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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015


EVENTS 10.16 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

10.17 – 8pm; VIP 7pm NIGHT OF 1,000 ANDYS Tickets $95 / $85 Members; VIP $250 FREE parking in The Warhol lot

10.23 – 8pm RICHARD MAXWELL / NEW YORK CITY PLAYERS: THE EVENING New Hazlett Theater Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students

11.4 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: LIVE! ON STAGE JONATHAN RICHMAN, FEATURING TOMMY LARKINS ON THE DRUMS! The Warhol entrance space Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait (detail), 1986, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

This exhibition is supported in part by Affirmation Arts Fund.

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11.6 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN WITH AUTHOR AND FOOD HISTORIAN SUSAN ROSSI-WILCOX The Warhol theater FREE

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL}

10.14/10.21.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns THEO SCHWARZ, KELECHI URAMA, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 41

{ART}

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[PULLOUT] your favorite eateries to 29 From your most-loved drag performer, check out the winners in this year’s Best of Pittsburgh Readers’ Poll

[NEWS] were hoping he would become 06 “They tired and just not fight anymore, but this is his life.” — Michelle Burton Brown on her brother Shawn’s fight for a new trial on murder charges

[TASTE]

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

pork chop with mustard glaze 16 “The and sour-cherry demi glace was thick and beautifully cooked.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Mighty Oak Barrel

[MUSIC] yourself first with all of your heart, 21 “Love and then you will have the world to give.” — Singer-songwriter Rachael Yamagata offers her best advice

[SCREEN]

a critique of the Cultural Revolution 70 “Itthatisresulted in millions of intimate tragedies like this one.” — Al Hoff reviews Coming Home

can see ourselves in any of 73 “We Hopper’s works, something we could never do in those of the past European masters.” — Stuart Sheppard on painter Edward Hopper

[LAST PAGE]

raises so many questions. For 94 “This example: When dogs die and go to heaven, aren’t their legs brand-new?” — Frances Sansig Rupp in this month’s This Just In

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 15 EVENTS LISTINGS 78 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 87 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 88 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 92 +

Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing & Sales Assistant MARIA SNYDER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[ARTS]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ, JAMES PORCO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

“THEY WERE HOPING HE WOULD BECOME TIRED AND JUST NOT FIGHT ANYMORE, BUT THIS IS HIS LIFE.”

Find out exactly where to find City Paper’s Best of Pittsburgh winners by exploring our interactive map at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Sharon Needles talks about being selected Best Drag Performer by CP readers and about the history of drag in Pittsburgh. See the interview on our website.

TRIAL BY FIRE

This week: Ghostbustin’, zine-makin’ and play-watchin’ all weekend long. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Instagrammer @gingerbeard412 sent this shot from Market Square. Tag your Instagram photos as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to see Bill Burr at Heinz Hall, at 9:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 22. Contest ends Oct. 15.

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(PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHELLE BURTON BROWN)

Old family photos of Shawn Burton and his aunts.

I

T’S OCT. 1, barely one week since Juanda Burton-Burch ended chemotherapy for stage-four colon cancer. But already, the 79-year-old matriarch is bound to a hospital bed, unable to eat or talk. In four days she will be dead. One of Burton-Burch’s daughters, Michelle Burton Brown, says visitors have been cycling in and out of her mother’s Hill District apartment on a consistent loop. And when City Paper visited, at least one neighbor stopped by to wish her well. A delivery man dropped off what might have been her last medicine prescription. Medical equipment whirred in the background. But one important visitor was absent: Burton-Burch’s 48-year-old son, Shawn Burton. Burton has spent the past 20 years in state correctional institutions, more than

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

50 miles from his mother, sister and five other siblings. He’s serving life without parole for a 1993 jailhouse murder he claims he did not commit. Not only that, it’s a crime that others, including the man who actually confessed to the killing, say Burton didn’t commit.

Acting as his own lawyer, Shawn Burton won a new trial for a murder he says he didn’t commit and has already served 20 years for. So how come the DA’s office keeps appealing? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} “It’s been extremely difficult, especially knowing that he didn’t commit the crime. We know that our brother has

been wrongly convicted,” says Burton Brown. “Once you’ve been wrongly incarcerated, it’s just an uphill battle to clear your name.” Burton was charged with and convicted of the 1993 first-degree murder of Seth Floyd, a California native who was awaiting trial on burglary and robbery charges. Floyd’s death, which was originally ruled a suicide, was the first homicide ever in the Allegheny County Jail. Burton has maintained his innocence from the start, filing a series of petitions and appeals for the past two decades. In 2013, he got a break when another man confessed to the murder. But that confession hasn’t meant freedom for Burton. He’s spent the last two years petitioning the court for a new hearing to examine the new evidence. And while the Superior Court ruled in August that he deserves a new trial, Allegheny CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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Wednesday, October 21 • 6 to 9 p.m. • Andy Warhol Museum Featuring • Breast reconstruction-inspired mannequin exhibit by local artists • Access to Andy Warhol Museum • Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres For more information or to purchase tickets: Visit www.bradaypittsburgh.org Call 412-641-3962 Email bradaypittsburgh@gmail.com VIP — $150 (6 p.m. admission time) General — $75 (7 p.m. admission time)

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TRIAL BY FIRE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

presents

PET of the

WEEK

County District Attorney Stephen Zappala has appealed to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. “To do over 20 years for a crime you didn’t commit has got to be the most desperate feeling,” Burton Brown says. “To work on something for 20 years and to get so close, [only] to have the powersthat-be constantly appealing you and fighting you at every angle. “I’m confident they were hoping he would become tired or depressed and just not fight anymore, but this is his life. He’s been working on this for the past 20 years, and he’s very close to freedom.” Whether or not Burton is innocent, taking his case as far as he has while acting as his own lawyer is an amazing feat, say legal experts who aid and study the efforts of the wrongly convicted. Postconviction law is a difficult area to tackle, they say, even for lawyers with years of education. “These things are incredibly complicated, and for Mr. Burton to have gotten that far is extraordinary,” says Marissa Boyers Bluestine, legal director for the Pennsylvania Innocence Project. “That takes an incredible amount of due diligence on his part. The pitfalls are immeasurable; it’s quite comparable to walking through a field of landmines. To get as far as he’s gotten is almost unheard of.” Burton’s legal prowess, however, is of little solace to Burton Brown and her family, who had hoped he would’ve been able to be reunited with their mother before she died. Still, she takes comfort in believing that he will soon be free. “He and his mother made peace years ago. He has nothing to regret in terms of his love for his mother and her love for him,” Burton Brown says. “I know she really had hoped to hold her son in her arms one last time, but I think now she can rest in peace knowing that he will be free.” The question of Shawn Burton’s innocence was decided long ago for Burton Brown, who says she can still remember her brother mouthing the words “I did not kill your son” to the victim’s mother in the courtroom during his trial. “My brother is free. It’s simply that the Allegheny County District Attorney’s office has to accept that. My brother did not commit the crime. That’s the bottom line,” Burton Brown says. “It doesn’t take but a couple months to convict someone, to sentence them to life in prison, but

apparently it takes over 20 years to clear that person’s name. “Certainly there’s a flaw in the system.” WHEN HE WAS first found dead in his cell, on March 9, 1993, Seth Floyd was hanging from the top bunk by his shoelaces and a cord. His death was ruled a suicide, according to media reports from the time. Floyd’s family didn’t believe the finding and asked for a second autopsy to be performed by former Allegheny County coroner Cyril Wecht, who ultimately determined that Floyd had been strangled to death, making his death a homicide. CP was able to retrieve details about the murder that officials say Burton committed through witness statements and a court brief filed by him and the DA’s office during the long appeals process. According to court records, Burton was in the Allegheny County Jail in 1993 after being arrested for possession of a controlled substance. CP was making arrangements to visit Burton in prison but details could not be finalized by press time. During the trial, witnesses testified that they had heard that Burton and another man, Melvin Goodwine, were going to murder Floyd because of a family-related dispute between Goodwine and Floyd. Several witnesses testified that they saw Burton and Goodwine in the victim’s cell around the time of the murder. “[Inmate Marvin Harper] likewise testified that as he walked past a cell, he heard scuffling inside and witnessed two men, whom he positively identified as [Burton] and Goodwine, wrestling another man, whom he did not know, on a bed,” the Allegheny County District Attorney’s office wrote in an appellate brief. “He said the man he did not know was positioned face-down on the bunk and it appeared that he was trying to force his way up from the bed. He said that when he walked past the cell a second time, the three men were still inside.” Burton was convicted of first-degree murder and received life without parole. Goodwine was acquitted of murder, but found guilty of conspiracy. He received a 5- to 10-year sentence. But in 2013, Brown received a letter from the Pennsylvania Innocence Project saying that Goodwine had written an affidavit confessing to the killing. Goodwine had written the confession in a 2009

“IT’S DISINGENUOUS WHEN PEOPLE WON’T EVEN ENTERTAIN THE IDEA THAT MAYBE THEY MADE A MISTAKE.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

motion to expunge his criminal record. “[I] committed this act in self-defense. However, I was advised not to use this defense at trial,” Goodwine wrote in the motion. “The petitioner has already admitted to the parole board that I committed this act on my own in self-defense. [I] also [admit] and [take] full responsibility and ownership that an innocent man went to jail for a crime that I committed.” Burton has filed a number of appeals and petitions over the years, but his most recent application for post-conviction relief was based on Goodwine’s statement. However, in 2013, Common Pleas Court Judge Donna Jo McDaniel, who presided over Burton and Goodwine’s case in 1993, denied the petition because under state law, a request for post-conviction relief must be filed within 60 days of discovery. And while Burton filed his motion within 60 days of being told about Goodwine’s affidavit in 2013, McDaniel ruled that it would have been discovered in 2009 if Burton had done his due diligence. Burton appealed McDaniel’s decision to the Pennsylvania Superior Court, where six judges voted to reverse her ruling in August 2015. In the majority’s decision, the judges said that although Burton did not discover the confession until four years after it was entered into the public record, his level of due diligence was adequate for an inmate representing himself. “It would not be reasonable to expect [Burton] to investigate public records with sufficient regularity to ascertain quickly whether Goodwine may have disclosed potentially exculpatory information concerning [Burton’s] case,” they wrote. “What the court says in this opinion is that you can’t hold an inmate to the same standard as someone who’s not in prison,” says Boyers Bluestine, of the Innocence Project. “And you have to consider the fact that he is in prison without resources. It’s very easy to say, ‘You were convicted 15 years ago, why did it take you 13 years to find this guy?’ “But just because there’s a period of time where it appears nothing happened doesn’t mean that he wasn’t actually working on it. So, to overcome that kind of presumption of lack of diligence because of mere passage of time is very important.” Three judges disagreed, saying: “Goodwine’s acquittal gave him license to make exculpatory disclosures without risk of criminal prosecution. Combining [Burton’s] awareness of this fact with the precise factual posture of this case, Goodwine was the most, if not the sole, promising source of exculpatory evidence CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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TRIAL BY FIRE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

supportive of [Burton’s] innocence claim. This considerably narrowed the scope of [Burton’s] information search from the ‘entirety of the public domain’ to the criminal docket filings of his former criminal confederate, Goodwine.” On Sept. 11, Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala appealed the Superior Court’s ruling to the Supreme Court on the same basis. A spokesman declined to comment on or respond to written questions about the case because it was still going through the appeals process. But in its appeal, the DA’s office continues the argument started by McDaniel that Burton did not meet the requirement of due diligence. “Where the newly discovered fact is a matter of public record, the Majority now allows a pro se petitioner (and not those represented by counsel) to obtain a hearing without having to plead and prove due diligence,” the DA’s office said in its filing. “This exception, however, directly conflicts with this Court’s long-standing precedent that matters of public record cannot be ‘unknown’ for purposes of the after-discovered facts exception to the timeliness requirements of [state law].” Burton Brown claims that the DA’s appeal is an attempt to hide evidence of misconduct in its office. “How long is it going to take for Allegheny County to accept that they cannot suppress this information?” Burton Brown says. “Once it’s opened, a lot of things are going to come up. People have written affidavits to the effect that they were offered deals or less time, things that were inappropriate and will reflect poorly on Allegheny County.” Burton is referencing a February 2014 affidavit where the now-deceased Marvin Harpool says he provided testimony against Burton in exchange for favor. In the original trial and court documents Harpool was referred to as Marvin Harp-

er, one of the witnesses who said he saw Burton and Goodwine in Floyd’s cell. CP specifically asked the DA’s office in writing whether it had investigated allegations that witnesses were offered favors for testimony against Burton. According to the Innocence Project, informants and incentivized witnesses providing false testimony contributed to wrongful convictions in 19 percent of the 1,600 cases of exoneration nationwide since 1989. In the affidavit, Harpool wrote: “I, Marvin Harpool, was 19 years old in 1993 and in the old county jail at the time when Mr. Shawn Burton was a suspect in a jailhouse homicide, this particular homicide was not witnessed by me. I was informed by the county jail guards that if anyone would be willing to provide any information which would link to Mr. Burton to this homicide that I could receive legal favor in exchange for this information. “I did notify the prison guards that I had actually witnessed Mr. Burton commit the particular homicide, in exchanged [sic] for my $ 50,000 bond to be dropped and that I could gain my freedom. I was informed by the Allegheny County Jail guards that the bond deal had been approved by the District Attorney, at which time I gave a false statement to the District Attorney and the Courts also that I had actually witnessed the homicide.” Harpool also wrote: “I also hope and pray that the Burton family will also forgive me for what I have done to their loved one.”

that he will be freed immediately. It only means that there is enough new evidence to suggest that a new trial is warranted. That’s an idea that Burton Brown can’t believe the DA’s office won’t acknowledge. “I think it’s disingenuous when people won’t even entertain the idea that maybe they made a mistake, and continue to use all the powers of the court, the county and the system to fight one single incarcerated man who is doing legal work from his jail cell without a lawyer,” says Burton Brown. “It’s like David and Goliath. My brother Shawn has a rock, and they have the whole power of the system behind them: lawyers, advisers, money, clout, influence, status …” And the fact that Burton has spent the majority of the last 20 years fighting for his release on his own is what makes his case so significant, advocates for the wrongfully convicted say. “You do it all on your own, without access to the Internet, without access to up-to-date case law, without resources to hire an investigator,” says Boyers Bluestine from the Pennsylvania Innocence Project. “And those are just some of the obstacles in your way. That’s assuming you’re literate and have some access to some resources.” “The law is very stacked against inmates. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has said that finality trumps everything, even in light of potential innocence claims,” Boyers Bluestine continues. “My understanding is that Mr. Burton has claimed his innocence for a very, very long time. Courts get kind of almost deaf to claims of innocence … so the fact that he has been able to do this is just an incredible testament to him and the work

“HOW LONG IS IT GOING TO TAKE FOR ALLEGHENY COUNTY TO ACCEPT THAT THEY CANNOT SUPPRESS THIS INFORMATION?”

EVEN IF THE Supreme Court rules in Bur-

ton’s favor, it doesn’t necessarily mean

that he’s put in.” Now Burton’s case is in the hands of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. The court must first decide whether to hear the case. If the justices choose not to, the Superior Court’s decision to grant Burton an evidentiary hearing will stand. If they do decide to hear the case, Burton will face yet another legal battle. “We’re requiring inmates who really have no experience at all, no knowledge of the system, no education, no expertise; we expect them to navigate this on their own. It’s kind of insane,” Boyers Bluestine says. “We’re making this so difficult for people. When we continue to put these restrictions on them again and again, the only thing that we do is cut off people who are actually innocent from being heard. That’s all these procedural barriers do.” And what happens if Burton does finally win his plea to retry his case? Both the district attorney’s office and the defense will have to track down witnesses to a more than 20-year-old murder. “Under the best of circumstances, these are all difficult cases,” says John Rago, a law professor at Duquesne University. “You’re dealing with witnesses that are 20 years old[er], witnesses whose memories no doubt have been lost or exaggerated or falsified. We know enough about memory science that just to try a case alone on memories that go back 20 years would be a very difficult thing. And that’s if you can find them.” And what would overturning Burton’s first-degree murder conviction mean? His conviction for conspiracy in the murder could still stand, but his co-defendant Goodwine was sentenced to 5 to 10 years for conspiracy. “If everything alleged is true, he has served more than twice the time of the actual killer in this case,” says Rago. “That’s the irony.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015


Save your energy. Take the bus or T. Next time you’re headed to Consol Energy Center, consider transit. Steel Plaza T Station is a short walk and 61 and 71 routes have stops nearby. Hop on board, we’ll get you there.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

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{PHOTOS BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Workers at the site of cityLAB’s tiny house, in Garfield

TINY HOUSE, BIG COST A tiny house comes to Garfield with a larger-than-expected price tag, exemplifying the problems of building affordable, single-family homes on vacant lots. {BY RYAN DETO} A TINY HOUSE will soon stand in Garfield.

Unfortunately, its costs ended up being not so tiny. Last November, City Paper reported how tiny houses might provide affordable single-family homes in blighted neighborhoods in Pittsburgh. But thanks to unforeseen costs, the expenses associated with the tiny house on North Atlantic Avenue have ballooned to more than $ 190,000, about twice what was initially expected. “I am really disappointed about the costs. I think I am going to get hate mail about it,” says Eve Picker, CEO of cityLAB, the nonprofit building the tiny house. And while much about building the tiny house was unique — it is, after all, the first of its kind in Pittsburgh — experts say that the inflated cost of building on vacant lots is a widespread issue, whether a home is miniscule or a mansion. Tiny houses, while new to Pittsburgh, have been a growing phenomenon. They started out as alternative homes that were constructed on top of trailers (to skirt zoning laws), but are now being constructed as legal homes. Nationally, some cities are considering adjusting their minimum-squarefootage requirements, paving the way for tiny houses with cinder-block foundations that are hooked up to utility grids.

