says. This year’s Roots Pride events include an evening rally and party at East Liberty’s Ace Hotel on Fri., June 10; a daytime potluck picnic in Schenley Park on Sat., June 11; and a Sun., June 12, prayer walk at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. Roots is not the only group doing alternate programming to Delta’s Pride Fest. Pittsburgh Black Pride, for instance, will hold a week of events beginning July 25. “Roots Pride would be happening with or without the Delta Foundation,” says KMT. “Delta has taken the banner of serving the entire population and we haven’t seen evidence of that. They may have reached out to certain people, but Pride belongs to the all the people, and the entire community needs to be represented.” Battle adds that he doesn’t even view what Roots is doing this year as an “alternative” to Pride Fest. “I haven’t even looked at Delta’s page this year, so I have no idea what they’re doing. We’re just going to continue to create safe spaces for those who need to have their voices heard.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN

Pittsburgh AIDS Center for Treatment The Pittsburgh AIDS Center for Treatment (PACT) provides continuous primary medical care and education for those who are infected with HIV or have AIDS. PACT also offers specialty services including women’s health care, Hepatitis-C care, and mental health care. To make an appointment at the PACT clinic, or for information about HIV/AIDS, call 412-647-PACT (7228) or visit UPMC.com/PACT.

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

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JULY 15-16-17

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2016 RIB & WING FESTIVAL AT SEVEN SPRINGS • JULY 15-16-17 FEATURING AWARD-WINNING RIBS & WINGS FROM: • Armadillo’s BBQ & Co. • Smokin’ Joe’s Hog Wild Barbecue • Pigfoot BBQ • • Butch’s Smack Your Lips BBQ • Randita’s Vegan Food Truck • LIVE ENTERTAINMENT BY: • NOMAD • Shot O’ Soul • Joe Grushecky & The Houserockers • • Radio Tokyo • Chris Higbee • Sydney Hutchko • Totally 80s • Airborne •

LOOKING FOR A PLACE BEFORE THE GAME? HEAD TO WHEELHOUSE BAR & GRILL AT RIVERS CASINO!

KID’S ZONE • BEER GARDEN • AND MORE!

WAGS AND WHISKEY FRIDAY, JUNE 17TH 5-9PM

Enjoy one-of-a-kind appetizers along with traditional favorites including wings, burgers and more!

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At the Wigle Barrelhouse and Whiskey Garden 1055 Spring Garden Avenue, Pittsburgh +

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Must be 21 years or older to be on Rivers Casino property.

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BALL ON THE BRIDGE

Event highlights the city’s ball culture and need for improved health-care services for the city’s LGBT community {BY RYAN DETO} AFTER BEING part of an underground, late-night scene in Pittsburgh’s LGBT community for decades, ball culture is making its free outdoor debut at the Ball on the Bridge event on June 18. Balls originated in the 1960s as underground drag competitions, where participants were mostly black and gay. Since, ball culture has evolved into huge {PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Ball on the Bridge performers Jasmine Elite, Brazil Ebony and Mara Revlon on the Andy Warhol Bridge

events where performers compete in categories like Exotic European Runway, Pretty Boy Realness, Woman’s Face and Femme Queen Performance. The June 18 ball will feature performers competing during the evening hours on the Andy Warhol Bridge, which will be closed down for the event. And while the Ball on the Bridge is meant to bring ball culture to the public, it’s also a way to highlight the need for adequate healthcare services for the LGBT community. “I am very excited, and also nervous and anxious,” says Deedee Mizrahi, leader of Pittsburgh’s House of Mizrahi. (Performers battle in groups known as houses.) “It needs to be here now. I want to showcase what we can do and what we have been doing for decades.” Dalen Hooks has been involved in the Pittsburgh ball scene for years and currently works for Central Outreach Wellness Center, which provides health-care services to LGBT individuals. He is a main organizer of Ball on the Bridge. Balls in the area have progressed from being held in derelict warehouses, to event centers like the August Wilson Center and now on one of the city’s iconic bridges. Hooks says this is Pittsburgh’s chance to legitimize ball culture. “One of the perks of having this outside is, it is taking something that is underground and making it mainstream,” says Hooks. Ball on the Bridge, which the Delta

Foundation helped to organize, will have 28 different competition categories, and Hooks says the sidewalks on the bridge will be left open; he encourages passersby to take in the action. To accommodate newcomers, the ball begins earlier than usual (8 p.m., or “daytime” for the ball community, according to Hooks). Hooks adds that beyond mainstreaming, throwing the ball is meant to help “bridge the gap” of health-care access for members of the LGBT community. “We are challenging all the local healthcare providers to come and support this community that is often overlooked,” says Hooks. Central Outreach will have a mobile wellness center on site, and will be providing free check-ups and offering information on PrEP, medication that can prevent users from contracting the HIV virus. Jason Herring, program director of the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force, agrees that better communication is needed between health-care providers and the LGBT community. He says stigmas concerning LGBT individuals requesting and receiving treatment remain. Herring adds that such stigmas are further compounded for queer and trans people of color. Allegheny County statistics show that black men are more than three times as likely as white men to have HIV. Black trans women fare even worse, with 56 percent testing positive for HIV, according to federal studies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Herring says stigmas contribute to these figures and that improved communication between doctors and LGBT patients could go a long way. “We need to tell everyone to ask for what they need, and inform doctors how to properly respond,” he says. Brian Lamb, an internal-medicine specialist with Allegheny Health Network, says a lot of work remains. “No one should ever feel marginalized when they talk to their doctors,” he says. Lamb says Highmark, in partnership with AHN, is hosting an event the same week as Ball on the Bridge, designed to introduce individuals to LGBT-friendly physicians, which is the first time one of these events is geared toward a specific community. Says Lamb: “We want to say, ‘You are included in this. You are part of our patient population. You are part of Western PA.’”

EVENT WILL BE HELD AT 8 P.M. SAT., JUNE 18, ON THE ANDY WARHOL BRIDGE.

“Wellness - body,mind & soul” “Wisdom from yoga”

Sunday, June 19th • 5PM-7PM Byham Theater 101 Sixth Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Limited seating Tickets: www.trustarts.org or call 412.456.6666 for further details visit www.3riversJW. com

RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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B&B CCottages, B&B, ottages, Full-Service F ll S i SSpa, Crosswinds Grille Restaurant, & Winery

New “ZIP ZONE” Zipline! Go Carts, The Rock, Bungee Tramp, Batting Cages, Adventure Golf, Blaster Bumper Boats, Arcade, AND MORE! Open 7 days a week: Memorial Day – Labor Day Weekends only: May & September

Enjoy the Beaches, Fun, & Sun! We offer marinas, public boat launches, fishing, wineries, covered bridges, and more! 4th of July Fest: 6/30–7/3; Fireworks 7/3 D-Day Weekend: 8/19–20 Rib Burn-Off: 9/9–11

Make your Summer reservations now, before we’re booked! Packages available. 440.466.8668 www.TheLakehouseInn.com

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M – EEat – SShop Meet h – EEnjoy j Along the Waterfront

A Picturesque it & SSecluded l d d Wi Winery Extensive Lunch & Dinner Menus, Outdoor Patio Seating

Amusements, Restaurants, Just one mile west of Rt. 11 on Rt. 531 Live Music, Shops, Wineries, Camping, Farmers Market: Sundays thru 10/9 Lodging, and the Mile-Long Beach Glass Fest: 6/25–26 Entertainment Strip on Lake Erie TABS Fest: The Arts on Bridge Street: 7/30–31 800.862.9948 www.VisitGenevaontheLake.com

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Wine & Walleye Fest: 8/27–28

Award-winning wine & full-service restaurant overlooking Lake Erie!

NEWS

Live Entertainment: Thurs – Sun. Open 7 days a week.

866.826.9975 www.TheLodgeAtGeneva.com

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WIN A WINE COUNTRY GET GETAWAY ETA AWAY ffor two! Enjoy the amenities of The Lodge at Geneva-on-the-Lake while you experience Ohio’s premier viticulture region: Ashtabula County! Enter online at: www.VisitAshtabulaCounty.com

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Weird Pittsburgh

SEND YOUR LOCAL WEIRD NEWS TO INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

+ presents

PET of the WEEK

Two students at Quaker Valley High School, in Sewickley, wanted to see whether they could sneak quotes from Hitler, Stalin and ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi into their yearbook. It turns out they could. “Originally, I thought, ‘OK, there’s no way they’re going to let me do this,’” one of the pranksters, Joe Sutton, told WPXI. Yet when students received their yearbooks, there was Sutton’s face next to the words “‘Ideas are more powerful than guns. We would not let our enemies have guns, so why would we let them have ideas?’ Joseph Stalin” and “‘Be just: the unjust never prosper. Be valiant. Keep your word, even to your enemies,’ Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.” The school district is apologizing for the “regrettable mistake” and offering refunds and dictator-quote-sized stickers to place over the offending words.

+ Allyse Allyse is an adorable Dutch rabbit who enjoys the company of other rabbits. She is a little shy around people but warms up fairly quickly. Allyse most enjoys being around people who are calm and relaxed, but don’t think she won’t still play! This young lady loves to stay active by running around and playing with toys. Allyse is currently living in a foster home, so if you think she could be the rabbit for you, call Animal Friends to set up your meet and greet with her today!

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 14

Two years ago, the Harmar Township Board of Supervisors decided to spruce up the municipal building by inviting local art students in grades eight through 12 to design and paint a mural. It shows a tree, each quadrant depicting the plant in a different season, with the roots spelling out the name of the township. “[S]tudents who put paint to the entryway wall could someday come back with their own children, point to the mural and tell them the story of how they did that,” wrote the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s Brian C. Rittmeyer back in March 2014. Sorry, kids, not gonna happen; the new board has decided your art sucks. “It wasn’t professionally done,” Supervisor Bob Exler told the Trib last week. “It looks like kids did it.” The board voted 3-2 to have the mural painted over in order to make the entrance more “presentable” in the words of another supervisor. “The Man” is a fickle art critic.

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State lawmakers are considering revising Pennsylvania’s open-records law to fight a glut of what Erik Arneson, director of the Office of Open Records, describes as frivolous requests from prison inmates. According to a reporter for the Community Newspaper Holdings Inc. group, inmates filed 1,414 of the 2,926 appeals the office received in 2015, but few were directly related to their cases, says Arneson. Most seem to be the result of curiosity, spare time, access to mail, and a vague understanding of the open-record system from having endured court proceedings. For example, one inmate filed an appeal after the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board failed to respond to his letter asking whether the state stockpiles milk. The change would limit open-record requests from inmates to materials related to their cases.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016

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“We haven’t had a ninja running around ever,” Ambridge Police Chief Jim Mann told WPXI. Well, the covert warriors of Imperial Japan have apparently made their way to Beaver County, because a Circle K in Ambridge was robbed by a man dressed in all black and armed with a foot-long sword. “The Ninja Robber,” as WPXI dubbed him, might not be quite ready to join the Foot Clan. After threatening the clerk by displaying his sword, the man was handed “a minimal amount of cash barely worth the crime,” according to Mann. Trying to carry it out while fidgeting with his cosplay outfit, he stumbled, briefly dropping his gloves, surveillance cameras show. The incident took place in 33 seconds, sluggish by ninja standards.

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A priest allegedly stole at least $220,000 from the collection plates of Good Samaritan Parish in Ambridge

over the course of 10 years to fund his gambling habit. Thomas Paul Ross, a.k.a. Brother Ambrose Ross, tampered with seals the church placed on bags of parishioner money, taking the cash to casinos, the Beaver County district attorney’s office told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Ross apparently had a Players Card at the Rivers Casino and had lost $331,531 on it from 2010 to 2015. (His annual salary is $28,158.)

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A woman was hospitalized after she was hit by her own car in the drivethrough lane of a McDonald’s in Mount Pleasant. The Trib reports that the 76-yearold woman dropped her bag of food when it was passed to her. She then opened the door of her Toyota Camry and leaned over to retrieve it. The car lurched forward, expelled her, hit the building and then rolled backward, striking her.

WAYNOVISION


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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

McGuireWoods, LLP Peoples PNC Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. A-1 Realty, Inc. Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff Atlas Dental Specialists

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from Major League, but they should’ve been. The Traverse City Beach Bums are the reigning champions, and the Wild Things hope to unseat them in 2016. The Wild Things haven’t been without success; they won division titles in 2002, and from 2004-2007. We took them from Canton, Ohio, where they were known as the Crocodiles. Kent Tekulve helped get the Wild Things going in their inaugural 2002 campaign. The former Pirates great was director of baseball operations and led the team to the Frontier League Championship, only to lose to the stupid Richmond Roosters. Since then, with the exception of 2012 and 2013, Washington has been pretty successful. The Wild Things mascot, like his Pirate Parrot counterpart, has also been embroiled in controversy. Last year, the maker of the mascot was charged by North Franklin police for taking money for a mascot costume, but not providing the costume. I had no idea scumbags existed in the seemingly benign world of fluffy mascots. The Wild Things have sent a couple of players to the big leagues. Vidal Nuno is currently a relief pitcher for the Seattle Mariners, and former Pirate Quincy Latimore is still in the Orioles organization. He’s with the Bowie BaySox now, waiting to crack the O’s roster. Players in the Frontier League have an age limit of 27; after that they kick you out. Some parents wish they could deliver that kind of tough love. Not only are players out the door at 27, but they live off $600 to $1,600 a month, based on experience. The money comes in for only three months a year. But the Meadows Casino is nearby if they want to parlay that cash. It’s a great night for a family, lots of giveaways, a friendly staff, and the purity of baseball without millionaires and their attitudes. Seats are as low as $7, nice and cheap, the way I like it. The Wild Things play from late May to late August, Upcoming opponents for the June 14-19 homestand include the Joliet Slammers and the Windy City Thunderbolts. The Wild Things are the best thing to come out of Washington County since Ken Griffey Jr., the Trolley Museum and the Whiskey Rebellion.

THEY PLAY FOR LITTLE MONEY AND A SLIGHT HOPE THAT THEIR DREAMS MIGHT STILL COME TRUE.

ST SOLD OUT! TICKETS ALMO S.ORG W AT MATTRES O N SE A H C R PU

UPMC & UPMC Health Plan Anonymous Allegheny Health Network & Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield CGI AIO (Associates in Ophthalmology) Dr. Lisa Cibik and Bernie Kobosky J.A. Sauer Co.

IF MAURICE SENDAK ever got you wondering where the wild things are, it turns out they’re down the road in Washington County. The Washington Wild Things just started their 15th season as a member of the Frontier League. It’s an independent league with no major-league affiliation, one of eight such leagues in the country. The Frontier League has the distinction of sending the most players (27) to the majors of all of the rogue leagues. This league is akin to a halfway house for baseball players — they play for little money and a slight hope that their dreams might still come true. Sounds like me, except for the athletic part. Consol Energy Park, just off I-70 in Washington, is a 3,200-seat stadium equipped with a million-dollar scoreboard. These players run out every ground ball, dive for every fly ball and order fries with every meal. Wild Things skipper Gregg Langbehn is in his first season after a lot of success as manager of the Traverse City Beach Bums. It’s nice to see that the state of Michigan also considers any piece of land near any body of water to be a beach. We do it with Erie in Pennsylvania, and Ohio bases its whole tourism pitch on going to its beaches. Langbehn’s hitting coach is former major-leaguer Mike Marshall. Marshall put together a very respectable career with the Los Angeles Dodgers and was on two World Series winners, in 1981 and 1988. He also spent a year in Japan as a member of the Nippon Ham Fighters; thank him for his service in the fight against ham. Marshall even dated Go-Go’s singer Belinda Carlisle for a short time, making him possibly the only Washington County resident with that distinction. The Frontier League is a 12-team organization in the Midwest with a constantly changing array of teams. The Johnstown Johnnies, for example, were once in the league. This year, teams include the Lake Erie Crushers, the Florence Freedom, the River City Rascals, the Schaumburg Boomers and the Normal CornBelters. So as you can see, Wild Things is definitely one of the better names. They weren’t named for the Charlie Sheen character Ricky “Wild Thing” Vaughn,

412.231.3169 MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN A N D M E M B E R OF T HE Q M ORN I N G S HOW E AC H WE E K DAY MO R NING O N Q 9 2 . 9 F M. F O L L OW HI M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016


1991

2016

THIS WEEK IN CITY PAPER HISTORY

In celebration of City Paper’s 25th Anniversary, each week we’re looking back at the headlines, pictures and people who graced our pages over the years.

LATE-NIGHT ROUNDUP (June 6, 1996)

CP writer Ralph Reiland reported on the efforts of Pittsburgh City Council to enact a curfew for city youths under the age of 17. The plan would cost more than $213,000 to implement; a majority of those funds would go to establishing and operating a Downtown detention center for wayward juvenile night-owls. Opponents said the proposed law was too broad-based, and lumped kids hanging out at places like the Beehive with kids who might be up to mischief. The law would eventually pass, but between 1996 and 2004, a total of five kids were picked up for curfew violations and the law was scuttled. It was revived and revised in 2009 by Mayor Luke Ravenstahl despite the fear that it might have kept the 13-year-old mayor from hitting the clubs.

MUSIC MAN

(June 10, 1998) CP contributor David Pulizzi told the story of Pittsburgh blues legend Chizmo Charles. At nearly 70 years old, Chizmo was on the cusp of releasing two albums, the first of his long career. How important was he to Pittsburgh’s blues scene? His longtime bandmate Gil Snyder explained: “In Chicago they have Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. We have Chizmo. He’s the real thing, like Coca-Cola.” Making his first recordings so late in life didn’t seem strange to Chizmo, a life-long student of his craft: “See, you never know music. It’s always something different and you’re always learning. You think you know music, but you don’t know nothin’.”

former candidate Hop Kendrick told Mock. Sadly, 11 years later, Kendrick’s words still ring true.

On June 5, 2012, news editor Charlie Deitch looks into the practice of some health-insurance companies refusing to pay for experimental treatments that could save patients’ lives. The story profiled terminal-cancer patient Brenda Brunner, who has since succumbed to the disease. As her health was declining, Brunner often wondered whether the experimental treatments she was denied early in her illness could have prolonged her life. “I started getting letters informing me that there was a clause in my policy that they wouldn’t pay for any medical treatments associated with clinical trials or experimental treatments,” said Brunner. “We couldn’t afford the costs otherwise and I had to leave the trial. I was absolutely devastated.” According to the American Cancer Society, of the 20 percent of cancer patients eligible to take part in a clinical trial, only 5 percent actually do, and part of the reason is cost. While 27 states have laws requiring insurance companies to pay for some costs associated with clinical trials, Pennsylvania is not one of them. “The insurance companies are against this because they hate mandates,” said state Rep. Tony DeLuca, the top Democrat on the state’s House Insurance Committee. “But when you get down to it, this shouldn’t be about money. It’s about saving people’s lives.” Added Brunner: “I’ve been through so many treatments that I’m just not healthy enough to be accepted anymore. You always wonder, ‘What if ... what if ...’ The worst part for me is that I’m never going to know.” Pennsylvania still doesn’t require insurance companies to pay for experimental treatments.

STILL WAITING (June 8, 2005)

Staff writer Brentin Mock delves into the long-asked question: “Is electing a black mayor outside the realm of possibility for this city?” For

PUBLIC DICK (June 7, 2007)

By the time he ran for re-election in 2007, everyone knew Rick Santorum probably didn’t really live in the Penn Hills district in which he was registered to vote. Editor Chris Potter sounded off on the Santorum residency fracas after the ultra-conservative senator claimed that his neighbors — who were challenging his residency in court — were “operatives” for Democratic opponent Bob Casey. “Intimidating and scaring my family — and they feel threatened, let me assure you — is thuggery,” Santorum said of the neighbors, whom Santorum alleged trespassed on his property. The neighbors denied that claim, however, as Potter wrote: “If [they] did trespass on his property they’ve spent more time there than he has.”

