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KATHLEEN KANE’S EXIT STRATEGY 12

JOHN LYDON ON HUMAN NATURE 20

NORTH SIDE PROJECT MOVES AHEAD 44

X PGHCITYPAPER XXXX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX XX PGHCITYPAPER

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015


EVENTS

We are down to the final four objects in the ultimate clash with the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh.

YOU DECIDE! Vote Today for The Warhol’s finalist at warhol.org/carnegieclash! The winning object will be announced on November 14 at the Carnegie Museums 120th birthday celebration at our Oakland Museums. One lucky contest participant will receive a prize package including a FREE one-year membership.

11.6 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN WITH AUTHOR AND FOOD HISTORIAN SUSAN ROSSI-WILCOX The Warhol theater FREE

11.12 – 4:30pm ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Teachers in attendance receive Act 48 credit. Tickets $10

11.13 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU The Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

11.14 – 10am KID CITY DANCE PARTY WITH DJ KELLYMOM The Warhol entrance space Presented in connection with Year of the Family. FREE

11.14 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN WITH ART HISTORIAN LUCY MULRONEY The Warhol theater This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Warhol By the Book. FREE

Sponsored by The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Andy Warhol, Silver Clouds [Warhol Museum Series], 1994, The Andy Warhol Museum, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., photo by Abby Warhola

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015


{EDITORIAL}

11.04/11.11.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns THEO SCHWARZ, KELECHI URAMA, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 44

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

[NEWS]

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has pretty much everything 06 “Pittsburgh to offer our students, things that

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we could not possibly give them.” — Wilkinsburg school-board member Michael Johnson on the decision to send students to Pittsburgh Westinghouse

[VIEWS] Kane is indiscriminately firing 12 “Kathleen bullets at her enemies like a drunken assassin.” — Charlie Deitch on the Pennsylvania attorney general’s messy exit strategy

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

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Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing & Sales Assistant MARIA SNYDER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

“The kitchen knows when to play the bacon card and when to hold it.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth on Bakn

[MUSIC] no, they spray-painted the house.” 22 “Oh — The Decline of Western Civilization director Penelope Spheeris on the unusual friendships she formed with her subjects

[SCREEN] just doesn’t seem to be a lot of 40 “There hope.” — Filmmaker Steve Hoover on Mariupol, Ukraine, the setting of his new doc Crocodile Gennadiy

[ARTS] city government or the property44 “Ifowner bargains away too much, then all the meetings in the world won’t help.” — Charles Rosenblum on community processes for real-estate development

[LAST PAGE] different just in terms of the 63 “It’s ideologies driving everything.” — U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee of California, the 2015 Merton Center honoree, on how things have changed in Washington, D.C.

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 50 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 60 N E W S

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{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“WE HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO OFFER CHILDREN MORE THAN WHAT THEY HAVE RIGHT NOW.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

OPEN HOUSE

Find daily updates of the issues facing Pittsburgh and the events happening in and around the city on our Blogh* (*the ‘h’ is silent).

Pittsburgh Westinghouse will welcome Wilkinsburg students in 2016, but will the benefits outweigh the drawbacks in the long run? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

www.pghcitypaper.com

O Last week Pittsburgh City Council questioned Pittsburgh police officers’ secondary employment. Keep up with what your councilors are up to by visiting our council blog. www.pghcitypaper.com

N OCT. 28, Pittsburgh Public Schools approved a partnership with the

Wilkinsburg School District that would send students in grades 7-12 to Pittsburgh Westinghouse for the 2016-17 school year. The following day, PPS Superintendent Linda Lane visited Wilkinsburg’s three schools to talk to the more than 200 students who will be filling her desks next year. “Do you have a swimming pool?” Lane says one student asked. “Do they have uniforms there?” asked another. The answer to both questions was “yes.” “They seemed more curious and were wondering, ‘What are some of the opportunities we’re going to have when we attend there?’” says Lane. It’s no secret that Wilkinsburg is one of the lowest academically performing school districts in the state. And according to scores released by the Pennsylvania Department of Education last November, Wilkinsburg High School was the lowest-performing school in the county. But it’s also no secret that Westinghouse is one of the lowest-performing schools in Pittsburgh, and doesn’t rank too well at the state level, either. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

This week: Whether you love records or juggling, there is a festival in town this weekend for you. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Instagrammer @j_minear highlights Pittsburgh’s fall colors in this shot along the Allegheny River in Fox Chapel. Tag your Instagram photos as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win a $50 gift card to Sewickley Spa. Contest ends Nov. 12.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

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OPEN HOUSE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

So while many see this as an opportunity for Wilkinsburg students, the question remains how much of a benefit they’re really receiving. “It’s a shame that they were willing to settle for sending their kids to Westinghouse, because if there was one school in Western Pennsylvania, if not the state, that is academically as poor oor as Wilkinsburg, it’s Westinghouse,” e,” says Jake Haulk, president of the Allegheny Institute for Public Policy, a conservative think tank. “I’m not sure their kids are going to be uplifted ed by being around kids who are failing as bad as they are, if not worse.” rse.” The decision to send students tudents to Westinghouse has raised aised red flags for many Wilkinsinsburg parents, including members of the district’s own school board. Some parents are worried about their children’s safety, both f t b th due to current discipline issues at the school and the potential for conflict between the two groups of students. And Keystone Test scores released last year showed that Westinghouse ranked lowest in English, science and math of all schools in the city. But while statistically there might

appear to be little difference between the two schools, supporters of the decision say the differences are night and day. They say the PPS/Wilkinsburg partnership is the best chance the borough’s children have to get the education they deserve. “II graduated from Wilkinsburg. grad The level of education T they were receiving, we thought it was unfair to the students,” says Michael Johnson, a Wilkinsburg parent and school-board representasc tive. “It took a lot out of us tiv to this decision. We to come c just want the best for our kids. We think Pittsburgh has pretty much everything to offer m our students, things that we could not t possibly give them. th “We just couldn’t sit around any c longer and l d accept what was going on.” A FEW DAYS after the two school boards approved the PPS/Wilkinsburg partnership, Marcus Wells was waiting for his daughter, Naomi Williams, across the street from the Wilkinsburg High School building. As a seventh-grader, Williams will be part of the first group to enter

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

Westinghouse next year. “I don’t want to go there. I don’t want to go Westinghouse,” she says after bounding across the street with a friend. “I have teachers that talk to me who I can learn from here.” Wells isn’t too sure about the partnership, either. Both father and daughter share uneasiness about how students from Wilkinsburg and Homewood will interact once they’re attending the same school. They’ve also heard stories about Westinghouse kids fighting each other in the school’s bathrooms. “We think mixing Wilkinsburg and Homewood right now is going to start some drama,” says Wells. And Wells isn’t the only parent worried about the social aspect of the partnership. Andre Scott, another parent with a seventh-grader, says he’s worried the change could affect his son’s behavior. “I just want to ensure his behavior doesn’t shift,” Scott says. Despite these concerns, both Scott and Wells say they’re excited about the new opportunities their children will receive at Westinghouse. “On the positive side, they have a lot more activities at Westinghouse. My son wants to play sports. There’s a [career and technical education] program. He’ll be able to benefit from those programs,” says Scott. “If that is the option we have to take, we just have to ensure Westinghouse is teaching all the children at a high level.” Other than the Wilkinsburg Tigers football program, parents, students and residents say there aren’t many extracurricular activities available to children in the borough. A combination of declining enrollment and financial instability has forced the district to cut programs p g over the years. “My son doesn’t have the extracurricular component ent that I would definitely like ike him to have,” says Scott. “Education-wise, he’s definitely learning. He’s being g challenged, so I wouldn’t say it’s a lackluster education. But I know there’s e’s not enough youth in the he school for them to have cerertain programs, so I know he could be enriched more in n a better setting.” The potential for more e opportunities for Wilkinsburg students is why

school-board member Johnson voted in favor of the partnership. As a father of two, he says he originally was not in favor of sending students to Westinghouse until he toured the school. “The main concern for the parents is the safety issue — the two communities having issues in the past,” says Johnson. “I had the same fear they had, but after taking a tour of the school and speaking with some of the administrators and some of the students, it changed my decision completely. I was totally pleased with the security measures they have in place. I would not have voted yes for this partnership if I thought it was dangerous for any children.” Johnson currently hosts regular meeting with Wilkinsburg parents where he plans to share his experience touring Westinghouse. “My decision was ‘no’ up until I walked into that building. There was no way I as a parent could say no to my son with all of the opportunities they had there,” says Johnson. “We have had to cut so many sports programs. This year we didn’t even have a cheerleading team. There are different languages they could be learning. We offer nothing. There are no electives and they’re at a disadvantage for everything. Enough was enough.”

“WE JUST WANT THE BEST FOR OUR KIDS.”

BEYOND THE strengths supporters say

they see in Westinghouse, Wilkinsburg students will also be able to apply to Pittsburgh magnet programs at other schools after the first year. But some have questioned why the students have to wait one year at all. “Why are you holding students away from full access for one year?” outgoing board member Mark Brentley said at Pittsburgh’s school-board vote. He Pittsb made mad a motion to eliminate the one-year requirement, but it o did not pass. “Is it because d this community is predominantly African American? Whatever the reason, you don’t treat children this way.” th And even after Wilkinsburg students meet the oneyear requirement, there will be barriers to magnet entry, b ssay critics. Pittsburgh’s magnet programs — like those at n CAPA, which specializes in the CA creative and performing arts, cre and Sci-Tech, which focuses on an


STEM fields — are already at capacity. “They’re not going to dump Pittsburgh kids to put Wilkinsburg kids in,” says Haulk, of the conservative Allegheny Institute. “You’d be able to hear the screaming over in Beaver County if that happened, and I wouldn’t blame the Pittsburgh parents. If I’ve ve been waiting in line to get my kid id into a good magnet school and this Wilkinsburg kid comes along ong and bumps them, that’s not going to sit well.” Haulk says his organization ation believes a state takeover off the district, or sending Wilkinsburg urg students to charter or private te schools, would be preferable e to sending the students to Westinghouse. “To me, it would’ve been en a lot better to solve the e Wilkinsburg school problem m in Wilkinsburg,” says Haulk. lk “But to have them shipped out of the neighborhood to go to a school that does not offer much in the way of promise in terms of educational attainment, I just don’t see that as benefitting anyone.”

Pittsburgh is eager to prove Haulk wrong. “We’re pretty excited about the opportunity to work with the students from Wilkinsburg, and you’ll feel that excitement from the students at Westinghouse, g , too,” says Superintendent Lane. ““There are several things think we can offer.” we th In addition to resources now at their disposal, Lane says Westinghouse has sesay cured a grant that is being cur used to improve academic use programming. The district is progr also adding a public-safety career program to the school. care “At Westinghouse we’ve added additional supports add from the district in order to help tthem make even further progress than we made last progre We saw some real positive year. W things iin terms of the culture, so we want to maintain the momentum,” says Lane. “We have an opportunity to offer children more than what they have right now, and we’re willing to do the work.” RNUTTAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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TRAILING ON

Hiking trails throughout the county are growing, but property owners still hold the final say {BY RYAN DETO}

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THE RACHEL CARSON Trail Conservancy

wants to create a hiking trail more than 170 miles long, stretching from Pittsburgh’s North Side all the way to the Allegheny National Forest, on the northern edge of Pennsylvania. It would traverse forestland and pass through county parks, over vistas gazing at green gorges, alongside the occasional rural road and next to bubbling streams and rivers. The small group of dedicated hikers who make up the RCTC have been working under the radar to maintain hundreds of miles of trails in the region for more than 20 years. Recently, their vision of a super-trail came a bit closer to reality when Allegheny County purchased property next to Harrison Hills Park that brings the Rachel Carson Trail, known for its annual 34-mile challenge race, to within a few hundred yards of linking with the Baker Trail, which extends 132 miles north from the AlleghenyArmstrong County border. Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald says he is “very supportive of trails” and is currently working to extend the Three Rivers Heritage Trail from Station Square to connect with the Montour Trail near Coraopolis. “We are in a challenge to recruit people to Allegheny County, and people want amenities like trails,” says Fitzgerald. “The trail system is a big asset that has drawn a lot of people to this county.” But unfortunately for the Conservancy, many parts of the final dozen miles of a potential supertrail pass through scores of private properties, and getting owners to allow it on their land has been an ongoing battle. Some owners are supportive and encourage trails, but others fear their privacy would be encroached. Even though the RCTC is building more and more support, it takes only a few naysayers to stall a project in perpetuity. One of the owners opposed to the trail is Ron Eichner. He owns Eichner Farm on the edge of McCandless, and his property marks the end of RCTC’s first trail, the mile-long Harmony Trail. The conservancy was founded in 1992 with the goal of creating a trail that would fol-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DONNA STOLZ}

Trail sign marking the path of the 34-mile Rachel Carson Trail, which spans most of northern Allegheny County

low the old Harmony Short Line trolley route and provide a car-free path from the North Hills to the North Side. But expansion of the Harmony Trail stalled once property owners like Eichner nixed potential easements to allow the trail to go through their land. “It comes down to a simple right of the property owner,” says Eichner. “The trail opens up too many problems and invites [hikers] to trespass across my property.” Eichner says that about 10 neighbors share his concerns, which include privacy, parking and lack of facilities on the trail. “We worry about privacy concerns,” he says, “and where are people going to go to the bathroom.” With about 12 miles to complete before reaching the North Side, Eichner argues that the project is too cumbersome to take on. “There are a lot of neat concepts that could be done, but sometimes you just have to understand that it is too difficult to get something complete,” he says. But John Stephen, of the RCTC, recognizes the process is going to “take a long time,” and says that residents’ desire to enjoy nature could eventually win out. “People always want to get outdoors. It is part of being human,” he says. When the Harmony Trail stalled, the Conservancy focused its attention on the Rachel Carson Trail and the Baker Trail, stewardship of which it inherited from a youth-

“TRAIL DEVELOPMENT HAPPENS PIECE BY PIECE.”

hostel organization in 2004. “I often get out to Hampton Township Community Park and walk the Rachel Carson Trail, and after a while I hear no cars and I remember that I am living in forest,” says Stephen. Stephen also argues that the vast majority of trails are blazed and maintained amicably, and that being a great neighbor is “critical to the success of the conservancy.” He says RCTC’s trail stewards keep the trails clear and maintain relationships with property owners. Nicola DiCio, who owns White Oak Farm, in Hampton Township, believes that there should be more trails in the area. He has allowed the Rachel Carson Trail to cut through the middle of his property for decades. “I am extremely protective of my property and sometimes exposure can bite you, but I have never had an issue with the trail,” says DiCio. “People are there to walk, not to vandalize.” Local municipalities are supportive, too. Marshall Township Parks and Recreation director Heather Jerry says her goal is to connect the Rachel Carson Trail to the 10-mile trail system zigzagging through Marshall. She says a connection to trails in Cranberry Township is already complete and that, after a new township park is built, a connection to the Harmony Trail will be a couple of blocks away. “Trail development happens piece by piece,” says Jerry. “Half a mile here and there, and eventually they all connect. ... It is a bit of waiting game, but we definitely have our eye on the future.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

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TOTA LP ETSTO R E S.C O M Pittsburgh Labor & Management Past & Future: A Labor-Management Discussion presents

The Elliott Group & United Steelworkers– Our Journey Together How a 100-year-old U.S. factory went from a candidate for closure to expanding its USW workforce and investing more than $100 million in its operational structure.

November 10, 2015 t 2:00 PM–4:00 PM Featured speakers will include members of the Elliott Group’s current labor and management team. CCAC Allegheny Campus Foerster Student Services Center Auditorium 808 Ridge Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 The event is free and open to the public. Reservations are requested. CEUs are available. For more information or to register, contact 412.237.4412 or LaborManagement@ccac.edu. Free parking is available.

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specks of shit involving Kathleen Kane started hitting the fan, I wrote a column saying she should not be forced to resign from office. I didn’t support her tactics and methods as Pennsylvania Attorney General and I firmly believed then, as I do now, that she was probably one of the worst public officials to ever take an oath of office. At the time, she was the focus of a grand-jury investigation, and even if indicted I didn’t believe she should be forced to resign. But as I pointed out in that column, there’s a way to deal with horrible politicians in this country: We don’t re-elect them. Besides, at that point I wasn’t sure that the legal campaign targeting her wasn’t politically motivated. The whole situation needed time to play out. I am a firm believer in the right of the people to select their elected officials. And back then, I didn’t see any reason to usurp the people’s authority. Since then, however, Kane has lost her law license and still faces criminal charges for perjury and obstruction of justice. And at a time when some people would take a step back and assess the situation, she has cranked up the crazy and has decided to fight just about anyone in Harrisburg who she thinks is attempting to screw her over. So, in case you haven’t guessed yet, I have changed my tune. It is time for Kathleen Kane to leave office and handle her legal issues. Maybe I was an idiot, or at least naïve, for thinking that this could all play out in a dignified manner, with the truth finally prevailing. But now I’m not sure what the truth is, if we’ll ever get to it or, if it does come out, if we’ll even recognize it. To be perfectly honest, I can barely keep straight the who, what, where, why and how this whole convoluted, ill-conceived game of political football started. All I know is that it has devolved into a highstakes game of chicken that can end only one way: mutually assured destruction. MAD is a war strategy that basically involves the two opposing sides using weapons of mass destruction against one another. Nobody wins. Everybody loses. And in this game the weapons are emails sent by various ranks of state employees and public officials. By now, we all know about the porn emails. They cost several high-ranking members of the Tom Corbett

administration their posts, and a state Supreme Court justice was forced to resign for sharing the emails. Another, Justice Michael Eakin, is back under investigation for sending emails that were not only pornographic but also contained racist, sexist and homophobic comments and images. State Democrats have begun calling for the Republican justice’s resignation. I think the odds are pretty good that at some point they’re going to get it. Kathleen Kane is on borrowed time and, as other pundits have also pointed out, she has decided not to go down alone. She is firing her missiles at every available target, hoping to take as many of them with her as possible. Recently she released email communication from 2013 between Judge Barry Feudale and two Philadelphia reporters. Feudale was ticked because Kane had him removed as judge of the statewide grand jury. He was discussing with the reporters whether he could leak to them information surrounding that removal, particularly the order stating the reasons he was taken off grand-jury duties. Kane says she got the emails because they were on the attorney general’s server and therefore public. The problem? Feudale sent them from a personal email address, on a personal computer. He says his office was burglarized, and guess whom he blames? With these revelations come more unintended consequences. Attorneys for convicted child-molester and former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky want the charges against him thrown out because of Kane’s allegations that there were grandjury leaks surrounding the case. The judge overseeing the appeal has ordered Kane to appear on Nov. 5. Last week. Steve Esack, the excellent state-government reporter from the Allentown Morning Call, ran a story about members of Kane’s staff asking Northhampton District Attorney John Morganelli to enact a rarely used court procedure to get her out of office. In response to the request, Morganelli said, “I never imagined it could get so bad.” Neither did I. Kane is running around indiscriminately firing bullets at her enemies like a drunken assassin. I can only imagine how much worse it’s going to get from here.

KANE IS RUNNING AROUND INDISCRIMINATELY FIRING BULLETS AT HER ENEMIES LIKE A DRUNKEN ASSASSIN.

