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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016


EVENTS 2.20 – 2pm EXPOSURES: ARTIST TALK The Warhol theater Elizabeth Rudnick and Jamie Earnest discuss their installations. FREE

2.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: DISAPPEARS The Warhol theater FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

2.27 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: GEORGE LEWIS The Warhol entrance space Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series and Pitt Jazz Studies of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

3.5 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NEW MORSE CODE AND JAMIE JORDAN The Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music. FREE parking in The Warhol lot Advance Tickets: $15/$10 students; visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

3.17 – 9pm SOUND SERIES: AN EVENING WITH RANGDA The Warhol theater FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

This exhibition is sponsored by

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016


{EDITORIAL}

02.10/02.17.2016

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Interns COURTNEY LINDER, AARON WARNICK, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 26 + ISSUE 06

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} {COVER PHOTO BY CAROLINE MOORE}

[NEWS] to start in every home, and 06 “Itit’s needs a discussion they need to start having.” — Turtle Creek mayor Kelley Kelley on addressing heroin addiction in her hometown

[NEWS] is being fought for is that 12 “What the landlord holds up its end of the bargain.” — Advocacy group Action United director Bill Bartlett on Penn Plaza negotiations

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[TASTE] just not your average toppings. 17 “It’s We try to go the extra mile.” — Shane Feeney of Feeney’s Weenies

[MUSIC]

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“I’ve discovered that the orchestra can do all kinds of very cool stuff.” — Stewart Copeland on his new Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestracommissioned orchestral piece, Tyrant’s Crush

LECTURE: AN ABUNDANCE OF PLANTS – HOW TO HAVE MORE MARTHA SWISS, Garden Writer & Designer Watching a seed sprout and grow into a plant is truly one of life’s miracles! Starting your own seeds enables you to experiment with varieties you can’t find at the local nursery. Taking cuttings and dividing perennials is a great way to increase the number of plants in your garden, plus you can share the extras with gardening friends. This talk will teach you how to start seeds indoors, as well as direct-sow seeds in your garden. You will also learn how to take and care for cuttings, and how to and divide various perennials.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16 • 6:00 – 7:30 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527

curators have chosen not to 38 “The comment directly on the shortcomings or errors of the era’s architectural work.” — Charles Rosenblum on Imagining the Modern, at the Carnegie

[LAST PAGE] City Grammers put Troy Hill 55 Steel in focus in this photo essay.

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 42 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 50 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 51 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 53

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2016 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Visit www.phlf.org to join! Non-members: $5.

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“It’s grim as you’d expect from such material, but also resolutely affirming.” — Al Hoff reviews the Holocaust drama Son of Saul

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{ADMINISTRATION}

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ, JAMES PORCO, MARIA SNYDER, KARIN TURKOVICH Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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6 Months of FREE Personalized Matchmaking Services.* * Some restrictions apply, No purchase necessary to enter. Must be 18 or older to enter. One entry per person. One male and one female winner will be selected Feb. 14th. Must enter online by 5:00 PM , 2-13-16. Winner will be drawn Feb. 14, 2016.

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

“YOU CAN MAKE ALL THE ARRESTS YOU WANT, IT’S NOT GOING TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM.”

Audio-visual artist Ricardo Iamuuri challenges the notion of creativity for sale in BRAND NEW WORLD: kill the artist, Thursday at the New Hazlett Theater. Hear our interview on the City Paper podcast or read our Q&A at www.pghcitypaper.com.

This week: We visit a Harry Potterthemed Dinner Lab, where croquettes were golden snitches. No secrets were revealed, though. Listen at bit.ly/citypaperpodcast or subscribe on iTunes.

{PHOTO BY CAROLINE MOORE}

Kelley Kelley, in the mayor’s office

SUPER POWERS

City Paper and Steel City Grammers team up to bring you scenes from Pittsburgh neighborhoods. This time, the Grammers captured images of Troy Hill. See page 55, and follow @PghCityPaper on Instagram for more featured photos.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Instagrammer @silber_bullet brings us this shot of Pittsburgh in black and gold. Tag your Instagram images as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you. Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to see Blue Man Group on Feb. 23 at Heinz Hall. Contest ends Feb. 18.

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K

ELLEY KELLEY was honest with

voters when she campaigned three years ago for mayor of Turtle Creek, a Rust Belt town about 12 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. She told them her husband, Kevin, is a recovering heroin addict who was arrested nine years ago for a nonviolent crime. She said proper treatment, not jail time, saved his life and their marriage. And she promised that, if elected, she’d take an empathetic approach to ease the pain heroin has inflicted on her hometown. “You can make all the arrests you want, it’s not going to solve the problem,” says Kelley, 42, who this year will complete classes to become a certified substanceabuse counselor. “It needs to start in every home, and it’s a discussion they need to start having.” She was elected mayor in 2014, and then came the hard part. Emergency re-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

sponders reported a spike in the number of heroin and prescription-opioid overdoses that year in Turtle Creek, a town of about 5,000 with an average household income of $31,000. Drawing from a master’s degree in criminology, her experience with a local

Turtle Creek’s mayor knows the damage heroin can inflict and she has a plan to stop it before it gets worse {BY KYLE LAWSON} advocacy group and her fandom for Wonder Woman — who stands with hands on hips on a shelf in her office — Kelley took a threepronged approach to buck the trend. >> Train police officers to educate nonviolent offenders who have an opioid addiction about nearby treatment options at the time of arrest.

>> Provide affordable treatment options in and around Turtle Creek and teach residents how to prevent a fatal overdose. >> Empower residents to report suspected drug activity outside their homes, anonymously if need be. The plan might already be working. Emergency responders who serve Turtle Creek reported nine heroin- and prescription-opioid-related overdoses in 2015, after an average of 14 overdoses each of the previous four years. This while heroin-related deaths throughout Allegheny County increased for the fifth consecutive year in 2015. “[Kelley] is educating people on the disease, and she’s providing tools not just for police, but for everyone,” says recently elected Turtle Creek Borough Councilor Connie Tinsley, who also has taken classes to become a substance-abuse counselor. CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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SUPER POWERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

Enforcement vs. education

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Photo credit: Animal Friends

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One of the first officers Kelley helped hire was Joe Wincko, whose childhood friend died in 2014 of a heroin overdose. Wincko was in the police academy when he received the news. “This guy was pretty much like a brother to me, and it crushed me,” he says. The fatal batch was laced with fentanyl, which the Allegheny County coroner linked to 14 other deaths in January of that year. “At first, I was upset with him, which turned into trying to seek knowledge,” Wincko says. “I wanted to know why he did it and [what] the addictive properties are in heroin. I wanted to know the right steps for someone on the road to recovery and how to get them there.” In light of what the Centers for Disease Control has deemed an epidemic in the U.S., officers in Turtle Creek have taken on a new role as educators, police chief Dale Kraeer says. They’re trained to speak with nonviolent offenders who show signs of addiction, and their family members, about inpatient and outpatient detox and counseling in the area. He said the end game, from a law-enforcement standpoint, is to reduce the number of thefts, robberies and burglaries fueled by addiction. “If you’re a victim of drugs, you’re capable of all kinds of crime,” Kraeer says. The word “victim” is indicative of a paradigm shift among law enforcement throughout the U.S. as the rate of heroinrelated overdose deaths nearly quadrupled from 2002 to 2013. A program spearheaded in June by the police chief of Gloucester, Mass., linked 150 people with free treatment, in lieu of arrest, within the first three months of its inception. People traveled to the police station from out of state for treatment. And as an increasing number of state and city leaders have voted to reform marijuana laws, the war on drugs has started to become a war on heroin. In August, the White House announced an initiative that paired drug intelligence officers with public-health coordinators to trace heroin from port cities, such as those in New York and New Jersey, with a special interest in batches laced with a deadly additive. Federal and local law-enforcement

officers in retail-heavy Monroeville, which borders Turtle Creek, have pointed to such port cities as the starting point for millions of dollars worth of heroin transported to the east suburbs over the last five years.

Treating the problem locally Turtle Creek residents treated for substance abuse last year at New Freedom Recovery Center in Irwin often mentioned an arresting officer or borough official as their referral to the inpatient detox and counseling facility, says director Sherry Philips. “A lot of them have said they got the number from an officer, or they picked up a pamphlet in the reception area of the [police department].” But not everyone can be treated, due to a lack of beds, government funding or health insurance, Philips says. “There used to be county funding, but now there’s a delay with that.” And outpatient treatment, offered at no cost by more than a dozen churches and nonprofits in the Pittsburgh area, comes with a low success rate for longtime users, according to medical experts. “Their brain is injured, and they don’t know how to deal with stress,” says Dr. Harold Urschel, chief medical strategist at Enterhealth, in Dallas, Texas. “They need resident time to have a chance to get better.” On a recent night at the borough building, Kelley met with Tinsley to brainstorm new treatment options for residents. A hand-drawn sign from Kelley’s niece reading “I love mayor Ni Ni” hangs on the wall behind her. Stacked on a shelf are free toys for kids in the community, leftover from a recent event. She sits at the same desk her father used when he was mayor in the early 1980s, though she laughs when asked if she had political aspirations as a young adult. Then, life happened, the heroin epidemic happened and she’s found herself in a position to help. So after a full day of work as a grant writer for the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, long after the sun has gone down, she sits with Tinsley in her office. Kelley says she hopes to partner with a nearby facility and a nonprofit group to provide more affordable long-term treatment. And in the meantime, assuming she’s a

“IF YOU’RE A VICTIM OF DRUGS, YOU’RE CAPABLE OF ALL KINDS OF CRIME.”

certified counselor this year, she could work with residents firsthand. Tinsley, who says Kelley inspired her to run for council, plans to offer yoga classes to help residents in recovery transition from a treatment center to everyday life. One of the hardest stages of recovery was the homecoming, says Kevin Kelley, who after long-term, in-patient treatment moved to a transitional house with other people in recovery. Then he went home, where a fix was at the bar down the street or just a phone call away. Seven years of sobriety later, Kevin is a lieutenant with the Turtle Creek Fire Department and a volunteer with an advocacy group for substance-abuse treatment. He says the only time he thinks about heroin or prescription opioids is when it comes up at community meetings, which he often attends to answer residents’ questions about addiction. Borough officials say it’s important for residents to put a face to a successful recovery. “We need to show people that [addicts] can turn it around,” Kelley Kelley says. “I thought at one point my husband would die, but that didn’t happen.” Kevin says he hopes an open discussion will inspire friends and family members of addicts to offer support, rather than deny the problem or break ties. “I knew I had a problem and I knew I needed help, but I didn’t want to be looked at a certain way because of the stigma,” he says. “I just kept hiding and hoping one day I’d wake up and be well.”

A community effort As residents arrived for a crime-watch meeting in November, they passed under a sign outside the borough building that read “Turtle Creek, Home of Chuck Blasko and The Vogues.” The 1960s pop vocal group used to sing on the front steps of the middle school as factory workers returned home through a vibrant business district. But long before the factories closed, families moved away and property values dropped. Inside the building, more than 30 residents — some of whom remember The Vogues — questioned police about a recent shoot-out on a residential street; graffiti in a nearby alley that read “kill the cops”; and what they suspect to be drug deals outside their homes. “We’ve gone from a blue-collar town to a no-collar town,” resident Beth Hamill said. She’s one of the new faces at the CONTINUES ON PG. 10

www.dayauto.com 8

CORRECTION In the Feb. 3 news story, “Female Voices,” the photo caption was incorrect. The woman depicted with Lisa Bennington and Chelsa Wagner is Jeanne Caligiuri, co-founder of Run Baby Run, and not Teresa Heinz Kerry. We regret the error.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016


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SUPER POWERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

meetings, and part of a collaborative effort between community leaders and government officials in recent years that has yielded an urban garden, refurbished homes, a community Facebook page and yard signs that read, “Won’t you be my neighbor.” Attendance at the meetings doubled after Kelley was elected, along with 911 calls to report drug activity. Residents left the meeting with fliers for naloxone training, which until recently was reserved for doctors and emergency responders. The medication helps restore breathing to a person who is overdosing. In September, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf encouraged school officials to obtain the medication in the event of a student overdose, citing a rate of opioid-related overdoses that is “unprecedented.” Some experts question whether easier access to naloxone — more commonly known as Narcan — will tempt users to increase their dosage and thus lead to more deaths. “I’m not saying it’s good or bad, but it’s not solving the problem,” says emergency medical responder John Licina, a 20-year veteran who serves the Pittsburgh area. “To be honest, when you see the same

people overdosing time and time again, it gets irritating.” New Freedom Recovery Center’s Sherry Philips says too often there is a sense of hopelessness when it comes to heroin addiction. She lauded Kelley’s emphasis on education and treatment, rather than enforcement and arrest. “It’s not bad people that need to get good — it’s sick people that need to get well,” Philips says. “[Kelley] knows that, and she’s seen the other side to this.” In order to reduce the number of overdoses and drug deals in Turtle Creek this year, Kelley says it’s going to take an effort from everyone. While the town is 20 percent black or mixed race, and more than half the residents are between the ages of 18 and 65, nearly every person at the November crime-watch meeting was white and over the age of 50. But it’s a good start, says Kelley, as the disposition of older residents toward heroin use has begun to shift from condemnation to concern. She saw it on their faces when she campaigned for mayor. “When I told them our story, I didn’t get that look,” Kelley says. “They were pretty receptive.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN


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Negotiations unclear on Penn Plaza residents’ relocation {BY RYAN DETO} THE RESIDENTS of a soon-to-be vacated

Penn Plaza building, in East Liberty, haven’t found a place to live. Last summer, LG Realty (run by the Gumberg family) announced 90-day evictions for residents of Penn Plaza, a two-building, below-market-rate apartment complex. After negotiating with the city and tenants, the owners extended the eviction dates for each building. Residents in one building, at 5600 Penn Ave., have until March 2017 to move out; tenants in the other building, at 5704 Penn Ave., have until the end of February to vacate. The city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority funded a relocation office at Penn Plaza, spearheaded by Neighborhood Allies, a local nonprofit, to assist residents in finding new homes. With less than three weeks until the move-out date, the unplaced residents, from about 25 units, are taking action. The residents have formed a “crisis committee,” with support from the advocacy group Action United. Last week, they sent a letter to Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto’s office, informing the administration that dozens of families are at risk of homelessness. Negotiations ramped up, postponing a Feb. 5 rally planned by the unplaced residents and Action United. “This [negotiation] is happening because the residents got together and will not allow each other to become homeless,” says Action United Director Bill Bartlett. “What is being fought for is that the landlord holds up its end of the bargain.” The original agreement states that at least 20 units will be made available in 5600 Penn, so some 5704 Penn residents can move in and have another year to find a permanent home. Zak Thomas, of Neighborhood Allies, says the 20 units are currently spoken for, and it’s unclear if the Gumbergs will offer any more units from 5600 Penn. However, the agreement also states that the owners will use “commercially reasonable efforts” to make units in 5600 Penn available as they come open. According to a count by Action United and details from Neighborhood Allies, there are around 135 units in 5600 Penn and around 85 of them are currently occupied, leaving potentially 50 units that could house the 5704 Penn residents. Mayor’s office spokesperson Tim Mc-

{PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK}

Three-year Penn Plaza tenant Dana Hogan

Nulty wrote in an email to City Paper that the relocation assistance has been successful “with the overwhelming majority of residents placed, and [the office] will continue working around the clock the next three weeks to assist every last resident at 5704.” The mayor’s chief of staff, Kevin Acklin, says the city isn’t “going to let anybody fall through the cracks.” He says meetings between the city, Penn Plaza tenantcouncil members, Neighborhood Allies and the Gumbergs have increased in frequency to every other day. As for the unused units in 5600 Penn, Acklin says negotiations have been “very productive.” But Action United’s Bartlett says the level of stress for the residents is “unbelievable.” He points to Myrtle Stern, an eight-year Penn Plaza resident. “She is [a senior], and her whole life is up in the air. These renters aren’t being treated fairly,” Bartlett says. “I don’t want to move. I am 75 years old, who would want to move?” says Stern. In addition to the anxiety of being displaced, Dana Hogan, a three-year Penn Plaza tenant, alleges management has neglected its duties at 5704 Penn for months. “When I first moved in, I thought the apartment was nice, but now there is no heat and an infestation of roaches,” she says. Hogan says she has resorted to heating her unit with her oven. “This whole thing has taken a toll on me and on everybody in here,” says Hogan. Jonathan Kamin, the Gumbergs’ attorney, did not return calls for comment on this story.

“I DON’T WANT TO MOVE. I AM 75 YEARS OLD, WHO WOULD WANT TO MOVE?”

REFLECT

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

REST IN PEACE

tomorrow exchange buy * sell*trade

The Pittsburgh sports franchises that were {BY MIKE WYSOCKI} IF AT FIRST you don’t succeed, cut your

losses and move on. That’s a lesson learned by seven unsuccessful sports franchises who are the historic complements to Pittsburgh’s ultra-sucessful teams. This week, we take a look back at these epic fails, as the kids say these days. You might still see some of the team logos worn ironically by hipsters in a soon-tobe-gentriďŹ ed part of town.

The Pittsburgh Maulers Owned by the same family that owned Century III Mall. The DeBartolos were successful; they just didn’t have an eye for the future. The United States Football League had owners like current presidential hopeful Donald Trump, and yes, this organization went bankrupt as well. Not easy going up against a behemoth like the National Football League. The USFL lasted four years, just like the Confederacy. It remains to be seen whether people will be ying USFL ags on their porch 150 years from now. The Maulers mauled nobody, going 3-15 in their only season, in 1984.

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The Pittsburgh Bulls. The early ’90s were a new heyday for the city. Stonewashed jeans, creepy mustaches and freshly combed mullets took the Steel City by storm. Barry Bonds and the Pirates were hot, and the city ďŹ gured all it needed now was some indoor lacrosse. Enter the Bulls. They won the hearts of dozens of fans in their four-season tenure. A 10-24 record gets you very few bandwagon-jumpers.

Pittsburgh Pipers/Condors. This team was founded from the ashes of the Pittsburgh Rens basketball team. The Pipers pulled a Grover Cleveland and served two non-consecutive terms as lessees of the Civic Arena. In 1968, the Pipers even won it all, defeating the hated New Orleans Buccaneers. The Pipers then became the Condors and never equaled that success. In the 1970-71 season, it got so bad that the team offered free tickets; attendance hovered around 2,000 per game. Only 8,000 showed up to that freebie in the then 13,000-seat arena. After the next season, the Condors went extinct.

The Pittsburgh Triangles.

Let’s face it, the 1970s were pretty weird — lots of hair, ’ludes, disco, short shorts and professional tennis teams. Tennis had a surge of popu-

larity after the Battle of the Sexes match, in which Billie Jean King played Bobby Riggs, and the unfairer sex was roundly defeated. Unlike the other teams that folded, the Triangles were pretty good. They won it all in 1975, but went bankrupt the following year.

The Pittsburgh Spirit. In the 1983-84 season, the Major Indoor Soccer League’s Spirit actually outdrew the NHL’s struggling Penguins in fans. Then came Mario Lemieux, and things changed. Much like the band Huey Lewis and the News, the team peaked in 1984 and wound up holding on for two more unsuccessful seasons.