SICK MUSIC

(June 5, 2012) Music Editor Aaron Jentzen takes a look at the difficulties full-time musicians have getting health insurance. According to a survey by the Future of Music Coalition, one in three musicians is uninsured — nearly twice the 17 percent national average. The story focuses on musician Erny Papay, a musician and music teacher who pays more than $1,400 a month in health-insurance premiums. Jentzen also talks to Papay’s son, Jeremy, a musician with the Ringling Brothers circus, who gets health-care through his job. “It’s funny,” Jeremy said. “But joining the circus was one of the most responsible decisions of my life.”

the first 189 years of municipal government in Pittsburgh, only white men and one woman (Sophie Masloff) had held the city’s top job. Even the African-American leaders interviewed by Mock weren’t so sure it could ever happen. “I don’t ever see a black mayor happening,”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016


TRUSTARTS.ORG/TRAF HEADLINE CONCERTS

6/8 CHARLES BRADLEY & HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES + PETER WOLF AND THE MIDNIGHT TRAVELERS

6/9 BETH ORTON 6/10 GUSTER 6/11 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 6/12 LAKE STREET DIVE + RUBY AMANFU ARTIST MARKET

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DAILY IN POINT STATE PARK + WEEKENDS IN GATEWAY CENTER

FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH THURSDAY, 6/9 | 12 - 9 PM

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THE NACHOS HAD CHORIZO, BEER CHEESE, WHITE CHEDDAR AND CHILI-LIME SAUCE

FROZEN IN PLACE

{BY RYAN DETO}

Stickler’s Ice Pop Company is no longer a pop-up stand — the popsicle-maker has found a new home. The formerly roving “Pop Stop” has settled into a cleanly furnished brick-andmortar space in Millvale, located next to a tiny park complete with a gazebo. “We started on a bike, then moved up to car, and now we finally have a store,” says co-owner Todd Saulle, who runs Stickler’s with his wife, Laura. The new location on Evergreen Avenue has already granted Saulle a number of benefits. There is now space to install his special popsicle freezer, imported from New Zealand. Lots of windows provide a sunny environment to cultivate the fresh herbs used in recipes. An old-fashioned shaved-ice machine sits on a counter, and there is a big wall to hang community art. Saulle says the store plans to be open Wednesday through Friday from noon to around 8 or 9 p.m., and 4-9 p.m. on Saturday. Fans of the ice-pop cart can expect more of the same from Stickler’s. The popsicles are still made completely from scratch. Besides traditional favorites like strawberry and tropical fruit, the Saulles are experimenting with new flavors such as coffee with little donut chunks, raspberry with fresh mint, and even a red-white-and-blue bomb pop for the Fourth of July. For that one, Saulle says, they might have to break away from their all-natural credo. “We can never get anything in nature to be that blue.” RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1149 Evergreen Ave., Millvale. 412-444-8513 or www.sticklerspgh.com

the

FEED

The Bloomfield Saturday market is back, providing a mix of produce and food vendors, music, kids’ activities and special events. Sat., June 12, is Pet Day, so bring your well-behaved animals out for a stroll. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. www.bloomfieldnow.org

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{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Pierogi with grilled onions, cranberries, Brussels sprouts and apple vinaigrette

BEYOND BAR FOOD {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

IME WAS, it was noteworthy if a bar had a salad or even fried zucchini on its menu alongside its burgers, fries and wings. Nowadays, practically all but the most basic sports bar goes well beyond that, but the choices can seem kind of rote: potstickers, mac-and-cheese, Brussels sprouts, flatbread. Now that even the upgrades are predictable, bar kitchens are seeking the next wave. Enter the gastropub. But just off the Cranberry exit on I-79, nestled amidst chains along the suburban strip, Pig Iron Public House is taking innovation in a different direction. With ginormous screens tuned to the Pens game in view of every table, a whopping 66 beers on tap and a kids’ menu, Pig Iron is a sort of hybrid of a sports bar on steroids and a family restaurant.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016

As the name suggests, steel-era nostalgia is part of the mix. The blast-furnace diagram blown up to floor-to-ceiling dimensions provided a topic of educational conversation with our kids while

PIG IRON PUBLIC HOUSE

926 Sheraton Drive, Cranberry. 724-553-5592 HOURS: Mon.-Wed. 11 a.m.-midnight; Thu.-Fri. 11 a.m.-2 a.m.; Sat.-Sun. 10 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: $5-15 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED we waited for our food, but we couldn’t shake the feeling that it seemed a little contrived in Cranberry, whose history of farmland-turned-upper-middle-class-

suburb occurred at a time and place removed from the mills. But judging by the parking lot — almost completely full on a Wednesday evening — the people of Cranberry are hungry for what Pig Iron has to offer. The menu started out familiar, with wings, burgers, and sandwiches with fries and slaw on them. But when we looked beyond these staples, things got a lot more interesting, as in a meatball made with lamb, beef and almonds, and stuffed with mozzarella and goat cheese. Or nachos with chorizo, beer cheese, white cheddar and chili-lime sauce. Indeed, there was very little on the menu that was by the book. We started with sweet-potato waffle fries, which were deeply colored, crisp and light. A smattering of salt played against the sweet potatoes’ inherent sweetness,


as did tangy and subtly bitter notes in the accompanying honey-maple-mustard dipping sauce. But Jason thought the two sources of sweetness in the sauce were too much, piling on the sugar at the expense of balance. Sweet-potato pancakes were even better: not too heavy, browned on top and crisp at the edges, and served with a steel measuring cup of ginger-infused maple syrup that was out of this world. Between traditional wings and “pig wings” — three hefty pieces of shank — and a plethora of sauces from chili-lime to a house-made blend of garlic, BBQ and hot sauce, wing-lovers have plenty to choose from. We chose pig wings. The meat was very satisfying, nearly fall-apart tender with charred edges. Although the sweet whiskey-BBQ sauce was as thick as a glaze, it wasn’t candy-sweet, allowing the meat’s smokiness to come to the fore. Pierogi were one item at Pig Iron that wasn’t re-imagined, but served in the classic fashion, with butter and onions. They were both exactly right and a little bit dull, a good introduction to the dish but also one we’d want to move past to fillings beyond plain potato. When served as a pub plate, they’re combined with Brussels sprouts, dotted with cranberries and dressed with an apple vinaigrette. The house burger featured a fried egg and grilled tomato, plus pickled red onion and red-pepper mayo. The burger was fine, but the stars of this show were the tomato, as vibrant as a peak-season slice, and mayo, which subtly but unmistakably suffused a pretty big sandwich with flavor. The pulled-pork sandwich also took a workmanlike meat and made it sing. The pork, with middling texture and not much smoke to it, was only lightly coated with BBQ sauce, leaving room for thin slices of Granny Smith apple, plus apple butter on the brioche bun, while finely shredded vinegar-dressed coleslaw cut the richness of the meat and the sweetness of the fruit. Finally, a grilled gruyere-and-whitecheddar sandwich, with crumbled chorizo, roasted peppers, arugula and horseradish sauce, was truly grilled on a panini press for a delectable squashing and melding of the ingredients into one gooey, sophisticated filling. We seem to be entering a baroque period of cooking, in which chefs composing dishes out of many ingredients can come uncomfortably close to a kitchen-sink approach. If we had any doubts that a bar in Cranberry would really be able to integrate disparate ingredients, and to balance so much savory and sweet, Pig Iron Public House put them to rest. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[PERSONAL CHEF]

VEGAN ONEPOT CURE {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

STIFF

I come from a long line of people who spent most of their time in the kitchen. I used to perch on a stool and watch with reverence as my mom confidently buzzed around our counters. Usually I’d get roped in when she planned and cooked dinner for hundreds at community events. She was always such a confident cook, and I’m always a little intimidated when I cook for her. But when she had double kneereplacement surgery, all I wanted to do was feed her. After a few debilitating months of pain and recovery, she’d lost a lot of weight and found it difficult to eat while taking pain medication. She is a former hippie and Mollie Katzen devotee (The Enchanted Broccoli Forest is the first cookbook I ever saw), and I knew she would want to maintain her mostly vegan diet. This recipe had all the calcium, iron and protein she needed to recover, all in one hearty bowl.

and gives great

PLEASURE? Harris GrilL 5747 Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside

412.362.5273

HarrisGrill.com

Shiloh GrilL

INGREDIENTS • 1 yellow onion, diced • 5 cloves garlic, minced • 1 medium shallot, diced • 2 large carrots, trimmed, peeled and diced • 1 14.5 oz. can crushed tomatoes (spiced, if possible) • 1½ cups flat leaf parsley, chopped • 1 tbsp dried basil or ¼ cup fresh basil, chopped • 3 cups hearty pasta, like orecchiette • 12 oz. canned butter beans • 12 oz. canned cannellini beans • 1 pound Swiss chard, deveined • 2 quarts vegetable broth • smoked paprika, salt, cumin, all to taste

123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

412.431.4000

theShilohGrill.com

INSTRUCTIONS Boil salted water for pasta and cook until al dente. (Slight undercooking is important, so the noodles don’t get soggy when you add them to the broth.) Drain and set aside. While the pasta is cooking, prepare the vegetables. Heat olive oil in the soup pot, and sauté onions and garlic until translucent. Add some of the spices to the oil to infuse extra flavor, and let cook about one minute. Add carrots, tomatoes and broth, and bring to a boil while the carrots soften. Add the beans. Cook until all ingredients are combined and hot. Add parsley and basil, and simmer for 10 minutes. Finally, add the pasta, heat through and serve immediately. Serves 8-10; good for leftovers. WE WANT YOUR PERSONAL RECIPES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM. EMAIL THEM TO CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM.

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BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR

bar • billiards • burgers

MONDAY & THURSDAY $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________ TUESDAY Burger, Beer, & Bourbon $11.95 ____________________ WEDNESDAY Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________ FRIDAY Sangria $3 ____________________ SATURDAY & SUNDAY 10:30am-3pm

$5 Margaritas $1 off Mexican Beers $2 off appetizers

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm

900 Western Ave. North side 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

ESTd

1910

TAVERN ...........

GO BIGHAM OR GO HOME MT. WASHINGTON

.

PITTSBURGH, PA

321 Bigham Street Mount Washington 412-431-9313 bighamtavern.com

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

[ON THE ROCKS]

One stop along the CP bar crawl: Lou’s Corner Bar, in Bloomfield

NEW MENU

City Paper’s food-and-drink section has undergone some changes {BY CELINE ROBERTS} FOR YEARS, City Paper has had a food section dedicated to showcasing the people and places responsible for building and innovating Pittsburgh’s culinary scene. We haven’t been short on inspiration, or new and delicious places to dine. In recent years, the “On the Rocks” column has been our sole homage to eating’s natural companion: drinking. This week, we’re proud to debut an extended food-and-booze section to match Pittsburgh’s growing interest in all things tasty and imbibable. We thought: What better week to introduce these changes than our Drink Issue. Just like our massive bar crawl (featured on page 24), we want to keep the focus on the local and regional artisans who are setting our city apart. We hope to give farmers, brewers, distillers, bartenders, chefs and home cooks of all types a place to let the community know what things the city has in store for its palate. First, we’re expanding “On the Rocks” to provide readers with more details about the subjects, places and products we’re highlighting. If you think of this column as a martini, thus far we’ve only been able to give you the vodka (or gin, depending on your preference) and the vermouth. But what’s a martini without the olives? It’s the little extras. A new feature, “Booze Battles” takes a playful look at the nuances of cocktail-making that differ from bar to bar. While you may have your favorite cocktail that you can reliably order anywhere, we’re willing to bet it’s the little differences that separate your favorites from the bar next door. We’ll be traveling the city to compare and contrast the same drink at two different bars,

or made by two different bartenders, in a light-hearted competition that our readers can sound off on. Anyone who’s ever been to a bar — and we’re assuming that’s most of you — knows that it can be overwhelming to choose from the wide sweep of offerings. “One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer” will temper some of that anxiety with weekly profiles on the beer, wine and spirits found at local watering holes and retail shops. We’re not forgetting the food side of “food and drink.” For everyone who likes to cook, we’re introducing a new column called “Personal Chef.” Food is a very personal thing. It’s a universal human experience to gather and eat. We want to hear your stories about recipes you connect with and why. Send us that recipe you learned in college to impress a date, or maybe the comfort food your family makes in time of crisis. We don’t just want the list of ingredients; share the story of what makes it special. Finally, we’re bringing you sustenance for your ears. “Soundbite,” our audio culinary segment, is expanding to its own short podcast. Since January, I’ve been talking to folks at their workplaces to give our listeners a closer look into the lives of those who help put food on your table. Additionally, we’ll be offering a quick look into the history behind various food, drink and products with our new short segment, “5 Minutes in Food History.” Our goal with these new features is not only to educate and inform you about the Pittsburgh culinary scene, but also to inspire you to go out and experience it for yourselves. C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016


BOOZE BATTLES {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Each week, two mixologists will put their own spins on the same drink in a head-to-head battle. Go to the bars, taste them both and tell us your thoughts on each by tagging @pghcitypaper on Twitter or Instagram and use #CPBoozeBattles. If you want to be a part of Booze Battles, send an email to food-and-beverage writer Celine Roberts, celine@pghcitypaper.com.

THE DRINK: HORSE’S NECK

VS. The bar at Ace Hotel

Acacia

120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty

2108 E. Carson St., South Side

INGREDIENTS: Bourbon, club soda, ginger-turmeric-honey syrup, lime wheel and candied ginger garnish

INGREDIENTS: Bourbon, ginger ale mixed with Jamaica’s Finest Ginger Beer, lemon, lemon peel garnish

OUR TAKE: The ginger syrup, underscored by the turmeric, gives the drink a spicier kick than you get from using ginger beer. Club soda adds a refreshing lightness to the drink while cutting some of the sugar. Working on more of an “update to a classic” model, it would be easy to drink these down without noticing how much bourbon was in each glass.

OUR TAKE: The arc of the lemon peel curling around the top of the glass enhances the citrus notes from the first sip. It’s a very bourbon-forward and balanced cocktail. The carbonation is subtle, just noticeable and tempered by the bourbon. While light and refreshing, the minimal carbonation made it more like a traditional cocktail than a fizzy bourbon-flavored soda.

Check out our new podcast feature, 5 Minutes in Food History. This week, we talk with bartender Max Stein, of Hidden Harbor in Squirrel Hill, about the classic tiki cocktail, The Zombie. www.pghcitypaper.com

One Bordeaux, One Scotch, One Beer Sierra Nevada, Otra Vez $9.99/six-pack

They say never drink a beer with cactus in it, but “they” are almost always wrong. Otra Vez is a gose — a Germa-style sour beer — which means it tastes like it’s gone bad but it hasn’t. The beer is tart, bizarre and despite all that, pretty delightful. BY ALEX GORDON

OTRA VEZ CAN BE FOUND AT AREA BARS INCLUDING:

OTB Bicycle Café, 2518 E. Carson St., South Side; Hough’s, 563 Greenfield Ave., Greenfield; and Blue Dust, 601 Amity St., Homestead.

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THE EPIC CRAWL

WANT TO R FOLLOW IN OU ) EN K (DRUN FOOTSTEPS? om

itypaper.c Visit www.pghc ive map ra te for an in ct t of the bars we hi l! aw cr r ou on

by Celine Roberts

{PHOTO BY BILLY LUDT}

with bar napkins illustrated by D.J. Coffman

City Paper staffers set out on a crawl to our favorite bars in the city

Bar crawls are time-honored traditions in American drinking culture. The first typically occurred on your 21st birthday, when you were young and invincible. Your older friends probably drew up an intimidating list of watering holes and kept it going until you either gave up or puked. It didn’t matter, because at that age you were able to chug pitchers of cheap beer in a single gulp. The next day wasn’t an issue because you had the recovery time of a superhero. As you aged, though, these expeditions became something you did for charity, when your friends visited your city or when your co-workers harassed you into it. Here at City Paper, I am that co-worker and I have no shame. The goal of this particular adventure was to cover as much ground — physically and culturally — as we could in one day. There are dozens of bars that could (and maybe should) have been included on this list, but our collective livers, the limits of the space/time continuum, and things as simple as road construction or incompatible hours caused us to fall short of perfection. However, the resulting list is a collection of neighborhood bars, cocktail lounges, breweries and dives throughout Pittsburgh that have stolen our hearts in one way or another.

Armed with a company credit card, a list of questions, an artist, a designated driver, five game staff members and a rather cramped SUV, we set out to give you a guide for your next night out. Our first stop was Villa Reale, a bar behind our building where CP staffers have been gathering over drinks (never during working hours, of course) for years. >>>

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The Drink Issue 2:30 P.M.

Villa Reale

628 Smithfield St., Downtown DRINK: Bombay gin and tonic with lime WHO’S HERE: Everyone and their grandmother: Bus commuters, the homeless, expensively dressed businessmen, yinzers and City Paper staffers frequent this dive with its own clandestine alley entrance. ENTERTAINMENT: The clientele and the friendly bartenders will make sure you can count on at least one unexpected conversation. DRINK OPTIONS: Well to mid-shelf liquor and domestic beers. Blue Moon is as “craft” as it gets. SNACKS: You’re in luck since this bar is in the back off a pizza shop. To complete the experience, grab a soft-serve cone on your way to the bus.

3 P.M.

James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy 4224 Foreland St., North Side Butler Brown Ale, DRINK: Reclamation Brewing Company, Butler WHO TO BRING: Jazz lovers or a first date. ENTERTAINMENT: The Ballroom and Speakeasy host intimate performances of acoustic, jazz and blues music most nights of the week. Every other Sunday, get your kicks at the popular drag brunch. SPECIAL FEATURES: Once a genuine Prohibition-era speakeasy, and then a secret socialist gathering place, the space has history. The original hand-carved bar in the dining room was moved down from the ballroom.

3:45 P.M.

Smallman Galley 54 21st St., Strip District DRINK:

Bobby Bonilla’s Tortillas

(a tortilla-chip-infused Del Maguey Vida, lime and agave cocktail, served with a side of chips)

AMBIANCE: The hippest cafeteria you’ve ever been in. Keywords: exposed brick. THIRST QUENCHERS: The cocktail menu tiptoes into the experimental and embodies a theme. The Bobby Bonilla’s Tortillas is on its current Pittsburgh Pirates-themed menu, along with the Dock LSD, named after the former Pirates pitcher Dock Ellis, who once threw a no-hitter while high on acid. The beer list stocks only Pennsylvania brews. SNACKS: Got the drunchies (drunk munchies)? Choose between four restaurants all in the same space, serving a wide array of dishes. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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ation. “Come for the libco tion.” Stay for the nversa

THE EPIC CRAWL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

4:10 P.M.

Gooski’s

Hours Monday and Tuesday - 11AM-3PM Wednesday and Thursday - 11AM-11PM Friday and Saturday - 11AM-Midnight

3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill DRINK:

Iron City

Reclamation Brewing Company 221 S Main St, Butler, PA 16001 Formerly the Tin Angel

WHO TO BRING: Your pals, out-of-towners looking for grit BAR GAMES: Pinball, pingpong, pool and poker machines adorned with cartoons of sexy ladies SNACKS: Nine flavors of highly regarded wings, plus pierogies. Or smoke instead, since you can buy packs from what appears to be one of the city’s last cigarette-vending machines. ENTERTAINMENT: This is where Gooksi’s really shines. Shows, mostly of the rock and punk variety, happen two or three nights a week on a small stage with a giant American flag behind it. SPECIAL FEATURES: The posted bar rules, which are: “Know what you want. Have your money ready. Don’t make us kill you. P.S. No making out at the bar. Crying at the bar is also forbidden. If you bring someone here, you’re responsible for them. If they fuck up, you’re to blame.”

Dining D iningg with with a

Father’s Day Brunch! June 19th, 10am-2pm

(call for reserv ations)

1200 GRANDVIEW AVENUE • MT. WASHINGTON • 412-381-1919 • VUE412.COM

4:40 P.M.

Butterjoint 214 N. Craig St., Oakland DRINK:

Down to Earth Session Ale, 21st Amendment Brewery, San Francisco

$6 Craft Cocktails Monday - Friday 5-7PM thesummitpgh.com

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thesummit412

AMBIANCE: This bar adjoins Legume’s dining room and is of the city’s more intimate, cozy places to have a drink. (On cold winter nights, it’s a warmly lit haven where time seems irrelevant.) The feeling of intimacy extends to the other patrons, and you’ll often find yourself in conversation with friendly strangers. Typically busy. THIRST QUENCHERS: A well-curated cocktail list of both in-house creations and classics. Beers are all American-made craft brews, including popular beers from regional breweries. Wine is available by the glass. WEIRDEST THING OVERHEARD BY THE BARTENDER: “This burger is more expensive than you are,” from an older man to his female companion, says bar manager Eric Werner.


The Drink Issue

Family Owned Since 1872 +ʋQɍ&UɈԳHɍ ʖɚʃȱɏ3ʑʜQʣʉʙYʋʜLɈ:ɵOGɡ FRESH & LOCAL

5:30 P.M.

Lou’s Little Corner Bar, 4924 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield DRINK:

Blue Moon Belgian White, Blue Moon Brewing Co., Golden, Colo.

