Page 1

X PGHCITYPAPER XXXX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX XX PGHCITYPAPER

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 01.20/01.27.2016


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


EVENTS EVERY FRIDAY IN JANUARY 5-10pm FREE GOOD FRIDAYS PRESENTED BY UPMC HEALTH PLAN FREE admission

1.28 – 11am POP GENERATION For the generation that inspired Warhol, a new program exclusively for older adults, age 65 and over. Tickets $10/Free Members

1.30 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: EKMELES The Warhol entrance space Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music. FREE parking in The Warhol lot Advance Tickets $15/$10 students visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

2.6 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE RED WESTERN The Warhol entrance space FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

Disappears

2.27 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: GEORGE LEWIS The Warhol entrance space Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series and Pitt Jazz Studies of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets or call 412.624.7529

2.23 – 8pm The Warhol theater | FREE parking in The Warhol lot | Tickets $15/$12 Members & students visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes the Chicago-based band Disappears for a special two-set evening. The first set features new and unreleased material, and in the second set the band performs David Bowie’s 1977 album Low, which was recorded live at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in fall 2014 in conjunction with its David Bowie Is exhibition. The record was mastered by Sonic Boom (Spacemen 3), and it will be released on Sonic Cathedral. The band features Pittsburgh-native Noah Leger (formerly of the Karl Hendricks Trio), who replaced Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth) on drums. NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

3


2+%-%10%'465

(14 CHOOSE 3 OF THESE UPCOMING CONCERT CONCERTS TS FOR ONE LOW PRICE! BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

FUSE@PSO:

TITLE SPONSOR

PNC POPS

Rachmaninoff’s Third Concerto

,CP&/CTEJ

The Ultimate Oscars (GD

,CP MEDIA SPONSOR

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

TITLE SPONSOR

Valentine’s Day: Romeo & Juliet and Carmen (GD

S U P P O R T I N G PA R T N E R TITLE SPONSOR

A Musical Valentine: The Love Songs of Marvin Hamlisch (GD

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

Stewart Copeland Debuts

120th Anniversary Celebration

TITLE SPONSOR

at Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland (GD

(GD

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS MEDIA SPONSOR

TITLE SPONSOR

Bach: St. John Passion /CTEJ

TITLE SPONSOR

TITLE SPONSOR

/CTEJ

Carpenter Plays Rachmaninoff

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

All Sibelius

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

PNC POPS

The Chieftains featuring Paddy Moloney

Emanuel Ax Plays Brahms #RT

#RT TITLE SPONSOR

TITLE SPONSOR

/CTEJ

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 8KUKVVJG*GKP\*CNN$QZ1HÆ‚EGQTECNNVQQTFGT

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


01.20/01.27.2016 01.20/01.27 VOLUME 26 + IS ISSUE 03

{COVER ARTWORK BY JEFF BRUNNER/ HEY BEAST STUDIO}

For a h Q&A wit st cover arti er, n n Jeff Bru w. visit ww er. ap pghcityp com

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Interns COURTNEY LINDER, AARON WARNICK, ANDREW WOEHREL

{ART}

[MAIN FEATURE]

mope about the house: Let CP’s 20 Don’t Winter Guide help you find fun and interesting things to do this season.

[NEWS]

don’t realize how much harm they 06 “They are causing.” — Activist Julia Johnson on the dangers of the close relationship between the mayor and city council

[VIEWS]

changes are required underground, 16 “No where the gas is actually found and extracted.” — Bill O’Driscoll on DEP’s new proposed regulations governing natural-gas drilling

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MATT HAHN, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ, JAMES PORCO, MARIA SNYDER Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

27

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

“I want to show people some of the traditional flavors of Turkey.” — Cenap Kosar, owner of Ephesus Mediterranean Kitchen

[MUSIC]

was just a matter of getting into 32 “Itacceptance and realizing, ‘Hey, OK, this is

the cards I’ve been dealt.’” — Scott Stapp on dealing with addiction and mental illness

[SCREEN]

bang, slo-mo injury, boom, 42 “Bang, American flag floating in pool.”

— Al Hoff reviews 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

[ARTS]

eye-catching is the wall of Bissell 44 “Also vacuums and sweepers, displayed against bright stripes of paint as if at a product trade show.” — Nadine Wasserman on Silver to Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk

[LAST PAGE]

the population in Pittsburgh is 62 “While down a smidge overall, it remains a big age spot on the skin of the United States map.” — Frances Rupp in this week’s edition of This Just In!

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 60 NEWS

+

Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

Join Us For a FREE Informational Meeting

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2016 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

“Learn About Adoption” Monday, February 8th at 6:30 pm in Pittsburgh, PA

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

Call or Visit Us Online to Register

www.AFTH.org +

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

ª

724-221-3484

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

5


THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“PAST ADMINISTRATIONS HAVE RARELY HAD THE ABILITY TO SWAY COUNCIL AS EASILY AS PEDUTO.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Last Saturday, more than 20 neighborhood venues were a part of the Strip District Music Festival. Check out the sights and scenes of the festival in our photo slideshow at www.pghcitypaper.com.

As election season heats up, check out our PolitiCrap blog for campaign news and updates … and for the lowdown on which candidates are running on the facts and who’s slinging plain old crap. www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTOS BY AARON WARNICK}

Mayor Bill Peduto in this office

This week: See Phipps’ most pampered plants or hear Little Women, opera style.

COALITION FORCES

The podcast goes live every Wednesday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Instagrammer @patent_goddess captured this winter scene in Mount Lebanon. Tag your Instagram images as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you. Download our free app for a chance to win an overnight stay for two at Seven Springs Mountain Resort. Contest ends Jan. 28.

6

T

HESE DAYS, Pittsburghers can’t

open a newspaper, or visit a national news site, without being bombarded by accolades for our city. “The story of Pittsburgh is resonating,” Mayor Bill Peduto told City Paper in a recent interview. “It is, to the urbanist, the story of resiliency before resiliency became the cool thing. It is, to the environmentalist, the story of how a city can solve its problems and that we don’t have to look to nations to be able to do it. To the economist it’s a story of transition, and soon it will be a story of inclusion to those around the world that are facing the same issues. “Pittsburgh is an urban lab to so many urban thinkers and writers, and I’m just its salesman and I put together a pretty

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

good sales pitch.” But perhaps the mayor, who recently passed the half-way mark on his first term in office, is being a little modest.

A friendly Pittsburgh City Council has been crucial to Mayor Peduto’s half-term successes {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Supporters say much of the story people are buying can be attributed to Peduto himself, who spent two decades in city government building a coalition of likeminded progressive politicians who share his vision for the city.

Today, members of that coalition hold the majority on Pittsburgh City Council. They also hold seats in other elected offices at the county and state level. And this coalition, separate from the traditional Democratic machine that has long ruled Pittsburgh, is a key reason Peduto’s first two years in office have gone so smoothly. His appointments to key positions like police chief have been praised. Measures to reform government and improve workers’ rights have passed through council almost unanimously. And Pittsburgh’s even been selected for some high-profile national initiatives. “He’s doing things that are giving Pittsburgh a really good reputation around the country,” says Gabriel McMorland, a community organizer. “I don’t CONTINUES ON PG. 08


NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

7


COALITION FORCES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

presents

PET of the

WEEK

Photo Credit: Animal Friends

Alexie Alexie is an absolutely lovely lady who enjoys interacting with both people and other buns. Though a little timid with new people at first, Alexie warms up quickly and then will accept affection from anyone with a willing hand to give her a little scratch behind the ears. Alexie is a part of our Mission: Adoptable program! This means her adoption donation has been waived and her forever family will receive special counseling and a package, complete with items you’ll need to make a smooth transition from shelter to your home. Your mission, should you choose to accept, is to give Alexie a forever home!

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 8

want to pretend that we don’t still have problems as a city, but I think it’s good that the things to me that look like big problems are things he’s acknowledging and saying he wants to address.” What little criticism Peduto has faced has come from those who worry that city council isn’t serving as a check and balance on the mayor’s administration, and others who do not support all of his reform initiatives. But can it last? Peduto’s consensus could face opposition if members of his coalition are defeated in upcoming elections. And it might be too soon to tell whether Pittsburgh’s standing on the international stage will resonate with voters when Peduto runs for re-election in 2017. “Peduto himself made it clear that he had ideas ready to go for years. He has been ready for this moment for a long time,” says McMorland. “Things Mayor Peduto at a press conference for Pittsburgh’s bicentennial were pretty underwhelming under the previous administration. So when he stepped in, we saw a lot of big changes, This unprecedented level of coop- that those mayors enjoyed, especially on a lot of positive activity, and it’s almost eration has lead to a more harmonious major issues. not surprising that he did a lot of stuff relationship between the mayor’s office That’s the same concern that some, that I feel really good about and and city council than in years past. including activist Julia Johnson, have I’m impressed by. But now Examples include the unani- about Peduto and the current council. that we take a look back it’s mous vote to support the And she worries that the vision that like, ‘What’s he going to mayor’s budget and the they have for Pittsburgh isn’t inclusive m o fr re Hear mo uto in do next?’” passage of land-bank leg- of everyone. d e Bill P s r’ islation that went from “I think city council needs to hold him e p City Pa odcast p SINCE PEDUTO took ofbeing opposed by sevaccountable, and people need to be holdly k e e new w ng Wed., fice more than two eral council members to ing the mayor and city council accountdebuti t years ago, the fifth floor being mostly supported. able,” says Johnson. “A lot of times [the Jan. 20, aity c h g .p of the City-County Buildw Among those who didn’t mayor and council] are on the same page ww m ing has looked a little difpaper.co originally support it were as far as what they believe is best for the ferent. And that’s not just District 9 Councilor Ricky city and they don’t realize how much because of the Talent City Burgess, who now serves as the harm they are causing. And even when hiring process the mayor used to fill chair of the land-bank task force. we do tell them about the harm, they key administration positions, increasing “The council and the mayor have been continue to invalidate our lived experidiversity to record levels. working in partnership to ences.” One such issue, she It’s also because of changes to the lead our city,” says Bursays, is that Peduto and way city government is done. Some of gess. “We’ve been workcouncil don’t share lowthe reforms during Peduto’s first two ing in concert so that it’s a income people’s concerns years, such as using Talent City and shared vision. As partners, about affordable housing. hiring a police chief with a background we work together to solve When asked whether in community policing, are more flashy what I believe are some of the system of checks and changes. But others, like efforts to reor- the most important chalbalances that Peduto once ganize the Bureau of Building Inspec- lenges to our city. Because championed during his tion and a program to ensure every of our partnership, we talk time on council still exsecond-grader knows how to swim, [regularly] about the work ists, and whether council are less so. each of us are doing and provide con- is challenging him, Peduto said, “When “There’s something going on every structive criticism when necessary.” we put something on the table, we know week that I look back with my staff and This is a far cry from the council/ that it will face amendments and almost I just go ‘Wow,’” Peduto tells CP. “There mayoral relationships that Peduto expe- every time does. isn’t anything on an individual basis rienced as a member of council. Serving “I think we have a council that has that I can say is the hallmark. It’s a com- as a city councilor during the mayoral made legislation that we have authored bination. It’s an attitude that Pittsburgh reigns of Tom Murphy and later Luke better by the changes they have done, can do anything, that it is in partnership Ravenstahl, Peduto often found himself and that is something that only happens with our county, with our schools and on the losing end of a 5-4 council split when you have divergent voices lookwith city council, more than it has ever that backed the mayor. He often railed ing through that lens. The moment we been in my lifetime.” against perceived rubber-stamp councils take that as a threat we lose that, and we

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

“I THINK CITY COUNCIL NEEDS TO HOLD HIM ACCOUNTABLE.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PARKING Reserve Extended Lot Parking FOR ONLY

PER DAY WITH 10+ DAY STAY NO HIDDEN FEES, ALL TAXES INCLUDED

Visit FlyPittsburgh.com

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

9


COALITION FORCES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

create a system that is no better than a rubber stamp.” HOWEVER, there’s no denying that some of the legislation the mayor and city council have passed hasn’t been well received by everyone in the Pittsburgh community. Several organizations have sued the city over pieces of legislation they say are beyond the city’s jurisdiction to legislate. Recently passed legislation to mandate paid sick leave was defeated last month in a court challenge by the Pennsylvania Restaurant & Lodging Association. And a measure to create a registry for rental properties has also been challenged on the basis that

it places an unfair burden on landlords, one that could possibly be passed on to tenants. While these measures might not have unanimous support from the Pittsburgh business community, the mayor’s commitment to keep fighting for them in court is touted by local activists, especially those organizing in the area of workers’ rights. “We’ve felt like in the issues that have been important to the coalition partners at Pittsburgh United, that the mayor has responded by not just agreeing but by really taking a leadership role,” says Barney Oursler, that activist organization’s executive director. “When workers were marching behind the Fight

“THE STORY OF PITTSBURGH IS RESONATING.”

8 co convenient o nv v en n ien n t lo locations! o ca a tion n s!

for $15, the mayor not only came out and sus on city council could be swayed if supported it, but then he immediately council seats are lost to Democrats on proclaimed that he’s going to take all the other side of the aisle. “Mayor Peduto came into office city workers to the $15 level in a stepped process over the next couple years, and with enough votes to move his agenda then he called on council to enact legisla- forward. He has failed to pick up any others,” Friedman says. “Past adtion that would make sure all the ministrations have rarely had city contract workers are also the ability to sway counbrought to the $15-an-hour ONLY: E cil as easily as Mayor minimum wage.” IN L N O ctive Peduto, and inevitably But some of Peduto’s e ff e w o H uto d e P it will only get tougher l progressive ideas don’t il B has g ombatin over time.” resonate with all Pittsbeen in caffordableAnd while accolades burghers, including those the city’s g crisis? housin have come rolling in in his own party and the hcity www.pg m from national and interAllegheny County Democo r. pape national observers, Friedcratic Committee, says one man says there’s no guarpolitical analyst. antee Peduto’s reforms have “By and large I suspect that been well received by the majority much of the existing committee outside the 14th Ward object to the mayor’s of Pittsburghers. “[It’s] too soon to tell. Except for the progressive instincts, and would put great trust in someone who thinks clearly bike lanes which are almost universally ‘in the box’ rather than outside of it,” complained about, much of what Mayor Peduto has been doing isn’t on the radar says political analyst Don Friedman. While Friedman argues that support for most city residents,” says Friedman. from the Democratic Party hasn’t been “Garbage continues to be picked up, the necessary to win an election in recent streets paved and plowed, and the police years, he also says the mayor’s consen- still are on call.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN Make a New Year’s resolution to feed your pet better! TOTA LP ETSTO R E S.C O M

Sunday Suppers Meet. Eat. Repeat.

6PM • 3rd Sunday of each month Family style • Chef’s favorites 4 courses • $35 per person

/

Tues-Sat 8am-10pm Sun 8am-9pm 335 E. MAIN STREET CARNEGIE, PA 412.275.3637 10

//

Bring your family and friends for a warm, nostalgic and blissful supper! Guest appearances by some of Pittsburgh’s BEST Chefs! MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


Save your energy. Take the bus or T. Next time you’re headed to Consol Energy Center, consider transit. Steel Plaza T Station is a short walk and 61 and 71 routes have stops nearby. Hop on board, we’ll get you there.

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

11


Formally the Tin Angel

This Valentine’s Day, Dine High Above it All. 5 COURSE OPTIONS. 5 COURSEDINNER DINNER OPTIONS. Specials including Dinner Two! Specials including Dinner forfor Two!

Call for Reservations. 1200 GRANDVIEW AVE | MT. WASHINGTON | 412-381-1919 | VUE412.COM/EVENTS

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

Casa Rasta owners wrote on the rock that was thrown through their window last week.

DEVELOPING TREND? Second Latino-owned business in the South Hills vandalized {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} ON THE SHELF between the bar and dining room in Beechview’s Casa Rasta restaurant sits a rock reading, “Cuantas mas piedras encuentra en mi camino … mas grande mi castillo.” That roughly translates to a Spanish saying that goes: “The more rocks in my path, the bigger my castle.” A vandal hurled the rock through the restaurant’s front window last week. In an act of defiance, the owners decided to display it. “There’s going to be a hater somewhere, and unfortunately we found him here,” says the Mexican-Caribbean restaurant’s co-owner Antonio Fraga, who lives a few doors down from the place.

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

“I was very surprised about the incident because it’s a super-quiet neighborhood. You rarely see anything bad or good happening here, and we have a very good relationship with our neighbors. It’s just an isolated incident.” But this is not the only time recently that a Latino-owned business has been vandalized in the South Hills. In December, someone tagged the Las Palmas grocery store in Brookline with the phrase “Go back to Mexico.” Fraga merged with the owners of Las Palmas this past summer. “[I thought,] ‘Here we go again,’” Las Palmas co-owner Gabriel Berumen says


about the rock incident. “It’s something we have to deal with. We know there’s a lot of people who don’t like Hispanic communities, African communities, Asian communities. … [T]he first time I walked into this country is the first time I have to deal with it.” Berumen came to the U.S. illegally 23 years ago but has since become a citizen. He and his three brothers owned a landscaping business in Indiana, Pa., and heard from friends that Pittsburgh had no Latino grocery stores. They started the business in Brookline five years ago. Since then, they’ve branched out to Oakland, Beechview and Washington, Pa. “Pittsburgh is one of the few if only major metro area in U.S. that doesn’t have a traditional and significant Latino population,” says Tara Sherry-Torres, of Café Con Leche. Her organization connects Latino businesses to the wider Pittsburgh community. “There are a lot of restaurant owners who’ve been here for a very long time, and then there’s a lot of international businesses who do business in Latin American countries. It’s here but not as visible as it is in other places.” Other than the recent incidents at Las Palmas and Casa Rasta, Sherry-Torres says she hasn’t heard of other Latino businesses being targeted. But Berumen says his grocery store’s vans have been the target of vandals before: He’s had “Go back to Mexico” scratched into the paint and tires slashed. Police say they’re investigating the incidents as possible hate crimes, and department spokesperson Sonya Toler said the “investigations are ongoing.” Fraga and Berumen are installing a new security system in Casa Rasta this week. The cameras were not working last week when the restaurant was vandalized. Asked if he’s heard anything back from police, Berumen says he hasn’t, but that he understands the difficulty of the investigation. “I understand because there’s no security [system], and they probably come in middle of the night. Who knows who is walking [around]?,” says Berumen. Both Berumen and Fraga say that, overall, they’ve received support and have had a positive experience in Pittsburgh as business owners. When the Brookline store was hit, community members rallied in support. “We received flowers, we received candies. They called and said, ‘We’re sorry, we don’t want you to close,’” Berumen says. “What I told them, it’s probably 90 percent [who] support us, and we’re here for the 90 percent of people.” AMUR R AY @ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

13


COMMUNITY BANK New land trust will help low-income residents purchase homes in Lawrenceville {BY RYAN DETO} IN DISCUSSIONS of affordable housing,

the conversation almost always centers on creating affordable rental units. The Lawrenceville Corp., that neighborhood’s nonprofit developer, is thinking a little differently. The group is starting a community land trust (CLT) with the intention of selling homes to low-income residents. Lawrenceville, which has been featured in the New York Times and dubbed a “top hipster neighborhood,” has experienced exploding home prices over the past few years. Ed Nusser, Lawrenceville Corp.’s land-use coordinator, says that most of the houses in the neighborhood are selling for between $280,000 and $550,000. (The average home price in Pittsburgh is around $100,000, according to real-estate web site zillow.com.) But even though Lawrenceville might have the hottest housing market in the city, Lawrenceville Corp. director Matt Galluzzo says plenty of low-income residents still live in the neighborhood. More than 800 Lawrenceville households qualify for food stamps. “Behind that veneer is still a neighbor-

hood with considerable need,” says Galluzzo. “We want to work to ensure security and stability in the neighborhood, and hopefully the land trust will address that.” The corporation has purchased one property, and is set to close on three others. The CLT’s plan is to build or rehab seven homes in Upper Lawrenceville. To maintain permanent affordability for the properties, Lawrenceville Corp. will retain ownership of the land, but will sell the homes to residents who qualify by earning 80 percent or less of the area’s average income — about $55,000 for a family of four. Nusser says the land trust makes home ownership affordable for folks from a different income bracket than those currently snatching up properties. The neighborhood is experiencing a trend where many homes are being bought as investments through limited liability corporations (LLCs). According to the Wall Street Journal, LLC home-buyers are usually wealthy and use

“WE WANT TO WORK TO ENSURE SECURITY AND STABILITY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.”

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

FESTIVAL

®

FRIDAY, February 12 FRIDAY, 3pm-10pm + 21

BE

T S U

CALL 412.835.3246 TODAY! LEARN MORE AT TRAXFARMS.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

and Penn Hills. She also says that many of the young professionals who have helped revitalize Lawrenceville — and who work in public service or the area’s growing restaurant scene — are themselves starting to be pushed out. Bryne says that although the land trust is a good tool to start addressing Lawrenceville’s affordable-housing crisis, it will not solve all the problems. Nusser agrees. He says that while Lawrenceville Corp. recently entered into negotiations on cityowned property in Doughboy Square with the intention to build around 50 affordable units, 800 apartment units remain in the pipeline for the neighborhood, and none of them is affordable. But Byrne is starting to see a change in some home sellers’ attitudes that offers some hope. “We have gotten calls from people that want to make sure the next homebuyer is someone who wants stay here,” says Bryne. “Some are even asking if they can sell their home to the land trust … which is refreshing.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

M

TR

OF : : $1 FARM $2 5 X A 0 S

WINTER BEER

14

JA 30 N , UA 2 AD 0 R Y TI V DA C K A N C 1 6 Y ET E S

N O PM NO O 4 T

TRAX FARMS

LLCs to remain anonymous and to receive significant tax breaks; they rarely live in the homes. In 2012, Hawaii had the highest percentage of LLC-purchased homes of any state, at 11 percent. Galluzzo says that over the past three years in Lawrenceville, LLCpurchased homes have made up 27 percent of the market. CLTs have built-in protection against LLCs and other high bidders. In CLTs, residents own the homes but not the land. That, says Nusser, allows them to grow a limited amount of equity, but leaves them unable to sell the property to the highest bidder. Instead, Lawrenceville Corp. will manage the sale of the property to another low-income buyer. Nusser says that landtrust homeowners can make alterations to their properties and will otherwise have all the freedoms of a typical homeowner. Tim McNulty, spokesperson for Mayor Bill Peduto, says Lawrenceville’s CLT is an “important test run” for programs that could help low-income residents citywide stay in their long-time neighborhoods. “While we’re trying to solve the affordable-housing issues of today — both for homeowners and renters — we’re also looking at finding ways [to preserve] affordability in the long term, and the land trust is potentially a model for that,” wrote McNulty in an email to City Paper. Lauren Byrne, director of Lawrenceville United, another nonprofit, reiterates that while Lawrenceville’s boom is something to marvel at, it has come at a cost. She says that “hundreds of families” are being forced out of Lawrenceville and moving to less expensive neighborhoods like Millvale, Etna

SATURDAY, February 13 SATURDAY, 12pm-10pm SUNDAY, February 14 SUNDAY, 12pm-6pm

Reservations e Date! Saavvee Th’s Weekend Required. S e Valentin

Light All Ages e l d n a C g: $25 per couple Paintin $16 per person

Color Me Mine is, as always, non-toxic, lead free & food safe. Visit us at www.colormemine.com

5887 FORBES AVENUE

Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-2909 pittsburgh.colormemine.com

301 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE Pittsburgh, PA 15241 412-854-1074 southhills.colormemine.com


Animal

CATS CAN HAVE

In collaboration with

petsmartcharities.org

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

15


{CP FILE PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

The site of a Lawrence County gas well is prepped for drilling in this 2012 photo.