The Garfield tiny house, thanks to zoning variances granted for its lot, will be anchored to a foundation and have typical amenities: water, sewage and electricity. The one-story, 350-square-foot home will also include a bathtub, two mini-fridges, a stove, a 24-inch dishwasher, a washer/dryer combo and a small front porch. The original project cost was about $100,000. Major factors increasing the price tag included the high cost of site preparation, says Picker. She says CityLAB excavated the lot to remove the remnants of a collapsed home and dug a 12-foot-deep trench to separate the sewage line from the property’s stormwater runoff, to comply with the federal Clean Water Act. Because the project is the first of its kind, costs associated with the zoning variances were also higher than expected. Such additional expenditures totaled about $ 50,000, says Picker. She later learned that such costs are not uncommon among projects on deeply distressed lots. “You are pretty likely to have the same exact costs; you have to pull [all the debris] out,” says Picker. “Most sites in Garfield are going to have this same problem. Any neighborhood with abandoned properties will have this problem.” Additionally, Picker had costs that

“ANY NEIGHBORHOOD WITH ABANDONED PROPERTIES WILL HAVE THIS PROBLEM.”


wouldn’t accrue to someone building his or her own house, including $ 15,000 for a developer fee to market and sell the house. Such site-prep costs are typical for new homes on most vacant lots, agrees Rick Swartz, executive director of the Bloomfield-Garfield Corp. Swartz says that the BGC recently built a normal-sized home on a vacant lot for $ 237,000, but was able to sell it for only $143,000. Swartz says the high upfront expense means that new homes in blighted neighborhoods cost well over what the market will bear. With all the news about Pittsburgh’s growth and livability, Swartz sees this issue as “a crisis that gets overshadowed by the city’s transformation.” “There is a hard decision that is facing the city the next couple years,” says Swartz. “Historically, we have relied on state and federal funds to revitalize city neighborhoods. There has been a 30 to 40 percent decline for federal funding regarding housing over the years. The city is going to have to think about taking a dedicated portion of funding to help fund the infrastructure costs.” Instead of building new, prospective homeowners might want to consider renovating existing buildings, Swartz says. He says that renovating can be accomplished for about $90,000, on average. Swartz recommends finding homes that have been vacant for less than three years. Bethany Davidson, head of Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group’s vacant property working group, agrees. She says that it costs 40 percent less to renovate than to build from the ground up. However, finding such salvageable properties is not easy. Davidson says that more than 25 percent of parcels in Pittsburgh (whether built on or not) are N E W S

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classified as distressed. This means they are either physically distressed (suffering everything from chipping paint to complete structure collapse) or economically distressed (for example, tax delinquent). Most fit into the former category, she says. Davidson says the goal is to stabilize distressed properties to ensure they do not fall into disrepair, thus costing developers tens of thousands of additional dollars. She adds that the city receives federal funds to stabilize city-owned blighted lots. (Privately owned blighted lots are also a big problem, but mostly out of the city’s hands.) But there is only so much the city can accomplish to save its thousands of abandoned homes. “Despite their best efforts, there is never enough funding to go around,” says Davidson. “[The city] has to focus on triage and

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What does your child buy at convenience stores? The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to learn about what children, ages 11-17, purchase at convenience stores. Participation requires completion of a 20 phone or web survey and one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center. Children who complete the study will be compensated for their time and eort with $50 in gift certiďŹ cates. Parking and travel compensation is provided. If you are interested and want to ďŹ nd out more, please call 412-545-3005 or c-storestudy@rand.org or http://www.rand.org/storestudy. The RAND Corporation is a nonproďŹ t institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

public safety ďŹ rst.â€? Representatives of the mayor’s ofďŹ ce did not return calls seeking comment on the city’s property-stabilization efforts. City programs exist to aid buyers of abandoned homes. Davidson says individuals can apply for a tax abatement associated with certain designated districts, grants from the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority to refurbish a home’s façade, and sidewalk-reconstruction reimbursement programs. She also says individuals can apply for a consolidated loan through the PCRG, in partnership with local banks and the URA, which handles purchase and renovation under one loan. Pittsburgh’s Land Bank is also beginning work to combat the problem. Its goal is to make it easier for developers, community groups and neighbors to ďŹ x up blighted, abandoned properties. Pittsburgh City Councilor Ricky Burgess, chair of the land bank, says it is in the process of procuring funding for a staff. Once funding and a staff are established, says Burgess, the bank will focus on gathering up vacant parcels and maintaining them. However, Burgess says, the cost to build

on the properties will be on the developer, “at least for now.� For Picker’s part, to recoup her costs on the tiny house, she says, the property must sell for about $100,000. That’s much higher than she wanted, but lower than it could have been, thanks to grants and donations totaling around $ 90,000 from contributors including the BGC, the URA and IKEA. Picker is now selling the tiny house through her crowdfunding site smallchange.com and, at press time, it had raised $ 30,000 of the $100,000 from eight investors. URA chair Kevin Acklin says that the city was happy to invest in the tiny house and that it was a “great pilot� for an effort at a sustainable home. “It was worth the investment,� he says. “whether it is scalable, is yet to be seen.� While Picker is not happy with the tiny house’s price tag, she says she still wants to pursue the tiny house as an affordable model for blighted neighborhoods. But she says that she might change her development strategy. “I am pursuing up to six tiny houses on three lots, trying to get them on one parcel,� says Picker. “That way the site preparation cost is lower per house.� RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN pm | 6 – 10 6 1 . , Oct Friday

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015


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SPECIAL TALENT {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

OCTOBER 21 French Wines 6:30 P.M.

UNIVERSITY OF Pittsburgh’s women’s head

basketball coach Suzie McConnell-Serio is better than you or me. Those are my words, not hers, and I can prove that assertion. Now, of course, lots of people are better than me — even monthly-pass-holding Port Authority riders are better than me. (Highfalutin show-offs with their season tickets to the bus are always rubbing in their superiority.) But unless you’ve been named one of the 100 greatest athletes in the state of Pennsylvania by Sports Illustrated; were a high school and collegiate standout; won coach of the year at a professional level; reside in your sport’s Hall of Fame; won two Olympic medals; and raised four children, then, yes, Suzie McConnell-Serio is likely better than you. If the day arrives when this city comes to its senses and finally puts up a statue of a Pittsburgh sports star who’s not a guy, there is no better candidate. McConnell-Serio’s list of accomplishments reads longer, and certainly more glorious, than an off-season NFL jurisprudence report. The Seton-La Salle Rebels and Penn State Nittany Lions all-star turned the Minnesota Lynx, of the WNBA, into a winning franchise, taking home coach of the year there in 2008. She even helped a Cleveland team — the nowdefunct Rockers — to a winning season. She didn’t win a championship in Cleveland, but I never claimed she was a deity. The sighting of a Cleveland victory parade was last reported 51 years ago, after all. After righting the ship with the Lady Dukes, of Duquesne — where she went 123-68 in six seasons — she is now in charge of Pitt’s program. She is in the midst of turning around a program that went 9-21 in the 2012-13 season. In just the second year of McConnell-Serio’s watch, the Panthers were 20-12 last year — she has the Midas touch indeed. In fact, one of the aforementioned Olympic medals is a gold one, picked up in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. Not bad for a local girl. This year’s Panthers squad looks to improve on that mark, a goal made tougher after the graduation of Brianna Kiesel last year. The three-time team captain was the first player in Pitt women’s hoops history to have 1,500 points, 500 rebounds and 400 assists in a career. She has moved on to Oklahoma, where she just made the team for the WNBA’s Tulsa Shock. Three sophomores will try to replace

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

Kiesel’s Oscar Robertson-like statistics. As a freshman, Chicago native Aysia Bugg had 75 assists and started all but three games. Yacine Diop, who like McConnell-Serio attended Seton-La Salle, is a rebounding force averaging more than seven boards a game. She’s not only a great athlete, but she can speak three languages fluently. Some people, like myself, have trouble with one. Diop steadies the front court with Stasha Carey right next to her. Carey had the fourth-most rebounds by a freshman in Pitt history when she managed to come down with the ball 245 times last year. Add in Destinie Gibbs, a redshirt junior transfer from the University of Southern California; 6’11” shotblock specialist Bubbles Anderson; and Canadian three-point sniper Fred Potvin, and this is a well-rounded team. It is a young team as well — no seniors. McConnell-Serio also added five freshman to round out the roster. (Just to make everyone feel old, today’s freshmen were born in 1997.) Playing in the historic Atlantic Coast Conference doesn’t make McConnell-Serio’s job any easier. This is a conference of juggernauts. The Maryland Terrapins, North Carolina Tar Heels, Florida State Seminoles, Louisville Cardinals and Duke Blue Devils are all in the preseason top 12. ACC teams dominate the charts like The Beatles in 1965. If Suzie McConnell-Serio can lead these Panthers to greatness through this murderer’s row of basketball nobility, we should start melting the bronze and looking for a spot for that new statue.

SHE DIDN’T WIN A CHAMPIONSHIP IN CLEVELAND, BUT I NEVER CLAIMED SHE WAS A DEITY.

Space is limited. Call 412-325-2227 for reservations. 2224 E. Carson Street, Pittsburgh *Plus tax and gratuity.

CHINESE ART AND ANTIQUES Free Appraisal Day and Cash Buying Event Beijing HH International Art Fund is the first art foundation in China dedicated to the preservation and collection of Chinese art & Antiques. Based in Beijing and founded in 2004, we now have over $75 million under our management. We are excited to launch our newest venture in the US by hosting Free Appraisal and Cash Buying events in Connecticut, Massachusetts & Rhode Island. Please check our website frequently for updates on event schedules. We welcome collectors, scholars, dealers and institutions to participate in our event and we look forward to seeing you soon. Top price will be paid for the following items: Chinese jade, ceramics, bronzes, Cloisonné, Buddhist figures, robes, embroideries, Snuff bottles, photographs, furniture, watercolors & paintings etc. and we are interested in purchasing art works from one piece to an entire collection. Flexible Payment Methods: Cash, Check & Wire Transfer. We are always buying Chinese Art and Antiques from one piece to entire collection. If you missed our event, please call us and we can arrange a date to see you. • Earn 10% Referral Fee if you refer a friend or family to us. • Free in-home appraisal available for larger pieces.

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MIGHTY OAK BARREL’S HOUSE SALAD WAS TRULY EXCEPTIONAL

FAMILY COOKING {BY RYAN DETO} The Gibson family is too large and has too many great cooks to have just one restaurant. Its original restaurant, Gibson’s, in Penn Hills, offers Southern specialties and sides and has experienced continued success since opening in 2006. So the family decided to open another location in Bloomfield. Nana’s Place opened in July in the heart of Bloomfield, on Liberty Avenue. The sit-down restaurant was named after co-owner’s Amicia Collins’ grandmother, and the space was designed to recall the visits Collins had with her grandma every Saturday. “When you walk into [Gibson’s], you can get your meal in less than three minutes,” says Collins. “Here, it is a bit more relaxed, and [it’s] made to feel like her living room.” Nana’s menu is slimmer than Gibson’s, offering turkey, roast beef, baked ham and catfish dinners with a few sides and salads. And while you can’t sample Gibson’s charcoal-grilled ribs (which sell out every Saturday), you can still enjoy the family’s most popular dish: macaroni and cheese. Nana’s hopes to add desserts soon. Collins says the desserts will be in honor of her grandma, who passed away recently but was baking pies for Gibson’s up until three months before her death. It’s this spirit that drives the family enterprises. At the cozy Bloomfield space, diners might be greeted by Collins’ siblings, aunts or cousins — whoever has time to help out. “My granddad, who is in his 80s,” says Collins, “still comes up and pitches in from time to time.” RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4510 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-1400

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fundraiser, sample ample delicious food prepared pared by some of Pittsburgh’s burgh’s best chefs, and feel good knowing the proceeds go toward YouthPlaces, which trains young people for careers in the food industry. Fifteen chefs will put their spin on “Fall BBQ,” from 3-6 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25, at YouthPlaces, on the North Side. Tickets $35, at www.showclix.com.

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Royal Canadian salmon in tarragon-avocado butter

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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OR AWHILE, the charmingly named

Mighty Oak Barrel was a word-ofmouth favorite, offering some of the region’s best food and wine in a surprisingly nondescript building tucked into a humble neighborhood of riverside cottages beyond the Oakmont business district. Part of its charm was this hidden aspect, which — in the pre-Urbanspoon era — allowed everyone who dined there to feel like they had discovered this delicious secret themselves. Eventually, the Mighty Oak Barrel closed, and its owners moved on to other ventures. Recently, however, a new restaurant has opened in the old spot under the old name, but with a distinctly new personality. Gone are the dim lighting and plastic grapevines draping the dropped acoustical ceiling tiles. The reopened dining room is brightly lit, the better to display the local art that’s a cut above typical coffee-shop

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

fare. Black tablecloths set off brightly colored Fiestaware dishes. And as for the menu, where the old Mighty Oak Barrel was ahead of its time — seasonal and bold when those were still rare qualities in the local scene — the new

MIGHTY OAK BARREL 939 Third St., Oakmont. 412-826-1069 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. lunch 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; dinner 4 p.m.-close PRICES: Appetizers, flatbreads and salads $7-14; entrees and pasta $16-29 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED venue is more of a throwback, with chops and pasta dishes, all pretension-free. Nothing here is cutting-edge, but neither is it boring, for example, grilled salmon with avocado-tarragon butter. Indeed, lack of pretension seems to get

at the heart of new owner Michael Flowers’ vision. Flowers, an Oakmont native who’s worked at the renowned Oakmont Country Club as well as a few of the area’s fine dining spots, seems to be looking to affirm the Oak Barrel’s neighborhood vibe. Thus, while the menu includes refined dishes like seared duck breast with blood-orange sauce, the atmosphere is warm and welcoming, not cool and professional. Bacon-wrapped shrimp, a riff on that canapé classic, bacon-wrapped scallops, was served with horseradish aioli. Firmer and less buttery-sweet than scallops, the shrimp could stand up to such an assertively flavored sauce, and their texture was close to perfect, plump, not dried out. The bacon was great, too, crisp at the edges but mostly tender. This was supposed to be a shared starter, but it was so good, it would have been easy for one person to devour it all.


On the RoCKs

Duck confit and fig flatbread was topped with diced fresh figs, instead of the fig spread we often see in this application. The fruit firmed up a bit in the oven, maintaining its distinct flavor, which complemented the rich, moist shredded duck, the sweet caramelized onion and a blend of mozzarella and gruyere that was flavorful and gooey. A bit too gooey, truth be told; while normally we can’t get enough melted cheese, here we thought less could have been more, revealing rather than muting the wonderful flavors of the other ingredients. Not many house salads are worth discussing, but Mighty Oak Barrel’s was truly exceptional. Toasted, slivered almonds delivered gentle crunch and earthy balance to dried cranberries and apricots — not too sweet, but just right — while tangy crumbled blue cheese added a pungent note to the tender mixed greens. Several dressings were available, but the champagne vinaigrette was the perfect complement, bright but not sour.

Jason’s pork chop with mustard glaze and sour-cherry demi glace was thick and beautifully cooked, juicy and just rosy in the middle. The thick layer of wholegrain mustard balanced the sweetness of the demi and a generous topping of little, cooked cherries. Jason tends to be a purist about chops, but he had to admit that all of these flavors enhanced even this one, which would have been excellent on its own. A side of ratatouille, seasonal but an imperfect match for the autumnal feel of the chop, was quite good, cooked long enough to intensify the flavors without rendering the squash and eggplant mushy. Lobster ravioli is a dish from the previous incarnation’s era, but the new one’s version is far from tired. Each ravioli was packed with briny, succulent shredded lobster meat for big seafood flavor, and the creamy tomato-vodka sauce had a more concentrated, astringent tomato flavor than the name usually implies. With its comfortable, casual atmosphere and expertly prepared food, the new Mighty Oak Barrel is a worthy successor to the old.

LOCAL FLAVORS

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{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Featuring cuisine in the style of

Hotel bars get a bad rap. And with boring, overpriced draft lists and way too many cocktails ending in “tini,” a lot of them deserve it. But these days, hotels around the world are spending serious time developing beverage programs that leave cookie-cutter bars in the past. The bar at East Liberty’s brand-new Hotel Indigo is one of them, boasting a drinks list that looks to the future while nodding to the neighborhood’s rich history. Though the Hotel Indigo is owned by massive hotel company IHG, its bar/restaurant, named Wallace’s Tap Room, is hardly a corporate affair. “The idea is to bring in the culture of the community here,” explains bartender Cat Cannon. “Pittsburgh is its own beast.” Wallace’s Tap Room draws inspiration from the history that dances around it. One of the buildings that makes up the Hotel Indigo once housed the Governor Hotel, whose architect, C.L. Wallace, gave the bar its name. Another of the hotel’s buildings supposedly contained a speakeasy during Prohibition, and drinks like the Boulevardier and the Bee’s Knees date to the bootlegging era. Other cocktails honor the past in different ways. One of Cannon’s favorites, The Carnegie Collins, is a biting Scotch, honey and ginger cocktail with a float of Penn Dark Lager. It pays homage to Pittsburgh’s most famous Scotsman, who once had a home in the neighborhood. The beer list is equally Pittsburghfocused. The night I visited, nearly threequarters of the drafts were taken up by local brewers, including a pumpkin ale from Highland Park’s Costar Brewing and a lime-basil saison from Lawrenceville’s Hop Farm. Other local touches abound, such as a house coffee blend from nearby Zeke’s Coffee and sodas from Natrona Bottling Company. The prices at Wallace’s Tap Room are as unexpected as the drinks themselves. Cocktails start at just $8, and most drafts are about $6. The Hotel Indigo will hold its grand opening in mid-October.