AMBIANCE: A classic yinzer dive with a back porch that feels like it’s in n your own yard. The service is incredibly friendly, and so are the regulars. WHO TO BRING: Your closest friends. HAPPY HOUR: 5-7 p.m. Monday through Friday, domestic beers are $2.50 0 and 16-ounce PBRs are $2. WEIRDEST THING OVERHEARD BY THE BARTENDER: “Picture me with my ass in the air smeared in Vaseline.”

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,6SINCE 1933 3$1

For more info Vecenie Dist. Co. beersince1933.com

V(&(1,( D

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THE EPIC CRAWL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

SHOOTER JENNINGS Sunday, June 12

6:15 P P.M. M

RATT Thursday, June 16 SOUL ASYLUM / ENGLISH BEAT

Blue Moon 5115 Butler St., Lawrenceville DRINK:

Wednesday, June 22

Whiskey and soda

THE YARDBIRDS Wednesday, July 6

TORONZO CANNON Thursday, July 7

1120 East Carson St 412.918.1006

MOLLY HATCHET Thursday, July 14

- - - - - all shows 8pm - - - - -

www.streetsoncarson412.com

D

K RIN

Tickets at jergels.com

YOUR W AY

BELGIUM THE MORE BEER YOU TASTE, the greater your chances of winning a trip to Belgium & other great prizes!

TYPE OF BAR: “It’s for everyone, no matter who you are,” says bartender Rob Dunham. The decor ranges from multi-colored lights and a back bar donated from a previous owner’s castle to a caged, life-size demon dummy with a giant penis. SPECIALTY DRINKS: The Strong Island, Blue Moon’s version of Long Island Ice Tea HAPPY HOUR: Everyday 7 to 9 p.m., it’s $1 off all drinks. ENTERTAINMENT: Friday karaoke, Saturday drag shows, Tuesday show-tune night and Wednesdays are open stage. Best of all? No cover charge.

6:45 P.M.

The Allegheny Wine Mixer 5326 Butler St., Lawrenceville DRINK:

A bottle of Gurrieri Vini La Favola “Fravolato,” a dry mediumbodied red wine from Sicily AMBIANCE: This is a wine bar that defies pretension by making you feel classy and welcome from the moment you walk in the door. Silly art adorns the walls, while delicious wine and cocktails fill the menu. WHO TO BRING: Your cool parents.

1001 Liberty Ave. Pittsburgh

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412.567.2300 billsbarandburger.com

SPECIAL FEATURES: AWM changes its regional wine focus with the seasons. Last winter was all about Portuguese wine, and spring has moved on to Sicily. It’s an excellent way to see what a country has to offer. SNACKS: High-quality cheese, charcuterie and chocolates galore


The Drink Issue

7:30 P.M.

Kelly’s Bar & Lounge, 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty DRINK:

A Rusty Nail, the daily special cocktail ail

WHO’S HERE: Industry professionals, couples and larger groups roups ranging in age from mid20s to mid-50s. There are plenty of regulars. HAPPY HOUR: Monday through Friday, 5-7 p.m., with a rotating $4 daily cocktail special SPECIAL FEATURES: An Art Deco ambiance that’s comforting and familial, and a back patio perfect for summer drinking SNACKS: The mac-and-cheese is famous and there’s also other slightly refined, but not frilly, pub grub. SMOKING: Only outside CONTINUES ON PG. 30

C’MON DOWN TO THE LAUREL HIGHLANDS FOR THE “SUMMER OF CRAFT” BEER AND FOOD AT WHITEHORSE BREWING HOURS: FRI 5-9, SAT 11-7, SUN 12-5

FOOD TRUCKS EVERY SATURDAY CHECK WEBSITE FOR SCHEDULE WWW.WHITEHORSEBREWING.COM 824 DIAMOND ST, BERLIN, PA 15530 NEWS

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8:45 P.M.

Hidden Harbor

1708 Shady Ave., Squirrel Hill DRINK:

Milk Punch, a rum-based cocktail

TYPE OF BAR: Tiki! WHO’S HERE: People who want to have a drinking experience instead of just a drink. Anyone seeking novelty. NOISE LEVEL: Conversation-level noise with a reggae background SPECIAL FEATURES: Weird Science Wednesdays that see the bartenders whip up “weird molecular and science-forward takes on tiki cocktails.” WEIRDEST THING OVERHEARD BY THE BARTENDER: “I’m a part time apiarist and a full-time chiropractor.”

9:30 P.M.

Brew Gentlemen Beer Company 512 Braddock Ave., Braddock

12.50

$ SHARPSBURG

LITE BUCKETS

DRINK:

Loose Seal Spring Saison, Brew Gentlemen Beer Company, Braddock

2.50

$

LITE DRAFTS

AMBIANCE: Clean, functional, modern, low key WHO TO BRING: Anyone who is a Pittsburgh-beer enthusiast. Your dog. HAPPY HOUR: Nope, but they are always releasing new beers.

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SPECIAL FEATURES: The bar hosts food-truck round-ups and yoga classes. Food trucks often stop by to provide the snacks for the evening. Franktuary was serving up dogs on the night we visited. WEIRDEST THING OVERHEARD BY THE BARTENDER: “So this drunk girl from the City Paper asked me what the weirdest thing I’d ever overheard was.” C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


The Drink Issue

THE HANGOVER

JOIN US!

June 20th - OTB North Park 5-7pm for Summer Solitice!

We were probably overambitious when we thought we could get to 14 or more bars in one night. After a solid eight hours of drinking and more than one heated argument about city bike lanes, we had to call it a night. Some met up with friends; one had to fetch the bike he had abandoned in the Strip District eight hours earlier; and I tipsily tricked a co-worker into finally watching Beyoncé’s Lemonade. But we had fallen short. So, for pride’s sake, we decided to visit the last three on the list. BY CELINE ROBERTS

2 P.M.

Birmingham Bridge Tavern, 2901 Sarah St., South Side DRINK:

Tangerine Swirl Cream Ale, Penn Brewery, Pittsburgh

TYPE OF BAR: An English-style neighborhood tavern that pays special attention to sports. Both floors have a couple of TVs that show whatever game is in season. SPECIAL FEATURES: The 120-year-old building started life as Hotel Lieb, and was reputedly known as one of the best brothels in the city. In the 1930s, to facilitate its own expansion plans, J&L Steel paid for the building to be moved across the street to where it stands now. HAPPY HOUR: 50 cents off all drinks from 4-6 p.m. Monday through Friday WEIRDEST THING OVERHEARD BY THE BARTENDER: “It usually comes out of my mouth,” says owner John Hauck. “We once had a sweet old lady tell us, ‘Ya know, this used to be a whorehouse,’ she had pictures that she showed us of women sitting on the steps.” CONTINUES ON PG. 34

WIN H G R U B S PITT L L A B E S A B S! T E K C I T

69.com 9 m f b o .b w w w to o G ns for all the locatio win. & your chances to

EAST LIBERTY HAS A NEW PLACE TO DINE IN THE SUN Wallace’s Taproom features an amazing outdoor patio and even more amazing signature cocktails and appetizers. You can even bring Fido along as we are 100% pet friendly whether dining in the sun and hanging at the bar. Located in the new Hotel Indigo.

ndy Enjoy Summer Sha prizes! f o ts lo & ls ia c e Sp

123 North Highland Ave. Pittsburgh, PA

wallacestaproom.com NEWS

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5 P.M.

Täkō, 214 Sixthh St., Downtown DRINK:

Michelada helada (spicy beer cocktail)

AMBIANCE: Inside, it’s t’s dance club meets pirate ship meets str street-side t eet ett-si -s de -s e ta ttaqueria. taq a aq queria. Bar-stool seats on the outside give it the feel of a stationary food truck. SPECIALITY DRINKS: Margaritas imported ritas and mezcal. Beers are mostly impor orrte tted e selections from Spanish-speaking countries. NOISE LEVEL: Fucking loud WEIRDEST THING OVERHEARD BY THE BARTENDER: At the one one-year-anniversary ne-y year ear-anniversary ea -annivers party: “Well, no one died. And no one got pregnant. pretty gnant. I’d say it wass a pr pre tt zen tty tt year. We made no life and took no lives.”

5:30 P.M.

Acacia, 2108 E. Carson St., South Side DRINK:

Horse’s Neck (bourbon, ginger ale, ginger beer, lemon))

TYPE OF BAR: A speakeasy-style bar that’s easy to walk past if you aren’t looking for it. The low lighting and mellow mood make it a breath of fresh air on a night out in the South Side. WHO TO BRING: A date or a close friend. The vibe is intimate, but there’s plenty of fun to be had. SPECIALTY DRINKS: If you’re looking for a superbly made, detail-oriented cocktail, Acacia has a list full of them; drinks change frequently enough to keep bringing you back. Look for pours of hard-to-find spirits as well. C E L I N E @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

s p a T n e e t ix -S u n e M e l p - Sim ourced S y l l - Loca Pub and tap room located at

5601 Butler Street, Lawrenceville hopfarmbrewingco.com 34

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LOCAL

“IT’S MAVERICKS MUSIC; IT REALLY IS ITS OWN THING.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

NEW YEARS

GUITAR HERO {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

E

DDIE PEREZ knew from a very early

Emily Rodgers {PHOTO COURTESY OF EMILY RODGERS}

You’re unlikely to make it more than a paragraph into an article about Emily Rodgers’ music without reading words like melancholy, moody or Mazzy Star (this article included, apparently). Since debuting in 2005, she’s developed a mesmerizing low-key sound in the realm of alt-country, which, translated from music journalese, means roughly “has pedal steel guitar.” The songs are unrushed, the vocals are haunting and the production is subtle. The music is melancholy and moody, and it’s not an accident. “I wanna go to a concert and I wanna end up crying. I don’t wanna dance,” says Rodgers. “That’s what I want out of art, so that’s what I try to make.” This week marks the release of Rodgers’ third full-length, a 10-song album called Two Years, which will be released by Misra Records on June 10. It’s unquestionably her most complete piece of work to date, due at least in part to producer Mark Kramer — known simply as “Kramer”— who’s known for his work with seminal bands like Galaxie 500 and Low. Kramer also mixed and mastered her sophomore record Bright Day remotely, but the benefit of in-the-room collaboration is evident on Two Years. Take the slow-burning opener “No Last Call” as an example. As heard on the album, it’s a somber seven-minute tune with spare instrumentation, but it was originally written to be upbeat, something closer to a rock tune. Kramer suggested slowing it down, and the result is one of the most affecting songs on a record full of affecting songs. “I trust him implicitly. He’s a person I’d want to work with regardless of him having name recognition,” says Rodgers. “It is nice to have that, but even if he was just some regular guy on the street, he gets it.” Collaboration looms large on this album, even beyond the booth. The songs are too strong to require much accompaniment, but the subtle complements of Megan Williams’ violin and Allison Kacmar Richards’ bass make the album feel intangibly whole. Not everybody can make melancholy work, but Rodgers nails it on this album. The Two Years release show is at Club Café on June 18. If you’re like Rodgers, pack the Kleenex and leave the dancing shoes at home.

age that he wanted to be a rock god. “My heroes were Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Van Halen and Ace Frehley,” says Perez, lead guitarist of the Mavericks. “Everything a big-eyed boy would find fascinating about rock ’n’ roll, that was me. “I was 12 years old and my father took me to see ZZ Top and it blew my mind. I was never the same after that.” Perez began playing paying gigs at the age of 13, and would hone his guitar skills playing in other bands across Los Angeles. But in 1986, he heard a sound that would change his life. “That was the first time I heard Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Guitars, Cadillacs’ and it was amazing,” Perez says. “I hadn’t heard anything like that before. It was a modern spin on the classic honky-tonk music of the ’50s and ’60s. “Hearing that really turned me around and it gave me a focus. From then on I started to learn everything I could about that music. But then I also had that rock ’n’ roll background, too.” In 2003, Perez replaced Nick Kane as lead guitarist of the Mavericks. The Mavericks — fronted by Raul Malo, possibly one of the most distinctive and powerful vocalists performing today — had begun in the mid-’90s as a traditional country quartet. But by the early 2000s, the group was beginning to incorporate different styles, especially a bit of the Doug Sahm-ish Tex-Mex sound. The band broke up just two years into Perez’s tenure, but in 2013 reunited with In Time — a record unlike anything it, or any

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RAY LEWIS}

Eddie Perez rocks out

THE MAVERICKS 7 p.m. Fri., June 17, and 7 p.m. Sat., June 18. The Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $45-65 (two-show discount: $80-120). All ages. 412-368-5225 or www.librarymusichall.com

other band, for that matter, has ever produced. They followed it up last year with an even more progressive album entitled Mono. Both records were gloriously genredefying. Songs ranged from the honky-

tonk variety to those driven by tight Latin rhythms and heady ballads. On the most recent record there was even a ska tune. “The Mavericks have morphed into this band where the parameters in which other bands live just don’t exist for us. We come together to create this thing with no real agenda other than trying to hit that joyous sweet spot within each song,” Perez says. “When we play together, we’re not thinking about any of the labels or restrictions that are placed on musicians. So when you say that the Mavericks have become CONTINUES ON PG. 36

ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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its own genre, you hit the nail right on the head. It’s Mavericks music; it really is its own thing.” While the Mavericks do “rock” on stage with their infectious, lively tunes, there really isn’t much that could be defined as ’70s guitar rock. Still, on stage, Perez is every bit the rock god he dreamed of being as an 8-year-old Latino kid from L.A. During a show last April at the Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead (where he’ll return for two shows on June 17 and 18), Perez owned his side of the stage. Yes, he played soulful, driving guitar licks, but his presence was something to behold. He danced rhythmically with the music, his long, black hair flowing and waving with each note he played. He made grand flourishes as he moved about the stage; his whole body moves with the music. It’s Eddie Perez playing “Dance in the Moonlight,” but at times you swear it’s Jimmy Page playing “Whole Lotta Love,” and it works. “You wouldn’t think that an influence of Jimmy Page or Angus Young of AC/DC would fit into the Mavericks, but somehow it does,” Perez says of his stage presence. “When I’m on stage, I show up to give a performance because that’s what I would want to see. You dig what I’m saying? I’m not so much thinking it as much as I’m feeling it. I try to get to the most real, honest place that I can within each song. “What I’m doing on stage is a visual to what that sound feels like to me.” That sound has been an important part of the band since it reunited three years ago. When it broke up in 2003, the move shocked their fans, but it probably shouldn’t have. The band began to morph into something different musically with Trampoline, but couldn’t complete the transition. Perez performed on one studio album and a live record called Live in Austin. That record is full of lackluster performances. Malo would spend the next eight years putting out amazing solo records. Perez would work with several artists including Malo, but he spent the majority of the time on the road with Dwight Yoakam, the man who turned him on to the new era of honky-tonk. Perez says that bringing the Mavericks back together in 2013 made sense. And throughout his nearly 25-year career, he says, this is the best place for him to be. “Our success is based on an old-school work ethic and respecting the history of the music that’s come before us,” Perez says. “In doing that, I think we’ve become our own branch off of that tree of American music. I don’t think there’s anyone out there doing what we do, not all of it together anyway. We take all of these sounds, put them in one pot, stir them all up and what comes out, I think, is pretty special.” C DE IT C H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

RENEWED PRIDE {BY CARALYN GREEN}

Kesha

Tolerance should be a prerequisite for musicians booked to promote queer visibility in Western Pennsylvania, but it’s not always a given. Last year’s Pride in the Street originally featured Iggy Azalea, who had drawn criticism for homophobic and racist statements. But thankfully, Pride’s organizer, the Delta Foundation, gave in to public outcry and replaced the Aussie “rapper” with Nick Jonas, who had been on the cover of Out magazine. But some felt this selection reinforced the perception that the Delta Foundation caters to affluent, white gay men, while leaving others, including transpeople and people of color, out of the representation equation. That’s where Kesha and Angel Haze come in. Kesha, a bisexual intergalactic superstar, has spoken at length about loving “the spirit that exudes from that other person you’re with,” rather than just men or women. And Angel Haze — a pansexual, agender rapper who identifies as African American, Creole, Cherokee and Blackfoot Indian — creates music so feminist and darkly cathartic, it’s almost unbelievable a major label ever signed them. This power coupling of Kesha and Angel Haze is astounding, not just because of their queerness or messages of acceptance and fighting back, but also because they’ve both made surviving sexual abuse a major part of their public conversations. LGBT individuals are even more likely than their straight counterparts to experience sexual violence, and this violence is deeply stigmatized and often rendered invisible. Which makes it all the more awesome that two queer sexualabuse survivors are being invited to bring Pittsburgh together in love and respect. Sure, it’s a coy PR move to follow up last year’s national headline-making fiasco. But it’s also a well-intentioned and well-executed move that speaks to shifting consciousness within our Pittsburgh community and beyond. And that’s progress to be proud of. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KESHA, ANGEL HAZE 6 p.m. Sat., June 11. Liberty Avenue, between Ninth and10th streets, Downtown. $38-65. www.pittsburghpride.org


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SAMANTHA CASOLARI}

Ray LaMontagne

ACCESSIBLE ART {BY CALEB MURPHY} WHEN RAY LaMontagne releases an album, he wants it to stick to the walls of your everyday. Whether playing from your smartphone, your car radio or the recordplayer in your living room, the songs are meant to attach themselves to memories and emotions. This is what the Grammywinning artist hopes will happen with his latest album, Ouroboros, which he released in April. “I just hope that [Ouroboros] can find a place in people’s lives,” he says in a phone interview. “I think any artist, whether you’re a musician or a painter or an actor or a dancer … all you can hope for … is that slowly, eventually, [your work] makes its way into people’s lives.”

“After he heard it,” LaMontagne continues, “Jim told me that that was the album, and I should release it just as it was. It was just me in my studio with no percussion, just guitars and vocals. I resisted the urge to do that.” What that demo eventually became is not just an album of songs — it’s a cohesive piece of art, or “one thing,” as he calls it. “I really thought of it as one song, in two distinct movements,” LaMontagne says. “Really, the vinyl is the canvas for it — I always think in terms of vinyl. ... You have this time limit of 40, 45 minutes to work within. ... I think it’s perfect. I think any more than that is too much. There’s just something about … those constraints that appeal to me.” Hearing LaMontagne talk about his music, one can imagine that he’d like to stand on a rooftop, dropping armfuls of Ouroboros records (or, more safely, download cards) into the hands of people below. “The really wonderful thing about music [as an art form] is that it’s so easily accessible,” he says. “And if you want to hear something — if you want to feel that way again — you can just grab your phone and within three seconds, you can feel that way again. If you want to see a painting or a dance performance or even a great film ... it’s just not quite the same.” “There’s something kind of magical about that, about music,” he adds. “Once you put it out into the world, it’s just there. It just exists. And people can access it whenever they want to.”

“I JUST HOPE THAT OUROBOROS CAN FIND A PLACE IN PEOPLE’S LIVES.”

RAY LAMONTAGNE 6:30 p.m. Sun., June 12. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $39.50. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

As he explains in a press release about the record, Ouroboros just came to him. “I had this vivid dream,” he writes. “I dreamt I was working in my home studio, and the music presented itself to me. I woke up feeling that it was all there, every word and every note.” LaMontagne made a quick 40-minute demo and sent it to Jim James, the frontman of My Morning Jacket.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF TIERNEY_ GEARON}

Beth Orton [ELECTRO FOLK] + THU., JUNE 09

Tonight, the Three Rivers Arts Festival showcases the whimsical musical workings of Beth Orton. On her latest release, Kidsticks, Orton’s raspy voice joins magnificently with the retro-tinged sound of her looping samples. She’ll likely play older material as well: Her previous work is in a folkier vein and displays Lucius-esque pop energy. Equal parts experimental and danceable, Orton’s work showcases the creative spirit of the artist behind the music. This is a perfect opportunity to groove barefoot in the setting sun. Meg Fair 7:30 p.m. 101 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. Free. All ages. 412-456-6666 or traf.trustarts.org

[COUNTRY] + FRI., JUNE 10 Are you ready to enjoy the Dixie Chicks in the wide open spaces of First Niagara Pavilion? The country trio is the top-selling female band in America, and authors of such anthems of independence as “Goodbye, Earl,” “Not Ready to Make Nice” and “Lubbock or Leave It.” The band is embarking upon its DCX MMXCI World Tour with a unique lineup of funky rock band The Heavy and country singer/ songwriter Josh Herbert. MF 7 p.m. 665 Route 18, Burgettstown. $35-212. All ages. 724-947-7400 or www.livenation.com

[COUNTRY] + FRI., JUNE 10

Matt Aquiline is coming home, and he’s bringing some friends. Aquiline was born in Pittsburgh but moved to Washington, D.C., where he performed music for several decades as a solo artist and in the band Kid Goat. Returning to Pennsylvania to raise his family, Aquiline has been keeping busy performing

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solo acoustic sets, but the storytelling songwriter will take the stage with a full band at Club Café. Joining him are his friends from D.C., The Highballers, another group of country-music tale-weavers. The night is sure to be a joyful homecoming for a Pittsburgher returning to his roots. MF 6 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[ANTI-POP] + TUE., JUNE 14

The Hotelier has a knack for writing records that start off strong. The gut-tearing “Introduction to the Album” kicked off Home, Like Noplace Is There. This time around, Goodness also features an epic, raw opening song: “Goodness, Pt. 2.” {PHOTO COURTESY The band writes music OF RICHARD BURKE} that is honest and intimate, and the twinkly riffs accent the emotional Matt ups and downs of the Aquiline lyrics. Joining The Hotelier on this tour is everversatile Felix Walworth’s band Told Slant and the bedroom-y emo rockers of Loone. Catch the feelsheavy lineup tonight at Cattivo. MF 7 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville All ages. $15. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

LISTEN UP! You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days.