C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015


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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

A FEW PUCKIN’ THOUGHTS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

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LITE DRAFTS 10 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT ON THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

MILLER LITE 32OZ DRAFTS DURING PENS GAMES

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

PITTSBURGH HOCKEY fans are the only fans anywhere, of any sport, who celebrate when their announcer exclaims, “She wants to buy my monkey.” We know that is good news, and if it’s quickly followed by “Shave my face with a rusty razor,” we know the Penguins are scoring goals. This is normal behavior in the Steel City; nothing weird here. Hard to believe this is the Pens’ sixth season at the Consol Energy Center. Yes, it is clean and modern and was necessary, but count me in with those who miss the Igloo. The Civic Arena was an architectural gem that was ahead of its time. Three Stanley Cups were won while they played there and it was also where the Jean-Claude Van Damme classic Sudden Death was filmed. Consol was featured in the Robert DeNiro-Sylvester Stallone movie Grudge Match, but it’s just not the same. But despite my love of the old building, Pens fans pack Consol for every game, also known as “The House that Sidney Crosby Built.” The fans are still just as helpful as they’ve always been, offering players helpful advice like “shoot the puck” and the less specific “get it outta there!” Another tradition that’s followed them into the new facility is getting riled up at ex-Pen Jaromir Jagr. A recent game brought Jagr and his team-of-the-week, the Florida Panthers, to Pittsburgh. Jagr is still booed vociferously every time he touches the puck, despite being the second-best player in the history of this franchise. By the end of this season he will pass Gordie Howe for the third-most points in NHL history. But in Pittsburgh, he is Public Enemy No. 1. You can hate Jagr if you want, but you cannot deny his place in mullet history. Jags has vowed to go retro and bring back his sweet mullet for the 2015-16 season. Stand back MacGyver, Randy Johnson, Lionel Richie and Florence Henderson (check out season four of The Brady Bunch) and give proper respect. The legendary Czech will be in the mullet and the NHL Halls of Fame. This year, the third- and fourth-best players in Penguins history — Sid Crosby and Evgeni Malkin — are back; so is much underappreciated goalie Marc Andre Fleury. An injection of offensive firepower was needed after the Pens limped their way out of the postseason with a first-round loss to the New York Rangers. The Penguins acquired Phil Kessel from the Toronto Maple

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

Leafs. The only downside of the Kessel acquisition is that it brings out the annoying new-jersey guys. You know the type; they rush out to be the very first person with a jersey of the latest player. The only thing more annoying than new-jersey guys are New Jersey guys. And while I hate new-jersey guys, I love old old-jersey guys. So, if you hung on to your Rob Scuderi or Ben Lovejoy jerseys, you can dust them off. Both players have returned to the Pens after playing hockey in California. I would imagine Pens coach Mike Johnston is feeling a sense of urgency this season. While Crosby, Malkin and Fleury are not old by regular-people standards, all of them are in the 28- to 30-year range. That’s old enough to qualify for the early-bird special in NHL years. Scuderi, Chris Kunitz and Pascual Dupuis are all 36. We might need to put blades on their Rascal scooters. Perhaps to offset the graybeards, 18-yearold Dutchman (is that the preferred nomenclature?) Daniel Sprong made the team. The most difficult challenge I faced at that age was hoping my fake ID would fool the bouncer at the bar. They will need his energy to compete in the stupidly named Metropolitan division. Hockey, in my opinion, is the most exciting sport to see live. Football is made for television and baseball is great on the radio, but hockey is the best when you are right there. Maybe I would have played the sport if it were not so expensive. Watching it is not much cheaper. Not too many cheap seats unless you are a college student. Maybe I should contact my old fake-ID guy and see if he can whip me up a college ID — I’m thinking Harvard or Yale — just so I can get into the games for cheap. If I could pull that off, I would be “smiling like a butcher’s dog.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

MONDAY ALL DAY MIK E WYSO C K I IS A STANDU P C O ME DIAN AND M E M B E R OF J I M K RE N N ’ S Q M ORN I N G S H OW E AC H WE E K DAY MO R NING O N Q 9 2 . 9 F M. F O L L OW H I M ON T W I T T E R: @ I T S M I K E W YS OC K I


Customer service any time, day or night 24/7. Port Authority’s new automated phone system enables you to use both touchtone dialing and voice recognition technology to instantly access information about your next scheduled bus, T or Incline and even check your ConnectCard balance – 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Best of all, the system allows you to bypass others waiting to speak with the next available phone representative. Call 412.442.2000 and follow the prompts.

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THE KITCHEN KNOWS WHEN TO PLAY THE BACON CARD AND WHEN TO HOLD IT

GOOD AND RAW {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} ExtraVEGANza Pgh hosts the latest installment of its Intercontinental Superfood Brunch, on Nov. 7, at Schwartz Market on the South Side. “I want to help change other people’s lives,” says Mya Zeronis, the one-person operation behind ExtraVEGANza Pgh. Zeronis — who has dubbed herself “the 98-pound chef” — is an advocate of the slow-food movement. Originally from Burma (now Myanmar), she says she learned to cook a mostly whole-foods, plant-based diet at age 11. “We ate meat maybe once a week,” she says, explaining that meat and dairy products were expensive in her country. But when she moved to the U.S. in 2000, she said her health began to change. “Everything was big in size, but so diluted in flavor,” she says. While pursuing culinary arts, she worked her way through several U.S. restaurant kitchens, where to her disgust, she saw items arrive in boxes from institutional food distributors, and learned to smother everything in butter. By 2008, she described herself as “unhappy and depressed in a 145-pound body,” rolling out pizza dough for an Italian bistro. Now, she’s evangelizing that people can get full by mindfully eating whole foods, rather than empty calories. Her ExtraVEGANza location, open Tuesday-Saturday, offers a raw, organic juice bar as well as a create-your-own organic smoothie menu. A savory menu features raw pizza, raw zucchini lasagna, and hot dogs made from carrots. And, for each monthly brunch, Zeronis promises a 14-item menu and four juice choices. AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.98poundchef-pgh.com

the

FEED

Did you know that Andy Warhol illustrated a cookbook? Created by Warhol and Suzie Frankfurt, Wild Raspberries (1959) poked fun at the fancy French recipes that were popular at mid-century. Learn more at this free discussion led by Warhol Museum chief archivist Matt Wrbican and food historian Susan Rossi-Wilcox. 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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JUST ADD BACON {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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ERHAPS THE most memorable food trend of the early 21st century has been baconmania — that moment when everything from chocolate to cocktails was colonized by smoked pork belly. The re-installment of fat and meat as components of a satisfying diet aligned tidily with a mass cultural agreement that bacon sure is pretty darn tasty. It led to rampant experimentation with this crunchy cured meat, as an enhancement to all manner of treats, savory and sweet alike. Clearly, then, a bacon-themed restaurant is an idea whose time has come. Fortunately, Bakn is not a confectionary, but plays by the old rules, beginning with bacon’s primacy as a breakfast meat and sandwich ingredient. Under chef Randy Tozzie, a native of Upper St. Clair and alumnus of such diverse establishments as Giant Eagle Market District and the Duquesne Club, Bakn takes the meat as its muse in building the brunch equivalent of a gastropub. Bakn is located in the old Carnegie Granite Works building on the town’s charming Main Street. It has a sleek industrial aes-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Bakn BLT: one-pound smoked-applewood bacon, baby spinach, tomato and baconnaise

thetic, with a subway-tiled bar in front and a diner-style kitchen counter in back. Its menu is brief yet comprehensive, familiar yet imaginative. It encompasses diner staples like pancakes, omelets and BLTs (of course), but also more elaborate dishes such as slow-braised short ribs with creamy parmesan polenta and a sunny-side-up egg on top. Although bacon does appear in

BAKN 335 E. Main St., Carnegie. 412-275-3637 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: $6-13 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED some surprising places, such as in the steelcut oatmeal (in candied-maple guise, with berries and almonds), Tozzie knows when to play the bacon card and when to hold it. There is also none of the eager-to-please tendency that leads to unnecessary variations on a theme; when the kitchen has a good idea, it’s on the menu, but nothing

seems perfunctory. We went straight to the meat of the matter by ordering a bacon flight: five strips, one each of uncured, applewoodsmoked, candied, Cajun and peppered bacon. The strips at the more boldly flavored end of the spectrum were cut slightly thicker than the milder ones, but all hovered near the sweet spot of meaty chew and delectable crispness, and each distinguished itself with flavor. The Cajun, in particular, had a spicy profile that reached deep into the meat without hiding the pork’s smoky essence. The peppered bacon was darkly flecked with plenty of bold, coarse grind, and the candied tasted subtly of maple. “Uncured” bacon is actually cured without nitrates, and was our kids’ favorite. The applewood-smoked tasted the most like traditional bacon, with peak notes of salt, smoke and cider. Pancakes stuffed with bacon were alluring, but the chocoholic among us elected to try chocolate-chip pancakes. (It is a measure of Tozzie’s restraint that bacon and chocolate are not served together in the pancakes.)


Jason chose from the sandwich section, bypassing the BLT made with a full pound of applewood-smoked bacon for the porkbelly reuben. His choice had as much to do with the apple sauerkraut as the promise of braised belly. Served on marbled rye, the sandwich was a triumph: The pork was tender; the kraut perhaps not tart enough, but crunchy and with a hint of pickle; and baconnaise — which is what it sounds like, mayonnaise with tiny bits of diced, crisp bacon stirred in —adding another dimension of pork flavor, and pulled everything together. The fries alongside were topnotch, too, beautifully seasoned with herbs and pepper. Bakn shows how a theme can transcend a trend by playing up a single ingredient’s inherent strengths. We already knew bacon was delicious. Bakn lets you count the ways.

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I’m crammed in line waiting for my brush with greatness. I’m sweating, I’m being touched from all sides and every second someone takes a selfie. What is this hell I’ve found myself in? It’s the shadow side of the booze-slinging business: the phenomenon of the celebrity endorsement. This go-round, it’s an Effen nightmare. In late October, rapper Curtis James Jackson III, a.k.a. 50 Cent, arrived at the Consol Energy Center, promo girls and posse in tow, to endorse his Effen Vodka brand by cutting the ribbon on the new Effen Liquid Luxury Lounge. Effen is imported from Holland, and the Dutch name conveniently translates to “smooth.” While this might be low-hanging fruit, the company has made some entertaining if tawdry plays on its name in commercials including taglines like “There’s nothing like Effen on a plane” or “Everyone enjoys Effen in the penthouse.” These nods to luxury hook in nicely with the image that 50 Cent has promoted in his music, namely making lots of money, dancing in nightclubs and of course, drinking. Killjoy that I am, sleek, shiny events where one harassed-looking person (in this case 50 Cent) has everyone’s cell phones mere inches from his face seems a little slimy. It doesn’t enhance the experience of the actual product, and I walked away wondering whether 50 Cent had even had time to have a sip. None of this is to disparage the product itself, which was, for someone who typically avoids vodka, a smooth and friendly experience. The bottle is nicely designed, sleek and mod, with a cushy grip around the middle for anyone with slippery hands. All of the drinks created and slung by some of Pittsburgh’s notable bartenders, such as Jay DeNat, Nicole Battle, Maggie Meskey, Cecil Usher, George Santel and Carrie Clayton, were something I would be happy to be served at any bar — though that’s as much a testament to the skilled professionals as it is to the liquor.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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40 Craft Beers

Celebrity endorsements are a shadow side of the booze business

The author with Effen spokesman 50 Cent

Housemade Bloody Mary

NorthSide Sandwich ars Running! n i W ner 4 Ye

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

EFF WORD

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NNING SAND W WI S! HE IC

On the RoCKs

The cakes were broad and medium-thick, neither thin and crepe-like, nor bland and fluffy like most diner cakes. Despite a generous hand with mini-chips in the batter, the buttermilk flavor came through. Apple-pie French toast, on the other hand, was neither light nor crisp. The caramelized apple topping was sweet and soft, with little of the deep flavor or browned edges suggested by the name. Beyond the griddle, Bakn showed what a truly great brunch is made of. Angelique’s shrimp and grits was, simply, perfection. Plump, pan-blackened shrimp were succulent and deeply seasoned in a silken swirl of creamy cheddar porridge. Finely diced tomato, scallion and meaty bits of bacon added further depth and breadth of flavor, and a sunny-side-up egg, its yolk broken into the mixture, brought this dish close to paradise.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Asian American Cuisine The Largest Buffet in Town!

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

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MIKE WYSOCKI’S

THE CHEAP SEATS PAGE 14

CITY PAPER’S WEEKLY

SPORTS COLUMN

FROM LOCAL COMEDIAN & MEMBER OF JIM KRENN’S Q MORNING SHOW ON Q 92.9 FM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-266-6362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern California-style Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BOB’S DINER. 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400. Well-prepared fare and a warm atmosphere distinguish this local diner chain. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-toyour-ribs dinner platters. The fried chicken is a winner, with a skin that is deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. J BUTCHER AND THE RYE. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-391-2752. Amid the twee décor, diners can find outstanding food (and house-recipe cocktails). Starters might be a remade Caesar salad with baby kale, roasted Brussels sprouts or rich mac-and-cheese. Game dishes, such as quail and rabbit, are available as entrees, as are popular standbys such as burgers, with fries and pickles. KE THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific

Bob’s Diner {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412-968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, complete with Japanese and French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE

Seviche {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} KASAI PGH JAPANESE RESTAURANT. 146 E. Main St., Carnegie. 412-279-5500. Here, the menu is fairly sushi-centric, with a handful of cooked appetizers and entrees. Kasia offers a wide variety of sushi, from slender, one-filling hosomaki and traditional rolls, to more elaborate multi-ingredient

offerings — all with impressive attention to detail. Non-sushi items include crisp, flavorful gyoza dumplings and a craband-cucumber salad. KF KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE LA TAVOLA ITALIANA. 1 Boggs Ave., Mount Washington. 412-481-6627. This family-run restaurant in Mount Washington offers Italian favorites in a warm, welcoming atmosphere. Entrees include classics such as parmigiana, marsala and piccata, prepared with either chicken or veal, as well as hearty surf-and-turf fare. Be sure to try to pizza Margherita, on the antipasti list, or the superb appetizer eggplant Milanese. KF LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare sprinkled with more authentic options such as tinga (saucy stewed pork) and sopes, thick cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos excels with Americanized Mexican dishes, imbuing them with authentic ingredients and preparations that recalls the fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s prepared in Mexico. JF OLIVES AND PEPPERS. 6052 William Flynn Highway (Route 8), Bakerstown. 724-444-7499. This casual Italian spot that offers pizza, pasta and sandwiches as well as more refined entrees. The meat-and-cheese sandwiches are a forte, with ciabatta “panini”


Subba Asian Restaurant. {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and hoagies options. The lasagna is enormous, its homemade noodles laden with a creamy five-cheese mix and a savory Bolognese sauce with meatballlike chunks of beef. KE OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-3698. This twowheel-themed café and bar offers a creative pub-grub menu (with many offerings named for bicycle parts). The salads are more impressive than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered zucchini planks wrapped around melty cheeses. JE

North Side. 412-586-5764 or 412-853-1070. A humble restaurant offers a broad menu. Among the more common, but well-prepared, Chinese stir-fries and Indian curries are such Nepalese specialties as momo dumplings (meat and vegetarian); sadako, a sort of sauceless stir-fry; and curries, served on a large platter filled with many tasty and complementary components. JF

SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. This North Hills restaurant offers a full range of Japanese cuisine beyond sushi that is more representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and RAMEN BAR. 5860 rice bowls. But, as Forbes Ave., Squirrel the name suggests, Hill. 412-521-5138. there is also plenty What’s not to love www. per pa of well-prepared about a big steaming pghcitym .co sushi, including bowl of wheat noodles, specialty maki. KE flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. vegetable add-ins? Besides the 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. traditional offerings, Ramen Bar 412-665-2770. The menu offers a also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm to a variety of classic dishes spices. Order the sampler platters from across Asia, such as Chinese for the best variety of flavors, and ground-pork dishes. JF ask for a glass of tej, a honeybased wine that is the perfect SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., accompaniment. KE Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty tapas restaurant specializes Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. in citrus-cured fish, while also This Thai restaurant in the heart offering a small selection of of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves Latin-inspired tapas and finger up authentic dishes with warm, sandwiches. And what better friendly service. The restaurant to wash down an empanada also offers an updated vegetarian or mini taco than a refreshing menu that features mock duck, capirinha cocktail? KE vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., familiar non-meat offerings of Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open tofu and vegetables. KF late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn satisfies theater buffs, families Ave., Strip District. 412-281-8881. and young professionals alike. The menu features a manageable The seasonal menu offers lively selection of noodle and rice dishes updates on comfort food from and the eponymous pho soups. lobster mac-n-cheese to braised There’s also a tempting assortment short ribs. Gourmet burgers and of simple vegetable dishes and pizzas make for quick meals. appetizers that go beyond mere Linger for homemade desserts, spring rolls, such as whole quail or stop by after the show. KE with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on SUBBA ASIAN RESTAURANT. sugar-cane skewers. JF 700 Cedar Ave. (second floor),

FULL LIST ONLINE

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TAKE OUT | DELIVERY | ORDER ONLINE

(Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

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LOCAL

BEAT

“DON’T ASK ME TO BE BITTER. INDEED, I HAVE NO BITTERNESS.”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

Thomas Douglas, artistic director and conductor of the Bach Choir of Pittsburgh, has a deep curiosity about history. Sometimes, at social gatherings, he’ll throw out a question like, “How many of you know the full name of your paternal grandfather?” “That’s where the stories really start,” he says with a chuckle. “I always hope to stir up people’s interest in their own heritage.” That’s the spirit behind the Bach Choir’s 81st season, which opens this weekend with America: Makers and Dreamers. For this season, the organization, which is known for its bold mix of traditional and unconventional works, will present a series of concerts dealing with the idea of work from a historical perspective. In March, the choir will present a program of work and union songs; in April, it will close the season with “Smoke and Steel,” a commissioned piece to be performed at Carrie Furnace, a decommissioned U.S. Steel blast furnace, which is now a historical site. The theme was inspired by a tour Douglas took of the Carrie Furnace. Though the site is only a couple of miles from where he lives, he was initially surprised to learn it was there. “But there are a lot of people who worked really hard and really struggled in those mills,” he says. “Something should be done to talk about … that whole generation of workers who really worked hard to create Pittsburgh and America.” America: Makers and Dreamers features pieces which celebrate the American aspirational spirit, including Aaron Copeland’s “The Promise of Living,” Leonard Bernstein’s “Make Our Garden Grow” and works by Randall Thompson based on the poetry of Robert Frost. The performances will take place at the Energy Innovation Center in the Hill District. That space is currently in transition, Douglas says, “So it’s really rough and austerelooking, not like a refined concert hall.” Which, for a concert like this, felt like the perfect choice of venue. Ultimately, “we wanted to surround the subject of how we got to where we are today,” Douglas says. “To me, it feels like so much of our society doesn’t really give enough credit to the people who got us to where we are.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AMERICA: MAKERS AND DREAMERS 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7, and 4 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. The Energy Innovation Center, 1435 Bedford Ave., Hill District. $9.95-30. 412-241-4044 or www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org

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Thomas Douglas

BACH TO WORK

PUBLIC FIGURE {PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL HEARTFIELD}

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

J

OHN LYDON has just loudly expecto-

rated in my ear, via an overseas phone call. This act of nature is not meant as a commentary on our conversation. “Sorry,” he says, sounding sincere. “You know, I am a singer and I will hack. It’s funny — the first thing to go is not the singing voice. It’s the talking voice. I lose the normal register, but I can squeak extremely high.” When he coughs up another one a minute later, generating a laugh from both of us, Lydon decides to dispel a punk-rock myth. “I would like you to inform an audience that I never aimed that at another human being,” he says. “I have a bin! That was another thing that them early journalists got wrong, implying that we liked to spit on each other. Sorry, no. I don’t know such foolish people!” Once upon a time, John Lydon flustered veteran TV interviewer Tom Snyder by answering questions about Public Image Ltd., with as few words as possible.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

In the face of adversity: John Lydon with Public Image Ltd.

And of course, a few years earlier, he made television history when, as Johnny Rotten, he and his bandmates swore during a live television interview. Today, Lydon speaks at length, in a congenial manner. When discussing performances by the current lineup of Public Image Ltd. (PiL), he says the band aims to please. But then he qualifies that thought:

PUBLIC IMAGE LTD. 9 p.m. Thu., Nov. 12. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $31-33. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

“Actually, we aim to please ourselves, and hopefully that translates further down the line. Other bands compromise or go for the popular vote or the current trend. We’ve always been above and beyond that kind of nonsense. So when I say we aim to please ourselves, that’s what I mean quite literally,

because we love creativity.” If he doesn’t sound like the confrontational John Lydon of yore, it may be because after years of battling with record labels and troublesome band members, he says he’s finally having a good time. The feisty persona is alive and well, and a bad question could turn him at any moment. But he’s up for a good conversation. In recent interviews Lydon has mentioned how a childhood bout with meningitis affected his memory and derailed him for several months. He teared up during one chat as he talked about it. (He famously cried in the Sex Pistols documentary The Filth and the Fury, as he recalled the death of Sid Vicious.) Maybe the angry young man has been misunderstood all these years. “Well, I reckon! Deliberately so from day one, don’t you?” he asks. “Initially, the outburst was, ‘Oh, dumb working-class [kids], what do they know about anything?’ Then [there was] bitter resentment when they


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realized I actually had opinions that kind of meant something. [Then there was] outright negativity and continuous hostility. “But at the same time, while I’ve been learning to smile in the face of adversity, there’s also been some people out there that started to pay attention, and understand what we really do. And so in life, it’s six of one, half-a-dozen of the other. And if you expect everyone to love you all the time, then you’re a very, very foolish person who’s going to really have a miserable life.” He clearly has a good handle on human nature. “People by nature — this is why I love us all — we’re just born fucking awkward,” he says. “It really is just a question of square pegs and round holes. We’re meant to be that way. That’s what character is. ‘I will not conform.’ ‘Oh go on, John. Why not?’ ‘’Cuz I won’t!’” PiL’s latest album is titled What the World Needs Now …, but Lydon’s healthy perspective hasn’t softened his lyrics. Rather than finishing the album title with “love, sweet love,” as Dionne Warwick did, his trademark yelp calls for “another fuck-off” in the song “Shroom.” He also welcomes listeners at the start of the album by barking, “What? You fucking nagging again?!” The original lineup of PiL, which debuted in 1978, featured dub-influenced bass lines from Jah Wobble and slashing guitar riffs from Keith Levene. Metal Box, a set of three 12-inch 45s packed in a metal canister, offered the group’s finest hour, leaning closer to the prog bands like Can than the punk crunch of the Sex Pistols. Various players have come and gone, leaving Lydon as the sole original member. The current lineup features guitarist Lu Edmonds (formerly of the Damned and the Mekons), drummer Bruce Smith (formerly of equally abrasive jazz punks the Pop Group) and bassist Scott Firth. In place since 2009, this incarnation lays claim to a visceral excitement on the new album. Live, they’re combining new tracks with songs from the early days, which, Lydon chuckles, are played much better now. The one time during our talk that Lydon gets short is when, after he mentions the word “reunion,” he’s asked if he would ever hook up with Wobble and/or Levene. The whole question isn’t complete before he fires back, “No. No. No. No.” He explains, more casually, “Don’t ask me to be bitter. Indeed, I have no bitterness. They’re all my friends. But I can’t go back and work with certain members because their wage demands and ego trips were just so far in excess of reality. Love ’em forever, but good riddance and take your egos with you. Can we move on?” It is good to know he has.