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The bar at Wallace’s Tap Room

Mighty Oak Barrel owner and chef Michael Flowers

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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BANGAL KEBAB. 320 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-605-0521. This Indian restaurant isn’t limited to kebabs, but offers fairly typical Northern Indian selection, including some newerto-menus items such as meat samosas and the street-snack chaat. There is also a sizable vegetarian list and, from the tandoor, an unusually large selection of Indian breads. KF BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412-323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-thanaverage fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pear-and-bleucheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. 1701 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6199. Having made the jump from street truck to modest sit-down venue, the owners retained their menu, so popular with the late-night crowd, of fresh-cooked Cambodian cuisine. Kabobs, fried wontons, chicken, shrimp cakes, curried vegetable bowls and fried noodles are among the restaurant’s staples, as is its distinctive in-house “moon sauce” and fresh limeade. JF

Teppanyaki Kyoto {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JAMISON’S. 3113 W. Liberty Ave., Dormont. 412-561-3088. A former cozy watering hole is reborn as a sport bar, but with commendable beer-friendly burgers, wings and Bacon Stix (extra-thick slices of hickorysmoked bacon, fried and balsamic-glazed). Also of note: a variety of dressed burgers in two sizes, incliding one made from kielbasa.KE

CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF EL BURRO COMEDOR. 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412-904-3451.A casual Southern California-style taqueria offers a variety of tacos, burritos and Cal-Mex specialties, such as carne asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles (a homey casserole). Tacos are come with a variety of fillings, including mahi mahi and shrimp, and burrito fillings run from standard to breakfast and French fries and steak. JF IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

El Burro Comedor

JOHNNY’S. 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. This Wilmerding institution offers well-prepared ItalianAmerican cuisine and a welcoming atmosphere around a horseshoe bar. The menu offers the expected standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories. But overall, the preparations are fairly up-to-date: exceptionally bright and slightly

chunky marinara, fluffily battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. KE THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE OFF THE HOOK. 98 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale. 724-719-2877. This fine-dining fish restaurant features a menu almost exclusively from the sea; even the pastas are seafoodcentric. The fresh-fish section has a variety of suggested preparations, from classic (almondine) to modern (finished with chimichurri). Off the Hook also offers a fresh-oyster bar, CONTINUES ON PG. 20


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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

BZ Bar and Grill {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} expertly curated wine selection and impeccable service. LE PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE

into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders made with chicken, pulled BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari come with a basil-garlic aioli, and the robust Yuengling beer-cheese sauce was the perfect complement to “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE

TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD lunch counters, train stations ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, and family kitchens. From salads Wexford. 724-935-9870. This containing burdock root and rice bar and restaurant delivers balls to cabbage pancakes top-notch pub grub, and stir-fried noodles, this plus a well-curated diner-style venue lets beer menu. Among casual eaters expand the offerings: the beyond sushi. KE Buffalo, N.Y. classic www. per a p sandwich, roast beef THAI COTTAGE. pghcitym .co on weck, a Germanic roll 1109 S. Braddock with caraway seeds; and Ave., Regent Square. mac-and-cheese, made with 412-241-8424. This Regent Buffalo hot sauce. Well-prepared Square restaurant distinguishes burgers, wings, fish and chips, itself with its appealing ambience, and sandwiches round out excellent service and superb the menu. KE renditions of classic Thai cuisine: complexly textured, with flavors THE PUB CHIP SHOP. 1830 E. balanced gloriously among s Carson St., South Side. 412-381-2447. weet, salty and brightly tangy This storefront venue offers notes. A good stop for the British-style quick fare, from fish popular appetizers, soups, curries and chips and meat pies, to doner and stir-fried entrees. KF kebabs and pasties. Pastry pies include traditional (meat, Stilton) TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East but also more modern fillings like Ingomar Road, Allison Park. chicken curry and vegan vindaloo. 412-364-6622. Located on Beer-battered haddock pairs well the verdant edge of North Park, with housemade sauces and Tomato Pie is more than a thick fresh-cut fries. JF pizzeria. It offers other simple Italian specialties including pasta STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight and sandwiches, and the chef Road, Ross Township. 412-369-5380. uses plenty of fresh herbs grown There is an art to making a on the premises. FJ really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered WILLOW. 634 Camp Horne here. The lengthy menu spans Road, North Hills. 412-847-1007. traditional sandwiches but also This stalwart of the North Hills burgers, quesadillas and wraps, fine-dining scene has revamped as well as salads and homemade itself, now with a one-page menu, soups. Originality is a hallmark: divided among snacks and salads, “Green fries” are shoestrings small plates and large, that is tossed with pesto, artichoke almost universally appealing. hearts and bits of brie. FJ Choose from simple (spiced mixed nuts) or a carefully prepared TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., salad, to entrees including pastas, Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step burgers and chops. KE

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LOCAL

“THERE IS BEAUTY IN THE DARKEST OF PLACES.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

CROSSING CULTURES

ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MUSIC ON THE EDGE: MUSICAL FUSIONS. Ensemble N_JP: 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 16. Music From China: 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 17. Bellefield Hall, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. 412-624-4141 or www.music. pitt.edu/mote N E W S

FEARLESS Music From China {PHOTO COURTESY OF MAN ASURA}

Concert series Music On The Edge (MOTE) kicks off its 25th season this week, but don’t expect fireworks for the anniversary. The organizers — co-directors Eric Moe and Matthew Rosenblum, with Amy Williams, all of them music faculty at the University of Pittsburgh — are focusing their time elsewhere, marking the occasion with one of their busiest, most ambitious and robust seasons to date. One example: “Musical Fusions: Chinese, Japanese and American Intersections” is a musical celebration of the ways Asian and American composers influence and interpret one another, featuring a symposium and performances by two preeminent groups, Ensemble N_JP and the Music From China ensemble. “We give the highest priority to programming the most exciting art music that is being written right now, both in the U.S. and abroad,” says Moe, who founded MOTE in 1990. With funding from grants and the University of Pittsburgh, MOTE brings elite international performers to Pittsburgh to showcase contemporary classical music in some of its boldest forms. “It’s concerts we want to go to,” says Williams, who got involved with MOTE in 2005. “Groups we want to hear and we think Pittsburgh should hear.” Over its 25-year run, MOTE has become increasingly involved with other cultural institutions in Pittsburgh, including guest appearances by members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and collaborations with The Andy Warhol Museum, with whom MOTE presented the Beyond Microtonal Music Festival earlier this year. “It’s like a rotating exhibit in a museum, where the curator’s voice really decides what is going to be shown on those walls,” says Williams. “Music On The Edge is eclectic for sure. I wouldn’t say that there’s one style of music represented, but I think the idea is that it is very high-quality, serious contemporary music.” MOTE’s season starts Friday at Bellefield Auditorium and runs through May, including appearances by New Morse Code; Bedroom Community; Williams’ film interpretation series Cineshape; and more.

LOVE

{BY CARALYN GREEN}

L

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA CROSTA}

Readying for change: Rachael Yamagata

AST YEAR, Rachael Yamagata opened

for Joshua Radin at the Carnegie Library Music Hall on Valentine’s Eve — the night before the day of love. On a dark stage, in a room full of couples on dates and women in pairs, she played her piano, opened her heart and reassured us, tenderly, and with grit, “Everything will be alright ... if you just stay the night.” This reaching sentiment from her 2004 debut’s standout “Be Be Your Love” feels as relevant today as a decade ago, when it appeared on the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants soundtrack — an of-thetime collection featuring Chantal Kreviazuk, a pre-”I Kissed a Girl” Katy Perry, and the Valli Girls, a manufactured pop group featuring two out of three Haim sisters. Yamagata’s music is a darkly reassuring sort — hopeful and comforting, but wistful for human connection and, even more, for a connection with one’s deepest self. The 38-year-old singer-songwriter is at work on a new album slated for an early-2016 release. It’ll be Yamagata’s fourth

studio LP, and her first since 2012’s Heavyweight EP, on which Yamagata sang of yet another heartache: “I am readying myself for a change ... Has it happened yet?”

RACHAEL YAMAGATA WITH MY NAME IS YOU

8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 15. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20-22. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

LAST YEAR YOU CELEBRATED THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF HAPPENSTANCE BY PLAYING THE ALBUM IN FULL AT A HANDFUL OF SHOWS. HOW DOES IT FEEL TO GET UP ON THAT STAGE AND, ESSENTIALLY, PERFORM A VERSION OF YOURSELF THAT EXISTED A DECADE AGO? It was a joyful experience, actually. The angst within some of those songs has a transformed beauty for me now based more on youth and the purity of first heartbreaks. It was nostalgic and exciting because the audience was filled with

people who really felt connected to that record, and we all got to go back in time. I appreciated the songs for their poptasticness in a new way, and I’d never played the record live like that front to back, so it was really special. LOOKING BACK ON THE DECADE SINCE HAPPENSTANCE, WHAT’S YOUR PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT? I’m most proud to have found creative ways to weather any industry storms, and still be playing and making music as my life to this day. I don’t play it safe with my releases. They can be dramatically different from each other, and I’m grateful to still be inspired by writing and recording. I HEARD THAT KATHLEEN EDWARDS IS TAKING A BREAK FROM MUSIC TO OPEN A COFFEESHOP CALLED QUITTERS. IF YOU WERE TO PUT THE PAUSE ON RELEASING AND PERFORMING MUSIC, WHAT WOULD YOU DO? I’d dig a pond out of the swamp that lives CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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FEARLESS LOVE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

on my property. I’d fix my roof and clean out the woods. Anything with nature or working on land relaxes me. I’d love to travel somewhere new and build houses or something like that … YOU WORKED WITH MANDY MOORE ON HER 2007 ALBUM WILD HOPE, WHICH IS A COMPLETELY UNDERRATED MASTERPIECE. TELL ME ABOUT THAT EXPERIENCE. She’s a sweetheart and a badass. I also love her album Amanda Leigh that she did with Mike Viola. She was incredibly dedicated, extremely well educated about all genres of music, and relentless in her pursuit of a great lyric. She inspired me to go further in my writing and not just go with the first phrase that comes to mind. I’m definitely a fan.

“LOVE YOURSELF FIRST WITH ALL OF YOUR HEART, AND THEN YOU WILL HAVE THE WORLD TO GIVE.” YOUR MUSIC IS SO DEEPLY ROMANTIC AND DEEPLY HEARTBREAKING. THE LYRIC FROM “ELEPHANTS” — “TO THOSE OF YOU FALLING IN LOVE … KEEP IT GOOD, KEEP IT KIND, KEEP IT RIGHT” — IS SOMETHING I THINK ABOUT AT THE BEGINNING OF EVERY NEW RELATIONSHIP. WHAT’S THE BEST ADVICE ABOUT LOVE YOU CAN GIVE? Love yourself first with all of your heart, and then you will have the world to give. Love without fear. Stand true to what you know you deserve, and insist upon it. I’VE SEEN YOU PERFORM IN A CHURCH’S CHAPEL, A DIVE BAR, A HISTORIC LIBRARY CONCERT HALL. HOW DOES YOUR PERFORMANCE CHANGE BASED ON THE VENUE YOU’RE PLAYING? I love to take advantage of setting when possible. I’ll mix up the set list to indulge in the magic of a place for sure. A chapel and the spiritual feel, acoustics and such — that may lead to an a cappella version of “Elephants” because I know the room will support it. However, I’ve also done that in the divey bar where no one is paying attention and it’s a weekend night. It’s dramatic and a challenge and faces the circumstance head on. Both experiences are inspiring to me. For me, there is beauty in the darkest of places. and if I can bring it out and create a special experience, well, that makes me happy. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDREW WOEHREL}

SIKES AND THE NEW VIOLENCE I’VE SEEN BETTER (BAD IDEA COLLECTIVE)

It’s hard to tell how many levels of irony Brian Howe, known by the stage name Sikes, is operating on. I’ve Seen Better, released this past August, is the rapper’s fifth album, and his first featuring his live backing band, The New Violence. Eschewing the braggadocio that’s so common in hip hop, Sikes is more eager to be painfully self-deprecating. On the track “Low Expectations,” Sikes exclaims, “When I take my own life, dump my corpse in the street and fill the air with the failure my body will reek.” He’s already setting himself up to disappoint, and with a title like I’ve Seen Better, it’s easy to ask, “Why bother?”

THE PARK PLAN JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT (SELF-RELEASED)

Adam JannonFischer, the vocalist and guitarist for The Park Plan, has an unhurried baritone that glides over the band’s smooth surf-pop in such an unassuming way that you might not realize the words he’s singing have a satirical bent. On songs like “Gender Gap” and “Good Guy With a Gun,” Jannon-Fischer sets out to portray the disturbing nature of American society, but doesn’t always get his point across. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE PARK PLAN EP RELEASE. 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 17. Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerspittsburgh.com


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH KAY}

Matthew Ryan

THE NEXT ROUND {BY TROY MICHAEL} EVEN THOUGH he moved to Beaver Coun-

ty from Nashville about four years ago, singer/songwriter Matthew Ryan hasn’t really performed much around town. “This is my first show in the city other than guesting with Gaslight Anthem at Stage AE a couple years back,” says Ryan, a native of Chester, Pa., near Philadelphia. “I can’t even express how excited I am to be playing Club Café. It’s one of the best rooms of its kind in the country.” “It’ll be the last night of a twoweek tour Jesse [Malin] and I will have done together,” he adds, “so we’ll be in top form.” For more than two decades, Ryan has been known for his raspy vocal delivery and his poetic storytelling, usually about folks who have been beaten down by life and who possess little more than the will to survive — for those reasons, he is often compared to both Bruce Springsteen and The Replacements’ Paul Westerberg. His 11th studio album, Boxers, is a prime example of that style. It’s also a reflection of the region he now calls home. Ryan has become, in some circles, a modern-day working-class hero: In his songs he creates a world where darkness turns into light, where ugly becomes beautiful and where one just doesn’t give in. Boxers is an album for those who have struggled in a bluecollar society. Maybe they were put out on the streets after failing to pay rent,

maybe they lost a job, or maybe they’ve done things they aren’t proud of. But they never give up. These are tales of survivors, as the song “An Anthem for the Broken” amplifies in its repeated chorus “We won’t quit.” Sure, Ryan arguably wrote these songs for those types of people — “This One’s For You Frankie,” “God’s Not Here Tonight,” as well as the title track. But it also feels like Ryan wrote these songs for himself. His career longevity has shown he’s not a quitter. He’s a survivor. Matthew Ryan is the boxer. “Boxers was heavily influenced by the spirit of what I see, hear and feel in Western Pennsylvania,” Ryan says. “I’m currently out on the road a lot supporting Boxers and building its story.”

“WE’LL BE IN TOP FORM.”

MATTHEW RYAN WITH JESSE MALIN, DON DILEGO

8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

After he wraps up the tour with Malin, Ryan plans to get “settled in to start writing the next album,” although he says he plans on taking his time. And just as his life in Western Pa. influenced Boxers, Ryan says you’ll feel the influence on the new record as well, even if that feel is a little different from his previous work. “The new songs have an optimism, an anthemic light to them,” he says. “They’re still gritty, but not quite as pastdwelling. I credit a lot of that to this new life I’m building, and the friendships I’m finding here in the area.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF TIM ANDERSON}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Amy Bezunartea

[AFRO POP] + THU., OCT. 15

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. 412-345-1059 or www.therobotoproject.org “Chachacha” is a traditional form of protest song, played on homemade instruments [AMERICANA] + WED., OCT. 21 like the kalimba (a xylophone made out of “Alt-country,” “gothic country,” “neohollowed-out gourds), and originally sung by bluegrass,” “Americana” and other similar Zambian freedom fighters in the 1960s. It’s genre names are tossed around frequently also the title of a new work by Mathew Tembo, these days, as there are a lot of young musicians who is an international pop star and one pairing bluegrass, country and traditional of the biggest in his home country of Zambia. old-time music with a modern attitude and punBut he has recently resettled in Pittsburgh — kish energy. The Devil Makes Three, an aptly which was his first long-term home when named trio of troubadours from Santa Cruz, he moved to the U.S. several years ago — Calif., are a perfect example, and they tread to be close to his young daughter. Tembo familiar territory: will be performing banjos, stand-up Chachacha tonight basses and Southern at the New Hazlett drawls, and lyrics Theater, with The Devil about booze, the assistance from devil, sins, morals Makes Three his band, the Afro and retribution. Routes. Andrew You can see them Woehrel 8 p.m. tonight at Mr. 6 Allegheny Square Small’s Theatre with East, North Side. support from The $20. 412-320-4610 Deslondes. AW or www.newhazlett 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln theater.org Ave., Millvale. $20. 412-821-4447 or [INDIE] + www.mrsmalls.com FRI., OCT. 16 At first listen, Amy [METAL] + Bezunartea may WED., OCT. 21 sound like any Scott “Wino” other indie-folk Weinrich has been singer-songwriter a huge figure in from any time American doombetween 1995 and {PHOTO COURTESY metal, having fronted 2005. Though her OF PIPER FERGUSON} some of the genre’s voice and chords most influential occasionally echo bands, including The Obsessed and Saint Vitus. tropes of confessional indie music, her He also leads Spirit Caravan, a three-piece from lyrics are braver and more frank than one Maryland that reunited last year after a 12-year might expect, and her melodies have a hiatus. Originally active from 1996 to 2002, the knack for unfolding in unexpected ways. band operated as sort of a return to early-’70s Bezunartea’s slow and somber tales are Black Sabbath, as Weinrich’s voice and guitarrewarding; a close listen will reveal how playing are clearly indebted to Ozzy Osbourne she subverts the expectations listeners may and Tony Iommi, respectively. Tonight, Spirit have of a sweet-voiced and poised modern Caravan plays Brillobox, with support from woman. She’s playing tonight at the Tennessee’s Dirty Streets and locals Monolith Mr. Roboto Project, with Advance Base Wielder. AW 8 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. (formerly Casiotone for the Painfully Alone), $12-15. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net Cold Weather and more. AW 8 p.m.