[GREEN LIGHT]

DRILL BITS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

10_4.75_x_4.75.indd 1

1/14/16

THE STATE’S Department of Environmental Protection recently released documents supporting its rewrite of Pennsylvania’s rules for oil and gas drilling. Those rules had not been updated since 2001 — several years before the Marcellus Shale boom dramatically increased gas drilling here and fundamentally altered its character. 9:55 AM But how much would the proposed regulations — which might take effect as soon as this summer — actually change how drilling is done? The DEP itself characterizes this as a necessary update to protect public health, safety and the environment. The drilling industry criticizes the changes as a needless intrusion that would cost it a lot of money for no environmental benefit. Most environmental groups, meanwhile, welcome the rules as an improvement, while adding that much more is needed. The new regs separately address new “conventional” wells and “unconventional” wells; the latter are those that use horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing to access shale gas a mile or more deep. Hydrofracturing involves huge quantities of water. Unconventional wells are both more numerous and more affected by the changes. Yet in some ways, the new rules are pretty limited. For instance, they apply only to surface activities at well sites. No changes are required underground, where the gas is actually found and extracted, or along the state-wide network of pipelines, compressor stations and more where it is

processed and sent to market. One change involves the open pits that drillers use to store drill cuttings and flowback fluids from the wells, a practice that environmentalists have long said poses unacceptable risks to air and water quality. Pennsylvania has thousands of active wells. Each unconventional well uses up to 5 million gallons of water to break up the rock containing the gas; flowback fluid contains salt, heavy metals and toxic chemicals. The drilling industry contends that such pits can be operated safely. But those DEP documents cite “33 recent cases of liner failures” in pits at drilling facilities. In 2014, for instance, the agency fined the state’s largest driller, Range Resources, $ 4.15 million for leaks in pits in Washington County. The new regulations would ban open pits at individual well sites and require drillers to instead store the waste either in tanks or in “centralized impoundments,” which take wastewater from multiple wells and meet stricter construction and monitoring standards than the pits. Another new rule pertains to gas wells near such “public resources” as parks, historical sites, schools and playgrounds. Some have reported that this rule is a new setback requirement. But in fact, all that the new rule does — all it legally can do, says DEP spokesman Neil Shader — is give DEP a chance to set conditions on drilling at such sites. For instance, Shader says, if a drilling site is within 200 feet of a school, DEP could limit drilling to non-school hours.

“THIS IS AN IMPORTANT STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.”

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


The regs would also upgrade cleanup standards for spills and require drillers to ensure that new wells won’t disturb older, existing oil and gas wells. The Marcellus Shale Coalition, a trade group, says that the new regs are often redundant — “in some cases, a regulation for the sake of a regulation,” says spokesperson Erica Clayton Wright. She adds that the Coalition believes the changes might even exceed DEP’s rulemaking authority. The Coalition estimates the compliance will cost the industry $2 billion per year. That’s a far cry from DEP’s estimate of $73 million in initial costs (mostly for the upgraded centralized impoundments) and $31 million annually. Among environmental groups, PennEnvironment, which advocates for a statewide fracking ban (like New York’s), favors the new regs. “This is an important step in the right direction,” says Allie DiTucci, head of PennEnvironment’s fracking campaign. Penn Future, which does not favor such a ban, supports the new rules too. Others are more skeptical. John Detwiler, of grassroots group Marcellus Protest, agrees that the new rules might curb “some of the worst abuses” of industry. But he notes that the rulemaking process took five years. “If that amount of energy went into [changing] energy policy, it would really be constructive,” he says. Marcellus Protect considers fracking unavoidably dirty and dangerous, and a way to extend our dependency on the fossil fuels whose burning contributes to climate change. The group also favors an outright ban. Gov. Tom Wolf is notably less friendly to the gas industry than was his predecessor, Tom Corbett. Wolf, for instance, re-imposed a moratorium on new leasing of state parks and forests for drilling, and backs a severance tax on gas. However, his administration has no plans to halt fracking. As DEP Secretary John Quigley recently told the online news site PennLive, “We’re roughly a decade into what could be a hundredyear” shale development. The new rules head to the state’s Environmental Quality Board on Feb. 3, and if approved, to the Independent Regulatory Review Commission. Legislative committees would consider the rules next. A legislative vote is not needed to enact them. That’s good news for DEP: As part of the state’s ongoing budget impasse, the majority-Republican House recently passed a bill that would, among other things, delay enactment of the drilling rules. While the formal public comment period has ended, citizens can still write to DEP, the EQB and the IRRC about the new regulations. For more information, see the “Oil and Gas Rulemaking” section of www.dep.pa.gov.

Jan 21, 2016 cmoa.org/3T

Third Thursday: BOOM!

Third Thursday at CMOA is the museum's monthly party with music, open galleries, and good times.

CMOA and BOOM Concepts kick off 2016 with a silent disco in the Hall of Sculpture. Choose beats by either Christo or DJ EyeJay; take an unconventional gallery tour led by local creatives; and get an early look at the new Teenie Harris exhibition, Great Performances Offstage. Third Thursday is sponsored by:

Third Thursdays are 18+ events. 8–11 p.m. Tickets: $10, $8 members, $5 students cmoa.org/3T

Media support provided by:

D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

17


[THE CHEAP SEATS]

ROLLING ON THE RIVER {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

Men’s Underwear Swimwear Socks T-Shirts & More 5968 Baum Blvd East Liberty TRIMpittsburgh.com

HOME PROTECTION

NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD LEARN TO SHOOT ONE ON ONE CLASSES AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

AS LITTLE AS 1 DAY NOTICE

& SHOOTING CENTER

TIME TO BUY! Plenty of Manufacturer Rebates & Incentives.

Prices are at their lowest! B U Y- S E L L - T R A D E FIREARMS

FREE RANGE PASS Free range time or gun rental your choice expires 2/29/2016

VISIT OUR INDOOR SHOOTING RANGE - OPEN 7 DAYS 2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

ALIQUIPPA — named after Queen Aliquippa, the leader of a group of Mingo Seneca that lived along the three rivers — could possibly have the highest concentration of greatness of any town in America. Fewer than 10,000 people live there now, yet it has produced some very respectable NFL players like Ty Law, Jon Baldwin and Sean Gilbert. That alone would be impressive, but those guys are almost sidenotes compared to other stars the Beaver County community has contributed to the sports world. Darrelle Revis, a seven-time Pro Bowler and current Super Bowl champion, is from the town as well. He is, in fact, the best known Island from this area, just ahead of Neville Island. The town’s population has dwindled over the years — 50 years ago, it had 26,000 residents. That’s still not a big city, but when you consider the level of talent to come out of there, it’s downright amazing. And I’m not just talking about sports. Henry Mancini, the composer, not the bread guy, was born in Cleveland, but his family wisely realized it was a loser town and moved to Aliquippa when he was very young. Mancini is recognized as one of the greatest composers in the history of film. His trophy shelf includes four Oscars and 20 Grammy awards. Had he stayed in Cleveland he might have just won a couple of Daytime Emmys. Not impressed yet? How about NFL Hall of Famer Tony Dorsett? Dorsett went to Hopewell, but that’s certainly close enough. T.D. became one of the best running backs in the history of college football, if not the best. His college career culminated in a Heisman Trophy and Pitt’s last national championship in 1976. The next year, the expansion Seattle Seahawks traded his rights to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for Clint Longley, Terry Beeson and some other clown no one has ever heard of. Dorsett went on to four Pro Bowls and a Super Bowl ring, and is currently the NFL’s eighth all-time leading rusher. The stupid Seahawks had to wait 28 years after their blunder to make it to their first Super Bowl. It was against the Steelers in 2005, and we all know how that one turned out. On Saturday Night Live, the late Chris Farley played a Bears superfan and was

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

known for the phrase “Bears, Polish sausage, Ditka.” Yes, legendary Mike Ditka grew up in Aliquippa, too. The 1985 Chicago Bears he coached could almost really beat you 31 to negative-7, as the skit once predicted. Ditka won a Super Bowl as a player, assistant coach and head coach. He’s enshrined in Canton, as well, as one of the greatest tight ends to ever play the game. Also, Iron Mike has a mustache that Burt Reynolds would envy. OK, enough about Hall of Fame football players and Oscar-winners. Let’s go to basketball. Aliquippa raised a player who is rightfully considered the greatest collegebasketball player to ever lace ’em up. “Pistol” Pete Maravich is still the NCAA’s all-time leading scorer, with 3,667 points and a mindboggling average of 44.2 points per game. Think about that. When the Pistol scored 37 points in a game, his average actually went down. Even more incredible was that he didn’t play his freshman season and played in an era before the three-pointer. No less than NBA great John Havlicek once said, “The best ball-handler of all time was Pete Maravich.” The LSU standout has the Tigers’ home court named after him. Poor Shaquille O’Neal had to settle for being that school’s second-best player. Top that off with the fact that the Aliquippa Quips’ high school teams are also pretty good. The Quips’ football program is a staple of the WPIAL playoffs, including a trip to the finals just a couple of months ago. Mighty Queen Aliquippa herself would have a tear of joy running down her face if she had any idea the kind of superstars this little Beaver County town has produced in her honor.

MIKE DITKA GREW UP IN ALIQUIPPA, TOO.

MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN AND M E M B E R OF J I M K RE N N ’ S Q M ORN I N G S H OW E AC H WE E K DAY MO R NING O N Q 9 2 . 9 F M. F O L L OW H I M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I


Photo: David Bachman© 2016

MARK ADAMO’S

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT’S BELOVED NOVEL COMES TO LIFE JANUARY 23, 26, 29, 31 Ǧ CAPA THEATER, DOWNTOWN BUY TICKETS NOW .

ǦŽˆŠ™˜ȖȠțʑ ǦȟȜȝǂȟȠȡǂȡȡȡȡ Ǧ•Ž™™˜‡š—Œ”•Š—†ǀ”—ŒǠ UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD!

SEASON SPONSOR

“Œ‘Ž˜™Š™˜•—”Šˆ™Š‰†‡”›Š™Š˜™†ŒŠǀ

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

19


Winter Guide It’s the time of year that offers the sort of weather preferred by penguins and snowmen. But that doesn’t mean you have to stay cooped up: Our staffers have rounded up plenty of local happenings and things to do through March.

Bundle up and head out!

{ILLUSTRATION BY JEFF BRUNNER}

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


tomorrow exchange buy * sell*trade

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUES HENRI LARTIGUEŠ MINISTĂˆRE DE LA CULTURE FRANCE/AAJHL}

NEW IN SOUTH SIDE FLATS!

“Albert HeĂŻdĂŠ, Francis Pigueron and Ostertag. Chamonix, January 1918,â€? from Fast Cars and Femmes Fatales, at the Frick Art & Historical Center

'%CTUQP5V CVVJ5V ĂŠ

interactive exhibits. Jan. 30-May 22. Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmnh.org

BuffaloExchange.com

You may know “Mr. Chowâ€? for his eponymous high-end Chinese restaurants, but now Chow (nĂŠ Zhou Yinghua) has returned to his first love, painting. His first U.S. solo exhibit, Michael Chow aka Zhou

The new Silver Eye Center exhibit Fellowship 16 features the work of two winning photographers: Hong Kong-born Ka-Man Tse’s series “Narrow Distance� seeks to draw connections between LGBT culture and the Asian-Pacific Islander community, while Pittsburgher Aaron Blum offers “A Guide to Folk Taxonomy,� which explores the mysteries of Appalachia. Jan. 29-April 2. South Side. 412-431-1810 or {PHOTO COURTESY OF ŠTHE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC.} www.silvereye.org

Yinghua: Voice for My Father, opens at The Andy Warhol Museum

CONTINUES ON PG. 22

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

OPENING NG VALENTINE’S WEEKEND! WEEK

412.456.6666 | PBT.ORG | Groups of 10+ Save: Call 412.454.9101 +

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

Artist: Amanda Cochrane :: Photo: Duane Rieder

and features new paintings by Chow, vintage photos of his opera-singer father, and portraits of Chow painted by Warhol, Basquiat and Ruscha. Feb.13May 8. North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Born into a wealthy French family, Jacques Andy Warhol, Michael Chow, 1984, Collection of Henri Lartigue Michael and Eva Chow, at The Andy Warhol Museum spent the first half Flying lizards are of the 20th century real! Or, were once. photographing the sights his privileged Check out the latest findings about upbringing afforded him — from long-ago flying reptiles in Pterosaurs: luxurious European holiday resorts to Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, at automobile racing. The new exhibition, the Carnegie Museum of Natural Fast Cars and Femmes Fatales: The History. The exhibit features fossils and Photographs of Jacques Henri Lartigue, casts, plus life-sized models, videos and

NEWS

FEB BR R UA R Y 1 2 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 6

21


WINTER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

shares these frequently delightful works. Feb. 6-May 15. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

The great Toni Morrison’s debut novel comes to the stage as Point Park’s

Conservatory Theatre Company

offers the local premiere of The Bluest Eye, Lydia Diamond’s 2006 adaptation. It’s the story of an AfricanAmerican girl growing up in smalltown 1940s Ohio who longs to be white. Feb. 26-March 13. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.org

The newly revamped Westmoreland Museum of Art offers another chapter in our nation’s art history, with

Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-Century American Art. This

exhibition of paintings explores the styles and narrative themes that helped define American styles and tastes apart from the European traditions. March 6-June 19. Greensburg. 412-837-1500 or www.wmuseumaa.org

Trevor Noah is the new face of late night’s The Daily Show, and though he isn’t from around these parts, he’s making a quick study of skewering American news, politics and culture. Catch the South African-born comedian in person at the Carnegie Music Hall. March 4. Oakland. www.ticketmaster.com

Dancers from the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre perform in Mixed Repertory #2, comprising three unique, emotionally driven works: Antony Tudor’s “Jardin aux Lilas,” Michael Smuin’s “Eternal Idol” and James Kudelka’s “Man in Black,” the latter a tribute to the late Johnny Cash (and performed to his songs). March 10-13. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN HOGG}

Swan Lake, Jan. 30

Quantum Theatre stages the American premiere of the latest from acclaimed Scottish playwright David Harrower (Knives in Hens; Kill the Old Torture Their Young). Ciara is a monologue by the adult daughter of a Glasgow mob boss who left the criminal underworld for the art world. Local favorite Mary Rawson stars. Jan. 27-Feb. 14. Javo Studios, Lawrenceville. www.quantumtheatre.com If it’s Nathan Detroit, Sky Masterson, Miss Adelaide and Nicely-Nicely Johnson, it’s gotta be Guys & Dolls. Pittsburgh Public Theater stages the classic musical based on the underworld stories of Damon Runyon, with Frank Loesser tunes including “Luck Be a Lady” and “Marry That Man Today.” Jan. 28-Feb. 28. Downtown. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org This is not your dad’s Swan Lake: Dada Masilo’s version re-imagines the classic ballet through a South African lens, incorporating such contemporary issues as sex, gender, homophobia and the AIDS crisis. The score combines Tchaikovsky and African rhythms. Jan. 30. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

The Community Supported Art Performance Series, the New Hazlett Theater’s initiative for new and emerging artists, features Richardo Iamuuri. The musician and audio-visual artist’s A BRAND NEW WORLD: kill the artist tells the story of a rebel on trial in a hyper-consumerist world. Feb. 11. North Side. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org “Making America Great Again!” isn’t just a cynical campaign slogan. It’s also the ironic name for David Cross’ first tour in six years. The comedian, known for his work on Mr. Show and Arrested

Pittsburgh Opera stages the local premiere of 27, Ricky Ian Gordon’s critically praised 2014 opera about Allegheny City native Gertrude Stein and her partner Alice B. Toklas. The show, staged at Pittsburgh Opera Headquarters, depicts the women’s shared lives in Paris, and famous visitors like Picasso and Hemingway. Feb. 20-28. Strip District. 412-281-0912 or www.pittsburghopera.org

In Miss Julie, Clarissa and John, local playwright Mark Clayton Southers’ new recasting of August Strindberg’s classic drama Miss Julie, the action reset in Reconstruction-era Virginia. And the forbidden lovers are a white landowner’s daughter and his African-American servant. Kevin Brown, Tami Dixon and Chrystal Bates star in this Pittsburgh

Celebrate the frozen H2O at the 25th annual Ligonier Ice Fest. There will be more than 50 ice sculptures to goggle at, some carved while you watch. Also, live music and fun food, like kettle corn. Jan. 23-24. Diamond area, Ligonier. www.ligonier.com

Winter is the perfect time to explore Emerald View Park, a hilltop park-in-progress that spans Allentown, Mount Washington and Duquesne Heights. The leaves are gone, the air is clear and crisp, and the views are spectacular. Get a trail guide at www.mwcdc.org/park.

Park Conservatory Dance Company

22

Munhall. www.librarymusichall.com

Outdoors

Get “inside the minds and senses of the dancers to reflect on the difficult choices we make every day” with Five. The Point

production is the first collaboration between dance-department chair Rubén Graciani and choreographer and faculty member Keisha Lalama. The show, at the Rockwell Theatre, features a live choir. Feb. 5-14. Oakland. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.org

Development, hits the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall on Feb. 18.

Embrace the season with a snowshoe hike, led by Venture Outdoors. Upcoming destinations include Oil Creek and Gallitzin State Forest. Never walked on snowshoes? Sign up for a beginner’s class. And hope for lots of snow. www.ventureoutdoors.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VENTURE OUTDOORS}

Snowshoe hikes with Venture Outdoors


We’ve got you covered!

Playwrights Theatre Co. production. n. March 12-27. Downtown. www.pghplaywrights.com

-Gynecological Care -Birth Control -Pregnancy Testing -STD & HIV Testing -Emergency Contraception -Cancer Screenings

Laura Eason is known for her work on House of Cards, but meanwhile her Sex With Strangers is one of the nation’s most frequently staged plays this season. The comedy aboutt ng fortysomething novelist Olivia getting snowbound with twentysomething h sex blogger Ethan gets its Pittsburgh premiere at City Theatre. March 12-April 3. South Side. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

$IIRUGDEOH&RQğGHQWLDO &RQYHQLHQW

933 Liberty Avenue 1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA

Acclaimed, Pittsburgh-based danceturns theater company Corningworks returns on with Right of Way. The collaboration between choreographer/performer Beth n Corning and famed local drag queen n Jezebel Bebbington D’Opulence is an res original, full-length work that explores ideas of femininity, gender, identity and acceptance, with five performances at the New Hazlett Theater. March 30-April 3. North Side. s.org 412-320-4610 or www.corningworks.org

Calliope opens the 2016 portion of its season with blues guitarist Eric Bibb. He’s better known in Europe than in the States (the New York native currently lives in Helsinki), but his soulful, rootsy style has drawn comparisons to Taj Mahal and earned accolades from blues fans everywhere. Jan. 23. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org What better on a cold winter night than the warmth of some eclectic R&B courtesy of singer and songwriter Eric “Erro” Roberson? The New Jersey-born performer’s es from music ranges smooth soull ballads to umbers, up-tempo numbers, luences ranging and taps influences from gospel,, jazz and n. 30. hip hop. Jan.

August Wilson lson Center,

Right of Way at New Hazlett Theater

Experience America's premier folk ensemble for an unforgettable performance as the Tamburitzans bring vivid color, widely acclaimed music, songs, and dances of eastern Europe and neighboring cultures to our stage.

“Rapper” is the descriptor most people use for him, but Kid Cudi — touring this winter in support of a new record — is more genre-bending than that title suggests. On past releases, he’s collaborated with everyone from Kendrick Lamar to HAIM. Feb. 5. Stage AE, North Side. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com It’s almost too easy to compare Protomartyr to its Detroit forefathers (The Stooges, The MC5), but the rock legacy cannot be denied. The stoicsounding group is more post-punk than punk punk, but crunchy guitar tones and minimalist riffs abound. Feb. 11. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 421-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

SUN • JAN 31 • 2PM $24, $20, $16

The Palace Theatre (Greensburg)

724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING Evening & Weekend Shows! Every dollar raised stays local to benefit the Western PA Chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation.

Let The Spinnerss groove you with their smooth soul sounds. The group, which had huge hits in the 1970s (“Rubberband Man,” “I’ll Be Around”), will lay down the vocal magic on Valentine’s Day, at the Palace Theatre. It’s sure to be a “One of a Kind (Love Affair).” Feb. 14. Greensburg. www.thepalacetheatre.org

Downtown. 66 412-456-6666 or www. g trustarts.org

9:00 a.m. Registration We will be joined by special guests Mikey and Big Bob from the KISS 96.1 Morning Freak Show!

10:00 a.m. Event Starts 9-Hole Scramble

1:00 p.m. Lunch Buffet Soup & Sandwich Buffet

CONTINUES ON PG. 24

1:30 p.m. Awards Hosted by KISS 96.1 DJ, Tall Cathy!

Saturday, February 20, 2016 Diamond Run Golf Club Sewickley, PA

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAN MALMSTROM}

Eric Bibb, Jan. 23

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

Register online at wpcnhf.org +

CLASSIFIEDS

23


WINTER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

$77

+tax

er cus tom w e n al* -

i - spec

Call today to set up your appointment Residential & Commercial Gift Cards Available phone. 412-542-8843 www.littlegreenmaidservices.com

We’re more than just cleaning. * $77 new customer special includes two professional maids, cleaning for a two hour maximum with our environmentally friendly cleaning products.