[RAP] + WED., JUNE 15 Few things are as dynamic and magical as hip hop that features a live band. That’s what makes producer and rapper Black Milk’s collaboration with Nat Turner so compelling. Spirit hosts a team of musicians for a performance showcasing work from the two artists’ project, The Rebellion Sessions, as well as selections from Milk’s rap repertoire. If you enjoy To Pimp a Butterfly’s combination of jazz and hip hop, you’ll also like the way that Nat Turner and Milk riff off each other to create soulful, experimental sounds. MF 9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

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at pghcitypaper.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THU 09 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny & Larry. Monroeville. 724-733-4453. CLUB CAFE. John Doe Band w/ Jesse Dayton. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Dark Thoughts, Wild at Heart, CHILLER, Peace Talks. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. LINDEN GROVE. Shannon & The Merger. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Houndmouth w/ Los Colognes. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Kevin Garrett. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 10

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

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BACKDRAFT BAR & GRILLE. Right TurnClyde. Baldwin. 412-885-1239. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. The Maven. Strip District. www.bayardstown.com. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. HARD ROCK CAFE. J.D. Simo. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS. SeaFair w/ The Tilt Room & Lone Wolf Club. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Diego’s Album Release. North Side. 412-904-3335. KENDREW’S. The GRID. Aliquippa. 724-375-5959. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. PINBALL PERFECTION. Deluded Youth. West View. 412-931-4425. SMILING MOOSE. Yigga Digga, Xstrophy & Over My Dead Body. South Side. 412-431-4668. ST. CLAIR PARK. Joy Ike. Greensburg. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. David & Pappy w/ Angela Autumn Cash. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Space, Black Souled Pope, Coffin Notice, Patience Is Peace. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE LAMP THEATRE. Mr. Speed. Irwin. 724-367-4000. THE MEADOWS. No Bad Juju. West Mifflin. 412-650-9000. THE R BAR. Eric Sommer. Dormont. 412-942-0882. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Eagles Tribute. Ross. 412-364-8166. SQUIRREL HILL SPORTS BAR. The Relics & The Mavens. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Naughty Professor w/ Bleil Brothers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VALLEY HOTEL. King’s Ransom. Clairton. 412-233-9800. WESTWOOD GOLF CLUB. Right TurnClyde. West Mifflin. 412-462-9555.

SUN 12 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Damaged Pies. Sunday

Afternoon Music Series. Oakland. 412-622-3114. HOWLERS. Gang Green w/ Antagonizers, Traditionals & Killer of Sheep. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MONROEVILLE COMMUNITY PARK. The Holidays. Monroeville. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Brett Dennen w/ Firekid. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PARK HOUSE. Grand Piano. North Side. 412-224-2273. THE R BAR. BTK, Bubs McKeg. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. The Armadillos, Josh and Gab, Grant Street Grifters. Weather Permitting. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. STAGE AE. Ray LaMontagne. North Side. 412-229-5483. TRAX FARMS. Right TurnClyde. Finleyville. 412-835-3246.

Bahari. Millvale. 412-821-4447. STAGE AE. Blitzen Trapper w/ Quiet Life. North Side. 412-229-5483.

MON 13

DJS

HOWLERS. Jamison Williams Quartet, Machine Listener, Matthew Ryals, White Reeves. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Birdy w/

MP 3 MONDAY

EMILY RODGERS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIELLE MEDIATE}

ROCK/POP

SAT 11 ATC SALES & SERVICES, INC.The Turbosonics, Jackals of Botswana, The Bessemers. Ross. 412-931-9010. BALTIMORE HOUSE. LuckyMe. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. BEACH HOUSE RESTAURANT. The Dave Iglar Band. Washington. CLUB CAFE. Essential Machine, Arlo Aldo. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Boys, Choir, It It, Wei Zhongle. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Filthy Low Down. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HOB NOB LOUNGE. Random Play. West Mifflin. 412-461-8541. HOWLERS. Different Places In

TUE 14 CLUB CAFE. Tancred. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Violent Femmes. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 15 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. The Love Letters. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. AVONWORTH COMMUNITY PARK. Flashback. Ohio Township. 412-766-1700. CLUB CAFE. James McCartney w/ The Damaged Pies. South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Monaco & Alameda w/ Nameless in August. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

THU 09 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the Funhouse. Millvale. 603-321-0277. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 10 ACE HOTEL PITTSBURGH. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. East Liberty. 412-621-4900. ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. PLAY. North Side. 412-904-3335. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 11

Each week we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s track comes from singersongwriter Emily Rodgers. Stream or download “Two Years,” the title track from her new record for free at FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com. Two Years comes out June 10 on Misra Records.

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Feeling Without Touching. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

WED 15 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.


HEAVY ROTATION

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Lee Robinson. North Side. 412-322-5058. GREENHOUSE WINERY. RML Jazz. North Huntingdon. 724-446-5000. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff Victor Garzotto & Kenny Blake. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Rick Gilbert. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. REVEL + ROOST. Funk + Soul Fridays. Downtown. 412281-1134.

Here are the songs our foodand-drink writer Celine Roberts can’t stop listening to: “All Night”

Beyoncé

“Andrew in Drag”

The Magnetic Fields

SAT 11 ANDYS WINE BAR. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Reggie Watkins. Album release. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. WICKED FOX. Eric Johnson Trio. Fox Chapel. 412-794-8255.

“Sunwheel Dance”

Bruce Cockburn

“Girls Love Beyoncé”

Drake feat. James Fauntleroy

SUN 12 ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell & the Jazz Surgery. McKees Rocks. 412-875-5809.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 09 HOWLERS. Height, Mrs. Paintbrush, Mister, Barz Blackman, Lazy JP. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Lucarelli Brothers. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

FRI 10 1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254. REX THEATER. Aesop Rock w/ Rob Sonic, DJ Zone & Homeboy Sandman. South Side. 412-381-6811.

SAT 11 1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254. BOOM CONCEPTS. The Agenda. Performances by Joel Kellem & Pk Delay. Garfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ginuwine w/ Karlos Farrar. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

SUN 12 BELVEDERE’S. Bleubird, Ecid, Marion Quinn, Leftfield, Stillborn Identity. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. MOONDOG’S. HipHop Hug. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

TUE 14 STAGE AE. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 15 CATTIVO. Azizi Gibson. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

NEWS

FRI 10 MOONDOG’S. Soul Survivors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Jimbo & the Soupbones w/ Byron Nash & Plan B. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

THE R BAR. Tom & Katie Acoustic Show. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

WED 15 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE

master of the Berlin Philharmonic Noah Bendix-Balgley & his father, international folkdance expert, Erik Bendix. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010.

THE MEADOWS. BJ Thomas. West Mifflin. 412-650-9000.

CLASSICAL FRI 10 PITTSBURGH OPERA. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Playing the music of John Adams & Richard Strauss. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 11

THU 09 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Dale & ZDubs. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 10 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. PEPPERS. The Flow Band w/ Joe Spliff Finneydredlox, Deb Star, Sam Fingers & Doug Lane. Squirrel Hill.

SUN 12 WEST END-ELLIOTT OVERLOOK PARK. The Flow Band w/ Joe Spliff Finneydredlox, Deb Star, Sam Fingers & Doug Lane. West End.

COUNTRY FRI 10 MEADOWS CASINO. Mad Dog Rodeo. Washington. 724-503-1200.

THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Works from Dvorák, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Strauss & Bernstein. Hackman w/ guest vocalists Malia Civetz, Ben Jones & Will Post, will perform selections from Beethoven + Coldplay, which was part of the 2015-2016 FUSE@ PSO series. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-0235.

SUN 12 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Playing the music of John Adams & Richard Strauss. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 15 ELLEN FAST, PIANO W/ ASHLEY FREEBURN, VIOLIN. Music for Midsummer Nights series. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. First Concert-

OTHER MUSIC THU 09 RIVERS CASINO. Hewlett Anderson Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 10 RIVERS CASINO. Rebecca Kaufman & the Groove Doctors. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 11 RIVERS CASINO. Artistree Etta Cox Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777. SYNOD HALL. University of the Philippines Concert Chorus. Oakland. 412-621-6204.

SUN 12 ANDYS WINE BAR. Gerdan. Ukrainian Folk Band. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

MON 13 BOOM CONCEPTS. NO/NO, olivia ii, KMFD, Seth McBurney. Garfield. HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 15 PALLANTIA. Jon Bañuelos, flamenco guitarist. Shadyside. 412-621-2919.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Shari Richards. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Kyle Green Bass Cadet. North Side. 412-904-3335.

ACOUSTIC THU 09

SAT 11

PALACE THEATRE. Switch Acoustic. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Al Scorch. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

THE JAZZ BEAN CLUB. Blvd of the Blues feat. Ms. Sydnie Jefferson. Monroeville. MOONDOG’S. Nicole B Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 10

ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE & WINE CELLAR. West Holiday Trip. Lawrenceville. www. per 412-260-6968. pa pghcitym CLUB CAFE. Matt .co Aquiline w/ The Highballers. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181.

TUE 14 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Youth Blues Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335.

JAZZ THU 09

ANDYS WINE BAR. Maura Minteer. Downtown. 412-773-8884. HYEHOLDE. Ron Wilson Meets the Bassists. Moon. 412-264-3116. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-394-3400.

FRI 10 ANDYS WINE BAR. Bronwyn Wyatt Higgins. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

TA S T E

TUE 14

SAT 11

WED 15

BLUES

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Group Ukulele Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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SAT 11 ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE & WINE CELLAR. Unknown String Band. Lawrenceville. 412-260-6968. HARMONY INN. BeJae Fleming & Jackie Blount. Harmony. 724-452-5124.

SUN 12 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Larry & Sandra Groce, Michael Lipton & Ted Harrison of the Carpenter Ants. Harmony. 724-452-0539. HAMBONE’S. Steel City Ukulele

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do IN PITTSBURGH

June 8-14 WEDNESDAY 8 Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival POINT STATE PARK, GATEWAY CENTER & CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org/traf. Through June 12.

THURSDAY 9 Kevin Garrett

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

John Doe Band

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. With special guest Jesse Dayton. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 10 After Dark: Indiana Jones

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Oakland. 412-662-3131. Over 21 event. Tickets: afterdark.carnegiemnh.org. 6p.m.

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Millvale. With special guest Firekid. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Dixie Chicks

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Ray LaMontagne: The Ouroboros Tour 2016

4th Annual Wine Festival & Comedy Show

STAGE AE North Shore. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

MONROEVILLE CONVENTION CENTER Monroeville. Tickets: eventbrite.com or 800-747-5599. Through June 11.

Flag IIII

DIXIE CHICKS FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION BURGETTSTOWN

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Chris Hardwick: ID10T Tour

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Earth: An HD Odyssey

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016

Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org. Through June 12.

SATURDAY 11 Pride in the Street with Kesha

LIBERTY AVE BETWEEN NINTH AND TENTH STREET Downtown. Over 18 show. Tickets: pittsburghpride.org/tickets or 888-71-TICKETS. 6p.m.

Naughty Professor THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Alex Stypula Live Album Recording

MONDAY 13 Birdy MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. With special guest Bahari. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. With special guests Felicia TUESDAY Gillespie and Tim Ross. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. Andy Black: The Homecoming Tour 10:30p.m. ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. SUNDAY Tickets: ticketfly.com or Brett Dennen MR. SMALLS THEATRE 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

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POP THIS

THE LOBSTER IS FUNNY IN AN OBSERVATIONAL DEADPAN MANNER

{BY AL HOFF}

Just because something is low-hanging fruit doesn’t mean it shouldn’t get picked. And so it goes with Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping, a mockumentary that takes aim at such broad targets as Justin Beiber, the 24/7 world of celebrity media, today’s factory-formulated pop music and a couple of long-in-the-tooth romantic balladeers.

Band of boys: Kiva Schaffer, Andy Samberg and Jorma Taccone

Popstar tells the oh-so-familiar tale of a former boy-band member who goes solo, hits it big, alienates his former bandmates, “over-reaches creatively,” bottoms out and then — after discovering what really matters and smoking a hella amount of weed — makes a comeback. The comedy is the work of The Lonely Island boys, which would also be a great name for a boy band. But you most likely know them for their SNL short films, like “Lazy Sunday” and “Dick in a Box.” Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer wrote the screenplay and star; Taccone and Schaffer share directing duties. It’s an affectionate satire that moves briskly. The starring trio of goofballs gets able support from comedy vet Tim Meadows, who plays the band’s manager (and who was once the fourth member of Tony! Toni! Toné!). The jokes range from pratfalls and exposed genitals to unexpected celebrity cameos and the occasional clever observation, like “Nowadays, if you don’t sell out, people will think nobody asked you to.” AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Catch the shirtless OG of grimy proto-punk in this new concert film,

Iggy Pop Live in Basel 2015. Hear all your faves — “I Wanna Be Your Dog”

“The Passenge r”

“Lust for Life”

7:30 p.m. June 16; 7 and 9:15 p.m. Sat., June 18; and 7 p.m. Sun., June 19. Hollywood

David (Colin Farrell) ponders at poolside.

NATURAL SELECTION {BY AL HOFF}

T

HE FILM opens with a woman driv-

ing into the countryside, leaving her car and shooting a donkey. This scene is never explained or referred to again, but when you get to the end of Yorgos Lanthimos’ singular dark comedy The Lobster, you’ll definitely understand. In the next scene, we meet David (Colin Farrell), slumped and resigned, as an unseen woman dumps him for another man. “Does he wear glasses or contacts?” he asks, to no reply. Thus, in this mildly dystopic world, David follows the mandatory procedure for the newly single. He checks into a hotel, where he has 45 days, according to the manager (Olivia Colman), to find a mate, or he will be turned into the animal of his choice. (David arrives with “Bob,” a dog who used to be his brother.) David picks “lobster,” because “they live for over a 100 years, have blue blood like aristocrats and stay fertile all their lives. I also like the sea very much.” Life in the hotel is a series of awkward exercises designed to pair up couples. The

hotel staff stage pantomimes showing how life is better when married. (Example: A single man, choking on food, has no wife to administer the Heimlich maneuver and will die.) There are dances that recall nights at a fading Catskills resort, and cringe-y introductions, in which candidates offer their defining traits, such as a limp, tendency toward nosebleeds or lisp. Ideally, one will find a mate with a similar characteristic.

THE LOBSTER DIRECTED BY: Yorgos Lanthimos STARRING: Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz

CP APPROVED In the woods beyond the hotel live “loners.” The guests take daytime excursions there to hunt the loners with tranquilizer guns to earn benefits. (Pay no attention to the wandering camels or flamingos.) Later, David strikes up a friendship with a loner (Rachel Weisz), and the film shifts to explore this community,

whose members are neither part of the city of approved couples nor the hotel purgatory of looking singles, yet hardly free from social strictures. As bleak as it sounds, The Lobster is funny, but in an observational deadpan manner. (Fans of the U.K. TV show Black Mirror should dig this.) There’s the absurdity of its premise and its committed presentation of a seemingly genteel dystopia in which pairing up is paramount. There is also an undercurrent of cruelty and pathos, which may temper your enjoyment, but what is more fraught and capricious than seeking a lifetime companion? (“Good morning, Room 101 — 44 days left.”) The Lobster offers plenty of time to contemplate its larger allegories about love in our modern world — whether it’s bythe-traits computerized match-ups, or the perpetual anxiety about whether life as singleton or married is more fulfilling. As the enigmatic ending suggests, perhaps the easiest certainty is which sort of animal you’d like to be. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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WARCRAFT. Duncan Jones’ fantasy action adventure film is adapted from the popular video game. Expect battles and beasties galore! In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., June 10

FILM CAPSULES CP

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REPERTORY

NEW THIS WEEK

DOLLAR BANK CINEMA IN THE PARK. To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie N ewmar, Wed., June 8 (Schenley). Minions, Thu., June 9 (Brookline); Fri., June 10 (Arsenal); and Sat., June 11 (Grandview). The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Sat., June 11 (Riverview). The Land Before Time, Sun., June 12 (Schenley); Tue., June 14 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., June 16 (Brookline). Jurassic World, Wed., June 15 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free

THE CONJURING 2. Paranormal couple Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga) are back on the job, this time chasing down some spooky things in 1970s London. James Wan directs. Starts Fri., June 10 FRANCOFONIA. In his new essay, director Alexander Sokurov (Russian Ark) ruminates on the Louvre Museum, its long-standing relationship to France’s cultural identity and, more specifically, the fate of the museum and its contents during the Nazi occupation. Sokurov uses archival material (there are a fascinating number of paintings of the Louvre) and some dramatic recreations. One establishes the Western proclivity for building such critical cultural temples as a “happy” outcome of war (or colonialism). To the victors, go the sarcophagi! And then there is the fascinating tale of Jacques Jaujard and Count Franziskus WolffMetternich, the French bureaucrat and the Nazi officer, respectively, who were unlikely collaborators in saving the Louvre’s treasures from both physical destruction and theft. They shared a keen understanding of the vulnerability of art, especially as a stand-in for culture, during times of conflict. (Today, we see the same impulses playing out in the Middle East, as ancient cultural sites are intentionally destroyed.) Some of the film’s material is less interesting, and a contemporary thread about the shipping of art across oceans left me puzzled.