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

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BLOOMFIELD

ROCK/POP THU 15 31ST STREET STUDIOS. Kaskade. Strip District. 412-228-0231. CLUB CAFE. Rachael Yamagata, My Name Is You. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Mad Doctors, Ghost Guts, The Shit Boys. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Failure w/ Torche. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Tillers w/ JD Wilkes. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 16 BRILLOBOX. Donora, Wreck Loose, Ay Oh. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. Peter Frampton. Acoustic set. Homestead. 412-462-3444. CLUB CAFE. Jason Walker w/ DJ 7up. Early. Fetish Noir w/ The Headway Trio. Late. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOD TIME BAR. Hard Karma. Millvale. 412-821-9968. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MEADOWS CASINO. No Bad Ju Ju. Washington. 724-503-1200.

MOONDOG’S. Doug Deming CATTIVO. HOWLoween Bash. Luxxe Inferior, Horehound, Argus, & Dennis Gruenling & the Mollassus Barge, Flesh Tuexdo, Jeweltones. Blawnox. Gothees, Mud City Manglers, 724-888-6183. Neverweres, Muscle of Love. MR. SMALLS THEATER. For Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Today w/ Fit For A King, Gideon, CLUB CAFE. Tiny Stills, A Silver Phinehas, Silent Planet. Millvale. Lining, Northern Gold, Pete Finelli. 412-821-4447. South Side. 412-431-4950. OAKS THEATER. Rockin Bones DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The James Monster Rock Show. Live Claytor Band. Robinson. music & short horror 412-489-5631. films & trailers along HACKETT SLOVENIAN w/ a costume CLUB. Hard Karma & contest. Oakmont. Gone South. Venetia. 412-828-6322. 724-348-5503. www. per THE R BAR. Angel a p HAMBONE’S. Cheer’ly pghcitym Blue & The Prophets. .co Men. Lawrenceville. Dormont. 412-942-0882. 412-681-4318. RIVERS CASINO. HARVEY WILNER’S. Mimi Antoinette & No Ordinary Soul. Lee. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. North Side. 412-231-7777. HOWLERS. The Park Plan w/ SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Brazilian Wax, Murder for Girls, Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. Dumplings. The Park Plan CD 724-319-7938. Release. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. SiLK9, Leeja KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Stark, NeverWake. South Side. Iglar Band. Ross. 412-366-7468. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Wes Statler, KOLLAR CLUB. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. South Side. 412-431-2002. AM Faces, Greg Kihslon Band. MEADOWS CASINO. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Bon Journey. Washington. 724-503-1200. MOONDOG’S. Dizzy Whoosh & BREAKAWAY BAR AND GRILL. Squeazen the Shaman. Blawnox. Angel Blue & The Prophets. 412-828-2040. New Kensington. 724-212-7468. OAKS THEATER. Beatlemania: The Invasion. Beatles Tribute Concert. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SEVEN SPRINGS. Totally 80s. Champion. 800-452-2223. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Randall Baumann’s Dead Ramble. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VALLEY HOTEL. King’s Ransom. Clairton. 412-233-9800.

FULL LIST ONLINE

Cavacini Garden Center

@CLOTHES_MINDED_PGH

Vast selection of gardening supplies, decorations, and plants, ensure that you’ll find the perfect plant or accent for your yard or garden.

End of Season Sale Now on Shrubs and Trees! Great prices on

PUMPKINS & MUMS Check out our HUGE variety of colors and sizes! Great FALL items in stock! Corn stalks, straw and much more! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

100 51 51st st STREET • LAWRENCEVILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

SAT 17

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HUGH TWYMAN}

THE PARK PLAN

SUN 18 ASSEMBLE. Run Forever, Outer Spaces, Fun Home, Teeth Like Yours. CD release show. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BRILLOBOX. Anthonie Tonnon, Andre Costello, City Steps. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Matthew Ryan w/ Jesse Malin, Don Dilego. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS. Stone Jack Jones, Scott Fry Experience, Idle Bloom. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Timeflies w/ Kalin & Myles. Millvale. 412-821-4447. MR. TOADS. Angel Blue & The Prophets. Greensburg. 724-689-1050. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

Each week, we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s track comes from The Park Plan; stream or download “Good Guy With a Gun” from the EP Junior Achievement, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

REX THEATER. Leftöver Crack. South Side. 412-381-6811.

MON 19 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Stevie Wonder. Uptown. 412-642-1800. HOWLERS. Stone Jack Jones & Idle Bloom. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Cherub w/ Hippie Sabotage, Shooka. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 20 CLUB CAFE. David Wax Museum w/ Arc Iris. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Arms Aloft, Guerilla Poubelle, Playoff Beard. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. X Ambassadors w/ Skylar Grey. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Emancipator Ensemble w/ Wax Tailor & Yppah. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Dear Rouge, Rah Rah, Kaz. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. The String Cheese Incident. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 21 BRILLOBOX. Spirit Caravan, The Dirty Streets, Monolith Wielder. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CATTIVO. Have Mercy w/ Transit, Somos, Microwave. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Pan Astral w/ Emerson Jay, Data Banks.

South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Devil Makes Three w/ The Deslondes. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Patrick Sweany w/ Dan Bubien. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Music of Frank Zappa w/ Ike Willis & Denny Walley. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS FRI 16 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 17 DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Push It!. DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. SPIRIT. DJ Kelly. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

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The 2015

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Finals: Oct. 22

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

These are the songs Steph Flati of The Lopez and Dream Phone can’t stop listening to:

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES MOONDOG’S. Reverend Raven & the Chain Smokin’ Altar Boys. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

Dr. Octagon

“Earth People”

FRI 16

Roulette Waves

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Bill Weiner & Al Taylor, The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-904-3335. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Black Cat Moan. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

“Run” Taylor Swift

SAT 17

“Wildest Dreams”

565 LIVE. Ms. Freddye’s Blues Band. Bellevue. 412-301-8623. DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Mars. 724-553-5212. THE R BAR. Mr. B & the Bad Boyz. Dormont. 412-942-0882. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. The Witchdoctors. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Jimmy Adler Band, Swing City. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1623.

Chastity Belt

“Joke”

SUN 18 BROAD STREET BISTRO. Mark Passaro. North Versailles. 412-829-2911.

TUE 20 BLUSH SPORTS BAR. Shari Richards. Jam session. Downtown. 412-281-7703.

Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. HAMBONE’S. Funky Fly Project. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 20 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange w/ Lina Allemano Four. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

JAZZ THU 15 ANDYS WINE BAR. Trudi Hollar. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 16

WED 21 ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC THU 15

ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Michael Gulezian. Squirrel ANDYS WINE BAR. Hill. 412-422-0710. Clare Ascani. Downtown. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. 412-773-8884. John Wiatrak. Robinson. LEMONT. Mark Pipas. 412-489-5631. Mt. Washington. . w ww per 412-431-3100. a p ty ci h pg NOLA ON THE .com CLADDAGH IRISH SQUARE. Neon Swing PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. X-Perience. Downtown. South Side. 412-381-4800. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CASINO. No Ordinary Soul. North Side. 412-913-3516. HAMBONE’S. Daphne Lee Martin & Francis Lombardi w/ Kayla ANDYS WINE BAR. Dane Vannatter. Schureman. Lawrenceville. 412681-4318. Downtown. 412-773-8884. SUNBURST SCHOOL OF MUSIC. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY Christopher Mark Jones, Annie & AT SAND HILL. RML Jazz. Rod Capps. BurghSong Concert Mt. Pleasant. 412-370-9621. LEMONT. Judi Figel & Dave Crisci. Series 3rd Saturdays. Squirrel Hill. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. 412-436-9240. SYNOD HALL. Pittsburgh Mandolin Orchestra. Features ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Tamara Volskaya & Pittsburgh

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 16

SAT 17

MON 19

Downtown. 412-392-4900. RENAISSANCE CITY WINDS. Works by American composers William Grant Still, Roy Harris, Wallingford Riegger & more, w/ Erberk Eryilmaz, piano. Northmont United Presbyterian Church, North Hills. 412-681-7111.

SUN 18

THU 15

SAT 17 .00

HEAVY ROTATION

WED 21

Balalaika Orchestra. Oakland. 412-952-4300.

WED 21 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. Lawrenceville. 412-408-3248. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG. Michelle Lewis. Greensburg. 724-836-9905.

DOUG HIMES, BOB BLEVINS, STEVE ANISKO. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performance of the music from Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 20 WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Presents “Muscialympics” for their Young Peoples Concerts. GreensburgSalem High School, Greensburg. 724-832-2962.

WED 21 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Danny Elfman’s score to Tim Burton’s film The Nightmare Before Christmas. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC THU 15 KRESGE THEATER, CMU. John Carson. Oakland. 412-279-2970. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Christian Lopez & JD Eicher. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RIVERS CASINO. Bobby V Band. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 16

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

NIED’S HOTEL. The Stillhouse Pickers, Slim Forsythe, New Payday Loners. BarnesFest. Benefiting the Sandra Grace Barnes Fund to Cure Leukemia. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Songwriters in the Cellar. Featuring: David Mayfield, Hannah Aldridge, & Levi Lowrey. Strip District. 412-605-9542. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. Music on the Edge: Musical Fusions Concert I. Ensemble N_JP performing works by Amy Williams & Toshi Hosokawa, traditional pieces for sho & koto. Bellefield Auditorium. Oakland. 412-624-4141.

CLASSICAL

SAT 17

REGGAE FRI 16

FRI 16 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performance of the music from Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 17 THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. The Heart of Darkness: A Choral Call & Response to Injustice. Sixth Presbyterian Church, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5884. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performance of the music from Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring. Heinz Hall,

PARK HOUSE. Lonesome Bob & Friends, The Mavens. BarnesFest. Benefiting the Sandra Grace Barnes Fund to Cure Leukemia. North Side. 412-224-2273. RIVERS CASINO. Nick Fiasco. North Side. 412-231-7777. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. Music on the Edge: Musical Fusions Concert II. Music From China performing recently commissioned works by Chen Yi, Eric Moe, Huang Ruo & Wang Guowei. Bellefield Auditorium. Oakland. 412-624-4141.

TUE 20 KEYNOTE CAFE. Aryk Crowder. Jeannette. 412-638-5263.


THANK YOU TO THE BEST FANS IN BASEBALL #BUCSTHANKYOU

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


BESTOF PITTSBURGH

8 co convenient o nv v en n ien n t lo locations! o ca a tion n s!

2015

Available in both canned & dry, at Burton’s Total Pet! TOTA LP ETSTO ETST R E S.C O M

Having been involved in roughly 10 of City Paper’s Best of Pittsburgh Readers’ Polls over the years, I’ve managed to make a few observations about what readers like. For example, we love the places that have always been there for us, like Eat’n Park. The local chain never misses a Best Of list and quite frankly, it would probably be a little sad if it ever did. But we also love our arts, our sports and our people. And that’s what this year’s guide celebrates. Exploreh’s rg Pittsbu f On our covers were reader choices for Best Male O st e B Athlete and, in a new category, Best Drag Performer. I’m n our o rs e n ap Win tive m willing to go out on a limb and say the two probably interacw.pghcity w w have very little in common, but they are both part of what at m o c r. pape makes this city great: people from diverse backgrounds with differing philosophies and ideas coming together to form a pretty unique community. On the pages that follow, you’ll meet your favorite artists and activists like Jasiri X and Baron Batch. But you’ll also hear from the people behind your favorite restaurants and shops, such as Dora Walmsley and Deirdre Kane, who teamed up to make a neighborhood market in Lawrenceville a reality. While we all have our favorite eateries, bars, bands and hangouts, it’s the people behind those ventures who are truly the best. CHARLIE DEITCH, EDITOR

Culture+Nightlife 04 Goods+Services 14 Food+Drink 24 People+Places 34 ON THE COVERS: Best Male Athlete Andrew McCutchen at PNC Park {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} ____________ Best Drag Performer Sharon Needles, pictured at Best LGBT Bar 5801 Video Lounge & Café {PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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+ CULTURE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Local Visual Artist Baron Batch

4

“I WANTED A PLACE WHERE I COULD BE MYSELF ALL THE TIME.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


NIGHTLIFE BEST LOCAL VISUAL ARTIST

BARON BATCH www.pop-x.com

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

“T

AKE ME TO Another Place,”

reads the hand-painted message on the mantel above Baron Batch’s bed. The words feel not like a plea for escape, but simply a prayer for inspiration: Batch is right where he wants to be. Even sleeping in the unfinished, windowless basement of his A.M. Studios — right alongside the paintings he’s working on, and an opened suitcase full of paint tubes — is a choice this quickly rising young artist embraces. “I wanted a place where I could be myself all the time, where I could have other creative people that did something and where we could work together,” says Batch, 27, about the Homestead building that A.M. Studios has occupied since early 2014. In that time, Batch has gone from novelty — an ex-Steeler who paints! — to star local artist, his vibrant canvases as much in demand as his quietly friendly presence at community events and charity functions. Batch, a star collegiate running back, rediscovered his childhood love of art while recuperating from the torn ACL that had ended his rookie season in Steelers training camp, in 2011. After the team cut him, in 2013, the West Texas native happily began painting full time,

and became convinced he could make art and entrepreneurship his life’s work. “What blew it up was my street art,” says Batch — small, unsigned canvases depicting pop-culture icons, playful animals and such that he set out in public, unannounced, for anyone to take. Later, he began announcing new pieces on Twitter. The practice really raised his profile. Batch has painted live at a Pittsburgh International Airport event, and he’s a favorite at fundraisers for groups like POWER, which aids women in recovery. He’s also done three live-painting programs for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, at events variously designed to appeal to young professionals and young children. “It is really great to work with an artist who is so genuine and so passionate about pushing the arts in Pittsburgh,” says the PSO’s Gloria Mou. Batch’s heavily textured oil paintings are influenced, he says, by artists ranging from Dr. Seuss and Andy Warhol to Van Gogh and Banksy. He’s self-taught, and calls his style “Pop-X” — a blend of pop art and expressionism. The work is typically joyful. Of one new painting, depicting a huge elephant’s head on a field of blue, Batch says he told one collector, “It’s gonna look like you looked at the earth and it hugged you.” When not painting, Batch oversees A.M.’s other enterprises. Its staff of five, for instance, includes chefs Steve Morehouse and Jamilka Borges: The storefront studio doubles as a dining space that hosts gourmet brunches Saturdays and Sundays, and also ticketed dinner series. Whether in business or art, Batch says, he’s committed to keeping busy. Referring to his sleeping/painting space, he says, “It takes having a bed and your work. I’m still trying to make it. I always will be.”

AN EX-STEELER WHO PAINTS!

DRI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

Best Local Music Venue Stage AE

BEST GALLERY FOR LOCAL ARTISTS

MOST WANTED FINE ART 5015 Penn Ave., Garfield www.most-wantedfineart.com • • • • • • • •

Jason and Nina Sauer’s independent gallery helps anchor the Penn Avenue arts corridor with its DIY vibe and bustling but mellow atmosphere. This “community-service organization disguised as an art gallery” tackles everything from trans-racial adoption and creepy doll art to Jason Sauer’s enthusiasm for demolition derby. _________ 2nd: SPACE, Downtown 3rd: Revision Space, Lawrenceville

BEST LOCAL THEATER COMPANY

CITY THEATRE 1300 Bingham St., South Side www.citytheatrecompany.org • • • • • • • •

In its converted historic church, City

focuses exclusively on new plays by established and up-and-coming playwrights like Daniel Beaty, Jessica Dickey and John Patrick Shanley. The company consistently presents polished productions — including the occasional world premiere — and its actors and directors include both local and visiting talent. _________ 2nd: Bricolage Productions, Downtown 3rd: Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown

BEST DANCE COMPANY

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE 2900 Liberty Ave., Strip District 412-281-0360 • • • • • • • •

Founded in 1969, this acclaimed company features nearly 30 dancers from around the U.S. and beyond. Known for its mainstay Nutcracker at the Benedum each December, the company has recently begun upping its game and raising its profile nationally. Its new season begins this month with a mixed-repertory show CONTINUES ON PG. 06

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE featuring works by Balanchine, Jiří Kylián and William Forsythe. _________

touring ’tellers and consistently sells out the Byham. _________

2nd: Attack Theatre 3rd: Texture

2nd: Free Monster Poems About Monsters, Garfield 3rd: Carnegie Library

Contemporary Ballet

Summer Reading Kickoff

BEST LOCAL STAGE PRODUCTION

MOROSE & MACABRE’S ATROCITY EXHIBITION

www.moroseandmacabre.com • • • • • • • •

Not your average stage production, this “360 degree living art installation” is for those with a taste for vintage spookiness. The event, which has happened every spring since 2009, features a cabaret of fetish, sideshow and other unusual acts (think: burlesque, “pain-proof” performers, etc.) from around the country, as well as artisans offering a range of darkly themed wares. _________ 2nd: My Fair Lady, Pitsburgh Public Theater 3rd: Saints Tour, Bricolage Production Company and Real/Time Interventions

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

BILL CRAWFORD www.billcrawfordlive.com • • • • • • • •

Bill Crawford has been lighting up the airwaves at WDVE since 2012, where he still hosts the morning show with Randy Baumann. Starting out doing standup at the Pittsburgh Improv, Crawford has joked his way onto TBS and toured clubs across the country. Family life as a father of two young girls propels his act with a healthy dose of sarcasm. _________ 2nd: Jim Krenn 3rd: T-ROBE

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LOCAL PODCAST

BEST LOCAL VISUAL ARTIST

BARON BATCH

BEST LOCAL COMEDIAN OR COMEDY TROUPE

SEE N STORY O PG. 04

WEREWOLF AMBULANCE

Reason: It’s funny as hell.

www.pop-x.com • • • • • • • •

Tickets at www.jergels.com

UPCOMING SHOWS: BIG 104.7 Presents Chase Bryant - Oct 28

The Clarks' Nov 6

Sonny Landreth Nov 18

Robert Randolph & the Family Band - Nov 19

Michael Stanley Nov 21

Blood, Sweat & Tears Dec 1

Marshall Tucker Dec 3

Donnie Iris & the Cruisers - Dec 5

Bret Michaels Dec 16

“When people look at my art, I want them to see me,” writes Batch on his website. And Pittsburgh is quickly forgetting Batch’s past as a Pittsburgh Steeler and recognizing him for his vibrantly colored paintings (elephants are a favorite subject), which are increasingly visible around town at exhibits and live-painting events. _________ 2nd: Vanessa German 3rd: Terry Boyd