* Homes that have 3 or more bedrooms or require a more involved cleaning will fall under the $89 new customer special, or $20 an hour after the first two hours.

Disappears, Feb. 23

Philadelphia’s prolific slack-rock king Kurt Vile (who’ll be coming through town with his band the Violators) released his sixth record, b’lieve I’m goin down, last year. It proved something that many of his fans already know: Vile’s subtly hooky songwriting just keeps getting

better and better. Feb. 22. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com The fact that Chicago’s krautrock fourpiece Disappears is scheduled to play David Bowie’s Low in its entirety seems

Kids huge party + brief run + more party trust us, it’s for charity. SATURDAY FEBRUARY 13TH | 12PM

cupids undie run.com

McFadden's Restaurant and Saloon 211 North Shore Drive *Gotta be 21+ to party this hard*

Don’t just watch football — get active! Join in the fun of NFL PLAY 60, which spreads out over all five floors of the Heinz History Center. Get some healthful eating tips, flex your feet in the 40-yard dash and celebrate with your own touchdown dance. Exercise your brain with the museum exhibits. Free for kids under 17. Feb. 6. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org If the kids want to go outdoors, but it’s too cold, take them to the “inside outside” at Phipps Conservatory. Enjoy the tropical Congo Garden, luxurious orchids and adorable tiny trees (bonsai), and the Garden Railroad. For hearty sorts, the Winter Lights show runs through Feb. 18. Oakland. www.phipps.conservatory.org

Brooktree Health Services A Holistic Approach to Drug & Alcohol Treatment Specific treatment programs offered by Brooktree Health Services include: • Partial Hospitalization Program • Intensive Outpatient • Outpatient Services • Greater Pennsylvania Sober Living Superman 2050, March 18-19 Conveniently located in Wexford

Brooktree Health Services 6500 Brooktree Road Wexford, PA 15090 724-935-0460

Recovery is a journey, not a destination. 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

In a change from huuuuge movies, in Superman 2050, seven actors stage an original tale about the superhero all on a 3-by-7-foot platform. It’s enough room to re-create Metropolis and a battle between Superman and villain Lex Luthor. This 40-minute family-friendly show is presented by the visiting Theater Unspeakable. March 18-19. August Wilson Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org


the fun way to stick to your new year’s resolution!

almost eerily prophetic — or maybe, as with all things Bowie, the stars have simply aligned. Feb 23. The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org Known for his work with Miles Davis and others, Jack DeJohnette is one of the most influential jazz drummers in the game. Don’t miss him when he’s joined by famed dancer Savion Glover (Bring in ’Da Noise, Bring in ’Da Funk) for a celebration of percussion and rhythm. Feb. 26. Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, North Side. 412-322-1773 or www.mcgjazz.org If it was good enough for 1896 … the

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

stages a celebratory concert marking its 120th anniversary to the exact date, with a commemorative show featuring significant pieces from its history, including some works performed at its first concert, in 1896. Feb. 27. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org For many, the highlight of the season will be when Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey and their touring band (which includes drummer Zak Starkey, Ringo’s son) bring The Who Hits 50 tour hese rock greats aren’t aren t to town. These getting anyy younger, so see them while you can. March 16. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. ptown. 800 or www. 412-642-1800 rgycenter.com consolenergycenter.com Her first hitt launched d memes, a thousand but there’ss more ae Jepsen to Carly Rae than “Call Me Maybe.” On her follow-up release, ON, N she E•MO•TION, to the tapped into die dancecurrent indie eist and pop zeitgeist at she could proved that cord you make a record n to all the could listen gh. way through. March 18. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 447 412-821-4447 or www. om mrsmalls.com

Winter in Oakland by Instagrammer @lilysmithofficial {PHOTO COURTESY OF DESE’RAE L. STAGE}

Emily St. John Mandel, Feb. 15

Tag your winter photos of Pittsburgh as #CPReaderArt and we just may re-gram you!

With last year’s three-LP rock opera, The Most Lamentable Tragedy, New Jersey’s Titus Andronicus challenges the idea that upbeat punk music must also be brief. Of course, because some of those songs clock in at under a minute, no one is reinventing the wheel — and that’s a good thing. March 20. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

Dance for f all ages, ages pole dancing... ancing ancing... nccing ng and more. ore. ore re. re

pghcitypaper

4765 LIBERTY ERTY AVE AVE. | BLOOMFIELD 412 412.681.0111 6811 0111

Literary

PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER.COM

Poet and writer Rac Rachel Zucker’s book Museum of Accidents was a finalist for the N National Book Critics Circle Award; her nine books also include The Pede Pedestrians, a double collection of prose an and poetry. On memo MOTHERs, the heels of her memoir, w the New York-based writer visits the

Pittsburgh Contempor Contemporary Writers Series on Feb. 11. Frick Fine Arts

p Auditorium, Oakland. pghwriterseries. wordpress.com Novelist Emily St. John Mandel, Statio Eleven (about whose latest was Station Shakespear a troupe of Shakespearean actors post-apocalyp America) touring a post-apocalyptic L Monday visits Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Night Lectures. Feb. 15 15. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 41 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlecture www.pittsburghlectures.org Join carto to oon o ist and illus cartoonist illustrator Stephan Pastiss at Pitts Pittsburgh Arts Stories. You. & Lectures’ Authors. S series. Pastis is known for both his riotous com comic strip “Pearls Before Swi Swine” and his “Timmy Fa Failure” kids’ book series, a about a hapless

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JUERGEN FRANK}

Jennifer Koh at the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Feb. 27

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

25


PEABO

WINTER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

BRYSON

the Voice of Love

Dreamcatcher, at Faces of Conflict

child detective. Pastis visits Carnegie Lecture Hall for a Feb. 21 talk, book-

Festival and The Pittsburgh Creative Arts Festival. Besides yarn work, there are

signing and lemonade reception. Oakland. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

also workshops on quilting, paper arts, sewing and felting. March 4-6. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pghknitandcrochet.com

Other

Among the more reliable signs of spring is the Pittsburgh Home and Garden Show. Sure, you can look at plans for the world’s most luxurious shower, but green and eco-solutions for both inside and out are also part of the vendor offerings. March 4-13. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pghhome.com

A celebration of legendary local sportswriter and broadcaster Myron Cope seems a natural for a museum that spans both Pittsburgh history and sports. Bring your Terrible Towels and your memories to Yoi! Remembering Myron Cope. Jan. 31. Heinz History Centerr, Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www. heinzhistory center.org

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2016 8:00 PM • AUGUST WILSON THEATER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

ACCESSIBLE

SERVICES AVAILABLE

There is always controversial ring action when WWE profession professional-wrestling stars hit the squared circle. But this WWE Raw event, held just three w weeks before W WrestleMania, c could be pivotal. S Scheduled to Gas prices are a appear are super low, so “ “The Beast” Brock there is a real L Lesnar, John temptation to C Cena, Roman upgrade one’s R Reigns and more. ride. Why not n. 31 Myron Cope, Ja March 14. Consol check out this Remembering Energy Center, Uptown. year’s models www.consolenergycenter.com at the Pittsburgh International Auto Show? Cars large and small, sporty and More than a month’s worth of interesting practical, fuel-efficient and otherwise. American and foreign films will screen at But all are sooo shiny. Feb. 12-15. David two upcoming annual festivals. First, it’s L. Lawrence Convention Center, Carnegie Mellon University’s International Downtown. www.pittautoshow.com Film Festival: Faces of Conflict (March 17April 3, www.cmu.edu/faces), followed Cold weather got you dreaming of wooly immediately by JFilm (April 7-17, www. hats and scarves? Get up to speed on materials, techniques and more at the 12th jfilmpgh.org), which presents films related to Jewish and Israeli culture and issues. Annual Pittsburgh Knit and Crochet


DE

SI

the

ON

MONTE CRISTO FRENCH TOAST SPLIT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SWEET AND SAVORY

PIDE POWER {BY RYAN DETO} Turkey has a love affair with meat, cheese and vegetables combined with thin, crispy dough. But Turkey’s stuffed flatbread isn’t Italian-inspired pizza: It’s Turkish-born and called pide. “Just like how there are so many pizza shops here in America, there are just as many pide shops in Turkey,” says Cenap Kosar, owner of Ephesus Mediterranean Kitchen, a pizza shop that offers traditional Turkish dishes including a dozen varieties of pide. Turkey-born Kosar came to Pittsburgh 15 years ago. He has been making pide for the past 10 years as a way to honor the tastes he remembers from home. Pide is a football-shaped flatbread with folded-over edges and a center filled with ingredients like cheese, spinach, mushrooms and peppers. For the most authentic Turkish taste, try the lahmajun pide, which is filled with the traditional mixture of spiced ground beef, diced onions, tomatoes and parsley. Kosar also imports sujuk (a spicy Turkish sausage) and pastirma (cured beef similar to jerky) that top other pides. Kosar knows of other Turks who run Italian-style pizzerias locally, but he believes that Ephesus might be the only restaurant in the area offering pide. It’s a distinction he’s proud of. “I want to show people some of the traditional flavors of Turkey,” says Kosar. “I am trying to separate myself from the other pizza places.”

{PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Spanikopita French toast: baby spinach, feta, asiago and fresh mozzarella, drizzled with a balsamic glaze

BREAKFAST- LUNCH

COMBO

RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

219 Fourth Ave., Downtown; 50 Freeport Road, Aspinwall; and 616 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue. www.ephesuspizza.com

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

the

FEED

Take a break from noisy food TV — the shouty competitions, the chirpy chopping of cook-hosts, the dumbeddown recipes — and settle in with A Chef’s Table, a six-part Netflix show. Let six renowned chefs (from Italy, USA, Argentina, Sweden, Australia) explain their passion for food, cooking and life, in their own unique ways.

REAKFAST, of all meals, tends to

exist at either end of the diningout spectrum. You’ve got your diners and you’ve got your fancy brunch splurges fit for Mothers’ Day or Easter, and in between, little creperies and coffee shops that offer a tempting morsel or two. What’s really needed is the breakfast equivalent of a lot of lunch places: a casual dining room and a range of simple, satisfying, well-prepared items — not all of them griddled — at reasonable prices, easygoing enough for catching a bite with friends but “nice” enough to serve food on real plates. Caffe Mona sits right at that sweet spot. Its menu of omelets and sandwiches, French toast and salads, and crepes both

savory and sweet spans breakfast and lunch. Everything is available all day from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. (except weekends, when the cafe sleeps in till 9), so there’s no rolling in at 11:05 a.m. only to find out that breakfast closed while you were parking the car.

CAFFE MONA

4200 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-5338 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. PRICES: $3-10 LIQUOR: None

CP APPROVED Combinations such as turkey, apple, homemade fig jam, avocado and smoked

gouda put Caffe Mona a notch above delis and diners. But it never strays into fussy territory, and several salutary combos are available in sandwich or crepe form. Other concoctions, such as the Elvis crepe, are more whimsical, but if straight-up butter and syrup or preserves are more your style, you can have that, too. Caffe Mona has something for nearly everyone. Located in a storefront across from Children’s Hospital, Caffe Mona is deep and narrow, with a coffee bar as a buffer between the street and the brick-walled dining room. Its cozy, faintly bohemian, coffee-house atmosphere is enhanced by a charming mural of nature in silhouette and a couple large paintings. In good weather, a nicely sized rear deck offers CONTINUES ON PG. 28

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

27


BREAKFAST-LUNCH COMBO, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

outdoor dining away from the traffic of Penn Avenue. Caffe Mona prides itself on its excellent coffee and would be a nice place to linger over a cup, food aside. But for us, food was front and center, and we sampled as much of the menu as four people could. On the sweet side, the aforementioned Elvis crepe was thinly spread with peanut butter, then folded into triangles, generously topped with banana slices and three slices of appleal orm abn our of Because wood bacon, then drowned in maple syrthe obsession with using re up. And we mean drowned; the pool of the out S NT BEST INGREDIE nearly submerged the crepe in the and making everything weH syrup shallow dish of the plate. It was much TC RA SC OM possibly can FR too much. The crepe itself was tender, ing nn Wi ard Aw d ate we cre Pizza, Salads, & Hoagies. the banana ripe and the peanut butter’s creamy sweetness was set off perfectly by the bacon’s smoky saltiness, but next BEECHVIEW Craft Bottle, Domestic Beer time, we’ll order syrup on the side. & Wine Available! By contrast, the “Kordon” savory 2128 BROADWAY AVENUE crepe was neatly folded into a plump Phone: 412-531-1068 rectangle and lightly pressed for a light crust. Within were thin, tender slices CARNEGIE of beef, pleasingly chewy slices of dark, BYOB, No Corkage Fee! earthy mushroom, still-crisp peppers 108 E. MAIN STREET and onions, and a gorgonzola sauce that Phone: 412-276-0200 was so intense and rich that Jason had @PGH_Slice @sliceonbroadway to take little breaks to rest his palate. @sliceonbroadway To be clear, that’s not a complaint: The For full menu visit us at depth of flavor was amazing. Only the sliceonbroadway.com vegetables’ texture, in theory a pleasing contrast, stood out a bit too much. Monte Cristo French toast split the difference between sweet and savory with ham, Swiss and apricot jam. While a true Monte Cristo sandwich is more like a grilled cheese with the fillings between two slices of grilled toast, here the fillings were transformed into toppings, with the cheese lightly melted, the ham layered on in a lattice of slices, and the jam in one big dollop in the center. The ingredients were not as melded together as in the sandwich approach, and it took a little work to make sure each bite was balanced. But the French toast withstood the scrutiny of a family that considers itself connoisseurs of the genre: thick and substantial, soft inside, well-browned outside and not forgetting to taste like bread. Buffalo chicken on a baguette was agreeably spicy in a sriracha-based “Mona sauce,” mixed with crinkle-cut potatoes and tangy bleu cheese. It was accompanied by a simple side salad of mixed greens with a relatively thick, intense balsamic vinaigrette. Other salads all serve as meals, ranging from fairly traditional styles like cobb and chef to one with marinated chicken, brie, apples and avocado. Caffe Mona is a charming place that serves great food at good prices and gets the little things right.

Slice…Nice

Hora Feliz (Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

• 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

now open 7 days a week!

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

SHIM-DIG Low-alcohol drinks are as tasty as their beefier cousins A few weeks ago, countless wellintentioned individuals resolved to drink less in the New Year. Then they remembered that January is a bleak, boring month and doled out a generous pour of something strong and brown. There are ways, however, to have a few drinks without the head-splitting Sunday mornings. Enter the shim. “Shims are a category of cocktails which answer the conundrum of how to enjoy more drinks without overindulging,” explains Dinah Sanders in her book The Art of the Shim. “I named these low-alcohol beverages ‘shims’ for their ability, like their wooden counterpart in carpentry, to keep one level.” Though the term belongs to Sanders, the concept of the shim is an old one indeed. The sherry cobbler, a low-impact mixture of sherry, sugar, fresh fruit and ice, was one of the country’s most popular cocktails in the 19th century. There are numerous arguments in favor of a cocktail with less alcohol. Often reliant on vermouth and other herbaceous spirits, many shims are classic appetitestimulating aperitifs. They also tend to complement food, as the lower ABV wakes up the taste buds rather than numbing them. And with less calorie-dense spirits, shims make it easier to stick to those other pesky resolutions. Of course, the most compelling case for any cocktail is that it provides a pleasing drinking experience. Low-alcohol drinks are as complex and tasty as their beefier cousins, as Pittsburgh’s best bartenders well know. Newcomer venues like Morcilla and Poros draw inspiration from the Mediterranean region, where fortified wines like vermouth and sherry are common. The menu at Tender Bar + Kitchen features a section of loweralcohol cocktails, and drinks like Sarah Clarke’s Red Vespa (a beguiling blend of Campari, sweet vermouth and coldbrew coffee) prove that “responsible” does not equal “boring.” A stiff Manhattan will always have its place. But as cocktails move from special-occasion treats into the realm of the everyday, shims let us have another round without getting wobbly. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-431-9313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE BITES AND BREWS. 5744 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-4425. The concept is simple: 30 beers on tap, more in bottles, and two menu items — pizza and sandwiches. You construct your own creation using a checklist, and there is plenty of variety in ingredients and preparation. What the kitchen does, it does well, serving some of the best pizza and custom sandwiches in town. JE CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a porkbelly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE

Sawasdee Thai Kitchen {CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} well-prepared Italian-American cuisine and a welcoming atmosphere around a horseshoe bar. The menu offers the expected standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories. But overall, the preparations are fairly up-todate: exceptionally bright and slightly chunky marinara, fluffily battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. KE

menu, this restaurant is a top contender for the ultimate, authentic Korean dining experience in Pittsburgh. Start with steamed and pan-fried mandoo dumplings, and an enormous vegetable-seafood pancake. Entrees include one-pot meals to share, plus soups, stirfrys, rice dishes and Korean barbecue. KF NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. This modern take on the traditional Jewish deli makes the argument that such Eastern European cuisine deserves to be served alongside the world’s favorites. Stop in for matzoh-ball soup, egg creams, blintzes and classic deli sandwiches, including one made with “Montreal meat,” a sort of Canadian hybrid of corned beef and pastrami. JF

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Nu Modern Jewish Bistro

GRIT & GRACE. 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748. Small plates with plenty of unexpected ingredients and designed for sharing mark this Downtown venue. The menus offers updates on classics (Rueben, ramen) and eclectic Asian fusion fare to dim sum and “pork face” sandwich. Fortunately, the kitchen brings a confident approach to a wildly various list of boldly complex dishes. KE

JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE

JOHNNY’S. 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. This Wilmerding institution offers

NAK KWON GARDEN. 5504 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-904-4635. With its authentic

RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills venue offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d expect, such as greens (cooked in pork broth), mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2238. This bubble-tea café has CONTINUES ON PG. 30

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

DINE IN - TAKE OUT - LOCAL CATERING

Sushi Up to 50% OFF Every Wednesday!

Asian American Cuisine The Largest Buffet in Town!

We are a family-friendly Japanese restaurant and hibachi grill that features a full menu of delicious Asian dishes. Our sushi bar prepares handmade sushi from the freshest ingredients available.

Over 200 Specialty Items: Roast Beef, Ham, Baked Salmon, Ribs and Seafood Casserole

Dessert Bar Banquets of 20-200 Guests 412- 481-1118 860 Saw Mill Run Blvd. (Rte. 51S)

3450 William Penn Highway

Minutes from Downtown, Close to the Liberty Tunnel. Next to the Red, White & Blue Store

Wilkins Twp. @ Penn Center 412-829-3900

www.oldtownbuffetpgh.com

YAMATOEXPERIENCE.COM

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

29


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

Tables on the Green {CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

TACDOAY!

ES TU/

Food & Drink Specials!

1000 Sutherland Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15205 412-787-8888 www.plazaazteca.com

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR

bar • billiards • burgers

MONDAY & THURSDAY $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________ TUESDAY Burger, Beer, & Bourbon $11.95 ____________________ WEDNESDAY Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________ FRIDAY Sangria $3 ____________________ SATURDAY & SUNDAY 10:30am-3pm Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm

900 Western Ave. North side 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 Washington Pike, Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers a modern yet comfortable take on seafood, offering distinctive appetizers and a few signature entrées. There is also a buildyour-own entrée option, in which a dozen fish and shellfish (plus a few meat options) can be combined with interesting sauces, starches and vegetables to create a custom dinner, whether your tastes run to truffle jus or mac-n-cheese. LE

meat appetizers are beautifully seasoned, and the pad Thai offers a lively balance of ingredients. The assertively spicy pumpkin curry features a special variety of Thai gourd. JF STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE

TABLES ON THE GREEN. 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955. A golf course east of town may not be where one would expect to find refined Cajun and Creole SALVATORE’S PIZZA www. per cuisine, but that’s a p HOUSE. 612 Penn pghcitym exactly what this o .c Ave., Wilkinsburg. clubhouse restaurant 412-247-4848. A offers. The menu offers neighborhood pizza place Louisiana bayou classics such and more, Salvatore’s offers as shrimp, grits, gumbo and something even rarer than blackened fish in an authentic and good pizza: fast food of the well-prepared manner. In a nod to finest quality. “Fresh” is the Pittsburgh, steaks and Italian pasta watchword, and the large, fulldishes are also offered. LE color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. THAI COTTAGE. 1109 S. Shellfish are prominently Braddock Ave., Regent Square. featured, and worth trying. K 412-241-8424. This Regent Square restaurant distinguishes itself with SAWASDEE THAI KITCHEN. its appealing ambience, excellent 112 Abbeyville Road, Upper St. service and superb renditions of Clair. This tiny restaurant (set up classic Thai cuisine: complexly for take-out, with a few tables textured, with flavors balanced for eating in) departs from the gloriously among sweet, salty and boilerplate of local Thai menus. brightly tangy notes. A good stop Sure, there are the usual red, for the popular appetizers, soups, green and yellow curries, pad curries and stir-fried entrees. KF Thai and basil noodles. But there is also an eclectic assortment of non- YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Thai dishes, including bulgogi, Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. yakisoba and tempura.KF 724-591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, SMILING BANANA LEAF. straightforward Japanese cooking 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. without hibachi theatrics or other 412-362-3200. At this absolute culinary influences. Besides the jewel-box of a restaurant, the wide sushi selection and tempura menu emphasizes authentic offerings, try squid salad or Thai dishes rather than Thaientrees incorporating udon, inflected Chinese food. Grilled Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE


, d n u o R r a e Y n e p O d an ! k e e W a s y a D n e v Se

Sample Succulent ta, Seafood, Steaks, Pas . e r o M d n a s e h ic w d n Sa

R U O H Y P HAP

m p s 7 r – e 5 z i y t a e D p y p r Eve $5 A

DRINK SPECIALS

THE GREAT SOUTHERN SHOPPING CENTER | 1155 WASHINGTON PIKE | BRIDGEVILLE | 412-914-8013 | RUMFISHPGH.COM NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

31


LOCAL

“THERE’S BEEN A TREMENDOUS OUTPOUR OF SUPPORT.”