The Pittsburgh Power. Football fans in Western Pennsylvania love high school, college and professional football. Every Friday night and weekend afternoon is spoken for from September through January. But what about football in the spring? That’s what the owners of the Power were hoping for — year-round pigskin. The Power was the reincarnation of the Gladiators, one of the original four teams of the Arena Football League founded in 1987. The Power went out after just three seasons. In 2012, the team released its entire roster but still beat the Cleveland team, who forfeited a game because it couldn’t afford it. The Power’s best season was 2012, when it beat its bitter rival, the Jon Bon Jovi-owned Philadelphia Soul. Fans of the Power did not have their faces rocked that night. The Pittsburgh Hardhats. Great name, not a great sport. The Hardhats were a men’s slow-pitch softball team. This is a sport that usually has guys polishing off a beer while on ďŹ rst base. Surprised it didn’t last longer. The Hardhats slowly won a following during their 1977-1982 existence. Then fans caught on that this was not the sport of the future. An upstart rival, the Pittsburgh Champions, even tried to loot their roster. The Hardhats survived that upheaval but eventually went the way of the Atari 2600. Here we go, Hardhats, here we go! Other franchises will come and go. That just makes us appreciate our stable teams even more. All the seats to these games were cheap, I assume. Perhaps, in the case of the Condors, they were too cheap. Rest in peace friends, and thanks for the mediocre memories.

MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN AND M E M B E R OF J I M K RE N N ’ S Q M ORN I N G S H OW E AC H WE E K DAY MO R NING O N Q 9 2 . 9 F M. F O L L OW H I M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016


B*tches Ball 5th Annual

HE

D LP U S CELEBRATE WORL

Pittsburgh Opera 2425 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Thursday, March 10, 2016 6-10 pm (doors open at 5:30 pm)

Presented by:

Y DA Y SPA

VIP Tickets – $50 (includes stage side seating and one drink ticket) General Tickets – $35 ($45 at the door) s Drink Specials s Souvenir Glass* s Light Refreshments s Raffles and Giveaways s Celebrity Judges s Cat Walk s Crowning of Miss B*tchburgh 2016 (9pm) * While supplies last. s Dancing (9-10pm)

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Drag Competition Crowning Miss B*tchburgh 2016

Proceeds benefit:

412-345-7300 4 41 2 34 345 5 73 7300 00 www.animalrescue.org

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CONVENIENT We can be as flexible as your schedule. Stored cash value is another great option to help get you where you need to go. It’s easier than using exact change and it doesn’t expire like an annual, monthly or weekly pass.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

PortAuthority.org


DE

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the

ON

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WERE TERRIFIC

HOT DOGS GALORE

{BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

What happens when four guys are sick of working for the man? They open a hot-dog shop. Well, that doesn’t happen every time, but for the owners of Feeney’s Weenies in Beechview, that was indeed the case. “Working for corporations sucked,” says Shane Feeney, one of the four owners (and namesake) of Feeney’s Weenies, along with Tyler Sero, Dom Demarco and Micha Patragas. They worked together in a chain-restaurant kitchen. Their new spot on Broadway Avenue had been a hot-dog shop, but the owner decided to sell. “We were [regular] customers of his,” says Sero. “We saw the opportunity to buy and start from there. Since people already started to recognize this as [a] hot-dog shop, we wanted to stick with that type of menu but expand on it.” Sero is clear: Feeney’s Weenies is not serving your run-of-the-mill dog. The bestseller — the Pittsburgh Dog — is “loaded with fries, cheese, slaw n’at.” This month, Feeney’s is featuring hotdog creations submitted by customers. Last week it was a peanut butter and bacon hot dog (Feeney swears by it). This week, it’s the “Lucky Dog,” topped with home fries, sour cream, chives, bacon bits and cheddar cheese. The contest winner will be featured as a monthly dog. “It’s just not your average toppings,” Sero says. “We try to go the extra mile.” And if you don’t like hot dogs, Feeney’s offers other meats and a “beyond chicken” vegetarian option.

{PHOTO BY ERIN KELLY}

Spinach salad

PERFECTLY SIMPLE

AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

11 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 2102 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-737-5720

G

the

FEED

Get ready for planting at the fourth annual Seed and Plant Swap,, at the Carnegie Library Main in Branch, sponsored byy Grow Pittsburgh and d Phipps Conservatory. If you have commerciall or saved seeds (open-pollinated, non-GMO, non-hybrid seed) to share, bring them. “Borrow” seeds and seedlings, attend a seed-starting workshop, check in with gardening experts and more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat., Feb. 27. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www.carnegielibrary.org

ASTROPUBS OFFER the pleasing comforts of pub grub without the greasy regrets and food-service ingredients. For friends meeting to grab a bite, their universally appealing menus help sidestep those tiresome “What are you in the mood for?” conversations; for families, especially with little kids, they offer several steps up from fast-food and diner-style chains (plus a drink for mom and dad). No wonder the trend is flourishing. And as new gastropubs open, old bars are overhauling their menus and upping their game. Even hotel restaurants, which could until recently be counted upon as fingerfood-free zones, are adopting the gastropub’s more casual, affordable concept. A case in point is Wallace’s Tap Room, the restaurant in East Liberty’s new Hotel

Indigo. The one-page menu is typical of the genre: several appetizers that wouldn’t be out of place at a Super Bowl party, albeit one hosted by foodies; some wellconceived burgers and sandwiches; and

WALLACE’S TAP ROOM 123 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-665-0555 HOURS: Breakfast weekdays 6-10 a.m., weekends 6:30-10:30 a.m.; lunch daily 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; dinner 5-10 p.m. PRICES: Starters, sandwiches and salads $5-16; entrees $18-36 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED a few meat-and-potato entrees for those looking to dine with a knife and fork. Local sourcing is ubiquitous these days, but

Wallace’s still managed to devote as much space on the menu to its local partners — including East Liberty neighbor Zeke’s Coffee — as it did to sandwiches or entrees. Still, the formulaic quality of the menu meant there would be only one true way to set Wallace’s apart: really good food. Wallace’s advantage is executive chef Jose Rodriguez, whose long career with Indigo’s parent company, InterContinental Hotel Group (IHG), sent him around the world before he came to Pittsburgh to work at the Mansions on Fifth. The opening of Indigo brought him back into the IHG fold to apply his extensive experience to perfecting pierogies, wings and meatloaf in revitalized East Liberty. Those pierogies! They’re not just locally sourced; they’re made in-house from CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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PERFECTLY SIMPLE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

BEERS OF THE NORTH SIDE

A mid-spring opening is planned for the nanobrewery

War Streets Brewery co-owner Jake Bier {PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK}

scratch, and they’re excellent. They had a thick, but not chewy, wrapper, and a perfect topping of sweet, softened onions, bacon, chives and sour cream. Since we’re guessing Rodriguez didn’t learn the recipe in Cancun, we give him kudos for picking it up quickly and very, very well. Everyone knows a gastropub must have mac-and-cheese. Wallace’s served it up straight, without the lobster that was so in vogue 10 years ago, or the short rib that tends to get mixed up in it today. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but a good mac-and-cheese, all by itself, can be a delectable thing. Wallace’s was wonderfully molten and creamy with browned bread crumbs on top. But whatever cheese, or combination of cheeses it used (the menu, surprisingly, doesn’t say, perhaps because it’s offered as a side), it was bland enough that Angelique felt the need to salt it at the table, and she’s not usually one to reach for the salt shaker. Buffalo wings, too, could have had more lively flavor. Brussels sprouts, another gastropub given, were terrific. Too often since their revival, we’ve seen these little cabbages smothered in sweet sauces or hidden beneath piles of bacon as if they were the sad, boiled brassicas of yore in the witness-protection program. But their beauty comes out in simple roasting, which Wallace’s did to perfection — tender heads wreathed with crisped, lightly seasoned outer leaves. Creamy potato soup was reminiscent of the baked-potato soup sometimes served in local bars, but grilled corn added a chowder-like quality, while bacon and cheddar helped the flavor pop. The Black and Gold burger, a blackened bacon-cheeseburger on a brioche bun, was tender, juicy and flavorful; our only quibble was that the caramelized onions were not even brown. The CLW sandwich, named after C.L. Wallace, architect of the historic Governor Hotel which has been incorporated into the Hotel Indigo, was itself quite an edifice. A sort of reuben gone mad, it contained roast turkey, shredded short rib, bacon, corned beef, slaw, Russian dressing, Swiss cheese and, for good measure, mustard and pickled onion as well. Somehow, it was neither too tall to bite nor a cacophony of competing flavors. Instead, the varying tastes and textures of the ingredients ebbed and flowed from bite to bite, the condiments serving as a savory baseline. The hearty Mediterra farm bread held up impressively under the load. Simplicity is never as simple as it looks. Wallace’s Tap Room resists the urge to tart up its bar food with anything but excellent preparation, and the results speak for themselves.

Childhood friends Jake Bier and Zach Ingoldsby took to the spirit of collaboration early. Now, they are coowners of the soon-to-open War Streets Brewery, a nanobrewery in the North Side; appropriately, Bier is the brewer. The brewery is taking shape on the first floor of a 138-year-old firehouse on Arch Street, with a projected midspring opening. Last month, the two put on Imbibe North Side, a tasting event at the Mattress Factory with two other North Side breweries also planning to open this year — Allegheny City Brewing Co. and Spring Hill Brewing. “I made the event so we could pour beer before we were open,” says Bier. “Why not collaborate with everyone on the North Side, introduce ourselves and make it known we’re in the same business together and supporting each other.” The three breweries, as well as Penn Brewery, have already discussed brewing together to represent the North Side at future beer festivals. Before Pittsburgh beer-lovers can enjoy future collaborations, War Streets Brewery has a few hurdles to clear, such as waiting for its Brewer’s Notice from the Alcohol and Tobacco Trade and Tax Bureau and a brewery license from the Pennsylvania Liquor and Control Board. On Jan. 31, they launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to raise $20,000 by April 31. Bier and Ingoldsby hope to receive enough donations to purchase more equipment and upgrade the brewing capacity from an existing 15-gallon system (“I’m basically making one keg at a time,” says Bier) to a 93-gallon, or three-barrel, system. Membership rewards range from pint glasses and T-shirts to free beer for life. Bier is enthusiastic about the brewery’s future as a gathering place for the community. He plans on having a bar that hosts live music and events, while being an affordable, dog-friendly place to grab a beer. And keeping it local, the beers — Arch Street amber ale and Palo Alto pale ale — will be named for neighborhood streets. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR

bar • billiards • burgers

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Asian American Cuisine

424 WALNUT. 424 Walnut St., Sewickley. 412-741-7143. Offering “fine Italian and American cuisine in a casual, relaxed atmosphere,” diners can expect faves such as chicken Romano, crab Hoelzel, chops and pasta, but with careful and sophisticated touches. Thus a linguine special might offer diced ham and spring vegetables, and beans-and-greens, combined with sausage and pasta, are upgraded to a meal. LE ATRIA’S. Multiple locations. www.atrias.com. A local chain, Atria’s locations offer distinctly different atmospheres but the same quality steaks, chops and pasta menu. Suburban spots are for quiet casual dining while the North Side location is pure sports pub. Regardless of the ambience, the sherry crab bisque and the pasta fra diablo are superb. kE BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF

The Largest Buffet in Town!

The Slippery Mermaid {CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J EVEREST. 4042 Saw Mill Run Blvd., Brentwood. 877-650-2694. At this Nepalese restaurant, diners can expect momos, the region’s characteristic dumplings, here filled with chicken or vegetables, and served with dipping sauces. Also on the menu, variations on dishes associated with Indian cuisines, such samosas, sambar soup, rice pilafs and curries. JF

BOB’S DINER. 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400. Well-prepared fare and a warm atmosphere distinguish this local diner chain. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-toyour-ribs dinner platters. The fried chicken is a winner, with a skin that is deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. J BURGATORY. Multiple locations. www.burgatorybar.com. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tunaand-avocado spring rolls. LE

MONDAY & THURSDAY $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________ TUESDAY Burger, Beer, & Bourbon $11.95 ____________________ WEDNESDAY Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________ FRIDAY Sangria $3 ____________________ SATURDAY & SUNDAY 10:30am-3pm

Over 200 Specialty Items: Roast Beef, Ham, Baked Salmon, Ribs and Seafood Casserole

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

Dessert Bar Banquets of 20-200 Guests

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm

412 - 4 81-1118 860 Saw Mill Run Blvd. ( Rte. 51S)

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar 1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

900 Western Ave. North side 412-224-2163

Minutes from Downtown, Close to the Liberty Tunnel Next to the Red, White & Blue Store

www.oldtownbuffetpgh.com

BenjaminsPgh.com

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT. 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500. This restaurant, situated in a charming reclaimed Victorian building, pulls off being both upscale and casual, with a fresh and original seasonal menu. Appetizers are as varied as Chinese-style pot stickers and scallop tacos, while entrees include pastas, fish and chops. There is also a selection of burgers and sandwiches. KE

John Marcinizyn

KAVSAR. 16 Southern Ave., Mount Washington. 412-4888708 or 412-488-8709. The varied cuisine of the old Silk Road is available at this Uzbekistan restaurant. The menu reflects the country’s time as a Soviet Socialist republic, with beef stroganoff and blini-like crepes rolled around savory fillings, and its proximity to China, evident in many dishes based upon noodles and dumplings. K

(latin guitar)

• February 14th • From 5 to 7:30pm • No Cover!! • Reservations 412-904-1242

Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grille FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hot-doggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable, with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE

LADLES. 516 Pittsburgh St., Springdale. 724-274-5230. This cozy eatery in the Allegheny Valley offers superb soups and Italian-American favorites. Soups are homemade, as is much of the pasta (served with a variety of red sauces). A standout item is the “raviogie,” a mash-up of meat ravioli and potato/cheese pierogie, available with butter and onions or marinara sauce. KE

Ask your server for Valentine Specials. 2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 now open 7 days a week!

@casareynamex

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE chinapalace-shadyside.com

Burgatory {CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-251-0031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: aboveaverage sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE

the Light Up Night burger, topped with blue crabmeat, bacon, avocado and pepperjack cheese. LE THE SLIPPERY MERMAID. 613 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-741-2459. With a lengthy menu of creative rolls and a tropical atmosphere, this spot makes sushi fun and exciting. The choices and combinations are myriad and have names like Psycho Mermaid, Crabby Sailor and Triton’s Triple Tuna; ingredients range from familiar (seafood, avocado) to unusual (bacon, steak). Non-sushi selections are extremely limited, and there are no hot entrees. KF

LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 Murray mostly grilled fish with various Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521sauces. Appetizers 8888. This Vietnamese include favorites such as restaurant offers the calamari, mussels and popular pho and bun crab cakes, but also entrees, but also lessgrilled corn with common dishes. The ww. r w feta cheese. KE menu has a section of pape pghcitym com tam (“broken rice”) .co PARIS 66. 6018 Centre dishes, including some Ave., East Liberty. 412-404topped with a fried egg; 8166. This charming bistro is both there is also a jellyfish salad less pretentious and every bit with pickled carrot and daikon. as impressive as the frou-frou Another worthy entrée was French fine dining of yore, banh xeo, savory crepes filled offering both light lunch fare with shrimp, sautéed pork and (croques and crepes) and serious vegetables, or try the make-yourdinners. Expects classics such as own summer roll option. FK salade Niçoise, frog legs and exquisitely prepared meats, plus THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty a cocktail list. KF Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the Butler St., Lawrenceville. casual, no-nonsense and no-frills 412-781-8724. Traditional Thai member of Pittsburgh’s Thai sauces and curries from scratch restaurant club. The prices are are among the reasons to stop on the low end, but the food by this charming eatery, which quality is high and the portions boasts an outdoor patio. are huge. The decor mixes Asian Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp themes with diner kitsch in a cakes, the classically prepared delightful way. JF tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver 394-3400. The venerable Italian St., Sewickley. 412-741-9457. restaurant from Greensburg now At this revamped hotel, the has a Downtown outpost. In this offerings reflect a balance elegant space, some classic dishes between time-honored dishes are updated; a few favorites, like such as turtle soup and more turtle soup are retained; and the modern fare, like a crabmeatfresh mozzarella bar deserves stuffed quesadilla. Steak-lovers to become a classic. Try the will be pleased, but adventurous distinctive pizza, with a layered, burger fans should check out cracker-like crust. LE

FULL LIST E N O LIN

We visit a Harry Potter-themed Dinner Lab event on this week’s City Paper podcast. Listen every week at bit.ly/citypaperpodcast or subscribe on iTunes.

Is there something you’d like to hear on the City Paper podcast? Send your ideas and feedback to multimedia editor Ashley Murray at amurray@pghcitypaper.com.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016


LOCAL

“I THINK THE ITALIAN TERM IS BIG-ASS ORCHESTRA.”

BEAT

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

DIRECT CONNECTION Attracting a Younger Audience. The State of the Album in 2016. Adele. Two of those three topics were covered in panel discussions at the Jazz Connect Conference 2016 early last month in New York City. But even the British pop star’s name frequently popped up when discussing album sales and runaway hits, usually in the same breath as Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly, an album that features several jazz musicians. While the music industry is supposedly dying, jazz is alive and well. Taking place at St. Peter’s Church in Manhattan, Jazz Connect marked its fourth year, bringing together musicians, promoters and journalists for two days of discussions, key-note addresses and a screening of Jaco, the documentary on the late bassist Jaco Pastorius. Lee Mergner, publisher of JazzTimes magazine (full disclosure: I’m a contributing writer), co-organizes the conference, along with the Jazz Forward Coalition. It initially launched under the umbrella of a larger industry conference hosted by the Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP). Now Jazz Connect happens independently of the larger group. Mergner observes that some of these same panel topics have been part of the dialogue for years. All that’s changed is background. “Expanding the audience for jazz, that’s always the true motif or theme,” he says. “Since there’s seismic changes in this industry — like a lot of industries — it’s much more grassroots now because … there are whole parts that are [gone, such as] store chains, retail.” Pittsburgh had representation at the conference. Janis Burley Wilson, of Pittsburgh Jazzlive and the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, sat on the “Youth Movement” panel. MCG Jazz’s Marty Ashby moderated a panel on how artists can engage communities with education models. The directors of Kente Arts Alliance, which presents concerts locally, also attended, looking for ways to build their audience. Gail Austin, Kente’s managing director, enjoyed the event but observed that the conference attendees skewed more toward a white, middle-aged demographic. “On the business end, it’s a very non-AfricanAmerican experience, and I find that very disappointing,” she says. “These are wellmeaning people and they’re good at what they do. But the people whose music it came from are really underrepresented.”

“EXPANDING THE AUDIENCE FOR JAZZ, THAT’S ALWAYS THE TRUE MOTIF OR THEME.”

ORCHESTRAL

MANEUVERS {BY JORDAN WEEKS}

“W

Not Mahler: Stewart Copeland

ELL, IT AIN’T Mahler.” Ameri-

can composer Stewart Copeland is speaking over the phone from his home in California of his latest orchestral work, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra-commissioned Tyrant’s Crush. A concerto for percussion and trapset drums (i.e., drum kit or drum set), the piece features Copeland accompanying the orchestra on the latter at the world premiere, on Fri., Feb. 19, and then for a matinee performance, on Sun., Feb. 21, both at Heinz Hall. “I think the Italian term is big-ass orchestra,” Copeland says, clarifying the piece’s instrumentation. “There are featured roles for percussion, and the tympani gets a few starring roles. So ... drums, three percussionists, featured harp and tympani.” And one big-ass orchestra. While the event of a composer performing his work with an orchestra is not so unusual, that composer being a drummer — a bona fide trap-set drummer — absolutely is. And while percussionists performing original

works with percussion ensembles is not wholly unusual (see: Steve Reich. et al.), a composer accompanying a full-scale orchestra on a drum set is virtually unheard of. “Yes!” Copeland booms in half-facetious celebration. “We can agree, most definitively — this is a first, it is unique in the annals of music history! Love it.” Despite his animated air of self-deprecation, this composeras-drummer-accompanist configuration may indeed be a first — not in jazz or rock, but certainly in the largely buttoned-up world of classical and orchestral fare.