Francofonia (It’s too risky? Art should stay home?) But mostly, Sokurov does a fine job weaving together art and history, and what both reveal about ourselves, individually and as a culture. In various languages, with subtitles. Starts Fri., June 10. Regent Square (Al Hoff) MAGGIE’S PLAN. Rebecca Miller’s comedy of manners set among the Brooklyn-brownstone intelligentsia veers dangerously close to being a parody of the same. Maggie (Greta Gerwig) is single, but wants a baby, so she enlists the help of an artisanal pickle-maker. Meanwhile, she meets-cute a rumpled professor, John (Ethan Hawke), who is unhappily married to a more important academic, the imper-

vious Georgette (Julianne Moore). So, John leaves Georgette for Maggie, and then — surprise – everybody is still miserable. Like the rarefied world of Woody Allen’s signature films, these people never stop talking about themselves! (I’d be remiss not to point out that everybody also self-consciously wears scarves, funny hats and sturdy sweaters all the time.) The best barometer is: if you liked Gerwig’s other similar films, you’ll likely find something to enjoy in this one. Though I fear for her typecasting, and wish that she and the other able actors here were in something more illuminating than another round of aging-hipster navel-gazing. Starts Fri., June 10 (AH)

RIVER OF FUNDAMENT. As part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival, the Harris screens the new film from artist-sculptor-filmmaker Matthew Barney (The Cremaster Cycle) and his collaborator, composer Jonathan Bepler. Begun in 2007, the film is inspired by Ancient Evenings, Norman Mailer’s 1983 novel set in ancient Egypt, and by the West’s slide into industrial (and every other kind of) decay. There are automobiles, excrement, destroyed factories, Egyptian gods and reincarnation. The three-act film, which contains explicit imagery, runs more than five hours; there are 20-minute intermissions between acts. Through Sat., June 11. Harris. Free. TREMORS. Something is living underground and it’s about to make life tough in one isolated Nevada town. Kevin Bacon stars in Ron Underwood’s 1990 comedic horror film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 8. AMC Waterfront. $5

ME BEFORE YOU. In this oddly spritely romance, a young working-class woman named Lou (Emilia Clarke) takes a caretaking job for Will (Sam Claflin), a former Dashing Young Man About Town who is now a quadriplegic. She’s poor, perky and naïve; he’s rich, depressed and cynical. And in Thea Sharrock’s adaptation of Jojo Moyes’ popular novel, this mismatched pair is destined to fall in love. The impediment is Will’s disability, or more correctly, his response to it: Lou learns that Will is planning an assisted suicide, and works with his parents (Janet McTeer, Charles Dance) to prove life is worth living. It’s a darker and complex issue that this largely cheery film has trouble incorporating, and the resolution of the story is problematic for a variety of reasons. There’s much left unexplored, such as class, money, privilege, agency and why Lou dresses like a 4-year-old. (AH) NOW YOU SEE ME 2. The Four Horsemen of magic are back, and tricking you big time! Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo and James Franco are joined by Lizzy Caplan and Daniel Radcliffe. John M. Chu directs this comedy. Starts Fri., June 10 VAXXED: FROM COVER-UP TO CATASTROPHE. Remember the British doctor Andrew Wakefield who, in 1998, kicked up the “could childhood vaccines cause autism?” argument with a study that was later redacted? He’s back, and directing his documentary about himself and a handful of folks who believe that the Centers for Disease Control intentionally covered up data that proved his theories. The film presents various graphs and harder-to-follow analyses of statistical data along with anecdotal material from parents of autistic children. There is also material from a CDC whistleblower via telephone calls that were secretly taped. It’s a film that’s unlikely to change anybody’s mind — it looks cheap, and comes across as an infomercial by way of a conspiracy theory for a discredited argument. Starts June 10. Parkway, McKees Rocks (AH)

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Me Before You THE STREET FIGHTER. Sonny Chiba stars in this 1974 martial-arts actioner about a mercenary fighter who runs afoul of some gangsters. Same old story, but you watch these old-school flicks for the fights, not the plot. Shigehiro Ozawa directs. June 10-11 and June 13-15. Row House Cinema RESERVOIR DOGS. Quentin Tarantino’s stylish 1992 debut charts the failure of a heist in a nonlinear fashion, while riffing on dozens of earlier crime thrillers and their conventions. June 10-14 and June 16. Row House Cinema FOXY BROWN. In this 1974 blaxploitation classic directed by Jack Hill, Pam Grier poses as a hooker to infiltrate the mob and cop some revenge on the badasses who killed her man. Hell hath no fury, and all that. June 10-12 and June 14-16. Row House Cinema BAND OF OUTSIDERS. In Jean-Luc Goddard’s 1964 French New Wave classic, three bored young people conspire to steal a cache of money. Screens in a new


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6/9 @ 8pm Martial-arts expert tries to rescue an ambassador’s daughter who was kidnapped in Thailand. Starring Jim Kelly. __________________________________________________

Xanadu (1980) 6/10 @ 7:30pm, 6/11 @ 7pm, 6/12 @ 7pm The story of a girl who makes dreams come true! Starring Olivia Newton-John. __________________________________________________

A Cat In The Brain (1990) Film Kitchen 4K restoration. June 10-13 and June 15-16. Row House Cinema XANADU. In this 1980 roller-disco musical from Robert Greenwald, a Greek muse (on skates, natch) comes to life in order to help a man open a groovy nightclub. Featuring the combined talents of Olivia Newton-John, Robert Beck, joke-rockers The Tubes and Pittsburgh’s own Gene Kelly. Also on deck: a deliriously over-produced soundtrack with tunes by Newton-John, Cliff Richard and ELO, and combinations thereof. 7:30 p.m. Fri., June 10; 7 p.m. Sat., June 11; and 7 p.m. Sun., June 12. Hollywood (AH) CAT IN THE BRAIN. A horror-movie director named Lucio Fulci (played by horror-film director Lucio Fulci) begins to find bloody scenes from his films merging with his real life. Is he losing control and actually staging bizarre Nazi orgies, or chopping up neighbors into little pieces? The 1990 film, which Fulci directs, doesn’t exactly probe this issue in any meaningful way, treating it instead as a plot device to ensure the maximum number of grossout scenes. There’s the film-within-the-film scenes, Fucli’s hallucinations, and then actual gruesome murders. It’s all done in the extra-bloody, over-thetop, tongue-in-cheek style of Italian horror, and if you’re a fan, this is quite the smorgasbord of topless women, chainsaw attacks and even a cat eating a brain. 10 p.m. Fri., June 10, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 11. Hollywood (AH)

June 14 Film Kitchen, curated by Matthew R. Day, also includes two live-action shorts by Kevin Hejna. “Zombie Woman” is a superhero origin story, first in a planned series. And “God Is Laughing” is a drama set in “the 10th year of the American Civil War.” 8 p.m. Tue., June 14 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room. $5. www.pf.pca.org (Bill O’Driscoll)

6/10 @ 10pm, 6/11 @ 10pm New restoration of this Italian cult gore flick directed by Lucio Fulci.

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HAIRSPRAY. John Water’s affectionate 1988 look at the Baltimore of his ’60s youth mixes a social message about racial integration with lots of campy goings-on at a teen-dance television program. Ricki Lake stars as the big-hearted heroine Tracy Turnblad; Divine is her big-everywhere mother; and look out for Sonny Bono, Pia Zadora, Debbie Harry and Waters himself. Everybody form a big strong line and get ready to do “The Madison”! Kicks off this summer’s monthly series of Rooftop Shindigs. Music by Beauty Slap and HEAF at 7 p.m.; film at sundown. Wed., June 15. Theater Square Garage roof, 667 Penn Ave., Downtown. Bring your own chair (or buy one on site). Food and beverage vendors on site (no outside food/drink allowed). Free (AH)

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ALICE IN THE CITIES. Wim Wenders’ 1974 film depicts a road trip shared by a German journalist and a 9-year-old girl he finds left in an airport. The film screens as part of a month-long, Sunday-night series of Wenders films. In English, and German, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Sun., June 12. Regent Square FANTASTIC PLANET. René Laloux’s animated 1973 science-fiction film relates the tale of slaves and masters, and the inevitable revolt, on the faraway planet of Ygam. In the 1970s, the French film was a rephouse staple, frequently paired with other trippy films that looked like innocuous kids’ films, but were loaded with larger philosophical ideas. The film has been recently restored. In French, with subtitles. Mon., June 13, through Thu., June 16. Harris FILM KITCHEN. The monthly screening series for local and independent artists is highlighted by three strong short animations. Kristen Lauth Shaeffer’s “349” edits together work by 349 artists asked to depict themselves and a person with whom they have a significant relationship; it plays like a single poignant pas de deux. Andrew Halasz’s “Emmett: A Tomato’s Life” is the dark-humored biography of an anthropomorphized fruit in an urban backyard. And Paul Hluchan’s “Snow Story” is an oddly transcendent fable positing an unlikely Creator. The

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PREDATOR. In a Latin American jungle, it’s Arnold Schwarzenegger versus an alien warrior. John McTiernan directs this 1987 actioner. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 15. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 BUILDING PITTSBURGH. This 45-minute 1991 documentary from Charlie McCollester and Steffi Domike looks at local labor unions, particularly those of the craft labor and skilled trade, whose members helped build much of the city’s bridges, buildings, factories and infrastructure. Rick Okraszewski, of the Carpenters Union, will speak after the screening. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 16. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront St., Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomestead.org.

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[COMEDY]

“IT WAS PURELY A WAY FOR ME TO GET AWAY FROM MY MOTHER.”

LOUIE’S LIFE

{BY SAM LEONARD}

For more than 30 years, Louie Anderson has been making people laugh as a standup comic, voice actor, game-show host and author. Now, as co-star of FX’s hit Baskets, he plays Christine, the mother of Chip Baskets (Zach Galifianakis). On June 11, Anderson headlines the Monroeville Wine Festival & Comedy Show. It’s his first Pittsburgh visit since his animated series Life With Louie was honored at the ToonSeum in 2013. He spoke with CP by phone.

IS YOUR STANDUP MATERIAL POLITICAL? I talk a little about the idea of how Trump’s hair got to be the way it is, because all men with a receding hairline understand his dilemma. I talk about how I wish my dad were alive so that he could hear these people. My dad was such a great voice. I remember when I found [his] voice, I was at [in St. Paul, Minn., club] Mickey Finn’s doing mostly fat jokes. I remember a guy came to the show with his father … and I said, “My dad wasn’t as nice as your dad. He never hit us, but he carried a gun.” And that moment changed my whole career because I found that I could talk about things that were real. That joke, “He carried a gun. He never shot us, he’d just go click click,” has been repeated to me a thousand times by people who walk by and just go “click click,” and that says everything. ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO TELL READERS? I’m going to talk about Christine and the next season of Baskets a little bit. ... And now I’m thinking of coming out with a new wine because I’m doing the Monroeville Wine Festival. You know what would be fun is a “Christine” wine. You know, something that would go well with curly fries. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LOUIE ANDERSON 8:30 p.m. Sat., June 11. Monroeville Convention Center, 209 Mall Blvd., Monroeville. $30-35 (includes Wine Festival admission). www.simoneventmanagement.com

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Louie Anderson

HOW MUCH OF CHRISTINE IS INSPIRED BY YOUR OWN FAMILY? I’m kind of celebrating my mom in that character. … When you come to the Midwest, there’s a sensibility that moms have; you know, they do their thing. The American mom has always been important in sitcoms, from June Cleaver to Roseanne Barr. I try to make Christine as real as possible.

{PHOTO BY JOHN ALTDORFER}

Author Dorit Sasson with copies of Accidental Soldier

[BOOKS]

MILITARY TIME {BY DANIELLE LEVSKY}

D

ORIT SASSON’S Accidental Soldier:

A Memoir of Service and Sacrifice in the Israel Defense Forces (She Writes Press) recounts her journey as a 19-yearold New Yorker who escapes her mother’s neuroticism and her own comfort zone by volunteering for the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). Her coming-of-age memoir — which concludes in 1993, when her service ended — also contrasts life in Israel’s cities with that in its countryside. This will be her first memoir in a planned trilogy. Sasson, who lives in Squirrel Hill, is a Jewish feminist, author and motivational speaker. She also hosts the internet radio show Giving Voice to Your Story. YOU RETURNED TO THE U.S. IN 2007 AND STARTED WORK ON THE BOOK IN 2012. WHY DID YOU WAIT? You have to understand that every Israeli citizen does their time in the army. It’s nothing to write home about. I have a friend who

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.08/06.15.2016

lives in a rural area and said she might host me for a book tour. She immediately found out that nobody in the community was interested in coming to that kind of talk. It would be a matter of time before I came back to the U.S., received a lot of support, felt safe and found my voice.

DORIT SASSON

ACCIDENTAL SOLDIER BOOK LAUNCH 6:30 p.m. Tue., June 14 (Shaler North Hills Library, 1822 Mount Royal Blvd., Glenshaw; free; www.shalerlibrary.org). OTHER APPEARANCES: June 23 (Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley) and June 26 (Classic Lines Bookstore, Squirrel Hill). www.doritsasson.com

WHY IS IT CALLED “ACCIDENTAL SOLDIER”? It was a complete accident that I got inducted in the IDF. Israelis are born into the service. It was not something I ever planned for. My choice was not [for] Zionist reasons

or religious ideologies. The world I grew up in was free-spirited, artsy, not anything close to the military. It was purely a way for me to get away from my mother and prove to my Israeli father that I was not going to be like her. WHY WAS IT IMPORTANT TO LEAVE YOUR MOTHER? If I hadn’t left her, I wouldn’t be who I am today. My mother was anxious and catastrophizing all the time. When I was able to get away from her, I was able to face my fears. The real discovery in my journey was that I didn’t have to be like her. MOST READERS WILL HAVE THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT IN MIND. HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE CONFLICT, THEN AND NOW? Most Israeli memoirs are political. The Accidental Soldier is not political at all. … This is a psychological/cultural memoir


that shows a different side of Israel and my own journey of transformation. There have been many stories and memoirs written about what it’s like to be an immigrant in the U.S.; this one is about the immigrant experience in Israel. I did not discuss my views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the memoir and to do so now would be a disservice to my readers. You can’t talk about Israel without getting in bias. I don’t want to infuse misinformation.

WHAT WAS THE HARDEST PART OF WRITING THIS BOOK? Getting feedback from my editor got me thinking more about my experiences, and it was hard to go to that place in my mind. After each round of edits, I thought to myself regarding my editor: “Why are you nagging me?” It hurt each time I had to go back in time and write a take-away — “Why do I have to go deeper? I already told you everything!” I was hiding from myself. I had to peel more layers from myself and I felt so bare. To make it authentic, I had to write it in that 19-year-old voice. You can’t hide your truth. You have to be with your truth. IS THERE A KEY MESSAGE IN YOUR BOOK? The main take-away of this book is that of courage. The character can’t go through any transformation if the writer doesn’t have the courage to write it. The other, deeper message of the book is that of faith, and to continue going through with experiences. There’s a certain level of adaptability that you have to go through and tests you have to go through to see the rainbow on the other side, to reach a better version of yourself. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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DANCE PRIDE {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Moriah Ella Mason

WERE THERE ANY MOMENTS THAT YOU FOUND DIFFICULT TO INCLUDE IN YOUR BOOK? One scene I didn’t explore was with Svetlana, a girl that lived in the same quarters as me. It had a very strong Tom-and-Jerry feel to it. Though I wrote about her in the book, I didn’t include our physical fight. Nobody even knew this fight was happening. She was harboring resentments against me because she couldn’t understand why this privileged American girl would voluntarily come to the army. I felt misunderstood. It was almost like a representation of the Cold War drama between us, the aggression that had built up. But I reached the max word count. It would have been another half of a chapter and when I saw what I was up against, I couldn’t include that.

[DANCE]

The kick-off to the local summer dance season, Pittsburgh PrideFest’s eighth annual free dance showcase, curated by Richard Parsakian, offers a stylistically diverse set of performances by seven artists and troupes. Part of Pittsburgh PrideFest 2016, it takes place on Sun., June 12, on two Downtown stages on Liberty Avenue. Here’s what’s on tap (all times approximate): Sixth Street Stage. Jean-Paul Weaver (2 p.m.) will perform his solo work-in-progress “Madonna Gris.” Set to music by Yo-Yo Ma, Bobby McFerrin and others, the seven-minute solo “examines the history and intersection of queerness and spirituality through the lens of voodoo culture and folklore,” says Weaver. Texture Contemporary Ballet (2:15 p.m.) performs four short repertory works, including: artistic director Alan Obuzor’s solo “Happiness” (2016); Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancers Diana Yohe and Corey Bourbonniere’s five-minute duet “If You Don’t Wanna Love Me” (2015), set to music by James Morrison and performed by Bourbonniere and Madeline Kendall; an excerpt from Alexandra Tiso’s “Weight of Living” (2015); and Kelsey Bartman’s “Outro” (2012). STAYCEE PEARL dance project (3 p.m.) performs an excerpt from Pearl’s PLAYGROUND entitled “MINE.” The seven-minute duet to music by Beyoncé recalls Pearl’s memory of her first crush as a child. Dancer/choreographer Moriah Ella Mason (3:10 p.m.) makes her PrideFest debut in a yet-to-be-titled duet she and Sarah Bauer will perform to an original soundtrack created by Mason and J.F. Winkles. The work-in-progress, says Mason, “is inspired by representations of the poet Sappho and what she has come to represent throughout history and our own experiences of poetic sensuality and relationship.” And Trevor Miles | Trevor C. Dance Collective (3:15 p.m.) debut a new version of “To Part,” which the company performed at last month’s newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival. The group work, says Miles, “is about the powerful moment before someone takes their life, and the discussion they have internally.” 10th Street Stage. As in a music concert, slowdanger (4:30 p.m.), a.k.a. Anna Thompson and Taylor Knight, will perform a set of their original songs while improvising dance to them. And concluding the program is the debut performance of LaMar “Honeybee” Williams’ troupe kNOwSHADE (4:45 p.m.), with “kNOwSHADE: The Awakening,” a 10-minute work featuring underground ballroom vogue dance styles.

The best musical since The Lion King.” “

Through Sunday Only! Benedum Center CulturalDistrict.org/Matilda • Box Office at Theater Square

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412-456-6666 • Group 10+ Tickets 844-PGH-SHOW (844-744-7469)

PITTSBURGH PRIDEFEST 2016 DANCE SHOWCASE 2-5 p.m., Sun., June 12. Liberty Avenue between Sixth and 10th streets, Downtown. Free. www.pittsburghpride.org +

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RREESSEEAARRCCHH SSTTUUDDYY

Borderline Pe r s o n a l i t y D i s o r d e r The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, difficulty controlling anger or frustration, mood swings, self-destructive or impulsive behaviors, or history of self-inflicted pain or injury. Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality traits and will be compensated up to $125 upon completion of the interviews. Some participants may also undergo an fMRI scan. There is no cost for this procedure. Participants are compensated $50 upon completion of the fMRI. For more information, call 412-246-5367.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOAN MARCUS}

The Broadway cast of Matilda

[PLAY REVIEWS]

KID STUFF {BY TED HOOVER}

OUTSIDE THE Benedum Center, for the

Have a strange, weird or exotic pet? Does your cat, dog or miniature pony do algebra or something equally amazing?

If so, we want to hear about It for our June 29 Pet Issue. Email the details to info@pghcitypaper.com

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first national tour of hit Broadway musical Matilda, they’ve posted a quote from one of the New York reviews: “The Best Musical Since The Lion King.” I agree … if you substitute “most disheartening” for “best.” In a funny way, it’s unfair to blame Matilda for its problems. Taken from Roald Dahl’s contemporary children’s classic, with a book by Dennis Kelly and music and lyrics by Tim Minchin, Matilda is what it is — a cute children’s show about a precocious little girl in England who, though hated by her parents and terrorized by her headmistress, soldiers on with the sort of plucky, can-do spirit that helped Britain rule the globe for a couple of centuries. “Believe in yourself,” the show says, “and don’t let others bring you down.” All in all, not a bad message for kids … who are normally told that if they want to be liked, they need to buy something. The trouble is that someone threw millions of dollars at this little piece of fluff and inflated it to the size of one of those Macy’s Thanksgiving Day balloons, which it resembles in hollowness and artificiality. The show’s villains are ridiculously evil — although Darcy Stewart, Brandon McGibbon and David Abeles locate and play the humor to fun effect. The heroes are so sweet and pure that it beggars belief, but Keisha T. Fraser and Paula Brancati are moving and joyful

when they get the chance. And the title character is like Annie (from the musical of the same name) only on steroids, speed and crack. The performer rotates nightly; I saw a charmingly stubborn Lily Brooks O’Briant.

MATILDA

continues through Sun., June 12. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $26-90. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

I credit director Matthew Warchus for some very imaginative staging, which occasionally tries to work against the usual over-the-top musical-theater pyrotechnics. But still, as produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company and The Dodgers (and presented by PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh), this is a tiny show distended and glitz-engorged beyond all reason. The results are … well, my date for the evening called it “torturous.” I wouldn’t go that far, but it is a listless and glum couple of hours. You can’t blame Matilda for the juvenilizing of Broadway, but it’s as much a victim as we are. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

EXECUTIONS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

TIM RUPPERT’S new play The Consorts gives

British history a postmodernist tickle. It’s set in 1556, in the jail cell where Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer awaits execution the following morn: As a leader of England’s Reformation, and the fellow who unburdened Henry VIII


of Catherine of Aragon and secured him Anne Boleyn, Cranmer is to be burned alive for heresy. Cranmer’s companions are Nick, a comically incompetent jailer, and the ghosts of the long-dead Catherine and Anne themselves. The central conflict is whether Cranmer should recant to possibly save himself. Catherine argues yes, while Anne urges him to stick to his theological guns. But The Consorts, as staged by The Summer Company, is only partly a standard costume drama; it’s also surprisingly, and perhaps mostly, an antic and very theatrical comedy. From the go, the somber premise is sliced and diced as characters directly address the audience, mouth wildly anachronistic phrases (“put a sock in it”; “one sec”) and reference latter-day BBC staples. As comic tensions mount between Catherine and Anne, The Consorts combines farce, Monty Python, Oscar Wilde and a heaping helping of camp (cat fight included, no extra charge). The explanations suggested for all this sport are that the whole play is either a dream Cranmer is having, or that he’s already dead. Either way, it’s a real challenge for director John E. Lane Jr. and his cast, and Act I is pretty bumpy. Yet in Act II, when Ruppert doubles down — it’s even more delirious, employing every po-mo trick in the book — The Consorts paradoxically finds its footing. Ruppert, a Pittsburgh-based educator, is a witty writer, and The Consorts brims with jokes. (“I must recapture my jailer,” quips Cranmer at one point.) Perhaps half of them land, but that’s plenty: Ruppert has designed such an amusing hall of mirrors that the play keeps hurtling along.