BEAT

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

GARDEN CENTER Located on the first floor of the College of Fine Arts building on Carnegie Mellon’s campus is the Arts Greenhouse, a socially-driven music program for high school students whose goal is to teach young people the art of hip-hop production. Led by program coordinator Paul Crocker, the Arts Greenhouse sets up a four-hour workshop every weekend. Adding support are CMU professors Tomé Cousin, from the drama department, and the English department’s Jane McCafferty. Students completing the program receive a certificate of achievement from CMU. Funding is provided by private donations as well as local foundations: The Pittsburgh Foundation, Sprout Fund and American Eagle are among those providing support. Crocker believes that part of the success of the program comes from the power of music generally and the inherent social awareness of hip hop specifically. “Most kids look up to musicians,” Crocker asserts, “[and] hip hop is becoming one of the most popular genres of music among young people of all racial and economic backgrounds.” He adds that with the recent increase in awareness of racial inequality, the program’s mission becomes even more relevant. “The political awareness these kids have for their age is really amazing,” Crocker says, “and [Arts Greenhouse] gives them a platform and a way to express a lot of their frustrations with government or school, or the view that they may be undervalued by society.“ This Saturday, Arts Greenhouse hosts a spoken-word performance event in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Then, prospective students are encouraged to show up on Jan. 30 for the first Saturday workshop of the year. Crocker sees the Arts Greenhouse evolving into more than just a creative space. Eventually students will be expected to engage in community service to complement their instruction. “We want to work with the city,” Crocker says, “and help build a more socially and economically integrated community. That’s our goal and mission.”

PRISON BREAK

“THE POLITICAL AWARENESS THESE KIDS HAVE FOR THEIR AGE IS REALLY AMAZING.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EMPOWERED: MLK SPOKEN WORD. 9 p.m. Sat., Jan. 23. CMU’s Cohen University Center, 5032 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-268-3451 or www.artsgreenhouse.org

32

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SKEISVOLL PHOTOGRAPHY}

{BY SHAWN COOKE}

A

FEW YEARS AGO, it might have seemed inconceivable that one of the best-selling bands of the early aughts wouldn’t dominate the first page of a Google search for its name, but here we are. Equally mind-boggling: That we’d be considering a late-stage entry in the Rocky franchise (with the same name as said band) an Oscar snub in multiple categories. 2016 is weird. Scott Stapp got in on the joke last November by reviewing Creed, the movie, with astonishment that it wasn’t true to the origin story of his multi-platinum band, Creed. The Funny or Die video went semi-viral and managed to score laughs beyond the face-value irony of “Creed, Creed — get it?” (sample line: “I’m not from Philadelphia; I’m from Creed”). But Stapp’s Creed review wasn’t just the average parody video — you could argue that it was his first buoyant public moment after a too-public breakdown. In late 2014, Stapp drove across the country, posted alarming videos to Facebook in which he claimed to be penniless and homeless. He made some surreally

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

Higher ground: Scott Stapp

contradictory phone calls to his son’s school and wife, claiming that “the core of ISIS is within my own family,” and insisting that he was an agent in the CIA tasked with assassinating Obama. Following that episode, Stapp attributed the disturbing behavior to alcohol and drug abuse, along with a recent diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

SCOTT STAPP

WITH ROCKETT QUEEN, DESCENDSION 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 27. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $26-28. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.co

In the months since, Stapp and his wife, Jaclyn, made a transparent effort to mend their marriage on VH1’s Couples Therapy. After his current Proof of Life tour wraps, Stapp teases new solo music in the pipeline (which he can’t go into detail about), along with an open door for reuniting Creed. Through clear eyes and open arms, Stapp finally seems ready to reclaim his image.

HOW ARE YOU DOING AT THIS POINT IN YOUR RECOVERY? I’m doing great, man. I’ve made a pretty significant lifestyle change in terms of living a healthy lifestyle — how I live my life. I’m just taking it one day at a time. DO YOU STILL HAVE A STRONG RECOLLECTION OF WHAT HAPPENED AND WHERE YOU WERE EMOTIONALLY DURING THAT MONTH-LONG PERIOD, OR IS IT MOSTLY HAZY? I think I’ll forever remember that period in my life, because it’s something that dramatically changed my life and gave me a lot of answers to why I was struggling so hard in my journey. It’s made an indelible imprint on my mind as to the seriousness of mental health and also addiction and alcohol. ONCE YOU WERE OFFICIALLY DIAGNOSED WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER, IS THAT WHEN THINGS REALLY SNAPPED BACK INTO PLACE FOR YOU? Yeah, most definitely. It’s never easy to get diagnosed with a life-long illness, but I got a lot of answers … once I learned more about


the illness. I began to reflect on my life, my past. It made sense to me, so then it was just a matter of getting into acceptance and realizing, “Hey, OK, this is the cards I’ve been dealt.” And it’s something that’s very treatable, and if I do what I’m supposed to do and change my lifestyle — in terms of diet, exercise and medication — I can return to normal with a healthy, productive life. THIS CURRENT TOUR IS THE FIRST SINCE THAT BREAKDOWN. I’M CURIOUS AS TO WHY YOU’RE CALLING IT THE PROOF OF LIFE TOUR, SINCE THE EPISODE OCCURRED BETWEEN THAT RECORD’S RELEASE AND RIGHT NOW? Because it’s a continuation of that tour. You know, I took a little over a year off right after the Proof of Life album essentially came out, so I never completed that tour … We’re picking up where we left off prior to that health crisis and continuing on with the promotion of the record and promotion of the themes of that record, because those themes are so relevant to my life now. HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE THE FANS’ SUPPORT AT THESE SHOWS AND DURING YOUR RECOVERY? It’s been overwhelming. There’s been a tremendous outpour of support. We’ve received hundreds of emails to our general mailbox, with people expressing how they’ve recently gone through a similar situation or they’re dealing with a situation with a loved one — a spouse or a family member. A lot of them were asking for guidance from us, you know, what did we do, where did we go, who did we talk to. YOU’VE SPOKEN BEFORE ABOUT HOW THE PUBLIC CAN CONSUME AND GO CRAZY FOR CERTAIN ACTS AND THEN SPIT THEM OUT YEARS LATER. IN ONE INTERVIEW, YOU’VE TALKED ABOUT THIS AS BEING AN AMERICAN THING. DO YOU NOTICE WHEN TOURING IN OTHER COUNTRIES THAT THIS PHENOMENON ISN’T AS STRONG? What I’ve learned in touring in other countries is that they [couldn’t] care less about your personal life or anything that you do publicly outside of music. They care about the music, they’re fans of the music, and they love the live show. And outside of that, they don’t even pay attention to anything. So there’s a much different phenomenon in America as it pertains to celebrities and people in the public eye. DO YOU FEEL MISUNDERSTOOD BY AMERICAN AUDIENCES? Not at all. For the first time in my career, I feel very much understood. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

33


34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


blogh.pghcitypaper.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL SCHEID}

Emo cowboy: Stephen Lee

RAMBLING MAN {BY MARGARET WELSH} FOR BALTIMORE-BASED singer-songwriter

Stephen Lee, touring the country by himself has its pluses and minuses. On the one hand, it gets lonely from time to time; on the other, he can listen to all the classic-country radio he wants, with no complaints from other passengers. And when he’s performing without a band, he says, “I feel like there’s more connection between the audience and me.” Lee has had plenty of time to test that theory, having spent about half of the past three years on the road: Last year, he was out for around 135 days. His music reflects the romanticism and longing of the classic solitary traveling musician, and draws heavily from Americana and outlaw country. (He’s known to cover Willie, Waylon and Johnny during his longer sets.) But, at 28, he pulls equally from the music of his teens. Lee grew up in Northern Virginia with a musical family, and played his first show with his brother, a professional musician who now lives in Chicago. “Pop punk was one of the first things I really grabbed on to, and from there [I got] into the indie world,” he says, citing the Get Up Kids, Tim Barry and Lucero as influences. “From the scene [I came from], ‘emo’ is not a bad word,” says Lee, who sometimes describes his own style as “cowboy emo.” But while songs like “Jet Lag Blues” carry their fair share of heartbreak, Lee doesn’t subscribe to emo’s stereotypically whinier aspects. “A lot of that genre is writing about … the themes and ethics in your own life.”

For Lee, those themes and ethics have changed over the years. Lately, he says, his venture has been to take stock of where he is — both personally and musically — evaluating the experiences of the past few years. For his latest release, West of Twenty-Three, he revisited and reworked some songs he’d written years ago. “Going through my older stuff, there’s some negative stuff that probably comes from solo traveling,” he says. “I have a couple songs that I really like but I don’t play out just because they’re not really positive songs. They’re not really positive messages to be throwing at a room full of people.” Which is not to say that he’s ignoring darkness: While his songs still offer moments of catharsis, his focus has changed. “Where I’m at now, it’s like, ‘Well, I made it through. … I don’t really need to keep reliving these story songs.’”

“I DON’T REALLY NEED TO KEEP RELIVING THESE STORY SONGS.”

STEPHEN LEE

WITH FRY JONES, PRO WRESTLER 9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 22. Hambone’s, 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318 or www.hambonespittsburgh.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

While Lee will be performing a solo set at Hambone’s this Friday, he’s currently in the process of putting together a band. Being alone has its perks, but a recent mid-tour meet-up with his brother’s band reminded him of how nice it is to be surrounded by other musicians. “There’s kind of a mutual understanding among everyone about what we do with our lives,” he says. “I sort of underestimated that sense of community.” MWELS H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

35


CRITICS’ PICKS

TONY AWARD WINNER ®

{CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST REVIVAL

The Gotobeds

[FUNDRAISER] + FRI., JAN. 22

A BROADWAY JEWEL IN ALL ITS GLITTERING GLORY!

The Mr. Roboto Project has been working hard for Pittsburgh’s music scene for nearly two decades. The volunteer-run nonprofit has booked hundreds of great shows and provided an alternative to bar and club culture. Tonight, an old tradition of Roboto fundraising — one dating to the venue’s old Wilkinsburg location — is revived. Building A Better Robot is an event where some of Pittsburgh’s biggest DIY acts raise money for this institution. This year, the event features Sub Pop darlings The Gotobeds, retro supergroup Dream Phone, bonafide hip-hop legend Mrs. Paintbrush and promising newcomers Blod Maud. Andrew Woehrel 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5-10. www.the robotoproject.org

FEBRUARY 2-7 • BENEDUM CENTER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-4800 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 C ABARET M USICAL . COM PNC BROADWAY IN PITTSBURGH IS A PRESENTATION OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY AND BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA.

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

The Toasters aren’t named after the household appliance, but if that helps your enjoyment of the group, then by all means picture the members of this classic third-wave ska act as anthropomorphic toasters, a la the nightmarish 1987 children’s animated feature The Brave Little Toaster. All jokes aside, The Toasters are named after the Jamaican vocal style of “toasting,” a precursor to rap that is prevalent in reggae and dancehall music. Formed in 1981, The Toasters are legends in the world of ska. You can catch the group tonight at Club Café with support from The Pressure and Inco Fido. AW 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $13-15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[CLASSICAL] + WED., JAN. 27

Tonight, conductor Steve Hackman collaborates with the Pittsburgh Symphony Music fans who aren’t Orchestra to present really, really into the third installment of metal usually just call his FUSE series — this anything with heavy time combining the guitars “metal” or Steve Hackman works of 20th-century “hardcore,” but real metal fans like to American composer pinpoint the exact Aaron Copland with genre specifications of the songs of modern their favorite bands. indie-folk troubadour You end up with genre Bon Iver. Previous FUSE names that sound like events have included ways you could cook Brahms vs. Radiohead a steak, like “blackened crust.” (I think some and Beethoven vs. Coldplay, and tonight’s event people call that “Pittsburgh rare,” actually.) at Heinz Hall promises delight in a similar vein. North Carolina punishers Funeral Chic are a Copland’s pastoral Appalachian Spring’s sense perfect example of a blackened-crust band. The of celebration makes a sharp contrast to the word “chic” is not usually what comes to mind isolation found in Justin Vernon’s For Emma, when you hear bludgeoning guitar sounds, Forever Ago, which Hackman and the PSO hammering drums and throat-shredding vocals, will explore. Local electronic/brass group so there’s a bit of cognitive dissonance here. Beauty Slap will make a guest appearance, its You can catch Funeral Chic, as well as Joy, liveliness a juxtaposition to the tranquility of Heavens Die and more, at the Mr. Roboto Copland + Bon Iver. AW 6:30 p.m. 600 Penn Project tonight. AW 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Ave., Downtown. $30-35. 412-392-4900 or Bloomfield. $5. www.therobotoproject.org www.pittsburghsymphony.org

[METAL] + MON., JAN. 25

WILLKOMMEN BACK.

[SKA] + TUE., JAN. 26


DEAD ON {BY IAN THOMAS}

Hard rock — that nebulous and sprawling label that can mean everything or nothing at all, often simultaneously — is once again enjoying mainstream accessibility and relevance within taste-making circles. Along with albums like Baroness’ recent Purple and Hound’s Out of Space, Graveyard’s fourth offering, Innocence and Decadence, makes a great argument as to why. Presenting a multitude of sounds, confidently at that, the Swedish outfit succeeds because it doesn’t set out to redefine the terms, but to stake its claim within the canon. On Innocence and Decadence, it is clear that the aim is mastery of the form, but it doesn’t sound like the band is checking items off a list. Throughout, vocalist Joakim Nilsson’s emotive delivery lends the proceedings a sense of hard-won authenticity. Graveyard builds Innocence and Decadence on the tried-and-true foundation of blues-based licks, then proceeds to adorn the simple structure with turrets of synth (“Exit 97”) and ramparts of soulful R&B (“Too Much Is Not Enough”). As a result, Innocence and Decadence can be a shotgun shack or a sci-fi tower, gleaming on the horizon of an alien world. It’s often both at once, undulating between rollicking and doleful, shallow and pensive, but never so self-conscious as to forego indulgence in a hand-clap breakdown when the opportunity presents itself (“Never Theirs to Sell”). Innocence and Decadence has more studio polish than Graveyard’s previous efforts, including the Swedish Grammywinning second album, Hisingen Blues. When it works to the band’s benefit, this approach lends a glam-rock swagger. Fortunately, it mostly works, and when Nilsson implores the object of his affection to “stay for a song” on the album’s closer of the same name, listeners will want to do the same.

LISTEN UP! You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days.

PIT TSBURGH, PA BENEDUM CENTER ON SALE NOW!

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at

pghcitypaper.com

SHOW DATES

FRIDAY, FEB. 26, 2016 • 8PM THROUGH

SATURDAY, FEB. 27, 2016 • 2PM AND 7PM TICKET PURCHASE: Theater Square Box Office TICKETS ONLINE: www.trustarts.org BY PHONE: 412-456-6666

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GRAVEYARD with SPIDERS. 8 p.m. Tue., Jan. 26. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $16-18. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

4SHOWINFO.COM • TYLERPERRY.COM +

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

37


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 21 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Heart, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Cheap Trick. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. HOWLERS. Zach Schmidt, Beagle Brothers, Jayke Orvis, Jenn Gooch. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Under The Covers. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LINDEN GROVE. Shady Mugs. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. RIVERS CASINO. Jason Kendall Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 22 ALTAR BAR. Misaligned Mind. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. Legless, Belligerents, Lombroso, Hand & Knee, Echolaliac, Nihilistic Void. Knoxville. 412-291-8994.

CLUB CAFE. The Headway Trio, Fetish Noir Live. (Early) The Telephone Line w/ Working Breed, Josh Verbanets. (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Random Play. Station Square. 412-481-7625. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. No Bad Ju Ju. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Show w/ Ethan Jano Band, Divine Betrayal, The Classifieds, TeraChain Sky. Millvale. 412-821-4447. OAKS THEATER. Charlie Hustle & the Grifters w/ Miss Freddye’s Home Cookin Trio & The Cause. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. PALACE THEATRE. Get The Led Out. Led Zeppelin cover group. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Accidentals. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE R BAR. The Bo’Hog Brothers. CLUB CAFE. The www. per Dormont. 412-942-0882. Shameless Hex w/ pa pghcitym THUNDERBIRD CAFE. .co Mike Hickey. South Side. Sean Preston & the 412-431-4950. Loaded Pistols, w/ Mickey & DOWNEY’S HOUSE. the Snake Oil Boys. Lawrenceville. The James Claytor Band. 412-682-0177. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE VALLEY HOTEL. King’s HARVEY WILNER’S. Nik Sea. Ransom. Clairton. 412-233-9800. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. VILLAGE TAVERN & JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. TRATTORIA. Moose Tracks. Totally 80s. Warrendale. West End. 412-458-0417. 724-799-8333. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Melody Moninaro Fundraiser. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SAT 23

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 24

MP 3 MONDAY

MON 25

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TAYLOR WAY ENTERTAINMENT}

AUBREE NICOLE

BENEDUM CENTER. Wilco w/ William Tyler. Downtown. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler Street Sessions w/ SGDB. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 26 CLUB CAFE. The Toasters w/ The Pressure, Inco Fido. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Height, Gavin Riley Smoke Machine, Sikes, AA Arm. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Graveyard w/ Spiders. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 27 PITTSBURGH WINERY. Kevin Garrett. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

DJS FRI 22 Each week we bring you a new song by a local artist. This week’s track comes from Aubree Nicole; stream or download “Get a Little Crazy” from her EP Dairy of Aubree, for free at FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. CONTINUES ON PG. 40

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

39


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 38

EARLY WARNINGS

THE CLUB BAR & GRILL. DJ Rick The Ruler. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Dance Crush. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

WED 27 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

THURSDAY, JAN 21 / 10 PM

STOLEN STITCHES, DOC HUNTLEY, PIERCE BISHOP

FRI 22 ELWOOD’S PUB. Bojack Bluegrass. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

Matthew Logan Vasquez

{FRI., MARCH 18}

Carly Rae Jepsen Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale {THU., APRIL 21}

Krizz Kaliko

BLUES

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

FRI 22 MOONDOG’S. Felix & the Hurricanes. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SHELBY’S STATION. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. 412-319-7938.

DANCE PARTY

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

{WED., MAY 04}

Matthew Logan Vasquez of Delta Spirit Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side

SAT 23 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Eric Bibb w/ Michael Jerome Brown. Oakland. 412-361-1915.

TUE 26 BLUSH SPORTS BAR. Shari Richards. Jam session. Downtown. 412-281-7703.

JAZZ THU 21 ANDYS WINE BAR. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8800. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 22

{PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK}

Fist Fight in the Parking Lot at Plantscape Warehouse

Last Saturday, more than 20 neighborhood venues were a part of the Strip District Music Fest. Check out our online slideshow for more photos from the event! www.pghcitypaper.com/ blogs/AllAccess PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Olga Watkins. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PARLAY LOUGNE. RML Jazz. Washington. 412-370-9621. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Can’t Top the Lindy Hop Workshops w/ Peter & Naomi. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1623.

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

SUN 24

ANDYS WINE BAR. w JERGEL’S RHYTHM Kenia. Downtown. paper pghcitym GRILLE. Benny 412-773-8800. .co Benack. Warrendale. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. 724-799-8333. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. BREW ON BROADWAY. Reggie JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Watkins, Tony DePaolis, Tom SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Wendt, Eric Susoeff. Beechview. Band. Dance lesson & open dance. 412-437-8676. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Jessica Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. Lee. Downtown. 412-471-9100. 724-799-8333. RIVERS CASINO. Etta Cox Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777.

MON 25

SAT 23 ANDYS WINE BAR. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8800. THE CLUB BAR & GRILL. Tubby Daniels. Monroeville. 412-728-4155. LEMONT. Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Tuesday Night Country w/ Michael Christopher & dj JD Greene. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

CLASSICAL

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. After Funk. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SATURDAYS•10PM

TUE 26

SAT 23

FRI 22

ALT 80S NIGHT

40

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

HIP HOP/R&B

FRIDAYS•10PM

COUNTRY THU 21

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PARADIGM TALENT AGENCY}

SAT 23

TUE 26

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange w/ David Throckmorton. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 27 ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8800.

CULTURE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Downtown. 412-238-2222. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dan Bubien. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

ACOUSTIC THU 21 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 22 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Songwriters in the Cellar w/ Morgan Erina. Featuring Mikey Deluca, Kelly McCafferty, & Mike Cali. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 23

KASSIA ENSEMBLE. James Laughlin Music Center. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

SUN 24 CONCERT IV: WANDERER FANTASY. Presented by Schubert on the Bluff. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6083. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The official Pokémon live orchestral concert, Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions. All-new orchestral arrangements and carefully timed visuals draw from recent & classic Pokémon video games. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SCHUBERT ON THE BLUFF. Concert IV: Wanderer Fantasy PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6083.

WED 27 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & BEAUTY SLAP. FUSE@PSO returns w/ a mash-up of Aaron Copland’s quintessentially American orchestral suite “Appalachian Spring” w/ the music of Bon Iver. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 22 ATLAS BOTTLE WORKS. Haygood Paisleys, Casual Hobos, Lone Pine String Band. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4248.

SAT 23

THE R BAR. Tom Lagi & Katie Simone. Dormont. 412 942-0882.

INDIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. River City Brass. Hekima Place’s capital campaign for a new girls’ high school in Kenya w/ refreshments & a meet & greet w/ Kate Fletcher & James Gourlay. Carnegie. 412-343-8410.

WED 27

SUN 24

VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Bill Couch. West End. 412-458-0417.

TUE 26

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 22 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

SHALER AREA HIGH SCHOOL. Broadway in the Burgh: Kathy Voytko & John Cudia in Concert. Broadway’s former Phantom, John Cudia, & vet of 7 Broadway shows, Kathy Voytko, sing a benefit concert for the Performing Arts. Shaler. 412-492-1200.

WED 27 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Well Strung. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.


What to do January 20 -26

IN PITTSBURGH

WEDNESDAY 20

& more. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. No cover. 8p.m.

The Shameless Hex

Chop Shop

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Stephen Kellogg Band

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Big Something

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

THURSDAY 21 Exotype

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

FRIDAY 22

HEINZ HALL SUNDAY, JANUARY 24

Paula Poundstone

Gallery Crawl

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, Downtown. For more info visit trustarts.org. 5:30p.m.

Get the Led Out

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. Through Jan. 23.

NEWS

SUNDAY 24

POKÉMON SYMPHONIC EVOLUTIONS

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The Telephone Line CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950.

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

Pokémon Symphonic Evolutions

23

Over 21 show. SATURDAY Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. Ron White 10:30p.m. BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. After Funk 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m. Over 21 show. Some Brighter Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m. Distance

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

CITY THEATRE MAINSTAGE South Side. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Feb. 14.