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STEADY DECLINE

and they said, “Let’s go for it.” So then they introduced me to a lot of other people they knew, and we went to a bunch of squats they lived in.

{BY SHAWN COOKE} UNTIL FOUR years ago, three esteemed music documentaries were sitting in a vault, untouched. They existed in outdated formats, including recorder tape that would disintegrate at the touch and VHS tapes locked cold into place. Director Penelope Spheeris asked her daughter, Anna Fox, to work for her, and Fox accepted, with one condition — that their first project would be restoring these dormant films, The Decline of Western Civilization. Throughout a meandering career which features major-studio diversions like Wayne’s World, Black Sheep and The Little Rascals, Spheeris kept returning to the Decline saga like a reliable punkrock vacation home. By documenting three distinct eras — Part I’s riotous Los Angeles underground (1981), Part II’s overblown excess of heavy metal (1988) and Part III’s elemental look at homeless gutterpunks (1998), the films highlight punk’s timeless ethos. After Shout Factory distributed highquality scans of the Decline series this summer on disc, Spheeris and Fox began touring the country for screenings they cheekily call “The Decline World Domination Tour.” The tour rolls through Pittsburgh’s Hollywood Theater this weekend, and City Paper talked to Spheeris and Fox about the trilogy and what lies ahead.

WHEN YOU WERE GETTING READY TO MAKE THE FIRST DECLINE, WERE YOU ALREADY PRETTY INGRAINED INTO THE L.A. PUNK SCENE, OR WAS

HAVE YOU FOLLOWED UP WITH THE KIDS FROM DECLINE III? PS: The people in Decline III for me are the people that I’m really most close with. I met my boyfriend on Decline III, and he was in the movie briefly, and he’s been my boyfriend for 18 years. And the other people, like Eyeball and Gizmo from the Resistance, we’re still in touch with, and Kirsten, from Naked Aggression. For me, those are the people that just knowing them changed my life, and made me not even want to do that Hollywood thing anymore and just help other people.

On the scene: Penelope Spheeris and Eyeball

SCREENING OF THE DECLINE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION Parts I & III: 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. $12. (Spheeris and Fox will do a Q&A at the Nov. 6 event only.) Part II: 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. $10. Hollywood Theater, 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-563-0368 or www.thehollywooddormont.org

THERE A LOT OF DISCOVERY THAT CAME WITH FILMING? Penelope Spheeris: That’s actually a point that most people are really interested in. I’ve even been asked, “How could a professional filmmaker like you infiltrate these underground scenes and actually

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

get some truth out of it?” The fact of the matter is, I was a part of the scene before I started the movie. Anna Fox: And you weren’t a successful filmmaker at the time either. It was your first movie. PS: These were our friends. Anna was 9 years old, and Darby [Crash, of the Germs] used to come to our house, and — AF: Give our dog beer. PS: Yeah, Darby would dump out the water in the dog dish and put beer in there. And then we would stop him from doing that right away, because we are animal-lovers. And then they’d also come over for a little dinner or something, and the next day when it was light, we’d go, “Oh no, they spray-painted the house.” Their band name’s on the outside of the house.

DO EITHER OF YOU KEEP UP WITH CURRENT PUNK SCENES AT ALL? AF: I have a 16-year-old daughter who’s going to a festival this weekend called Beach Goth, so my only exposure to all the new stuff is basically through her. She went through a phase where she was all about the stuff I was into, and we went to all the shows. PS: So Beach Goth is the only new thing we can report on, via my granddaughter. We’re doing the Decline IV, but we’re not able to speak about the subject matter, because you could go make that movie, Shawn.

“I WAS A PART OF THE SCENE BEFORE I STARTED THE MOVIE.”

I DON’T KNOW IF I COULD. PS: The point is, you get to a point in your life where you go, “OK, what’s more important: going out to clubs, rocking out and sticking my hair up in the air, or going out and trying to help people.”

IT SOUNDS LIKE THE FOURTH DECLINE MIGHT BE CLOSER IN SPIRIT TO PART III THAN PARTS I AND II? PS: Well, I think that’s a really good guess. And here’s the thing about SO HOW DID YOU FIRST COME making a documentary — you need ACROSS THE KIDS FROM PART III? to let it take you on the trip. First THAT SCENE SEEMED A LOT time I ever heard anybody say, MORE PROTECTED AND “Is your script ready for your UNDERGROUND THAN PART I. re Read mo documentary,” I almost fell off PS: I saw them, a whole pack . w at ww my chair. How can you script of kids walking down Melrose y it c h g p m o a documentary? You let it unc Avenue in Los Angeles, and I r. e pap fold in front of you if you make said, “These guys look exactly a good documentary. That’s what like the kids from Suburbia or we’re doing with the fourth Defrom the first Decline. I’m going to stop and talk to them.” When I stopped, I cline, and people are asking for it, so we said, “Hey, how about we do The Decline better hurry the heck up and stop with Part III?” They said, “No, no — Penelope this tour. Don’t you think? Fire up our has to do that.” I said, “I am Penelope,” machines again. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS

Dilly Dally

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID WALDMAN}

[DJENT] + SAT., NOV. 07 “Djent” is an emerging genre of progressive metal; its name is derived from the tone of the guitars, which sound like “djent, djent, djent.” It’s akin to the origins of the word “ska,” which, legend has it, was named after the “ska, ska, ska” sound of its guitars. An onomatopoeic name is just about all djent has in common with ska, though. Polyrhythmic drumming and odd, difficult time signatures make djent a demanding genre of music TesseracT to perform, and even to listen to. Its fans, though, heartily appreciate the challenge. (Maybe djent has more in common with ska than one might think.) Tonight, the British band TesseracT, known as a pioneer of the genre, is playing at Mr. Small’s Theatre, with support from The Contortionist, E.R.R.A. and Skyharbor. Andrew Woehrel 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $16-18. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[SHOEGAZE] + MON., NOV. 09 Traditionally, shoegaze has been an English genre — the American equivalents, like Galaxie 500, have always been classified as dream pop. Although Wild Moth is from the Bay Area in California, it sounds more like an English shoegaze band than an American dream-pop band. Members sing in affected British accents, and their rhythms and textures bring to mind Slowdive, Swervedriver or even Blur. The closest American touchstone to the sound is actually another Anglophile rock band from San Francisco, The Brian Jonestown Massacre. Tonight, the group is playing at the Black Forge Coffee House with locals Roulette Waves, Run Forever and Swingers Club. AW 7 p.m. 1206 Arlington Ave.,

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Allentown. $5. All ages. 412-291-8994 or www.blackforgecoffee.com

[METAL] + WED., NOV. 11 The Irish blackened-death-metal band Malthusian is named after the theories of Rev. Thomas Robert Malthus, an advocate of population control, who wrote in the late 18th century about how human population would always be kept in check by disease and famine. This dark and depressing world view has a lot in common with the way Malthusian’s music sounds: oppressive, hopeless, unfriendly. Though Malthus’ political views don’t necessarily point to the views {PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM BARNES} of the band members, it’s clear that they are probably pessimistic about the state of world affairs. Malthusian is playing one of its few U.S. tour dates at Spirit tonight, with Mutant Supremacy, Imperial Triumphant and more. AW 8 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

[GRUNGE] + WED., NOV. 11 Katie Monks, vocalist of the Toronto neogrunge band Dilly Dally, has an androgynous voice that falls somewhere between Courtney Love and Ezra Furman. Though admittedly not terribly original (the drums and guitars are dead ringers for “Where Is My Mind”-era Pixies), Dilly Dally has got charisma, a lot of it thanks to Monks’ nails-on-a-chalkboard slurred singing voice. It’s an acquired taste, but it’s what makes Dilly Dally’s music stand out from countless other ‘90s-nostalgia indie-rock bands. You can catch Dilly Dally tonight at Brillobox, with support from The Love Letters and Space Pope. AW 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} Tickets at www.jergels.com

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24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

AESTHETIC PARLOUR. Mike Sopko & Hamir Atwal. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0591. BRILLOBOX. Blod Maud, Robin Vote, Brazilian Wax, Daryl Fleming & the Public Domain. Bloomfield. 412-480-7803. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MR. SMALLS THEATER. theNEWDEAL w/ Broccoli Samurai. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PALACE THEATRE. Amy Grant. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. REX THEATER. The Infamous Stringdusters w/ Horseshoes & Hand Grenades. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 06 BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. CLUB CAFE. Lydia Loveless w/ The Red Western. South Side. 412-229-5483. FRIDAY FAITH CAFE. Jericho Rising. Washington. 724-222-1563. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Polyphonic Spree. Millvale. 412-821-4447. OLIVE OR TWIST. Billy Schneider Acoustic. Downtown. 412-255-0525. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Commonheart & Coastal Remedy. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 07 BROTHERS GRIMM. Daniels & McClain. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CATTIVO. The Royal Concept, Parade of Lights, Tribe Society. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Egomyth & Essential Machine. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. South Side. 412-431-4090. HAMBONE’S. Standing Wave. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Platinum. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. LATITUDE 360. Jukebox Band. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MEADOWS CASINO. Hit Play. Washington. 724-503-1200. MOONDOG’S. Shannon & the Merger, Shot O’ Soul, High Road Easy, & Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. Stand Up for Homeless Veterans Benefit. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. TesseracT, The Contortionist, Erra, Skyharbor. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

REX THEATER. EOTO & Friends w/ Mike Rempel, Electric Love Machine. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Steeltown Band. Ross. 412-364-8166. SKYLARK MOTOR INN. King’s Ransom. Moon. 412-264-5753. SMILING MOOSE. The Tilt Room, Brahctopus, Wayside Exchange. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Hawkeyes, w/ Wine & Spirit, Hero Jr. CD Release Party. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. ZANDERS SPORTS BAR & NIGHT CLUB. EZ Action. Monroeville. 724-387-2444.

SUN 08 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Rachel B. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CLUB CAFE. David Mayfield & Sean McConnell w/ Ferdinand the

Bull. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Possessed By Paul James, Mickey & the Snake Oil Boys, Devil’s Holler. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Yonder Mountain String Band w/ Henhouse Prowlers. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

MON 09 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Blessthefall w/ Stick To Your Guns, Emarosa, Oceans Ate Alaska, Cane Hill. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 10 CLUB CAFE. Sean Rowe w/ Mark Dignam. South Side. 412-431-4950.

MP 3 MONDAY KEVIN FINN

{PHOTO COURTESY OF AMY TRONOLONE}

ROCK/POP

Each week we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Kevin Finn; stream or download “Broken Cup” from his new record, Green Metal Folk, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.


REX THEATER. Lettuce. South Side. 412-381-6811. SPIRIT. Wild Adriatic w/ Chrome Moses. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. STAGE AE. Matoma. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 11

MEADOWS CASINO. Tony Janflone Jr. Washington. 724-503-1200. MOONDOG’S. Savoy Brown. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Neon Swing X-Perience. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SUN 08 ANDYS WINE BAR. Shari Richards Band. Downtown. 412-773-8800. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Don Aliquo, Sr., Howard Alexander w/ Tony DePaolis, Lou Schreiber, James Johnson III. A jazz service titled “Become a Blessing.” North Side. 412-431-4090.

SAT 07

CLUB CAFE. Mustard Plug w/ Inco Fido, Cynimatics. South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Holly Bowling. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Sweaty Betty. North Side. 412-904-3335.

TUE 10

TUE 10

BLUSH SPORTS BAR. Shari Richards. Jam session. Downtown. 412-281-7703.

DJS THU 05 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Yury. North Side. 412-904-3335.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Colter Harper. Space Exchange series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

JAZZ

WED 11

THU 05 ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM. Jazz Seminar w/ Bassist Robert Hurst. Expanding Musical Ideas through Rhythmic Variety. Oakland. 412 624-4187. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 06

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ANDYS WINE BAR. ROWDY BUCK. Top Bronwyn Wyatt. 40 Dance. South Side. www. per a p Downtown. 412-431-2825. pghcitym o .c 412-773-8800. RUGGER’S PUB. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. Tony Campbell & South Side. 412-381-1330. Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals GUILD. Ken Peplowski & Gary & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. Smulyan, Bill O’Connell & the 412-687-2157. Latin Jazz All-Stars. North Side. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-322-0800. 412-431-8800. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET LAVA LOUNGE. The Night Shift CLUB. Antoinette Manganas & DJs. Obsidian: gothic/industrial No Ordinary Soul. Monroeville. dancing. 412-431-5282. 412-913-3516. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. O’HARA STUDENT CENTER. North Side. 412-231-7777. Jazz Seminar w/ Saxophinist ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Tineke Postma & Drummer South Side. 412-431-2825. Jimmy Cobb. Working on a Personal Sound & Style. Oakland. 412 624-4187. STAGE AE. The Chainsmokers. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 06

SAT 07 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Sugartop Funk & Blues Review, BOOM. Bloomfield. 412-841-8789.

BLUES FRI 06 HARD ROCK CAFE. Billy Price, Kenny Blake, Sputzy, Reggie Watkins, Stevee Wellons, Shari Richards. Victory Not Victims Blues Benefit Show. Station Square. 412-481-7625.

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FRI 06 ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Kyle Horn, Aaron Lefebvre, Chad Gerbe. Squirrel Hill. 724-344-1833. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. David Childers w/ Jeff Wiley. Harmony. 724-452-0539.

Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days.

565 LIVE. The Jazzed Owls. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. ANDYS WINE BAR. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-773-8800. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. Pitt Jazz Concert. 45th Annual Jazz Seminar & Concert. Oakland. 412-624-1085. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Jerry & Louis Lucarelli Sunny Sunseri, Ron Scholl w/ Peg Wilson. Strip District. 412-281-6593. ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM. Mino Cinelu. Master percussionist performing & taking questions from the audience. Hill District. 412-624-1085. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Ken Peplowski & Gary Smulyan, Bill O’Connell & the Latin Jazz All-Stars. North Side. 412-322-0800.

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ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too?

SAT 07

HIP HOP/R&B

THU 05

LISTEN UP!

TUE 10

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

ACOUSTIC

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

SAT 07

WED 11

ANDYS WINE BAR. Chris Laitta. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FORM PG. 25

to Sam Smith

celebrating the band, their music & the beer that traveled the nation keepin' everybody dancin' •

Music • Sammy Specials • Lot-Style Food • • DSO Ticket Give-A-Ways •

Sunday, Nov Sunday Nov. ov 8 8pm

Monday, Nov Monday Nov. 9 8pm

Lawrencevillee Lawrenceville

EEast ast L Liberty ib berty

Thursday, Nov. 12th 5pm

Saturday, Nov. 14th 7PM

The Brillobox

Kelly’s Bar & Lounge

Pre show at The Beer Market The Grateful Dead Movie Dark Star Orchestra at Stage AE Row House Cinema/Atlas Bottle Works

NNorth orth S Shore hore

Lawrencevillee Lawrenceville

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ZACK LABOS}

A Grateful Salute

EARLY WARNINGS

CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. Chet Vincent & Molly Alphabet. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 07 BOBBY P’S INN THE RUFF. The Nightones. Penn Hills. 412-704-5843. CLUB CAFE. Richard Shindell. South Side. 412-431-4950. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Chris Coole & Ivan Rosenberg. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. PARK HOUSE. Wheatley Matthews. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Chevy Woods

WED 11

{SAT., NOV. 21}

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

KRS-One Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum, 7310 Frankstown Road, Homewood

REGGAE

{FRI., NOV. 27}

Chevy Woods

FRI 06 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District {TUE., MARCH 01, 2016}

COUNTRY

Glassjaw

THU 05

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

SAT 07

Mozart’s “Cosi Fan Tutte” sung in Italian w/ English subtitles. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

CLUB CAFE. Lera Lynn. South Side. 412-431-4950.

CLASSICAL

OTHER MUSIC

FRI 06 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. PNC Pops: West Side Story. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 07

THU 05 LINTON MIDDLE SCHOOL. River City Brass: Home Of The Brave. Patriotic tunes such as “Summon the Heroes,” “The Stars & Stripes” & “The Armed Forces Salute.”. Penn Hills. 412-434-7222. RIVERS CASINO. Mark Ferrari. North Side. 412-231-7777. www.

PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. Upper St. Clair Theater, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-1389. PITTSBURGH OPERA. Presenting Mozart’s paper pghcitym “Cosi Fan Tutte” sung .co in Italian w/ English CARSON MIDDLE subtitles. Benedum Center, SCHOOL. River City Brass: Home Downtown. 412-456-6666. Of The Brave. Patriotic tunes such as PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY “Summon the Heroes,” “The Stars ORCHESTRA. PNC Pops: West & Stripes” & “The Armed Forces Side Story. Heinz Hall, Downtown. Salute.” McCandless. 412-434-7222. 412-392-4900. OAKS THEATER. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie Granati. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN SHADYSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Third CHURCH. Rutgers University Glee Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Club. Shadyside. 412-682-4300. www.mendelssohn.org PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. PNC Pops: West BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN Side Story. Heinz Hall, Downtown. NATIONAL EDUCATION AND 412-392-4900. CULTURAL CENTER. Grand UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Bon Rien. West Homestead. CARPATHIAN ENSEMBLE. Heinz 412-461-6188. Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. ENERGY INNOVATION CENTER. The Bach Choir of Pittsburgh. The program includes: The Promise of PITTSBURGH OPERA. Presenting

FULL LIST E N O LIN

FRI 06

SUN 08

SAT 07

TUE 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

Living by Aaron Copland, Frostiana selections, by Randall Thompson, Shenandoah by Gwyneth Walker, Old American Songs (selections) by Aaron Copland & Make Our Garden Grow Leonard Bernstein. Hill District. GREATER PITTSBURGH MASONIC CENTER. Sounds of Pittsburgh Chorus. A cappella show including groups from Pitt & CMU. Ross. 412-973-8558. PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass: Home of the Brave. Patriotic tunes such as Summon the Heroes, The Stars & Stripes, & The Armed Forces Salute. Greensburg. 412-434-7222. RIVERS CASINO. Freddy Hartz Live. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 08 ENERGY INNOVATION CENTER. The Bach Choir of Pittsburgh. The program includes: The Promise of Living by Aaron Copland, Frostiana selections, by Randall Thompson, Shenandoah by Gwyneth Walker, Old American Songs (selections) by Aaron Copland & Make Our Garden Grow Leonard Bernstein. Hill District. www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org

TUE 10 UPPER ST. CLAIR HIGH SCHOOL. River City Brass: Home of the Brave. Patriotic tunes such as Summon the Heroes, The Stars & Stripes, & The Armed Forces Salute. Upper St. Clair. 412-434-7222.


Are you looking for a career change, or thinking about pursuing a degree? If you have questions about what school is right for you, look no further. The Education Guide is here to help you discover the right degree program for your future goals. Flip through these pages and let us pinpoint the right school for you.

A D V E R T I S I N G

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CHATHAM CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

WOODLAND ROAD, PITTSBURGH, PA 15232 www.chatham.edu • 412-365-1100 Now fully coed, Chatham University is home to nearly 2,200 undergraduate and graduate students. Founded in 1869, Chatham is comprised of two distinct campuses. The Shadyside Campus includes Chatham Eastside, home to our health sciences and interior architecture programs, and Woodland Road — a leafy sanctuary minutes from downtown Pittsburgh. Located in the North Hills of Pittsburgh, our 388-acre Eden Hall Campus is the world’s first academic community built from the ground up for the study and practice of sustainability. Eden Hall has net zero energy; zero carbon emissions; and onsite management of all storm and waste water. In addition to housing our sustainability programs, Eden Hall also offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programming for North Hills residents in business management, psychology, and education.

Explore the new Chatham University

Chatham’s academic excellence is centered within three schools: the Falk School of Sustainability, the School of Health Sciences, and the School of Arts, Science, and Business. Undergraduate students can choose from over 40 majors, and through the Integrated Degree Program, qualified students to earn both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in as few as five years.

Visit us this fall to learn about our rigorous academics, explore our stunning campuses, and meet our faculty. Can’t make it to one of our events? Plan a visit for one of our Saturday tour days. Register today at chatham.edu/admission/events

r SCHOLARSHIP INTERVIEW DAY & ACCEPTED STUDENT VISIT Sunday, November 15, 2:00 p.m.

r UNDERGRADUATE

ACADEMIC VISIT DAY Monday, November 16, 9:00 a.m.

Sustainability • Health Sciences • Business & Communications • Arts & Sciences

A tuition free public cyber school providing a quality education. We have highly qualified PA certified teachers, assigned Family Coaches, and supporting staff that serve our students in their educational success. 590 NORTH GULPH ROAD KING OF PRUSSIA, PA 19406

A D V E R T I S I N G

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TOLL FREE:

 1-844-GO-AGORA WWW.AGORA.ORG


Fall Open House

Nov. 14

Schedule a campus visit today 0. by calling 724-946-7100. Can’t make it to the open house?