STEWART COPELAND WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 19, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Feb., 21. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-94. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

“The story,” says Copeland of Crush’s thematic narrative, “is the tyrant, his ascendance and fall.” And the tyrant in question? “There are a few to choose from. There is kind of a template, I suppose. ... Basically

the young intellectuals, the revolutionaries that take over everything, and once they’re in the palace, they kind of get used to running things, and they like the brocade, and they like the life of running a country, but then it all goes wrong.” Copeland cites, in part, a piece he heard some years ago by Los Angeles radio performer Joe Frank as an early inspiration for Tyrant’s Crush. “He did this monologue, which was the inner musings of a dictator as it all falls apart. And I was completely captivated by that ... a person, a guy, with his stomachache, and the girl that he likes, but he’s found himself in that [compromising] position, and how he deals with it. He’s not good, he does bad stuff, but you’re in his mind as he goes through this strange adventure. It doesn’t end well.” As is often the case with compositions, Tyrant’s Crush began life a couple different times before reaching its ultimate incarnation. The first movement, “Poltroons in Paradise,” appeared in nascent form as a commission from the Royal Liverpool Phil-

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ORCHESTRAL MANEUVERS , CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

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Gale force singing and power ” - The Chicago Tribune

Shemekia

Copeland “ Copeland

embodies the blues” -NPR

FRIDAY MARCH 4, 2016

AUGUST WILSON CENTER TrustArts.org . Box Office at Theater Square 412-456-6666 . Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930

harmonic. “Then,” says Copeland, “it was picked up by the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, who asked me to adapt it for their star harpist and lone percussionist. Then, in incorporating that movement into the larger piece for the Pittsburgh Symphony, which has me playing on drums, that was a further re-ordering and restructuring of the orchestration for that first movement. The next two movements, ‘Monster Just Needed Love’ and ‘Over the Wall,’ that’s all written with that new configuration in mind.” Now fully formed, Tyrant’s Crush will soon continue its life elsewhere. Following the premiere in Pittsburgh, Copeland will join conductor Marcelo Lehninger in a tour of the piece with Los Angeles-based New West Symphony Orchestra, of which Lehninger is musical director. Copeland is still most widely recognized as the drummer for the enormously popular band, The Police. His career scoring films (now almost too many to count) began during his tenure in that band. Composing operas, ballets and other pieces for orchestra would follow. As is evident with his energetic, textural drumming and singular, inventive songwriting style, Copeland has never seemed to be especially interested in toeing traditional lines in any musical realm. “My dad was into big-band jazz, and my mom was into 20th-century composers. So, actually, the music raging around in my head was more Stravinsky and Ravel until the advent of Jimi Hendrix. And then it became raging guitar — surrounded by Stravinsky and orchestral colors.” Paired with Tyrant’s Crush on the PSO program is a work well enough bursting with orchestral colors, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 1. “It’s an interesting choice,” says Copeland of the Shostakovich piece. “He wrote it when he was 19, it has a real youthful vivacity. And he probably knew more at 19, living in the era that he did, about [instrumentation] than I do now, so I can only admire his technique. It’s a lively piece. It’s a good match.” “I’ve discovered that the orchestra can do all kinds of very cool stuff,” continues Copeland. “What we’re used to in the concert hall is Mahler, and the great works of all the classical composers. But there are still tricks that can be surprising from an orchestra. They can do things that aren’t a part of where the current and recent composers for orchestra have been. Popular music, playing stadiums with 80,000 people raging at you, does change your perspective of what music is for. And if three guys with amplifiers can do it, 60 guys on the stage can light up a room and burn down the house, in my opinion. And that’s my mission with the orchestra.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

IN BLOOM {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALL EYES MEDIA}

The Cactus Blossoms: Page Burkum (right) and Jack Torrey

It took six months for brothers Jack Torrey and Page Burkum, known collectively as The Cactus Blossoms, to finish their first studio record, You’re Dreaming. It wasn’t the ideal situation, the brothers tell City Paper via phone from their home in Minneapolis, but it was necessary. They recorded the album live with a full band in Chicago, so getting schedules to match up took some work. But for the duo, it was worth it. “This record comes from a whole lot of people recording together in one room,” Torrey says. “When I sing, and this goes for my brother as well, I’m usually strumming a guitar and I wanted to be able to do that. I want to have the band with me, so we’re all reacting to each other. That’s how music works in my world.”

“WE’RE REALLY NOT NOSTALGIC.” The brothers formed the band in 2009 after Torrey spent some time performing alone in clubs around the area. But Torrey says performing scared him at the time. So he asked his brother to join him on stage to perform what he calls “drunken party blues,” as well as songs from Hank Williams and the Louvin Brothers. That morphed into the sound they have today — songs inspired by midcentury country-and-western, but that still sound fresh and modern. Because their sound leans more to the traditional, some may try to pigeonhole the band as a nostalgia act. But Burkum says the brothers didn’t set out for this particular sound; rather, it came about organically. “We found this sound, this music, through our own exploration,” Burkum says. “People might not believe it, but we’re really not nostalgic. To us this is just our music.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE CACTUS BLOSSOMS. 8 p.m. Tue., Feb. 16. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10-12. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net


! P U N E LIST You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days. Tune in while you read, and judge for yourself whether that indie band’s guitar work is really angular, or if that singer actually sounds like Sandy Denny.

{PHOTO OF HAMIET BLUIETT COURTESY OF MARKUS LACKINGER}

Clockwise from top left: Hamiet Bluiett, Craig Harris and Kahil El’Zabar

ON A HIGH NOTE {BY MIKE SHANLEY} A HANDFUL OF baritone saxophonists have

liberated the large instrument from its heavy look and low register. Others have been perfectly content to use it to blow some fat, low-end blues riffs. Hamiet Bluiett might be the only baritone practitioner who can do both in just a few breaths. Best known as a founding member of the World Saxophone Quartet, he can lay down a groove, like his “Hattie Wall” (the quartet’s unofficial theme song), or join his compatriots in group solos or melodies that push his instrument beyond its typical range. Next week, he returns to Pittsburgh with the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble, the trio led by percussionist Kahil El’Zabar. Bluiett fell in love with the instrument when he was 10 years old, growing up in Brooklyn, Ill., just outside of St. Louis. Originally a clarinetist, he eventually made the baritone sax his main instrument. He moved to New York in the 1970s, where he impressed legendary bassist Charles Mingus with his skills. “I developed a fouroctave range with no problem. High reed notes, all that kind of stuff. I was screaming,” he says. “When I was playing with Charles Mingus, I was reading the parts an octave up. Mingus said, ‘How do you do that?’ I said, ‘I worked on it! It’s very difficult and very hard.’” After two years with Mingus, he eventually teamed up with some musicians he had known from St. Louis’ Black Artists Group (BAG). They formed the World Saxophone Quartet, which has played everything from Duke Ellington to Marvin Gaye to heady originals. Despite a few minor lineup changes, they continue to resurface

every few years, even as each member maintains solo career. Bluiett crossed paths with drummer Kahil El’Zabar while playing in Chicago in the ’70s. The two would start working together more regularly in the following decade, usually in a stripped-down lineup that included one other horn or a pianist. (Trombonist Craig Harris will perform with them in Pittsburgh.) What might seem like a minimal instrumentation has become the norm for Bluiett. “I’m used to the World Saxophone Quartet, and it was more challenging than this because we didn’t have no drums, no piano, no bass and no sound system,” he says, adding, “I learned from people who were playing hardcore blues. I’ve played with an organist and no microphone. That’s how I developed that range on that instrument, to play above — notes that you can hear.”

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

ETHNIC HERITAGE ENSEMBLE 7:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 20. First Unitarian Church, 605 Morewood Ave., Shadyside. $16-20. 412-682-0591

At 75, it’s admirable that a veteran musician like Bluiett still travels the country, playing one-nighters. What’s more impressive is that the saxophonist suffered a stroke five years ago, from which he says he’s rebounded fully. It makes him, he says, “the poster child for recovery.” Perhaps that’s why he describes his current work as a “healing journey. I think it’s time for that to happen, with so many horrible things going on that we have to face every day. We need to get back in touch with what we’re really about,” he says. “At least that is where my head is at.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF APRIL RENAE}

Raya Brass Band

[PUNK] + THU., FEB. 11

introduced to mainstream America several years ago. British DJ Hatcha, who is performing at tonight’s Lazercrunk dance night at Brillobox, is a pioneer of the genre. Though there are still plenty of wub-wub-wubs, Hatcha’s dubstep is more subtle and tasteful than Skrillex’s, and doesn’t have the nu-metal guitar overdubs. AW 10 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

Although Detroit’s Protomartyr is the big draw for tonight’s show at Brillobox, Priests, hailing from our nation’s capital, play a dancey yet apocalyptic style of post-punk that also deserves attention. Vocalist Katie Greer’s growls and screeches recall alternative heroines like Kim Gordon and Kathleen Hanna, and the band members righteous ferocity has made Priests one of the rising stars of modern American underground music. Locals Gotobeds open the show. Andrew Woehrel 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[DREAM POP] + TUE., FEB. 16

[WORLD] + FRI., FEB. 12 Tonight the Carnegie Museum of Art introduces FEAST, a series which pairs museum exhibits with culinary delights. The debut event is inspired by The Propeller Group: p The Living g Need Light, The Dead Need eed Music, c an exhibit exploring the funerary traditions of South Vietnam nam through visuals and music. sic. And, while food takes center stage, music will not be neglected: ted: The after-party features music by Pandemic and New York City’s Raya Brass Band, plus a performance by Steel Dragon Kung Fu and Lion on and Dragon Dance. Margaret Welsh 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $125-150 Chuck Ragan (dinner and after-party), $35-40 (after-party only).. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

A coffee house may be an unlikely setting for a rock show, but Nashville’s dream-pop two-piece Keeps, performing at Black Forge Coffee House in Allentown, doesn’t exactly rock. Keeps is perhaps an example of a band that rolls. With slow and deliberate drumming, guitar lines that echo “Ocean Breathes Salty”-era Modest Mouse and marble-mouthed vocals that sort of resemble Randy y Newman’s, Keeps’ music gossamer that I’d be afraid is so delicate and goss tangible. AW 6 p.m. to touch it, were it tan 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. $10. 412291-8994 or www.blackforgecoffee.com www.b

[FOLK PUNK] + WED., FEB. 17

[DUBSTEP] + FRI., FEB. 12 Thanks to artists like Skrillex, the term “dubstep” has become a bit of a punchline, but let’s not forget that this throbbing, psychedelic form orm of EDM actually had a long ong history in the U.K. before e being

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA JOHNSON}

It seems to be a ccommon occurence that when former pu punk rockers become “too old to rock,” they turn to folk Both punk and folk have music. Bo working-class roots, political working lyrics and an simple chord structures, so it isn’t is that surprising of a transition. Chuck Ragan, tran formerly forme of the Gainesville, Fla., band Hot Water Music, b is a perfect example of this. p Donning old-timey clothes Donn that make him look like a train conductor and growing a rugged beard, he has ru transformed from punk singer tran to folk fo troubadour. Tonight, he and a his backing band, The Camaraderie, perform at the Cam Rex Theater, with guest Cory Branan. Bra AW 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-17. 412-381-6811 or $1 www.rextheater.com w


2016

Wine Guide WineFest“alcular� Pittsburgh Saturday, March 19th 11:00 AM - 8:30 PM Sample and purchase over 18+ fine PA Wineries, enjoy Live Entertainment, Shopping Vendors and more! Complimentary Stemless Wine Glass Included! Wine Bottle Check so that you can Sample, Shop and Enjoy! $25/Admit 1 or $40/Admit 2

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All Tickets $30 at the Door

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21+ Event

Wineries providing you the opportunity to sample and purchase fine PA Wines as per State Law the Wineries are only permitted Up to One Ounce pours at a time!

David Lawrence Convention Center A D V E R T I S I N G

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Limited discounted tickets available at WineFestPa.com

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sip | swirl | learn www.palatepartners.com

Sonoma

COME IN FROM THE COLD AND WINE UP

WINE

BEER NOMS

COCKTAILS wine bar & tap room

412-252-2337

5326 Butler St. Upper Lawrenceville

www.alleghenywinemixer.com

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sonoma Celebrates 10 Years with Refreshed Wine Program, Expanded Tapas Menu. There’s a reason City Paper readers vote Sonoma winner of “Best Wine Selection” year after year. It’s the restaurant’s unwavering commitment to excellence, offering the very best wines on the market. “I always go for true quality – no matter the price. We offer the best possible quality in whatever price bracket you choose,” says Sonoma’s General Manager and Beverage Director Randy Wright. Satisfied customers now have even more to look forward to, as the restaurant debuts its newly-renovated wine bar complete with new Wine Flight options and an expanded Tapas menu. Celebrating Sonoma’s 10th anniversary late last year, Owner and Chef Proprietor Yves Carreau decided to refresh and expand the alreadypopular wine program with some new twists. Branching out from the domestic focus of the past, Carreau and Wright added wines from around the world and created a menu off wine flights to encourage customers to taste and learn about fine wines. Scripted wine flights now include the mind-blowing “Intergalactic Planetary” which features Bourasque Brut from Loire France, Rothburg Riesling Spatlese from Germany, Vina Palaciega Malbec from Argentina, Iconoclast Cabernet from the Napa Valley, and Domaine Pinnacle Apple Ice Wine from Quebec, Canada, for $30. Customers may choose from a menu of pre-scripted wine flights like this one, or may create their own flights of 3 ($25) or 4 ($30) wines, selecting any of the 75 wines offered by the glass from the restaurant’s impressive list S U P P L E M E N T

of more than 300. Whether they choose progressive wine flights staged to accompany a meal, or comparative flights (where wines are served simultaneously), globe-trotting oenophiles may complement their wine tastings with one or more irresistible selections from the expanded tapas menu. More than twenty options tempt with unforgettable names like “Angels on Horseback” and “Devils on Horseback” -- for those who like their oysters prepared divinely or sinfully -- along with a range of ethnic flavors to please any palate and complement any wine, from chile rellenos to pork belly steam buns, from frog legs to Yorkshire pudding to ramen. The tapas, like the wines, may be ordered individually ($5) or as flights (3 for $12). All of this can be enjoyed in the newly renovated wine bar area with open-air windows and more sit-down dining and community seating, welcoming for large groups and inviting for people to linger. Full renovations will be complete by late winter; diners can get a sneak ppeek on Valentine’s Day when Sonoma offers a special 3-course Prix Fixe menu t that starts with a sriracha-lime oyster amuse b bouche and offers plentiful c choices – duck, octopus, pheasant, steak, or lobster -- plus vegetarian options and a sensuous dessert to finish. “Whether you know a lot about wine or nothing at all, our new wine program and tapas menu is a fun way to expand your mind and your palate,” says Wright. Sonoma is located at 947 Penn Avenue in downtown Pittsburgh. More info at www. thesonomagrille.com or 412-697-1336.


Bella Frutteto Family owned and operated since 2008, Bella Frutteto specializes in Italian cuisine and a commitment to offering exceptional service and the freshest ingredients available. This comes through in every bite, especially in signature dishes such as their Apple Ravioli, where Granny Smith apples are sautéed with amaretto, raisins and balsamic roasted figs in a fresh sage butter sauce served atop cheese ravioli. This dish is simply fabulous paired with Ruffino Orvieto. If you have a sweet tooth, this is the place to be with all desserts made in house. It can be a hard choice from their daily offerings of jumbo cupcakes to the bomb diggity of all chocolate desserts, the “Chocolate Bomb” made with decadent chocolate mousse covered in an Oreo cookie crumb shell on a chocolate brownie topped with Frangelico cream. Wine lovers know that the ultimate pairing is a full bodied red, like Paso Creek Cabernet (their number #1 seller by the glass). The wine list boasts over 40 bottles and 25 selections by the glass from around the world including an array of Italian wines from Tuscany’s Vino Noble di Montepulciano and Chianti Classico Gran Selezione to Sicily’s Nero

Meet. Eat. Repeat.

D’Avola. Bella Frutteto highlights winery selections each month. February’s selections from Kim Crawford in New Zealand are an Unoaked Chardonnay and Pinot Noir which will get your palate excited to join them on March 1st for a five course wine dinner focused on Kim Crawford’s Small Parcels line, the epitome of boutique small production offerings with as little as 500 cases made for worldwide distribution. Bella Frutetto’s spacious layout can accommodate large groups and is the perfect spot for any celebration including Mother’s Day and graduation parties. During the summer months, dine outside on the patio overlooking the neighboring Soergel’s Orchards. Owners Jeff and Sandy Rook look forward to serving you and hope to see you soon! For information on the upcoming wine dinner or to make a reservation to dine please call 724-940-7777. More information including menus and features can be found online at www.bellafrutetto.com. Bella Frutteto is located at 2602 Brandt School Road in Wexford Pennsylvania only 15 miles from Downtown Pittsburgh.

Wine & Swine Wednesdays

fRESH fRESH INGREDIENTS fRESH NEW MENU ITEMS

BREEZE.

It’s everything you could ask for in a lovely spot for dinner, drinks or special tasting events. With a creative twist on Italian cuisine, a delicious array of beer and wine, and the perfect al fresco spot in Point Breeze, Pino’s is a fresh start to spring.

5PM – 10PM

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Tues-Sat 8am-10pm Sun 8am-9pm

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Wine by the Glass - $6

335 E. MAIN ST, CARNEGIE, PA 412.275.3637

6738 REYNOLDS STREET POINT BREEZE PITTSBURGH (412) 361-1336 • WWW.CHEFPINO.COM

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WineFest“alcular” Whether you consider yourself a novice, or an aficionado, the WineFest”alcular” event is a must attend. Visit the David Lawrence Convention Center on Saturday March 19th to sample, learn and purchase wines from over a dozen of the regions top vineyards. Staggered start time sessions are available to minimize wait and maximize interaction.

Complimentary stemless wine glass included with all ticket purchases. Just looking for a fun day out with the girlfriends, WineFest”alcular” will also have over 40 shopping vendors on-site offering tips and samples from industries such as hair and makeup, jewelry, food and more. Discounted tickets available for purchase by visiting WineFestPa.com

Pennsylvania Wine Cellar Since 1987 Pennsylvania Wine Cellar has been bringing you award winning wines from Heritage Wine Cellars and Christian W. Klay Winery. Our two locations offer free wine tasting and over 50 wines to purchase. As well as our large selection of wine we also may have the largest wine rack and wine accessory store in the country. The Waterfront location is our largest store and is located across from Starbucks. Station Square houses our second store and you will find it to be very quaint in the unique atmosphere of the old landmark train station offering a large selec-

tion of wine racks and accessories. Heritage Wine Cellars of North East, PA is offered for sale at both of our lo-

cations. They are one of the largest and oldest wineries in Pennsylvania. They old are seventh generation growers and third generation wine makers. They are known for their flavorful wines and offer over fifty varieties of wine. Christian W. Klay Winery is the second winery offered at Station Square only. The winery was established in 1997 and is located in Chalk Hill and offers over 16 varieties of wines from grapes grown at their vineyard near Nemacolin Resort. Except for the Ice Wine, sampling is free at our stores and the varieties of wines range from Cabernet Sauvignon to Winter Pear. While you are at The Waterfront location you can also

WINTER WINE

FESTIVAL SAT, FEB. 27TH NOON-5PM

Local Wineries Live Music Great Food ADVANCED TICKETS - $20 DAY OF TICKETS - $25

CALL THE WINE SHOP AT 412-835-3246 X 114 FOR TICKETS!