BEST LITERARY EVENT

THE MOTH www.themoth.org • • • • • • • •

The local incarnation of the popular public-radio storytelling program includes the monthly local StorySlam, at the Rex Theater, and the big annual GrandSlam, at the Byham Theater. But the highest-profile event is the annual Moth Mainstage, which offers celebrity hosts and nationally

BEST LOCAL MUSIC VENUE

STAGE AE

400 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com • • • • • • • •

Stage AE is, quite literally, a venue for all seasons. In the warmer months, big tours, like Death Cab for Cutie and Mac Miller, take to the outdoor stage, but there are plenty of indoor shows of all sizes throughout the year. And, it’s a venue conveniently located in the heart of town. _________ 2nd: Altar Bar, Strip District 3rd: Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale

BEST POP/ROCK BAND

BASTARD BEARDED IRISHMEN www.bastardbeardedirishmen.com • • • • • • • •

This band has been a hit with Pittsburghers since bursting onto the CONTINUES ON PG. 09

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST HAUNTED ATTRACTION

SCAREHOUSE

118 Locust St., Etna 412-781-5885 or www.scarehouse.com {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

I

T’S 6:30 P.M. on opening day and a man in full, bloody makeup, with a listless chainsaw at his side, struggles with the ScareHouse Banner in the parking lot of the Pittsburgh Zoo. A short queue has already begun to form. A staff member in a day-glo orange construction vest separates us according to our pre-purchased entry time and whether we have tickets to “The Basement,” a more fully immersive haunt, sold separately from entry to the main manor. A couple who drove from Indiana, clad mostly in black leather and big boots, smirks at each other and steps into the line reserved for the basement crowd. They seem braver than most. Soon we’ll board the school bus that acts as a shuttle to Etna, where ScareHouse, voted Best Haunted Attraction by City Paper readers, looms. The main haunt is broken into three distinctive theaters: “The Summoning,”

“Krampus: Come All Ye Fearful” and “Trick ’r Treat: Hallowed Grounds.” Each adheres to a visual and psychological theme of horror, but the transitions between them are seamless. A large foyer with a waiting ticket-taker in full costume serves as the entrance to The Summoning. Off to the side, an expressionless dancer moves her body, sinuously accompanied by a mustachioed accordion player with a manic look in his eye. Plunging into this beautifully curated world, where four of the senses are fully engaged (touching is not allowed upstairs), the realization dawns that you’ll be living this for the next 30 to 40 minutes. This is only the beginning of the journey your small group will take. Traveling through the spaces, I hit ob-

stacle after obstacle, never getting a chance to fully adjust, or fully get used to the amount of screaming I was doing. The sets, costuming and makeup are worthy of any professional Hollywood movie. It was so good, in fact, that I once complimented an actor instead of screaming when he rounded a corner. During another scene, what felt like real snow drifted into my hair from the ceiling. It’s no surprise that the haunt has earned praise from director and writer Guillermo Del Toro, himself the master of creepy scenescapes and characters. For more scary fun, sign up for the ground I dared not tread, The Basement. For an additional fee, thrillseekers over the age of 18 can produce photo ID, sign a waiver and walk two by two into their own nightmares. Participants are told they may not touch the actors but should expect to be touched, restrained and blindfolded. After a trip there last year, actor Elijah Wood was quoted gleefully telling late-night TV host Seth Myers that he was made to “confess my sins” and that it “gets oddly, uncomfortably sexual.” Enter at your own risk, Halloween crazies. I’ll be on the couch.

WHAT FELT LIKE REAL SNOW DRIFTED INTO MY HAIR.

C E L INE @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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HOW CAN YOU HELP?

November 20-23, 2015 The Shops at Station Square Pittsburgh, PA 501Auctions.com/TAB

• Donate a patriotic ornament for our chapter tree or a small amount of cash. • Donate a decorated holiday tree, wreath, or table top display in a theme for the auction. • Donate a gift card or gift certificate. • Volunteer. • Come and enjoy the beautiful display. For volunteer information or to donate an item please contact Kara at 724-741-6160 or kara@wpcnhf.org.

“All proceeds stay local to benefit the members of The W PA Chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation.”

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST LOCAL HIP-HOP PERFORMER TO BE THE NEXT MAC MILLER

JASIRI X www.jasirix.com

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

W

HEN JASIRI X started rapping, he

was told that nobody wants to hear music with a message. So when his track “Free the Jena 6” — about six black Louisiana high-schoolers charged with the beating of a white student — started getting national play, he was a

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

little surprised. “I’d been told so much that people didn’t want to hear it,” he recalls. “It was like, ‘Oh, y’all lied to me.’” As a young teen, the rapper, born Jasiri Oronde Smith, moved from Chicago to Monroeville. His childhood dream was to become a lawyer — a goal that he now


seems to find somewhat amusing, but one that points to a life-long interest in social justice. “I grew up in a household where [my mother] stressed the love of being black,” he says. He started making music when his best friend, an aspiring DJ, received turntables as a Christmas gift. His first attempts were terrible. “But I just kept writing, and the people around me encouraged me instead of dissing me,” Jasiri says. “So, eventually I got better.” These days, Jasiri — who cites Nas, Wu Tang Clan and Lauryn Hill as major influences — is known for his political activism as much as for his music. (He also ranked in the top three in CP’s Best Activist category.) His political consciousness — which he’s been expressing in his music since the mid-2000s — would seem to place him opposite of artists singing about their party exploits. But Jasiri says that in the wake of Ferguson, the tide is turning away from pure party music, and politically conscious artists like Kendrick Lamar are coming to the foreground.

“I THINK THE MOVEMENT HAS CAUGHT UP WITH THE KIND OF MUSIC I WAS MAKING.” “I feel like rappers are really coming out and talking about what’s happening right now,” Jasiri says. After the killing of Michael Brown, for example, people started tweeting, “Do We Need to Start a Riot?” a song Jasiri had released a couple years earlier. “I think the movement has caught up with the kind of music I was making,” he says. Jasiri is a founding member of anti-violence group 1Hood Media, which works to unite neighborhoods while challenging police brutality and other systemic injustices. This year, in particular, has been a successful one: Jasiri received the competitive Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artists and Activist Fellowship, and a fellowship from BMe, an organization which focuses on black men as community assets. All of that will help to support 1Hood Media’s programs, including a media academy, which offers education and resources to young artists. One of Jasiri’s workshops, not surprisingly, is entitled, “How to Succeed in Hip Hop Without Selling Your Soul.” “[Hip hop] requires a real heavy grind. You have to market yourself,” says Jasiri, who will release his new record, Black Liberation Theology, this fall. “But I feel like if you do it in a way where you can be honest and true to yourself … you can be successful.” M WE LS H@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

BEST OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE city’s music scene in 2008. A regular on our Best Of Pittsburgh list, the band has opened for national acts like the Dropkick Murphys and even gained a sponsorship from Jameson Irish Whiskey. _________ 2nd: The SpacePimps 3rd: Nevada Color

The Elephant Wrestler Indian Ink Theatre Company

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST MUSIC FESTIVAL

PITTONKATONK Reason: Did you go? It was amazing!

BEST METAL BAND

DETHLEHEM www.dethlehem.com • • • • • • • •

Who would have thought that a band that claims to have battled dragons would find its greatest victory on the pages of City Paper, where it’s captured its fourth award (third in a row) for top metal band. Add to that a new album, Destroyers of the Realm, this past January and it’s been a pretty good year. _________

“This is a piece of absolute enchantment... Jacob Rajan is extraordinary... We were in the palm of his hand for every second of one of the tenderest, most life-affirming shows...” – The Scotsman, Edinburgh

2nd: Greywalker 3rd: Fist Fight in

the Parking Lot

BEST JAZZ/BLUES BAND OR PERFORMER

JILL WEST & BLUES ATTACK www.jillwestandbluesattack.com • • • • • • • •

The Blues Attack consists of blues-scene stalwarts Gregg Krupa (guitar), Sudden Steve Binsberger (keys), Nick Crano (drums) and Hank Raffetto (bass). But this longtime area favorite, seen at gigs from local bars to the Gateway Clipper, is best known for the booming voice of Jill West, who delivers on both original material and classics like “Damn Your Eyes” and “Big Boss Man.” _________ 2nd: Billy Price Band 3rd: Phat Man Dee

October 30 & 31

Part of

8 pm | Byham Theater TRUSTARTS.ORG/INDIA • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 This engagement of Indian Ink Theatre Company is funded through the Mid Atlantic Tours program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE BEST ALT-FOLK/ ALT-COUNTRY BAND

THE ARMADILLOS • • • • • • • •

With songs about working-class struggles, whiskey and dysfunctional relationships, this folk band hailing from Butler seems to hit all the right chords with Pittsburghers. With its latest album, Nevertheless, The Armadillos continue to win this category, and keep us dancing along to the rhythm of a stand-up bass and the twang of a mandolin. _________ 2nd: The Hills and the Rivers 3rd: Christian Beck Band

BEST LOCAL SEE HIP-HOP Y ON PERFORMER STOPGR. 08 TO BE THE NEXT MAC MILLER

JASIRI X • • • • • • • •

It’s been a busy year for Jasiri X. Known as much for his activism as his politically conscious rhymes, the rapper works with local youth through 1Hood Media and travels to rallies and speaking engagements around the country. Earlier this year, he was awarded a prestigious fellowship from NYC-based Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, to help support his many projects. _________ 2nd: Beedie 3rd: Sikes

BEST SPORTS BAR

JEROME BETTIS’ GRILLE 36 393 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-224-6287 or www.jeromebettisgrille36.com • • • • • • • •

Why is this spot, located next to Heinz Field, the city’s Best Sports Bar? Sure, it’s got great food and big-screen TVs, along with 36 beers on tap, 36 different bottles of wine and 36 different martinis. But there’s also its namesake, Jerome Bettis, No. 36 himself, who is known to pop in and hang out from time to time. _________ 2nd: Bigham Tavern, Mount Washington 3rd: McFadden’s, North Side

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


JACK OF ALL TRADES,

MASTER OF NONE?

At Venture Outdoors, we want to help get you outside no matter what level of mastery you find yourself. This fall and winter we’re offering beginner friendly outings: food / drink tasting, hiking, biking, snowshoeing, cross country skiing and much more. Sign up for one of our programs at ventureoutdoors.org! EMAIL: INFO@VENTUREOUTDOORS.ORG PHONE: 412-255-0564

TWITTER + INSTAGRAM: @VENTUREOUTDOORS FACEBOOK.COM/VENTUREOUTDOORS

“One OF America’s BESt HAuNTED HOUsES!” Travel Channel, USA Today, Elijah Wood

{PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON}

Best Jazz/Blues Band or Performer Jill West

BEST NEW BAR

THE FLATS ON CARSON 1500 E. Carson St., South Side 412-586-7644

Beer pretzel dip, and a number of salads, tacos and flatbreads. _________ 2nd: Spirit, Lawrenceville 3rd: Howl at the Moon, Downtown

• • • • • • • •

The Flats on Carson just turned a year old, and judging by revelers’ Instagram pics, its birthday party looked like a blast. The multi-level bar here boasts more than 50 beers — a selection of them rotating drafts — 25 whiskeys, and seasonal craft cocktails. The menu offers appetizers, including Sam Adams Cheesy

BEST LGBT BAR

5801 VIDEO LOUNGE & CAFÉ 5801 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-661-5600 • • • • • • • •

Looking for a gay-friendly spot that

NO LONG LINES WHEN YOU BUY ONLINE! SCAREHOUSE.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE doubles as a sports bar and plays music videos? 5801, in the heart of Shadyside, has what you’re after. It’s a destination for LGBTQ nightlife on two levels, plus an outdoor patio in the summer. Weekly events include team trivia night on Tuesdays. _________

extensive food menu, party packages and high-profile dancers. _________

2nd: Blue Moon, Lawrenceville 3rd: Cattivo, Lawrenceville

1916 Smallman St., Strip District www.cavopgh.com

BEST COCKTAIL LIST

Cavo calls its look “bordello chic,” and indeed, its vast, exposed-brickand-concrete interior incorporates back rooms and cozy nooks, and feels both intimately spacious and welcomingly sophisticated. With its menu of modern American cuisine, it’s a favorite for events from DJ nights to private parties. _________

2nd: Blush, Downtown 3rd: Club Erotica, McKees Rocks

BEST CLUB

CAVO • • • • • • • •

Apply by Oct 30th  newsunrising.org

Build Your Social Enterprise j or Community Project Fundin of Business Planning g 000 , 0 1 Strateg $ t r o p y Sup  Gr of ow Y onths m o 2 u 1 r Netw idance u G t r o e rk   Exp

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN



4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com • • • • • • • •

If the atmosphere of this old bankbuilding-turned-bar isn’t enough to make you feel as though you traveled back in time, the evocative names on the seasonal cocktail list — say, the Van Buren — might. But don’t expect stuffy: When it comes to booze, Tender mixes classic and cutting-edge. _________ 2nd: Butcher and the Rye, Downtown 3rd: Acacia, South Side

BEST BARTENDER

RICHIE WALTER (CAVO) 1916 Smallman St., Strip District www.cavopgh.com

2nd: Diesel, South Side 3rd: Cruze Bar, Strip District

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST RESIDENT

RON SCHILLER, PLEASANT HILLS

Reason: He is a good husband.

• • • • • • • •

He’s fast and he remembers patrons’ favorite drinks. But Walter’s many fans typically rate him most highly for his ready smile and charming personality — a reminder that even for a repeat Readers’ Poll winner with more than a decade of experience, customer service isn’t limited to efficiency. _________ 2nd: Mark Seneca (The Flats on Carson, South Side) 3rd: Wes Shonk (Wigle Whiskey, Strip District and North Side)

BEST STRIP CLUB

CHEERLEADERS GENTLEMEN’S CLUB 3100 Liberty Ave., Strip District 412-281-3110 or www.cheerleaderspittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

Is your football-watching routine feeling a little stale? You might try moving the party to Cheerleaders. The upscale gentleman’s club is a hybrid sports bar/strip joint, offering a comfortable low-key atmosphere, as well as daily drink specials, an

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

BEST BAR TO PREGAME

BLUE LINE GRILLE 1014 Fifth Ave., Uptown 412-281-2583 or www.bluelinegrille.com • • • • • • • •

Given its immediate proximity to Penguins games, hockey fans are sure to take advantage of Blue Line’s Monday through Friday happy hour, when a selection of spirits, beers and wines are under $5. To really cool down, try the bar’s shock-a-vodka system, which chills shots to 5 degrees Fahrenheit. _________ 2nd: McFadden’s, North Side 3rd: Rivertowne, North Side

BEST DIVE BAR

JACK’S BAR 1117 E. Carson St., South Side 412-431-3644 or www.jacksbarpittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

Aglow in neon at the end of the East Carson bar strip, Jack’s keeps a low profile and a smoke-filled interior. Its barely-there website crows that


{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Mark Trunzo, Mark Seneca and David Turnzo at Best New Bar The Flats on Carson

the bar is “a party on a budget 365 days a year.” With bottom-floor drinks prices and tons of local color, this is a hideaway from the frattier parts of the South Side. _________

hear lots of Fall Out Boy, New Found Glory, Blink 182 and Paramore. _________

2nd: Gooski’s, Polish Hill 3rd: Dee’s Cafe, South Side

w/ DJ Nugget @ The Flats on Carson, South Side

2nd: Pandemic at Brillobox, Bloomfield 3rd: Saturday Nights

BEST TRIVIA NIGHT

BRILLOBOX

4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net • • • • • • • •

Head to pub-quiz night at Brillo to get sucked into the world of MC extraordinaire Dave Mansueto. Running on what seems like pure nervous energy and quick wit, Mansueto mans clever cuts of pop music while interjecting questions. Over several rounds, teams compete to win food and gift certificates. _________

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

POP PUNK NIGHT AT THE SMILING MOOSE 1306 E. Carson St., South Side 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com • • • • • • • •

Run by DJ Adam Rahuba — of the PittPunk website and production company — Pop Punk Night is the last Saturday night of each month. Rahuba showcases the “poppier side of punk.” So while you might hear a few Ramones classics, you’re sure to

Soldiers & Sailors

Memorial Hall & Museum Trust, Inc

BEST LOCAL PROFESSIONAL WRESTLER

GANON JONES JR. Reason: He’s an All Star. BEST HAUNTED ATTRACTION

2nd: Franktuary, Lawrenceville 3rd: Hambone’s, Lawrenceville

BEST MONTHLY/ WEEKLY DJ NIGHT

Presented by

SCAREHOUSE SEE N STORY O PG. 07

118 Locust St., Etna 412-781-5885 or www.scarehouse.com • • • • • • • •

Last year, a delighted Elijah Wood, on Late Night With Seth Myers, said that he had to “confess his sins” on a visit to ScareHouse. Located in an old bank, the house has multiple terrifying experiences. Three new haunts launch this year, one from the mind of Pittsburgh art director Macabre Noir. _________ 2nd: Kennywood Phantom Fright Nights, West Mifflin 3rd: Hundred Acres Manor, Bethel Park

with the

Jam!

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14 4 8 :3 3 0PM M — A U DIT T ORIU UM

Party with us in our historic Concert Hall with a variety of rock ‘n’ roll performed by the B-MEN, some familiar faces and special performance by JOE GRUSHECKY!

For information visit www.soldiersandsailorshall.org Proceeds benefit Soldiers & Sailors.