You can visit anytime! Come experience Westminster, meet our faculty and students, and check out our new majors!

NEW MAJORS NOW AVAILABLE AT WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

MORE T H A N YO U

• CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES • • SPORTS MANAGEMENT • • MARKETING •

IMAGINE

• ENGINEERING PHYSICS • • MATERIALS SCIENCE •

New Wilmington, PA | 724-946-7100 | westminster.edu/visit A D V E R T I S I N G

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CCAC COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Allegheny Campus (North Shore) | Boyce Campus (Monroeville) North Campus (McCandless) | South Campus (West Mifflin) Braddock Hills Center | Homewood-Brushton Center Washington County Center | West Hills Center www.ccac.edu • 412-237-3100 Community College Of Allegheny County Will Host an Enrollment Open House at all eight of its locations Saturday, November 14, from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., for prospective students and their families. Individuals who bring their high school diploma, GED or college transcripts can complete their CCAC registration in one day. Attendees also can complete “on demand” placement testing, meet with an advisor and learn about CCAC’s program offerings in the arts and humanities; business; education, social and behavioral sciences and human services; health; science, technology, engineering and math; and the skilled trades. CCAC staff will be on hand to answer questions about admissions and enrollment procedures, financial aid options, transfer and career opportunities and college services, sports, clubs and other activities. Attendees will learn about: s!SSOCIATE DEGREE CERTIlCATE  diploma programs s0ROGRAMS DESIGNED TO FACILITATE easy transfer to four-year COLLEGES  UNIVERSITIES

s)N DEMAND CAREERS THAT OFFER STRONG WAGES  CAREER GROWTH s3CHOLARSHIPS GRANTS  lNANCIAL AID opportunities s$AY EVENING WEEKEND  ONLINE COURSES

A D V E R T I S I N G

CCAC personnel also will conduct tours of the facilities for prospective students and their families. Ever since its founding in 1966, CCAC has embraced the concept of providing affordable access to quality higher education. For hundreds of thousands of the region’s residents, CCAC has been the gateway to a more fulfilled and prosperous future, offering an avenue to a firstrate college education oftentimes not otherwise available. CCAC has an exceptional reputation for providing quality instruction at an affordable cost and this is just one of the reasons why every year thousands of students make CCAC their college of first choice. For more information or directions to the CCAC location nearest you, visit ccac.edu.

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______ OPEN HOUSE ______ Saturday, November 14

10:00 AM–1:00 PM

CCAC offers 23 transfer programs, 125 articulation agreements and more than 150 programs of study.

OUR GOAL IS YOUR

SUCCESS.

Visit us on the web at ccac.edu or email admissions@ccac.edu

A D V E R T I S I N G

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ICTC

IUP

INDIANA COUNTY TECHNOLOGY CENTER

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

-LH[\YLK7YVNYHT!4LKPJHS(ZZPZ[HU[ A medical assistant program is now offered in Westmoreland County! Graduates of ICTC’s medical assistant program are qualified for a variety of entry-level positions in a medical practice’s administrative office, examining room, and office laboratory, with opportunities for future career advancement. Students learn the latest techniques from qualified practitioners who are some of the best educators in the field. The 1030-hour program includes 12 months of classroom instruction and a customized externship. All students are equipped with an iPad and a kit with tools of the trade. Graduates are eligible to sit for multiple healthcare certifications.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania offers all the opportunities of a large, doctoral university, but with small classes and faculty members who are actively engaged in helping you ÄUKZ\JJLZZ, not only in the classroom, but after graduation.

441 HAMILL ROAD, INDIANA, PA 15701 www.ictcmedicalassistant.com • 724-349-6700 Ext. 131

For more information, contact ICTC at 724349-6700 ext. 131, or visit us online at www.ictcmedicalassistant.com. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. About the Indiana County Technology Center The Indiana County Technology Center is an innovative regional career development and technology center working in partnership with the community to provide a safe, caring environment that includes the integration of challenging vocational/technical skills and academic education. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills which provide pathways to further education and employment in an ever-changing world.

A D V E R T I S I N G

1011 SOUTH DRIVE, INDIANA, PA 15705, www.iup.edu • 724-357-2100

IUP has close to 14,000 students from 44 states and more than 60 countries. It offers 132 undergraduate programs, 52 master’s programs, and 12 doctoral programs, and students take advantage of O\UKYLKZVMPU[LYUZOPWZ and other YLHS^VYSKL_WLYPLUJLZ in almost every major. IUP has more than 136,000 living alumni, with graduates prominent in almost every career field imaginable — including 1999 graduate Chad Hurley, cofounder of YouTube. IUP also offers the Robert E. Cook Honors College community of scholars. The university has more than 760 faculty members, and they are in the classroom; classes are small, and are taught by credentialed and L_WLYPLUJLK WYVMLZZVYZ, who work collaboratively to prepare students for careers that are in demand today, including jobs related to energy initiatives. IUP has more than 250 student organizations and a 280-acre outdoor recreational park. IUP offers Z[H[LVM[OLHY[Z\P[LZ[`SLOV\ZPUN through its $270-million Residential Revival, which integrates a living-learning philosophy and themed buildings and floors related to academic majors and co-curricular interests.

S U P P L E M E N T


PITT CGS

PROPEL

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH COLLEGE OF GENERAL STUDIES

PROPEL SCHOOLS

3447 EAST CARSON STREET, SUITE 200, PITTSBURGH, PA 15203 www.propelschools.org • 412-325-7305

1400 WESLEY W. POSVAR HALL, 230 SOUTH BOUQUET ST., PITTSBURGH, PA 15260 www.cgs.pitt.edu • 412-624-6600

Is your child getting the education they need to succeed?

We’re What’s next! For more than 50 years, CGS has been addressing the unique needs of students who are busy with work, family, and other obligations. We support adult learners, transfer students, veterans, and others who want the personalized attention of a small academic community, and the competitive advantage of a degree from a world-renowned university.

For more than ten years, Propel Schools has provided students with a safe learning environment, individualized instruction, extraordinary science and arts programs, real-world opportunities and a standard of academic excellence. Our community partnerships allow our students to learn and grow through collaborative, enriching and real-world experiences. Students have hands-on learning opportunities – from Kindergarten through 12th grade!

We Invest In Your Success! With our results-oriented degree programs, flexible course formats—including online and hybrid courses—and convenient evening and weekend classes, CGS is the region’s best choice for busy people who want to fit a college education into their already full lives. Even our academic success programs, career development seminars, and free tutoring sessions are held in the evening to help even the busiest students succeed.

Our eight elementary schools and two high schools are staffed with caring professionals, who are eager to see our students succeed. Propel inspires achievement in our students!

Most Popular Majors: Administration of Justice; Health Services; Media & Professional Communications; Natural Sciences (includes premed track)

Thousands of parents across the Pittsburgh region make the choice to send their children to one of Propel’s award-winning schools each and every day, because they believe Propel is the right choice for their child.

Awards and Recognitions: Pitt has been ranked as the top value in Pennsylvania ten consecutive times in The Kiplinger 100: Best Value in Public Colleges; 2015 Military Friendly Schools, a designation that recognizes the top 15 percent of colleges, universities, and trade schools in the nation that are doing the most to ensure the success of veteran students.

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Propel is NOW accepting lottery applications for grades K through twelve at all ten locations for the 2016/17 school year. Application deadline is December 31, 2015, so apply today at www.propelschools.org.

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WE’RE WHAT’S NEXT. Ready to complete your degree? Looking to advance your career? CGS’ career-focused programs and personalized support help you succeed wherever you’d like to go next. Our most popular majors include Administration of Justice, Media and Professional Communications, and Health Services.

Visit cgs.pitt.edu/cp today. A D V E R T I S I N G

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CARLOW

PUBLIC s PROVEN s PROUD

CARLOW UNIVERSITY

3333 FIFTH AVENUE, PITTSBURGH, PA 15213 www.carlow.edu • 412-578-6059 Carlow University: Transforming Lives. Transforming Our World. Carlow University is a co-educational, private, Catholic, masters comprehensive University looking for young men and women who share our commitment to making the world a better place for themselves and others. Listed among the Top 20 best Bang-for-the-Buck private colleges by Washington Monthly, and ranked in the Top 100 by Educate to Career for doing the best job preparing students to find well-paying jobs in their fields after graduation, Carlow will provide you with more than just an education. Your teachers will become mentors, your classmates will become friends, and your friends will become family. And when it’s time to leave, you’ll be prepared not just for a career for when you graduate, but for opportunities that don’t even exist yet.

Carlow has an 11:1 student/faculty ratio and classes are taught by faculty members who are not only experts in their fields, but who exhibit an ardent, deeply-rooted commitment to the practice of teaching. With more than 50 undergraduate majors, Carlow offers a wide variety of programs that turn a spark of curiosity into real-world skills that make a difference. Carlow undergraduates can also save time and money by working on their graduate degree as an undergraduate student through our accelerated degree options. At Carlow, students can take volunteerism to a new level, exercise their civic responsibility, and increase their understanding of social issues and problems by working on various service-learning projects: a unique feature of a Carlow education. Outside the classroom, Carlow students have the opportunity to explore professional experiences in Pittsburgh’s corporate community, its many health care institutions, non-profit organizations, and an abundance of arts organizations.

Apply today at

propelschools.org A D V E R T I S I N G

Carlow is affiliated with the NAIA and the USCAA, and fields eight athletic teams including women’s and men’s basketball and cross-country and women’s soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball.

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NO GRE OR GMAT REQUIRED.

Designed for working professionals and taught by faculty with real-world, specialized expertise, Carlow’s graduate programs offer ultimate flexibility with classes that accommodate the busiest schedules.

Offering 15 masters, two doctoral, and four graduate certificate programs. œBusiness Administration œFraud and Forensics œHigh Performance Learning œPsychology œCreative Writing œArt Education œNursing

CARLOW.EDU/GRADPROGRAMS | 412.578.6000 | PITTSBURGH, PA 15213 A D V E R T I S I N G

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BRADFORD UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT BRADFORD 300 CAMPUS DRIVE, BRADFORD, PA 16701 www.upb.pitt.edu • 1-800-872-1787

At the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, you’ll be in a friendly, supportive environment where you’ll get personalized attention. Since Pitt-Bradford is a regional campus of the University of Pittsburgh, you’ll earn the prestigious Pitt degree, which is respected worldwide. Here are the top 10 reasons why you should consider Pitt-Bradford (in no particular order). 1. Your professors will get to know you and work closely with you to help you succeed. 2. Most of your classes will be small, so you’ll get personalized attention. Our average class size is 19. 3. You can choose from more than 40 majors, from accounting, athletic training and broadcast communications to criminal justice, nursing and biology. 4. You’ll have the chance to get a great internship, conduct research or study in another country. Or, all three. 5. You won’t just listen to lectures (though there’s nothing wrong with lectures.) You’ll learn by doing. Nursing majors work on computerized mannequins in our nursing suite. Criminal justice students solve mock crimes in our CSI House. Psychology majors conduct counseling

sessions in our psychology suite. Broadcast communications majors produce radio and TV broadcasts in our all-digital television or radio facilities. 6. All of our residence halls are apartment style and spacious. You won’t be stuck in a cramped dorm room.

9. You will never be bored – unless you want to be – because we have more than 60 student clubs and organizations.

7. You’ll have a ton of athletic, recreational and cultural activities to choose from: Play baseball, soccer or volleyball; explore caves, ride horses or ski; or enjoy a play, concert or lecture by a visiting author.

10. Your University of Pittsburgh degree will help you go beyond. Of the Class of 2014, 92 percent are employed, in graduate school, or both.

8. We offer many different types of financial aid to help you pay for college. More than 93 percent of our students receive some form of financial aid.

11. Our campus is even more beautiful than it looks on our virtual tour at http://tour.pittbradford.org. OK, we know that’s 11, but who’s counting?

FRANCISCAN UNIVERSITY FRANCISCAN UNIVERSITY OF STEUBENVILLE 1235 UNIVERSITY BLVD., STEUBENVILLE, OH 43952 franciscan.edu • 1-800-783-6220

A Franciscan Education for Life Franciscan University of Steubenville is no ordinary university, and a Franciscan education is no ordinary education. Rather, it’s an education that challenges students intellectually, forms them professionally, and feeds them spiritually. Founded in 1946 in nearby Steubenville, Ohio, by Franciscan Friars of the Third Order Regular, Franciscan University integrates strong academic programs with a lively Catholic faith environment. The result? An extraordinary education that draws more than 2,400 students from 50 states and 13 foreign countries. Franciscan University offers more than 40 undergraduate and 8 graduate degree programs with theology, nursing, biology, communication arts, and business among the most popular majors. Science career tracks include Pre-Professional Programs in dentistry, law, medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, and veterinary medicine, and a new engineer dual degree program that allows students to start their studies in Franciscan’s faith-filled environment and then finish at the University of Notre Dame, Gannon University, or the University of Dayton. With an international reputation for programs grounded in authentic Church teachings, Franciscan University continues to attract far more undergraduate theology and catechetics majors than any other Catholic

university in the country. Franciscan University’s study abroad program in Gaming, Austria, brings 200 students each semester to study and live in a restored medieval monastery near the Austrian Alps. From there, students travel to historic sites and Catholic shrines across Europe. Confession, daily Mass, round-the-clock eucharistic adoration, prolife outreaches, and Festivals of Praise are a few ways students seek ongoing personal conversion in the power of the Holy Spirit. Some 550 students annually participate in mission trips, bringing the light of Christ to homeless shelters, orphanages, and remote jungle villages. Franciscan offers a faith-based, virtue-driven NCAA Division III athletics program with seven men’s intercollegiate teams and nine women’s intercollegiate teams. Franciscan University’s goal is to educate, evangelize, and send forth joyful disciples of Christ to be a transforming presence in the Church and the world. The University’s success in its mission has led to national recognition from Kiplinger Personal Finance Magazine, FORBES’ America’s Top Colleges, and The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College, which characterized Franciscan as “joyfully Catholic.” Visit us at Franciscan.edu.

A D V E R T I S I N G

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“I am grateful to be a part of a university that focuses on the students and their academic growth.� Edith Lloyd-Etuwewe of West Mifflin

Biology major Studied in India

Edith wants to be an obstetrician/gynecologist. To help prepare for a career in medicine, she interned at Bradford Regional Medical Center shadowing doctors and spent her summer in India learning about traditional medicine. Find out how Pitt-Bradford can help you go beyond. Visit www.upb.pitt.edu or call 1-800-872-1787.

above and

beyond A D V E R T I S I N G

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Franciscan University Academically Excellent • Passionately Catholic

Undergraduate Majors

Graduate Programs

Online Programs

Theology Business Administration Nursing Catechetics Education Psychology Communication Arts Biology Philosophy English and more

MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling MA Philosophy MA Theology MBA MS Education MS Educational Administration MS Nursing/ Family Nurse Practitioner

MA Catechetics & Evangelization MBA MS Education With Concentration in •Online Instruction, •Reading Endorsement, or •Educational Administration

APPLY TODAY @ franciscan.edu 1235 University Blvd. • Steubenville, Ohio 43952 • 800-783-6220 • franciscan.edu

Franciscan University of Steubenville is committed to principles of equal opportunity and is an equal opportunity employer.

A D V E R T I S I N G

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What to do

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

Nov. 4-10 SOUND SERIES: Live! On Stage Jonathan Richman

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Lil Debbie

SATURDAY 7

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Emery “The Question 10 Year Anniversary Tour” ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Amy Grant THE PALACE THEATRE

Gatherers

LESTER HAMBURG STUDIO, CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-CITY. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Dec 13.

BLIND GUARDIAN

Winter Craft Brewhaha 2015

ALTAR BAR, STRIP DISTRICT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4

FRIDAY 6

Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood

Ken Peplowski & Gary Smulyan “Encounters” / Bill O’Connell and the Latin Jazz All-Stars

theNEWDEAL / Broccoli Samurai MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD North Side. Tickets: mcgjazz.org or 412-322-0800. 7p.m. & 9:30p.m.

Where to live

RawDraw Live Drawing Event NEU KIRCHE North Side.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

SUNDAY 8 Mystic India

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7p.m.

Doug Paisley & NOW LEASING

NOW LEASING

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CITY

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& TOWNHOMES

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Bakery Living

Micro, 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments Studio, 1 And 2 Bedroom Urban Apartments

Upscale urban rentals • 844.734.3719 Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, East Side & South Side N E W S

MONDAY 9

Sunset Baby

Blind Guardian

THURSDAY 5

PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. 412-566-1000. Over 21 show. Tickets ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Aakash Odedra Company

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM ENTRANCE SPACE North Side. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Joan Shelly

412-322-2224. Tickets: neukirche.org. 6p.m.

WEDNESDAY 4

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SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

TUESDAY 10 Ailey II

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m

Amaranthe ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

The Chainsmokers STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

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3RFF OPENING NIGHT The 34th annual Three Rivers Film festival starts Fri., Nov. 6, and runs through Sun., Nov. 15. More than four dozen films screen at Melwood, Harris, Regent Square and Waterworks theaters. Below are two of the four films featured on opening night; the others are Crocodile Gennadiy (see right) and Tumbledown, a dramedy featuring Mount Lebanon native Joe Manganiello, at Regent Square. All four films begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 or $20, with after-party.

“THERE JUST DOESN’T SEEM TO BE A LOT OF HOPE.”

FATHER FIGURE

This Changes Everything

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING. A widespread if particularly hopeless take on climate change is that it’s unstoppable because humans are inherently greedy. But in this new documentary based on her eponymous bestselling 2014 book, narrator Naomi Klein argues that the real problem is the story we’ve too long told ourselves: that nature is not a mother to be loved but a machine to be engineered. Director Avi Lewis’ camera follows Klein to potential or already devastated “sacrifice zones” — Canada’s tar sands, Montana coal-and-oil country, smogchoked Chinese cities, the site of a proposed Indian coal-fired power plant — to meet the ordinary, often poor people who are using lawsuits and protest to save the places they live and work in. Klein’s essayistic case for viewing the planet through new eyes is a broadly argued Big Idea built on very specific cases, but it’s a fast-paced, engaging and even inspiring 90 minutes. . See wwwper. Harris (Bill O’Driscoll) a pghcitypfor com al COURT. Chaitanya Tamhan’s addition 3RFF pointed drama follows the overage. c case of an Indian street poet accused of spouting verse that led to a sewer worker’s suicide. The film, which toggles between satire and painful reality, is structured as a series of vignettes that illustrate both the court proceedings and the home life of the participants, including the workaday prosecuting attorney and the slicker defense lawyer. It’s an effective technique for exploring India’s complicated relationships with class, vestigial colonialism, inequality, language, gender and, of course, a torturously slow and byzantine judicial system. In English, and other languages, with subtitles. Waterworks (Al Hoff)

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Gennadiy Mohnkenko

{BY AL HOFF}

“W

HO WILL do it?” asks Pastor

Gennadiy Mohnkenko, referring to his work rescuing abused, neglected and drug-addicted kids from the streets of Mariupol, Ukraine. Mohnkenko is the focus of Crocodile Gennadiy, the new documentary from Pittsburgh-based director Steve Hoover and producer Danny Yourd, whose first doc, Blood Brother, won the Audience and Grand Jury awards for Best Documentary at Sundance in 2013. Crocodile is one of four films opening the 34th annual Three Rivers Film Festival. Hoover explains that the team was looking for a subject for a featurelength documentary when friends encountered Mohnkenko during a project in Ukraine. The charismatic “Crocodile” — he derives his nickname from a Soviet-era cartoon about a helpful reptile — had spent more than a decade helping to rehab street kids, through methods both conventional and unconventional, and proved a good match. The filmmakers made trips to Mariupol over the past three years, documenting Mohnkenko’s work at his rehab

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center and throughout the industrial port city, which in 2014 became part of the ongoing Russia-Ukraine armed conflict. Mohnkenko also provided hours of footage from his own archives, covering 2000-2008, which Hoover incorporated. (This material contains some troubling images of abused children.)

CROCODILE GENNADIY DIRECTED BY: Steve Hoover 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. Melwood In English, and Russian and Ukrainian, with subtitles $15 and $20 (includes opening-night party). www.3rff.com

The film doesn’t shy away from darkness, whether it’s Mohnkenko’s work, which strays into vigilanteism (“I had no legal right to take the child — I did it for moral reasons”); the despairing outcomes of many of the kids; the pollution-choked town; or the disruption caused by the conflict with Russia. “It’s not an uplifting story, it’s not life-affirming,” explains Hoover. “There just doesn’t seem to be a

lot of hope.” (A somber score, composed by Atticus Ross, Leopold Ross and Bobby Krlic, adds another layer of darkness.) But the work has generated happier outcomes for the filmmakers, garnering awards at domestic film festivals and securing a distribution deal with The Orchard, after its premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival last spring. Crocodile has its international premiere in Amsterdam later this month, and early next year will get a theatrical release. Hoover agrees there are some parallels between this film and Blood Brother, which recounted a friend’s work with AIDS orphans in India. “It’s the fact that somebody is trying to do something positive with kids. I like character studies, and that’s what both films were intended to be for me. I don’t have a passion to focus on that particular subject matter.” Asked what he might tackle next, Hoover says, “I would love to do something domestic, something local — and something more comedic.” Steve Hoover and Danny Yourd will present the film. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


HYPNOTIZING.”