On Sa l e MUS T N o w BE 21 +

®

L E A R N M O RE AT T R A X FA RMS . COM A D V E R T I S I N G

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sample wine slushie. Pennsylvania Wine Cellars was the first to offer Custom Labeled Wine Bottles. Our staff artist can create a special label for any Occasion or Holiday. Orders can be one bottle to case lots. We also offer a favor size bottle for Weddings or any large venue. You will find that our prices are the best in the area. Once in Pennsylvania Wine Cellar you will not know where to look first. Whether it is our selection of over 40 wine related tee shirts, wide variety of wine racks, cork cages, or any of our hundreds of wine accessories. Included in our selection are wine racks and wine cabinets made by the Amish in Lancaster, Pa. You will truly be amazed how unique our store is.


AEGEAN ESTIATORIO

Deer Creek Winery De Free wine tasting is available every day at one of western Pennsylvania’s fastest growing wineries. Visit any of their three Pittsburgh area mall locations (The Mall at Robinson, Beaver Valley Mall & Butler Clearview Mall) or take a short drive to their main winery in Shippenville. Deer Creek Winery is locally owned and is located on the family’s old raspber-

ry farm. They now bottle 20+ varieties of red and white varietals, fruit, limited edition, and their signature raspberry wines. Each winery location includes gifts, wine accessories, olive oils, and balsamic vinegars. For locations and events, call (814) 354-7392 or visit DeerCreekWine.com.

Apple Ravioli

PPG2 MARKET SQUARE

porospgh.com

40 Wines by the Bottle and over 25 by the Glass! Gluten Free and Vegetarian options

Locally Owned and Operated

Accepting Reservations for Mother’s Day and Graduation Parties

--------- Tuesday March 1st ---------

Kim Crawford Winery 5 Course Dinner Seating is limited, make your reservations today! 724-940-7777.

More information including menus and features can be found online at www.bellafrutteto.com

The Chocolate Bomb

2602 BRANDT SCHOOL ROAD - WEXFORD PENNSYLVANIA - ONLY 15 MILES FROM DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH - OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK A D V E R T I S I N G

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Pino Contemporary Italian Pino’s is, and always will be, a family owned and operated restaurant. The restaurant is spearheaded by Joe, aka Chef Pino, and Jen Mico, the husbandand-wife duo that have made, and sustained, Pino’s great success. It is the quintessential Italian experience; excellent food and wine in a cozy, comforting atmosphere. All of the pasta is fresh, made in-house daily by Chef

Pino. The pizza is famous for its outof-this-world harmony of homemade dough, cheese & toppings. Jen’s wine selections reflect her interest in smaller wineries with a particular focus on lesser known varietals. We invite you to come to Pino’s. Experience the best Italy has to offer without ever having to leave the East End!

Engine House 25 Arriba is the new wine tasting room in Lawrenceville brought to you by Engine House 25 Wines. Serving several varietals of wine, including Cabernet, Grenache, Malbec and Chardonnay, each batch is hand made from grapes sourced from vines of premium growers in California and Chile, South America. The tasting room offers wine available by the flight, glass or bottle. We have partnered up with Wheel and Wedge to bring you delicious local and regional artisan cheeses to pair with the A D V E R T I S I N G

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wines. Parking is located next to the building and is free of charge. No reservations required.


Pennsylvania Wine Cellar www.pawinecellar.com

Trax Farms Winter Wine Festival Our Annual Winter Wine Festival will be on Saturday, February 27, 2016. Traditionally, Trax Farms has offered exceptional wine tastings and lectures but the festival will be bigger than anything the farm has ever done before with great food, live music, and a showcase of the very best from local,

Award-Wining western PA wineries. Tickets on sale now and pre-sale tickets are limited. $20 Pre-sale tickets and $25 day of event. Enjoy a day at the farm and taste some of the most delicious award winning wines from around western PA wineries. Call our Wine Shop at 412-835-3246 ext. 114!

Featuring Wines from Heritage Wine Cellars THE WATERFRONT - HOMESTEAD

Poros Poros - A Wine Odyssey “It is the wine that leads me on, the wild wine that sets the wisest man to sing at the top of his lungs…” – Homer Poros Aegean Estiatorio is the Market Square’s newest addition, celebrating the food and wine of the Greece and the

Mediterranean. Chapter One of our Mediterranean Wine Odyssey begins Thursday, February 25th. This five-course wine dinner will showcase the Flagship Grapes of Greece beginning on the Island of Santorini and finishing with the robust wines and fare of Macedonia.

Featuring Wines from Heritage Wine Cellars and Christian W. Clay Winery STATION SQUARE - PITTSBURGH

Visit any of our five locations

Irwin (main winery) North Huntington • Connellsville Westmoreland Mall • Brentwood 724-446-5000

The Waterfront StationSquare HOMESTEAD 412-462-4646

www.greenhousewinery.com A D V E R T I S I N G

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PITTSBURGH 412-642-9212


WINE TASTING GUIDE Sponsored by Sonoma Grille

West Coast Kitchen and Wine Bar where food and wine are celebrated everyday.

947 Penn Avenue thesonomagrille.com A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 11 BRILLOBOX. Protomartyr, Priests, Gotobeds. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Lionize w/ Brahctopus, Mama’s Madness. South Side. 412-431-4950. STAGE AE. R. City. North Side. 412-229-5483.

Side. 412-904-3335. CLUB 206. EZ Action. Braddock. 412-646-1203. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. CLUB CAFE. Seratones w/ Coastal Dancing Queen. Warrendale. Remedy, JontiTrot. South Side. 724-799-8333. 412-431-4950. LINDEN GROVE. Move DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mojo Dia Makers Band. Castle Shannon. & The Fireball Horns. Robinson. 412-882-8687. 412-489-5631. MOONDOG’S. Norman HAMBONE’S. Nardini. Blawnox. Amoeba Knievel, 412-828-2040. Patton, Strange PARK HOUSE. Union Monsters. Rye & Company ww. r w Lawrenceville. Townes. North Side. pape pghcitym 412-681-4318. 412-224-2273. .co JAMES STREET PITTSBURGH WINERY. GASTROPUB & iCandy Pittsburgh: iCUPID. SPEAKEASY. Beauty Slap Strip District. 412-566-1000. w/ Tracksploitation & Special SMILING MOOSE. The Filthy Guests. North Side. 412-904-3335. Lowdown, Rebuilding Year, Sound JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Track 96, Male Clerks. South Side. Fathertime. Warrendale. 412-431- 4668. 724-799-8333. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Fletcher’s MEADOWS CASINO. House of Grove & Derek Woodz Band. Soul. Washington. 724-503-1200. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. MOONDOG’S. The Chain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Ferris & GRILL. Random Play. Bueller’s Revenge. Fox Chapel. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. 412-963-0640. NIED’S HOTEL. James Buckley, John Casciato, Shani Love, Donna O, Slim Forsythe, Jennie Kay Snyder, Candy Mountain. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THE NIGHT GALLERY. Tera Chain Sky, Prime 8, It Is Written, God Hates Unicorns. Blackbird Bullet. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. NORTH HILLS PITTSBURGH MOOSE LODGE #46. Scheer Element. Glenshaw. 412-969-7197. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Donora, Brooke Annibale. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE R BAR. John Gresh’s Gris Gris Each week we bring Band. Dormont. 412 942-0882. REX THEATER. Particle. you a song from South Side. 412-381-6811. a local musician. RICHLAND HOTEL. The GRID. This week’s track Gibsonia. 724-443-4946.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 12 BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. Klaymore, Resinaut, Talion. Knoxville. 740-424-0302. CLUB CAFE. Paul Luc, Jordan DePaul. Early. American Aquarium w/ Todd Edwards. Late. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Dante Spinosi. Robinson. 412-224-2273. HOWLERS. Molasses Barge, CANT, Horehound. Bloomfield. 412- 682-0320. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Daily Grind, Blithehound & Changre. North

SAT 13

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN HERMAN}

RACHEL B

comes from Los Angeles-toPittsburgh transplant

SUN 14 MEADOWS CASINO. Johnny Angel & the Halos. Washington. 724-503-1200. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Never Shout Never w/ Metro Station, Jule Vera, Waterparks, Get The Picture. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PALACE THEATRE. The Spinners & Eddie Holman. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Session Americana. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. PGH Tango Trio. Squirrel Hill. 412-638-6941.

Rachel B. Stream or download her new single

“I’m the Boss,” at FFW>>, the music blog of www.pghcity paper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

TUE 16 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Cactus Blossoms. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 12

DJS FRI 12 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 13 ACE HOTEL PITTSBURGH. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. East Liberty. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Touching Without Feeling. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

WED 17 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BOOM CONCEPTS. Jordan Montgomery/1HOOD/Tairey. Garfield. 412-877-1371.

BLUES THU 11 VA HOSTPIAL. Blvd of the Blues. Oakland. 412 688-6000.

SAT 13 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. South Side. 412-431-4090. PLUM AMERICAN LEGION. Jill West & Blues Attack. Verona. 412-795-9112.

WED 17 MOONDOG’S. The Ben Miller Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ THU 11 ANDYS WINE BAR. Bronwyn Wyatt Higgins. Downtown. 412-773-8800. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Mark Strickland. North Side. 412-904-3335. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Jerry & Louis Lucarelli w/ Samantha St. John. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

Meet our new political blog.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8800. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher, Jr. w/ Tom Wendt & Paco Mahone. Downtown. 412-325-6769. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Arturo O’Farill & the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra. North Side. 412-322-0800. SENTI ITALIAN RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR. The Mariko Reid Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4347. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Betty Douglas & Company. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

Songs that members of local roots-rock band The Hawkeyes can’t stop listening to: Screaming Trees

“Revelator”

Rival Sons

“Pressure & Time”

The Decemberists

SAT 13 565 LIVE. The Jazzed Owls. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. ANDYS WINE BAR. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8800. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Pianist Isaiah Small. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Groove Doctor. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. OAKS THEATER. Neon Swing X-Perience. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SENTI ITALIAN RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR. The Mariko Reid Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4347. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. w/ Eric Susoeff. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. West End. 412-458-0417. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708.

SUN 14

We wade through the crap so you don’t have to.

HEAVY ROTATION

FRI 12

“Make You Better”

Warren Zevon

“Things to Do in Denver When You’re Dead”

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MICHIKO SAIKI’S WINTER TOUR. Music by Amy Beth Kirsten, Brian Ferneyhough, & Pitt doctoral candidate Jeff Weston. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-651-2130. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. A Musical Valentine: The Love Songs of Marvin Hamlisch. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WASHINGTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing “Dreamscapes”. Trinity High School, Washington.

SUN 14 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Romeo & Juliet Overture, Wagner’s “Prelude und Liebestod” from his opera Tristan und Isolde, & excerpts from Bizet’s impassioned & fiery Carmen suites. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Under the direction of Francesco Lecce-Chong, PYSO presents An American in Paris. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4872. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY’S YOUNG ARTIST COMPETITION. Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

TUE 16 WALNUT GRILL. RML Jazz. Shadyside. 412-638-6941.

TUE 16 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Joe Sheehan. Downtown. 412-456-6666. REX THEATER. Big Sam’s Funky Nation. South Side. 412-381-6811.

WED 17 ANDYS WINE BAR. Heather Kropf. Downtown. 412-773-8800. WALNUT GRILL. RML Jazz. Robinson. 412-370-9621.

ACOUSTIC SAT 13 ELWOOD’S PUB. Ms. Freddye’s Home Cookin’. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Brad Yoder, Judith Avers, Morgan Erina. Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Maria Becoates-Bey. Downtown. 412-773-8800. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Kinetic. Oakland. 412-622-3114. EMMANUEL www. per pa pghcitym EPISCOPAL CHURCH. .co ALLEGHENY ELKS Dr. James Johnson, LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Pamela Johnson, Tony Banjo Club. Wednesdays. DePaolis, Lou Schreiber & James North Side. 412-321-1834. Johnson III. Jazz at Emmanuel. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String North Side. 412-431-4090. Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Mary Ann Mangini. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Tubby Daniels, Sly Jock. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT Monroeville. 412-728-4155. & TAVERN. The Flow Band SENTI ITALIAN RESTAURANT Reggae Rockers. North Side. AND WINE BAR. The Mariko Reid 412-322-1850. Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4347.

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 17

REGGAE

www.pghcitypaper.com/ blogs/PolitiCrap

SAT 13

THU 11

FRI 12 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

ORGANIST SZABOLCS SZAMOSI. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC THU 11

MEADOWS CASINO. Mad Dog Rodeo. Washington. 724-503-1200. REX THEATER. Travelin’ McCourys. South Side. 412-381-6811.

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS. Eden Hall Bluegrass Jam. All acoustic instruments and ability levels welcome. Eden Hall Lodge dining area. Gibsonia. 412-365-1450. RIVERS CASINO. The Lava Game Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 13

FRI 12

COUNTRY FRI 12

A.O.H. DIVISION 23. Molly Alphabet. Lawrenceville. 412-657-0635.

TUE 16 CLUB CAFE. Noam Pikelny w/ Kristin Andreassen. South Side. 412-431-4950. STAGE AE. Anderson East w/ Andrew Combs. North Side. 412-229-5483.

CLASSICAL FRI 12 KAMRATON. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Romeo & Juliet Overture, Wagner’s “Prelude und Liebestod” from his opera Tristan und Isolde, & excerpts from Bizet’s impassioned & fiery Carmen suites. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

ATLAS BOTTLE WORKS. Jen Gooch & Friends. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4248. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Motown Records Night: Valentines Edition. North Side. 412-904-3335. RIVERS CASINO. Kenny Blake Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 13 MR. SMALLS THEATER. New Sun Rising Presents: The Cultural Gumbo. W/ Raya Brass Band, DTC Organ Trio, Colonel Eagleburger’s High Stepping Good Time Band, U Prep & Mayday Marching Bands, & DJ Sets by Pandemic Pete. Millvale. 412-821-4447. RIVERS CASINO. Darryl & Kim Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 14 PITTSBURGH WINERY. Anti-Valentine’s Day w/ Juan Vasquez & Friends. Strip District. 412-566-1000.


ORDER YOUR TICKETS NOW!

*GKP\*CNN$QZ1HƂEG| 412.392.4900 | pittsburghsymphony.org VALENTINE

R omance WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY!

MEDIA SPONSOR

THE LOVE SONGS OF MARVIN HAMLISCH

This Saturday at 8:00 p.m. Francesco Lecce-Chong, conductor Doug LaBrecque, vocalist Anne Runolfsson, vocalist Jessica Lea Patty, vocalist This one-night-only concert features music from Marvin Hamlisch’s vast array of timeless, award-winning music from A Chorus Line, The Way We Were and more! PHOTO CREDIT: JOSUÉ JACOB [WIKIMEDIA COMMONS]

STEWART

FEATURING:

ANDREW REAMER, PERCUSSION JEREMY BRANSON, PERCUSSION CHRISTOPHER ALLEN, PERCUSSION EDWARD STEPHAN, TIMPANI

COPELAND E OF TH

POLICE

PERFORMING WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Friday, Feb. 19 at 8:00 p.m. Sunday Feb. 21 at 2:30

Marcelo Lehninger, conductor Stewart Copeland, percussion Copeland: Trapset & Percussion Concerto No. 1, “The Tyrant’s Crush”

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION SATURDAY, FEB. 27, 2016 • 8:00 P.M. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL, OAKLAND

(Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra commission/world premiere)

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 1

MANFRED HONECK, MUSIC DIRECTOR

WINDBORNE’S

JENNIFER KOH, VIOLINIST • WILLIAM D. CABALLERO, HORN GEORGE VOSBURGH, TRUMPET • CRAIG KNOX, TUBA

THE MUSIC OF

In 1896, Grover Cleveland had settled into his second term. The Dow Jones Average was established. F. Scott Fitzgerald was born. John Philip Sousa penned “The Stars and Stripes Forever.” And on February 27, 1896, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra «>Þi`ˆÌÃÛiÀÞwÀÃ̘œÌiÃ>Ã>˜i˜Ãi“Li°

Saturday, Feb. 20 at 8:00 p.m.

Brent Havens, conductor • Brody Dolyniuk, vocalist The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and a full rock band perform Led Zeppelin’s classic songs like “Stairway to Heaven,” “Kashmir,” “Black Dog” and more in a brilliant combination of passion and power!

>Ã̇vœÀÜ>À`iÝ>V̏Þ£ÓäÞi>ÀÃ̜̅i`>Þœv̅>ÌwÀÃÌ«iÀvœÀ“>˜Vi>˜`̅i*ˆÌÌÃLÕÀ}… Symphony returns to the spot where it all began – Oakland’s Carnegie Music Hall – for a commemorative concert to celebrate this historic milestone. The Pittsburgh Symphony will «iÀvœÀ“È}˜ˆwV>˜Ì«ˆiViÃvÀœ“ˆÌÃ…ˆÃ̜ÀÞ]ˆ˜VÕ`ˆ˜}ܜÀŽÃ«iÀvœÀ“i`>Ì̅iwÀÃÌVœ˜ViÀÌ in 1896. Guest artist Jennifer Koh, violin, Principal Horn William D. Caballero, Principal Trumpet George Vosburgh and Principal Tuba Craig Knox will be featured on the program, which includes music from Andre Previn, Beethoven and Leonard Bernstein, among others.

TICKETS START AT $20!

BRING YOUR GROUP AND SAVE! N E W S

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BROTHER ACT

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

THEIR DAILY SURVIVAL DEPENDS ON THEIR EFFICIENCY IN KILLING THEIR OWN PEOPLE

A quarter century after their acrid Barton Fink, Joel and Ethan Coen finally do Hollywood right — or wrong. Set in 1951, Hail, Caesar! revolves around a credulous leading man (George Clooney) kidnapped by Commies who serve finger sandwiches, and a beset studio head (Josh Brolin) who loves his job nonetheless. Shot in shimmering faux Technicolor, the farce that unfolds is at once fanciful and far-fetched. Along the way, the Coens lampoon movie genres, gossip columnists, Hollywood types and, of course, religion (especially the one they left behind).