THE SHOW

+

EVENTS

TUESDAY 26 Graveyard

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Ethan Jano Band, Divine Betrayal

ARTS

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 2:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

+

CLASSIFIEDS

41


AMERICANS AT HOME

BANG, BANG, SLO-MO INJURY, BOOM, AMERICAN FLAG FLOATING IN POOL

{BY AL HOFF} Fredrick Wiseman’s latest documentary, In Jackson Heights, introduces viewers to the incredible diversity of the New York City neighborhood. It’s the summer of 2014, and the streets are lively — from gaypride marches to World Cup celebrations. Wiseman’s camera highlights various

A mariachi band entertains.

CP APPROVED

religious and ethnic enclaves, while weaving a portrait of 21st-century America: an ever-hybridizing melting pot of immigrants and cultures; the many small bricks that comprise the American dream (and what larger forces threaten it); and democracy in action, be it an engaged politician or the grassroots community groups that coalesce around specific issues. America is in a gloomy, angry mood this election season, but Wiseman’s film serves as a reminder that, sure, our system is messy, but it’s one that works more often than not. Like most of Wiseman’s works — this is his 40th film — Jackson Heights is long, at a shade over three hours. It drags in places (some folks do go on and on), but viewers are rewarded in the last reel with one of the film’s most amusing segments. A man use mnemonics to train prospective taxi drivers (on the compass, “NESW: Never Ever Smoke Weed’), and the loose humor is just a notch above a comedy skit. But take note, while laughing: He is creating new working cogs of the great American machine. Fri., Jan. 22-Tue., Jan. 26. Melwood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

The Boy An American nanny gets a job working for a British family, but her charge is simply a life-like doll. Or is there something more supernatural afoot? Lauren Cohan and Rupert Evans star in William Brent Bell’s new horror thriller. Starts Fri., Jan. 22

AMERICANS

ABROAD A secret soldier (John Krasinski) at dawn

{BY AL HOFF}

I

F YOU’RE STILL foaming about “Benghazi,” a.k.a. the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on a U.S. diplomatic outpost in that Libyan city that killed four Americans, including the ambassador, then by all means line up for Michael Bay’s latest macho explosion-fest. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi recounts the events at the outpost, as well as what went down at a CIA base one mile down the road. Our guides are the six civilian “special operators” — former U.S.-military special forces hired by the CIA for security, who, on the night of the attack, do double duty at both locales. A set-up that takes the better part of an hour establishes that Benghazi is dangerous; U.S. government figures are a bunch of know-nothing paper-pushers; and when manly men talk about how they miss their wives and kids (a.k.a. the world’s laziest character development), you can bet that one or more of these dudes ain’t making it out. Not that you’ll really care, because other than the guy from The Office (John

Krasinski) and one man without a beard, these he-men are indistinguishable from each other. The action scenes are long, murky, confusing and, soon enough, tedious. Bang, bang, night vision, bang, boom, f-word, bang, bang.

13 HOURS: THE SECRET SOLDIERS OF BENGHAZI DIRECTED BY: Michael Bay STARRING: John Krasinski, James Badge Dale, David Costabile

Nobody expects nuance from Michael Bay (Transformers), but for the clear-eyed viewer, there are some intriguing dark streaks that run through this rah-rah actioner. There’s the suggestion that the traditional overseas standard-bearers of the American way and justice — Department of State, military, CIA — are hidebound, ineffective, soft, etc., etc. in today’s vaguer geo-political conflicts. But is the answer really hyper-macho for-hire

dudes operating off the books? Somewhere in this stew of explosions and Fox News agendas is the material for a more provocative drama. One about the consequences of mixing it up in another country’s affairs, and how intentions and plans fare within the reality of an unexpected outcome. Add in layers of lumbering bureaucracy, and ideals can quickly get subsumed in red tape, bad management, human error and so on. Focus on some well-developed characters caught up in this mess who struggle to match mission to morals to WTF is this?! Rather than unspool the minutiae of actual events, a better film could have used elements of what happened at Benghazi to flesh out an inspired-by drama rather than “a true story.” But who has time for being thoughtful when there are things to blow up, bigger and bigger guns to wield and pulp-novel dialogue like “They are all bad guys until they are not.” Bang, bang, slo-mo injury, boom, American flag floating in pool. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


FILM CAPSULES CP

gritty, funny and musically influential doc about the Los Angeles punk-rock scene. In 1998, Spheeris made Part III, which profiled a later generation of L.A. punks — many of them street kids, who find community and meaning in the ongoing music scene. Some things don’t change: Everybody still hates cops and loves beer. But there’s a larger sadness that hangs over Part III, where the brio and brass of the late-1970s rebels has now become fatalistic resignation that life is getting harder. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 22. $5. Harris

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK ANOMALISA. A depressed and disconnected man has an experience that changes his perspective, in this new stop-motion-animated drama from Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson. Starts Fri., Jan. 22

SAME CIRCUS DIFFERENT TOWN. Catch Justin Rainier’s doc, which showcases the long-running and ever-evolving Pittsburgh band The Damaged Pies. The band, celebrating its 25th anniversary, will play after the screening. Noon, Sat., Jan. 23. Hollywood.

BOY AND THE WORLD. In Ale Abreu’s Oscar-nominated animated film from Brazil, a little boy goes on a quest to find his father. It’s a simple story, with larger themes about poverty and globalization. Starts Fri., Jan. 22. Row House Cinema DIRTY GRANDPA. An uptight dude (Zac Efron) drives to Florida for spring break with his outrageous and crude grandfather (Robert De Niro). Dan Mazer directs this comedy. Starts Fri., Jan. 22

IP Man 3

THE 5TH WAVE. J. Blakeson directs this sci-fi actioner about a young woman (Chloe Grace Moretz) who tries to save herself and her younger brother when Earth suffers a series of devastating attacks from alien forces. The film is adapted from the first of Rick Yancey’s young-adult book series. Starts Fri., Jan. 22 IP MAN 3. This final chapter of Wilson Yip’s biographical trilogy about renowned Wing Chun martial artist Ip Man (Donnie Yen) is a mixed bag. There is an incredibly cheesy plot about a school being menaced by sillylooking gangsters, and this generates a fight scene or two. This drama, set in 1959, is tied into a real-estate deal facilitated by “foreign devils” (this chapter doesn’t have the earlier two’s more explicit critiques of colonial Hong Kong), including a pugilistic character played by Mike Tyson. There’s a third fight-related plot in which Ip Man is challenged by another to decide who is the truest practioner of Wing Chun. A lot of time elapses between the film’s three best face-offs: Yen vs. Tyson; Yen vs. a muay Thai fighter, in an elevator; and Yen vs. his challenger (Jin Zhang), in a gorgeous dance-like battle staged by Yuen Woo-Ping (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Kill Bill). Then there is another, more personal struggle, where Ip Man faces the devastating news that his wife has terminal cancer. This finds him at home, caring for his wife, and some of these scenes are genuinely affecting. Yen plays the melodrama with a quiet dignity, and Yip gives some of these domestic passages the quiet space they need. It’s a bit of an odd fit with some of the more cartoonish action, so viewers should expect to shift gears frequently. In Cantonese, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Jan. 22. Hollywood (Al Hoff) NORM OF THE NORTH. Less than two weeks into 2016, and I’m confident this truly dreadful film will stay well planted on the year’s Worst Films list. Trevor Wall’s animated family film is about a polar bear named Norm who can “speak human,” and goes to the big city to stop a corporate guy from building luxury homes in the Arctic. Along the way, Norm shamelessly borrows from earlier works (Despicable Me, Madagascar, Ice Age), while doubling down on some of the cheapest digital animation I’ve seen in a decade. (The ice in this film looks like carved Crisco.) Another cost-saving measure must have been not bothering to pay for any decent or fresh

NEWS

+

EAST OF LIBERTY TRILOGY. Chris Ivey’s threepart documentary project began in 2005 with the goal of examining how Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood and its residents were affected by ongoing structural, demographic, cultural and economic changes. All three parts — A Story of Good Intentions, The Fear of Us and In Unlivable Times — screen, to be followed by a discussion with Ivey and others. Story: 2 p.m.; Fear: 3:40 and Unlivable: 5:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 23. Mixer, 6:30 p.m.; discussion, 7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theatre, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org.

CP

REAR WINDOW. The convalescing photographer L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies (Jimmy Stewart) is an involuntary but enthusiastic couch-potato prototype: Bored to distraction, he needs to spy on his Greenwich Village neighbors. So while Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller is a characteristically terrific entertainment, it’s also a witty, probing look at spectatorship and voyeurism centered on a man who wants to see without being seen, and what happens once that’s no longer possible. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 24. Regent Square (Bill O’Driscoll)

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PEGGY GUGGENHEIM COLLECTION ARCHIVES, VENICE}

Norm of the North

jokes; this film is so strenuously unfunny that a theater full of kids stayed silent during even reliable gags involving peeing, farting and falling down. Do your part for the polar environment by staying home. (AH)

pearance by a major Hollywood star. Ultimately, despite her personal and professional troubles, Guggenheim had the last laugh: Her collection of modern art is stunning, now near-priceless, and housed in one of the world’s most visited museums, in Venice. A must for fans of art and of iconoclastic women. Starts Sat., Jan. 23. Harris (AH)

Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict

PEGGY GUGGENHEIM: ART ADDICT. Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s documentary is a straightforward work about a considerably more offbeat woman. Peggy Guggenheim was born into the wealthy New York banking family (her father went down on the Titantic when she was 13), but the rebellious young woman was a square peg amidst Manhattan’s glittery society. She decamped to Paris in the 1920s, taking quickly to the city’s bohemian scene, particularly its lively pack of modern visual artists. Over the next few decades, Guggenheim would befriend, discover, promote, subsidize and collect works from dozens of the 20th century’s most prominent artists (Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Alexander Calder, Jackson Pollock). Unthinkable for a woman of her time and class, she enjoyed numerous romantic affairs, and opened and operated a series of influential art galleries. The high point of Vreeland’s film is hearing the elderly Guggenheim recount these adventures herself, in long-ago audio tapes recently rediscovered. Vreeland has various contemporary art-world types weigh in on Guggenheim’s substantial influence (some older men still sound a bit dismissive because she was a rich, self-educated woman), and there’s even a surprise ap-

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA. A truck driver (Kurt Russell) gets drawn into a centuries-old war in San Francisco’s Chinatown, in this 1986 actioner from John Carpenter. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 27. AMC Loews. $5 GROUNDHOG DAY. In this neo-classic 1993 charmer from Harold Ramis, Bill Murray plays a Pittsburgh weatherman who gets trapped in a time loop while covering the annual festivities in Punxsutawney. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 28. Hollywood

REPERTORY DRAGNET. Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks star in this 1987 comedic reboot of the popular (and unintentionally funny) 1960s TV cop show. Tom Mankiewicz directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 20. AMC Loews. $5 CITY OF GOD. Fernando Meirelles’ gritty 2002 drama about two boys growing up in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. One turns to drug-dealing and the other hopes to be a photographer. In Portuguese, with subtitles. Jan. 22-28. Row House Cinema ELITE SQUAD. In José Padilha’s 2007 action thriller, a police captain is busy — preparing Rio de Janeiro for the pope’s visit, cleaning up the streets and searching for his own successor. In Portuguese, with subtitles. Jan. 22-25, and Jan. 28. Row House Cinema

Moonwalkers (2015)

1/21 @ 7:30pm In 1969 London, a CIA agent and the manager of a rock band must find a way to fake the moon landing.

_______________________________________________

IP Man 3 (2016) 1/22 @ 7:30pm & 10pm, 1/23 @ 7pm & 9:30pm, 1/24 @ 7pm, 1/25 @ 7:30pm, 1/26 @ 7:30pm, 1/27 @ 7:30pm Donnie Yen vs. Mike Tyson!

_______________________________________________ Same Circus, Different Town

1/23 @ 12pm A charity benefit featuring a documentary about the band Damaged Pies, with live performance afterwards.

THE DECLINE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION PART III. Director Penelope Spheeris made her mark in 1980 with The Decline of Western Civilization, her

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

43


[STAGE]

MULLER-MUNK GREW DISSATISFIED WITH THE “EXCLUSIVITY OF HANDMADE WORK”

ROCKET MEN During last week’s State of the Union address, Tracy Brigden started when President Obama touted American ingenuity by referencing the moon landing. Coincidentally, Brigden’s theater company is readying the world premiere of a play about a scandalous but little-discussed aspect of the U.S. space program: It was led by German scientists whose Nazi pasts were scrubbed by the U.S. government. Keith Reddin’s Some Brighter Distance tells the true story of Arthur Rudolph, one of more than 1,500 Germans brought here after World War II as part of Operation Paperclip. The group included Werner von Braun, the ex-Nazi later celebrated as “the father of the American space program.” But Rudolph — who directed the German lab that produced the V-2 rocket, and who was implicated in working thousands of slave laborers to death — was the only scientist to face prosecution for war crimes. In 1984, after decades of Cold War service to his adopted country, he and his wife, Marta, were deported to Germany. (He died in 1996.) Reddin and Brigden met 25 years ago, in New York’s theater scene, and Some Brighter Distance is Reddin’s third world premiere at City Theatre during Brigden’s 15 years as artistic director (following 2007’s The Missionary Position and 2009’s Human Error). The play was commissioned by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to promote understanding of science. But Reddin, by phone from New York, says that science-heavy drafts gave way to a human story centering on Rudolph and Marta, and involving von Braun himself and government officials Turner and Davis. The settings range from 1933, early in Rudolph’s career, through 1984, when he’s confronted with evidence of his crimes. The 35 scenes, some as brief as one page, are packed into a single, 90-minute act. The play’s theatricality includes quicksilver shifts between time periods, with characters often saying something in one decade that’s responded to in another. Projected historical footage helps set the scenes. Visiting actors Jonathan Tindle and Elizabeth Rich play Arthur and Marta, with local favorite David Whalen as von Braun, Carnegie Mellon alum Matthew Stocke as Turner, and LeRoy McClain as Davis. Brigden, who directs, says the play asks audiences to think for themselves about the characters’ morality. Reddin she says, “shows the shades of gray around these particular stories.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SOME BRIGHT DISTANCE Jan. 23Feb. 14. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-56. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

44

Playwright Keith Reddin

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Work by Peter Muller-Munk, clockwise from left: Normandie pitcher for Revere Copper and Brass, from 1935; a 1931 tea service (from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; gift of Mr. & Mrs. Herbert R. Isenburger); {BOTH PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}; Waring blender, from 1937; and Peter Muller-Munk Associates’ Symbol line of cast-aluminum cookware, from 1962 (from the Carnegie Museum of Art, gift of Jewel Stern). (BOTH PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART)

DESIGNS OF THE TIMES [ART REVIEW]

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

W

HAT WOULD John Ruskin and

William Morris have made of Peter Muller-Munk? If they had seen Silver to Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, maybe they would have thrown in the towel and embraced the marriage of craftsmanship and industrial production. Then again, there is plenty of evidence that mass production can churn out oodles of crap. But beautiful handmade things often come with a hefty price. And while there is no shortage of reasonably priced items with celebrity designer names attached to them at big-box stores, these things are often made with poor materials in overseas factories with questionable labor practices, and the pieces rarely hold up over time. Industrial design is linked to the rise of mechanization, urbanization, a growing

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

middle class and a shift in patterns of consumption. According to Silver to Steel exhibition materials, Muller-Munk was one of the preeminent industrial designers of the mid-20th century and he inspired a revolution by recognizing a growing middle-class demand for beautiful and functional everyday items in the post-World War II era.

SILVER TO STEEL: THE MODERN DESIGNS OF PETER MULLER-MUNK continues through April 11. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Muller-Munk was raised in Berlin, Germany. Around 1923, his mother met the sculptor and silversmith Waldemar Raemisch, and this led to a fortuitous ap-

prenticeship for her son, who had decided that he wanted to work with his hands. Raemisch was a professor at the Unified State Schools for Fine and Applied Art. The school was born out of a merger between two schools in Berlin. Its direction was set by Bruno Paul, who believed in the ideals of the Arts and Crafts Movement combined with the practicality of machine production with an eye toward modernism and the avant-garde. These early influences are evident throughout Muller-Munk’s work. The exhibition — the first retrospective dedicated to his life’s work — is organized in a more or less chronological fashion. It begins with his elegant and stunning hand-wrought silver pieces from the 1920s and ’30s. In 1926, Muller-Munk moved to New York and worked for almost two years at the bench of Tiffany & Co. before opening his


own studio. He quickly gained a reputation, but as the demand for luxury goods declined due to the Great Depression, he grew dissatisfied with the “exclusivity of handmade work.” In 1935, in an effort to do something different, Muller-Munk combined traditional silver methods with affordable materials to make one of his most famous creations, the Normandie pitcher. Based on the shape of the luxury ship the SS Normandie, this shiny, streamlined tabletop pitcher was distinctively modern. Interested in a broader application to make useful things in larger quantities, he envisioned a role for industrial design in mass production while adapting modern designs to suit industrial processes. By using electroplating and chrome, he created affordable high-styled tableware and personal accessories. It was also in 1935 that Muller-Monk moved to Pittsburgh to teach as an assistant professor of industrial design in a newly formed program at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. Within the next few years, he also created his design-consultancy firm, Peter Muller-Munk Associates (PMMA), which would become one of the top 10 in the nation. The major local industries of steel, aluminum and glass would greatly influence his creative energy, along with other modern industrial materials, such as plastic. PMMA worked on appliances, graphic design and technical literature. The exhibition offers a dizzying array of mass-produced products including cameras, lighters, mirrors, brushes, clocks, hearing aids, refrigerators, freezers, power tools, safety helmets and even a gasoline pump. Of note is the Waring blender, redesigned by MullerMunk with such aesthetic appeal that it has become iconic. Also eye-catching at the Carnegie is the wall of Bissell vacuums and sweepers, displayed against bright stripes of paint as if at a product trade show. For Bissell, PMMA delivered a “total corporate service,” not only consulting on product design, but also creating the company’s entire corporate identity, packaging, displays and even the design of their executive offices. Good design is now a mainstay of our everyday life, and the democratization of design means that product development should be visually striking, user-friendly and functional. And this is exactly what the co-organizers of this exhibition — Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design at Carnegie, and Jewel Stern, guest curator and independent scholar — have done. Helped by Emily Rice, the Carnegie’s exhibition designer, and Alicia Cheng, of MGMT. design, they have created an elegant, orderly and thoroughly edifying exhibition. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

+

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

[PLAY REVIEW]

FULL HOUSE

PRESENTS...

{BY TED HOOVER} Fourteen people! If I took nothing else away from local playwright F.J. Hartland’s Be Our Guest, it’s that the cast comprises 14 people! Most new musicals don’t feature 14 people, let alone situation comedies like this. Some of the funniest evenings I’ve spent in the theater have been at Hartland plays, so I was eager to see this new one, in a special fundraising production for the Theatre Factory. The plot concerns the Guest family, a group of wackadoos living in some rural outland. The oldest Guest son — the only normal one in the bunch — brings home his new bride to meet the family. Hijinks ensue. In some ways, Be Our Guest is a tribute to another large-cast show about two lovebirds and a wildly eccentric family, the Kaufman & Hart classic You Can’t Take It With You … but on steroids. These people aren’t merely eccentric, they’re certifiable. The mother spends her time selecting her gravestone, epitaph and burial dress … even though she’s not ill. The father is a historical re-enactor who, every time he enters, is dressed as a different first lady. The daughter carries around (and speaks for) the stuffed carcass of the family’s dead dog, the grandmother is dating a porn star … and on and on. All of them, except for the newlyweds, are smack out of their minds. And 12 crazy people are just too much for one show. Hartland simply doesn’t have time to develop the strong structural spine he needs to carry all of this insanity. When the last of the dozen enters and proceeds to unwrap her hyper-lunacy, we are waaaay over it. But this is an early production of a new script, and Hartland is too smart a playwright not to understand the work ahead. Not that he needs my advice, but cutting the cast in half would be an excellent place to begin. Director Jacob Wadsworth does a terrific job keeping the pace and energy bright and fast. There are too many in the cast to mention individually, but I did enjoy T.J. Firneno, Teresa Madden Harrold, Greta K. Englert and Tom Protulipac, who manage to find a few moments to make an impression.

A Year with Frog and Toad Based on the books by Arnold Lobel

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS INFO@MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

Do you know what your Pittsburgh city councilor has been up to? Follow the latest updates on our blog at www.pghcitypaper.com Q UANT UM T HEAT R E

+

27

(through Feb. 14)

Ciara is the cherished daughter of a mob boss. She escaped the life of crime for a life of art: she runs a gallery and champions local artists, especially one whose female figures loom over the gritty city like goddesses. quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

BY

DAV I D H A RROWER DI R E C TE D BY

KARLA BOOS

JAVO STUDIOS 5137 Holmes St.

BE OUR GUEST continues through Sat., Jan. 23. The Theatre Factory, 235 Cavitt Ave., Trafford. $14-16. 412-374-9200 TA S T E

Opening Night January

CIARA

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

+

Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 PM, Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM Tickets are $12, $7 for students - group rates available. Handicapped Accessible.

Book and Lyrics by Willie Reale, Music by Robert Reale.

TWELVE CRAZY PEOPLE ARE JUST TOO MUCH FOR ONE SHOW.

M A I N F E AT U R E

JAN. 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 2016

LAWRENCEVILLE

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

45


[BOOKS]

SEEKING JUSTICE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Season 21

BRYAN STEVENSON is a leading advocate for reforming the criminal-justice system. The Harvard-educated attorney and founder of the Montgomery, Ala.-based Equal Justice Initiative has spent decades defending the poor and wrongly condemned. And as he recounts in his bestselling 2014 book Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption (Spiegel & Grau), he’s saved innocent men from death row in the Deep South — where, even more than elsewhere, being poor, black and charged with a crime can seem an insurmountable challenge. Stevenson’s work addresses a wide range of social-justice issues. The author, 56, last spoke in Pittsburgh in the 1990s. Prior to his Jan. 25 talk at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Night Lectures, he spoke with CP by phone from Montgomery. The event is sold out, but partial-view seats and a waiting list are available.

HOW HAS MASS INCARCERATION AFFECTED AMERICA? We’re really just a very different country today than we were 40 years ago, when the prison population was 300,000 people — today with a prison population of 2.3 million, and six million people on probation and parole. The U.S. has the highest rate of incarceration in the world, and we don’t seem to be particularly bothered by that.