FILM CAPSULES CP

– Tim Grierson, PASTE

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

“Pushes

the envelope.”

– Ramin Setoodeh, VARIETY

NEW THIS WEEK

“Radically

GHOST IN THE SHELL: THE NEW MOVIE. The popular cyberpunkish Japanese anime series continues with this new feature. In this outing, the Public Security Section confronts a “ghost” hacker. 7:30 p.m. nightly. Nov. 10, 11 and 16. Hollywood THE KEEPING ROOM. Most historical war dramas occur in male-only spheres, but Daniel Barber’s film places the viewer in an overlooked corner of the Civil War — in this case, a rural Southern homefront defended only by women. Property is to be protected, of course, but what gives the film its frisson is the omnipresent threat of sexual violence. (The opening scene clearly establishes that rape is a matterof-fact spoil of war for some men.) In this taut drama, two sisters (Brit Marling and Hailie Steinfeld) and their African-American slave (Muna Otaru) hole up in the family home; the men are dead or otherwise lost, food is scarce and the Union Army is approaching. Already, circumstances have forced the women to act outside the norm — the “slave” is more compadre than servant, and none of the women are above killing. After a slow but tense build-up, most of the drama is structured as a home invasion. The conclusion is openended but for its truths: War precipitates a hellish breakdown of society’s norms, and few are more vulnerable in it than women. Starts Fri., Nov. 6. Parkway, McKees Rocks (Al Hoff)

Suffragette gets its big-screen debut with this animated feature. Charlie Brown goes on a quest, while Snoopy takes to the skies to fight his nemesis, the Red Baron. Steve Martino directs. Starts Fri., Nov. 6

LOVE. Filmmaker and provocateur Gaspar Noé (Irreversible) returns with this tale about a pair of lovers in Paris — an American man and a French woman (plus the lady next door) — which features sexually explicit material shot in 3-D. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Nov. 6. SouthSide Works

THE PEANUTS MOVIE. The whole gang from Charles M. Schulz’s long-running comics strip

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other hand, Brendan Gleeson, as a detective dedicated to breaking the women’s movement, has a nice moment when his character has a shift in perspective.) Mulligan suffers sweetly as Maud, but she never quite sells the privation and misery that the narrative turns on; Duff is fantastic as the harder, more impassioned Violet. Still, it’s an important and oft-neglected piece of history, and even with its PBS-style steadiness, it should prove a fascinating window for those unfamiliar with the suffrage movement. And in an election season, it’s worth the reminder that for half of us, being able to vote was a hard-won right. Starts Fri., Nov. 6 (AH)

STARTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 PITTSBURGH SouthSide Works Cinema (412) 381-7335 CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES • NO PASSES ACCEPTED

REPERTORY OCEAN’S 11. Follow along as the Rat Pack take down Las Vegas casinos. Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford and Angie Dickinson star in Lewis Milestone’s booze-soaked 1960 caper. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 4. AMC Waterfront. $5

MISS YOU ALREADY. Catherine Hardwicke directs this dramedy about a female friendship that is tested by outside forces such as illness and a new baby. Toni Collette and Drew Barrymore star. Starts Fri., Nov. 6 OUR BRAND IS CRISIS. David Gordon Green’s film about American political strategists working in a Bolivian presidential election is inspired by the 2005 documentary of the same name and covering the same subject matter. (The “star” of that doc was James Carville.) This new fictionalized version aims to be a cynical black comedy, pitting two take-no-prisoners political strategists against each other: the slick Carville analog (Billy Bob Thornton) and “Calamity” Jane (Sandra Bullock), who’s a washed-up mess and thereby also seeking personal redemption. For a while Brand functions as an OK-butnot-great political romp, though its shagginess will have you pining for, say, the 30-minute clarity of Veep. But for a film cynical enough to blithely dip into the forbidden well to make three — three! — jokes about Nazi Germany, it goes right off the rails into a wholly unearned, sentimental, faux-inspirational ending. Bullock’s Jane may be skilled enough to sell the Bolivians on a bum candidate (though the less said about the conceit of Americans jetting in to solve other countries’ problems the better). But this film’s game cast, which also includes Anthony Mackie and Ann Dowd, can’t sell this lame campaign to American viewers. (AH)

intimate .”

– Robbie Collin, THE TELEGRAPH

Our Brand is Crisis

THE ANTHEM OF THE HEART. In this new Japanese anime from Tatsuyuki Nagai, a young girl who has had her voice removed discovers friendship and music. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 4. Hollywood

SPECTRE. Agent 007 is back, and a mysterious message from his past puts the dapper spy on the trail of a sinister organization known as SPECTRE. Daniel Craig stars; Sam Mendes directs. Starts Fri., Nov. 6 SUFFRAGETTE. Sarah Gavron’s docudrama puts viewers into the mix of the burgeoning British suffragette movement in the early 20th century. There is a fleeting glimpse of the movement’s leader, Emily Pankhurst (Meryl Streep), but the story focuses instead on efforts to rally working-class women to the cause. Women like Maud (Carey Mulligan) and Violet (Anne-Marie Duff), who toil in miserable East London laundries, and also face the demands of raising children and managing a household. The right to vote promises at least a chance at agency — a collective means that could push back against workplace harassment and inequal pay, as well as secure legal maternal rights and a wider chance at social, economic and political opportunity. Gavron’s film is a fine piece of cinematic broccoli, in that it is handsomely produced, well acted and wholly edifying to the point where it feels often more nutritious than delicious. It focuses primarily on Maud’s slow conversion from disinterested to tentative to manning the barricades and risking it all. It’s such a rote form of plot development that none of it is very surprising or inspiring. (On the

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Anthem of the Heart (2015)- 11/4 @ 7:30pm

New Japanese anime. _________________________________________________

Dead and Buried (1981) - 11/5 @ 7:30pm

Costal zombie horror. _________________________________________________

The Decline of Western Civilization Pts 1 & 3 11/6 @ 8pm - With director Penelope Spheeris in person! _________________________________________________

#filter412 original iPhone art by City Paper photographer Heather Mull

The Decline of Western Civilization Pt. 2

11/7 @ 8pm - The metal years! _________________________________________________

Aida on Sydney Harbor - 11/8 @ 7pm

Spectacular production of this stunning opera. _________________________________________________

Nasty Baby

(2015) - 11/9 @ 7:30pm New Kristen Wiig comedy. Pay what you want for tickets! _________________________________________________

Ghost in the Shell: The New Movie (2015)

11/10 @ 7:30pm, 11/11 @ 7:30pm The latest installment of this classic anime series.

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

The Keeping Room DEAD AND BURIED. In a small seaside town, residents are killing tourists. And worse, some of the dead won’t stay still. Gary Sherman directs this 1981 horror film starring James Farentino and Jack Albertson. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 4. Hollywood

NASTY BABY. In Brooklyn, a close-knit trio (two gay men and their female nurse friend) are considering having a baby, but a dramatic event shifts their focus to a darker act. Sebastián Silva directs this new drama. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 9. Hollywood

2015 CINEMA ARTS SHOWCASE. This hour-long program compiles recent short film work by Point Park University students. The films include fiction, animation and documentary works. 7 and 8:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. Row House. $5

FILM KITCHEN. A Three Rivers Film Festival edition of the monthly series for local and independent artists features Weird Paul Petroskey, a longtime fixture on Pittsburgh’s music scene. Petroskey is also an avid maker of short films and homemade music videos for popular songs, in particular under his YouTube handle, the Original Vlogger. The Nov. 10 screening includes “the first public, uncut showings of 1989’s ‘Suburban Disillusion,’ a stream-of-consciousness film with a rapid-fire series of images, jokes, set-pieces, and real-life footage,” along with Original Vlogger material and other homemade work. A performance by the Weird Paul Rock Band follows the screening. 8 p.m. Tue., Nov. 10 (7 p.m. reception). Regent Square Theater. $9. mday@pfpca.org

SKYFALL. This outing from Sam Mendes finds Agent 007 (Daniel Craig) severely tested after a mission goes badly and his mentor M comers under attack. The 2012 film marks 50 Years of Bond, and is filled with lots of homage to earlier films. Nov. 6 and Nov. 8-12. Row House CASINO ROYALE. Martin Campbell’s actioner adapts Ian Fleming’s first Bond novel, and introduces actor Daniel Craig as the new James Bond. Highlights include: a parkour-style chase and Mads Mikklesen’s bleeding eyes. Nov. 6, and Nov. 8-12. Row House THE DECLINE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION and THE DECLINE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION PART III. The Los Angeles punk-rock scene circa 1979-80 is the focus of Penelope Spheeris’ influential 1981 documentary. Decline captures the mix of loud fast music, political anger, DIY styling and beer, profiling bands such as Black Flag, Circle Jerks, Germs and X. In the time before widespread media about everything, Decline was a critical primer about punk — whether for kids who yearned to be in a similar scene, or the adults who freaked out about it. In 1998, Spheeris made the follow-up Part III, which profiled a later generation of L.A. punks — many of them street kids, who find community and meaning in the ongoing music scene. Some things don’t change: Everybody still hates cops and loves beer. (See page 22 for an interview with Spheeris and her daughter, Anna Fox.) Spheeris and Fox will attend the screening, and do Q&A between features. 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6 (doors at 7 p.m. for signing; proceeds go to charity). Hollywood. $12 THE DECLINE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION PART II: THE METAL YEARS. This 1988 doc from Penelope Spheeris hits the Sunset Strip in search of metal. Interviews include: the bands that made it (Poison); the progenitors, like Ozzy and Alice Cooper; and those hairsprayed, Spandex-ed hopefuls who toil in a sea of show-flyer litter looking for the big break. If “decline” can be defined by cheap sex, loud music and prodigious partying, then the end is indeed near. But this film is the funniest of Spheeris’ Decline trilogy, with the Los Angeles metal scene hewing closer to a noisy, self-aware carnival than any angry rebellion. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. Hollywood

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The Decline of Western Civilization HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN. Alfonso Cuarón’s 2004 film is the third installment in series, which broadens the world of witches and wizards, and begins to establish the historical context for Harry’s current situation and to lay the groundwork for the increasingly complex battles to come. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 11. AMC Waterfront. $5 SEMBENE! This new documentary from Samba Gadjigo and Jason Silverman profiles the life and career of Senegal’s Ousmane Sembene, “the father of African cinema,” whose films include Black Girl, Xala and Moolaadé. Director Gadjigo will do a Q&A after the screening, as well as lead a “master class” about Sembene’s work. In English, and French and Wolof, with subtitles. 6 p.m. Thu., Nov. 12. Carnegie Library, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free but registration required at www.sembenefilmfestival.org


THREE RIVERS FILM FESTIVAL November 6-15, 2015

OPENING NIGHT FILMS*

3RFF.com

Crocodile Gennadiy

This Changes Everything

Friday, Nov. 6 at 7:00pm

Friday, Nov. 6 at 7:00pm

Friday, Nov. 6 at 7:00pm

WATERWORKS CINEMAS

MELWOOD SCREENING ROOM

HARRIS THEATER

India’s Offical Oscar Enrty Co-presented by Silk Screen Festival

With director Steve Hoover and producer Danny Yourd

Documentary following climate change around the world.

Tumbledown

Court

Friday, Nov. 6 at 7:00pm REGENT SQUARE THEATER Starring Jason Sudeikis and Joe Manganiello

Co-presented by PublicSource

*Tickets are $20 and include admittance to the Opening Night Party! The Opening Night Party begins at 9:00 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers, 477 Melwood Ave. The evening includes a Dance Party with Keebs and visuals by ProjectileObjects, libations provided by Great Lakes Brewery, food from Onion Maiden and The Vandal, plus more!

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[DANCE]

FLYING SOLO

“ALL DESIGN IS ABOUT COMPROMISE.”

Though trained as a classical Indian dancer in the Kathak and Bharatanatyam disciplines, noted dancer/choreographer Aakash Odedra has found his biggest successes working outside those strict traditional dance forms. Grabbing a place in the contemporary dance spotlight in 2011, and basking in it since, the native of Birmingham, England, has wowed audiences globally with work combining elements of classical Indian dance with contemporary styles. As part of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s India in Focus festival, Odedra’s Aakash Odedra Company makes its Pittsburgh debut with the program titled Rising (2011) on Sat., Nov. 6, at the Byham Theater. Literally a one-man show, Rising is a series of four solos danced by Odedra, who is the lone performer in his company. Like Pittsburgh native and rising dance star Kyle Abraham, Odedra’s ability to rivet the audience’s eyes with his unique talents has led choreographers to want to work with him, presenters to want to book him, and award-givers to honor him. In Rising, three other artists have created solos for Odedra: fellow British dance juggernauts Akram Khan and Russell Maliphant and Belgium’s Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui. The program, however, will begin with Odedra dancing one of his own creations, “Nritta,” meaning “pure dance.” The solo in the Kathak style celebrates Odedra’s dance roots in a work about the Hindu deity Shiva and the merging of masculine and feminine elements into a perfect balance called “ardhanareshwara.” Writes Odedra on his website: “‘Nritta’ is the exploration and discovery of time, space, rhythm and how one’s potential energy affects the relationship with them.” Khan’s “In the Shadow of Man,” set to music by English composer Jocelyn Pook, explores Khan’s self-described fascination with the “animal” within us. In a YouTube clip of the solo, Odedra embraces his inner primate in stylized choreography that speaks to the primitive ancestors from whom we evolved and who are still part of our collective DNA. Maliphant’s “Cut” creates a contained world shaped by Michael Hull’s atmospheric lighting design that highlights Odedra’s movements. Set to composer Andy Cowton’s throbbing industrial music, “Cut” is a full-throttle sensory bum-rush. Rounding out the program, Cherkaoui’s “Constellation” is inspired by the different sound patterns and different sources of light that come together to create a constellation. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AAKASH ODEDRA COMPANY presents RISING 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 6. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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Aakash Odedra {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS NASH}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{IMAGE COURTESY OF ROTHSCHILD DOYNO COLLABORATIVE}

Project rendering for TREK Develepment’s proposed residential building on North Street at Federal

BUILDING CONSENSUS [ARCHITECTURE]

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

A

RCHITECTURAL renderings are meant

to convey a sense of permanence. ...This is what the building will look like in real bricks and mortar for decades to come, so you know what you are going to get. If we are lucky, though, such images are really about change. The issue becomes whether you like what you see, and what you might want to be different. That is certainly the case with the Rothschild Doyno Collaborative’s architectural renderings for the Garden Block residential project, on the North Side, for TREK Development. After dozens of community meetings, and in the midst of a number of board hearings, the design is in flux — closer than ever to being finalized, but still not done. It’s remarkable that there is a real proposal at all. The multi-parcel development plot, containing several historic properties,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

is at the corner of West North Avenue and Federal Street, adjacent to remains of the Garden Theater, which Pittsburgh-based TREK might yet secure for redevelopment.

IT’S REMARKABLE THAT THERE IS A REAL PROPOSAL AT ALL. The recent failure of Philadelphia-based developer Wayne Zukin to build on the site underscored the difficulty. Meanwhile, one of the site’s historic properties, 2 Allegheny West, “succumbed to gravity,” laments architect Ken Doyno, principal of Rothschild Doyno. Now comes TREK Development with a new proposal for a mixed-use development of 72 residential units with ground-floor retail. TREK has promised to

preserve as much as possible of the historic structures, a remarkable agreement given those structures’ very precarious condition. “Preservation is one of our core values,” explains TREK’s Bill Gatti. “Its value outweighs the financial hurdles.” TREK and Rothschild Doyno have assiduously pursued community meetings — “around 30 of them,” says Ken Doyno — with a wide variety of community groups, including the Mexican War Streets Association, Young Preservationists and Allegheny City Central Association, among others, as well as the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority and the City of Pittsburgh’s Contextual Design Advisory Panel. But, just having community meetings doesn’t necessarily make them good. If city government or the property-owner bargains away too much to an unsympathetic developer before asking individuals


COLD CASE On Sept. 1, 1979, Catherine Janet Walsh was found dead, lying face-down in her bed. Her hands were bound behind her back and a blue scarf was wrapped around her neck. Her death was ruled a homicide by strangulation. The responding officer, Andrew Gall, became committed to finding her killer. With five suspects with equally strong motives, the case took Gall and the Monaca police 32 years to solve. When police re-opened it in 2010, and took DNA samples, they arrested Gregory Hopkins, with whom Walsh had a sexual relationship at the time of the murder. Hopkins was convicted. Gall’s commitment attracted Steve Hallock, director of Point Park’s School of Communication’s graduate programs. The result is Hallock’s first true-crime book, Justice Delayed: The Catherine Janet Walsh Story (The Artist’s Orchard). WHAT DRAWS PEOPLE TO TRUECRIME STORIES? Look at all the shows there are. Law & Order, CSI, Murder She Wrote. Violence and sex. In [Walsh’s] case, it’s stranger than fiction. I intentionally wrote it like a novel, because these detectives were living a mystery. What draws people is the mystery element: Why would somebody do this, and which of these five did it? … It’s a human drama.

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PRESENTS

Aakash Odedra Company

{BY KELECHI URAMA}

FRI NOV 6 2015

8 PM • BYHAM THEATER

It is as if Odedra floats on air when he dances. Fresh, exciting and truly amazing. Three Weeks, Edinburgh

trustarts.org/DANCE 412-456-6666 Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

WATCH

Part of

trustarts.org/aakash

BUT WE NEVER FIND OUT WHY HOPKINS DID IT. Gall’s theory is that it was kinky sex gone bad. There’s an interview at the end [of the book] where he said, “Had [Hopkins] just called the police and said, ‘We were involved in this strange sex, and it went bad and she died,’ he probably would have gotten manslaughter and maybe even given probation.” But he didn’t. So in the end, we have someone convicted of this crime, but this person maintains his innocence still today. DO YOU THINK TRUE-CRIME STORIES TEND TO BE SENSATIONALIZED? I had a publisher interested in this book, and they said, “You’re going to have to include photos of the murder scene and the victim.” I told them no, and they said that they didn’t want to publish it. I think the temptation is there to sensationalize, and I had to be careful not to do that. I focused on character, the techniques, the science, the trial testimony and the investigation. The sex was part of it, you can’t avoid it, but my interest was more in telling a human drama and to study the human character involved here. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Steve Hallock

and organizations for input, then all the meetings in the world won’t really help. But TREK and Rothschild Doyno seem to have found a sweet spot of genuinely responsive attitude and the welldocumented professionalism to back it up. The renderings are the proof. They keep changing, and they are not done yet. Don’t like the big cornice? That can change. Would you prefer rooftop balconies to cantilevered porches? Those can change too. What about a more contextual response to the existing building height along Federal Street? “It’s been kind of a fun process,” says Rothschild Doyno project architect Robert Tuñón. A bit too much preservationist lockstep among North Side groups vetoed some potentially exciting yet suitable modern curtain walls, but numerous other palpable improvements emerged. “All design is about compromise,” says Doyno. The process is truly admirable, and no one runs or documents such things better than Rothschild Doyno. So the project as presented in August easily secured Zoning Board approval in October for its requested variances on the basis of lengthy testimony from developers, architects, engineers and URA officials. It received permission to use an existing adjacent structure for parking, instead of a new one. More notably, the building is allowed greater height (and accompanying profitability) than zoning normally stipulates because the effort to preserve historic structures on West North and Federal presents what regulations term “significant financial hardship.” Many neighborhood and civic organizations have supported the project, and just a couple have simply abstained from comment. Among a handful of opponents, the most vocal has been North Side resident David Demko, who threatens to appeal the zoning variances, delaying the project for months. “I disagree with the decision made by the zoning board,” he says. In August, Demko testified that the building would block views on the North Side, though he abandoned that argument after the architects’ testimony in response to his complaints. (The building will block views only toward the apartments at Allegheny Center). “It’s really just too many units for the area,” he said to CP, without stipulating how many would be suitable. Developer Gatti is undaunted. “Even if an appeal comes, we are going to see it through.” Meanwhile, with the basic building profile established, the architects are still asking for feedback on issues of color and detail that can still be up for discussion — a reminder that a well-designed process is as important as a well-designed building.

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THE THEATER EA

by Tom Dudzick

NOV. 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 2015 Fridays and Saturdays at 8:00 PM, Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM TICKETS ARE $15.00, $10.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF TAMI DIXON}

Watching you: Sean “Shaggy” Sears in Bricolage’s 1984

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RADIO DYSTOPIA {BY TED HOOVER} I’M A BIG FAN of Bricolage’s Midnight Radio series. At each installment, usually created around a theme, a group of actors and musicians stages a faux radio show replete with a dizzying array of sound effects. They’re bright, breezy evenings, funny, quirky and quick. This time the company steps away from that template to present an adaptation by Alan Lyddiard of George Orwell’s dystopian classic 1984. Jeffrey Carpenter directs a high-quality cast: Brett Goodnack as Winston, Sara Williams as Julia, and Paul Guggenheimer as O’Brien, with John Michnya and Sean Patrick Sears playing

FAURÉ

String Trio

Franktuary 3810 Butler St.