STEPPING IT UP

[BOOK REVIEW]

GEEK TO ME

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

{BY JENNIFER PAPALE RIGNANI}

POLISHED, professional and silly silly

silly — that’s the takeaway from the Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret Theater’s production of a romping The 39 Steps, directed by Guy Stroman.

THE 39 STEPS

continues through Aug. 14. Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret Theater, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $39.75-54.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.org

Thank the cast, too: Nathaniel Yost, wildly energetic as the daft Nick; Jill Jeffrey, a regally embittered Catherine; Colleen Garrison, a naïve but strong-willed Anne; and especially John Yost, as Cranmer, who with his eloquent eyebrows and booming voice successfully binds the play’s comedy to its tragedy. I’m not sure if The Consorts almost works or barely works, but as Cranmer himself says, apropos of something else entirely, “All in all, I enjoyed it.”

No doubt that when John Buchan wrote The 39 Steps on the eve of the Great War, in 1915, he considered it a serious novel. But Alfred Hitchcock exploited the humor when he adapted the spy thriller for film in 1935, on the eve of the Great War’s sequel. Then, in 2005, Patrick Barlow created this highly theatrical, business-filled version from an original concept by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon. Most of the magic is that there are only three people to play all the characters opposite our beleaguered hero. Listed as “clowns,” Quinn Patrick Shannon and Luke Halferty comprise most of the cast of thousands: police, villains, Pythonian women, et al., sometimes almost simultaneously with the switch of a hat or a prop. Ah, and what they do with a Scots nightgown. Megan Pickrell dons the sexier femme roles, fatale and otherwise. Allan Snyder maintains a high-camp profile as the tall, handsome, hirsute hero. (Freudian aside: Hitch, the same age as the hero when he made the movie, was decidedly short, pudgy and balding.) And then there is the multimedia stagecraft suggesting swank flats, country estates, moving trains (inside and out) — well, the whole cross-country vision of Hitch’s seminal movie. (Scholars consider it the best of Hitchcock’s early films, introducing the many stylistic elements of what would come to be known as Hitchcockian.) The design team deserves a hand: Tony Ferrieri, set; Andrew David Ostrowski, lights; Bob Bollman, sound; and Stephanie Shaw, costumes. Making the magic real is production stage manager Tim Brady. The 39 Steps is so very British, but there are plenty of laughs and chortles even if you don’t “get” some of the in-country japes and comic references to many other Hitchcock classics.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

RUPPERT HAS DESIGNED SUCH AN AMUSING HALL OF MIRRORS THAT THE PLAY KEEPS HURTLING ALONG.

THE CONSORTS

continues through Sun., June 12. The Summer Company at Genesius Theater, Duquesne University campus, Uptown. $6.50-16.50. www.thesummercompany.com

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In a recent NPR interview, actor Rainn Wilson bemoaned the commodification of nerdism, but acknowledged that because he is a nerd, the trend has helped his career. The new book Geek Parenting: What Joffrey, Jor-El, Maleficent and The McFlys Teach Us About Raising a Family (Quirk Books) confirms Wilson’s observations, but not necessarily because nerds are the newly anointed cool. In fact, this happy little book makes us realize nerds have been in our pop-culture hearts all along, and that we are among them. Drawing upon the allegory-rich landscape of comic books, movies, television, cartoons and science fiction, Geek Parenting concerns the complexity of family. The authors, former Pittsburgh Magazine editor Stephen H. Segal and fellow geek Valya Dudycz Lupescu, share a deep knowledge of pop culture. (Segal co-authored 2011’s Geek Wisdom: The Sacred Teaching of Nerd Culture.) They have meticulously extracted advice for mothers, fathers, siblings, twins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, step-siblings, stepmothers and fathers, family black sheep and family favorites. Bite-sized essays draw on “the most beloved tales of geek culture,” from a 1905 Little Nemo comic strip, to illustrate managing nightmares, to Game of Thrones, to reinforce the importance of pets (even if they are ancient wolves). Characters from relatively obscure works like Donnie Darko illustrate handling a child’s emotional challenges. The Walkman housing Guardian of the Galaxy’s Peter Quill’s connection to his mother is about sharing our own cultural touchstones. Dr. Evil’s attempts to bond with his son show us that parenting can be a bitch. But you need not have memorized plots from Battlestar Galactica or believe in werewolves — or even be parents, for that matter. Family is rife with suffering and ecstasy, so aligning your journey with those of harrowing protagonists like Maleficent works like a spell. Geek Parenting is a golden ticket to the nerd zeitgeist. Devout geeks will get Dr. Who references and appreciate the wisdom of Princess Mononoke. Chapters like “They Need Discipline to Do Their Homework — Even If That Means Exiling Them to a Fortress of Solitude” and “If You Always Harp on What They Are Doing Wrong, You’re Teaching Them to Focus on the Dark Side” will give you strength the next time you pick up action figures strewn on the floor. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GEEK PARENTING BOOK-SIGNING with STEPHEN SEGAL and VALYA LUPESCU Noon, Sat., June 11. Rickert & Beagle Books, 3233 W. Liberty Ave., Dormont. www.rickertandbeaglebooks.com +

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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.0906.16.16

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. as host of Comedy Central’s buzzy game show @midnight, AMC’s fan-focused spinoff Talking Dead, or his own hit Nerdist podcast, Hardwick has added a standup tour to his busy schedule. The comedian, dubbed “the Ryan Seacrest of nerds,” takes his blend of pop-culture fandom and revealing, hilarious stories about his personal life out on the Id1ot Tour, which hits the Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall tonight. TD 7 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $37.50. 877-435-9849 or www.librarymusichall.com

JUNE 11 Alex Stypula

{MUSIC}

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive. 50

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+ THU., JUNE 09 {TALK}

Nancy Moses has uncovered fascinating tales behind stuffy art history in her newest book, Stolen, Smuggled, Sold: On the Hunt for Cultural Treasures. Known to many for her award-winning 2008 book Lost in the Museum: Buried Treasures and the Stories They Tell, in her latest, Moses takes readers through the surprisingly winding (and often criminal) journeys cultural objects have taken, including a famous painting, a Lakota Ghost Dance shirt, North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights and even a naked mummy. Moses lectures at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh tonight courtesy of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Tyler Dague 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

features Carnegie Mellon professor and poet Jim Daniels; Stephanie Flom, of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures; and poet and Pitt professor Yona Harvey. The fundraiser, including food and cocktails by Legume, benefits Oakland Planning and Development Corp. Bill O’Driscoll 6-8:30 p.m. 201 N. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $50. www.opdc.org

{COMEDY}

Chris Hardwick is taking over. Whether you know him

JUNE 11 Killer Heels: The Art of the HighHeeled Shoe

+ FRI., JUNE 10 {WORDS}

Tonight at The Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, it’s good stories for a good cause. Rick Sebak, himself no mean raconteur, emcees An Evening of Oakland Storytelling. The program, curated by Caliban Bookshop and The Moth in Pittsburgh,

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra begins a weekend of live performances. Tonight and Sunday, at Heinz Hall, cinematic music from Copland and Shostakovich prefaces The Earth: An HD Odyssey, stunning NASA footage accompanied by Strauss and John Adams. On Saturday, at the Three Rivers Arts Festival, assistant conductor Francesco Lecce-Chong leads a free program ranging from Dvorak and Mendelssohn to Bernstein, and FUSE@PSO creative director Steve Hackman conducts a mashup of Beethoven’s Third

Shoe by Winde Rienstra {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY ZUKERKORN}


MainEvent

For the second year running, Pittsburgh has two simultaneous LGBTQIA-themed festivals: the longstanding Pittsburgh Pride and the fledgling Roots Pride Pittsburgh. The Delta Foundation-organized Pittsburgh Pride’s concluding week includes the citywide Fri., June 10, Pub Crawl ($20, chauffered), and Saturday night’s massive Pride in the Street Party ($38-65), with headliner Kesha and opener Angel Haze. At noon Sunday, Dykes on Bikes leads 130-plus organizations in the annual Equality March, Downtown, among Pittsburgh’s biggest civic parades. Immediately following is PrideFest, a free, day-long Downtown street fair with performers, games, vendors, a Cruze Bar-sponsored dance area and a closing performance by singer Dev. While Kesha is an outspoken LGBT advocate, and Angel Haze is an African-American and Native American rapper who identifies as agender, the issues that inspired Roots Pride remain: This festival was launched last year to honor what local activists called a more inclusive vision of the LGBT community on race, class and gender. The June 10 Roots Pride Rally and Party, at East Liberty’s Ace Hotel (suggested donation: $5-25) meshes protest, speakers and DJs until 2 a.m. June 11’s Roots Pride Potluck, BBQ and Water Balloon Fight (yes), at Schenley Park’s Westinghouse Pavilion is an all-ages daytime event. Roots Pride concludes with Sunday’s Meet Me by the River: Prayer and Walk, starting at 3 p.m. at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. Bill O’Driscoll Pittsburgh Pride: www.pittsburghpride.org. Roots Pride: www.rootspridepgh.wix.com

Symphony and Coldplay, with vocalists Malia Civetz, Ben Jones and Will Post. TD The Earth: 8 p.m.; also 2:30 p.m. Sun., June 12 (600 Penn Ave., Downtown; $20-94). Three Rivers Arts Festival: 7:30 p.m. Sat., June 11 (Point State Park, Downtown; free). 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

+ SAT., JUNE 11 {EXHIBIT} On the one hand, sings Lola (memorably played by Pittsburgh’s own Billy Porter) in the hit musical Kinky Boots, “The sex is in the heel.” On the other, high heels kinda torture feet and d spines. On the third hand, nd, there’s footwear as art object: That’s where Killer Heels: els: The Art of the High-Heeled d Shoe e comes in. The traveling g exhibit organized by the he Brooklyn Museum showcases cases 150 historic and contemporary ntemporary heels, including often fantastical designs gns by names like Balenciaga, Louboutin, McQueen and Prada. It opens today at the Frick ck Art Museum, and note: Unlike most Frick exhibits, bits, this one has an admission mission fee. BO 10 a.m.-5 -5 p.m. Exhibit continues es through Sept. 4. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $12. 12. 412-371-0800 orr www.thefrick pittsburgh.org

Featuring a wealth of options for creativity such as costumes, masks, custom blocks and musical instruments, the exhibit lets visitors step into the Neighborhood of MakeBelieve and Daniel’s house. The opening weekend will feature special appearances by Daniel Tiger himself. TD 10:30 a.m.5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Jan. 17. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-14 (children under 2 are free). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

+ WED., JUNE 15 {COMEDY}

JUNE 11 Grr-ific

{GAME} There’s still time to register for the inaugural Scavenge the Strip p scavenger g hunt,, starting g at the Heinz History Center and continuing throughout

the Strip District. Whether in teams of two or four or testing their clue-solving skills solo, photos at each searchers take ph them to social site and post the chance to win media for a chan prizes. Scavenge the Strip support Sister’s ticket sales suppo Place, a housing community homeless families in assisting homeles Pennsylvania. Southwestern Pe p.m. 1212 TD D 11 a.m.-2 p.m Strip District. Smallman St., Str or $25-75. 412-233-3903 412-233-3 www.scavengethestrip.com www.scavengeth

{COMEDY} {COMED

JUNE 10 Chris Hardwick

{EXHIBIT} Won’t you be my neighbor? Daniel iel Tiger’s Neighborhood, TV’s animated spiritual successor or to Fred Roger’s beloved d children’s program, comess to the Children’s Museum eum in the form of the all-new exhibit Grr-ific.

NEWS

University of Pittsburgh professor and poetry-scene stalwart Judith Vollmer. The series continues July 16, with a reading in Highland Park. BO 4 p.m. North Side. Free. www.autumnhouse.org

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“I just we went to the doctor,” says Alex Stypula. Stypula “He told me I have to stop h cutting cuttin myself: ‘I see you y got all these thes deep cuts and an lacerations all over your body.’ And I bo was wa just like, ‘Well, ‘W you find the microchips, asshole!’” The assh touring, Pittsburgh-based Pittsbu comic, whose sensibilities s run toward the th dark side, records his new ne live album tonight at Club Clu Café. The late show is hosted by h John Dick Winter, with Win

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special guests Felicia Gillespie and Tim Ross. BO 10:30 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10 (21 and over). 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

{WORDS}

+ SUN., JUNE 12 {SCREEN} For a certain breed of fan, few Pittsburgh sports legacies are more cherished than that of Dock Ellis’ 1970 no-hitter, which the late Pirates pitcher famously threw on LSD. Today, Hyperboy Media, hardball blog Since1887.com and The Josh Gibson Foundation mark the anniversary of that amazing game with the inaugural Dock Ellis Day Celebration, at Culture Restaurant. Ellis was an outspoken advocate for the rights of African Americans and athletes, as covered in No No: A Dockumentary, Jeff Radice’s feature-length 2014 profile of Ellis. A No No screening is followed by a panel discussion featuring Ellis’ agent, Tom Reich; proceeds benefit the Gibson Foundation. BO Noon-4 p.m. 130 Seventh St., Downtown. Suggested donation: $17. www.Since1887.com

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Free poetry, outdoors: Pittsburgh-based Autumn House Press’ monthly Pittsburgh Parks Summer Reading Series continues today in Allegheny Commons Park West (right by the currently waterless Lake Elizabeth). Today’s readers, all locally based, are Carnegie Mellon professor Kevin González; acclaimed Venezuelan-born writer Israel Centeno; and

Actor, comedian, author and radio host Jay Mohr did his first standup session at age 16. Joined the Saturday Night Live cast when he was only 23. Was cast alongside Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire at 26. And starred with Jennifer Aniston in Picture Perfect one year later. Despite decades in movies, television and radio, Mohr has never left standup behind, continuing to tour regularly. Mohr comes to Pittsburgh Improv for a special one-night comedy event. TD 8 p.m. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, Homestead. $27. 412- 462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA}

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The Th h Earth: E t An HD Odyssey

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER THE CONSORTS. Presented by the Summer Company. Genesius Theater. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 12. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6000. THE DINNER DETECTIVE INTERACTIVE MURDER MYSTERY DINNER SHOW. Sat, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Marriot City Center, Downtown. 720-271-2996. ENCHANTED APRIL. At the end of an especially bleak winter, two proper British ladies are suddenly swept into the adventure of their lifetime--one that includes romance, laughter & a glowing refreshment of spirit. Thu-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru June 9. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. HENRY IV. Part 1 presented by Poor Yurick’s Players. Fri-Sun, 7 p.m. Thru June 11. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. www.pooryoricksplayers.org. JUDGMENT AT NUREMBERG. A play about the post WWII

on your discoveries. Presented trials presented by the by Uncumber Theatrics. Throughline Theatre Company. www.uncumbertheatrics.com. www.throughlinetheatre.org. Thu-Sun. Thru June 11. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 349 Cedarville Street, Bloomfield. 2 p.m. Thru June 18. The Grey SPRING AWAKENING. A Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. rock musical, based on the 412-586-7744. controversial play set in lateOH JACK! A beanstalk musical 19th-century Germany, tells for kids. June 14-24, 11 a.m., the story of teenagers discovering Thu., June 16, 11 a.m., the inner & outer tumult Sat., June 18, 11 a.m., of teenage sexuality. Tue., June 21, 11 a.m., June 9-11, 8 p.m. Thu., June 23, 11 a.m. The Theatre Factory, and Fri., June 24, Trafford. 412-374-9200. 11 a.m. Apple Hill . www per SQUABBLES. Jerry Playhouse, Delmont. a p ty pghci m Sloan & his wife 724-468-5050. .co are a happy, successful, SERPENTINE: AN married couple living ALTERNATE REALITY w/ the not-so-happy Abe GAME. A film-noir style Dreyfus, Jerry’s curmudgeon Alternate Reality Game that of a father-in-law. The situation examines a true Pittsburgh cold is exacerbated when Jerry’s case. Be prepared to travel to mother Mildred loses her house different Pittsburgh locales in in a fire & needs a place to stay. search of clues, meet up w/ Call 412-831-8552 for reservations. different characters, collaborate Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. w/ fellow participants & influence Thru June 25. South Park Theatre, an unfolding month-long story Bethel Park. whose conclusion will be based

FULL LIST ONLINE

[THEATER]

Musician Emily Rodgers plays a few beautiful, haunting tunes in studio for us and talks about her new album, Two Years, which drops June 10.

VENUS IN FUR. A stage director anxiously searches for the perfect leading lady. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru June 28. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

COMEDY THU 09 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Derick Minto. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

SAT 11 ALEX STYPULA. 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

MON 13 COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. UNPLANNED COMEDY JAMBONE’S IMPROV. Hosted by Woody Drenen. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 15 KEVIN JAMES. 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY CITY HISTORIC

{SIGNAL CORPS PHOTO; RELEASED BY AUTHORITY OF THE BUREAU OF PUBLIC RELATIONS}

1946 photograph of a defendant on the witness stand at the Nuremburg Trials

Throughline Theatre Company delves into a painful part of history with its new production of Judgment at Nuremburg. Following World War II, Nuremburg hosted the famous military trials of the justices of the Third Reich’s highest courts. Abby Mann’s 1961 play explores how people assign accountability in the face of atrocity. June 10-18. Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $20. www.throughlinetheatre.org

GALLERY. Historical images & items forcusing on the North Side of Pittsburgh. North Side. 412-321-3940. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. BRADDOCK’S BATTLEFIELD HISTORY CENTER. French & Indian CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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… h g r u b s t t i P Who has the ? r e g r u B t s e B VISUALART “and who came up with this brilliant idea?” (oil on Belgian linen, 2016), by Marion Di Quinzio. From the exhibition Full Spectrum Ahead, at The Gallery 4, East Liberty.

NEW THIS WEEK BOCK-TOTT GALLERY. 10 Artists: a Collection of Works. Opening reception June 10, 5 - 9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-519-3377. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. OFF the wall Gallery Collection. Art from local, national & international artists. Opening reception June 11, 5 - 8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Killer Heels: The Art of the High Heeled Shoe. Deadly sharp stilettos, architecturally inspired wedges & platforms & a number of artfully crafted shoes that defy categorization are featured in this diverse presentation of style & design. Opens June 11. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. THE GALLERY 4. Full Spectrum Ahead. New work by Marion Di Quinzio & Carolyn Frischling. Opening reception June 11, 7 - 10 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. SHAW GALLERIES. County Fairs: Stromboli Land. A 2 day exhibit on June 10 - 11 featuring original photographs by local artist Cynthia Cable. Closing reception June 11, 5 - 8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3rd Annual Art Brew. Arts activities, games, craft beer, awesome eats, live music & an

Artists’ Market. Proceeds will benefit our numerous programs held throughout the year. 21+. June 9, 6 - 10 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

ONGOING 937 LIBERTY AVE. Humanae/I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures: Hanging Fruit. An original installation by Zhiwan Cheung. Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei. A major international exhibition feat. two significant artists of the 20th & 21st centuries—Andy Warhol & Ai Weiwei. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. What They Say, What They Said. A collaboration between The Andy Warhol Museum, BOOM Concepts & Artists Image Resource (AIR). D.S. Kinsel’s mural is the project’s introductory iteration of prints installed on the Rosa Villa, a shuttered building across the street from The Warhol. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302.

AUGUST WILSON CENTER. With I Wish I Knew How It Felt to Be Free. Work by Hebru Brantley. Vanessa German, Introspective. An ambitious hybrid of multidisciplinary work curated to highlight the dimensions of German’s life & work as a citizen artist & activist. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. SOUND: a solo reuse art exhibition. Work by Martin Thomas Smyczek II. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Strange Beauty: Autoradiography from Fukushima. The work of Japanese photojournalist Takashi Morizumi explores the affect of radiation from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant disaster on everyday objects. Regent Square. 412-247-1870. BOXHEART GALLERY. That was the River, This is the Sea. Paintings by Joshua Hogan, sculpture by James Shipman & a window installation by Daria Sandburg. Floodgates for Hydra. Paintings by Jennipher Satterly. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Work from 56 regional artists. Celebration Red. Conceptual artist, Allison Knowles reprises her 1962 work CONTINUES ON PG. 55

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Step 1:

G to www.budburgercontest.com for Go p participating locations.

Step 2:

T Taste their burger while enjoying a B Budweiser special.

Step 3:

G Go back to www.budburgercontest.com tto vote for your favorite and you will be rregistered to win a Budweiser Prize Pack: G Grille, BBQ Sauces and Cooler!