One Night Stand Rekindle your love, reignite your passion, and indulge in Attack Theatre’s One Night Stand. This new fundraiser will feature premiere dance performances, and a full bar and dinner from Whitfield. Saturday, Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. Attire: First-date chic Tickets: $250

Ace Hotel Pittsburgh 120 S. Whitfield St. Pittsburgh, PA 15206

www.attacktheatre.com/onenightstand

Photo credit: 2015 Craig Thompson Photography

BRYAN STEVENSON 7:30 p.m. Mon., Jan. 25. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-25. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

WHY DON’T WE TALK ABOUT IT? I think first of all we’ve had no leadership — that is, our politicians have been preaching fear and anger for decades because it gets them votes. But I think we have a hard time talking about it because what we do in the criminal-justice system is not largely transparent. The jails and prisons are remote; there’s no access to them unless you have a loved one inside [or] you work inside. You don’t really know how terrifying and abusive the conditions of confinement can be. HOW CAN THAT CHANGE? We just have to get people closer to what happens. I’ve always believed that if most

Bryan Stevenson

people saw what I see on a regular basis, they would feel the same way I do about reform. But because they don’t see what I see on a regular basis, they are resistant if I say, “We should stop putting children in prison until they die. We shouldn’t have the death penalty. We shouldn’t allow police and prosecutors to have this kind of power.” I don’t think my perspective is radical or comes from a set of values or norms that are extreme. I’ve just been getting information that most people don’t get. YOU MAKE A FINANCIAL ARGUMENT, TOO. We spent $ 6 billion on jails and prisons in 1980; we spent $ 80 billion last year. That means we’re not spending money on education, we’re not spending money on health and human services, we’re not spending money on infrastructure and public utilities. People need to be talking about these trade-offs. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE BLACK LIVES MATTER MOVEMENT? We’ve done a really poor job of confronting our history of racial inequality in this country. I think from the very first day when black people became part of the American experience, we have not valued their victimization. And so I think it’s been great to see young people in particular accept this challenge of giving voice to this. … I’m encouraged when people want to draw attention to acts of [police] violence that may be shaped by racial inequality and racial bias. I think we have to do that. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


#CrawlPGH

GALLERY CRAWL in the Cultural District

1

E

10

P

11 9

3 8 67 45 2

P

SEV

ENT

HA

VEN

UE

P

WO OD S

VENU

TY A

R LIBE

12 13

TRE ET

DUM BENETER CEN

UE

Z HEINL HAL

Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

REET H ST NINT

P 18

P

15 14

VEN NN A

PE

Sponsors:

REET

17

19

H ST

TER THEA RE SQUA ILLY O’RE ATER THE

A Production of:

16

ET STRE

Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl

P

20

REET

All information and locations are subject to change.

M BYHATER THEA

P

H ST

P

H SIXT

FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENTS

P

T EIGH

T

FOR

P

RD

LEVA

BOU

NT SEVE

Friday, January 22, 5:30-10pm

SNE

UE DUQ

NCE WRE ER L. LA CENT DAVIDVENTION N CO

CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

1. Wood Street Galleries

5. Trust Arts Education Center

601 Wood Street

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio (Basement)

Pastoral Noir: New English landscapes Guest curated by Justin Hopper. Artists: Tessa Farmer, Jem Finer, Ghost Box Records, Tony Heywood & Alison Condie, Autumn Richardson & Richard Skelton and Semiconductor Through their visual, sonic and sculptural investigations into the English landscape, the artists in Pastoral Noir have discovered a dark and eerie place. Using science and language, memory and myth, these works immerse the viewer in uncanny landscapes both real and imagined. Showing from January 22–April 3, 2016.

AMOR FATI – Uncommon Songs for Uncommon Hearts Christiane Leach Amor Fati musical release by Christiane Dolores featuring fellow musicians Chris Belin, Justin Brown, Paul Cunningham, Phat Man Dee, Geña and Steevie Wellons. Second Floor

Carnegie Library Button Making and Books We supply the materials, you supply the creativity. Want books? Buy them (for next to nothing).

2. SPACE

Third Floor*

812 Liberty Avenue

Associated Artists of Pittsburgh AAP will be showing its newest members juried into the organization in 2015. This exhibit features sculpture, paintings and prints by 30 talented AAP member artists.

The Mountain and the Bumblebee Curated by Chris McGinnis Participating visual artists and poets: Rick Barot, Patrick Bizarro, Robin Clarke, Mathew Conboy, Todd Davis, Wesley Dunning, Heather Green, BA Harrington, Chele Isaac, Chris McGinnis, Erika Osborne, Josh Reiman, Gwyneth Scally and Meg Shevenock The Mountain and the Bumble Bee brings together selected works by contemporary artists and poets who confront broadly defined notions of landscape as both cultural icon and raw material. Working in a variety of media including photography, sculpture, painting, digital media and poetic verse, featured artists maneuver the complex web of references contributing to our understanding of landscape. Scenes from Hollywood westerns abut survey photographs and miniature paintings to highlight America’s often contradictory role as both steward and exploiter of the land. Music with DJ Dave Zak Party Time

Fourth Floor

BOOM Concepts Presents: Hang With the Creatives BOOM Concepts will provide a pop up experience, Hang with the Creatives, that gives gallery crawl attendees an introduction to the creatives of BOOM Concepts. The evening will include interactive live painting, a #hashtag photo booth, musical performances with Jordan Montgomery & Norman Dean, and a small artist market.

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | Information Lab

4. Shaw Galleries 805 Liberty Avenue

6th Annual Bad Art Sale! Come see the Best of The Worst at Shaw Galleries’ 6th Annual Bad Art Sale!

6. Harris Theater The Harris Theater will be screening regionally produced short films. 5:30–9pm (Free)

7. Arcade Comedy Theater Live Improv comedy every half hour! Every half hour catch a brand new improv show at the Cultural District’s award-winning comedy theater!

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center 212 Ninth Street

Process Masters Exemplary high school students, dubbed Process Masters, from the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Youth & Arts program will exhibit visual art from various mediums and several will give artist talks.

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership presents the 2016 Winter Night Market – an indoor market featuring some of Pittsburgh’s most creative independent vendors.

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

Stop in and check out the Cultural District’s newest restaurant and enjoy live music from local musicians Tony Campbell, Eric Johnson, and Dan Wasson!

11. The August Wilson Center

17. Backstage Bar

980 Liberty

655 Penn Avenue

Great Performances: Teenie Harris Archive Presented by the Carnegie Museum of Art Veteran film and television actor Bill Nunn curates the Great Performances Teenie Harris exhibit. The archive documents notable events and Black daily life for over six decades through Harris’ photography for the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper. The other Side of Pop Guest Curated by Sean Beauford (Gallery II, Claude Worthington Benedum Gallery) The Other Side of Pop gives voice to those who observe pop culture but cannot relate to its mass media gatekeepers. This group exhibition illuminates creativity that, despite its influence, isn’t always given the recognition it deserves. This collection also serves as an updated take on a cultural genre that defies standards and rose to prominence over 50 years ago.

Fiber – Fiction Katy DeMent Encaustic paperworks. Jevon Rushton & Terrence Vaughn Group will perform from 5–7pm.

12. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery 914 Penn Avenue

Beginnings Experience middle school art while enjoying The Sounds of Steel steelpan band. Create art of your own!

Description of Encapsulation: CFA Group Show 2016 In Future Tenant’s 2016 CFA Group Show, the students from Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Fine Art share their art and their stories with you. This year’s featured artists are Carolina Vogt, Max Emiliano Gonzales, Daniel Kim, John Choi, Miranda Jacoby, Swetha Kannan, Hannah Gaskill, and Audrey Banks.

14. 709 Penn Gallery 709 Penn Avenue

Post Erotica: The Anthropology of Motherhood Fran Flaherty Post Erotica is an artistic scrapbook, a collection of moments, a visual diary of valuable experiences of being a mom.

15. 707 Penn Gallery 707 Penn Avenue

925 Liberty Avenue

+

130 7th Street

Photography by Zach Funk “A Pittsburgh Local” Seating is for those dining or purchasing at the bar.

18. Boutique 208 208 Sixth Street

Handmade Arcade is excited to host a make-and-take herbal infusion demonstration at Boutique 208. While at Boutique 208, shop their selection of local art and crafts and pick up a copy of Handmade Arcade’s coloring book “Things Making Things: A DIY Coloring Book.”

19. Verve 360 142 Sixth Street

bombyx collective presents Beautiful Nightmare Back by popular demand, bombyx collective dancers and aerialists move through a surreal dreamscape in a beautiful nightmare of the erotic and uncanny. Rated PG-13. Twentyminute performances at 8:30 and 9:30pm.

20. Braddock’s American Brasserie 107 Sixth Street

Braddock’s will be offering a deconstructed plate to Crawl participants.

819 Penn Avenue

809 Liberty Avenue

9. Winter Night Market

NEWS

16. Culture

971 Liberty Ave

13. Future Tenant

811 Liberty Avenue

3. Tito Way

10. Tonic

+

MUSIC

You’re not real, I’m real. Elizabeth Rudnick The work in this show asks what it means to a curator of one’s own life. Using a combination of new and traditional media, the artist explores anxiety and desire in the digital age.

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

crawl after dark The Decline of Western Civilization III 9:30pm, All Tickets $5 Harris Theater, 807 Liberty Avenue

Penelope Spheeris' third installment in the Decline trilogy chronicles the "gutter punk" lifestyle of LA teenagers who take the anti-establishment message with extreme seriousness, and tune out society completely. (Penelope Spheeris, USA, 1998, 86 mins) #CRAWLSPACE 10pm, $5 Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

Join Carnegie Museum of Art and Arcade Comedy Theater for #CRAWLSPACE, an improv comedy show based on art and social media. www.showclix.com/event/crawlspace1509 Karaoke with Rock ‘n Ray the DJ and YOU 10pm-2am August Henry’s City Saloon, 946 Penn Avenue

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

47


FOR THE WEEK OF

01.2101.28.16

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., JAN. 21

Art by Rebecca Vaughan

{PARTY}

• Seats 41-56 Passengeers • Stereo, DVD & Monitors • Air Ride • Air conditioning • Restrooms • Wi-Fi upon Request • Seats 40-41 Passengeers • High Back Reclining Seats • Stereo/CD/Aux Line-In • Rear Storage Area • Air conditioning • Seats 11-39 Passengeers • High Back Reclining Seats • Stereo/CD/Aux Line-In • Rear Storage Area • Air conditioning

The Carnegie Museum of Art debuts its new monthly party. For Third Thursdays, the museum stays open late and teams with different groups around town for art, music, a late-night café menu and more. Tonight’s inaugural event is a collabo with BOOM Concepts that includes a silent disco (DJ beats on wireless headphones) in the Hall of Sculpture; “an unconventional gallery tour by local creatives”; and a sneak peak at the new Teenie Harris photography show, Great Performances Off-Stage, spotlighting performers in Pittsburgh’s African-American community from 1935 to 1980. Bill O’Driscoll 8-11 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-10. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

JAN. 22

Maximum Minimum in Unum

+ FRI., JAN. 22 {ART}

• Seats Up to 30 Passengeers • Wrap-Around Seating • Premium Sound W/Aux input • 46” & 34” Flat Screens w/ DVD • LED & Rope Lighting • Built-In Coolers • Seats 30 Passengers • Park Bench Seats Reserve our newest addition to our • Stereo/CD/Aux Line-In • Air Conditioning fleet now for your special event! • Rear Porch • Removable Sides

• Customer friendly online reservations • • Trained & certified drivers • Reliable • • Affordable rates • Hassle-free travel • • Customized tours • Friendly professional staff •

Keith@checkertransport.com 724-256-4096 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

Maximum Minimum in Unum is the tongue-twisting title of the new group show at Miller Gallery. The exhibit, curated by Joshua Reiman and Susanne Slavick, gathers work by 14 artists or groups whose creations are neither maximalist nor minimalist, even when they go to extremes. The 14 contributors — all nationally or internationally exhibited alums of Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art — include: Diane Samuels (known for creating massive amounts of tiny, hand-written text); Ron Desmett (imaginative glassworks); and Gregory Witt (mechanical assemblages, often incorporating video). The Institute for New Feeling performs at tonight’s opening reception. BO 6-8 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Feb. 28. CMU campus, Oakland. Free. RSVP at millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu.

{STAGE} Trading blocks for bodies in an acrobatic display, TetrisPlus

is a children’s play performed by Netherlands troupe Arch 8. The show illustrates the idea of fitting into a group through its storyline and its performers’ matching knack for twisting, turning and climbing, encouraging the audience to do the same. Courtesy of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, this interactive event continues the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s EQT Bridge Theater Series. See how you stack up today and tomorrow at the area premiere, at the August Wilson Center. Courtney Linder 7 p.m. Also 2 p.m. Sat., Jan. 23. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10.50-12. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ SAT., JAN. 23 {GAMING} Fight disease in both real life and the virtual world at Pittsburgh’s Retro Gaming Convention, today at Xtaza nightclub. Among its many

vendors and opportunities for old-school play — including tabletop games, a Super Smash Bros Melee tournament and a cosplay contest — there’s a preview of a new game. Germ Squashers, a cross-platform experience created by local outfit 8 Bit Evolution, allows you to defeat germs to earn a Super Flu Shot. All proceeds from the convention benefit Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, as do profits from Germ Squashers. CL 10 a.m.3 p.m. 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. $15 ($20 for early-bird access). james@8bitevolution. com or www.Pittsburgh RetroGaming.com

{SPORT}

The Wheel Mill hosts its biggest BMX event of the year. The Winter Welcome Jam is a full day of riding and spectating for visitors of all ages and skill levels at this former industrial building in Homewood, now kitted out with ramps and trails for cyclists. The evening


sp otlight

Art by Molly Goldfarb

An obvious highlight of this week’s Gallery Crawl is the first art exhibit in the revived August Wilson Center. The Other Side of Pop, curated by Sean Beauford, features artists seeking “to connect with those who observe pop culture as portrayed by mass media but may not be able to relate to it.” The group show includes work by New York City graffitti artist Cey Adams; Saudi-born RexChouk; New York’s LinShuttr, Justin Gilzene and Molly Goldfarb; and Pittsburgh’s Magic Organs and Amani Davis. The Center also opens Great Performances, with freshly curated work from the archive of famed photographer Teenie Harris. Elsewhere at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust-sponsored Crawl, Wood Street Galleries opens Pastoral Noir: New English Landscapes, a multimedia group show. Shaw Galleries holds its Sixth Annual Bad Art Sale (“at rock-bottom prices!”). The Trust Arts Education Center hosts the album-release for Christiane D’s Amor Fati. The Winter Night Market is indoors at 925 Liberty Ave., with food and drink, jewelry, crafts and more. And CrawlAfterDark includes a 9:30 p.m. Harris Theater screening of The Decline of Western Civilization III, Penelope Spheeris’ 1998 documentary about Los Angeles gutter punks ($5), and #CRAWLSPACE, a 10 p.m. improv show about art and social media that teams the Trust, Arcade Comedy Theater, the Carnegie Museum of Art and, um, Twitter. Bill O’Driscoll 5:30-10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 22. Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

portion includes local bands and, for those over 21, a full bar. BO Opens at noon. 6815 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Riders: $16.99-25.99; spectators: $5. www.thewheelmill.com

the clock to collect colored blocks before a searchlight “freezes” you). There’s also COP fave Johann Sebastian Joust — a dancing tag game played with a glowing orb to a pre-recorded soundtrack of Bach — and Weather Permitting standby Stump (about hammering nails into … a stump!). Andre Costello and the Cool Minors play; Miss Mungo DJs. In future weeks, expect new games and performers. BO 3-8 p.m. Also Feb. 7 and 21, and March 6 and 20. 242 52nd St., Lawrenceville. $10. www.cityofplay.org

JAN. 22

TetrisPlus Tetri riisP Plu

{SCREEN}

{ART}

BoxHeart Gallery received hundreds of entries from around the world for its 15th — and, the gallery says, final —

+ TUE., JAN. 26 {COMEDY} Art Inter/National Exhibition. The 25 submissions by 22 artists that it finally selected include works on canvas and paper, in mixed media, porcelain and more, from as near as Pittsburgh and as distant as India, Crete and Ecuador. Meet the artists at tonight’s opening reception. BO 5-8 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through March 4. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

{OPERA} Catch Louisa May Alcott’s classic Little Women as revitalized in Mark Adamo’s world-touring 1999 operatic adaption. The show receives its Pittsburgh premiere tonight, in the first of four Pittsburgh Opera performances. Adamo’s libretto puts a fresh spin on Alcott’s 19th-century coming-ofage narrative, complete with rhyming couplets. Starring all seven of the Opera’s Resident Artists, the production features mezzo-soprano Corrie Stallings as Jo, and tenor Adam Bonanni as Laurie. Get your tickets quickly though, because the intimate CAPA Theatre is sure to sell out. CL 8 p.m. Continues through Jan. 31. 111 Ninth St., Downtown. $50.75-60.75. 412-456-6666 or www. PittsburghOpera.org

OF CHRIS IV EY}

In 2005, when filmmaker Chris Ivey began shooting his three-part documentary East of Liberty, “gentrification” wasn’t a word much heard in Pittsburgh. These days, the series’ themes of gentrification, displacement, class and race seem more relevant than ever. Today, the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater screens all three films, subtitled A Story of Good Intentions, The Fear of Us (focusing on small-businesspeople) and In Unlivable Times (featuring local youths). A discussion with Ivey and other experts follows the free screening. BO Screenings: 2, 3:40 and 5:30 p.m. Mixer: 6:30 p.m. Discussion: 7-9 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

JAN. JA N. 23 23

{PHOTO CO URTESY

East of Liberty

+ SUN., JAN. 24 {PLAY} Groups that tempt you outside, like City of Play and Weather Permitting, are

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

joining indoorsy types Pandemic and Schell Games for The Rec Room: Winter Games. The series of five events runs every other Sunday starting today, with novel games, bands and beer at Spirit Hall.

Ever get disgruntled with self-checkout kiosks and want to rip your pants off in protest? This frustration begins “DVDA,” a sketch by Las Vegas-based comedic performance-art group TSTMRKT, comprised of

Express calls TSTMRKT’s show “high risk” and “a thinking production.” Tonight’s show at Bloomfield artspace The Shop begins the group’s seven-city Midwest tour. Laugh your pants off. CL 9 p.m. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $10. 702-4128550 or www.tstmrkt.com

+ WED., JAN. 27 {STAGE}

It’s a coup for Quantum Theatre, as the company presents the American premiere of a 2013 work by a major playwright. David Harrower’s Ciara is a monologue by the title character, the daughter of a Glasgow mobster who left a life of crime to run an art gallery and champion local artists. The Scottish playwright’s previous works include Knives in Hens. In Ciara, Karla Boos directs local favorite Mary Rawson on a set designed by iconic Pittsburgh

JAN. 26

TSTMRKT

The inaugural week’s games include Bally (“four-square with nine squares”), GaGa (Israeli dodgeball) Bucket Pong (giant-sized beer pong) and Searchlight, a cooperative two-person team game (race

+

SCREEN

+

Ernest Hemmings and Breon Jenay. The sketch is set-less and prop-less, but the duo’s offbeat humor is complemented by pre-recorded audio and looping film projections. Milwaukee’s Shepherd

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

artist Robert Qualters for the venue: Lawrenceville’s Javo Studios. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 14. 5137 Holmes St., Lawrenceville. $18-51. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com

CLASSIFIEDS

49


{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER ALADDIN JR. A retelling of the classic story presented by Stage Right’s Student Theatre Company. Fri., Jan. 22, 7 p.m., Sat., Jan. 23, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 24, 2 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. BE OUR GUEST. Directed by Jacob Wadsworth, this event is a fundraiser w/ all proceeds benefiting the theatre. Fri., Jan. 22, 8 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 23, 8 p.m. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. CIARA. Ciara is the daughter of a mob boss. She escaped a life of crime for a life of art: she runs a gallery & champions local artists, especially one whose female figures seem like goddesses. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Tue, Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 14. Javo Studios, Lawrenceville. 412-362-1713. LITTLE WOMEN. Based on the book by Louisa May Alcott & presented by the Pittsburgh Opera.

Sung in English with texts projected above the stage. Sat., Jan. 23, 8 p.m., Tue., Jan. 26, 7 p.m., Fri., Jan. 29, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 31, 2 p.m. CAPA Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. TETRISPLUS. Works from Arch8. Fri., Jan. 22, 10:15 a.m. & 7 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 23, 2 p.m. August Wilson Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

COMEDY FRI 22 PAULA POUNDSTONE. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall, Homestead. 877-435-9849.

w paper pghcitym .co

FRANKLY SCARLETT COMEDY HOUR. All-female comedy troupe Frankly Scarlett debuts a brand new sketch comedy show, opening set by Atomic Jane. 8 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 30, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

MAKE NICE BOOM. A team improv competition presented by Unplanned Comedy. Fourth Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. MONDO! W/ SENATE CANDIDATE JOHN FETTERMAN. John Fetterman tells true stories as fodder for hilarious improvised scenes performed by some very funny improvisers. 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-212-7061.

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

SAT 23

See Phipps’ most pampered plants or hear Little Women, opera style.

MON 25

COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 26

TSTMRT. A performance art collective from Las Vegas, NV that incorporates time coding,

[COMEDY]

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL SCHWARZ}

Comedian Paula Poundstone brings her act to town this Saturday. A veteran of the stage as well as shows like public radio’s Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me, Poundstone is known for constantly reinventing her material. Expect clever audience interaction and lots of laughs. 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 22. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $29-49. www.ticketfly.com

minimalism, absurd theater, film & audio collage. 9 p.m. The Shop, Bloomfield. 412-951-0622.

WED 27 BROOKLINE COMMUNITY OPEN MIC. A community run open mic. Wed, 7-10 p.m. Brookline Pub, Brookline. 412-531-0899.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY CITY HISTORIC GALLERY. Historical images & items forcusing on the North Side of Pittsburgh. North Side. 412-321-3940. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Propeller Group: The Living Need Light, the Dead Need Music. A video based exhibition that looks at colorful, spirited funeral traditions in Vietnam & New Orleans. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex CONTINUES ON PG. 52

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


“Jewels” (leftover breast milk encased in resin, 2015), by Fran Flaherty. From the exhibition Post Erotica: The Anthropology of Motherhood, at 709 Gallery, Downtown.