Wednesday, November 11 5:00 PM

NO TICKET REQUIRED!

412-624-4129 www.chambermusicpittsburgh.org

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the other roles and supplying most of the sound effects. Jason Coll is the musical director, with fine work from Kira Bokalders on clarinet and cellist Will Teegarden. In place of the usual skits and comedy vignettes, the evening here is mostly a straight-ahead relating of the Orwell novel … which turns out to have its pluses and minuses.

MIDNIGHT RADIO: 1984 continues through Nov. 14. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. 412-471-0999 or www.webbricolage.com

As my date said: “This really makes me want to go reread the book.” And that’s a good thing. 1984 is an essential read anytime … and perhaps now more than ever. The problem turns out to be that the book is too big for the Midnight Radio format. There are massive ideas discussed in the novel; Orwell’s thoughts about capitalism, socialism, collectivism and, more than anything, the nature of language and its correlation to thought. But limited by its design to relating the book’s incidents, rather than its ideas, this radio version can’t possibly contain more than 10 percent of that thematic content. We follow the travails of Winston Smith and his rebellion against, and ultimate absorption into, Big Brother’s totalitarian state. But the concept of “Doublethink,” perhaps Orwell’s central tenet, is never explored. Don’t get me wrong: While I was wishing for much more, there’s no question that what Bricolage has created is up to its usual standards. The pace and


precision is spot on, and it’s rather miraculous to witness how an actor, in this case Goodnack, using nothing but his voice and a microphone, can create such harrowing drama. Bricolage’s 1984 is not all it could be, but what it is is highly compelling. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

WITCHING HOUR {BY STUART SHEPPARD} AS THE REV. HALE states during the mania that fuels The Crucible, “These are strange times.” Indeed, the 1953 play by Arthur Miller, as produced by Prime Stage Theatre, reminds us how strange the times always are, whether the 17th century or the 21st. And that this story of the Salem witch trials is just as relevant to our age as it was to the paranoid McCarthyism of the 1950s, upon which it is based. However, it’s a credit to the cast, and the director, Scott P. Calhoon, that the revelations achieved issue out of the agonies of the well-played characters, not just the playwright’s hand. The plot revolves around an affair between John Proctor (Jason Spider Matthews), a married farmer, and young Abigail Williams (Adrianne Knapp). Matthews, who has powerful stage presence, seems miscast as the complex Proctor, like a tight end thrust into the role of quarterback. He is all bass and no treble, but although it might be difficult to hear some of his lines, he still generates the passion necessary for this morally tortured protagonist. Knapp, who has the expressive eyes of a silent-film actress, becomes more monstrous as the play evolves, producing moments where she not only frightens the children and adults of Salem into terrible acts, but frightens the audience as well. This is one girl you do not want to knock on your door on Halloween.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA SLOVESKO}

Left to right: Adrianne Knapp, Jason Spider Matthews, Jason Michael Swauger and George Saulnier in The Crucible, at Prime Stage

George Saulnier gives the strongest performance as the aforementioned Rev. Hale. The depth of his spiritual transmogrification — one of the toughest challenges of this play — is utterly believable, because it is done in such minute steps. Hale is the only soul able to keep a clear mind in the fog of insanity that envelops the drama (and metaphorically, the stage, at the beginning of the show).

THE CRUCIBLE

continues through Nov. 8. Prime Stage Theatre, New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-25. 724-773-0700 or www.primestage.com

Linda Haston, as the slave Tituba, is absolutely convincing of the devil’s existence in her one powerful scene. Johnmichael Bohach’s modernist set looks like the Shakers tried to build Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, and feels incongruous with the Puritan costumes. But J.R. Shaw’s lighting achieves a wonderful crepuscularity, evoking a time of strangeness that can seem just as familiar today. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Alfred Henry Maurer (1868–1932), Two Sisters, c. 1925, Oil on board, 26 x 18 inches, Gift of the Westmoreland Society, 2000, 2001.7

Your country. Your art. The bigger, better Westmoreland Museum of American Art is now open. So get into it. America has always been about open spaces, new frontiers and room to roam. And now, so are we with thousands more square feet and hundreds of new works of art in a collection more expansive, dynamic and accessible than ever. So come connect to your heritage and discover what moves you. For more info, visit thewestmoreland.org

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*GKP\*CNN$QZ1HƂEGr pittsburghsymphony.org West Side Story Š 1961 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved. ŠA.M.P.A.S.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

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[BOOKS]

IN GUANTÁNAMO

THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST & PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE COMPANY PRESENT

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} In 2012, OR Books published Larry Siems’ The Torture Report: What the Documents Say About America’s Post 9/11 Torture Program. Among the many cases Siems covered, one that stood out was that of Mohamedou Ould Slahi, who had been detained in his native Mauritania in 2001. After renditions to Jordan and Bagram, in Afghanistan, Slahi was sent to the U.S. prison in Guantámano Bay, Cuba, where he suffered one of the cruelest interrogations on record there. That interrogation — which included extended sleep deprivation, shackling for days in a freezing cell, beatings and more — lasted months. Like most Guantanamo prisoners, Slahi was never charged with a crime; he remains imprisoned there still. Yet, in 2005, Slahi managed to write a lengthy memoir about his experiences. In 2012, a heavily redacted version was finally declassified, and Slahi’s lawyers contacted Siems, a Brooklyn-based writer and activist, about preparing it for publication. Guantánamo Diary, edited by Siems, was published this past January by Little, Brown and Company. It’s available in 18 countries (with more to come) and has been championed by the likes of John LeCarré and journalist Glenn Greenwald. On Nov. 11, Siems visits City of Asylum/ Pittsburgh to discuss the book, and the secrecy reflected by its long incubation. Slahi’s case appears to be one of wrong-place-wrong-time in the extreme. Though he joined Al Qaeda in 1990 to fight Afghanistan’s Communist government, he left the group in 1992, and most suspicion of him was by association: He was a distant cousin, for instance, of a top Osama bin Laden aide. And Siems notes in a phone interview that Slahi landed at Gitmo just as the military, under Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, was adopting CIA black-site torture techniques. Slahi’s treatment was a “special project” approved by Rumsfeld himself. With essentially no evidence against him, why has Slahi been detained so long? Siems believes it’s largely been to avoid embarrassing the U.S. “It’s a very shameful story,” he says. Perhaps even more than Guantánamo’s other silenced captives, the personable, humane and highly sympathetic Slahi who comes across in Guantánamo Diaries casts the U.S. security apparatus in a terrible light. “There’s clearly been an effort to suppress or to conceal what’s a pretty embarrassing story,” says Siems. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AUGUST WILSON’S DIRECTED BY

Mark Clayton Southers

NOVEMBER 13-15&19-21•AUGUST WILSON CENTER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

LARRY SIEMS 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 11 (7 p.m. reception). 330 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. Registration required at 412-323-0278 or www.cityofasylum.org. N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.0511.12.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {ART}

NOV. 06

Addicted to Trash

+ SAT., NOV. 07

Art by Robert Villamagna

{SCREEN}

+ THU., NOV. 05

Enjoy...

Smith Oatmeal Stouts 3AllSamWeek! &

$

Not At All Grilled Cheese

Breadworks Italian stuffed with cheese & bacon, panko crusted then fried

5

$

{STAGE} The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s India in Focus festival and EQT Theatre Series present a truly mad production of Alice in Wonderland at the Trust Arts Education Center. Mumbai-based theater group Tram Arts Trust has reimagined Lewis Carroll’s classic novel as a story about bout four bored individuals who enter a world of make-believe lieve through the use of objects, cts, puppets and shadows. The he first of four family-friendly dly performances is today. Kelechi lechi Urama 2 p.m. Also 7 p.m. p.m m Fr FFri., i., Nov. 6, and 2 and 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. 805-807 Liberty Ave.,, Downtown. $10.50-12. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org arts.org

live music by Brewer’s Row, and drinks too. Participating artists include Kim Beck, Mike Budai, Deanna Mance, Clayton Merrell, Connie Merriman, John Peña and Alisha Wormsley. Proceeds from the silent auction for the drawings benefit Neu Kirche, a fledgling nonprofit arts center. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. 1000 Madison Ave., Deutschtown. $10. www.neukirche.org

{ART}

1830 EAST CARSON STREET

THEPUBCHIPSHOP.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

Home Movie Day is your chance to discover what’s on those old reels of 8 mm, Super 8 or 16 mm film, whether from the attic or the flea market. Today, at the Carnegie Library Main Branch, in Oakland, projectionists will screen these treasures. Bring yours, or stop by to see fascinating bits of random past lives, in Pittsburgh’s incarnation of this long-running international initiative. Last year’s selections included: Christmas hi-jinks; a trip to the 1,000 Islands; life in the Hill District in and tthe e 1950s; 950s; a d an Old West including a stop vacation, includ Utah mine. Al Hoff at a U t mine tah 1-4:30 p.m. (check-in begins at (che noon). Free. homemovieday. ho pgh@comcast.net pgh@comcast.n

{STAGE}

+ FRI.,, NOV. 06 Forty of Pittsburgh’s tsburgh’s best artists gather er tonight at Neu Kirche he e for RawDraw! The live-drawing g event includes equally

“For me,” writes Robert Villamagna, “walking through a flea market is like walking through a well-stocked art materials store. The flea market is my palette.” Hence the title of the local artist’s new exhibit at the Gallery on 43rd Street: Addicted to Trash. Villamagna’s works combine painting, collage and assembly, and blend irony, humor and political commentary. The opening reception is tonight. BO 7 p.m. 187 43rd St., Lawrenceville. Free. www.galleryon43rdstreet.com

NOV. 07

Sunset S unsett B Baby

City Theatre stages sta the premiere of Pittsburgh prem off-Broadway play p Sunset Baby, hustler who Bab aby, y about a h reconnects rec e onnects with her estranged father fat a her — only tto have him hustle on her. trr and run a h try Abbott-Pratt (pictured) JJoniece Jo Jon iece Abbott Pittsburgh debut. sstars sta rs in her Pitts Playwright Dominique Morisseau is a twoMoriss time winner of the NAACP NAA Image award. Jade aw King Kin Carroll directs. The dir first fir two performances are pe


{PHOTO COURTESY OF EDUARDO PATINO, NYC}

sp otlight

Founded in 1974 by dance icon Alvin Ailey as a vehicle for promising students of The Ailey School, Ailey II has, over four decades, developed its own identity as a world-class company. “It’s continuously growing,” says Ailey II artistic director Troy Powell by phone from Midland, Mich., where the company was performing as part of its current 25-city U.S. tour. “It has gained a popularity over the years that is unmatched by any other second company in the world.” The 12-member troupe, which by design keeps its dancers for only two years (in order to give others in the school an opportunity), has a unique repertoire of works, along with some shared with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Ailey II’s Nov. 10 tour stop in Pittsburgh, at the August Wilson Center, highlights that repertory mix. The company, which last appeared here in 2011, this time performs choreographer Dwight Rhoden’s “Hissy Fits” (pictured), a 2006 work set to music by J.S. Bach that examines the sometimes tumultuous nature of human relationships; choreographer Ray Mercer’s new ensemble piece for the company, “Something Tangible” (2015); and the Ailey masterwork “Revelations” (1960). Steve Sucato 7:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 10. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-35. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

tonight. KU 5:30 and 9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 13. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $36-56. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

{STAGE} Pittsburgh’s longest-running tribute to short-attention-span theater has managed to hold our gaze for a dozen years: Future Ten, Future Tenant artspace’s annual festival of new 10-minute plays, turns 12. Director Brett Sullivan Santry guides a cast of seven through a fast-paced program of six one-acts. Future Ten 12 has a seven-show run tonight through next weekend, and tickets include free drinks. BO 7 and 9 p.m. Continues through Nov. 15. 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. $12. www.futuretenant.org

{OPERA} Young lovers are the protagonists — and the figures of fun — in Mozart’s classic Cosí fan tutte. Pittsburgh Opera’s new production of the comic opera is perhaps most notable, however, for starring Sir Thomas Allen, who’s billed as “Britain’s favorite baritone” and who was the real-life inspiration for Billy Elliot. Allen plays the cynical Don Alfonso and also directs the production, which is set on the Italian seaside. The show is sung in Italian, with English texts projected above the Benedum Center stage. BO 8 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 10, and Nov. 13 and 15. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $12.75-157.75. 412-281-0912 or www.pittsburghopera.org

NOV. 11 Bo Burnham

the supremely nerdy card game Fisticuffs! The group includes Pittsburgh native Katie Johnston-Smith, who also founded the Chicago Nerd Comedy Festival. Nerdologues has performed everywhere from San Francisco SketchFest and New York Comic Con to the PAX gaming festival, and it’s coming to Arcade Comedy Theater for a one-night-only “greatest hits” sketch show. Comedian Rob Speer and

Arcade house team 8-Bit Classic! open. KU 10 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

{COMEDY} Troupes that improvise entire stage musicals are by now a familiar sight. But babyGRAND is a novel practitioner: This outfit that turns an audience suggestion into an improvised long-form Broadway-style

musical, complete with choreography, is but a duo, consisting of Connor McCanlus and Missy Moreno, along with pianist James Rushin. McCanlus (Boeing, Boeing; American Falls) is well known on local stages, while Moreno studied at Chicago’s famed Second City. babyGRAND has performed at the Chicago Improv Festival, the inaugural Chicago Musical Improv Festival and Philadelphia’s DuoFest. See babyGRAND: Instant Musical Comedy at the Cabaret at Theater Square tonight. BO 10 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $10 (free for ticketholders of earlier Cultural District shows). www.trustarts.org

Bo Burnham started his career on YouTube. His talent for comedic songs made him the youngest talent to record a Comedy Central special, and he later scored with the 2013 special Bo Burnham: what., MTV series Zach Stone

NOV. 07

Home Movie Day

+ SUN., NOV. 08 {TALK} Retired attorney Eric W. Springer is a former chair of the Pittsburgh Human Relations Commission who in the late 1960s served as director of compliance for the federal Equal Opportunity Employment Commission. These days, amidst alarming trends like states passing restrictive voter-ID laws, Springer sees new threats to

Reconciliation Dialogue Group. BO 2 p.m. 125 N. Craig St., Oakland. Free. 412-681-8528

+ WED., NOV. 11 {COMEDY} It’s hard to believe that Boston-based comedian

Is Gonna Be Famous, and Egghead, a book of poetry that became a New York Times bestseller. Burnham visits the Carnegie Music Hall tonight as part of his Make Happy tour. KU 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $39.50. 1-800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com

+ FRI., NOV. 06 {ART}

{COMEDY} The Nerdologues is a Chicago collective that channels its nerdy comedic sensibilities into witty, non sequitur-laden sketch videos, podcasts and

N E W S

equality. In today’s talk, Retreat From Justice? Civil Rights Legislation in the U.S., Springer tackles the dangers facing once-sacrosanct legislation like the Voting Rights Act. The talk, at Synod Hall, is sponsored by St. Paul Cathedral’s Race &

Art by Andy Kehoe

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The Penn Avenue gallery crawl Unblurred celebrates art, but you’ll lament the title of the new show at ModernFormations Gallery: The Last Exhibition. After 15 years, co-founder and owner Jennifer Quinio is closing shop. ModForm was among the first artspaces to occupy Penn, long before it was an “arts corridor”; now it’s the oldest surviving gallery on the avenue. That designation lasts through November, when the venue that gave so many emerging local artists space on its purple walls shuts down. A cross-section of those artists are featured in this month’s retrospective, with work by Andy Kehoe (pictured), David Bernabo, Jesse Best, Seth Clark, Susan Constanse and two dozen more. And when you’ve bid farewell to ModForm, hit up the second- and third-wave Penn Avenue artspaces also participating in Unblurred. Bill O’Driscoll 7-10 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. www.modernformations.com

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Whether you love records or juggling, there is a festival in town this weekend for you

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

a solo puppet show made entirely of repurposed materials. Fri., Nov. 6, 2-3:30 p.m. and Sun., enters its 7th season w/ George Nov. 8, 12-2:30 p.m. Children’s Orwell’s 1984. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. Thru Nov. 24. Bricolage, 412-322-5058. Downtown. 412-471-0999. HOT METAL MUSICALS ALTAR BOYZ. Meet Matthew, READING OF KITTY. Set in Mark, Luke, Juan & Abraham – Ireland & England during the aka the ALTAR BOYZ. They’re turbulent 1880s, Kitty presents on a mission from above to put the story of Irish Home Rule the “pop” back in piety, wooing leader, Charles Stewart Parnell, legions of bingo hall & pancake & his lover, Katharine “Kitty” breakfast fans throughout O’Shea, whose estranged their “Raise the Praise” husband, Willie, exploited tour. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, his wife’s social 2 & 7:30 p.m. and connection to Parnell for Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. his own advancement. Thru Dec. 20. Backstage Mon., Nov. 9, 8 p.m. . w w w Bar at Theatre Off the Wall Theater, typaper ci h g p Square, Downtown. Carnegie. 724-873-3576. .com 412-323-4709. LETTERS TO SALA. THE CRUCIBLE. In late The true story of a young mid-century Salem, girl who survived 7 concentration Massachusetts, accusations of camps. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru witchcraft are brought forth Nov. 7. Little Lake Theatre, against a troubling number of Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. young girls & adult women of the LITTLE WOMEN. Based on the town. Presented by Prime Stage classic novel. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Theatre. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 14. Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 8. Bagpiper Theatre, Beaver Falls. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 724-847-5099. www.newhazletttheater.org. REPULSING THE MONKEY. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK. Two siblings inherit Jablonski’s A revival of the classic. Sun, Bar in the Southside Slopes and 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. must deal with the changes in Thru Nov. 8. The Theatre Factory, their neighborhood. Nov. 5, 7 p.m. Trafford. 412-374-9200. Pittsburgh Athletic Association, THE GIRL WHO SWALLOWED Oakland. 412-621-2400. THE SUN. Join teaching artist & A SERVANT TO TWO MASTERS. puppeteer, Felicia Cooper, perform Set in Venice in 1965, characters

THEATER 1984. Midnight Radio Series THURSDAY NOV 5/10PM AM FACES THURSDAY NOV 19/10PM SUITE MARY, CRANBERRY SANDERS TUESDAY DEC 29/10PM EMO NIGHT

FULL LIST ONLINE

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

NOVEMBER

MONTH LONG SPECIAL

Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

cravings for love, money & food lead to a wild comedy presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 6, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 6. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. STUDENT ORIGINATED FALL PLAYS. A compilation of five student written, stage managed, choreographed, produced & directed One-Act Plays by various members of the Norwin High School Theatre Company. Nov. 5-8, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 8, 2:30 p.m. Norwin High School, North Huntingdon. 412-480-2894. THE THREE MUSKETEERS. A classic tale of adventure, camaraderie, honor & heroism. Thu-Sat, 7 p.m. and Wed., Nov. 11, 10 a.m. Thru Nov. 14. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219.

COMEDY

$77.

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1/2 Barrel Free sleeve of Straub Cups and 2 Ping Pong Balls with each purchase! Mellinger Beer

402 Semple St, Pgh., PA Phone:(412) 682-4396 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

SAT 07 BABYGRAND: INSTANT MUSICAL COMEDY. A musical improv duo. 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. JOHN KNIGHT W/ COLLIN CHAMBERLIN. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. THE NERDOLOGUES DO PITTSBURGH. The Chicago sketch comedy collective makes local debut, w/ Arcade house team 8-Bit Classic. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SUN 08 NEPHEW TOMMY. 8 p.m. August Wilson Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 06

MON 09

BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL. Local stand-up showcase hosted by Shannon Norman. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. COLIN MOCHRIE & BRAD SHERWOOD: TWO MAN GROUP. 8 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. COMIC WARS. Aaron Kleiber hosts a stand-up comedy game show competition featuring local

COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

WED 11 [PUPPET THEATER]

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comics. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. UP ALL NIGHT OPEN MIC. 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

Felicia Cooper’s one-woman puppet show The Girl Who Swallowed the Sun was created in the spirit of the Cheap Art Movement, which holds that art isn’t a business and should be available to everyone. All of the nationally touring, New York City-based artist’s materials are recycled goods. The new show — with five free performances at locations, including the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh and the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination — is modeled on sun-based folklore from around the world, and relates one brave girl’s adventures. Fri., Nov. 6-Sun., Nov. 8. Free. www.feliciatmcooper.com

SCIENCE SLAM. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CONTINUES ON PG. 53


CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Propeller Group: The Living Need Light, the Dead Need Music. A video based exhibition that looks at colorful, spirited funeral traditions in Vietnam & New Orleans. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A fine jewelry exhibition that brings together scientific fact & pop culture in a showcase of wearable & decorative arts related to outer space, space travel, the space age, & the powerful influence these topics have had on human civilization. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Voyage to Vietnam. An immersive exhibit celebrating the Vietnamese Tet Festival. North Side. 412-322-5058. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada,

VISUAL

ART

“Bird Woman” (hand-embroidered on found textile, 2015), by Mary M. Mazziotti. From the exhibition Memento Mori, at be Galleries, Lawrenceville.