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 52

{PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

*Stuff We Like

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

War. The history of the French & Indian War w/ over 250 artifacts & more. Braddock. 412-271-0800. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF EVENT: NATURAL HISTORY. Dinosaurs , in Their Time. Displaying Phipps Conservatory immersive environments spanning and Botanical the Mesozoic Era & original Gardens, Oakland fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, CRITIC: gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population , 51, Impact. How humans are a restaurateur from affecting the environment. Upper St. Clair Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. WHEN: H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply [The Butterfly Forest] had the beauty of nature. My & the environment? Ongoing: favorite part was seeing the butterflies with their wings Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), open. We also saw a cocoon in there that shows the Miniature Railroad & Village, transition in life. It was beautiful. Overall, Phipps has USS Requin submarine & more. taken a lot of care. [The volunteers are] very helpful. This North Side. 412-237-3400. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL is my most favorite place, and I always bring my guests HISTORY. Explore the here. It’s such a special place for me. I’m really missing complex interplay between the Indian exhibit. They have now put in [Tropical culture, nature & biotechnology. Forest] Congo. They used to have an Indian rainforest, Sundays 12-4. Garfield. so I especially came to show my guests that, and that 412-223-7698. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF was missing. But I feel right at home here because I see PITTSBURGH. Daniel Tiger’s the foliage and the fauna that I find in India. Neighborhood: A Grr-ific BY TYLER DAGUE Exhibit. Step into Daniel Tiger’s world & join him to explore some favorite places. Work together to solve problems, circa French & Indian War & falcons and their friends take engage the imagination to American Revolution. Downtown. center stage! Home to more than transform surroundings & play 412-281-9285. 600 birds from over 200 species. along w/ Daniel’s sing-able FRICK ART & HISTORICAL W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. strategies to better understand CENTER. Ongoing: tours of North Side. 412-323-7235. & navigate everyday emotions. Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ NATIONALITY ROOMS. North Side. 412-322-5058. classes & programs for all ages. 29 rooms helping to tell the COMPASS INN. Demos & Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant tours w/ costumed guides feat. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this past. University of Pittsburgh. this restored stagecoach stop. Tudor mansion & stable complex. Oakland. 412-624-6000. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church DEPRECIATION LANDS in the surrounding park. features 1823 pipe organ, MUSEUM. Small living history Allison Park. 412-767-9200. Revolutionary War graves. Scott. museum celebrating the KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the 412-851-9212. settlement & history of other Frank Lloyd Wright house. OLIVER MILLER the Depreciation Lands. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Allison Park. 412-486-0563. KERR MEMORIAL Whiskey Rebellion site FALLINGWATER. Tour MUSEUM. Tours features log house, blacksmith the famed Frank Lloyd of a restored 19thshop & gardens. South Park. Wright house. Mill Run. century, middle-class 412-835-1554. 724-329-8501. . w w w home. Oakmont. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY FIRST PRESBYTERIAN aper p ty ci h g p 412-826-9295. MUSEUM. Trolley rides & CHURCH. Tours of .com MARIDON MUSEUM. exhibits. Includes displays, 13 Tiffany stained-glass Collection includes walking tours, gift shop, windows. Downtown. jade & ivory statues from picnic area & Trolley Theatre. 412-471-3436. China & Japan, as well as Meissen Washington. 724-228-9256. FORT PITT MUSEUM. porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Captured by Indians: Warfare MCGINLEY HOUSE & BOTANICAL GARDEN. The & Assimilation on the 18th MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Butterfly Forest. An interactive Century Frontier. During the Historic homes open for tours, exhibit w/ 21 species of mid-18th century, thousands of lectures & more. Monroeville. butterfly & the elusive Luna settlers of European & African 412-373-7794. moth. Summer Flower Show. descent were captured by Native NATIONAL AVIARY. Butterfly From whirligigs & water Americans. Using documentary Garden. Mingle w/ butterfly fountains to rotundas & Rube evidence from 18th & early 19th species native to the region, Goldberg machines, Playgardens century sources, period imagery, including Painted Ladies, for guests of all ages w/ interactive & artifacts from public & private Monarchs, Black Swallowtails, elements. 14 indoor rooms collections in the U.S. and Canada, Red Spotted Purples, Viceroys & & 3 outdoor gardens feature the exhibit examines the practice Giant Swallowtails. Species in the exotic plants & floral displays of captivity from its prehistoric exhibit will vary over the summer from around the world. roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & months. Masters of the Sky. Tropical Forest Congo. An Euro-American communities. Explore the power & grace of the exhibit highlighting some of Reconstructed fort houses birds who rule the sky. Majestic Africa’s lushest landscapes. museum of Pittsburgh history eagles, impressive condors, stealthy Oakland. 412-622-6914.

The Butterfly Forest

Sumedhi Nagpal Wed., June 01

Ramps

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

These wild onions thrive in Appalachian soil and are near-impossible to cultivate. Find them at local farmers markets and enjoy them, leaves and all, before their short season is up. pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/farmers-market

New Bike Pittsburgh Maps

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

The sixth version of this indispensable resource from advocacy group BikePGH introduces special markings for protected bike lanes, a detailed Downtown break-out, and all the city’s Healthy Ride bike-rental locations. www.bike-pgh.org

FULL LIST ONLINE

Free Sparkling Water A light-up cube-shaped sculpture that also dispenses free sparkling and still water: The future is now, people. BYOB. Penn Avenue and Eighth Street, Downtown

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PHOTO ANTIQUITIES MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. Glass Lantern Slides. Glass lantern slides from 1890 to 1920. Displaying 660 different movie cameras, showing pictures on glass, many hand-painted. The largest display of 19th Century photographs in America. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS THU 09 - SUN 12 DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. A 10 day festival of visual & performing arts. For a full schedule of event, visit http://traf.trustarts.org. Thru June 12 Downtown Pittsburgh, Downtown.


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by asking visitors to bring in a red item to contribute to a large grid. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Summer Series. Work from Artur Vasilevich. Michael Lies, painter/filmmaker will exhibit a few paintings. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CHROMOS EYEWEAR. Images in Watercolor. Work by Natiq Jalil. Lawrenceville. 412-772-1473. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Creative Journeys. Work from Jerome D’Angelo, Alexis Dillon & Maura Keeney. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FORT PITT MUSEUM. History Inspires. Works by 10 local, contemporary artists who have drawn inspiration from the 18th century history of Western PA. Downtown. 412-281-9284. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Collage Now. A show about creating new meanings through juxtapositions by finding relationships & contrasts in the world around them to form ideas. Work by Crystala Armagost, Stephanie Armbruster, Matthew Buchholz, Seth Clark, Ron Copeland, Kim Fox & Mary Dorfner Hay. Downtown. 412-325-7037.

GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Reveries of Reality. Work by Lindsay Feuer, Elizabeth Fortunato & Brian Sesack. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Expired Mills: Inspired Landscapes. Oil paintings by Claire Hardy. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HILLMAN LIBRARY. 1989 China/Avant-Garde Exhibition: Reflections. Materials from the archive of Gao Minglu, research professor, Pitt Department of History of Art & Architecture & a leading scholar of Chinese contemporary art. Thornburgh Room. www.humanities.pitt.edu. Oakland. 412-648-3330. HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ART. His Stories & Her Stories. The work of illustrators John Manders & Stacey Hogue. Kathleen Zimbicki. A solo exhibition of watercolors. New Castle. 724-652-2882. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Great Expectations. There is great expectation in the promise & energy held within a bud or a seed, & phases of this continuous cycle of plant development are beautifully illustrated w/ collection items. Oakland. 412-268-2434. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MATTRESS FACTORY SATELLITE GALLERY. Factory Installed. Work by David Bowen, Kevin Clancy, Wendy Judge &

Lauren Kalman. North Side. 412-231-3169. MINE FACTORY. One Hand Clapping. Work by artist/photographer Deborah Hosking. Homewood. www.minefactory.tumblr.com. MONROEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Harry Lindsey. A solo exhibit of watercolor paintings. Monroeville. 412-372-0500. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. bound by glass. Work by Jen Blazina, Gregory Grenon, Jon Goldberg, Owen Johnson, Weston Lambert, Carol Milne, David Patchen & Steven Weinberg / KASTAL. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Elizabeth Barreto Ortiz & Justin Waltenbaugh. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Regional Show – Multi-Media Juried Art Exhibit. Artworks featured in the show were submitted by local amateur & professional artists. Highlights of the show include works in oil, pastel, watercolor, fiber, stoneware & other media. Ross. 412-364-3622. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Arts in Education. Large scale fiber art works by students. Marcellus Shale Documentary Project: An Expanded View. New photography & video works by Noah Addis, Nina Berman, Brian Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Lynn Johnson, Martha Rial, and Joe Seamans & graphics by FracTracker Alliance that document the social & environmental effects of natural gas drilling in the region. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Turned On: Lighting Hooks Up with Sculpture. Work by Rik Allen, Christina Bothwell &

Robert Bender, Amber Cowan, Jean Fernandes, Evan Kolker, Carmen Lozar & Matthew Urban, Adam Holtzinger & Susan Spiranovich Julian Maturino, Janis Miltenberger, Corey Pemberton, Susan Taylor Glasgow & Leo Tecosky. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SEWICKLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. Giselle Potter. The art work of a well known children’s book & editorial illustrator. Original artwork produced for children’s books, as well as sketches & unfinished art that will highlight the illustrator’s process. Sewickley. 412-741-6920. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. The Hereditary Estate: Daniel Coburn. The solo exhibition explores the dark undercurrent of the artist’s family history through a series of lyrical & mysterious photographs.Homo Bulla: Megan Ledbetter. The solo exhibition is a study of surfaces & life cycles in the American South. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Fiberart International 2016. The 22nd in a series of triennial juried exhibitions sponsored by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh, Inc, featuring works by established & emerging artists the exhibition provides a unique opportunity to see current trends & innovations in this constantly evolving medium. Pattern & Place: Art Quilts by Valerie Goodwin. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. The Light in Nature & Time: Paintings by Fred Danziger. Ligioner. 724-238-6015.

TIMON ESAIAS, ROBERTA HATCHER, MIKE JAMES. Poetry reading. 7:30 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. WHAT IS SO RARE AS A DAY IN JUNE. A poetry reading by Timons Esais, Roberta Hatcher & Mike James. 7:30 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118.

SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Interwoven States Exhibition. Juried exhibition highlighting the diverse textile practices of our regional fiber arts community & the creativity in which artists express contemporary aesthetics & concepts. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. The Juried Visual Art Exhibition. Showcasing exceptional new art by regional artists in various stages of their careers & in a variety of media. Downtown. www.trustarts.org. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. By appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. UNSMOKE SYSTEMS ARTSPACE. You/U. Audio, digital & sculpture work by Ben Quint-Glick, Gianna Paniagua & Zach John Lee. Braddock. www.unsmokeartspace.com. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Telling Tales: Stories & Legends in 19th Century American Art. 53 pieces that portray themes of American ambition, pride & the spiritual elements of American life. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. All Around Us: Installations & Experiences Inspired by Bugs. Works by Jennifer Angus, Daniel Campos, Garnet Hertz, Ivana Adaime Makac, Robin Meier & Andre Gwerder, Nathan Morehouse, Daniel Zurek& Sebastian Echeverri, Matthijs Munnik, Stephanie Ross, Jeff Shaw, Susana Soares, Bingrui Tang & CMU CREATE Lab. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

SAT 11 DENNIS MARSILI. A book signing by the author of “Little Chicago: a history of organized crime in New Kensington, PA”. 11 a.m. The South Butler Community Library, Saxonburg. 724-352-4810. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292. THOMAS PAGE MCBEE. Bonfire Reading Series. 6 p.m. Borland Garden, East Liberty.

MON 13 WHAT’S YOUR STORY? An adult writing group for light-hearted stories. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

TUE 14 STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

KIDSTUFF THU 09 PAJAMA STORYTIME. For ages 3-6 & their families. Enjoy interactive stories & creative activities. Wearing PJs is optional. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

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THU 09

THU 09

MEMORY 4. Performed by dance duo, slowdanger. 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. www.newhazletttheatre.org.

NUCLEAR-FREE BLAST: AN EVENING OF MUSIC, POETRY & ART. Join Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace for an evening of music, poetry & art to raise awareness of the persistent dangers of nuclear weapons & power. This fundraiser features: Ben Shannon & John Kono, Kei Rush, Sheila Carter Jones & the Pittsburgh Raging Grannies. 7-9 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-247-1870.

FRI 10 SMOKIN’ BETTIES BURLESQUE PRESENTS: THE SMOKIN’ HOT SUMMER SHOW. 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

SAT 11 SILVER ANNIVERSARY GALA. Excerpts of choreography from the past 25 years & a revival of Stravinsky’s Firebird by Laurel Ballet Performing Company. 2 & 7 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SAT 11 JUSTBREATHEPGH PITTSBURGH’S 50 FINEST. Cystic Fibrosis benefit. 7 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-904-3335. SCAVENGE THE STRIP. Solve

clues that will send you to numerous businesses in the Strip where you will take a team photo & share it with the world. Benefits Sisters’ Place. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Strip District, Strip District.

SAT 11 - SUN 12 BIKE MS: ESCAPE TO THE LAKE. A150 mile ride in two days to benefit PA Keystone Chapter of the National MS Society. www.bikems.org. June 11-12 Moraine State Park, Butler. 724-368-8811.

SUN 12 2016 PITTSBURGH AUTISM SPEAKS WALK. A 1 mile walk to help raise funds to support advocacy, awareness, family services & critical research in the Western PA region. http://www.autismspeakswalk.org/.

10 a.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-255-2539. DOCK ELLIS DAY CELEBRATION. A screening & live entertainment. Proceeds will benefit the Josh Gibson Foundation. 12 p.m. Culture Restaurant & Lounge, Downtown. 412-238-2222.

POLITICS THU 09 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 09 3 POEMS BY . . POETRY DISCUSSION GROUP. Topic:

C.D. Wright 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3114. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. NANCY KRYGOWSKI, JANE MCCAFFERTY, LAWRENCE WRAY. 7 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-8888.

FRI 10 AN EVENING OF OAKLAND STORYTELLING. Featuring Rick Sebak & curated by Caliban Book Shop & The Moth in Pittsburgh. Food & cocktails by Legume/Butterjoint. http://www. opdc.org/oaklandstorytelling/. 6-8:30 p.m. Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, Oakland. 412-621-0100.

MOVIE NIGHTS ON THE LAWN. Family friendly movies (Rated PG or lower). Feel free to bring your dinner, a lawn chair & a blanket. No alcohol permitted. www.mtpisgahgreentree.com. Every other Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 19 Mt. Pisgah Presbyterian Church, Green Tree. 412-921-8444.

SUN 12 KIDS’ DAY. Activities for children under the tent including, face painting, balloon artists & free rides on the PNC Carousel. Second Sun of every month, 12-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 9 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-682-7275.

MON 13 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turnedTeaching Artist Molly. Mon, CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 14 SENSORY FRIENDLY AFTERNOON. Individuals w/ Autism Spectrum Disorders & Sensory Processing Disorders can enjoy a friendly experience in a comfortable & accepting environment. Announcement & exhibit sound volume will be reduced & sound reducing headphones will be available. Second Tue of every month, 1-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

City Paper wants to hear about your special family recipes and the stories behind them for our new feature, Personal Chef. Email your stories and recipes to celine@pghcitypaper.com

WED 15 SHEEP TO SWEATER. Watch wool being spun on a real spinning wheel & learn wet felting techniques. For kids entering 3rd-6th grade. Preregister at 412-531-1912. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PAJAMA STORYTIME. For ages 3-6 & their families. Enjoy interactive stories & creative activities. Wearing PJs is optional. Thu., June 9, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE THU 09 THURSDAY ADULT NATURE WALK. Free & open to ages 18 & older. Meets rain or shine every Thursday of the year. Naturalists guide these walks. Thu, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

FRI 10 - SAT 11

Does your bar make the best Alabama Slammer this side of the Mon River? Is your Singapore Sling something the people of Kirwan Heights have written folk songs about? Then put your recipe to the test and square off with other area bartenders in City Paper’s new feature: Booze Battles. Send your contact information and a few words about your bar to celine@pghcitypaper.com

WAGMAN STAR PARTY. Amateur astronomers, students & the general public to observe the wonders of the June sky along with Saturn, its rings & several of its moons. Visitors will be able to observe the First Quarter New Moon, Hercules Cluster & the Ring Nebula. 724-224-2510. June 10-11, 8:50 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

SUN 12 FRICK PARK ORIENTEERING. Find checkpoints using topographic map & compass. 11 a.m. Frick Park, Regent Square. www.wpoc.org. NATURE HIKE. Join a Park Ranger for an exploration & discussion of a variety of nature topics. We will discuss how to identify some plants & animals in the park. Bring water & wear hiking shoes. Pre-registration is recommended at www.alleghenycounty.us/ parkprograms. 2-4 p.m. White Oak Park, White Oak.

TUE 14 EDIBLE WILD PLANTS. Deepen your connection to nature by learning about wild plants growing

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nearby & why you should learn to harvest them w/ Faith Starr of Living Green w/ Faith. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUNG NATURE EXPLORERS CLASS. Getting kids outside, exploring nature. Pre-registration required, 724-935-2170. Latodami Nature Center. Second Tue of every month, 9:30-11 a.m. & 1-2:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

WED 15 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 09

dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. INDIANA JONES..AFTER DARK. Dress up for an Indiana Jones themed costume contest, see professional whip artist Gery Deer, search for treasure a scavenger hunt, make your own rubbing of ancient inscriptions & take a selfie w/ a life-sized replica boulder. Enjoy a performance of the movie series’ famous score by members of the Pittsburgh Philharmonic & dance Pittsburgh Vibes Unlimited. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL. An evening of fun, games & delicious food to celebrate the impending arrival of summer & support Sojourner House, a local non-profit organization. 5:308:30 p.m. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. CURATOR MEET + GREET. Meet José Carlos Diaz, Eric Crosby & Ingrid Schaffner AMERICAN RED CROSS will each give a ten minute BABYSITTER TRAINING & presentation about themselves. CERTIFICATION. The American Learn about their curatorial Red Cross will host a babysitter practice & share your top ten list training course to provide of things to experience in the knowledge & skills necessary to ‘burgh. 6-8 p.m. The Society for safely & responsibly give care for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. infants & children. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 412-261-7003. Baldwin Borough Public Library, DEPRESSION BIPOLAR Baldwin. 412-885-2255. SUPPORT GROUP. Thu, BEGINNER TAI CHI 6 p.m. C.C. Mellor CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Memorial Library, Friends Meeting House, Edgewood. Oakland. 412-683-2669. 412-708-9423. BUILDING STRONG w. w w INTERNATIONAL & VIBRANT UNIONS. r citypape h g p WOMEN’S The subject of this .com ASSOCIATION OF discussion will be PITTSBURGH. Social, organizing, engaging cultural club of American/ workers to maximize power, international women. Thu growing union membership & First Baptist Church, Oakland. defending existing contracts. iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. The panel features organizing MARKET SQUARE FARMERS directors from two PittsburghMARKET. Thu. Thru Oct. 27 based unions--Maria Somma of Market Square, Downtown. the Steelworkers, Gene Elk from 412-471-1511. United Electrical Workers & a PRINTMAKING OPEN STUDIO. member of the Academic Workers Experienced screen printers can Association, discussing strategies & utilize studio equipment to make techniques, successes & challenges films, burn screens & complete a facing workers today. 1:30 p.m. run of posters, t-shirts or prints. The Pump House, Homestead. A volunteer-driven environment MEET, LEARN, PLAY: A GAMING designed for short-run projects MEET UP. All-ages board gaming that can be completed in one session, playing & learning about evening for a small materials new games w/ an instructor. fee. Tue, Thu, 6-10 p.m. Artists Quiet Reading Room. Second Image Resource, North Side. and Fourth Sat of every month, 412-321-8664. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, SALSA NIGHT. Free dancing Oakland. 412-622-3151. lessons w/ host & instructor DJ SECOND SATURDAY AT THE Bobby D from 9:30-10 p.m. Thu, SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Perle Champagne w/ various musical, literary & Bar, Downtown. 412-471-2058. artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. SWING CITY. Learn & practice Second and Third Fri of every swing dancing skills w/ the Jim month and Fourth and Last Fri Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman of every month Irma Freeman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. Center for Imagination, Garfield. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE 412-924-0634. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, A social, traditional American North Side. 412-224-2827.