MAN IN THE MACHINE

When in “Rome”: George Clooney

CP APPROVED

All of the actors — Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Frances McDormand, Scarlett Johansson — nail it. Alden Ehrenreich is so good as a cowboy actor that I need to see him in something else to decide if he’s really like that. And it turns out Channing Tatum isn’t Magic Mike. He’s Gene Kelly, and his musical number about sailors and dames may be the most exuberant passage in the Coens’ oeuvre. If it seems like the Coens bite the hand that feeds them, I’d say they’ve nourished Hollywood more than Hollywood has nourished them. Like a movie star, Hail, Caesar! has charisma even when it’s too transparent. But I laughed more than I scowled, and I’m still smiling at a clever movie — more affectionate sendup than satire — that’s as warm and sincere as it is mordant and ridiculous. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

They say everything in fashion comes around again, so, of course, here, 15 years later, is Zoolander 2. Ben Stiller’s comedy catches up with Derek and Hansel, the beautiful boys of the runway, as they fend off competition from another agency. Stiller, Owen Wilson and Penelope Cruz star. Starts Fri., Feb. 12

{BY AL HOFF}

E

VERY MACHINE is made up of smaller parts working together. László Nemes’ Son of Saul looks at the mass-extermination machine that was Auschwitz, in 1944. His extraordinarily confident debut feature tackles difficult subject matter, and from a fresh angle: two days in the life of one of the death camp’s cogs. The Hungarian Saul (Géza Röhrig) works in the Sonderkommando, a group of Jewish prisoners who toil for a few months in the death houses before being killed. Their daily survival depends on their efficiency in killing their own people. The searing and intimate film opens during the course of a normal workday. Saul hustles prisoners from the train into the promised “hot showers.” As screams come from the gas chambers, the Sonderkommando sort through the discarded clothing, separating valuables. The dead are pulled from the chamber, which is scrubbed clean. The bodies — called “pieces” by the Germans — are

Saul (Géza Röhrig), on the job

taken to a crematorium, and still later, those ashes are carted to the river for disposal. It’s a brutally efficient process of completely disappearing people. But in the course of this one morning, Saul discovers a boy in the gas chamber whom he claims to recognize; the relationship is not explicitly clarified, nor does it matter. He hides the corpse and

SON OF SAUL DIRECTED BY: László Nemes STARRING: Géza Röhrig In various languages, with subtitles Starts Fri., Feb. 12. Regent Square

CP APPROVED seeks among the condemned for a rabbi to provide a proper burial. This act of sparing just one “piece” from the indignity of the mass cremation is undertaken in the tiny moments that the death machine sputters or rests. Throughout the film, the camera stays

close to Saul, as if hovering on his shoulder, so we are privy to both his perspective and his reactions. The focus is shallow, so that backgrounds are vaguely out of eyesight. Sounds and dialogue beyond Saul’s immediate areas are also somewhat muffled. It reinforces Saul’s coping mechanism, as he just robotically undertakes his job, emotionless, and without the will (or capacity) to take in the wider horror. Similarly, there is no backstory nor much broader narrative exposition beyond what is happening that day. Son of Saul is as grim as you’d expect from such material, but it is also resolutely affirming. People do live through the unimaginable and, like Saul, can find a way to reconnect to their humanity. Keeping the dead boy from the crematorium is foolhardy and ultimately inconsequential, but it is also an act of defiance and love. It is a small gesture that restores the humane order lost in the genocide, and grants Saul a transcendent victory over the evil he has been conscripted into. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

SPOTLIGHT. This excellent 2015 docudrama recounts how The Boston Globe uncovered the child-sex-abuse scandal in the Catholic Church. Tom McCarthy’s slow-build ensemble drama begins in 2001, when a new managing editor, Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber), assigns the story to Spotlight, an in-house team of three investigative reporters (Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, Brian d’Arcy James) led by editor Walter Robinson (Michael Keaton). It begins simply as a story about one accused priest, but soon grows to staggering breadth, ultimately documenting dozens of clergy. It is explosive subject matter, presented soberly as an investigative procedural. But the downbeat material is matched by a quiet celebration that the dogged pursuit of the truth can and should matter, and that journalists, given resources, can provide this necessary check on power. Starts Fri., Feb. 12. Hollywood (AH)

CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK DEADPOOL. The laughs started early at the Deadpool screening, with opening credits that promised: “some hot chick,” “a British villain,” “a CGI character” and “a gratuitous cameo.” And truly, Tim Miller’s adaptation of the Marvel comic did deliver all that and more. Deadpool offers a minimal story: Seeking a medical cure, a guy named Wade (Ryan Reynolds) gets deformed and super-strong, becomes “Deadpool,” and then tracks down the guy (Ed Skrein) who messed him up. But it’s told in a series of flashbacks, explanatory rambles, breaks for quipping and frequent bursts through the fourth wall. Wade/Deadpool addresses the audience directly, commenting on what we’re watching, the Marvel Cinematic Universe and The XMen movies, explicitly. (Even a superhero from differently branded universe gets a nod.) Understandably, the more a viewer knows about the MCU and superhero tropes, the better the inside jokes will play. But I’m an infrequent visitor to the MCU and still found plenty that was amusing. Superhero films have become so bloated lately with their own sense of self-importance that this skewering, however silly and vulgar, is welcome. Reynolds redeems his Green Lantern debacle (he still looks good in the colorful spandex), and Silicon Valley’s T.J. Miller steals every scene as Deadpool’s deadpan friend. (And, wait — Leslie Uggams is in this?!) The film is definitely R-rated for violence, nudity and language. If you bring the kids, be ready to explain the jokes about pegging, teabagging and Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret. (Al Hoff) HOW TO BE SINGLE. Four ladies take on the challenge of being single in New York City in this comedy directed by Christian Ditter. Rebel Wilson, Dakota Johnson, Alison Brie and Leslie Mann star. Starts Fri., Feb. 12 NATIONAL PARKS ADVENTURE. America’s National Parks network turns 100 this year. This new IMAX movie from MacGillivray Freeman celebrates this natural and recreational resource, taking the viewer to some of the country’s mostloved and scenic parks. Starts Fri., Feb. 12. Rangos Omnimax, Caregie Science Center, North Side. PRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND ZOMBIES. Today’s world feels overstuffed with zombie entertainment, but, gentle people, it was far worse in 19th-century England, when the land was overrun with actual zombies. So it is in Burr Steers’ adaptation of the 2009 parodic novel, which inserted a zombie subplot into the original text of Jane Austen’s comedy of manners. As a film, it’s still amusing, though likely to resonate better with Team Austen than Team Undead: Familiarity with Pride and Prejudice is helpful, and the PG-13 film doesn’t deliver the gory mayhem contemporary zombie enthusiasts demand. The main plot is still the travails of the Bennett sisters as they seek husbands, in particular the lively Lizzie’s courtship with haughty Darcy, here upgraded to a famed zombie detector and killer. The romance is played straight, and quite enjoyably by a keen cast. Downton Abbey’s Lily James plays Lizzie, and Sam Riley’s Darcy is deliciously dark and broody, with a floppy hairdo and a divine cloak-like black leather jacket. (It’s as if he’d tumbled out of an especially heartsick 1990s indie-pop band.) But in this version, the young ladies are trained in “both the female arts and deadly arts,” allowing Lizzie to deliver such arch shade

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STRETCH AND BOBBITO: RADIO THAT CHANGED LIVES. This new documentary from Bobbito Garcia chronicles his friendship with fellow DJ Stretch, and how the pair’s influential hip-hop radio show broke some of genre’s biggest stars. 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 13 (with Q&A and after-party) and 9:30 p.m. Tue., Feb. 16. Row House Cinema BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S. Blake Edwards’ 1961 film is, at its heart, still Truman Capote’s simple tale of the rootless nature of America’s then-impending future. Audrey Hepburn stars. 11 a.m. Sun., Feb. 14. Hollywood THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH. There are many ways to approach Nicolas Roeg’s 1976 cult classic starring David Bowie as a copper-haired space alien; perhaps the readiest is as a grandiose parable of rock-star degeneration. In one reel, Bowie’s mysterious Mr. Newton goes from solitary nobody to technology tycoon. He lives reclusively: “My life is not secret, but it’s private.” But eventually the distractions of affluence drag him down: The ascetic Newton turns to gin, sex and the comfortably numbing pleasures of 20 TVs to watch at once. But those are just the bare narrative bones of this iconic film. The gorgeous 140-minute director’s cut showcases Roeg’s visionary widescreen style, stuffed with symbol, implication, crazy sets and memorably surreal interludes. 8 p.m. Sun., Fri., Feb. 14, and 8 p.m. Sun., Feb. 21. Regent Square (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

Where To Invade Next

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

as “I would trade my Shaolin training for nothing.” In fact, the social intrigue is so pleasurable — Matt Smith kills as the hapless cousin Collins — that I was irked when a particularly fruitful bit of repartee was interrupted by a zombie. (And it made me wish the increasingly tedious Walking Dead had more icily witty banter.) The film’s final third is more action-intensive, but thankfully, there is also a wedding — as there should be. (AH)

polemics that already discourage such discussions from happening in a constructive fashion. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 12 (AH)

WHERE TO INVADE NEXT. Michael Moore’s previous film essay was 2009’s Capitalism: A Love Story. He’s back with this new documentary that compares and contrasts various aspects of American institutional life to that of other countries. So Moore visits Italy to learn about its liberal vacation policies, France for healthful school lunches, Slovenia for free college, Norway for nice prisons and so on. Some of the material is anecdotal, and Moore often seems to be reaching for the polar extremes to make his ratherobvious points. For instance, Norwegian prisoners sunbathing on a lawn is paired with footage of American prison guards beating an inmate. The film’s prevailing gimmick has Moore “invading” other countries to steal their best ideas. It isn’t that funny to start with and really wears thin over this nearly two-hour movie. And way at the end is Moore’s buried lede — that most of these ideas other countries borrowed from us in the first place. (I just wanted to reach into the film, compress and re-arrange it!) There is some provocative material, and the occasional laugh, though Moore’s silliness seems at odds with the seriousness of his purpose. Unquestionably, these differences in how various countries address critical quality-of-life issues like health care, education and criminal justice should be aired and debated. But Moore’s film too often feels like the one-side

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REPERTORY SEX AND THE CITY. Michael Patrick King’s 2008 film catches up with the four fashionable best-gal-pals, who are now variously married, settled and sort-of looking. The big news is: Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker) and Mr. Big (Chris Noth) are getting hitched. At its best, Sex and the City is funny and touching, just like the HBO TV series, and pleasingly familiar to its fans. At its worst, it’s five episodes strung together, like a holiday-weekend “marathon.” The acting is uniformly strong, and each supporting star has a moment or two. Parker, of course, gets many more. She runs the gamut beautifully, and Noth, so often without charm or depth as Big on TV, finally gives us reason to see why Carrie loves him. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 10. AMC Loews. $5 (Harry Kloman)

MANNEQUIN. Michael Gottlieb directs this 1987 comedy about a guy who falls in love with the mannequin he created. Andrew McCarthy and Kim Cattrall star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 17. AMC Loews. $5

AMELIE. Audrey Tatou stars in this whimsical 2001 French romantic comedy, set in Paris. Feb. 12-18. Row House Cinema SOME LIKE IT HOT. On the run from the mob during Prohibition, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon dress as women to travel incognito with an all-girl band, in Billy Wilder’s classic 1959 comedy. Feb. 12-18. Row House Cinema THE NOTEBOOK. This 2004 romance is adapted from the Nicholas Sparks novel, and stars Ryan Gosling, Rachel McAdams, James Garber and Gena Rowlands. Can love triumph over class differences and memory loss? Feb. 12-15 and Feb. 17-18. Row House Cinema

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Carol (2015) 2/10 @ 7pm, 2/11 @ 9:30pm, 2/12 @ 10pm, 2/13 @ 9:30pm, 2/14 @ 4pm, 2/15 @ 9:30pm, 2/16 @ 7pm - Six Oscar nominations, including Best Actress and Cinematography.

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Brew Cinema:

Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit

(2005) 1/28 @ 7pm Local beer, an exclusive poster, and the movie!

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Spotlight

(2015) 2/12 @ 7:30pm, 2/13 @ 7pm, 2/14 @ 7:30pm, 2/15 @ 7pm, 2/16 @ 9:30pm - A gripping story, fantastic cast, and multiple Oscar nominations.

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Breakfast and a Movie - 2/14 @ 10:30am Featuring the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961). Buy tickets by 2/11 for delicious catered brunch.

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[DANCE REVIEW]

THEY CONTINUE TO BE CONTROVERSIAL AND OFTEN DIFFICULT OR IMPOSSIBLE TO LOVE

SENSE-ITIVE {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY performs FIVE. Continues through Sun., Feb. 14. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $20-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

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Point Park University Conservatory Dance Company’s Five {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

For a dancer, a career-ending injury can be one of life’s most traumatic events, altering one’s perception of self and miring the future in uncertainty. That was the case for Point Park University dance-department chair Rubén Graciani, who in 2013 suffered career-ending injuries while creating a work for his Saratoga Springs, N.Y.-based RG Dance Projects. His experiences inspired Five, a new abstract contemporary-dance work that journeys from trauma to hopefulness. Five, choreographed by Graciani in collaboration with Point Park faculty member Kiesha Lalama, is set inside the mind of a dancer in the throes of a lifealtering experience such as Graciani’s. It’s set to a mix of classical and contemporary music with live accompaniment by Pittsburgh’s Bach Choir, and performed by the university’s Conservatory Dance Company. Five’s opening act introduced the main characters, with Christian Warner as the troubled Man and Alex Hathaway as his Conscience, an unflinching jailor who forced him to face his fears. Time and again, Warner struggled to flee from his anguish, symbolized onstage by a group of dancers controlled by Hathaway. Warner also found himself at times physically bound to his situation by a long red strap that prevented his escape. (Note: Four performances of Five remain; on Feb. 12, and at the 2 p.m. performance on Feb. 13, the roles of Woman and Conscience will be danced by Hailey Turek and Skylar Schultz.) While Graciani and Lalama’s choreography created some powerful moments, the first act was a bit one-note. Its best moments came with Warner in a frantic struggle with Hathaway, winding and unwinding himself in the red strap as the choir sang composer Carl Orff’s ominous “O Fortuna” from Carmina Burana, and in a wonderfully musical fourth scene choreographed by Lalama and danced with verve by CDC’s dancers. Five’s second act proved a bit more varied and interesting, with the introduction of a talented group of dancers representing the five senses. They awaken Warner’s character to the possibilities of life and turn his Conscience from bully to comrade, instilling feelings of happiness and hopefulness for the future. Warner and Hathaway, along with Kendra Epik as the “sense of hearing” and Aviva Gomes as the “sense of sight,” were standouts in this emotional if oversimplified story.

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

T

HE CURATORS might have called this exhibition “Representing the Modern,” for the many images and materials through which Pittsburgh’s postWorld War II architecture and planning are illustrated. Similarly, it might have been “Constructing the Modern,” for the familiar double meaning that we construct ideas as much as the buildings themselves. But this show at the Carnegie Museum of Art’s Heinz Architectural Center is titled Imagining the Modern. Place yourself at the beginning of this era, it seems to ask, when these buildings were new ideas or recently completed projects. Abandon your preconceptions and look afresh. The title could also just as easily have been “Modernism? What were they thinking?” Certainly, the vogue for the breezy and unencumbered architecture and design of the Mad Men era, at least in smallerscale works, has outlasted the long-running

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

{PHOTO BY NEWMAN-SCHMIDT STUDIOS, COURTESY OF DIRECTOR’S DISCRETIONARY FUND}

Workmen installing the first aluminum panel on Downtown’s Alcoa Building, 1951

TV show. In fact, the Carnegie currently offers four simultaneous exhibits celebrating modern subjects, and it schedules accompanying events and promotions with overt Mad Men themes. On the other hand, postwar Pittsburgh, to say nothing of the rest of the nation, was the era of Urban Renewal.

IMAGINING THE MODERN continues through May 2. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

From the Civic Arena, in the Lower Hill, to Allegheny Center, on the North Side, to Penn Circle Towers, in East Liberty, the major architectural projects were frequently over-scaled destroyers of traditional neighborhoods. They continue to be controversial and often difficult or impossible to love

amid their troubled persistence or contentious removal. The curators of this show are four principals from the Boston-based firm over, under, which has its own gallery space and has put on dozens of exhibitions. Two of its principals, Rami el Samahy and Mark Pasnik, have spent months or years in residence in Pittsburgh teaching in the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University. Pasnik, along with the other two principals, Mark Kubo and Chris Grimley, has researched the Boston architecture of this era (don’t call it Brutalist) and written a book entitled, with intentional irony, Heroic. So this group is well suited to a rigorously researched and intellectually charged engagement of the subject. They navigate the challenges of postwar Pittsburgh through a few notable strategies. They use an enormous amount of material. A section on the era’s photography could


be an entire exhibition on its own. In addition to placing some rare period brochures of architecture and planning on display, they use a genuine profusion of reproductions and sometimes real, perusable editions, of daily newspapers and professional journals as explanatory material. Visitors can immerse themselves in the clash between the exuberant design professions and the skeptical, even angry daily press. The downside is that the curators have chosen as part of their intellectual stance not to comment directly on the shortcomings or errors of the era’s architectural work. “There isn’t really an explicit point of view present,” said Grimley, in a lecture introducing the exhibit. In the case of the Hill District, it is quite clear that the clearing of the neighborhood for Urban Renewal projects was a stunning social injustice. Photographs and articles showing protests of the day say so clearly. The case of Allegheny Center Mall is not so clear. The gargantuan structure resulted from the similarly notorious destruction of a traditional neighborhood. But unlike the recently destroyed Civic Arena, it remains after decades of ghostly underutilization. It is now the subject of some gentle redesign as part of its renovation into the Nova Center. To the great credit of Imagining the Modern and the ongoing HACLab program that aims to make the architectural galleries more accessible and interactive, the exhibit’s largest space became a genuine architecture studio, with el Samahy’s Carnegie Mellon students proposing redesigns of Allegheny Center. Though their semester is now over, their drawings and models are on the walls right next to works by major practitioners including Frank Lloyd Wright and Mitchell and Ritchey. Ongoing videos show the students presenting their work and explaining their investigations and design intentions. The in-house studio is an admirable and instructive display of how architects think and produce their work. In much the same way, the profusion of archival materials and information rewards people who revisit the exhibit and examine it in depth. Yet it would be suitable for the curators to deliver certain messages in this exhibit with more directness, rather than leaving visitors to do so. The gigantic scale, univalent uses and unresponsive processes of many of these projects led to urban disasters whose effects we are still struggling to correct. We don’t yet know whether our corrections of those obvious missteps will be enough to fix previous errors, or if the problems are more deeply seated in attitudes and practices that we perpetuate to this day.

[BOOK REVIEW]

LIKENESSES {BY STUART SHEPPARD}

Ekphrastic poetry is by definition descriptive — usually of a work of art — yet the worst thing it can do is merely describe. Rilke, who intimately studied Picasso’s “La famille des saltimbanques,” made it the subject of his famous “Fifth Duino Elegy.” But rather than describe the canvas, he transfigured it. He metaphorically stole the painting from the painter, and used it to create one of the most important and original poems of the 20th century. Locally based Paula Bohince’s new collection, Swallows and Waves (Sarabande Books, $14.95), comprises 60 poems based on paintings and prints from Japan’s Edo period. Its strongest creations are those which depart most from the subjects portrayed, and become not mere descriptions of art, but works of art themselves. For example, “Butterflies” is a powerful meditation on a woodblock print that inspires Bohince to begin with the startling trope: “The hole at the center / of the galaxy is a black butterfly.” Likewise, “Riverboat Party” ends with the stunning revelation: What the river, if made of hours and minutes instead

The less successful poems are those that do not stand on their own as coherent works. Some are merely descriptive exercises, and some sound forced, or worse, are codependent on their subjects. The title poem is uncomfortably abstract, with awkward line breaks, and language that issues too patently from the illustration, not its own form as a poem. In “Beauty with Cat,” we are confronted with a series of rootless images that seem stapled together, the metaphors overly contrived. There are stretches of the book in which the cumulative effect is jarring, as if the poems were written on a bumpy train. The line breaks of such pieces feel snapped-off like icy twigs. But Bohince, a talented poet, also manages to evoke brilliant lyricism, as when she states in “Rabbits in Grass under the Moon”: “The moon, she goes / thirsty sending light to drink.” Sixty compositions based on artwork is a difficult undertaking. Many of these are successful; many are not. It might have helped if the poet took greater risks, like Rilke, and used the subject matter more as a platform of departure, rather than a frame. But we should be grateful for the enlightening poetic journey this volume takes us on through the art of traditional Japan.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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of water and fish means, finally.