— Honor Them with Your Presence — 4141 5TH AVE., PITTSBURGH, PA 15213 ★ 412-621-4253 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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+ GOODS

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

52nd Street Market co-owners Dora Walmsley (left) and Deirdre Kane

14

“WE ALWAYS PICK THE LOWEST END OF THE PRICE RANGE.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


SERVICES BEST NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET

52 ND STREET MARKET 601 52nd St., Lawrenceville 412-408-3798 or www.52ndstreetmarket.com {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

T

UCKED INTO A corner building on the steep street that it’s named for, the 52nd Street Market looks sunny and inviting. Dora Walmsley and Deirdre Kane, coowners of the grocery, named the Best Neighborhood Market by City Paper readers, are still glowing from the joint oneyear anniversary party it held with neighbor, Butcher on Butler. While it’s been a year-and-a-half since they opened, the two women have been so busy that the celebration got pushed back. “It’s been a roller coaster,” says Kane, adding that neither ever set out to be a small-business owner. The market is a labor of love, built on the strong commitment both women have to fulfilling the needs they see in the 10th Ward. Seemingly fated, they met wrist-deep in the dirt, working on Lawrenceville’s community gardens. It was a natural pairing, and they began to collaborate on gardening projects. After attending a community meeting with the Lawrenceville Corporation and Lawrenceville United, they sought help from Chatham’s Center for Women’s

Entrepreneurship to get the grocery out of their heads and into reality. From empty space to community shop, the market has grown into a neighborly stomping ground. People drift in, grabbing a coffee, a sandwich or that night’s dinner ingredients. Sometimes they just come to say hello. The store has bulletin boards for event postings, a free seed library, and a tiny nook with tables for newspaper browsing. With everything from plain white bread to locally made, gluten-free and soy-free granola, the offerings are incredibly diverse. The market tries to do as much localand small-business sourcing as possible. While most small businesses have higher prices, necessary to stay afloat amongst larger corporations, the market endeavors to keep its prices reasonable. “We always pick the lowest end of the price range,” says Kane. Cash, credit and SNAP cards are all accepted; the market hopes to offer discounts for low-income customers, like students and seniors, in the future. The future is looking bright and just as busy for Walmsley and Kane. They’ve recently hired a staff member to focus on event planning. One of her first acts was to host a nutritionist who had a day of drop-in sessions with market-goers. Product expansion is also a goal. Bridgeway Capital recently gave them a grant to buy a new freezer, so they’ll be able to offer more prepared foods. House-made frozen pizzas are first on the list. Lastly, a grocery-delivery program is in its test stages, targeting seniors who live in the surrounding high-rises. When asked how they keep up with themselves, Walmsley simply smiles and says, “It’s easy to bring people together over good food.” She’s already off to help the next customer.

“IT’S BEEN A ROLLER COASTER.”

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Allison Stetz and Hippo at Best Local Pet Store Petagogy

BEST LOCAL BOOKSTORE

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY MUSIC

4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield 412-224-2847 or www.eastendbookexchange.com

1210 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-8800 or www.davesmusicmine.com

EAST END BOOK EXCHANGE • • • • • • • •

Nothing makes a neighborhood feel more welcoming than a cozy bookshop. East End Book Exchange offers quality used and rare books; perhaps trade in your old books for store credit? But it’s not all just commerce: East End also hosts a variety of literary events such as book-release parties, poetry readings and author visits. _________ 2nd: Amazing Books, Downtown and Squirrel Hill 3rd: Caliban Books, Oakland

DAVE’S MUSIC MINE • • • • • • • •

This perennial CP readers’ favorite has aisles and stacks of vinyl, CDs, VHS, cassettes and books that one can easily get lost in. New, used, buy, sell, trade. There are even concert tickets for local venues — including Club Café, The Rex Theater and Mr. Small’s — for sale at the counter. _________ 2nd: Jerry’s Records, Squirrel Hill 3rd: The Exchange, multiple locations

CELI N E @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M CONTINUES ON PG. 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF GOODS+SERVICES Fall in love this! season

PITTSBURGH GUITARS

1305 E. Carson St., South Side 412-431-0700 or www.pittsburghguitars.com • • • • • • • •

© Linda Mitzel

3623 Butler St. Lawrenceville Pittsburgh, PA 15201 (412) 918-1864 www.espressoamano.com

“alternaƟve theater for grown-ups”

Tunnel Vision a new play Oct. 16 – 31, 2015

www.insideoffthewall.com

Brooktree Health Services A Holistic Approach to Drug & Alcohol Treatment Specific treatment programs offered by Brooktree Health Services include: • Partial Hospitalization Program • Intensive Outpatient • Outpatient Services • Greater Pennsylvania Sober Living Conveniently located in Wexford

Brooktree Health Services 6500 Brooktree Road Wexford, PA 15090 724-935-0460

Recovery is a journey, not a destination. 16

BEST LOCAL SHOE STORE

BEST PLACE TO BUY MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

The walls of this venerable storefront are hung four rows high with new, used and vintage Fenders, Gretsches, Martins and more, and lined with amps and effects pedals. But customers come back largely for the attentive and knowledgeable staff, your guides to not only great gear but also service, repairs and lessons. _________

LITTLES SHOES

5850 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-521-3530 or www.littlesshoes.com • • • • • • • •

Despite online shopping, there are certain things that are best done in person, and while being assisted by knowledgeable professionals. That’s the kind of service you get at Littles. It sells the latest styles for customers of all ages, but in an atmosphere reminiscent of where you got your first pair of school shoes. _________ 2nd: Pavement, Lawrenceville 3rd: Gordon Shoes, Waterfront, Homestead

2nd: N Stuff Music, Blawnox 3rd: Backstage Guitars, Lawrenceville

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY FURNITURE

LEVIN FURNITURE

Multiple locations 800-262-5200 or www.levinfurniture.com • • • • • • • •

This home-furnishings store was founded nearly 100 years ago in tiny Mount Pleasant. It has since expanded into both Pittsburgh and Cleveland but is still run by the Levin family. Your convenient one-stop for beds, couches, tables, desks, TV stands and the all-important “accents.” _________ 2nd: Perlora, South Side and Strip District 3rd: IKEA, Robinson Township

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST BIRD FEEDER

MR. K,

THE MANAGER OF CARMIKE SOUTHLAND 9 IN THE SOUTHLAND SHOPPING PLAZA

Reason: He feeds our old or unusable popcorn to the birds outside and it’s nice. BEST BOWLING ALLEY

ARSENAL LANES

212 44th St., Lawrenceville 412-683-5992 or www.arsenalbowl.com • • • • • • • •

BEST PLACE TO BUY VINTAGE CLOTHING

EONS FASHION ANTIQUE 5850 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-361-3368 • • • • • • • •

Eons has been a go-to for avid vintage-shoppers for years. Walking into the shop is like being caught up in a whirlwind of decades, but the clothing is carefully organized into men’s and women’s, then labeled by year and style. From art deco to mod, hippie to haute couture, treasures abound. _________ 2nd: Clothes Minded, Bloomfield 3rd: Avalon Exchange, Squirrel Hill

The sign hanging outside reads: “Where old-school bowling vibe meets nightclub atmosphere,” as heralded by The New York Times. To wit: karaoke and bowling, ’80s night and bowling, bingo and bowling. Plus a funky second-floor layout and a built-in bar. _________ 2nd: Hollywood Lanes, Dormont 3rd: Forward Lanes, Squirrel Hill

BEST LOCAL JEWELRY STORE

HENNE JEWELERS 5501 Walnut St., Shadyside 412-682-0226 or www.hennejewelers.com • • • • • • • •

Housed in a luxurious space, Henne has been offering opulent jewelry to Pittsburghers for more than 120 years. Like most high-end jewelers, Henne has a wide selection of engagement CONTINUES ON PG. 18


{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Co-owner Michael Shurina (left) styles a customer.

BEST BARBER SHOP

MISTER GROOMING AND GOODS 4504 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-326-5964 or www.mistergroomingandgoods.com {BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

S

TEAMING HOT TOWELS wrap Jeremy

Jacobs’ face as he reclines in a barber’s chair. His nose and mouth are exposed just enough to breathe, and to mumble that he’s feeling pretty relaxed. Under the towels is a sizable beard. “I’ve had it since senior year of high school,” Jacobs says. “It hasn’t always been this big. I’ve shaved it all once since then, and it was a disaster. I looked like Patrick from SpongeBob.” Jacobs is at Mister Grooming and Goods, in Lawrenceville, for his monthly “Beard Line-up,” a shave and shaping of the beard, and one of the shop’s main services. “Beards are so big right now, and there’s so much that goes into taking care of a beard,” says Heather Shurina, who owns and manages the shop with her husband, Michael. “There’s actually a beard competition

taking place at the end of October,” she says, referring to the Steel City Beard & Mustache Club’s annual contest; the club advises the salon on facial-hair products. But while Mister Grooming and Goods regularly caters to men with facial hair — stocking its shelves with beard oils and balms bearing phrases like “Can you handlebar?” — the array of man-pampering options is varied. There’s the “Man Hands” manicure; the “Sweeney Todd” hot lather and straight-razor shave; the “Hangover Cure,” complete with a peppermint-towel treatment; and the “Uncle Jesse” cut for medium-to-long-haired guys. Vintage-inspired chandeliers light the walls — some papered in yellow-and-gray damask, others solid red — and four chairs line each side. A mix of tchotchkes, taxidermy and religious iconography make a fun décor.

“We kept adding chairs in hopes that we could take walk-ins, but we kept booking up,” Shurina says. Customers mill in and out. Vivian Qiu, of Oakland, sits in the station next to Jacobs for her first haircut at Mister. Though the shop’s focus is men, some services for women are offered. Qiu was having the several inches from the nape of her neck on up shaved — an undercut. Think David Beckham or even A.J. Burnett. The New York Times even published a piece on the cut’s popularity just last month. “It gives you options to get different looks with your hair up or down,” says Qiu, whose hair is long on top. Six of the nine employees at Mister sport undercuts. Co-owner Michael Shurina, who wears an undercut with a pompadour, says his mission is not only to give a good haircut, but also to make sure people look good the next morning. “The important thing is to make sure they can do the same thing at home as we do here when they’re styling their hair, especially if they’re wearing a pompadour. All barbers here spend a lot of time training,” he says. And worker morale seems high. “This is the best job I’ve ever had,” says barber Ali Lorenzini. “I basically work with my best friends and cute guys all day.”

FAURÉ

String Trio St

Franktuary 3810 Butler St.

Wednesday, November 11 5:00 PM

Food and cocktails available for purchase, designed specially for the event by the folks at Franktuary! More Information: 412-624-4129 www.chambermusicpittsburgh.org No ticket required! (donations gratefully accepted)

AMU R R AY@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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Don’t let your piano Fall out of tune!

BEST OF GOODS+SERVICES rings, but also has an extensive collection of vintage bracelets and necklaces, and upon request, will help you design your own original piece. _________ 2nd: Orr’s Jewelers, Squirrel Hill and Sewickley 3rd: Goldstock Jewelers, Downtown

YOUR FAVORITE SPOT FOR LIVE COMEDY THESE SHOWS + LOTS MORE HAPPENING EVERY MONTH

BEST HAIR SALON

SALON IVY

DINNER WITH THE NOLENS five-star longform improv

1213 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-4488 or www.salonivy.net

FRANKLY SCARLETT

girl-powered shortform improv

• • • • • • • •

KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE

Whether you’re looking for a cut-and-color, eyebrow waxing, spray tan or makeup application for a special occasion, this salon is a tried-and-true choice for our readers. The staff of eight quality-trained stylists is equipped to handle hair of all ethnicities. And regulars rave about Ivy’s affordable prices. _________

live D&D comedy adventure 811 LIBERTY AVE. DOWNTOWN SHOWS EVERY FRI-SAT-SUN TICKETS $5-10, BYOB! ARCADECOMEDYTHEATER.COM

The Piano Hawk PIANO TUNING & REPAIR Emily Hawkins 412-407-4266

2nd: Studio Raw, Ross Township 3rd: Jeffrey Smith Salon, Highland Park

THICK BIKES

62 S. 15th St., South Side 412-390-3590 or www.thickbikes.com • • • • • • • •

Shopping here feels like stumbling around the basement of a wellorganized bike geek. In fact, the recently renovated store offers a wide selection of used bikes for sale in its basement, in addition to new bikes and all the latest gear upstairs. And if you can’t find that USB-charging, blinking LED light you crave, they will order it for you. _________ 2nd: Iron City Bikes, Lawrenceville 3rd: West Liberty Bikes, Brookline

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST SUBURB TO LIVE IN

GLENSHAW

BEST BARBER SHOP

MISTER GROOMING AND GOODS

BEST BICYCLE SHOP

SEE N STORY O PG. 17

4504 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-326-5964 or www.mistergroomingandgoods.com

Reason: It’s safe, friendly, has a great library, a nice park with a pool and reasonably priced homes that are not all the same.

• • • • • • • •

We’ve got you covered! -Gynecological Care -Birth Control -Pregnancy Testing -STD & HIV Testing -Emergency Contraception -Cancer Screenings $IIRUGDEOH&RQğGHQWLDO &RQYHQLHQW

933 Liberty Avenue 1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

Get a hot lather and straightrazor shave at this barber shop in Lawrenceville. The place is decked out in antiques, taxidermy and vintage furnishings, and cool tunes play on the speakers. Guests are asked to get comfy with an espresso or beer before reclining in the barber’s chair for some “man pampering.” _________ 2nd: Graham’s Barber Shop, Lawrenceville 3rd: Alder Street Barber, Shadyside

BEST DAY SPA

SEWICKLEY SPA 337 Beaver St., Sewickley 412-741-4240 or www.sewickleyspa.com

BEST VAPE SHOP

STEEL CITY VAPORS 4136 Library Road, Mount Lebanon and 4023 William Penn Hwy., Monroeville steelcityvapors.com • • • • • • • •

This electronic-cigarette shop is more than just a vape convenience store. Steel City’s knowledgeable staff helps patrons find the right vapor flavor and strength. Visit the store and try out some of the more than 80 flavors it carries. And a lot of its products, including e-liquids, are made right here in the U.S.A. _________ 2nd: Villain Vape Shop, Cheswick 3rd: Head of the Glass, Oakland

• • • • • • • •

When you’re in the mood to “Treat Yo Self,” head to this repeat reader favorite. From massages and facials to seaweed wraps and waxing, Sewickley Spa — which is welcomingly located in a renovated 19th-century house — offers more than 40 treatments to help you feel refreshed and fabulous. _________ 2nd: ESSpa Kozmetika, Aspinwall 3rd: Metamorphosis, Lawrenceville

BEST TATTOO SHOP

ARTISAN TATTOO GALLERY 5001 Penn Ave., Garfield 412-661-0503 or www.artisanpittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

Jason Angst — who opened Artistan in 2011 with his wife, Meliora — CONTINUES ON PG. 20


ur o y t ’ n i “This addaddy’s gran rshop!” barbe {PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Vendors Jim Anzelone and Robert Farmer have been coming to Trader Jack’s for more than 30 years.

BEST FLEA MARKET

TRADER JACK’S FLEA MARKET 999 Steen Road, Bridgeville 412-257-8980 {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

I

T’S 11:30 A.M. on Sunday at Trader Jack’s Flea Market, in Bridgeville, and I’m haggling over the price of a large wooden cross with the classic depiction of Jesus nailed to it. The item is sitting among other miscellaneous pieces of merchandise — like a cordless phone and old shower head — and below a plastic Heineken wall decoration. The price tag reads $20, but that’s not in the budget. I’ve brought exactly $ 37 to Trader Jack’s — voted best flea market by City Paper readers — and if I spend the full amount on this, I won’t have much left for any other treasure. I start low at $5, and he says $18. I say $7, he stands firm. I go to $10, and he drops to $15 when it hits me: “What the hell am I going to do with a giant wooden Jesus?” But that’s the magic of a flea market: You find a bunch of stuff you didn’t know you

wanted and then convince yourself that for $5, you absolutely have to have it. And there are so many vendors at Trader Jack’s that you’ll be making that decision many times during your visit. Vendors are selling everything from used and vintage clothes to sports memorabilia, electronics and used furniture, “What the and every sort of tool hell am I and random doodad going to do with that you could possia giant bly want. Did you lose wooden Jesus?” the knob off your grandmother’s antique dresser? It’s probably sitting somewhere on a table. There are also more knives, swords and military memorabilia than you can shake a stainless-steel samurai sword at.