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SUN 12 FAMILY/FRIENDS OF SUBSTANCE USERS/ABUSERS SUPPORT GROUP. Non 12-step support group exchanging experiences & ideas as a means to provide resources & suggestions that can help those struggling to support the recovery journey of a close relative or friend. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 4:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran Church, Bethel Park. 412-853-3189. LAWRENCEVILLE GARDEN TOUR. A self-guided tour. www.lha15201.org. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Allegheny Cemetery, Lawrenceville. 412-682-1624. THE NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. Vintage treasures, mid-century finds, local food & handmade wares. Second Sun of every month, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Strip District, Strip District. PANERA PUP WALK. Join Grand Marshal Charlie Batch & his wife Latasha for a beautiful morning walk followed by a vendor village & fun activities for your pup. Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-476-8889. PFLAG PITTSBURGH. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. http://pflagpgh.weebly. com/. Second Sun of every month, 2-4:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. PLAYWRIGHT WORKSHOP. Literary manager & dramaturg, Clare Drobot, will lead a workshop designed to cover basic skills & concepts in playwriting, as well as exercises that will help you get a jump on your next script. 2-4 p.m. Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. SONNTAG: SUNDAYS IN DEUTSCHTOWN. Beer from Northside breweries, Wigle spirits, German food from Berlin Street Foods & German activities. Sun, 2-5 p.m. Thru Oct. 23. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side.

MON 13 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PITTSBURGH MEETING. Monthly meeting. Second Mon of every month, 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. CENTER FOR WOMEN’S ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPEN HOUSE. Come meet our staff, facilitators & past participants while learning about all of our services for women business owners & women in business. 8-10 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

TUE 14 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.


CONCEPT TO LAUNCH. A 6-week entrepreneurial training program for women in the early stages of starting a business called “Concept to Launch.” Program is open to 15 participants & will cover the following topics: developing the business concept, industry & market research, identifying target customers, pricing & marketing strategies, startup financials, legal business entities & pitching your business. Tue, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 12 Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-731-3080. PRINTMAKING OPEN STUDIO. Experienced screen printers can utilize studio equipment to make films, burn screens & complete a run of posters, t-shirts or prints. A volunteer-driven environment designed for short-run projects that can be completed in one evening for a small materials fee. Tue, Thu, 6-10 p.m. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664.

Walters, Janis Miltenberger & Matthew Szosz presenting images, videos & informal discussions about contemporary glass art. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. URBAN HOMESTEADING: FIBER ARTS. Learn all about the processes that go into transforming raw animal fibers into finished fabrics & see demonstrations & examples of carding, spinning, weaving, more. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

AUDITIONS THE AMISH MONKEYS. Looking to take on 1-2 new performers. Experience as an improv performer required. Schedule an audition

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

U.S. OPEN FOR PARKINSON FOUNDATION OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA Help staff concession tables for the duration of the U.S. Open from June 13-19 in Oakmont. Individual and group opportunities are available. For more information or to register, call 412-837-2542, or send an e-mail to info@pfwpa.org.

SALLIE BOGGS TOASTMASTERS CLUB. Helping people from all walks of life to improve their communication & leadership skills. For any questions email Sallieboggstm@gmail.com or call 412-365-5803. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. C.C. Mellor Memorial Library, Edgewood. 412-731-0909. SQUIRREL HILL HISTORICAL SOCIETY. A lecture on “Marketing the Presidency” by speaker: Steve Mihaly. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill.

WED 15 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session w/ literary conversation. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 26 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. FLEET FEET SPEED SQUAD. At the track. Coach Alex from Fleet Feet Sports Pittsburgh hosts weekly Wednesday night speed workouts. The workouts are free & open to the public. Anyone who wants to improve their speed & form are encouraged to join. Wed, 7 p.m. Jefferson Elementary, Mt. Lebanon. 412-851-9100. GLASS ART LECTURE SERIES. Speakers: Darin Denison, Dave

NEWS

at amishmonkeys@gmail.com. No monologue necessary. Bring a photo if possible. 21+. 4:30-5:30 p.m., June 18 & 7:30-8:30 p.m., June 22. Father Ryan Arts Center, McKees Rocks. 412-771-3052. COMMUNITY MEN’S CHOIR. Looking for male-identified singers interested in joining community men’s choral ensemble. Volunteer role, 1 2.5 hr rehearsal/week, 2 concerts a year. For more information, visit www. steelcitymenschorale.org. Thru Aug. 6. First Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, Oakland. 412-683-4121. DIAMOND THEATRE OF LIGONIER. An open casting call for Disney’s “The Little Mermaid.” Cold readings from the script. Actors interested in singing parts will need to be prepared to sing a 32 audition bar cut to show their vocal range. Casting for ages 8+. June 10t, 6 - 8 p.m., June 11, 6 - 8 p.m., June 12, 6 – 8 p.m. & June 17, 7 - 9 p.m. Ligonier Diamond, Ligonier. 724-238-4200. JULY PGH. BICENTENNIAL COMEDY/VARIETY REVIEW. Seeking 2 males & 2 females. Singers, actors & improv. All Ages. Call 412-353-3756. Thru June 30. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. THE LOTUS. If you have a personal story to tell about your coming

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out, how it got better for you, how you overcame hurdles to live your authentic life, we want to hear from you. The Lotus is about celebrating & empowering our young LGBT generation. Straight allies welcome too. Deadline for story submissions is June 15. Email pitch@artsoutloud.org to send us your story synopsis. Thru June 15. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. GREAT LOCAL GARDENS CONTEST. All types of gardens will be considered. www. shalerlibrary.org. Thru July 11. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. PITTSBURGH QUARTERLY. Looking for new work by local poets. Please check out Robert’s poem “Home Movies” at http://pittsburghquarterly. com/between-the-issues-items/ item/1082-home-movies.html. Ongoing. Pittsburgh Quartley, Fox Chapel. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY AQUEOUS INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. Open to any artist 18 or older working in water-based media. Works submitted for consideration to PWS Aqueous Open must be primarily water based media on an unvarnished paper surface. Work must have been completed within the last two years & not previously shown in a PWS exhibit. For more information visit ww.pittsburghwatercolorsociety. com. Thru July 11. Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 33-year-old straight guy with a small dick. I have a girlfriend of seven years. When we met, I was really insecure and she had to spend a lot of time reassuring me that it didn’t matter — she loved my dick, sex with me was great, it was big enough for her, etc. I broke up with her once because I didn’t think she should settle for someone so small. After some hugely painful nights and another near breakup, we are in a good place. We have lots of great vanilla sex, we love being together, and we recently got engaged. After everything I put her through, how do I tell her that being mocked (and worse) for having a small dick is the only thing I ever think about when I masturbate? I want a woman to punish me emotionally and physically for having such a small and inadequate dick. There’s porn about my kink, but I didn’t discover it until long after I was aware of my interest. I’ve never been able to bring myself to tell anyone about my kink. How do I tell this woman? I basically bullied her into telling me that my dick was big enough — and now I want her to tell me it isn’t big enough. But do I really want her to? I’ve never actually experienced the kind of insulting comments and physical punishments that I fantasize about. What if the reality is shattering? TENSE IN NEW YORK

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for what I put you through”) and a warning (“This is probably going to come as a bit of a shock”). Then tell her you have a major kink, tell her she has a right to know about it before you marry, tell her that most people’s kinks are wrapped up with their biggest fears and anxieties … and she’ll probably guess what you have to tell her before you get the words out. “He should explain to her that he doesn’t want to be emotionally hurt as much as he wants to feel exposed and vulnerable, and that can be a thrill,” said TP. “It can be hard for people to understand how humiliation can be fun. But humiliation play is one way to add a new dynamic to their sexual relationship.” I have a health question/problem. About a week-and-a-half ago, the wife and I had sex. Being the genius that I am, I got the idea to put two condoms on because I thought it would help me last longer. (Spoiler alert: It didn’t.) But I guess the condoms were too tight, and climaxing hurt quite a bit. It’s like I duct-taped the tip of my penis shut and tried to blow a load. Even days after, the left side of my penis head was really sensitive and it hurt. It’s still too sensitive to touch from time to time. I have a doctor’s appointment, but it’s two weeks away. I’m a little worried I may have hurt my prostate or urethra or something. From my basic Googling, there doesn’t seem to be any medical advice about this. Help please?

“SHE’LL PROBABLY GUESS WHAT YOU HAVE TO TELL HER BEFORE YOU GET THE WORDS OUT.”

“I was in a similar situation years ago with my thengirlfriend, now-wife,” says TP. “I was too chicken to tell her about my fetish and worried she wasn’t satisfied with my size, so I didn’t want to bring more attention to it. I eventually went to a pro Domme and felt guilty about doing it behind my girlfriend’s back.” TP, which stands for Tiny Prick, is a prominent member of the SPH (small-penis humiliation) fetish scene. TP is active on Twitter (@deliveryboy4m) and maintains a blog devoted to SPH (his passion) and animal rights (which his Domme is passionate about) at fatandtiny.blogspot.com. “I got really lucky because I found the Domme I’ve been serving for more than 10 years,” said TP. “It was my Domme who encouraged me to bring up my kinks with my wife. I only wish I had told my wife earlier. She hasn’t turned into a stereotypical dominatrix, but she was open to incorporating some SPH play into our sex life.” According to TP, TINY, you’ve already laid the groundwork for the successful incorporation of SPH into your sex life: You’re having good, regular and satisfying vanilla sex with your partner. “TINY’s partner is happy with their sex life, so he knows he can satisfy a woman,” said TP. “That will help to separate the fantasy of the humiliation from the reality of their strong relationship.” When you’re ready to broach the subject with the fiancée, TINY, I recommend starting with both an apology (“I’m sorry again

PENILE PROBLEM POSSESSOR

“The application of an external constriction to the penis did potentially cause the pressure in the urethra to rise, possibly traumatically, during ejaculation,” says Dr. Keith D. Newman, a urologist, a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and a regular guest expert in Savage Love. In other words, PPP, somehow those two condoms conspired to dam up your piss slit — a.k.a. your urethral meatus — and the force of your impeded ejaculation damn near blew off your cock. “We sometimes see a similar phenomenon occur with people who wear constriction bands or cock rings that are too tight and try to either urinate or ejaculate with the ring on,” says Newman. “The result is a traumatic stretch of the urethra and microscopic tears in the lining of the urethra (mucosa). This disruption in the lining allows for electrolytes in the urine (particularly potassium) to stimulate the nerves in the layer beneath the lining (submucosa), thereby creating a chronic dull ache, such as PPP describes.” Your urethra should heal just fine in time — within a couple of weeks — but there are meds and other interventions if you’re still in pain a few weeks from now. “The bottom line is never impede urination or ejaculation by obstructing the urethra,” says Newman. On the Lovecast, sex blogger Ella Dawson on the herpes stigma: savagelovecast.com. mail@ savagelove.net. @fakedansavage on Twitter

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.08-06.15

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In his poem “Interrupted Meditation,” Robert Hass blurts out the following exclamation: “I give you, here, now, a magic key. What does it open? This key I give you, what exactly does it open?” How would you answer this question, Gemini? What door or lock or heart or treasure box do you most need opened? Decide today. And please don’t name five things you need opened. Choose one, and one only. To do so will dissolve a mental block that has up until now kept you from finding the REAL magic key.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The following excerpt from Wendell Berry’s poem “Woods” captures the essence of your current situation: “I part the out-thrusting branches and come in beneath the blessed and the blessing trees. Though I am silent there is singing around me. Though I am dark there is vision around me. Though I am heavy there is flight around me.” Please remember this poem at least three times a day during the next two weeks. It’s important for you to know that no matter what murky or maudlin or mysterious mood you might be in, you are surrounded by vitality and generosity.

“I fight it off, but it changes in other bodies and returns in a form to which I am not immune.” In the coming days, Scorpio, I suspect you will experience that riddle first hand — and probably on more than one occasion. Obvious secrets and wild understandings that you have fought against finding out will mutate in just the right way to sneak past your defenses. Unwelcome insights you’ve been trying to ignore will finally wiggle their way into your psyche. Don’t worry, though. These new arrivals will be turn out to be good medicine.

heavy with seeds whose small hard shells you must crack to get to the rich nut meat.” As I contemplate the current chapter of your unfolding story, I see you as being engaged in a similar process, even if you’re not literally an artist. To be exact, you’re at the point when you are producing a tall flashy flower. The seeds have not yet begun to form, but they will soon. Later this year, the rich nut meat inside the small hard shells will be ready to pluck. For now, concentrate on generating your gorgeous, radiant flower.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

A half-dead blast from the past is throttling the free flow of your imagination. Your best possible future will be postponed until you agree to deal more intimately with this crumbled dream, which you have never fully grieved or surrendered. So here’s my advice: Summon the bravest, smartest love you’re capable of, and lay your sad loss to rest with gentle ferocity. This might take a while, so be patient. Be inspired by the fact that your new supply of brave, smart love will be a crucial resource for the rest of your long life.

According to Guinness World records, the most consecutive time spent riding on a roller coaster is 405 hours and 40 minutes. But I suspect that during the next 15 months, a Sagittarian daredevil may exceed this mark. I have come to this conclusion because I believe your tribe will be especially adept and relatively comfortable at handling steep rises and sudden dips at high speeds. And that won’t be the only rough talent you’ll have in abundance. I’m guessing you could also set new personal bests in the categories of most frequent changes of mind, most heroic leaps of faith and fastest talking.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

Five times every day, devout Muslims face their holiest city, Mecca, and say prayers to Allah. Even if you’re not Islamic, I recommend that you carry out your own unique version of this ritual. The next three weeks will be a favorable time to cultivate a closer relationship with the inspirational influence, the high ideal or the divine being that reigns supreme in your life. Here’s how you could do it: Identify a place that excites your imagination and provokes a sense of wonder. Five times a day for the next 21 days, bow in the direction of this treasured spot. Unleash songs, vows and celebratory expostulations that deepen your fierce and tender commitment to what you trust most and love best.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The road reaches every place, the short cut only one,” says aphorist James Richardson. In many cases, that’s not a problem. Who among us has unlimited time and energy? Why leave all the options open? Shortcuts can be valuable. It’s often smart to be ruthlessly efficient as we head toward our destination. But here’s a caveat: According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re now in a phase when taking shortcuts may be counterproductive. To be as well seasoned as you will need to be to reach your goal, you should probably take the scenic route. The long way around may, in this instance, be the most efficient and effective.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Truth is like the flu,” says poet James Richardson.

Whether we like to admit it or not, all of us have acted like puppets. Bosses and teachers and loved ones can manipulate us even if they’re not in our presence. Our conditioned responses and programmed impulses may control our behavior in the present moment even though they were formed long ago. That’s the bad news. The good news is that now and then moments of lucidity blossom, revealing the puppet strings. We emerge from our unconsciousness and see that we’re under the spell of influential people to whom we have surrendered our power. This is one of those magic times for you, Capricorn.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I will provide you with two lists of words. One of these lists, but not both, will characterize the nature of your predominant experiences in the coming weeks. It will be mostly up to you which emerges as the winner. Now read the two lists, pick the one you like better, and instruct your subconscious mind to lead you in that direction. List 1: gluttony, bloating, overkill, padding, exorbitance. List 2: mother lode, wellspring, bumper crop, gold mine, cornucopia. Psychologists say that a good way to eliminate a bad habit is to replace it with a good one. Do that! Testify at Freewillastrology.com

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com gentle yoga yoga levels 1, 2 ashtanga yoga meditation

yin yoga prenatal yoga mommy & me yoga for kids

A few weeks ago you undertook a new course of study in the art of fun and games. You realized you hadn’t been playing hard enough, and took measures to correct the problem. After refamiliarizing yourself with the mysteries of innocent joy, you raised the stakes. You began dabbling with more intensive forms of relief and release. Now you have the chance to go even further: to explore the mysteries of experimental delight. Exuberant escapades may become available to you. Amorous adventures could invite you to explore the frontiers of liberated love. Will you be brave and free enough to meet the challenge of such deeply meaningful gaiety? Meditate on this radical possibility: spiritually adept hedonism.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Poet Sharon Dolin compares artists to sunflowers. They create “a tall flashy flower that then grows

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

NEWS

Mythologist Joseph Campbell analyzed fairy tales for clues about how the human psyche works. For example, he said that a fairy-tale character who’s riding a horse is a representation of our relationship with our instinctual nature. If that character drops the reins and lets the horse gallop without guidance, he or she is symbolically surrendering control to the instincts. I bring this to your attention because I suspect you might soon be tempted to

do just that — which wouldn’t be wise. In my opinion, you’ll be best served by going against the flow of what seems natural. Sublimation and transcendence will keep you much stronger than if you followed the line of least resistance. Homework: Visualize yourself, as you ride your horse, keeping a relaxed but firm grasp of the reins.

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NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

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NOTHING DOING

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

SATURDAY, JUNE 25, SCHENLEY PLAZA OAKLAND 3 P.M.

WYEP’S REIMAGINATION SHOWCASE (MAIN STAGE) FEATURING HAT Co, FUNKY FLY, THE INCANDESCENTS

3 P.M.

I MADE IT! MARKET (SCHENLEY DRIVE) CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES (SCHENLEY TENT)

MARGARET GLASPY

6 P.M.

7:15 P.M.

BOY & BEAR

LUCIUS

8:30 P.M.

BIKE VALET BY BIKE PITTSBURGH

ACROSS

1. Sgts.’ subordinates 5. Ladies undergarment 9. Routing abbr. 13. Thief’s swag 14. Miss in the barrio 15. Turkish coin 16. Top of the hill 17. Jilted person’s jumping-off point 19. Pick up 20. Seek damages 21. Phrase of mock shock 22. Dutch housewife Fanny who won four gold medals in the 1948 Olympics 26. Pigeon-___ 27. Coffee and cookie containers 28. Toast topping 31. 14-Across’s mother 33. Blaupunkt rival 34. Simply the best 35. Claims for some abandoned building residents 38. He wore #3 for the Yankees 39. Tech giant that owns StubHub 40. Brainy group 41. Fork over 42. Make out in Manchester 43. 4th and forever play, likely 44. “Grrr... can’t get this jacket off”

48. Psychologist Duckworth who studied “grit” 51. Most-impressive ending? 52. Letter for sisters 53. DJs, at times 56. Equal (to) 57. Sand castle building toy 58. Fancy style 59. Animal skin 60. Comic ___ (font that shouldn’t be used if you plan to be taken seriously) 61. Lower leg part 62. Runny cheese

DOWN

1. Alternative strategy 2. Word with length or point 3. Active service 4. Femme avec un halo: Abbr. 5. Smith attending hooves 6. Tyler of Hollywood 7. Smoothie base 8. Forgiving kind 9. Poe’s middle name 10. Stadium part 11. Trolley car 12. Shirt tag spot 14. Like every answer in this puzzle 18. Comprehends 20. ___ shooting 23. Jones who sang “Come Away

NEWS

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With Me” 24. Cloud coverage? 25. “Face” made to your sweetie 28. Titular high school student who “Must Die” in a 2006 teen comedy 29. Tunnel builders 30. Flat land 31. Car sticker fig. 32. Blue hue 33. Miles Davis played it (at the beginning at least) 34. Artist’s representation 36. Duel’s length? 37. “No really, let me do this”

42. Fertile mud 43. “Over here!” 44. Feelings of eagerness 45. Published a second time 46. Hot dog topping 47. Kunta of “Roots” 48. “Raiders of the Lost Ark” slitherers 49. Elite Eight org. 50. Goofy smile 54. FDR predecessor 55. Priest in Samuel 56. “The crook’s out there somewhere,” briefly

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PICTURING MCKEES ROCKS

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City Paper teams up with Instagram collective @SteelCityGrammers for a photo essay of McKees Rocks, a borough along the south bank of the Ohio River View more photos from McKees Rocks by searching #SCG_CityPaper or by following @pghcitypaper and @SteelCityGrammers on Instagram @kristen_in_pgh

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©2016 Blue Point Brewing Company, Toasted Lager ®, Patchogue, NY and Baldwinsville, NY | Enjoy responsibly.

SoMe DaYs, BiG UgLy CaN Be SpOtTeD RoAmInG ArOuNd ThE MaRiNa. To Be ClEaR, BiG UgLy Is ThE CaT.

TOA S T ED L AGER. A MERIC A N S T Y L E A M BER L AGER . B R E W E D W I T H A B L E N D O F S I X S P E C I A LT Y M A LT S FO R A FL AVOR A S RICH A N D U N IQUE A S T HE TOW N I T ’S FR OM .

BlUePoInTbReWiNg.CoM

June 8, 2016 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 23

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