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CP Readers get $10 off full price tickets with code CITYCITY. BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org 1300 Bingham Street, South Side

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

TRAGIC SONG {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

THE STORY of Emmett Till is part of history,

but the truths of the death of a 14-year-old Chicagoan at the hands of two Mississippian white supremacists in 1955 remain clouded. The New Horizon Theater picks a path through the fog with the musical, sometimes magical, ultimately heroic The Ballad of Emmett Till. Yes, we “know” how the story ends, but Bayeza’s 2008 play builds a compelling drama rich with character, mystery and even humor. In the play’s Pittsburgh premiere, both the cast and the space — the Falk School’s auditorium — are small, the effect intimate. Director Lundeana M. Thomas uses live and recorded music, minimal props and a lot of imagination to recreate Till’s worlds in the North and the South, and his hard-to-contain spirit. That, Bayeza insists, was never subdued even though his body was so brutally battered. Till became the martyr who sparked the modern civil-rights movement. (Rosa Parks famously refused to give up her bus seat barely two months after Till’s killers were acquitted.) The cast: Wow. Jonathan Berry bursts with life, energy and dreams as the ebullient Till: “Bo” or “Bobo” to friends and family,” and a ghost that still haunts us today. Two women and two men portray some half-dozen characters each, including the whites and a few extra men. Camille Lowman dazzles as Ballad’s various beauties, mainly Till’s mother but also a comely young neighbor and fateful white shopkeeper, as well as a thug or two. Given the widest range to portray, Dominique Briggs succeeds as Bobo’s grandmother and her sister, a potential girlfriend and a male cousin bully. Corey Lankford handles several young men, black and white, cousins and killer. Towering over all, Sam Lothard

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICHENA BROCKINSON}

Jonathan Berry and Camille Lowman in New Horizon’s The Ballad of Emmett Till

THE BALLAD OF EMMETT TILL continues through Sun., Feb. 14. New Horizon Theater at the Falk School, 4060 Allequippa St., Oakland. $20. www.newhorizontheater.org

smear and misdescribe the dead youth, e.g., portraying Till as a sexual predator who assaulted, or at least insulted, a white woman, and claiming that the chubby, stuttering 5-foot-4-inch polio survivor was so easily mistaken for an adult. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

embodies Till’s tragic Uncle Mose, who couldn’t protect the young ’un but famously witnessed against the killers. Although the play precedes the Black Lives Matter movement, New Horizon connects the obvious dots. The parallels between Till’s fate and that of so many African-American young men are truly depressing. Apologists for the killers

RUNYONLAND {BY TED HOOVER}

IT’S ODD TO think that Damon Runyon,

once a popular New York writer and journalist, is remembered not for his actual writing, but rather a work based on it.

That would be the classic musical Guys & Dolls, with a book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, based on Runyon short stories and featuring a score by Frank Loesser. The show opened in 1950 and it’s safe to say it hasn’t been out of production since. Pittsburgh Public Theater presents its version, directed and choreographed by Ted Pappas with an energetic cast of local and national performers. Runyon was so famous that the word “Runyonesque” became a term for describing a group of low-down but endearingly cartoonish people. The reason Guys & Dolls is still being produced, however, is Loesser’s glorious score; imagine sitting there on opening night and hearing, for the first time, songs like “I’ll Know,” “Luck Be A Lady,” “Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat,” “If I Were a Bell” and my favorite Loesser tune, “Fugue for Tinhorns.” Guys & Dolls recounts the travails of two slightly shady guys, Sky Masterson and Nathan Detroit, and the dolls they’re chasing, Sarah Brown and Miss Adelaide. It all takes place in a very Runyonesque version of Midtown, with a big assortment of appropriately colorful characters. Pappas does a remarkable job fitting this show — with 1950s Broadway woven into its DNA — into a space decidedly not a ’50s Broadway house. He keeps the energy bright, and the show flies by from start to finish with plenty of snap.

GUYS & DOLLS continues through Feb. 28. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-65. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

Joel Hurt Jones is an outstanding Nathan Detroit, the perfect blend of sad sack and schemer. Kirsten Wyatt knows where every single laugh is in the character of Miss Adelaide and she never misses one of them. Kimberly Doreen Burns and Charlie Brady, as Sarah and Sky, have a

ON SALE NOW!

Twelfth Night 40

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FEBRUARY 23 & 24

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interesting relationship onstage — his underplaying, almost to the point of disinterest, is counterbalanced by her startling ferocity, though both sing with strong, clear voices. Quinn Patrick Shannon is delightful with “Sit Down,” and he and Gavan Pamer take a wonderfully engaging turn with the title tune of this entertaining show. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

MIDSUMMER OF LOVE {BY DANIELLE LEVSKY}

THE DUQUESNE Red Masquers’ adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by John Lane, is a comical dive into Shakespeare’s fairy-land.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM continues through Feb. 21. Red Masquers at the Genesius Theater, Duquesne campus, Uptown. $6.50-16.50. www.duqredmasquers.com

The stage harkens to a 1960s theme, with tie-dyed sheets around the fairies’ cave, moons and rainbows painted on the floor, and pastel canopies hanging over the audiences’ heads. However, the only characters that fit 1960s personas are the fairies and the craftsmen. The craftsmen are dressed as beatniks in all-black garb and French berets, each with a signature interpretive dance movement. The most hippie-like fairies we see are Oberon and his Puck, played by Nathaniel Yost

and Abby Blackmon, respectively, who throughout the play take hits of their joints. Although there were times that the joint-smoking worked, such as when it signaled a new bout of mischief from the tricksters, it generally felt gratuitous. The show’s opening scene was lackluster, save for a dynamic and overpowering performance by Eric Matthews as Egeus. In fact, The Athenians’ performances paled compared to that of the fairies until the four star-crossed lovers were pushed into the fairy-land. When Demetrius, played by Logan Schmucker, awoke with a newfound love for Helena, his overdramatic performance induced riotous laughter. Jeff Way portrays Nick Bottom, the overconfident craftsman, quite vividly, with an excellent stage presence and a natural delivery. Though his fellow craftsmen’s performances are less authentic, it works for the amateur nature of their roles in the craftsmen’s play. Laura Donaldson’s Titania emerges through the stage floor, then captures the stage with her regal and haughty demeanor. She delivers her lines effortlessly. Like a true Queen of Fairies, she keeps her presence commanding but with glimpses of a fiery, pixie nature. For all the positive and compelling components of this Dream, the addition of the “diva fairy backup singers,” who belt out three hits from the ’60s, adds nothing to the production. In fact, the offkey delivery of the classic songs detracts from an otherwise cohesive performance. Overall, however, this Dream has a cast of characters who work well together, and the show tickles the funny bone of every audience member.

FEB BR R UA R Y 1 2 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 6

Luke Halferty & Caroline Nicolian | Photo: Laura Petrilla

Now - April 24

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OPENING NG VALENTINE’S WEEKEND! WEEK

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FOR THE WEEK OF

02.1102.18.16

THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST PRESENTS

02.20.16

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. FEB. 13

Amish Monkeys

+ THU., FEB. 11 {COMICS}

2016 ART EXPO AND SALE

FEBRUARY 20 AUGUST WILSON CENTER 980 LIBERTY AVENUE 11AM – 8PM FREE / OPEN TO THE PUBLIC LIVE MUSIC / DJ / ART DEMONSTRATIONS INFORMATION / 412-456-6666 TRUSTARTS.ORG Unique arts showcase features the work of some of the region’s finest artists representing the African diaspora, including pottery, paintings, jewelry and sculpture that are available for sale.

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Indulge in German-style brews and original comics at Penn Brewery tonight. The Northside Comic Creators event will feature work from Pittsburgh-based cartoonists Nils Balls and Daniel McCloskey. Grab a drink and check out an array of their original comic books and posters. McCloskey’s comic book “Free Money” will be appropriately available for free. Don’t forget to get your comics signed! Courtney Linder 6 p.m. 800 Vinial St., North Side. Free. 412-237-9400 or www.PennBrew.com

its soundtrack of Bee Gees hits from “Stayin’ Alive” to “You Should Be Dancing.” Anthony Crouchelli stars as Tony. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Continues through Feb. 21. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $12.75-49.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghmusicals.com

+ FRI., FEB. 12 {SCREEN} Dreaming of Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon or even just a quiet alpine meadow? The

100-year-old National Park Service has got you covered. Get inspired to head outdoors with National Parks Adventure, a new largeformat documentary opening today at the Carnegie Science Center’s Rangos Omnimax Theater. The film takes viewers up mountains, down rivers and through arches, highlighting the many spectacular natural sights and resources in the 408-park system. AH 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $8-9. 412- 237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

{STAGE} “Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night,” a 1976 magazine article by Nik Cohn, was fairly hard-edged, and so was the film it inspired, Saturday Night Fever. Well, Cohn later admitted he fabricated the story, but by then SNF was seen (perhaps unfairly) as more of a nostalgia piece; in 1999, it became a Broadway musical. Tonight, Pittsburgh Musical Theater opens its family-friendly version of the story of Brooklyn dance king Tony Manero and his new girl, Stephanie, with

FEB. 11

Saturday Night Fever


Art by Andy Warhol. From the collection of Michael and Eva Chow

sp otlight

{PARTY} Sure, you love to dance, but you also appreciate a good night’s sleep. Or perhaps have another club to hit. The occasional shindig In Bed by Ten solves the problem: It’s a dance party that starts at 6 p.m., gets its groove on, then breaks up at 9 p.m. Tonight’s Lovefest party, at Spirit Lodge, is also a fundraiser for Assemble, the Garfield-based nonprofit that fosters learning and creativity in kids. Learning, by the way, starts with a getting a good sleep. Al Hoff 6 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. www.inbedbytenpgh.com

{ART} SPACE gallery opens a collaboration between two adventuresome local artists that itself is about combining disparate elements. In Causal Loop, David Bernabo and Blaine Siegel join “material things (wood, od, glass, metal, bone) and non-things (sound and light) into new significant forms.” The e works, abstract and otherwise, wise, take the shape of sculptures, res, video and wall pieces. The e opening reception is tonight; at 6 p.m. Wed., Feb. 17, join n Bhante Pema, of the Pittsburgh urgh Buddhist Center, at SPACE for or a guided group meditation. n. BO 6 p.m. Exhibit continues through March 27. 812 Liberty y Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-325-7723 325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org epittsburgh.org

Malaysian coast, Dragonfish tells the story of Suzy, a wife who has escaped from her smuggler husband. Tran is the recipient of the 2009 Whiting Writers’ Award and is currently a professor at the University of Chicago. Head to City of Asylum tonight for a reading and discussion followed by dessert. CL 7 p.m. 330 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free with reservation. 412-3230278 or www.cityofasylum.org

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In Bed by Ten

+ SAT., FEB. 13 {EXHIBIT} Leave behind the dreary winter weather for a g’day in the Australian Outback, where it’s summer in February. The National Aviary is hosting a new show that’s sure to shake your tail feathers: Down Under: An Australian Adventure, features Giggles, a laughing kookaburra, and other feathered Aussie natives like the palm cockatoo, rainbow lorikeet and shafttailed finch. Explore the new Kookaburra exhibit and create crafts to remind you of your Outback adventure.

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history. Her work has been featured at renowned galleries worldwide, including the Horton Gallery, in New York, and the Lincoln Museum, in Edinburgh, Scotland. As a part of CMU’s School of Art 2016 Spring Lecture Series, Eggebrecht will discuss the style and vision behind her work. CL 5 p.m. 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-2682409 or www.cmu.edu

{MUSIC}

{WORDS} S} Weaving together ogether elements of fiction and d memoir, Vu Tran created eated a set of characters that would go on to inhabit his debut novel, Dragonfish. h. Closely echoing Tran’s own life as a refugee escaping Vietnam for the

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT DAYAK}

You might know of Michael Chow as the founder of the Mr. Chow restaurants in New York and Los Angeles, or as an associate of such 1980s art-world luminaries as Andy Warhol and Keith Haring. But Chow, who was born in China, in 1939, has a complex life story that includes early ambitions to be a painter, and a father, Zhou Zinfang, who was a revered grand master of the Beijing Opera. It all comes together in Michael Chow aka Zhou Yinghua: Voice for My Father, a new exhibit at The Andy Warhol Museum. Chow recently returned to painting after a half-century hiatus; this is his first solo exhibition in the United States. (A version premiered last year, in Beijing.) The exhibit includes Chow’s 1962 paintings; portraits of Chow, painted by contemporaries including Warhol, Basquiat and Ed Ruscha; and new paintings completed for the show by Chow, in his expressionistic mixed-media style — large-scale works incorporating everything from household paint to precious metals. Perhaps mostly poignantly, Voice for My Father features vintage photos of Zhou Zinfang in stage costume. During China’s Cultural Revolution, Zhou Zinfang was persecuted by Mao’s Red Army; he died in 1975. This exhibit is a tribute by the famous son who last saw him in 1952, when he left for boarding school, in London. Bill O’Driscoll 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

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CL 11 a.m. Also 11 a.m. Sun., Feb. 14, and 11 a.m. Mon., Feb. 15. 700 Arch St., North Side. Free with admission ($13-14). 412-323-7235 or www.aviary.org

{COMEDY} If hijinks and laughs are up your y r alley, you the Amish Monkeyss will steal your heart hea at tonight’s Valentine’s Day-themed improv show. skits Filled with short ski created from audience suggestions, suggestion the PittsburghPittsburg based comedy troupe also includes include original origina games and songs song in its performances.

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The humor is typically PG-13, so don’t fret bringing the whole family to monkey at the Winchester Thurston Upper School. CL 8 p.m. 455 Morewood Ave., Shadyside. $5-9. 412-243-6464 or www.amishmonkeys.com

{ART} Delve into the surreal this evening at Carnegie Mellon University’s Kresge Theater for a discussion with artist and professor Echo Eggebrecht. Combining elements of faux-naive and surrealist art, Eggebrecht’s paintings focus on the relationships between objects and experiences, creating a meeting point between personal lives and

+ MON., FEB. 15 {WORDS} Join Emily St. John Mandel at the Carnegie Music Hall, for an evening of literature, as she discusses her poetic post-technology novel, Station Eleven. This National Book Award-nominated novel follows a troupe of Shakespearean actors traversing America after a flu pandemic. As a part of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Night Literary Evenings, St. John Mandel will provide insight on her writing process and take questions from the audience, to be followed by a booksigning in the foyer. CL 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave, Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

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Classical-music connoisseurs, is rock ’n’ roll your guilty pleasure? Then ready yourself for the dynamic duo 2CELLOS, as they play their way through an unlikely repertoire of music, including Bach and Vivaldi, but also AC/DC and Iron Maiden. 2CELLOS have been featured on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, The Tonight Show and Glee, among others shows. The Croatian cellists, Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser, rock the Benedum Center as part of their North American tour, presented by Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and the Cohen & Grigsby Trust Presents series. CL 8 p.m. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $32.25-250. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

The Ballad of Emmett Till Written by Ifa Bayeza

Directed by Dr. Lundeana M. Thomas

Through February 14th Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday at 7:30 PM Saturday and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM Chicago author Ifa Bayeza captures the powerful truths at the heart of the story, creating a soaring work of music, brilliant poetry and theatricality. Tickets: $15, $20 (Group rates for 10 or more) Email newhorizontheater@yahoo.com, call (412) 431-0773 or visit Dorsey’s Records on Frankstown Ave. For more info visit newhorizontheater.org

The Falk School/University of Pittsburgh 4060 Allequippa Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261 This production is funded in part by grants from Advancing Black Arts in Pittsburgh Program, a Partnership of The Pittsburgh Foundation and The Heinz Endowments, Allegheny Regional Asset District, Chris Moore Communications, Inc., The Heinz Endowments, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

We hear from sound artist Ricardo Iamuuri and visit a Harry Potterthemed Dinner Lab event. Check out bit.ly/ citypaperpodcast or subscribe on iTunes.

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER ALEXANDER & THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY. Presented by Stage 62. Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat., Feb. 13, 2 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 14, 2 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. THE BALLAD OF EMMETT TILL. The story of the life of Emmett Till. http://www.newhorizontheater. org/ Thu, Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 3 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Feb. 14. Falk School, University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. CIARA. Ciara is the daughter of a mob boss. She escaped a life of crime for a life of art: she runs a gallery & champions local artists, especially one whose female figures seem like goddesses. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Tue, Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 14. Javo Studios, Lawrenceville. 412-362-1713. DON’T DRESS FOR DINNER. A case of double adultery & mistaken identity over a romantic dinner. www.ggccevents.org. Feb. 12-13, 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 14, 2 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic

ROOM ON THE BROOM. The Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757. GUYS & DOLLS. Classic adventures of a witch & her cat. musical set in 1950s New York Byham and other locations. Tue, City & Havana. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Wed, Fri, 7 p.m., Thu., Feb. 11, Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 13, 2 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 28, 2 p.m. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 12. Thru Feb. 28. Pittsburgh Public Byham Theater, Downtown, & Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. other locations. 412-456-6666. LOVE LETTERS BY: A.R. GURNEY. SISTER’S EASTER CATECHISM: Childhood friends whose lifelong WILL MY BUNNY GO TO correspondence begins w/ birthday HEAVEN? Celebrate the Easter party thank you notes & Season w/ Sister as she answers summer camp postcards. the time-worn questions Romantically attached, of the season like “Why they continue to isn’t Easter the same exchange letters more day every year like than 50 years. Fri., Christmas?” & “Will www. per Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. and a p ty ci h My Bunny Go To pg Feb. 13-14, 2 p.m. South .com Heaven?” Thu, Fri, Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 8 p.m., Wed, 7 p.m., Sat., 412-831-8552. Feb. 20, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and PETER PAN. Presented by Sun., Feb. 21, 2 & 5:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Sat, Thru March 13. City Theatre, 2 & 8 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sun., South Side. 412-431-4400 x 286. Feb. 14, 12 & 4 p.m. and Sun., SOME BRIGHTER DISTANCE. Feb. 21, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, The true story of Arthur Rudolph Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE PRETTY THINGS PEEPSHOW. who was one of more than 1,500 Germans brought here after WWII. A carnival of oddities & vaudeville Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. peepshow. Mon., Feb. 15, and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 14. City 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

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COMEDY FRI 12 ARCADE ANNIVERSARY: COMIC WARS. Part of the Arcade’s 3-year anniversary weekend. A stand-up comedy gameshow hosted by Aaron Kleiber & featuring Mike Wysocki, Sean Collier, Holly Price, Ed Bailey, Mike Sasson, & more. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. ARCADE ANNIVERSARY SHOW: PLAYER ONE. Part of the Arcade’s 3-year anniversary weekend. A night of short-form improv w/ Player One, alongside sketch comedy from Frankly Scarlett, & music from Jesse LE. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BEN KRONBERG, OWEN STRAW, JEFF KONKLE. 9:30 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 13 THE AMISH MONKEYS. 8 p.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 412-587-7500. PENNY ARCADE: VALENTINE’S DAY SHOW. Arcade’s all-ages family comedy show, Penny Arcade, features improv games & collaboration stations ideal for kids 5-12 years old. 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. RANDY LUBAS, SEAN COLLIER, MATT STANTON. 7:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden, Belle Vernon. 724-379-7100. RICK SEBAK & THE ARCADE HOOTENANNY. Part of the Arcade 3-year anniversary weekend. Storytelling by WQED’s Rick Sebak & improv scenes. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 15 COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

The Exhalations Dance Theater Choreography Project 2016 is a program of new original works from young choreographers. This show is an opportunity for dancers and choreographers who work in other professions to hone their craft on stage and share their talents in dance. 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 13, and 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 14. KellyStrayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $19.98. www.kelly-strayhorn.org