4504 Butler St. • 412.326.5964 Mistergroomingandgoods.com

The vendors at Trader Jack’s are just as varied as the merchandise. There are friendly, chatty dealers who are willing to deal, and there are those who stand firm no matter how odd the item is. For example, I got one vendor to sell me Bob Prince and Brian Giles bobbleheads (don’t judge) for $ 15, when he was asking $ 30. But no matter how much I tried to convince a woman that Bubby Brister sucked as a quarterback, she refused to move from her $15 price tag on a small action figure of the former Steelers QB. And although I didn’t buy any, prices on fresh produce at Trader Jack’s were unbelievably cheap. It’s certainly worth a drive every week or two to stock up, and a must-make journey if you need/want veggies to can this fall. All told, I left the flea market with some good buys. Besides my bobbleheads, I got a device to fish golf balls out of water hazards, and a Steelers jersey for my niece. I also got a couple of old 45s: Pittsburgh’s own Lou Christie and some Chuck Berry on the old Chess record label. The problem? I don’t own a record player. Maybe I should have gone with Jesus. C DE IT C H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF GOODS+SERVICES has been drawing since birth (almost), and you’ve probably seen his finely rendered artwork on the bodies of your fellow Pittsburghers. Angst and the other resident tattoo artists represent a range of styles, but quality work and professionalism is the shop’s hallmark. _________

heated power yoga in a welcoming and supportive environment. At $7 for 7 days of unlimited yoga, the intro special is a steal. If you’re looking to build strength, stamina and maybe a little inner peace, head to one of the studio’s three (soon to be four) locations. _________

2nd: Inka Dinka Doo, Lawrenceville 3rd: Neverending Ink Tattoos, Lincoln Place

2nd: South Hills Power Yoga, Dormont and Peters Township 3rd: Schoolhouse Yoga, multiple locations

BEST BODYPIERCING SHOP

BEST FLEA MARKET

HOT ROD PIERCING COMPANY 95 S. 16th St., South Side, and 115 Oakland Ave., Oakland www.hotrodpiercingcompany.com

SEE N STORY O PG. 19 {PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Sara Regale, Greg Combass and Cody Wise at Best Vape Shop Steel City Vapors

now with two locations, has been piercing Pittsburghers since 1995. _________ 2nd: Neverending Ink Tattoos, Lincoln Place 3rd: Alter Ego Body Art Studio, Dormont

999 Steen Road, Bridgeville 412-257-8980 • • • • • • • •

Every Saturday and Sunday, this large market has vendors indoors and outdoors. You can find all manner of treasure, from used furniture and housewares to old books and new clothing. It opens at 6 a.m. — the ideal time to start your bargain-hunting. The market also offers a fantastic array

• • • • • • • •

A quick look at Hot Rod’s Instagram stream shows the excited faces of customers and suggests the possibilities for piercings: curved barbells for the eyebrows, a triple helix in the ear, double-nostril for the nose, and more. The shop,

TRADER JACK’S

BEST YOGA STUDIO

AMAZING YOGA Multiple locations www.amazingyoga.net • • • • • • • •

This frequent best-of winner offers

GUARANTEED LOWEST MATTRESS PRICES QUEEN SETS Starting at just

198

$

LEVIN MATTRESS levinfurniture.com • levinmattress.com 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


of fresh, local produce at great prices. _________ 2nd: The Neighborhood Flea, Strip District 3rd: Pittsburgh Vintage Mixer, Lawrenceville

BEST LOCAL PET STORE

WORRIED ABOUT WHAT YOU EAT? HOW ABOUT YOUR BODY IMAGE IMAGE? EXERCISING TOO MUCH??

year, look for more prepared foods and community events. _________ 2nd: Bloomfield Saturday Market,

New Book!

Bloomfield 3rd: Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District

PETAGOGY

BEST THRIFT SHOP

GOODWILL

5880 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-362-7387 or www.petagogypgh.com

Lauren Lazar Stern

Multiple locations www.goodwillswpa.org

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

If a plastic toy and run-of-the-mill pet food are all you desire for your pet, a big-box store probably has you covered. But all items at Petagogy are hand-picked. Pet food and snacks are healthful; pet toys and supplies are selected because they are unique, and many are made from recycled materials. _________

Goodwill operates more than a dozen retail thrift stores in Greater Pittsburgh, including three in the city’s happening neighborhoods of South Side, East Liberty and Lawrenceville. Stop by to see what’s new in gently used clothing, furniture, books, housewares and, at some locations, even computers. _________

801 Brookline Blvd. Pgh, PA 15226 412.343.4230

www.westlibertycycles.com Find us on Facebook!

MA, ATR-BC, LPC

Specialist in Eating Disorders Trauma and EMDR Certified 311 South Craig St. | 412.361.8040 laurenlazarstern@gmail.com

LAURENLAZARSTERN.COM NOW ACCEPTING MOST MAJOR HEALTH INSURANCE & STUDENT HEALTH PLANS

2nd: Red, White and Blue, Bon Air and Bellevue 3rd: Salvation Army, multiple locations

2nd: Burton’s Total Pet, multiple locations 3rd: Animal Nature, Regent Square

BEST PLACE TO ADOPT A PET

ANIMAL FRIENDS

562 Camp Horne Road, North Hills 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org • • • • • • • •

Hundreds of dogs and cats need a caring home, and Animal Friends stand by to match you with a furry companion. Its North Hills location has drop-in hours, or you can search online. And once you get your pet, there are resources to help with training and care-taking. _________

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PUBLIC BATHROOMS

MAGEE-WOMENS HOSPITAL

2nd: Animal Rescue League, Larimer 3rd: Western Pennsylvania Humane Society, North Side

Reason: Abundant bathrooms on all floors that are clean, and you can always find a stall when you need one.

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET

BEST CITY TOUR

52 STREET MARKET ND

SEE N STORY O PG. 14

601 52nd St., Lawrenceville 412-408-3798 or www.52ndstreetmarket.com • • • • • • • •

Now celebrating its first anniversary on 52nd Street, this market couldn’t be more charming — or useful. Opened by two women who wanted to serve their community, the market offers everything from sliced white bread to hyper-local produce from the neighborhood’s community gardens. In their second

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 1 9AM TO 3PM

JUST DUCKY TOURS Station Square 412-402-3825 or www.justduckytours.com • • • • • • • •

See our fair city from both land and river; this tour company uses military amphibious vehicles (DUKWs, or “ducks”). But getting driven into the river is just part of the fun of these lively Downtown tours that incorporate history, fun facts, fowl puns and a lot of quacking. _________ 2nd: PedalPGH 3rd: PA Brew Tours CONTINUES ON PG. 22

THE DISCERNING COLLECTOR • THE AVID OPERATOR • TRAIN LOVING FAMILIES C.S.V.F.D. Memorial and Firemen’s Halls Rt. 88 & Grove Roads (3 lights south of Rt. 51) Admission $6. 12 & Under Free. CSVFD Business Office 412-884-7913 9am - 3pm, Mon - Fri. This show Sponsored by & for benefit of the C.S.V.F.D.

www.CSVFD.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF GOODS+SERVICES

LIVE MUSIC Every Saturday!

• Huge Selection of Craft Beer! • Enter to Win Steeler Tickets and other prizes on every game day. • Visit us as www.craftyjackalope.com or find us on facebook for more info.

$

10

OFF

Present this coupon to your server for $10 off any guest check of $30 or more! Expires 11/20/15

The Crafty Jackalope • 608 Washington Ave Bridgeville, PA 15017 • 412-220-9785

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Employees Lynn Celovsky and Jessica Garland at Best Local Shoe Store Littles Shoes

BEST CAR DEALER

ROHRICH AUTOMOTIVE GROUP Multiple locations www.rohrich.com • • • • • • • •

In business since 1938, the Rohrich family clearly has experience on its side when it comes to selling cars. With a huge array of options in new and used vehicles, from familystyle to luxury rides, the five locations offer something for every driver looking for a set of wheels. _________ 2nd: #1 Cochran, multiple locations 3rd: Day Automotive Group, Monroeville

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

BEST PLACE TO TAKE THE KIDS FOR AN AFTERNOON

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM One Wild Place, Highland Park 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org • • • • • • • •

Sure, kids can watch a nature film, but there’s no substitute for seeing an actual animal. Even napping, the Siberian tiger is a majestic beast, the monkeys are playful and the polar bear is really that big. Then, there are the colorful fish that outside of aquariums rarely come face to face with humans. Come visit. _________ 2nd: Carnegie Science Center, North Side 3rd: Children’s Museum, North Side


ROHRICH.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

23


+ FOOD

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Kitchen-side outdoor seating at Tako

24

LUXURIOUS INGREDIENTS MAKE THESE TACOS RICH AND QUITE FILLING.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


DRINK BEST NEW RESTAURANT

TAKO

214 Sixth St., Downtown 412-471-8256 or www.takopgh.com {BY AL HOFF}

O

NCE, PITTSBURGH had very few Mexican restaurants. Now we have enough that plain old tacos barely create any notice; instead, Pittsburghers are rushing to embrace fusion cuisine where tacos are just the jumping-off point for deliciously exotic flavors. There’s no better example of this than at Downtown’s Tako, the winner of this year’s readers’ poll for Best New Restaurant. It’s the brainchild of Richard DeShantz and Tolga Sevdik (who also operate Meat & Potatoes and Butcher and the Rye), and offers a mash-up of Asian and Latin American cuisines. The cultural interplay begins with the name, which is a phonetic match for “taco” and the Japanese word for octopus. Step inside Tako and there isn’t much of a taqueria vibe: It’s a funky, semiindustrial space reminiscent of a nightclub, dimly lit with octopus-arm sconces and chandeliers fashioned from metal chains. It’s no place for a quiet tête-a-tête, but its clatter and liveliness is infectious. The menu offers an easily navigable selection of slightly fancified versions of street food and tacos. (There’s also an inventive margarita and cocktails menu, which shouldn’t be ignored.) Diners can start with housemade chips and salsa, or take a flutter at crafting personalized guacamole. The standard “chef’s choice” comes with white

onion, jalapeno, lime and cilantro added to mashed avocadoes, but the adventurous can choose from 29 other add-ins, ranging from free to $1-4 each, and from tuna belly to pineapple. (It is possible to order a guacamole that costs $40.) But other starters show the kitchen’s playfulness. The beet tostada offers “beets pretending to be beef,” and the oncederided, now-necessary kale makes an appearance combined with other greens, avocado, radishes and sesame brittle. South of the Border-inspired snacks include: street corn, ceviche, queso fundido (a cheese dip) and “Papas Bravas,” a substantial plate of crisped potato chunks, drizzled with tomato sauce and garlic aioli. Chicken wings may be universal in appeal, but these “Thrice Cooked Wings” sing of Far East snacking pleasures: super crispy and sticky with a sweet fish-sauce glaze, paired with cool pickled carrots and cucumber. Leave room for tacos! They seem small — two per order, with fillings wrapped in a fresh flour tortilla and served on a custom wooden “taco board” — but the luxurious ingredients make these rich and quite filling. Among the “traditional” offerings are carnitas (pork), pollo asado (grilled chicken) or Baja (fish). But go loco! A chorizo taco comes with a fried egg; duck confit borrows Asian seasoning, such as charred scallions and hoisin sauce; and the “Korean” combines Wagyu short ribs with fermented cucumber, pickled carrots, sesame and peanuts. And don’t miss the signature Tako taco, in which a grilled octopus tentacle is dressed up with harissa aioli, pickled red onions, mizuna and preserved lemons. Tako has quickly proven itself to be a popular addition to the city’s dining scene, as well as a must-stop for well-prepared traditional and exotic tacos.

ITS CLATTER AND LIVELINESS IS INFECTIOUS.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Downtown Lunch Spot Emporio at Sienna Mercato

BEST HAPPY HOUR

MAD MEX Various locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

The “Happy Hora” at this mini-chain of local Tex-Mex restaurants is a weekday favorite, running 4:30-6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Take the edge of the work day with a budget-priced 22-ounce Big Azz Margarita ($7), or a half-priced draft. Once relaxed, don’t be surprised if happy hour slides into a convivial dinner. _________ 2nd: Harris Grill, Shadyside 3rd: Bigham Tavern, Mount Washington

2nd: Crazy Mocha, multiple locations 3rd: Beehive, South Side

BEST WAITSTAFF

BIGHAM TAVERN 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington 412-431-9313 or www.bighamtavern.com

BEST COFFEEHOUSE

ESPRESSO A MANO

quality coffee and superior machinery, this is more than your neighborhood coffee shop. The espresso bar offers elevated takes on favorites like chai lattes and caramel macchiatos, in hot and iced varieties. Much of the coffee is direct-trade and organic, with sustainable staples like Counter Culture Coffee and Fort Weight Coffee. _________

• • • • • • • •

SEE N STORY O PG. 27

3623 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-918-1864 or www.espressoamano.com • • • • • • • •

With knowledgeable baristas,

With this establishment’s quirky menu humor, it’s only natural that the waitstaff at Bigham Tavern would follow suit with a fun and friendly demeanor that keeps customers returning. But the Bigham crew isn’t just fun and games — they’re also tops

AHO F F @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M CONTINUES ON PG. 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF FOOD+DRINK in filling drinks and taking precision orders. _________

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

2nd: Harris Grill, Shadyside 3rd: Eleven, Strip Distict

3801 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-622-0111 or www.piccolo-forno.com

PICCOLO FORNO • • • • • • • •

BEST NEW RESTAURANT (AS OF JUNE 2014)

TAKO

SEE N STORY O PG. 24

214 Sixth St., Downtown 412-471-8256 or www.takopgh.com • • • • • • • •

ORGANIC SALON, SPA AND WELLNESS STUDIO Hair Services Miami-style Nail Bar Skin Care • Massage Sauna • Body Treatments Yoga Studio • Wellness Coaching • Bridal Parties

FULL SERVICE SALON, SPA AND WELLNESS STUDIO ABLE TO ACCOMMODATE LARGE GROUPS

5112 BUTLER ST LAWRENCEVILLE 412.781.1262 SPAPGH.COM

WE ARE SENSITIVE

TO YOUR PSL ALLERGIES

Only US-Based Restaurants to Offer Exclusively

PUMPKIN SPICE-

FREE BACON Sooner or latte, you’re gonna tire of that crap.

Harris GrilL

5747 Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside

412.362.5273

HarrisGrill.com

Shiloh GrilL

123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

412.431.4000

theShilohGrill.com

A funkily decorated space, a lively atmosphere, an inventive cocktail program and tacos! But this is where Latin American and Asian flavors playfully comingle, so these aren’t any ordinary tacos. Look for Korean beef, duck confit and mushroom fillings, and don’t miss the signature tako taco, featuring a grilled octopus tentacle. _________ 2nd: The Commoner, Downtown 3rd: Mezzo at Sienna Mercato, Downtown

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

TAJ MAHAL

7795 McKnight Road, North Hills 412-364-1760 or www.tajmahalinc.com

Located in the heart of happening Lawrenceville, this cozy, casual family-run restaurant is always a lively spot. The menu offers woodfired pizzas (including margherita and quattro formaggio), small plates and antipasti, panini and fresh-made pastas. It’s also BYOB, so you can bring your own favorite Italian bottle selection. _________ 2nd: Alla Famiglia, Allentown 3rd: Girasole, Shadyside

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST SPORTS VENUE

PNC PARK

Reason: Every seat is a good seat.

• • • • • • • •

It’s worth the drive to McKnight Road to visit Taj Mahal, where a vast menu, representing cuisine from many regions of India, offers something for everyone. If you’re the indecisive type, opt for one of the popular dinner or lunch buffets, and bring your appetite. And don’t skip the yogurt and cheese, made in-house daily. _________ 2nd: Tamarind, Cranberry and Green Tree 3rd: People’s Indian, Garfield

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT

NAKAMA

1611 E. Carson St., South Side, and 10636 Perry Highway, Wexford www.eatatnakama.com • • • • • • • •

Popular Nakama is great for a night out, to see and be seen. (Steelers have been spotted dining here.) The restaurant offers both hibachi and sushi, where options range from the most elemental shrimp tempura roll to, for more advanced diners, sea-urchin nigiri. On the go, catch Nakama’s cuisine via its food truck. _________ 2nd: Little Tokyo, Mount Lebanon and South Side 3rd: Umi, Shadyside

BEST MIDDLE-EASTERN RESTAURANT

ALADDIN’S EATERY Multiple locations www.aladdinseatery.com • • • • • • • •

While this long-running regional chain offers such Lebanese-American favorites as falafel, baba ghanoush and stuffed grape leaves, it’s also known for its fresh, tasty pita sandwiches and “pitzas,” all on homemade pita bread. Aladdin’s is also veg-friendly, with meatless options for everything on the menu. _________ 2nd: Ali Baba, Oakland 3rd: Kassab’s, South Side

BEST THAI RESTAURANT

NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN

903 Penn Ave., Downtown, and 856 Western Ave., North Side www.nickysthaikitchen.com • • • • • • • •

At this long-time favorite, start with a fresh spring roll and tom yum soup, and move on to the green curry with chicken; for dessert, try custard with sticky rice. At the BYOB North CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


authentic middle eastern food

g Celebratin in rs a e y 43 h! Pittsburg

Specializing in:

Shish Kebab Vegetarian - Vegan Daily Specials Modest Prices 404 South Craig Street Oakland • 412.682.2829 www.alibabapittsburgh.com {PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Emily Hurley shows off a caffeinated work of art made by Braden Walter Jr. (background).

BEST COFFEESHOP

ESPRESSO A MANO 3623 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-918-1864 or espressoamano.com {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

E

SPRESSO A MANO’S tagline says

it all: “espresso bar and gathering place.” With a neighborhood vibe, inviting interior and energetically friendly staff, this Lawrenceville coffee shop is a far cry from corporate. “We just try to make great coffee and be really nice to people,” says Matt Gebis, Espresso’s owner. The shop, which opened in July 2009, has become a fixture of Lawrenceville’s vibrant Butler Street business district. It’s great for a coffee on your way to work, or a few espressos while you do your work at one of its indoor or outdoor tables. “The majority of our customers are regulars, people who live in the neighborhood or pass by here on their way to work or school,” says Gebis. “And on the weekends, we have people who make a special trip to Lawrenceville to come here.”

The menu includes typical coffeehouse staples: mocha lattes, chai lattes, Americanos, an assortment of food items like yogurt and granola, and, of course, straight espresso. “We always have two different espressos, one of which is single-origin which really lets the individual flavor shine through,” says Gebis. Espresso’s “consistent attention to quality” is one of the main draws for regulars like local resident Zach Furness. “Their coffee is fabulous,” Furness says. On a Friday in late September, all of the tables inside and outside were filled. The red-brick walls give the space a cozy feel; they are lined with Italian accoutrements and art from Pittsburghbased artists. Local is what it’s all about at Espresso a Mano. The shop works with five local bakeries. It also gets its granola, milk and

yogurt from local suppliers. The coffee comes from sustainable direct-trade and organic-coffee companies like Counter Culture Coffee, Verve Coffee, Coava Coffee, Forty Weight Coffee and Commonplace Coffee. “It feels better knowing the coffee came from a place where people are getting paid a little more,” says Gebis. Gebis gained his coffee expertise at La Prima Espresso, the decades-old Strip District coffee shop, where he worked for five years. That’s where he developed a love for working in the coffee industry and providing patrons with coffee that is elevated above other establishments’. “I love that two days are never the same,” says Gebis. “I get to talk to people every day and I get to offer them a product I believe in.” It’s a philosophy that Gebis tries to impart to his baristas. He sometimes even sends his employees to an education program offered by Counter Culture Coffee. “There’s a farmer who grows these beans. There’s a guy who picks these beans. There are some really awesome roasters,” says Gebis. “There’s a lot of work going into these beans, so it’s important for us not to mess it up.”