NEW THIS WEEK BOULEVARD GALLERY. Anne Wateska. Drawings, watercolors, acrylics & oils by the artist. Opening reception November 7, 6-9 p.m. A Photographic Retrospective. Work by Michael Rosella. Verona. 412-828-1031. DIRECTANGLE PRESS. “Ghost in the Machine” Unveiling. Celebrating the unveiling of “Ghost in the Machine,” a collaboration between Philadelphia-based writer Nicholas DeLorenzo & Pittsburgh-based printmaker Josh Dannin. Wilkinsburg. 267-254-2657. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Eastside Outside. Landscape paintings & print by Adrienne Heinrich, Debra Platt, Phiris Kathryn Sickels, Sue Pollins & Kathleen Zimbicki. Opening reception November 8, 2-5 p.m. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. FRAMEHOUSE. Except For The Sound of my Voice: Photogravures by Leslie A. Golomb. Opening reception Nov. 7, 6 p.m. Featuring selections from Wielding the Knife, woodcuts by Master Chinese Printmaker, Li Kang. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. THE GALLERY 4. An Occasional Dream. Interactive mixed media works, enhanced w/ a free smartphone app by Erin Ko. Opening reception November 7, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Addicted to Trash. Opening reception Nov. 6, 7 p.m. Assemblage & metal collage by Robert Villamagna. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488.

IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Natural Renderings: Paintings by Irma Freeman. Paintings by Irma Freeman. The Face of Nature. A n exhibition of children’s art. Opening receptions November 6, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MATTRESS FACTORY. Art + Conversation. An informal discussion w/ Factory Installed artist Bill Smith & Eddy Man Kim. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. The Last Exhibition: A Retrospective of ModernFormations. ModernFormations is closing & the gallery is taking a final bow by paying homage to the community of artists that have supported, nurtured & loved it over the years. This final exhibit will showcase many of the local artists who have made ModernFormations a success. Opening reception November 6, 7 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. PERCOLATE. Return to Wonderland. Art by Jennifer Howison, Bill Miller, Amy Novelli & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Hot Jam. Featuring “Social Glass: Conversations through the Looking Glass,” an infusion of Musical & Poetic Storytelling (MAPS) & conversational performance by Speak Life Storytellers combined w/ hot glass demonstrations. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SHAW GALLERIES. Landscapes & Cityscapes of Western Pennsylvania. Original artwork by local artist, Seth McClaine. Opening reception

November 7, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Kaleidoscope: Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh Member Exhibition. Opening reception Nov. 7, 1 p.m. Exhibit celebrating the constant reinvention of traditional fiber mediums & techniques w/ unexpected, contemporary & frequently provocative results. Friendship. 612-465-0238.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Birth Series. Photography series by Gauri Gill that follows a midwife working in the remote village of Motasar, Ghafan. Part of India in Focus showcase A Million Marks of Home. Sarika Goulatia work incorporates traditional Indian pigments & spices within a contemporary art context. Part of India in Focus showcase. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Humanae/ I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Warhol By The Book. An exhibition on Warhol’s book work, from early student-work illustrations to his commercial work in the 50s. Exposures 4: Travis K. Schwab: Lost and Found. Three new paintings, large portraits of Warhol, flanked by a variety of smaller canvases painted from the lost photobooth strips & books. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley

& other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. THE ARTISTS’ GALLERY. the Pittsburgh Fine Art Photographers Group. A photography exhibition featuring images from landscapes to nudes. Bellevue. 412-339-8943. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Panoptica. Photos by Jessica Kalmar. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BE GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Work by Mary M. Mazziotti. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public officials & business leaders. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Amazing Artists Pittsburgh. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry, Patrick Schmidt, Sandra Moore, Carolyn Carson & Dimeji Onafuwa. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. The Mysterious Nature of Fungi. An overview of these mysterious organisms that are found almost everywhere on this planet & are the cause of both bliss & blight. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. Isabella D. Stoker Graham Collection. Heritage glass from her estate. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall Flower Show. Be transported across the globe in Phipps’ Victorian glasshouse to explore CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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{PHOTO BY MARGARET WELSH}

*Stuff We Like

Truths from the sides of Dumpsters

“Pretty Pimpin,” by Kurt Vile

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

On the opening track of his new record, b’lieve i’m goin down, Vile has a chilled-out identity crisis and shows off his knack for weird, memorable song structures.

Hedgehog Mug The “Coffee is Critter-cal Mug” from online retailer ModCloth is a must for hedgehoglovers everywhere. www.modcloth.com

The Case Against the Roberts Court This Oct. 12 special issue of The Nation documents how the U.S. Supreme Court has pillaged the Constitution, and democracy in general, from campaign finance to reproductive rights, since 2006 — and raises the specter of decades’ more devastation if the next president is a Republican.

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the sensational Japanese tradition of mum growing. Runs through Nov. 8. Garden Railroad. Model trains chug through miniature landscapes populated w/ living plants, whimsical props & fun interactive buttons. Runs through Feb. 28. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

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CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

ESPRESSO A MANO. The Whole Kit & Caboodle. Feat. quirky cats & whimsical floral acrylic paintings by Maura Taylor. Lawrenceville. 412-918-1864. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Forbidden Fruit. Porcelain figurines in the 18th century style by Chris Antemann. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Pour It On. Work by Tony Landolina & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GATEWAY CENTER. 412 Project. Exploring Pittsburgh through the lens of local Instagrammers. Gateway Center Kiosk at 400 Liberty Avenue, next to the Gateway Center Garage. http://412project.org/. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HOLOCAUST CENTER, UNITED JEWISH FEDERATION. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy Project. A photographic/ multimedia exhibit honoring & commemorating local Holocaust survivors. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1500. JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Jane Haskell: Drawing in Light. An exhibition of 30 sculptures, paintings & drawings by the artist. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. JOHN HERMANN JR. MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM. Germany in War Time - What an American Girl Saw & Heard. Ten paintings by Mary Ethel McAuley. 100 years ago, in October 1915, Mary Ethel McAuley & her mother arrived in Berlin. For two years, the younger McAuley, at age 19, painted scenes & wrote about the lives she observed in war-torn Berlin for the Pittsburg Dispatch. Bellevue. 412-761-8008. MALL AT ROBINSON. Digital Designs: Showcase of Student Design Work. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg,

FUNDRAISERS THU 05 - SAT 07 FRIENDS OF CARRICK LIBRARY BOOK SALE. A wide variety of materials will be priced to sell. Proceeds benefit Friends of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Carrick. 10 a.m., Fri., Nov. 6, 10 a.m. and Sat., Nov. 7, 10 a.m. Carnegie Library, Carrick. 412-882-3897.

Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal & Marnie Weber created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. parallelgenres. Christine Barney, John Burton, Granite Calimpong, Bernie D’Onofrio, Jen Elek, Saman Kalantari, David Lewin, David Royce, Margaret Spacapan & Cheryl Wilson Smith exploring an interconnected set of parameters through different genres. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. ON THE SKIDS. The Hunt. An exhibition of illustrations by Abby Diamond & Sean Coxen. http://www.ontheskids. bigcartel.com/. Knoxville. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. In the Air: Visualizing what we breath. Photographs that show the effects of western PA’s air quality. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Indagare. Work by Therman Statom. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REPAIR THE WORLD’S WORKSHOP. Snapshots of Poverty. 5 area residents document their personal experiences in photographs that show the impact of poverty in our community. Closing reception November 6, 6-8pm as a part of Unblurred. East Liberty. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. An exhibition distinguishing the historical & contemporary expressions of the Black Dandy phenomenon in popular culture. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. A Very Long Engagement. The works collected in this exhibition

emerge from lengthy encounters with string – whether knotted, netted, interlaced, woven or percussed. Created by six fiber artists, the works form a kind of network of linked ideas, processes, physical properties & material qualities. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x15. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Plus One. A series of large scale video, sound & print installations invoking repetition & patterns found in traditional Indian visual art. Participating artists: Shilpa Gupta, Sarabhi Saraf, Avinash Veeraghavan, Sumakshi Singh. Part of India in Focus showcase. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Coding: We Are Always There. Exhibition of fiber art by Tina Williams Brewer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. WINDOWSPACE. MIXTAPE: GOD BLESS THE CHILD THAT’S GOT HIS OWN. Work by Paul Zelevansky. Downtown. 412-325-7723. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. At Home. London based artist Hetain Patel unveils the photographic series “Eva,” & a newly commissioned work for the exhibition “Jump.” Part of India in Focus showcase. Nandini Valli Muthiah. Nandini’s photography incorporates traditional ideas of popular Indian art in contemporary, everyday settings. Part of India in Focus showcase. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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FRI 06

NCJW DESIGNER DAYS. Upscale resale & accessories w/ style. Proceeds from NCJW Spring Designer Days benefit NCJW Pittsburgh Section’s community service programs that improve the lives of women, children, & families. 12 p.m., Fri., Nov. 6, 10 a.m., Sat., Nov. 7, 10 a.m. and Sun., Nov. 8, 12 p.m. Thriftique, Lawrenceville. 412-421-6118.

CISV PASTA DINNER & FUNDRAISER FOR GLOBAL PEACE. delicious dinner, silent auction, salsa dancing, JB raffle, & more in support of Children’s International Summer Villages. 6 p.m. Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-689-3037. RAWDRAW! A Pittsburgh monster drawing rally feat. 40 local artists drawing, music by


local band Brewer’s Row, craft beer by Penn Brewery & a silent auction for an original drawing by Pittsburgh’s creative talent. 6:30 p.m. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Mod Sun’s Pink Lemonade Tour

SAT 07 CELEBRATE ZINFANDELS. Experience a Zinfandel tasting w/ John Eld, a professional wine educator. Proceeds benefit the library. 7-9 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. CRAFT SHOW. Craft vendors, silent autcion, cookie table, more. Benefits Prime Time Adult Care. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Christ United Methodist Church, Bethel Park. 412-835-6661. DANCING W/ WITH WCCC. Students & faculty are paired w/ professional dancers from the Dream Studio of Latrobe & perform ballroom dances. Proceeds will be donated to Gracie’s Wish. Youngwood Campus Science Hall Theater. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Community College, Youngwood. 724-925-4000.

SUN 08 FAMILY EVER AFTER 5K. Help raise awareness of the more than 1,000 children in Allegheny County’s foster care system & the need for more foster & adoptive families to provide safe, caring homes for these children. 9:15 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-559-3697.

LITERARY THU 05 HELEN FAYE ROSENBLUM. Reviewing “Purity” by Jonathan Franzen. 10:15 a.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. THE PAST WON’T STAY BEHIND YOU: HOW POETRY CREATES PERSPECTIVE. Discussion & reading from Samuel Hazo, director of the International Poetry Forum in Pittsburgh & Pennsylvania’s first State Poet. Registration is required. 7 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

SAT 07 ADAM MATCHO & ALLY MALINENKO DOUBLE BOOK RELEASE. Poetry readings celebrating the book releases off Adam Matcho & Ally Malinenko. Readers include John Grochalski, Lori Jakiela, Jason Irwin, Dave Newman & John Korn. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

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at Altar Bar, Strip District CRITIC: Nolan Henik, 21, a laborer

FRI 06

WHEN: Sun.,

WISE WALKS. 1-2 mile walk around the neighborhood and learn a little about Oakland, & the Library. Fri. Thru Nov. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

I heard about the concert through my sister. She’s a really big fan of Mod Sun, and I’ve been a fan of his for about two years. [The concert] so far has been high energy. The vibe is really good, there’s positivity everywhere. Everyone is happy. The first band I saw was [New Beat Fund]. [Their music] was like Sublime meets Bob Marley, maybe with a slight Green Day feel. I liked it, it wasn’t bad. I’m looking forward to Mod Sun, hearing my favorite song, “Heineken Freestyle,” and hearing him spread his music live. Mod Sun spreads a really good message: mentality to reality. You need to smile 24/7, you need to be happy 24/7. Your mindset controls your reality, so do what you gotta do to be happy. Next time there’s a concert with this kind of positivity, [everyone] needs to be here. BY KELECHI URAMA

FALL LOCAL AUTHOR FORUM. A panel discussion w/ some of our region’s authors. Learn about their writing process & work. Authors will be selling & signing their books. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, 412-531-1912. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:306:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty. 412-345-7182.

SAT 07

BEYOND THE BRUSH. Children in grades 6 & up can join an arts & crafts instructor as she introduces a new project each month. Registration required. 10 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 5, 10 a.m. Baldwin KENNEDY ODEDE Borough Public & JESSICA POSNER. Library, Baldwin. Authors Kennedy 412-885-2255. www. per Odede & Jessica Posner, pa SATURDAY pghcitym o discuss how their love .c SENSORY STORYTIME. has changed Kibera, the Storytime w/ songs & largest slum in Nairobi. movements for children 7 p.m. Carnegie Library, on the autism spectrum and/or Homewood, Homewood. sensory integration challenges. 412-622-8866. Registration required. 10:15 a.m. POETRY & PROSE READING. and Sat., Dec. 5, 10:15 a.m. Shaler Poetry, prose or original songs. All North Hills Library, Glenshaw. ages & stages welcome. Second 412-486-0211. Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-8888. MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching DESIGN & BUILD Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, young innovators to the North Side. 412-322-5058. engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. through identifying a problem, Introducing young innovators to

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12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN’S HEALTH. Topic: How Does Our Environment Play a Role? 9:30 a.m. Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium, Hill District. 412-404-2872. RADICAL TRIVIA. Thu, 9 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668. THREE RIVERS VILLAGE SCHOOL INFO NIGHT. Learn about democratic education. 6 p.m. Three Rivers Village School, Morningside. 412-408-3388.

OUTSIDE

from Youngstown, Ohio

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the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty. 412-345-7182.

FRI 06 FAITH IN THE FOOTLIGHTS. Father Peter Horton exploring the spirituality found in American musicals & compositions. Live performances by choir members & Director of Liturgy Diane Falvo. Zappala College Center Square. 7 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 800-838-4572. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. PITTSBURGH RECORD FEST #14. Night time record swap. Buy-Sell-Trade. All Types Of Music. 7 p.m. Spirit, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

TUE 10 YOUNG NATURE EXPLORERS CLASS. Getting kids outside, exploring nature. Pre-registration required, 724-935-2170. Latodami Nature Center. Second Tue of every month, 9:30-11 a.m. & 1-2:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

WED 11 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 05

FRI 06 - SAT 07 PITTSBURGH VINTAGE MIXER. 6 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 7, 9 a.m. Teamsters Hall Local 249, Lawrenceville. 412-682-700.

FRI 06 - SUN 08 NOT QUITE PITTSBURGH JUGGLING FESTIVAL VIII. Open juggling, juggling lessons for beginners, workshops, light-up juggling, raffles, shows, more. Monsignor Farri Hall in the Pastoral Center. 6-10 p.m., Sat., Nov. 7, 10 a.m.5:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 8, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. St. John The Baptist Catholic Church, South Side. 724-643-5378.

SAT 07 7TH ANNUAL BOUNTY FALL FEST. Kids’ crafts,petting zoo, baking contest, s’more making, apple sling shots, Geocaching, live music, food trucks/vendors & The Fall Feast 5K Relay. Community Recreation Center. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Boyce-Mayview Park, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1099. ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE BY BUILDING SOIL HEALTH. Workshop on systems & strategies for crop rotation, cover cropping & limiting cultivation. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Kretschmann Organic Farm, Rochester. 724-452-7189. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http:// citydharma.wordpress.com/ schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. BIOPHILIA: PITTSBURGH. A meet-up group dedicated to strengthening the bond between people & the natural world. Come discuss an enviromental topic & share ideas. First Thu of every month, 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. GANDHI: THE LAWYER. Rajmohan Gandhi, the grandson of the late Mahatma Gandhi, & scholar Dr. Charles DiSalvo will discuss Mahatma Gandhi’s career as an attorney in South Africa & India. 3:30 p.m. Power Center Ballroom, Duquesne University, Downtown. www.duq.edu. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. IS IT TIME TO RETHINK YOUR PRICING STRATEGY? 9 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. MEET THE NONPROFIT RESOURCE CENTER. Learn how the Library can help your nonprofit succeed w/ access to a variety of materials & services including grant writing classes & specialized databases for nonprofits seeking funding.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BONE & JOINT HEALTH SERIES. Learn About Hip & Knee Arthritis & Treatment Options. 9 a.m. Magee-Womens Hospital, Oakland. 412-641-1821. CANINE BODY LANGUAGE & STRESS SIGNALS. Ask the Trainer w/ Marsha Robbins to learn all about canine body language & stress signals. 11:30 a.m. Western Pennsylvania Humane Society, North Side. 412-321-4625. FERMENTING FOODS 101. Fermented foods such as kimchi, sauerkraut, kefir, & yogurt can contain beneficial probiotics, digestive enzymes, & health boosting nutrients that encourage a healthy gut. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. IN DISCUSSION: CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN W/ AUTHOR & FOOD HISTORIAN SUSAN ROSSI-WILCOX. A discussion of the limited edition 1959 cookbook Wild Raspberries, which Warhol illustrated. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. NATIVE-AMERICAN STORYTELLING. Allegheny County & Lenora “Lee” Dingus are presenting traditional stories of Seneca Cultural & some other Eastern Woodland stories.

Environmental Learning Center. sharing dance w/ others as you www.alleghenycounty.us/parks. serve as the dance partner to teens 7-8 p.m. Harrison Hills Park, & adults w/ cognitive disabilities. Natrona Heights. 724-295-3570. No dance experience is necessary. PA RESOURCE COUNCIL 12:30 p.m. Steel City Ballroom, VERMICOMPOSTING Mt. Lebanon. 412-999-3998. WORKSHOP. Vermicomposting SWING CITY. Learn & practice workshop. Registration swing dancing skills w/ the required at prc.org/programs/ Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. conservation-workshops/ Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. vermicomposting-workshops/. 412-759-1569. 11 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE Library. 412-488-7490 X 226. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. PITTSBURGH WINE TOUR. Tour Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, includes a visit to Pittsburgh North Side. 412-224-2827. Winery, Dreadnought Wines & Glades Pike Winery outlet at the Pittsburgh Public Market. WOOLWORKS RUG HOOKING 12 p.m. Pennsylvania Wine Cellar, SHOW. Recent works from the Station Square. 412-323-4709. Pittsburgh Rug Hooking Guild PRUNING TREES as well as demonstrations WORKSHOP. W/ 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and instructor Brian Sun., Nov. 8, 1-5 p.m. Wolyniak. 11 a.m. Shaler North Hills Office of Penn Library, Glenshaw. www. per a p State Extension, 412-767-5698. pghcitym o .c Point Breeze. 412-482-3455. REFRESH: SNEAKER BUY/ BOTANIC GARDENS – SELL/TRADE. 1 p.m. Pittsburgh THE VALUE OF THEIR PLANT Obama 6-12, East Liberty. COLLECTIONS PAST & PRESENT. 412-863-8646. Benjamin Carroll, Horticulture & RUST BELT CULINARY TOUR. Facilities Manager for Pittsburgh Visit a renovated church hall, a Botanic Garden, will look at modernized mill bar, & other why botanic gardens started & revamped treasures from the what their purposes were both in area. 10:30 a.m. Station Square. the past as well as today. 2 p.m. 412-323-4709. Mount Lebanon Public Library. SPECIAL NEEDS BALLROOM 412-531-1912. DANCE MENTOR TRAINING. FORUM ON VOTING RIGHTS Experience first hand, the joy in ACT. Attorney Eric W. Springer will

SAT 07 - SUN 08

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 08

speak on an analysis of the changes in the nation’s Voting Rights Act affecting the rights of thousands of the nation’s voters. 2 p.m. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-681-8528. HIGHLAND PARK NEIGHBORHOOD TOUR. Start at the garden at Reservoir Drive. 12 p.m. Highland Park. 404-444-8258. PFLAG PITTSBURGH. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Sun of every month, 2-4:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. POLISHFEST. Family-oriented celebration of Polish music, song, dance, religion, ethnic foods, folk arts & crafts, cooking demos, pierogi eating contest, children’s crafts,more. 12 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 814-969-5940. RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. STEEL VALLEY BREW TOUR. Learn a little history about the steel mills that dotted the Monongahela River as you visit breweries located in the Mon Valley including Voodoo Homestead & Brew Gentlemen. 11 a.m. Station Square. 412-323-4709. SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES: A GREAT MIGRATION. Learn about migratory birds’ great southern trip. 1 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve, Rector. 724-593-6105. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 09 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PITTSBURGH MEETING. Monthly meeting. Second Mon of every month, 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. IMPROV ACTING CLASS. Mon, 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 15 Percolate, Wilkinsburg. 412-607-4297. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TAI CHI. Please register. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Nov. 16 Blueberry Hill Park. TECHNOLOGY EXPO & CONFERENCE. Show off your technology related products to potential buyers throughout the Pittsburgh region & beyond, promote & grow your company in a city that has become an innovative leader in the rapid moving technology industry. 9 a.m. Sheraton Pittsburgh Hotel, Station Square. 724-271-8540.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

TUE 10 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://citydharma. wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. EYE OF THE BEHOLDER: JOHANNES VERMEER, ANTONI VAN LEEUWENHOEK & THE REINVENTION OF SEEING. Lecture by Laura J. Snyder, historian, philosopher & storyteller. www.humanities.pitt.edu. 5 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-648-8213. NATIONAL REMEMBRANCE DAY ROLL CALL. A reading of the names of those services members who have died while serving in the Global War on Terror. www.veterans.pitt.edu. 1-3 p.m. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

network w/ other artists & practice public speaking skills. Artists of all mediums are welcome. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

AUDITIONS MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER JUNIORS. Seeking students in grades 5 through 12 to audition for A Year w/ Frog & Toad. No appointment necessary. Please come prepared w/ a song & to learn a dance step. Cold readings. November 7, 4-6 p.m. & November 8, 7-9 p.m. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

CARNEGIE LIBRARY

Support your public library and sign up to volunteer at one of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s many branches. Placements include: helping with event programming, assisting with the language groups, working in the children’s department and providing tutoring. For more placements and information, visit www.clpgh.org. REFLECTIONS: GEORGE WASHINGTON’S PLUCK & LUCK IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, 1753-1758. Charles A. Fagan III will discuss the experiences that shaped George Washington into a successful leader of an army & a fledgling nation. 7 p.m. Calvin E. Pollins Library, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 ext. 210. AN UNBREAKABLE BOND: THE BROTHERHOOD OF MAURICE STOKES & JACK TWYMAN. Lecture by Pat Farabaugh. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. URBAN HOMESTEADING: HOME BEER BREWING. Learn how to home brew using extract & partial extract methods. Tour Grist House Brewing & learn more about the craft brewing process. Registration required by 11/5. 6 p.m. Grist House Brewing, Millvale. 412-482-3464.