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY CITY HISTORIC GALLERY. Historical images & items forcusing on the North Side of Pittsburgh. North Side. 412-321-3940. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures: Jamie Earnest: Private Spaces / Public Personas. 3 new large-scale paintings that incorporate details from the private, residential spaces of both Andy Warhol & Michael Chow. Michael Chow aka Zhou Yinghua: Voice for My Father. 3 main bodies of work which include new paintings completed expressly for The Warhol show, vintage photographs of the artist’s father Zhou Xinfang, a grand master of the Beijing Opera & a collection of portraits of Chow painted by his contemporaries, such as Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat & Ed Ruscha, linking his practice w/ the contemporary art communities of London, New York & Los Angeles. North Side. 412-237-8300. CHROMOS EYEWEAR. Waxed Abstraction. Work by Marlene Boas inspired by the psyche. Lawrenceville. 412-477-4540. FRAMEHOUSE. En Plein Air. Feating work by Barbra K. Bush, Ron Donoughe, Sondra Rose Hart, Patrick Lee, Constance Merriman, William Pfahl & Barry Shields. Opening reception Feb. 12, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. SPACE. Causal Loop. Sculptural work, video pieces & wall pieces by Blaine Siegel & David Bernabo, who transform & join material things like wood, glass, metal, bone & non-things like sound & light into new significant forms. Opening Feb. 12. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

937 LIBERTY AVE. Humanae/ I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Fibers Fiction. Encaustic handmade papers w/ embellished stitching by Katy DeMent. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOCK-TOTT GALLERY. 5 Artists: A Collection of Works. Works in various mediums by Brandy Bock-Tott, Jeffrey Phelps, Linda Breen, Joyce Werwie Perry & Cindy Engler. Sewickley. 412-519-3377. BOXHEART GALLERY. 15th Annual Art Inter/National Exhibition. Twenty-two powerful visual storytellers that are changing our world w/ imaginative imagery of wisdom, beauty, & truth. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public

officials & business leaders. Silver to Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk. Displaying the work of 60s German emigre & Pittsburgh industrial design Peter Muller-Munk, who started as a silversmith at Tiffany’s. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Tony Havrilla. Paintings utilizing high contrast & perspective to create images that blur the line between realism & abstraction. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONCEPT ART GALLERY. Douglas Cooper: Graphic Pittsburgh. 11 panoramic charcoal drawings of Pittsburgh. Regent Square. 412-242-9200. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. The Cranberry Artists Network Members Show. Work from over 70 members of the Cranberry Artists Network. www.cranberryartistsnetwork. com. Cranberry. DELANIE’S COFFEE. Double Mirror. 40+ artists displaying their works. South Side. 412-927-4030. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Fast Cars & Femmes Fatales:

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#LaterBurgh Evening photographs of Pittsburgh by City Paper intern @AaronWarnick

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artifacts & exhibits on the FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Allegheny Valley’s industrial Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. Run. 724-329-8501. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Army of the Republic served local Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on Civil War veterans for over 54 years the 18th Century Frontier. During & is the best preserved & most the mid-18th century, thousands intact GAR post in the United of settlers of European & African States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. descent were captured by Native BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large Americans. Using documentary collection of automatic rollevidence from 18th & early 19th played musical instruments & century sources, period imagery, & music boxes in a mansion setting. artifacts from public & private colCall for appointment. O’Hara. lections in the U.S. and Canada, the 412-782-4231. exhibit examines the practice of BOST BUILDING. Collectors. captivity from its prehistoric roots Preserved materials reflecting to its reverberations in modern the industrial heritage of Native-, African- & Euro-American Southwestern PA. Homestead. communities. Reconstructed fort 412-464-4020. houses museum of Pittsburgh CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. history circa French & Indian War & The Propeller Group: The Living American Revolution. Downtown. Need Light, the Dead Need Music. 412-281-9285. A video based exhibition that looks FRICK ART & HISTORICAL at colorful, spirited funeral tradiCENTER. Ongoing: tours of tions in Vietnam & New Orleans. Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes Oakland. 412-622-3131. & programs for all ages. Point CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF Breeze. 412-371-0600. NATURAL HISTORY. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour Pterosaurs: Flight in the this Tudor mansion & Age of Dinosaurs. Rare stable complex. Enjoy fossils, life-size models & hikes & outdoor hands-on interactives to activities in the www. per immerse visitors in the surrounding park. pa pghcitym winged reptiles’ Jurassic Allison Park. .co world. Dinosaurs in Their 412-767-9200. Time. Displaying immersive KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the environments spanning the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mesozoic Era & original fossil Mill Run. 724-329-8501. specimens. Permanent. Hall of KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems Tours of a restored 19th-century, & precious stones from all middle-class home. Oakmont. over the world. Population Impact. 412-826-9295. How humans are affecting MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection the environment. Oakland. includes jade & ivory statues from 412-622-3131. China & Japan, as well as Meissen CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. H2Oh! Experience kinetic MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY water-driven motion & discover LOG HOUSE. Historic homes the relations between water, open for tours, lectures & more. land & habitat. How do everyday Monroeville. 412-373-7794. decisions impact water supply NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters & the environment? Ongoing: of the Sky. Explore the power & Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), grace of the birds who rule the Miniature Railroad & Village, sky. Majestic eagles, impressive USS Requin submarine & more. condors, stealthy falcons and their North Side. 412-237-3400. friends take center stage! Home to CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL more than 600 birds from over 200 HISTORY. Explore the complex species. W/ classes, lectures, demos interplay between culture, nature & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 Garfield. 412-223-7698. rooms helping to tell the story CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. PITTSBURGH. TapeScape 2.0. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. A play exhibit/art installation, 412-624-6000. designed by Eric Lennartson, that OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church uses more than 10 miles of tape features 1823 pipe organ, stretched over steel frames to Revolutionary War graves. Scott. create twisting tunnels & curving 412-851-9212. walls for children to crawl OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. through & explore. North Side. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion 412-322-5058. site features log house, blacksmith COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ shop & gardens. South Park. costumed guides feat. this restored 412-835-1554. stagecoach stop. North Versailles. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY 724-238-4983. MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. DEPRECIATION LANDS Includes displays, walking tours, MUSEUM. Small living history gift shop, picnic area & Trolley museum celebrating the settlement Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. & history of the Depreciation PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor

FULL LIST ONLINE

rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. A display of orchids & bonsai. Garden Railroad. Model trains chug through miniature landscapes populated w/ living plants, whimsical props & fun interactive buttons. Runs through Feb. 28. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. Displaying 660 different movie cameras, showing pictures on glass, many hand-painted. The largest display of 19th Century photographs in America. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & cokemaking in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910. WILLIAM PITT UNION. Erroll Garner Exhibition. The display will feature materials from the Erroll Garner archive. Oakland. 412-648-7814.


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The Photographs of Jacques Henri Lartigue. A 125 photos that document the life in the Belle-Époque & early-20thcentury France. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Not Enough Time. Inside The Artists’ Studios. Artist/Owner Ellen Chisdes Neuberg moves her studio into the gallery for six weeks & paints live during regular business hours. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Redfishbowl Collective Artists’ Showcase. Recent Works from the Redfishbowl Collective. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HOLOCAUST CENTER OF PITTSBURGH. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy Project. A photographic/ multimedia exhibit honoring & commemorating local Holocaust survivors. North Side. 412-421-1500. JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Jane Haskell: Drawing in Light. An exhibition of 30 sculptures, paintings & drawings by the artist. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. MARTHA GAULT ART GALLERY. A Collaboration of Creativity, Two Masters: David C. Driskell, Master Artist & Curlee R. Holton, Master Printmaker. Works on paper from their collaboration over 10 years, artistic careers, in mediums including aquatint, collage, drawing, etching, lithograph & serigraph. Slippery Rock. 724-738-2020. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal & Marnie Weber created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach

DANCE FRI 12 - SUN 14 FIVE. Five takes us inside the minds & senses of the dancers to reflect on the difficult choices we make every day. Performed w/ a live choir. Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 14 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

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to the creative process. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Maximum Minimum In Unum. Exhibiting artists whose work eludes maximalist or minimalist classification. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MONROEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Close to Home. An exhibition by Murrysville resident & artist Bob Bickers. Monroeville. 412-372-0500. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. 3d@mgg2. Local glass artists will be joined by artists working in various 3d media –metal, fiber, wood & ceramic. The artists include brian engel, edric florence, jason forck, glen gardner, rae gold, laura beth konopinski, kevin o’toole, michael smithhammer & laura tabakman. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. Like a Body Without Skin. Work by Fiona Amundsen addressing the relationships between steel manufacturing industries & their mobilization into a united national front that produced everything from planes to bombs during WWII. North Side. 412-322-2224. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Winter Blues Art Show. Work by local amateur & professional artists in oil, pastel, watercolor, fiber, stoneware & other media. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Verse Envisioned. Poems from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette & works of art they have inspired. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. Shantytown. Twelve pictures & the only ones in existence from the Great Depression in 1930s of what is now the Strip District. See touching middle-class people living in poor shacks, but taking great steps to keep their style & cleanliness intact. Plus 30,000 other photos of History. North Side. 412-231-7881.

PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. In the Air: Visualizing what we breath. Photographs that show the effects of western PA’s air quality. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Lifeforms. An exhibition of the best biological glass models made in the spirit of the famous 19th & 20th century models of invertebrates & plants made by Rudolf & Leopold Blaschka for the Harvard University’s Botanical Museum. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 16: Projects by Ka-Man Tse & Aaron Blum. Two solo exhibitions from our International Award & Keystone Award winners, selected from an open call for entries in mid-2015. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. The Invisible One. Insight into the loneliness & confusion felt by stigmatized individuals. The three artists on display present hope for awareness, action & understanding through a variety of works composed of wood, fiber, clay & mixed media. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Poetic Logic: Collage & Assemblage. This national juried exhibition will showcase artists working in collage, assemblage & other processes of incorporating elements of repurposed materials as a way of expressing our contemporary experience. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

of Pittsburgh presented by Exhalations Dance Theatre. Feb. 1314, 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

that only the ‘burgh is capable of. First come, first-served. 6 p.m. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

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THU 11 BRETT KIESEL: SHEAR DA BEARD. Brett Keisel shaves to benefit the cancer programs at Children’s Hospital. Musical guests Donnie Iris & Gene the Werewolf. Mingle w/ all of Keisel’s buddies & teammates for a special evening

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3RD ANNUAL BOYCE PARK SHOOTOUT. Skiing & snowboarding races for men & women, ages 18 & older. Registration fee benefits the ski patrol & canned goods will be donated to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 12 p.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 724-327-0338.

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CUPIDS & CANINES. A Montecarlo night w/ hors d’oeuvres, live music & casino games to benefit the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society & the Bow Wow Buddies Foundation. The Lexus Club. www.cupidsandcanines.org 7:30-11 p.m. PNC Park, North Side. 412-323-5000. CUPIDS UNDIE RUN. 1.5 mile run in your bedroom-best, raising money for The Children’s Tumor Foundation. 12 p.m. McFadden’s, North Side. 724-205-1115. HAVE A HEART DONATIONS DRIVE FOR BUTLER COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY. Live music by Jim & Debbie Tobin, gift basket drawing, refreshments. 1 p.m. Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION! A red carpet gala Oscar preview night to benefit the library. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. SOLIDARITY: A FUNDRAISER FOR PAAR. Raise funds for Pittsburgh Action Against Rape while also being pampered for Valentine’s Day w/ a skincare analysis & consultation. http://paar. net/ 10 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. DoubleTree Hotel, Downtown. 412-281-5800.

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JENNIFER JACKSON BERRY & DORALEE BROOKS. Readings from the authors. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030.

CREATIVE INK TEEN WRITING WORKSHOP. No writing experience necessary. Registration required. Mon, 6-7:15 p.m. Thru March 7 Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 13 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

TUE 16 STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

KIDSTUFF SUN 14 ART IN THE AFTERNOON: MONOCHROME MARVELS. Children ages 4 & up & their families can explore art & stories. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BE MY BIRDIE VALENTINE. Create a “bird-friendly” ornament out of bird seed & natural materials to hang on trees outside the Environmental Learning Center. Also decorate heart cookies to take home. Environmental Learning Center. 1-3 p.m. Harrison Hills Park, Natrona Heights. 724-295-3570.

SUN 14 LOVE OF FRIENDS. DJ Diana Boss & DJ QUEEN YAS QUEEN, pizza, a drink ticket & dancing. Tickets can be purchased at www. ppwp.org. Hosted by Planned Parenthood of Western PA’s Young Leadership Council. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Spirit Hall & Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

WED 17 ONCE UPON A WEDNESDAY. Each week, a new fairy tale will be introduced as well as an accompanying craft. This creative program is geared for ages 4 & under, but all are welcome to attend. Registration required. Wed, 10:30 a.m. Thru April 27 Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255.

OUTSIDE THU 11 NORTH PARK THURSDAY ADULT NATURE WALK. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

WED 17 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or CONTINUES ON PG. 48

POLITICS THU 11 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 11 3 POEMS BY.. A discussion of three poems by Yona Harvey. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. NILS BALLS, DANIEL MCCLOSKEY. Signing comic books, drinking & drawing. 6-8 p.m. Penn Brewery, North Side. 412-237-9400 x120. RACHEL ZUCKER. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125.

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{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

*Stuff We Like

shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 11

Feminist Sticker Club

{PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

Sign up and get stylin’ stickers with femalepositive messages. It’s just $2.50 a month, and 10 percent goes to support feminist causes. www.feministstickerclub.com

Seldom Seen Greenway This green space on the border of Beechview and Mount Washington lives up to its name. A hilly mile-long hike ends near a creek and an old bridge.

A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. HALLOWED GROUNDS TOUR. A public 90-minute tour highlights a number of African American “firsts” that occurred on campus. Common Room. Contact wdonehue@pitt.edu. 11:45 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-621-9339. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. INTRODUCTION TO BUYING YOUR FIRST HOME. Join Realtor Kassie Cable for an introduction to the home buying process followed by a Q&A session. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. IRS TAX DAY. Representatives from the Pittsburgh IRS office will be on hand for mini tax presentations and to answer your tax law questions. 9 a.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MAKENIGHT (21+): MY SNARKY VALENTINE. Make valentines, have a drink & explore the museum. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MLK KEYNOTE LECTURE W/ JELANI COBB. The Half Life of Freedom: Race & Justice in America Today. 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-268-2075. RADICAL TRIVIA. Thu, 9 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668. TRIVIA NIGHT. Thu, 7 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

FRI 12

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. MOBILE BUSINESS ON THE MOVE. Part of the The Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series. James Laughlin Music Hall. 7:30-9:30 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253.

Maggie’s Farm Rum Distillery If you can’t make it to the Caribbean this winter, find your rum in Pittsburgh’s Strip District. Sip on rum cocktails at the distillery where you can also buy bottles of white rum, spiced rum or reserve spirits. 3212A Smallman St. www.maggiesfarmrum.com

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

SAT 13 6TH ANNUAL AFRICANAMERICAN HERITAGE CELEBRATION. Retired Soldiers & Sailors Historian John L. Ford, Sr., will moderate the panel discussion of speakers including Sergeant

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Rec Room: Winter Games at Spirit Lodge, Lawrenceville CRITIC: Carolina McVeagh, 29, a graduate student from Swissvale WHEN:

Sun., Feb. 07 [The Winter Games] are something to do in the winter when everyone is stuck inside. It’s a good blend of adults having good old-fashioned fun and a place for children. Kids play, adults play, and sometimes there’s adult swim because it get can a little intense. “Stump” is definitely for adults only — it involves flipping a hammer. For the kids, there’s gaga, a type of Israeli dodgeball. Then there’s also bucket pong, which is reminiscent of beer pong but with sand in buckets. Who doesn’t like to throw things? There’s also a game that combines Ping Pong with kickball. Instead of a small ball, you use your body. For people with kids, it’s so hard to get out and socialize, so this is a great way to not have to come up with your own plans. I love watching the kids rock the parents at games — you can really see their pride. B Y C O U RT N E Y L I N D E R

PITTSBURGH BALLROOM E-5 Charles E. Culliver, U.S. Army DANCE. Nightclub two-step Retired, Commander Leon lesson & open dancing. 7 p.m. McClain, Jr., U.S. Coast Guard & Teutonia Mannerchor, North Side. Staff Sergeant Paul Johnson U.S. 412-423-6144. Army 1 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Memorial Hall, Oakland. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing 412-621-4253. follows. No partner needed. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. Oakland. 412-683-2669. 412-683-5670. CELEBRITY NAME GAME: SECOND SATURDAY ART AFRICAN AMERICAN EDITION. WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry Test your knowledge of famous making, painting, cartooning, African Americans past & present puppet making, quilting, more. & compete for super cool prizes Second Sat of every month Trust like library swag and gift cards. Arts Education Center, 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-471-6079. Downtown. 412-281-7141. SECOND SATURDAY EMPTY BOWLS OPEN AT THE SPINNING STUDIO. An open PLATE. Art exhibits w/ studio session to make various musical, literary & glaze bowls for the www. per a p & artistic performances. Empty Bowl Fundraiser pghcitym o .c Second Sat of every in March. Registration month Spinning Plate is recommended. 1-4 p.m. Gallery, Friendship. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. Free Scrabble games, all levels. MAGICIAN LEE Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon TERBOSIC. Part of the Arcade Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 3-year anniversary weekend. Feat. 412-531-1912. a headlining set by nationallySTEEL CITY BOOGIE CLUB known magician Lee Terbosic, musical improv from Missy Moreno, VALENTINE DANCE. 8 p.m. Cranberry Elks, Cranberry. & more. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. 724-728-7222. STUDIO SATURDAYS W/ BILL MEET, LEARN, PLAY: A GAMING MILLER. The artist speaks about MEET UP. All-ages board gaming his techniques & work. RSVP session, playing & learning about requested. 3-4 p.m. Gallerie Chiz, new games w/ an instructor. Quiet Shadyside. 412-441-6005. Reading Room. Second and Fourth Sat of every month, 11 a.m.- SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman 412-622-3151.

FULL LIST ONLINE

School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VOICECATCH WORKSHOP W/ KATHY AYRES. A community writing workshop & writing space provided by Chatham’s Words Without Walls program. Sat, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, East Liberty. 412-363-8232. WHAT’S IN YOUR GENES? DNA TESTING MADE SIMPLE FOR HERITAGE SEEKERS. Guiding participants through the fundamentals of using the latest technology to explore their ancestry. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 14 ANIMAL LOVERS’ VALENTINE’S DINNER. 5 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-212-8816. CALMING COZY COLORING PROGRAM. Coloring sessions for adults. Sun, 2-4 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. A DAY W/ THE NEVILLES. Visit w/ the Neville family as they enjoy a typical Sunday afternoon at historic Woodville Plantation. Interact w/ costumed interpreters as they enjoy games, sewing entertainment & dining popular in the late 18th century. 1-5 p.m. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. 412-221-0348. FAMILY/FRIENDS OF SUBSTANCE USERS/ABUSERS SUPPORT GROUP. Non 12-step support group exchanging experiences & ideas as a means to provide resources & suggestions that can help those struggling to support the recovery journey of a close relative or friend. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 4:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran Church, Bethel Park. 412-853-3189. KOMBUCHA W/ JILL. Hands-On Workshop Series. Second Sun of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. NATURE EXPLORERS! NIFTY NESTS. Pat McShea, educator at Carnegie Museum of Natural History, will discuss the diverse nests of our native birds & the unique materials used to make them. 1 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve. 724-593-4070. PFLAG PITTSBURGH. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. http://pflagpgh.weebly. com/. Second Sun of every month, 2-4:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SUGAR DADDY & THE BIG BONED GIRLS: TRUFFLES & RED SATIN. A Valentine Soiree for the Ages. 6 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m.