VISUALART NEW THIS WEEK BOXHEART GALLERY. 15th Annual Art Inter/ National Exhibition. Opening reception Jan. 23, 5 p.m. Runs through Mar. 4. Twenty-two powerful visual storytellers that are changing our world w/ imaginative imagery of wisdom, beauty, & truth. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Maximum Minimum In Unum. Exhibiting artists whose work eludes maximalist or minimalist classification. Opening reception w/ a performance by Institute for New Feeling on Jan 22, 6-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-3618. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. The Invisible One. Insight into the loneliness & confusion felt by stigmatized individuals. The three artists on display present hope for awareness, action & understanding through a variety of works composed of wood, fiber, clay & mixed media. Opening Jan. 22. Downtown. 412-261-7003.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Post Erotica: The Anthropology of Motherhood. A visual diary of

being a mom w/ works by Fran Flaherty. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Humanae/ I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2015. Feat. prints created by 22 artists from around the country, the exhibition features innovative techniques combined w/ solid conceptual thinking. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Fibers - Fiction. Encaustic handmade papers w/ embellished stitching by Katy DeMent. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOCK-TOTT GALLERY. 5 Artists: A Collection of Works. Works in various mediums by Brandy Bock-Tott, Jeffrey Phelps, Linda Breen, Joyce Werwie Perry & Cindy Engler. Sewickley. 412-519-3377.

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public officials & business leaders. Silver to Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk. Displaying the work of 60s German emigre & Pittsburgh industrial design Peter Muller-Munk, who started as a silversmith at Tiffany’s. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Tony Havrilla. Paintings utilizing high contrast & perspective to create images that blur the line between realism & abstraction. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CHROMOS EYEWEAR. Steel Mills Past & Present: Lithography by Keith Clouse. Black & white imagery of both working & decaying mills and the people who worked in them translated through lithography printing. Presented in conjunction w/ Carolyn Pierotti of Purple Room Fine Arts. Lawrenceville. 412-477-4540. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRAMEHOUSE. Except For The Sound of my Voice: Photogravures by Leslie A. Golomb. Feat. selections from Wielding the Knife, woodcuts by Master Chinese Printmaker, Li Kang. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FRICK FINE ARTS BUILDING. Studio Arts Summer 2015 Creative Research Exhibition. Artwork by five studio arts majors. Oakland. GALLERIE CHIZ. Not Enough Time.Inside The Artists’ Studios. Artist/Owner Ellen Chisdes Neuberg moves her studio into the gallery for six weeks & paints live during regular business hours. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

51


*Stuff We Like {PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

WINTER EDITION

Snow It felt like it would never arrive, and now that it’s here, we remember how awesome it makes everything look.

@WPXIScott

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

WPXI weatherman Scott Harbaugh has a huge following on Twitter and for good reason: Besides reporting weather conditions, he interacts with his followers. Follow for snow-delay updates, and stay for his jokes.

Healthy Ride Bike Share Most cities shut down bike-share programs in the winter, but ours is open year-round. nd. Enjoy a brisk winter ride. www.healthyride.pgh.com de.pgh.com

Pennsylvania Tuxedo do Dogfish Head Brewery collaborates tes with Woolrich clothier for a delicious ous spruce-tip-infused ale that pays tribute ute to Pennsylvania’s woodsman of yore. ore.

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

interplay between culture, nature & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ,

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

THE GALLERY 4. Redfishbowl Collective Artists’ Showcase. Recent Works from the Redfishbowl Collective. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HOLOCAUST CENTER OF PITTSBURGH. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy Project. A photographic/ multimedia exhibit honoring & commemorating local Holocaust survivors. North Side. 412-421-1500. JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Jane Haskell: Drawing in Light. An exhibition of 30 sculptures, paintings & drawings by the artist. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. MALL AT ROBINSON. Digital Designs: Showcase of Student Design Work. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal & Marnie Weber created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. parallelgenres. Christine

Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. A display of orchids & bonsai. Garden Railroad. Model trains chug through miniature landscapes populated w/ living plants, whimsical props & fun interactive buttons. Runs through Feb. 28. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. Displaying 660 different movie

Barney, John Burton, Granite Calimpong, Bernie D’Onofrio, Jen Elek, Saman Kalantari, David Lewin, David Royce, Margaret Spacapan & Cheryl Wilson Smith exploring an interconnected set of parameters through different genres. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. Like a Body Without Skin. Work by Fiona Amundsen addressing the relationships between steel manufacturing industries & their mobilization into a united national front that produced everything from planes to bombs during WWII. North Side. 412-322-2224. PANZA GALLERY. Verse Envisioned. Poems from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette & works of art they have inspired. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PERCOLATE. The Futuristic Art Works of Ryder Henry. Open Saturdays 12-4 p.m. or by appointment. Organic, cybernetic urban landscapes portray a lush & stylish new world. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. Shantytown. Twelve pictures & the only ones in existence from the Great Depression in 1930s of what is now the Strip District. See touching middle-class people living in poor shacks, but taking great steps to keep their style & cleanliness intact. Plus 30,000 other photos of History. North Side. 412-231-7881.

cameras, showing pictures on glass, many hand-painted. The largest display of 19th Century photographs in America. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000.

PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. In the Air: Visualizing what we breath. Photographs that show the effects of western PA’s air quality. Oakland. 412-681-5449. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Mountain & the Bumblebee. An multi-artist, multimedia exhibition exploring our ideas about landscapes. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Transactions: Art & Poetry Exchange. Friendship. 412-559-4804. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Poetic Logic: Collage & Assemblage. This national juried exhibition will showcase artists working in collage, assemblage & other processes of incorporating elements of repurposed materials as a way of expressing our contemporary experience. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.


STEWART O’NAN. Book signing & reading for his new novel, “West of Sunset.” 6:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

DANCE SAT 23 THE SMOKIN’ BETTIES’ BIRTHDAY BASH. W/ special guests Bella Sin, Lilith DeVille, Macabre Noir, Pushing Daisys. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

parkprograms 7:30-9:30 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. FULL MOON WINTER HIKE. Free & open to all ages. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration is recommended. Grant Shelter. http://www.alleghenycounty.us/ parkprograms. 7-9 p.m. South Park, South Park.

TUE 26

FUNDRAISERS FRI 22

BURNS BASH. Whiskey tasting, live music, Highland dancers, dinner & a silent auction. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Golf Club, Squirrel Hill. 412-622-5772.

STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250. STORYTELLING @ RILEY’S. Story telling on a theme every month. Last Tue of every month, 8 p.m. Riley’s Pour House, Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

WED 27 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF

WED 27 PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Book discussion hosted by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. This month’s meeting focuses on Robert Duncan’s “Selected Poems”. Fourth Wed of every month, 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-928-9891.

SAT 23

THU 21

FOOD PANTRY BRUNCH CHALLENGE. Pittsburgh chefs make meals from items that are donated the food pantry. Live music & dancing. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. www.newhazletttheater.org. MACDONALD PIPE BAND OF PITTSBURGH BURNS NIGHT. Annual fundraiser for the nonprofit organization, the Robert Burns Supper FINE ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: event includes steak CRYSTAL WORL. pie dinner, pipe band Multimedia art drawing performance, traditional inspiration from music, Highland dance traditions & storytelling performance, poetry, of her native Alaska. raffle & more. 6 p.m. Her work explores www. per a Holy Cross Greek p the relationships & pghcitym o .c Orthodox Church, Mt. bonds between her Lebanon. 304-280-6212. people, the land, & ST. ALPHONSUS TRIVIA the animals. Thru Jan. 26 NIGHT FUNDRAISER. 7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, St. Alphonsus Catholic Church, North Side. 412-322-5058. Wexford. 724-935-1151.

A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http:// citydharma.wordpress.com/ schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. JAPAN LECTURE SERIES. U.S.-Japan Relations from a U.S. Government Perspective. Rm 33C12. 6 p.m. U.S. Steel Tower, Downtown. 412-433-5021. RADICAL TRIVIA. Thu, 9 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668. TRIVIA NIGHT. Thu, 7 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. UPSTAIRS, DOWNSTAIRS: IN SERVICE IN THE GILDED AGE. What was it really like to be a domestic worker during the Gilded Age? Using Clayton, the home of Henry Clay Frick, as a backdrop, this presentation looks behind the scenes at what it took to run the lavish mansions of wealthy American Industrialists. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WINE 101: WINE BASICS SERIES. This introductory level course is great for both hospitality professionals & avid consumers alike & is a great foundation for further study. 6 p.m. Dreadnought Wines, Lawrenceville. 412-391-1709.

KIDSTUFF

THU 21 - TUE 26

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 23

LITERARY THU 21 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. MICHAEL WURSTER, JUDY ROBINSON, RINA FERRARELLI, TIM ESAIAS & STEVE PUSATERI. Pittsburgh Poetry Review Roadshow. 7 p.m. Brentwood Library, Brentwood. 412-882-5694.

SUN 24

KEVIN HENKES. Lecture by the children’s author. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland.

MON 25

BRYAN STEVENSON. Lecture by the author of ‘Mercy: A Story of Justice & Redemption’. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

HOLA NINOS! Preschoolers age 3 to 6 and their parents will have fun in Spanish & English w/ Marissa Lipinski when they join her for songs & stories. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PAWS FOR A CAUSE. Meet at least one approved literacy dog, hear stories, read aloud to a four-legged friend & participate in a literacy activity. Readers of all ages & abilities are welcomed! Registration required. 11 a.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

THU 21 - SUN 24

MON 25

OAKLAND RESTAURANT WEEK. Thru Jan. 24 412-683-6243.

MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turnedTeaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 22 6TH ANNUAL BAD ART SALE. A sale of bad art, picture frames, mats, art books, gently used art supplies, more. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Shaw Galleries, Downtown. 412-281-4884. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BAD MOVIE NITE. A special celebration of all that is terrible.

OUTSIDE SUN 24 FULL MOON SNOWSHOE. Free & open to all ages. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration is required at www.alleghenycounty.us/

CONTINUES ON PG. 54

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

53


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

FIND LABATT BLUE & BLUE LIGHT SPECIALS NEAR YOU DURING ALL PENS GAMES ON THE CP HAPPS APP!

LETS GO PENS!

8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. FAMILY CONTRA DANCE. For kids & parents, w/ potluck dinner. Fourth Fri of every month, 6 p.m. Thru May 1 Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-680-8600.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT:

GABI concert, The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side

SAT 23

THE BALLROOM DANCE. CRITIC: West Coast Swing lesson & open , 51, an dancing 7 p.m. 2525 Rochester Road, Cranberry. international developer BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. from Point Breeze Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. WHEN: BREAD & HONEY. Artisan bread-baking & honey pairing. 12 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-281-4505. [GABI] used her voice a capella as various instruments and BRUCE SENCHESEN. Learn from layered it [with her computer]. So, she played a note on this local artist as he demonstrates the piano, synthesized her voice, added bass and kept techniques. 2:30-4 p.m. Gallerie layering. It was unique, I actually thought about buying Chiz, Shadyside. 412-441-6005. one of her CDs. [Her style] was mesmerizing and had a CAN’T TOP THE LINDY HOP WORKSHOPS W/ PETER & feel like Cirque du Soleil. She’s got beautiful harmonics NAOMI! 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and it makes you want to cry, gives you goosebumps. & 2:30-5 p.m. Wightman School, She’s got an amazing range in her voice. It’s really Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708. emotional music, I’d say visceral. It’s music for all the EAT.DRINK.WESTMORELAND. senses — she’s beautiful and it sounds beautiful. It’s not Bites from Westmoreland’s restaurants, live music, photo necessarily always about beauty, though, because at one booth, more. 6-10 p.m. Ramada point she was crying. I think she was telling a story about Inn Hotel & Conference Center, relationships, love — a connection. So, she had a very Greensburg. 412-353-1350. interesting stage presence — she made [the environment] AN EVENING OF WOMEN & THE very intimate very quickly. The theater was also really ARTS. Presented by Women of intimate and had great acoustics. Temple Sinai. Celebrate music & the visual arts featuring the Alumni B Y C OU RT N E Y L I N D E R Theater Company, the Temple Sinai Intergenerational Choir & a SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. all levels. Beginners from 5-7pm. Pittsburgh artist. 7 p.m. Temple Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing No partner required. Sun, 5 p.m. Sinai, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-9715. follows. No partner needed. Thru Feb. 22 Wilkins School MEET, LEARN, PLAY: A GAMING Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Community Center, Swissvale. MEET UP. All-ages board gaming Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-661-2480. session, playing & learning about 412-683-5670. CALMING COZY COLORING new games w/ an instructor. SMASH BROS FRIENDLIES. PROGRAM. Coloring sessions Quiet Reading Room. Second Playing Smash Bros WiiU. 6 p.m. for adults. Sun, 2-4 p.m. Shaler and Fourth Sat of every month, Looking For Group, Brookline. North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, 774-482-1264. 412-486-0211. Oakland. 412-622-3151. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. FAMILY/FRIENDS OF SUBSTANCE MY DOG IS DRIVING ME Free Scrabble games, all levels. USERS/ABUSERS SUPPORT CRAZY. A seminar on curbing Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon GROUP. Non 12-step support bad doggie behavior, crate issues, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. group exchanging experiences behavior warning signs, proper 412-531-1912. & ideas as a means to provide play, leash aggression, socializing SWING CITY. Learn & practice resources & suggestions that can your dog, more. Pre-registration swing dancing skills w/ the Jim help those struggling to support is required. To register for Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman the recovery journey of a close the seminar or for additional School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. relative or friend. Second and information contact the Dog VOICECATCH WORKSHOP W/ Fourth Sun of every month, House at 814-382-2267. 9-11 a.m. KATHY AYRES. A community Conneaut Lake Bark Park, 4:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran writing workshop & Conneaut. 814-382-2267. Church, Bethel Park. 412-853-3189. writing space provided NETWORKING MYSTICAL PSYCHIC FAIR. Shop by Chatham’s Words WOMEN: FEMALE for unique gifts, plus a variety of Without Walls program. ALLIANCES IN readers & Massage w/ messages. Sat, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. EARLY MODERN 12 p.m. The South Hills Elks Club, www. per pa Carnegie Library, East BRITAIN. Hunt Library Bethel Park. 724-348-8063. pghcitym o .c Liberty. 412-363-8232. 1A. Meet-up & add-aPIRATES’ GREG BROWN AT ST. WIGLE WHISKEY Thon featuring a keynote BRENDAN’S SPEAKER SERIES. BARRELHOUSE TOURS. address by Amanda Herbert. Discussing how he captured Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle 10:30 a.m. Carnegie Mellon his lifelong dream. 7:30 p.m. Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. University, Oakland. 412-268-2850. St. Brendans Episcopal Church, 412-224-2827. PITTSBURGH’S RETRO GAMING Sewickley. 412-364-5974. WINTER WELCOME JAM. CONVENTION. Showcasing local & RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game BMX events & challenges all day national vendors, panel discussions hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come long. Live music. The Wheel Mill, w/ record holders & industry leaders, alone or bring a team. Sun, Homewood. a Cosplay contest, Super Smash 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. Brothers Tournament, raffles, more. 412-828-6322. All proceeds benefit Children’s REC ROOM: WINTER GAMES. Hospital of Pittsburgh. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Active & passive participation Learn Argentine Tango w/ the Xtaza Nightclub, Strip District. games, live bands, DJs, more. Pittsburgh Tangueros. Classes for www.pittsburghretrogaming.com 3-8 p.m., Sun., Feb. 7, 3-8 p.m.,

Mary Renwick

Fri., Jan. 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

DOWNLOAD THE FREE APP FOR A CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS TO A GAME! 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

SUN 24


Sun., Feb. 21, 3-8 p.m., Sun., March 6, 3-8 p.m. and Sun., March 20, 3-8 p.m. Spirit Hall & Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 25 BEYOND THE KING’S EYE: OBSERVING COMETS IN THE AGE OF VERSAILLES. Lecture by Claire Goldstein, associate professor, Department of French & Italian, University of California, Davis. 6 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. DINING W/ DIABETES. Helping people w/ type 2 diabetes identify & understand important information about managing & preventing this disease. Mon, 5:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 2 Energy Innovation Center, Hill District. 412-263-1000. MT. LEBANON GENEALOGY SOCIETY. Join others in discussing family history as well as picking up tips on research. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TRIVIA NIGHT. Hosted by Pittsburgh Bar Trivia. Mon, 7 p.m. Carnivore’s Restaurant & Sports Bar, Oakmont. 412-820-7427.

TUE 26 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. COMMUNITY CREATE NIGHT: FERMENTATION. Run through a variety of vegetable fermentation methods in order to to creatively reduce food waste & increase health. 6 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-9918. LET’S TALK ABOUT GARDENING. Bring your questions, problems & something to drink & we will talk about new things on the plant horizon & answer your questions. Penn State Master Gardeners will also be on hand. Pre-registration required at www.alleghenycounty. us/parkprograms. Buffalo Inn. 7-8:30 p.m. South Park.

WED 27

FLEET FEET SPEED SQUAD. At the track. Coach Alex from Fleet Feet Sports Pittsburgh hosts weekly Wednesday night speed workouts. The workouts are free & open to the public. Anyone who wants to improve their speed & form are encouraged to join. Wed, 7 p.m. Jefferson Elementary, Mt. Lebanon. 412-851-9100. INCREASE YOUR BEER IQ W/ LOCAL CRAFT BREWER SCOTT

NEWS

SMITH OF EAST END BREWING. Scott Smith will talk about craft beer and how he turned his hobby into a career by founding East End Brewing 11 years ago. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MONITORING GROUNDWATER VARIABILITY FROM SPACE. Lecture from Matthew Rodell, chief, Hydrological Sciences Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Connolly Ballroom. 4 p.m. Alumni Hall, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-624-4141. MYTH OF THE COLOR-BLIND & GENDER-BLIND JUDGE. Lecture by Pat K. Chew, Judge J. Quint Salmon & Anne Salmon. 12-1:30 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-621-9339. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. EAST END COOPERATIVE MINISTRY. Request for proposals for artwork to hang in chapel of new building. Available funds of $2500 for materials and labor. Contact grumetjf@mac.com for more detailed information. Thru Feb. 15. 412-361-5549. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

OPERATION SAVE-A-LIFE

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

HIV Patrewvoreksnbytitaokinng

option th

ONERYPILDALY EVE PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis The word “prophylaxis” means to prevent or control the spread of an infection or disease

PrEP can help prevent you from getting HIV if you are exposed to the virus

Central Outreach Wellness Center

www.centraloutreach.com

less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. THERAPY DOG TESTING. To schedule an appointment for testing contact Robin Peterson at 814-425-7185. For additional general info on therapy dogs & the testing procedure, contact Sue at 814-382-2478. Thru Jan. 23, 11:30 a.m. Conneaut Lake Bark Park, Conneaut. 814-382-2267. WINTER BLUES. Call for artists for Multi-Media Juried Art Exhibit. Artists can submit recent work (from the last two years) that has not been in a previous juried show at the North Hills Art Center. Each piece must be ready for display or hanging w/ picture wire. Artwork may be delivered to the center between 10 a.m. & 3 p.m., Jan. 2530. Maximum of three pieces. Thru Jan. 30. 412-364-3622.

Auditions for ‘The Spitfire Grill’ & ‘Floyd Collins’. Seeking trained male & female singers/actors w/ strong singing abilities in folk-rock & contemporary musical theater styles, in addition to strong acting capabilities. Open calls Feb. 19, 5 p.m. & Feb. 20, 5 p.m. If called back, dance call Feb. 21, 4-6 p.m. All applicants must register online at http://frontporchpgh.com/ audition-form. Pittsburgh Musical Theater, West End. 412-551-4027. R-ACT TV DINNERS AUDITION. Auditions will be held for men & women of all ages to perform either in a live stage presentation of 90’s TV episodes or in one of the recorded commercials. Cold readings, no preparation needed. An audition form will be filled out at the time of the audition; resume & headshot not required, but appreciated. Jan. 23, 12-4 p.m. R-ACT Theatre Productions. THE THEATRE FACTORY KIDWORKS. Auditions for “Fairy Tale Courtroom“. Men, women & children ages 7+. Cold readings. Bring picture & resume. January 30, 12-3 p.m. & January 31, 2-5 p.m. Call 412-374-9200 or tfuditions@ gmail.com. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200.

i an P rEE P is

127 ANDERSON ST | 15212 | TIMBER COURT BUILDING | 412-322-4151 Dr. Stacy Lane DO. Walk-ins are Welcome. Free & Confidential HIV & STI Test and Treat Services.

Operation Save-A-Life is a street-outreach group that provides support, service referrals and resources to homeless individuals. Supported by Community Human Services, Operation Save-A-Life needs volunteers for outreach teams to go on rounds, giving out food, warm clothing, hygiene kits and other essentials. Rounds are performed every Tuesday evening. For more information, call Trevor Smith at 412-246-1615 or visit www.chscorp.com.

AUDITIONS FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS.

Did you know...

PITTSBURGH’S TSBURGH’S PRE PREMIER EM GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

ABSOLUTELY B Y TTHE BEST PARTY PRICES DRAFT BEE BEERS ERSS $1 $1.50 50 & $2 $2.25 25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLE ESS  ALL NIGHT EVERY NIGHT BOTTLES

WEDNESDAYS WEDNES SD $3 FIREBALL SHOTS WEDNESDAYS WEDNE WED ED ES & THURSDAYS

$2 WELL DRINK DRINKS KS + COORS LIGHT BOTTLES 2 FFOR OR 1 LAP DAN NCE • 2 FOR 1 DRAFT BEERS DANCES ALL NIGHT LONG

FFRIDAYS $50 BOTTLES 7PM10PM OPEN LATE Wednesday & Thursday 7pm-2am W Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

clubcontroversy.com clubc co 1635 635 W West We estt Ca Carson Street St.reet | 412-471-5764 412 112 471 5764 7 4

BY POPULAR DEMAND, NOW OPEN ON WEDNESDAYS! +

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

55


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

I am no longer sexually active, but I have a significant collection of sex toys from earlier years. I’m thinking of getting rid of most of them, and it seems such a waste for them to end up in the landfill. What’s an environmentally responsible way to dispose of dildos? I wish there was a place I could donate the dildos where they could be used again. Many of them are quality silicone types, they’ve never been used on a person without a condom, and they’ve been thoroughly cleaned. I’d be happy to donate them to impoverished dildo users in need, if only I knew where to send them. REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE

Your question comes up frequently, RRR, and there really isn’t a satisfactory answer. In Seattle, where I live, a community tool bank recently opened in my neighborhood — but they don’t collect and lend the kind of tools you’re looking to donate. I’ve heard about dildo graveyards in other cities (spots in parks where people bury their used sex toys), but burying sex toys isn’t environmentally responsible. And while highquality dildos can be cleaned and safely reused, most people are pretty squeamish about the idea. Which is odd, considering that we routinely reuse actual cocks that have been enjoyed by others — so why not the fake ones? But even if I can’t tell you what to do with your dildos, RRR, I can tell you what not to do with them: Do not ship your used dildos to the anti-government militia currently occupying a federal wildlife refuge in rural Oregon. After militia members asked supporters to send them supplies — via the U.S. Postal Service — their spokesperson complained bitterly about all the dildos they were getting in the mail. So if you decide to put your used dildos in a box and send them somewhere, RRR, please make sure the address on the box doesn’t read: Bundy Militia, c/o Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, 36391 Sodhouse Lane, Princeton, OR, 97721.