WED 11 CONVERSATION SALON. A forum for active participation in the discussion of the meaningful & interesting events of our time. Large Print Room. Second Wed of every month, 10:15 a.m.12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL POTLUCK. Please bring an ethnic food from your country or your family’s country heritage to share. Coordinated by the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912. OPEN CRITIQUE W/ LESLIE CLAGUE. Constructive feedback on in-progress or recent work,

MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for the classic comedy The Odd Couple. November 14, 1-4 p.m. & November 15, 5-7 p.m. Mon River Arts Studio. 412-405-8425. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Open auditions for the Annual Holiday Radio Show. Cold readings. November 7 & 8, 12-4 p.m. Trafford. 724-775-6844.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

DEAR READERS: Two weeks ago, I announced I would be taking a nice long break from questions about miserable sexless marriages. I tossed out my standard line of advice to those who’ve exhausted medical, psychological and situational fixes (“Do what you need to do to stay married and stay sane”), and I moved on to other relationship problems. Readers impacted by sexless marriages men and women on “both sides of the bed” — wrote in to share their experiences and insights. I’ve decided to let them have the last word on the subject. Since you don’t want to give any more advice to readers stuck in sexually unfulfilling marriages they can’t or don’t want to end, will you allow me to give a little advice from the perspective of the other woman, i.e., the person who makes it possible for them to “stay married and stay sane”? I contacted an old flame when my marriage ended. He was married. His wife refused to have sex with him but also expected him to stay faithful to her. Their kids were still in school. He honestly believed that staying together was the best thing for the kids. I went into it thinking it was going to be a fling, a temporary thing to get me over my husband and back in the game. But the sex was mind-blowingly good. And here’s the thing about amazing sex: It bonds people. We fell in love all over again. He told me our affair made his sexless marriage bearable. He was happier and a more patient father, he bickered less with his wife. He made me feel beautiful, desirable, known and accepted — all feelings that had been lacking in my marriage. But I was in the shadows. Every assignation was a risk. I couldn’t introduce him to my friends, my son or my family. After four years, I couldn’t take it anymore. My ego was shredded. So I ended it. I was tired of the fear, lying and hiding, and being secondary. My advice to readers stuck in sexless marriages who cheat to “stay sane”: Beware of unintended consequences. You can be careful not to get caught. It might be incredible for a while. But the chances of nothing going wrong and of everyone remaining happy over the long term are vanishingly small. It’s a matter of time before someone gets hurt.

women experience and I should just deal with it. I was told to “get started” and then maybe I would enjoy it. Finally, in response to other health problems, my doctor diagnosed me with diabetes. Within weeks of taking medication and changing my diet, my engine started running again. It’s not what it was, but I don’t feel dead below the belly button anymore. During this time, my husband was supportive. I did my best to make him happy. I’d like to think that if I had continued to suffer a loss of libido for years, I would be brave enough to give him permission to find satisfaction elsewhere, but it would break my heart. My points, briefly: Legitimate things happen to people that make them lose their sex drive. Medical support for people brave enough to say, “I’ve lost my mojo and need help to get it back” is not always there, and the solutions aren’t always easy or fast. Too often, people (especially women) are told that losing their sex drive is normal and they should just get used to it. No one should be forced to accept a sexless relationship if that’s not what they want. And if you’ve lost interest in sex and don’t really care to get it back, you don’t have the right to impose celibacy on another person. But in a long relationship, each partner is going to face challenges — and one of those challenges might be helping your partner fight to regain their libido.

“LEAVING MY SEXLESS MARRIAGE WAS WHAT I NEEDED TO DO TO STAY SANE.”

RUBY TUESDAY

Your advice to people whose partners have checked out of their sex lives is on target. But would you be willing to share a voice from the other side of the bed? Until a year ago, I was always appalled when I would read letters like these. Who would stop having sex?! Who would stay with someone who didn’t want to have sex?! Then I got sick. My illness came on slowly, but the first noticeable symptom was my sex drive vanishing. My lady parts were drier than a desert. No amount of lube helped. Sex hurt, and I didn’t want it. My journey through the medical system was a battle. Trained medical professionals poo-poo’d me. They told me this is what all perimenopausal

BED DEATH SURVIVOR

I’m the “other man” to a woman whose husband won’t fuck her. The guy must be gay or asexual, because his wife is beautiful, smart and great in bed. I’ve never wanted marriage or kids, so this arrangement works well for me. The only time it got awkward was when my girlfriend — this other guy’s wife — broached the subject of monogamy. Asking for a monogamous commitment when you’re married to someone else? Seemed nuts. But I hadn’t slept with anyone else for three years, or even wanted to, so I was already monogamous in practice. MONOGAMOUS IN THEORY NOW TOO

You wrote that you’re sick of telling people trapped in sexless marriages to do what they need to do “to stay married and stay sane.” I want to thank you for all that repetition. I needed it. But leaving my sexless marriage was what I needed to do to stay sane. My husband of 10 years berated me publicly, telling anyone who would listen that I was a whore. Had I not had your corpus of work on the matter of marital partners who have zero interest in sex but still demand enthusiastic monogamy, the journey through this would have been longer. Four years later, I still get excited that I actually get to have sex — awesome, giving, experimental, fun sex.

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

GLEEFUL ESCAPEE

On the Lovecast, Dan Savage and guests get baked in our pot-themed Denver live show! Listen at savagelovecast.com.

pghcitypaper

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.04-11.11

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Is it possible to express a benevolent form of vanity? I say yes. In the coming weeks, your boasts may be quite lyrical and therapeutic. They may even uplift and motivate those who hear them. Acts of self-aggrandizement that would normally cast long shadows might instead produce generous results. That’s why I’m giving you a go-ahead to embody the following attitude from Nikki Giovanni’s poem “Ego Tripping (there may be a reason why)”: “I am so perfect so divine so ethereal so surreal / I cannot be comprehended except by my permission.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Regard the current tensions and detours as camouflaged gifts from the gods of growth. You’re being offered a potent opportunity to counteract the effects of a self-sabotage you committed once upon a time. You’re getting an excellent chance to develop the strength of character that can blossom from dealing with soul-bending riddles. In fact, I think you’d be wise to feel a surge of gratitude right now. To do so will empower you to take maximum advantage of the disguised blessings.

American author Mark Twain seemed to enjoy his disgust with the novels of Jane Austen, who died 18 years before he was born. “Her books madden me so that I can’t conceal my frenzy,” he said, even as he confessed that he had perused some of her work multiple times. “Every time I read Pride and Prejudice,” he wrote to a friend about Austen’s most famous story, “I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone.” We might ask why he repetitively sought an experience that bothered him. I am posing a similar question to you, Aquarius. According to my analysis, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to renounce, once and for all, your association with anything or anyone you are addicted to disliking.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You are slipping into a phase when new teachers are likely to appear. That’s excellent news, because the coming weeks will also be a time when you especially need new teachings. Your good fortune doesn’t end there. I suspect that you will have an enhanced capacity to learn quickly and deeply. With all these factors conspiring in your favor, Capricorn, I predict that by Jan. 1, you will be smarter, humbler, more flexible and better prepared to get what you want in 2016.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The Sahara in Northern Africa is the largest hot desert on the planet. It’s almost the size of the United States. Cloud cover is rare, the humidity is low, and the temperature of the sand can easily exceed 170º F. That’s why it was so surprising

get your yoga on!

when snow fell there in February 1979 for the first time in memory. This once-in-a-lifetime visitation happened again 33 years later. I’m expecting a similar anomaly in your world, Pisces. Like the desert snow, your version should be mostly interesting and only slightly inconvenient. It may even have an upside. Saharan locals testified that the storm helped the palm trees because it killed off the parasites feeding on them.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1978, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield began selling their new ice cream out of a refurbished gas station in Burlington, Vt. Thirty-seven years later, Ben & Jerry’s is among the world’s bestselling ice-cream brands. Its success stems in part from its willingness to keep transforming the way it does business. “My mantra is ‘Change is a wonderful thing,’” says the current CEO. As evidence of the company’s intention to keep re-evaluating its approach, there’s a “Flavor Graveyard” on its website, where it lists flavors it has tried to sell but ultimately abandoned. “Wavy Gravy,” “Tennessee Mud” and “Turtle Soup” are among the departed. Now is a favorable time for you to engage in a purge of your own, Aries. What parts of your life don’t work anymore? What personal changes would be wonderful things?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

Before he helped launch Apple Computer in the 1970s, tech pioneer Steve Wozniak ran a dial-ajoke service. Most of the time, people who called got an automated recording, but now and then Wozniak answered himself. That’s how he met Alice Robertson, the woman who later became his wife. I’m guessing you will have comparable experiences in the coming weeks, Taurus. Future allies may come into your life in unexpected ways. It’s as if mysterious forces will be conspiring to connect you with people you need to know.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Small, nondestructive earthquakes are common. Our planet has an average of 1,400 of them every day. This subtle underground mayhem has been going on steadily for millions of years. According to recent research, it has been responsible for creating 80 percent of the world’s gold. I suspect that the next six or seven months will feature a metaphorically analogous process in your life. You will experience deep-seated quivering and grinding that won’t bring major disruptions even as it generates the equivalent of gold deposits. Make it your goal to welcome and even thrive on the subterranean friction!

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s the process I went through to create your horoscope. First I drew up a chart of your

east liberty- new location! squirrel hill north hills

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

astrological aspects. Using my analytical skills, I pondered their meaning. Next, I called on my intuitive powers, asking my unconscious mind to provide symbols that would be useful to you. The response I got from my deeper mind was surprising: It informed me that I should go to a new cafe that had just opened downtown. Ten minutes later, I was there, gazing at a menu packed with exotic treats: Banana Flirty Milk … Champagne Coconut Mango Slushy … Honey Dew Jelly Juice … Creamy Wild Berry Blitz … Sweet Dreamy Ginger Snow. I suspect these are metaphors for experiences that are coming your way.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Beatles’ song “You Never Give Me Your Money” has this poignant lyric: “Oh, that magic feeling, nowhere to go.” I suggest you make it your motto for now. And if you have not yet begun to feel the allure of that sentiment, initiate the necessary shifts to get yourself in the mood. Why? Because it’s time to recharge your spiritual battery, and the best way to do that is to immerse yourself in the mystery of having nothing to do and nowhere to go. Put your faith in the pregnant silence, Leo. Let emptiness teach you what you need to know next.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Should a professional singer be criticized for her lack of skill in laying bricks? Is it reasonable to chide a kindergarten teacher for his ineptitude as an airplane pilot? Does it make sense to complain about a cat’s inability to bark? Of course not. There are many other unwarranted comparisons that are almost as irrational but not as obviously unfair. Is it right for you to wish your current lover or best friend could have the same je ne sais quoi as a previous lover or best friend? Should you try to manipulate the future so that it’s more like the past? Are you justified in demanding that your head and your heart come to identical conclusions? No, no and no. Allow the differences to be differences. And more than that: Celebrate them!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

In the mid-19th century, an American named Cyrus McCormick patented a breakthrough that had the potential to revolutionize agriculture. It was a mechanical reaper that harvested crops with far more ease and efficiency than hand-held sickles and scythes. But his innovation didn’t enter into mainstream use for 20 years. In part that was because many farmers were skeptical of trying a new technology, and feared it would eliminate jobs. I don’t foresee you having to wait nearly as long for acceptance of your new wrinkles, Libra. But you may have to be patient. Brag about a talent or ability that few people know you have. Tout one of your underappreciated charms. Report to FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS

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starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on November 17, 2015, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for: • Loading Dock Rehabilitation 1305 Muriel Street, Pgh., Pa., 15203 Rehabilitation of Structural Slab General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes • Extraordinary Electrical Repairs Various Locations Electrical Prime • Security System Maintenance Various Locations Electrical Prime Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on October 19, 2015 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us +

ADOPTION

STUDIES

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Smokers Wanted!

GENERAL FOR SALE DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $34.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888-992-1957 (AAN CAN)

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

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412-403-6069

Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT Complete Treatment System Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

Hiring CAREgivers

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N E W S

5x10 $45/mo.+tax. 10x10 $65/mo.+ tax 10x20 $110/mo.+tax. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side.

The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

To participate, you must:

Newly Renov. 2BR apt, 2 full BA, new w/d, view of city, empl. and credit check $1,000+utils 724-344-2317

RETAIL

HELP WANTED

LOVE FASHION? BUFFALO EXCHANGE seeks Buyers. Our eclectic buy-selltrade clothing shop offers challenging, fun retail environ. Must be quick learner, cheerful, dependable, energetic. PT/FT w/ benefits. No exp. nec. Apply at www. buffaloexchange. com. Not your regular retail job! EOE

PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1000 a Week Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately www.themailinghub.com (AANCAN)

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 *Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit.

• Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health • Be willing to ďŹ ll out questionnaires • not smoke before two sessions.

for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $85 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call:

For more information call

The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

412-624-8975 +

S C R E E N

www.smokingresearchgroup.com

SMOKERS WANTED

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M U S I C

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GAME SHOW

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015

ACROSS 1. Fell off 6. “A Visit From the Goon Squad” author Jennifer 10. Nigerian prince’s offering, e.g. 14. Notorious R.B.G. colleague 15. Clue weapon 16. “Or ___ what?” 17. Herman Hesse novel that takes place in India 19. Turned on the waterworks 20. Bad news for an article with a clickbait headline 22. Broadcast 23. Place to pick up a bouquet 26. Thing passed around at a party 28. “My Fair Lady” composer Frederick 30. Modern pentathlon weapons 31. “The body is a temple” philosopher 37. Office drone 38. Spot in the laundry room 39. You shouldn’t lie under it 43. Wired subject? 46. When Ophelia dies, in “Hamlet” 49. Camera setting 50. Louis Prima standard covered by David Lee Roth 56. “You got it, cap’n” 57. Popular frightwig

58. Drink often served with a lime 59. Bone: Pref. 61. Indie band that took its name from a Robert De Niro film ... and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 67. See 3-Down 68. Broadway’s Prof. ‘iggins 69. Warfare tactic 70. “Divergent” hero ___ Prior 71. ___ majesté 72. Mobil’s partner

DOWN 1. Limp Bizkit guitarist Borland 2. Fighter with the career stat 56-5 3. With 67-Across, Royals manager 4. Termination 5. Dash, syllable-wise 6. Flub 7. Mopey kids dressed in black 8. Ladybug’s prey 9. “Ni-i-i-ice” 10. Put into stitches 11. Chop in two 12. Strive toward 13. Oxford lengths 18. Dish ___-look pass 21. Taken in 23. Go head over heels 24. Heavy reading? 25. Band’s first recording 26. Egg producer

27. Throw casually 29. Question after “I was going to throw this away” 32. Pac-12 school 33. Biblical ending 34. French film composer Francis 35. Family 36. “You were saying?” 40. “___ girl” 41. “The Iliad” setting 42. PR agent’s job 44. FEMA mission, briefly 45. Locale for some anal probes 46. First four-time Indianapolis 500 winner 47. Pointer on a laptop 48. 2005 Best Foreign Language Film

from South Africa 51. “Incompleteness theorem” mathematician Kurt 52. 2011 hurricane 53. Attendees 54. Deli order 55. ___-di-dah 60. 45-Down operators 62. Wear and tear 63. Strike from the record 64. Person from Pasadena, familiarly 65. Thing that can be bruised and stroked 66. “The Force Awakens” character Kylo ___ {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.04/11.11.2015


A VOICE FOR PEACE

Barbara Lee

A Conversation With Barbara Lee {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} IN 2001, THREE DAYS after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee was famously the lone member of either chamber of Congress to vote against the Authorization for the Use of Military Force. (The House vote was 420-1.) Lee called the AUMF a “blank check” for presidents to wage war anywhere, any time. Afghanistan is now the longest war in U.S. history. Last month, Lee, a Democrat, wrote a widely publicized op-ed in London’s The Guardian, criticizing President Obama’s recent suspension of a planned withdrawal of U.S. troops there. And for years, she’s been gathering Congressional support to repeal the AUMF. “Barbara Lee,” writes political journalist and author John Nichols, “has always had the clearest vision when it comes to the U.S. role in Afghanistan — and the rest of the world.” Lee, a leading Congressional voice for peace and social justice, has represented California’s East Bay area (including Oakland and Berkeley) since 1998. On Nov. 9, she visits Pittsburgh to accept the Thomas Merton Center’s highest honor, the peace-and-justice group’s annual Thomas Merton Award. The group cites her stands on everything from racism and criminal-justice reform to labor rights and ending the Cuban trade embargo. Lee recently spoke with City Paper from her offices in Washington, D.C. — where she had just finished speaking on the House floor against a Republican-led “budget-reconciliation deal” that would have defunded Planned Parenthood.

After such a horrific attack, when so many people have died, and were injured, we’re angry. We’re very angry, we’re sad, depressed, we’re very in the moment in terms of our emotions. That’s not when you make decisions about your national security. … We only had about an hour debate on that resolution. … You wait. You be deliberative, you be rational, you look at the facts. You have a full debate. You don’t want to create more havoc and more violence and more war. You want to, quite naturally, respond appropriately. And I’m not saying we should allow anyone to get away with what took place, in terms of the terrorist attack. But you have to be clear on how you do this. WHAT ABOUT THE ROLE OF THE DEFENSE LOBBY IN ALL THIS? The defense lobby. Oh boy. They’re pretty active. Wars do create economic opportunities and profits. It’s a combination of things. But you know the military-industrial complex is real. … And one of the areas I’ve been

“A LARGE PERCENTAGE OF THE PUBLIC REALLY UNDERSTANDS THAT WE SHOULD NOT BE IN A STATE OF PERPETUAL WAR.” HOW IS YOUR BILL TO REPEAL AUMF PROGRESSING? I have over 150 [bipartisan] members now who have voted to repeal it. I’m going to continue to try to repeal the 2001 and 2002 AUMF because if we don’t, we have the authorization there for perpetual war. … And we’ve got to come back and require Congress to do its job, and that’s have a debate and vote on any new authorities or declarations of war.

working on for years is I’ve been trying to get bipartisan support for auditing the Pentagon. You know the Pentagon is the only [federal] agency that has not been audited. And I’ve got support from Republicans to get that policy in place. But of course, given the Republican Tea Party Congress, these bills aren’t going very far.

WHAT’S THE URGENCY? The loss of life, the fact that so many of our young men and women have been injured, often with disabilities for life. We owe them a debt of gratitude, and I think a lot of members [of Congress] recognize that we need to be very careful when we put them into a war zone … when there’s no real military solution. And we see that now, over and over again, in Afghanistan, in Iraq. We have to have regional diplomatic and political settlements, if in fact we’re going to have and seek global peace and security. … I think a large percentage of the public really understands that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. It diminishes our capacity to provide for our domestic needs here at home.

THOMAS MERTON AWARD DINNER

ON THAT 2001 AUMF VOTE, YOU’VE SAID THAT YOUR TRAINING AS A PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKER GUIDED YOUR DECISION. My training … really helped me analyze the mood of the country.

WITH REP. BARBARA LEE

6 p.m. Mon., Nov. 9. Sheraton Station Square, 300 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $60 (scholarships available). 412-361-3022 or www.thomasmertoncenter.org

HOW IS CONGRESS DIFFERENT FROM WHEN YOU FIRST WORKED IN WASHINGTON? I worked here in the ’70s and ’80s … as a staffer. It’s different just in terms of the ideologies driving everything, and the fact that there are 40, 50 members who are just saying no to everything that would provide for the common good. I’ve never seen anything in my time here, any hardcore group of members of Congress who want to dismantle the entire government, and that’s what they want — not smaller government, but no government. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

November 4, 2015 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Alternative Weekly Volume 25 Issue 44

November 4, 2015 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Alternative Weekly Volume 25 Issue 44