The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 15 ASSEMBLE BANTAM NIGHT 2016. A night full of making, cocktails & LEDs. www.eventbrite. com. 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. HALLOWED GROUNDS TOUR. A public 90-minute tour highlights a number of African American “firsts” that occurred on campus. Commons Room. wdonehue@pitt. edu. 11:45 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-621-9339. IMPROV ACTING CLASS. Mon, 7 p.m. Thru March 22 Percolate, Wilkinsburg. 412-607-4297. MT. LEBANON GENEALOGY SOCIETY. Speaker Marilyn Cocchiola Holt, head of the Pennsylvania Department of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, will talk about genealogy research & share information & anecdotes. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. MONROEVILLE TOASTMASTERS OPEN HOUSE. Learn how Toastmasters can help you improve your public speaking skills while enjoying snacks & beverages. 6:45-8:30 p.m. Monroeville Public Library, Monroeville. 412-372-0500. WELLNESS PRACTICES. Rick Freeman, author of Changing My Reality, will speak on the Wellness Practices. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 17 31ST ANNUAL ALLEGHENY SPORT, TRAVEL & OUTDOOR SHOW. Celebrate the diversity of the region’s natural resources & the outdoor traditions treasured by thousands in the region. 3 p.m., Thu., Feb. 18, 3 p.m., Fri., Feb. 19, 12 p.m., Sat., Feb. 20, 10 a.m. and Sun., Feb. 21, 10 a.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-373-7300.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

FAMILY FUN NIGHT

Volunteers are needed for a community family-fun night at the Father Ryan Arts Center in McKees Rocks, on the evening of Thu., Feb. 18. Help with set-up, tear-down, registration, hosting, serving food and facilitating activities. For more information, call Sister Sarah Crotty at 412331-1685 ext. 230 or email her at scrotty@forstorox.org. RECEPTION & APPROPRIATIONS OF VERSAILLES & FRENCH FORMAL GARDENS IN THE 20TH & 21ST CENTURIES. Lecture by Georges Farhat, associate professor, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design. www.arch.pitt.edu. 6 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SEPARATING FACT FROM FICTION: HOW TO EVALUATE & INTERPRET GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES. A discussion of issues that can confuse even experienced researchers & providing tips to get the most out of the source material. 1-3 p.m. Calvin E. Pollins Library, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 ext. 210 TRIVIA NIGHT. Hosted by Pittsburgh Bar Trivia. Mon, 7 p.m. Carnivore’s Restaurant & Sports Bar, Oakmont. 412-820-7427.

TUE 16 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://citydharma.word press.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu

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CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session w/ literary conversation. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FLEET FEET SPEED SQUAD. At the track. Coach Alex from Fleet Feet Sports Pittsburgh hosts weekly Wednesday night speed workouts. The workouts are free & open to the public. Anyone who wants to improve their speed & form are encouraged to join. Wed, 7 p.m. Jefferson Elementary, Mt. Lebanon. 412-851-9100. GUIDED MEDITATION W/ BHANTE PEMA. 6 p.m. Space, Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412363-4550. THE PROVOCATIVE ERROLL GARNER. Lecture by Robin D.G. Kelley, Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in United States History, UCLA. 7 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-648-8213. VERTICAL - THE EVOLUTION OF WINE. Explore the evolution of wine through vertical tastings w/ two wines & showcase three different vintages of each, exploring how the wine has changed & why 6 p.m. Dreadnought Wines, Lawrenceville. 412-391-8502.

AUDITIONS CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for the

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children’s play The Little Mermaid. Ages 5 - 12 auditions at 10 a.m., ages 13 & up auditions at 11 a.m. For more info call the school at 412-279-8887 or visit www.carnegie performingartscenter.com. Thru Feb. 13. Carnegie. 412-279-8887. FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS. Auditions for ‘The Spitfire Grill’ & ‘Floyd Collins’. Seeking trained male & female singers/actors w/ strong singing abilities in folk-rock & contemporary musical theater styles, in addition to strong acting capabilities. Open calls Feb. 19, 5 p.m. & Feb. 20, 5 p.m. If called back, dance call Feb. 21, 4-6 p.m. All applicants must register online at http://frontporchpgh.com/ audition-form. Pittsburgh Musical Theater, West End. 412-551-4027.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. EAST END COOPERATIVE MINISTRY. Request for proposals for artwork to hang in chapel of new building. Available funds of $2500 for materials and labor. Contact grumetjf@mac.com for more detailed information. Thru Feb. 15. 412-361-5549. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. INTERWOVEN STATES ART EXHIBITION. Open to artists of any age who were a student or instructor at Sweetwater in 2015. Participant may enter 2 works in any medium (work does not need to be framed, but must be wired for hanging or prepared for display). Thru March 1. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405. MT. LEBANON ARTISTS’ MARKET. Seeking applications for the market from artists working in jewelry, wood, sculpture, glass, ceramics, fiber, wearables, mixed media, leather, metal & 2D art. Thru May 1. For more info or to apply, visit http://www. mtlebanonartistsmarket.com. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. Ongoing. NOTIONS: WESTERN PA WOMEN EXPLORE LEGACY. This exhibit will honor Women’s History Month. If you would like

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to submit a piece, please write to Robin at Flowingforce@verizon. net w/ a brief description, including the size & medium. Thru Feb. 15. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last two years. Drop off is March 6, 12:30-1 p.m. at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. For more guidelines, visit http://psaguild. org/?portfolio=2016-spring-newmember-screening. Thru March 6. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. RUNE. Accepting submissions of poetry, prose, drama, photography, drawing & graphic design for its 2016 edition. This year’s theme is “Growth.” Guidelines: 3 submissions maximum. Poems & prose up to 1,000 words, drama up to 1,250 words. Submit as email attachments to rune@mail.rmu. edu. Text files must be in .doc or docx format, art files in .jpeg format. Thru March 14. UPPAGUS. If you have been thinking about writing/creating a poem, short prose or artwork commemorating David Bowie, send it to uppagus, an online poetry journal. www.uppagus.com. Thru March 5.

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ONEERYPIDLALY EV

CENTRAL OUTREACH WELLNESS CENTER Walk-ins are Welcome

Free & Confidential HIV & STI Testing and Treatment Services Dr. Stacy Lane DO 127 Anderson Street, Timber Court Building Pittsburgh, PA 15212 • North Side FREE PARKING off Isabella Street

www.centraloutreach.com

412-322-4151

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Gay male in my late 20s. I recently ended things with a guy. Our relationship started as a strictly sexual one. We’re both involved in the kink scene in our city and have interests that align in a particularly great way. Quickly it became clear there was a real connection. The next two months were great! I had a toothbrush at his place within three weeks. But early on, I noticed that he was a much more extroverted person than I was. He would laugh loudly at movies, work the room at parties, say things about kink in the middle of crowded restaurants. I prefer to blend in. Initially I thought of this as “the price of admission,” one I was willing to pay, but it soon became tiresome. I ended things, telling him that there were conflicts with our personalities that made a relationship difficult, not specifying what. He fell for me but I don’t want him to think he has to change who he is to be with me. I’m confused, Dan. I loved being in a relationship again, the sex is great, and finding someone who shares your kinks and you’re attracted to emotionally is rare. He’s asking me to reconsider. Was I right to end this? TIRED OF BEING SINGLE

He shouldn’t have to change who he is to be with you, TOBS, but what if he wants to? It’s unlikely he’ll morph into an always-quietly-tittering, always-discreetly-kinking introvert, just as you’re unlikely to morph into a braying, oversharing extrovert. But if making an effort to dial it back is the price he has to pay to be with you, why not let him decide if he’s willing to pay? Gays represent a tiny percentage of the general population, TOBS, and kinky gays represent a not-so-tiny-but-still-smallish percentage of that. You should think twice about discarding a guy who’s gay and kinky and whose company you enjoy most of the time just because he gets on your nerves now and then. At the very least, you owe it to yourself, just as you owe it to him, to be specific about the reasons you pulled the plug — because he might want to make an effort to win you back. There’s a lot that’s good here — your kinks align (rare!) and you enjoy spending some, but not all, of your time together (common!) — and there are always work-arounds for the bad. An example from my own life: My husband is way more extroverted than I am. So sometimes he goes to movies, restaurants, clubs and concerts without me. I stay home and read or sleep or clean. He doesn’t make me go out; I don’t make him stay home. It’s a work-around that works for us. With some effort, TOBS, you could find the work-arounds that work for you two: He makes an effort, when you nudge him, to dial it back; he goes to comedies with his friends, dramas with you; if he’s working a room, he won’t take offense if you slip into another room. Give it — give him — a chance. I’m a gay male college student in a healthy D/s relationship with a bisexual guy. My boyfriend posts pictures of our kink sessions to his Tumblr. (No faces.) A trans woman active in campus queer politic confronted me today. Ze had seen my boyfriend’s Tumblr (!) and recognized me (!!!). Ze demanded I stop engaging in BDSM because ze has to see me on campus and knowing my boyfriend “controls and abuses” me is triggering for zir. Ze said images of me in medical

restraints were particularly traumatizing. Ze was shaking and crying, and I wound up comforting zir. I stupidly let zir think I would stop. Now what? SCENARIO UTTERLY BANANAS

P.S. Ze also threatened to out my boyfriend if ze saw new pictures go up on his Tumblr. My boyfriend is already out — about being bi and being kinky — so he laughed it off. But how fucked up is that? Tell this woman you take orders from your boyfriend, SUB, not from random campus nutcases. You advise zir to stay away from Tumblr porn ze finds traumatizing. And if ze pushes back, you explain to zir that if anyone’s being controlling and abusive here, it’s zir. And if ze starts shaking and crying, direct zir to the student health center. And for your own protection, SUB, tell zir all of this with at least one witness present. Document everything, and if ze keeps getting in your face about your consensual, nonabusive D/s relationship, take the ironic step of filing a restraining order against zir. I’m a 24-year-old gay male. My boyfriend and I have been together for just over a year. I have a hang-up when it comes to anal sex. I like bottoming, and I’ve had my fair share of great experiences, but I’ve bottomed only once with my boyfriend. I think I’ve identified why: The ceremonies around anal sex (the lube and condoms part) turn me off due to the smell of the lube and the sound of the condom wrapper. It brings up memories of times when I didn’t have a great time bottoming. Additionally, he is a little bigger than most, so there’s that. What do you suggest? Would it be as simple as finding a lube that doesn’t smell so much? When I top him, which is something we both enjoy, there isn’t a problem. WANTS ANAL NOW, GODDAMNIT!

Usually when someone complains about an unpleasant smell associated with anal sex … lube isn’t the issue. But that’s an easily solved problem: There are 10 million brands of lube on the market, kiddo. Shop around until you find one that doesn’t offend your nostrils. As for the condom-wrapper issue, try opening condoms 10 or 20 minutes in advance. Condoms are likelier to be an interruption — one that derails hot butt sex — if you wait until the split second before penetration to bust one out. Put the condom on the BF during foreplay. That way, if the fumbling deflates your bottom-boner (which is a state of mind), you’ll have time to make out, roll around, rim each other, stroke yourself — whatever it takes to get your bottom-boner back. To get a handle on your performance anxiety and those negative associations — bad memories of lousy experiences, fear of your boyfriend’s big ol’ dick, concerns about whether you’ll have to bail — get some butt toys of varying sizes and use ’em when you’re alone. With no boyfriend around to disappoint, the penetration will be about your pleasure. In a month or two, with a little effort and non-stinky lube, you’ll have built up a store of positive associations and gained some confidence. And finally, WANG, if nothing works … maybe you’re a top? On the Lovecast, Dan chats with the amazing Midori about how to get your dom on: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

02.10-02.17

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “We all have the potential to fall in love a thousand times in our lifetime,” writes Chuck Klosterman. “It’s easy. But there are certain people you love who do something else; they define how you classify what love is supposed to feel like. You’ll meet maybe four or five of these people over the span of 80 years.” He concludes, “A lover like this sets the template for what you will always love about other people.” I suspect that you have either recently met or will soon meet such a person, Aquarius. Or else you are on the verge of going deeper than ever before with an ally you have known for a while. That’s why I think what happens in the next six months will put an enduring stamp on your relationship with intimacy.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Sixteenth-century Italian poet Torquato Tasso described one of love’s best blessings. He said your lover can reunite you with “a piece of your soul that you never knew was missing.” You Pisceans are in a phase when this act of grace is more possible than usual. The revelatory boon may emerge because of the chemistry stirred up by a sparkly new affiliation. Or it may arise thanks to a familiar relationship that is entering unfamiliar territory.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Love is a fire,” declared Aries actress Joan Crawford. “But whether it’s going to warm your hearth or burn down your house, you can never tell.” I disagree with her conclusion. There are practical steps you can take to ensure that love’s fire warms but doesn’t burn. Start with these strategies: Suffuse your libido with compassion. Imbue your romantic fervor with empathy. Instill your animal passions and instinctual longings with affectionate tenderness. If you catch your sexual urges driving you toward narcissists who are no damn good for you, firmly redirect those sexual urges toward emotionally intelligent, self-responsible beauties.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Fifteenth-century writer Thomas à Kempis thought that real love can arouse enormous fortitude in the person who loves. “Love feels no burden,” he wrote. “It attempts what is above its strength, pleads no excuse of impossibility; for it thinks all things lawful for itself, and all things possible.” As you might imagine, the “real love” he was referring to is not the kind that’s motivated by egotism, power drives, blind lust or insecurity. I think you know what I mean, Taurus, because in the past few months you have had unprecedented access to the primal glory that Thomas referred to. And in the coming months you will have even more. What do you plan to do with all that mojo?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini novelist Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was fascinated in “life with the lid on and what happens when the lid comes off.” She knew both states from her own experience. “When you love someone,” she mused about the times the lid had come off, “all your saved-up wishes start coming out.” In accordance with the astrological omens, I propose that you engage in the following three-part exercise. First, identify a part of your life that has the lid tightly clamped over it. Second, visualize the suppressed feelings and saved-up wishes that might pour forth if you took the lid off. Third, do what it takes to love someone so well that you’ll knock the lid off.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “No one has ever loved anyone the way every-

one wants to be loved,” wrote author Mignon McLaughlin. I think that may be true. The gap between what we yearn for and what we actually get is never fully closed. Nevertheless, I suggest that you strive to refute McLaughlin’s curse in the coming days. Why? Because you now have an enhanced capacity to love the people you care about in ways they want to be loved. So be experimental with your tenderness. Take the risk of going beyond what you’ve been willing or able to give before. Trust your fertile imagination to guide your ingenious empathy.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here’s the counsel of French writer Anatole France: “You learn to speak by speaking, to study by studying, to run by running, to work by working; in just the same way, you learn to love by loving.” What he says is always true, but it’s especially apropos for you Leos in the coming weeks. You now have a special talent for learning more about love by loving deeply, excitedly and imaginatively. To add further nuance and inspiration, meditate on this advice from author Aldous Huxley: “There isn’t any formula or method. You learn to love by loving — by paying attention and doing what one thereby discovers has to be done.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I do not trust people who don’t love themselves and yet tell me, ‘I love you,’” said author Maya Angelou. She concludes: “There is an African saying: Be careful when a naked person offers you a shirt.” With this in mind, I invite you to take inventory of the allies and relatives whose relationships are most important to you. How well do they love themselves? Is there anything you could do to help them upgrade their love for themselves? If their self-love is lacking, what might you do to protect yourself from that problem?

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “It is not lack of love but lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages,” said Friedrich Nietzsche. He believed that if you want to join your fortunes with another’s, you should ask yourself whether you will enjoy your conversations with this person for the next 30 years — because that’s what you’ll be doing much of the time you’re together. How do you measure up to this gold standard, Sagittarius? What role does friendship play in your romantic adventures? If there’s anything lacking, now is an excellent time to seek improvements. Start with yourself, of course. How could you infuse more camaraderie into the way you express love? What might you do to upgrade your skills as a conversationalist?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Love isn’t something you find,” says singer Loretta Lynn. “Love is something that finds you.” Singer Kylie Minogue concurs: “You need a lot of luck to find people with whom you want to spend your life. Love is like a lottery.” I think these perspectives are at best misleading, and at worst debilitating. They imply we have no power to shape our relationship with love. My view is different. I say there’s a lot we can do to attract intimate allies who teach us, stimulate us and fulfill us. Like what? 1. We clarify what qualities we want in a partner, and we make sure that those qualities are also healthy for us. 2. We get free of unconscious conditioning that’s at odds with our conscious values. 3. We work to transform ourselves into lovable collaborators who communicate well. Anything else? What can you do to make sure love isn’t a lottery? Want some inspiration as you compose your romantic invitations? Go here: http://bit.ly/LoveAd

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Only love interests me,” declared painter Marc Chagall, “and I am only in contact with things that revolve around love.” That seems like an impossibly high standard. Our daily adventures bring us into proximity with loveless messes all the time. It’s hard to focus on love to the exclusion of all other concerns. But it’s a worthy goal to strive toward Chagall’s ideal for short bursts of time. And the coming weeks happen to be a favorable phase for you to do just that. Your success may be partial, but dramatic nonetheless.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “A coward is incapable of exhibiting love,” said Mahatma Gandhi. “It is the prerogative of the brave.” That’s my challenge to you, Scorpio. In accordance with the astrological currents, I urge you to stoke your uninhibited audacity so you can

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press onward toward the frontiers of intimacy. It’s not enough to be wilder, and it’s not enough to be freer. To fulfill love’s potential in the next chapter of your story, you’ve got to be wilder, freer and bolder.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.10/02.17.2016

(AAN CAN)

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NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

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ACROSS 1. Curly hair or colorblindness, e.g. 6. Finland’s neighbor: Abbr. 9. Spoiled, with “on” 14. Gut feeling 15. Actor Vigoda who finally made good on that Internet meme this year 16. Egg producer 17. Maze word 18. Author who coined the words “multicolor” and “normality” 19. Really tiny 20. Evil twin 23. Go back 26. Maze path 27. Hurricane aficionado 28. Russian czar nicknamed “The Great” 30. Banish forever 31. “___: Miami” 34. Like close baseball victories 35. Rural address abbr. 36. Pipe down? 37. Embassy official 40. Chugs on all cylinders 41. Short drink 42. Model railroad scale

43. Big voting bloc: Abbr. 44. Bursitis joint 45. Kind of potato 46. Put on a face 47. French courtesy title, briefly 48. Goes overboard at a party, briefly 49. Bill Clinton’s secretary of transportation 54. Maker of the TLX, RDX, and ILX 55. Have red ink 56. Dublin theater 60. Derailleur part 61. Place to take a stand at a frat party 62. Get rid of 63. E-ZPass charges 64. Funny pair? 65. Mail drop off, for the lazy postman

12. Lake that the Detroit River flows to 13. Zep’s “___ Maker” 21. Dull feeling 22. “I win!” 23. Earth science chapters? 24. First film to win 11 Oscars 25. Reserve squads 29. Goes wrong 30. Hang around a window? 31. David of 31-Across 32. Set up a blockade 33. Pictures of Hawaii, perhaps? 36. Remembered

Marines, briefly 38. Soft drink with the “It’s Mine” ad campaign 39. Chills, maybe 44. Books with suras 46. Risk exposure 47. Digital video formats 49. Often-checked thing 50. Bounce back? 51. Two-way 52. Western writer Wister 53. Share a side with 57. “U mad ___?” 58. Swelled head 59. “I heard ya”

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Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE. +

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PICTURING TROY HILL

City Paper teams up with Instagram collective @SteelCityGrammers for a photo essay from Pittsburgh’s Troy Hill neighborhood

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View more photos from Troy Hill by searching #SCG_CityPaper or by following @pghcitypaper and @SteelCityGrammers on Instagram @jmccann.7

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

February 10, 2016 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 6

February 10, 2016 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 6