You value monogamy, you want a monogamous commitment and you want someone who feels the same. That’s great, O4O, and you have my full support. But you do acknowledge that fantasies about others can be fun, as can looking, as can porn (watching others) and role-play (pretending to be others). So while you may wanna fuck other people — hence the looking and fantasizing and role-playing — you have no desire to actually fuck other people. If you’re having a hard time finding partners who want what you want — a monogamous commitment without the stress of maintaining the monogamous pretense/facade/fraud, i.e., pretending they don’t at least think about fucking other people — either you’re living in some sort of poly parallel universe where nonmonogamy is the default setting or you’re not giving others the same benefit of the doubt you’ve given yourself. You wanna fuck other people and you don’t seem to think that disqualifies you from making, honoring and genuinely wanting both a monogamous commitment and a monogamous sex life. (The two don’t always go hand in hand.) If you’re breaking up with people for admitting to the same things you’ve admitted to in your question — you might think about fucking other people, but you don’t want to actually fuck other people — then you’re the reason your quest to find a partner has been so frustrating.

I’VE HEARD ABOUT DILDO GRAVEYARDS, BUT BURYING SEX TOYS ISN’T ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE.

I understand that monogamy is not something people are good at — and that’s fine. In fact, most of the people I know are in healthy poly or monogamish relationships. Here’s the thing: I’m monogamous. Not the “I’m attracted to other people but won’t act on it because it makes me uncomfortable or believe it’s wrong” kind of monogamous, but the “I genuinely have ZERO desire to fuck anyone but my partner” kind of monogamous. Fantasizing about others is fun, so is looking, so is porn and role-play. There’s a world of deliciously kinky, weird and wonderful sex stuff I’d LOVE to explore until my sexy bits fall off. But I want to do those things with one partner and one partner only in a monogamous, intimate relationship. Here’s the kicker: I’d like my partner to feel the same way. I don’t want someone to enter into a monogamous relationship with me if in their heart/groin they’d genuinely like to fuck other people. Am I a lost cause? Surely I can’t be the only genuinely monogamous person there is? I’m 31 and still turn heads, but I worry my quest for a partner who feels as I do is impossible and a waste of my time. ONE 4 ONE

I’m 33, blah blah blah, and live in a big city. I’ve been dating an age-appropriate person for a year and a half. Everything seemed fine (great sex, common interests and hobbies, similar work ethic, we even talked about raising children), but my partner is so damn angry and full of hate. Mostly it manifests itself in racism, and I really don’t like it. He says that I “don’t understand,” like he’s gone through experiences that would justify wholesale prejudice against entire groups of people. The passing of David Bowie has accentuated these differences between us. I want to live better and brighter, to love more, but my boyfriend just keeps hating. He’s unrelentingly racist. I shouldn’t have children with him — right? Better to be 33 and alone — right? This racist stuff is a deal breaker — right? DTMFA — right? RACIST ANGER GRADUALLY ENDS RELATIONSHIP

Right. My best female friend is marrying her boyfriend in March and wants to go on a gay bar crawl on the night of her bachelorette party. She says it won’t be a problem because, as a bi woman, she’s part of the LGBT community too and because gay people can get married now. As a gay man, Dan, do you oppose bachelorette parties in gay bars? QUEER AND QUESTIONING

I oppose bachelorette parties in gay bars — or anywhere else, QAQ, and I feel the exact same way about bachelor parties. On the Lovecast, Dr. Robert Garofalo on parenting a trans kid: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

01.20-01.27

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The birds known as mound-builders are born more mature than other species. As soon as they peck themselves out of their eggs, they are well coordinated, vigorous enough to hunt and capable of flight. Right now I see a resemblance between them and many of you Aquarians. As soon as you hatch your new plans or projects — which won’t be long now — you will be ready to operate at almost full strength. I bet there won’t be false starts or rookie mistakes, nor will you need extensive rehearsal. Like the mound-builders, you’ll be primed for an early launch.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are not purely and simply a Pisces, because although the sun was in that astrological sign when you were born, at least some of the other planets were in different signs. This fact is a good reminder that everything everywhere is a complex web of subtlety and nuance. It’s delusional to think that anyone or anything can be neatly definable. Of course it’s always important to keep this in mind, but it’s even more crucial than usual for you to do so in the coming weeks. You are entering a phase when the best way to thrive is to know in your gut that life is always vaster, wilder and more mysterious than it appears to be on the surface. If you revere the riddles, the riddles will be your sweet, strong allies.

site, one tourist gave the experience five stars. “It’s a great change of pace from museums full of art,” she wrote. Another visitor said, “It’s an interesting detour from the cultural overload that Paris can present.” According to a third, “There is a slight smell but it isn’t overpowering. It’s a fascinating look at how Paris handles wastewater treatment and clean-water supply.” I bring this up, Cancerian, because now is a favorable time for you to take a break from bright, shiny pleasures and embark on a tour of your psyche’s subterranean maze. Regard it not as a scary challenge, but as a fact-finding exploration. What strategies do you have in place to deal with the messy, broken, secret stuff in your life? Take an inventory.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

The next four weeks could potentially be a Golden Age of Friendship … a State of Grace for Your Web of Connections … a Lucky Streak for Collaborative Efforts. What can you do to ensure that these cosmic tendencies will actually be fulfilled? Try this: Deepen and refine your approach to schmoozing. Figure out what favors would be most fun for you to bestow, and bestow them. Don’t socialize aimlessly with random gadabouts, but rather gravitate toward people with whom you share high ideals and strong intentions.

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20):

On a clear day, if you stand at the summit of Costa Rica’s Mount Irazú, you can see both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It’s not hard to get there. You can hop a tourist bus in the nearby city of San José, and be 11,200 feet high two hours later. This is a good model for your next assignment: Head off on a stress-free jaunt to a place that affords you a vast vista. If you can’t literally do that, at least slip away to a fun sanctuary where you’ll be inspired to think big thoughts about your long-range prospects. You need a break from everything that shrinks or numbs you.

“When I look at a sunset, I don’t say, ‘Soften the orange a little on the right-hand corner, and put a bit more purple in the cloud color.’“ Pioneering psychologist Carl Rogers was describing the way he observed the world. “I don’t try to control a sunset,” he continued. “I watch it with awe.” He had a similar view about people. “One of the most satisfying experiences,” he said, “is just fully to appreciate an individual in the same way I appreciate a sunset.” Your assignment, Leo, is to try out Rogers’ approach. Your emotional wellbeing will thrive as you refrain from trying to “improve” people — as you see and enjoy them for who they are.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The future is headed your way in a big hurry. It may not be completely here for a few weeks, but even then it will have arrived ahead of schedule. Should you be alarmed? Should you work yourself into an agitated state and draw premature conclusions? Hell, no! Treat this sudden onrush of tomorrow as a bracing opportunity to be as creative as you dare. Cultivate a beginner’s mind. Be alert for unexpected openings that you assumed would take longer to appear.

A filmmaker working on a major movie typically shoots no more than four pages of the script per day. A director for a TV show may shoot eight pages. But I suspect that the story of your life in the near future may barrel through the equivalent of 20 pages of script every 24 hours. The next chapter is especially action-packed. The plot twists and mood swings will be coming at a rapid clip. This doesn’t have to be a problem as long as you are primed for high adventure. How? Take good care of your basic physical and emotional needs so you’ll be in top shape to enjoy the boisterous ride.

More than one-third of all pregnancies are unintended. The two people involved aren’t actually trying to make a baby, but their contraceptive measure fails or isn’t used at all. According to my analysis, you heterosexual Libras are now more prone to this accidental experience than usual. And in general, Libras of every sexual preference must be careful and precise about what seeds they plant in the coming weeks. The new growth you instigate is likely to have far-reaching consequences. So don’t let your choice be reckless or unconscious. Formulate clear intentions. What do you want to give your love to for a long time?

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

The city of Paris offers formal tours of its vast sewer system. Commenting at an online travel

You Sagittarians are often praised but also sometimes criticized for being such connoisseurs of spontaneity. Many of us admire your flair for unplanned adventure, even though we may flinch when you unleash it. You inspire us and also make us nervous as you respond to changing circumstances with unpremeditated creativity. I expect all these issues

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn world-changer Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested and sent to jail on 29 different occasions. His crimes? Drawing inspiration from his Christian faith, he employed nonviolent civil disobedience to secure basic civil rights for African Americans. He believed so fiercely in his righteous cause that he was willing to sacrifice his personal comfort again and again. The coming months will be a favorable time to devote yourself to a comparable goal, Capricorn. And now is a good time to intensify your commitment. I dare you to take a vow. Embark on a week-long crusade to raise the level of well-being everywhere you go. Be inspiring! Report results to FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com now accepting applications for our teacher training program!

I was a rock musician for years, which meant that I rarely went to bed before dawn. I used to brag

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

+

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

to be hot topics in the coming weeks. You are in a phase of your cycle when your improvisational flourishes will be in the spotlight. I, for one, promise to learn all I can from the interesting detours that result from your delight in experimentation.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

NEWS

that my work schedule was from 9 to 5 — 9 p.m. to 5 a.m., that is. Even after I stopped performing regularly, I loved keeping those hours. It was exhilarating to be abuzz when everyone else was asleep. But two months ago, I began an experiment to transform my routine. Now I awake with the dawn. I spend the entire day consorting with the source of all life on earth, the sun. If you have been contemplating a comparable shift in your instinctual life, Scorpio — any fundamental alteration in your relationship to food, drink, exercise, sleep, perception, laughter, love-making — the next few weeks will be a favorable time to do it.

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

east liberty squirrel hill north hills +

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

57


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

STORAGE

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Rehearsal Space

ABC SELF STORAGE

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

5x10 $45/mo.+tax. 10x10 $65/mo.+ tax 10x20 $110/mo.+tax. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side.

412-403-6069

412-403-6069

EAST FOR RENT

ROOMMATES

2 BR. SHADYSIDE APT. NEAR WALNUT ST. SHOPS $1,350 MO. FEB. 1, 2016 INCLUDING HEAT & 1 PARKING SPACE BEYNON & COMPANY 412-261-3640

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION Eager to adopt your newborn. Will provide secure future, forever love. Doug & Scott 877-887-5034 ex pd.

HELP WANTED

CLASSES

ADOPTION

PAID IN ADVANCE

NEW YEAR, NEW AIRLINE CAREERS

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Make $1000 a Week Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately www.themailinghub.com (AANCAN)

Get training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Career placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. Evening Appointments Available Call the Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999 for more information or visit www.PittsburghSmokeStudy.com

SMOKERS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $85 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

or text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758

58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health • Be willing to fill out questionnaires • not smoke before two sessions. Earn $150 for completing study.

(412) 383-2059 *Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit.

STUDIES

Smokers Wanted!

www.smokingresearchgroup.com

For more information call 412-624-8975


FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

SUCCESS TEMP TO PERM

GET HIRED

PAID TRAINING

WEEKLY PAY

FULL-TIME

REFERRAL PROGRAM

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS GREAT TEAM

NO EXP NECESSARY

$8.48/HR CLEAN & SAFE WORK ENVIRONMENT

APPLY TODAY

START THE NEW YEAR WITH

A NEW CAREER GET HIRED HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES

READY TO WORK CASUAL WORK ENVIRONMENT

JOIN US

BENEFITS

STOP BY & APPLY! 106 GAMMA DR. PITTSBURGH, PA

WE’RE HIRING

Now Hiring

VETERANS

ALL SHIFTS AVAILABLE STAY AT MUST HOME BE AT LEAST PARENTS 18 YEARS OLD

TAKING APPLICATIONS MON-FRI 10AM-4PM LOCATED ON BUSLINES #91 & #1 CALL US: 412-967-7604 • E-MAIL US: 7217RECRUITING@SPARTANSTAFFING.COM

'LUHFW&DUH6WDII

• • • • •

Earn up to $12.50/hr Generous benefits All shifts Full & part-time Driver's license

$250 Hiring Bonus (all positions)

3URJUDP0DQDJHUV Salary mid30's + benefits

5HVLGHQWLDO - supervision of staff & daily operations for 2 community homes &RPPXQLW\ - supervision of staff & services provided to people within the community

Provide support to people with developmental disabilities in community homes and throughout Allegheny County

3OHDVHFDOORUVHQGUpVXPp 5RHVVOHU5RDG3LWWVEXUJK3$ [_FDUHHUV#PDLQVWD\OLIHVHUYLFHVRUJ RUDSSO\RQOLQHPDLQVWD\OLIHVHUYLFHVRUJ EOE

NEW YEAR, NEW CAREER! OPEN INTERVIEW/CAREER FAIR

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3 2ND FLOOR, RIVERS CASINO BANQUET ROOM 12PM – 7PM Now hiring for a variety of positions including both Full-time and Part-time! Apply online at RiversCasino.com SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be willing to submit to a pre-employment drug test and background check. Must be 18 or older to apply. Must be able to acquire state licensing. Rivers Casino is an equal opportunity employer. All applicants under 21 years of age must call 412-566-4390 to schedule an appointment by January 29, 2016.

NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

59


MASSAGE

REIKI

Downtown

Carnegie Reiki

$40/hour Open 24 hours

412-401-4110

MASSAGE

Reiki classes, individual healing sessions, various workshops and events. BARS class 1/30/16

322 Fourth Ave.

carnegiereiki@gmail.com www.carnegiereiki.com

AUTO SERVICES

HEALTH SERVICES

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men and women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-244-7149 (M-F 9am-8pm central) (AANCAN)

MASSAGE

HEALTHY Massage

SNOW DRIFTS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

9:30am-11pm Table Shower 724-742-3333 20550 Rt. 19 Unit 7 Cranberry Twsp, Pa 16066

Grand Opening 2 Locations!

Bodywork by Cindy Chinese Massage, Sauna & Table Shower available. McKnight - $40 per hour. Table shower only $10. Table shower & unlimited sauna only $15. Imperial - $50 per hour, includes FREE table shower Open 7 Days a Week • 9:30am-10:30pm 7777 McKnight Road, Pgh, PA 15237 • 412-366-7130 180 Imperial Plaza Drive, Imperial, PA 15126 • 724-695-8088 CC Accepted.

ACROSS

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat. Opioid Treatment Program Specializing in Methadone Maintenance Ta-di-so (ta-’di-so). n. renewal of life: mind, body, and spirit Priority admissions for: -Pregnant Injection Drug Users -Pregnant Substance Users -Injection Drug Users -Overdose Survivors -Those who are HIV positive -Veterans without Insurance

1425 Beaver Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15233 Phone: 412-322-8415 Fax: 412-322-9224 Intakes: M-F at 6am

“Meeting Needs. Renewing Lives.” Since 1968

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016

1. Directing word 4. Two-way 8. Triangular roof sections 14. Bus. letters 15. Haircut that’s tough wear to hat with 16. Stick in deeply 17. “Made for Moments” electronics company 18. Berry Gordy Jr. pioneered it 20. Beach Boys song off “Pet Sounds” 22. Emphatic confirmation 23. Significant other 24. Spray in the kitchen 27. No. 2 stuff 28. “___ minute?” 31. Like a Bostonian’s accent 33. Veep between Hubert and Gerald 35. Bunny’s trail? 36. Food providers for the homebound 39. City near the Lebanon Mountains 40. Calls at sea 41. Like the verbs “buy” and “sell”: Abbr. 42. Singer ___ Blacc 43. Women driver’s org. 47. Zit head? 48. Plane that burned 2,885 gallons

of fuel an hour: Abbr. 50. Non-natives, to Hawaiians 52. Comedian who is the narrator on TV’s “The Goldbergs” 55. Has a beneficial effect 58. Lemon in a lot 59. Country singer Ronnie 60. Bird that lives on cliffs 61. Landing no. 62. Polish change 63. Biblical verb with thou 64. Vegetarian bean

DOWN

1. “The Aeneid” author 2. Difficult to read 3. Maine national park 4. Curses 5. One who knows his saucers 6. Affected and then some 7. “Over there” 8. Kind of salami 9. Grading assistant 10. Super Smash ___ 11. Bodybuilder Ferrigno 12. Long stretch 13. A busy person might pick one up: Abbr. 19. Minnesota Lynx league

21. “It’s probable...” 24. Scripting language 25. Big name in laptops 26. Website with Outlook and Bing 29. Conquistador’s loot 30. Of sound quality 32. Waits for one’s time 34. Toils at it 35. Forces into an inadequate space 36. French mother 37. Erse land 38. “Name not ringing a bell” 39. Profession, casually

42. Forwarding letters 44. Comes in second 45. Trattoria dessert 46. Off the beaten path 49. Calls it quits 51. Strong point 52. “Look here” 53. Took in too much snow 54. His uncle was Caligula 55. War perimeter, briefly 56. Target of some divesting protesters 57. Chess rating system {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment LOCATIONS IN

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN.

Try FREE: 412-566-1861

More Local Numbers: 1-800-926-6000

Ahora español Livelinks.com 18+

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency • Group and Individualized Therapy

NO WAIT LIST

WE TREAT:

Opiate Addiction Heroin Addiction & Other Drug Addictions

Pregnant?

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

412-380-0100

Let us help you!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

www.myjadewellness.com

SUBOXONE SUBUTEX

WE SPECIALIZE IN

MONROEVILLE AND WEXFORD, PA

We can treat you!

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today! Pittsburgh

Beaver County

Pittsburgh • South Hills

Methadone • 412-255-8717 Methadone • 412-488-6360 Methadone • 724-857-9640 Suboxone • 412-281-1521 info2@alliancemedical.biz Suboxone • 724-448-9116 info@summitmedical.biz info@ptsa.biz NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com +

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

Serving Western Pennsylvania

412-532-4267

www.aandrsolutions.com WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCES EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

61


THIS JUST IN

{BY FRANCIS RUPP}

A look at local news online and on the tube What year is it? If I relied on the culture of middle-aged, white male comedians to try to figure this out, I’d guess we’re living in Pittsburgh circa 1977. That’s probably before a lot of you were even born. From the retro-aviator-bespectacled, ’70s-porn-star-groomed Pittsburgh Dad hawking for the Pennysaver — “You paid too much? I told yinz to check the Pennysaver first” — to blogger and podcaster “Ya Jagoff” and his snooze festivals reminiscent of the SNL skit, “The Chris Farley Show” (“Remember that? Yeah, that was awesome.”), you might find yourself scrambling for respite from nostalgia saturation — which we have reached. While the population in Pittsburgh is down a smidge overall, it remains a big age spot on the skin of the United States map. But thanks to thriving universities, a mentionable increase in younger folk has occurred. According to recent U.S. Census Bureau data, the population in Allegheny County in the past five years has lumbered along from 7 to 7.6 percent in the 25-29 age range, and from 6 to 6.5 percent in the 30-34 age range. In Gary Rotstein’s Pittsburgh Post-Gazette story last spring, he quoted University of Pittsburgh economist and demographer Chris Briem, saying, “There are parts of the city growing and changing and doing well — absolutely. But people forget that of 90 neighborhoods, there are a lot of them still suffering from trends of the past.” You can say that again. {SCREENCAP FROM WTAE.COM VIDEO CAST} Win an “ice scrapper”! For example, the ’70s-style rock-guitar riff that underscores the latest promo for WTAE meteorologist Mike “4-Degree Guarantee” Harvey would also leave a hapless, time-traveling soul to speculate he had arrived the year when Apple Inc. first incorporated. What may be the most cornball promotion portrayed by Paul Newman to play like goons. (Great movie, by the way.) in local-news history doesn’t help, either. Let’s Do the Time Warp, Again! His “4-Degree Guarantee” works thusly: Seriously, more 1977? ICYMI, there is a Facebook community — 2,219 strong “Every weekday during the 5 p.m. newscast, Mike Harvey will give viewers and growing — with the cleverly crafted moniker, “Straight Outta Pittsburgh.” his 4-Degree Guarantee. He guarantees the next day’s low temperature will On Jan. 3, it posted a vintage WTAE promotion from 1977. It sounds a lot like the be within 4 degrees of what he predicts. The following day we will compare theme to The Love Boat, which isn’t strange at all since TLB first aired in 1977. Mike Harvey’s guaranteed forecast to the actual temperature. ... When Instead of cruising the Pacific Princess, though, you’re riding a Sea-Doo on the he is right, one viewer will be randomly selected from among all eligible entries Mon. (Treat yourself here.) and will be offered a ‘Mike Harvey. He Gets It Right’ ice scrapper [sic] prize.” Look for us; That’s right, folks, you WIN AN ICE SCRAPPER. We’ll be there; Perhaps it’s no coincidence that one of Harvey’s proudest moments was Action News is everywhere; meeting the “Hansen Brothers” [sic] from the 1977 movie Slap Shot. From the warm and friendly city; Which brings me back to Ya Jagoff, who recently posted an interview on his Where three rivers flow blog, yajagoff.com, with “yinzer” Dave Hanson, who does, in fact, have a really And everywhere cool (pun intended) and impressive hockey story. The tagline? “We are yakkin’ We’re always there with Dave Hanson from the 1970s cult hockey movie ‘Slapshot [sic].’” The local-news promotional themes of yesteryear and today are much the In case you were wondering, the movie Slap Shot could be pithily described same. The images and soundtrack may change, but the message is always: “WE as a struggling hockey team in a struggling Rust Belt town, coached by a character ARE WATCHING YOU.” So, you know — relax.

The Pitt News reported last week that more millennials are buying homes in Pittsburgh, so it’s only natural to want to keep our ears to the ground and keep 1977 around … forever. Emily Migdal of TPN writes, “[Matt] Stephens is one of about 12 percent of millennials buying and considering buying homes in the Pittsburgh region — a number below the national average of one-third, but one that, according to a December 2015 National Association of Realtors prediction, is set to rise.” I think working toward peaceful coexistence is the only solution. I mean, you did see Star Wars, right? I’m talking about the one that debuted in 1977, of course. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.20/01.27.2016


NEWS

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

TA S T E

+

MUSIC

+

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

+

CLASSIFIEDS

63


Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

2016 Winter Guide  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 26 Issue 3

2016 Winter Guide  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 26 Issue 3