TAJ MAHAL

RESTAURANT

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

7795 McKnight Road Pittsburgh, PA 15237 412-364-1760 tajmahalinc.com

R NU T TAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF FOOD+DRINK Side location, dine outside on the lovely patio filled with plants and artwork. The Downtown locations features sakes and Thai beer, plus lunch specials. _________

like imported Japanese Waygu beef, and steaks that have been dry-aged as long as 40 days. _________ 2nd: Morton’s The Steakhouse, Downtown 3rd: Eddie Merlot’s, Downtown

2nd: Thai Me Up, South Side 3rd: Thai Cuisine, Bloomfield

BEST SEAFOOD

PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY

BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT

SESAME INN

2208 Penn Ave., Strip District, and 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown www.pennavefishcompany.com

Multiple locations www.sesameinn.com • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Sesame Inn offers something for every palate. Classics such as General Tso’s please those seeking comfort, while spicy Hunan and Mongolian dishes await those looking to branch out. (Fussy kids can get chicken fingers.) The restaurant also offers Thai dishes, including stirfrys and curries. _________

Lunch at the Downtown spot offers a variety of upscale sandwiches, while the dinner menu has more refined entrees like Chilean sea bass and grouper with braised kale and green tomatoes. The sushi and clam chowder are not to be missed, nor are the fish tacos at the Strip’s more casual location. _________

2nd: China Palace, Shadyside 3rd: Wai Wai, Bloomfield

BEST MEXICAN/LATIN AMERICAN RESTAURANT

MAD MEX Multiple locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

This Mexican restaurant isn’t “mad” as in angry, but “mad” as in a crazy, out-of-the-box fusion of Mexican, Southwestern and Asian cuisine. And if that doesn’t sound mad to you, you’ve obviously never had a Gobblerito, featuring turkey, black-bean mashed potatoes, stuffing, corn and gravy rolled in a tortilla and served with a side of cranberry sauce. _________ 2nd: El Campesino, multiple locations 3rd: Steel Cactus, Shadyside and South Side

2nd: Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grille, Strip District 3rd: Monterey Bay Fish Grotto, {PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

General manager Shireen Attar and server Sarah Alkayed at Best Middle-Eastern Restaurant Aladdin’s Eatery

BEST CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN RESTAURANT

wine list, and Eleven still goes to 11. _________

ELEVEN

2nd: Cure, Lawrenceville 3rd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown

1150 Smallman St., Strip District 412-201-5656 or www.elevenck.com

BEST STEAKHOUSE

• • • • • • • •

Exactly 11 years after opening, this exponent of contemporary American cuisine remains a huge favorite for Chef Derek Stevens’ seasonal menu — from roasted chicken to sea scallops with grits, and from tuna tartare to the celebrated Eleven Burger. Add its elegant yet casual atmosphere and extensive but carefully curated

HYDE PARK

247 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-222-4014 or www.hydeparkrestaurants.com • • • • • • • •

Because this upscale steakhouse is located near the sports arenas, you’re just as likely to see Neil Walker jerseys as you are Armani suits. All your traditional cuts of beef are here, but Hyde Park also offers options

Mount Washington

BEST SUSHI

NAKAMA 1611 E. Carson St., South Side, and 10636 Perry Highway, Wexford www.eatatnakama.com • • • • • • • •

An extensive drink list, entertaining chefs and great views of the South Side passersby on East Carson Street are all pluses, but diners appreciate Nakama for its commitment to high-quality sushi. The red dragon maki and Pittsburgh Penguins roll are customer favorites. _________ 2nd: Umi, Shadyside 3rd: Penn Avenue Fish Company, Strip District and Downtown CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


Squirrel Hill

FULL SERVICE BAR NOW OPEN 2128 Murray Ave.

521-9864 521-2053

Mt. Lebanon

713A Washington Rd.

344-9467 344-9468

VOTED BEST PIZZA IN PITTSBURGH FOR OVER 37 YEARS

PASTAS • PIZZA • HOAGIES PARTY TRAYS & MORE SUN-THUR 11:00 AM - 1:00 AM & FRI-SAT 11:00 AM - 2:00 AM

We FedEx Pizzas anywhere in the U.S.

www.mineospizza.com {PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Mark Meyer and Mary Ellen Meyer, two of the co-owners, stand amid the pipes flowing with alcohol.

BEST LOCALLY MADE WINE OR SPIRIT

WIGLE WHISKEY 2401 Smallman St., Strip District 412-224-2827 or www.wiglewhiskey.com {BY RYAN DETO}

T

HE PEOPLE AT Wigle Whiskey understand the weight associated with being Western Pennsylvania’s largest craft distillery. And they embrace it by setting lofty goals. “We want our role in the industry to be the one to bring back traditions, while also innovating and educating,” says co-owner Meredith Grelli They have accomplished these goals, and then some, since opening the distillery in 2012. The spicy and robust Wigle Rye, which reignited the traditional style of Monongahela rye whiskey enjoyed by Abraham Lincoln, is now distributed to liquor stores throughout the Mid-Atlantic and New England. Their innovative spirit (pun intended) led them to create a liquor called Landlocked, which is basically a rum made from local honey instead of sugar. They have also

been experimenting with grappa (booze distilled from Erie wine grapes), vermouth, a yet-to-be-approved absinthe, and the recent release of a whiskey infused with hops. Wigle even distilled some Penn Oktoberfest beer into a German beer brandy of sorts. (Look for that sometime next year.) Even with all the experimentation, making whiskey is still Wigle’s bread-andbutter. “Whiskey will always be the heart of our business,” says Grelli. Four of Wigle’s whiskeys won medals at the 2015 American Craft Spirits Association awards, including the prize for the best rye whiskey in the nation, for its Deep Cut Rye. With the increased recognition of craft distillers like Wigle, Grelli warns drinkers of craft spirits about imitators. She says that small distillers have been in hot water because some of them merely purchase spirits from a giant facility in Indiana, then market

them as locally crafted. (Grelli recommends looking at the bottle’s label to make sure it’s “distilled and bottled” in your region.) To ensure that consumers don’t feel this way about Wigle, the company opens its facilities to everyone through dozens of events each month, where visitors can watch the spirits being distilled. Events range from labeling parties, where volunteers help place labels on bottles in exchange for free cocktails and camaraderie, to elegant dinners with designed drink pairings and live music. (Coming soon, Wigle has a bunch of beer-related parties for those of you who like to chase your local microbrew with a local whiskey.) The community support and national recognition has been so strong that Wigle will soon be adding a second still to its operation and expanding to a third location. In liquor production, the Wigle team is dedicated to pushing the envelope, as evidenced by its 36 different products. And distiller David Harries feels fortunate that spirits, by nature, give him a little wiggle (pun intended) room to try just about anything, without the fear of producing something no one will like. “Booze is like nachos, pizza and sex,” says Harries. “Even when bad, they are still all pretty good.”

Meet. Eat. Repeat.

Wine & Swine Wednesdays

5pm-8pm $6 wine glasses $6 swine tasting plates 335 E. MAIN STREET

CARNEGIE, PA 412.275.3637

RYANDE TO @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF FOOD+DRINK

If Mr. Crane had this brew with him, Sleepy Hollow would have never been the same! Full bodied HIGH GRAVITY spiced ale is perfect to calm a scary situation! Cheers!

Now Ava

ilable!

Haunted Brewery Tours Every Friday and Saturday in October at Rivertowne Brewery in Export, PA. For tickets and more info visit: www.myrivertowne.com

Thai Me Up You’re bound to like it

Dine In Take Out Catering Party Trays Available 412-488-8893 or 412-488-7170

Hours: Monday - Friday 11:00 am – 9:30 pm Saturday Noon – 9:30 pm

118 S. 23 St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203

www.thaimeuppittsburgh.com 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Ron Reha Sr. and Ron Reha Jr. at Best Pizza Mineo’s Pizza House

BEST BURGER

BURGATORY Multiple locations www.burgatorybar.com

BEST WINGS

BIGHAM TAVERN 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington 412-431-9313 or bighamtavern.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Burgatory would be worth the trip just for its selection of traditional and off-the-wall burgers — like the Piggy Butter and Jelly, featuring pickles, bacon, peanut butter and habañero jelly. But add the option of elk, bison, veggie or crab patties, plus the fantastic milkshakes (spiked with alcohol or not), and it’s a can’t-miss burger joint. _________

With 30 varieties of wing flavors, Bigham Tavern is a must-stop on wing night — or any night. Can you handle the heat? Try the Cluckin’ Hot (a dry rub with ranch and cayenne). Or do something different with Thai Spicy Peanut. Get there early on Wednesdays for 44-cent wings. _________

2nd: BRGR, multiple locations 3rd: Tessaro’s, Bloomfield

2nd: Quaker Steak & Lube, multiple locations 3rd: Birmingham Bridge Tavern, South Side


BEST TACO

SMOKE BBQ TAQUERIA 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-224-2070 or www.smokepgh.com • • • • • • • •

Formerly in Homestead, Smoke BBQ Taqueria, now in Lawrenceville, still serves up its fan-favorite “chickenapple” and chorizo taco, but has since added more vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. The new location has bigger everything — staff, kitchen, meat-smoker and a flour-tortilla-maker that can produce hundreds of tortillas an hour. _________ 2nd: Tako, Downtown 3rd: Las Palmas, Oakland

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL COACH

MIKE ZMIJANAC, ALIQUIPPA HIGH SCHOOL

Reason: He truly cares about his players and their community. He’s won nine WPIAL titles and one state championship. BEST DESSERTS

LA GOURMANDINE 4605 Butler St., Lawrenceville, and 300 Cochran Road, Mount Lebanon www.lagourmandinebakery.com • • • • • • • •

La Gourmandine is a passport to a small French street where the heavenly scent of baking bread and buttery pastry hangs in the air. Fabien and Lisanne Moreau moved from France and brought their pastry skills with them, giving Pittsburgh a taste of almond croissants, baguettes and opera cake. _________ 2nd: Oakmont Bakery, Oakmont 3rd: Sinful Sweets Chocolate Company, Downtown

variety of baked goods that you’ll be glad there is a long wait in line: Now, you can take your time to decide what to pick. Options include a variety of bagels, breads, cookies, pies and pastries, as well as regional favorites like gobs, ladylocks and biscotti. _________ 2nd: La Gourmandine, Lawrenceville and Mount Lebanon 3rd: Prantl’s Bakery, Shadyside and Downtown

BEST BREAD

MANCINI’S BAKERY Multiple locations www.mancinisbakery.com • • • • • • • •

Mancini’s Bread was founded in 1926, which is exactly how long Pittsburghers have been boasting about great their hometown loaf is. The bread, with that perfectly crusty exterior and soft, pillowy inside, is a staple for sandwiches across the city, and spotted on tables in houses, diners and fancy restaurants across the region. _________ 2nd: BreadWorks, North Side 3rd: Bread and Salt, Bloomfield

BEST PIZZA

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE 2128 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill, and 713A Washington Road, Mount Lebanon www.mineospizza.com • • • • • • • •

Pittsburgh has room for many styles of pizza, and everyone will claim a favorite, but Mineo’s continues to make our Best Of list. The pizza house serves hot and greasy, slightly crispy-bottomed slices (as well as doughy Sicilian-style squares) in an unpretentious, old-school parlor. Plus, traditional slices are less than $2. _________ 2nd: Fiori’s Pizzaria, Brookline 3rd: Spak Brothers, Garfield

BEST SUNDAY BRUNCH

GRAND CONCOURSE 100 W. Station Square Drive, South Side 412-261-1717 or www.grandconcourserestaurant.com • • • • • • • •

BEST BAKERY

OAKMONT BAKERY 531 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont 412-826-1606 or www.oakmontbakery.com • • • • • • • •

Oakmont Bakery has such a large

When it comes to picking the city’s best Sunday brunch, it’s hard to compete with the Grand Concourse. There’s the extravagant ambiance offered by dining in the beautiful, historic 114-year-old Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad Station, plus the generous selection of hot and cold CONTINUES ON PG. 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF FOOD+DRINK foods. It makes any Sunday feel like a special occasion. _________

even order your food online for easy pick-up. _________

2nd: e2, Highland Park 3rd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown

2nd: RibFest, Heinz Field, North Side 3rd: Little Italy Days, Liberty Avenue, Bloomfield

BEST DOWNTOWN LUNCH SPOT

BEST LATE-NIGHT MENU

EMPORIO AT SIENNA MERCATO

EAT’N PARK Multiple locations www.eatnpark.com

942 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-281-2810 or siennapgh.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Honestly, there’s something about crunchy food late at night, and Eat’n Park has diners covered: planks of fried zucchini, baskets of crisp onion rings and piles of fresh-cut potato chips, all offered at a late-night discount. The after-hours menu also includes breakfast dishes for those looking turn their late night into an early morning. _________

Lunchers can tuck into a variety of gourmet meatballs in sauces and gravies, such as pork Bolognese, chicken gravy, “government cheese” and spinach-almond pesto. Sliders, panini and grinder sandwiches can be filled with classic beef, spicy pork, vegetarian or turkey. _________ 2nd: NOLA on the Square 3rd: Bluebird Kitchen

2nd: Mad Mex, multiple locations 3rd: Doce Taqueria, South Side

BEST OUTDOOR DINING

HARRIS GRILL

5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-362-5273 or www.harrisgrill.com

BEST LOCAL BEER

• • • • • • • •

On warm days and nights, patrons can be found sitting out on the patio, with its ample seating and vine-covered gates. The breezy ambiance makes Harris Grill a great spot for happy-hour drinks and appetizers (Tuesday is Free Bacon Night), as well as the perfect perch for scoping out the street scene. _________ 2nd: Double Wide Grill, South Side and Mars 3rd: Pusadee’s Garden, Lawrenceville

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Best Taco Smoke BBQ Taqueria

BEST FOOD FESTIVAL

ST. NICHOLAS GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL 419 S. Dithridge St., Oakland www.stnickspgh.org • • • • • • • •

This is the one worth marking the

calendar for — it rolls around every May. Conveniently located in central Oakland, the church-run festival offers a week’s worth of Greek food (from baked goods and snacks, to full meals), as well as live music and outdoor seating. You can

EAST END BREWING COMPANY

147 Julius St., Larimer 412-537-2337 or www.eastendbrewing.com • • • • • • • •

You’ll likely recognize this brewery’s growlers, featuring a sun shining behind a frothy pint. East End Brewing has been making beer for

Let us help you through life’s transitions Moving | Renovating | Home Staging | Seasonal Items | Business Storage

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


more than a decade, and now offers four year-round brews, six seasonals, and several favorites and “one-offs.” Try a sample at the Pittsburgh Public Market, or check out the brewery for events. _________ 2nd: Rivertowne Brewing, Export 3rd: Penn Brewery, North Side

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST

SONOMA GRILLE 947 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-697-1336 or www.thesonomagrille.com • • • • • • • •

Sonoma Grille has one of the most extensive and diverse wine lists in the city, with an emphasis on West Coast wines. Patrons can partake in their favorites from the Napa and Sonoma valleys, or opt for wine flights to try out new varieties and wineries. Nibble on tapas, or book a date for the jazz brunch. _________ 2nd: The Allegheny Wine Mixer, Lawrenceville 3rd: Eleven, Strip District

BEST LOCALLY MADE WINE OR SPIRIT SEE N STORY O PG. 29

WIGLE WHISKEY

2401 Smallman St., Strip District, and 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side 412-224-2827 or www.wiglewhiskey.com • • • • • • • •

Since opening in 2012, Wigle has gone from being the first post-prohibition distillery in the city to the most-awarded craft distillery in the country. The whiskeymaker opened an outdoor garden at its barrel house last year, and continues to create new spirits, including this year’s release of Pennsylvania Bourbon. _________ 2nd: Arsenal Cider House, Lawrenceville 3rd: Pittsburgh Winery, Strip District

BEST FOOD TRUCK

PGH TACO TRUCK www.pghtacotruck.com • • • • • • • •

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LITTLE-KNOWN PARK

EMERALD VIEW PARK

Reason: It has miles of renovated hiking trails around Mount Washington, with forested walks broken up by city views. BEST RESTAURANT BEER LIST

SHARP EDGE Multiple locations www.sharpedgebeer.com • • • • • • • •

Remember that beer you had abroad last year? Sharp Edge probably has it. A lengthy menu offers beers from countries as diverse as Jamaica and the Czech Republic, plus local Pennsylvanian breweries and other craft favorites. And for Belgian-beer selection, Sharp Edge is unparalleled. _________ 2nd: Fat Heads, South Side 3rd: Industry Public House, Lawrenceville

Award Winning Thai Cuisine

The fast, fresh and economically priced tacos have made this relatively long-running food truck a favorite around town. Seasoned meats and veggie substitutes are wrapped in corn tortillas and topped with lively accompaniments — opt for ground beef, more exotic Thai chicken or curried potatoes. The truck makes a lot of regular stops. Keep abreast at @PghTacoTruck. _________

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen has been dedicated to serving delicious authentic Thai cuisinee to the Pittsburgh region since 2007. We hope to see you at either location soon for either dining in or take out.

Please visit us either Downtown or on the Northside for Lunch Monday - Saturday or Dinner Every Day

——— NORTHSIDE ——— 856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412 321-THAI (8424) B.Y.O.B.

2nd: Mac & Gold Truck 3rd: BRGR Truck

LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Saturday 11:30am - 3pm DINNER HOURS: Monday - Thursday 5pm - 9pm; Friday and Saturday 5pm - 10pm; Sunday 5pm - 9pm

BEST JUICE/ SMOOTHIE BAR

——— DOWNTOWN ———

PITTSBURGH JUICE COMPANY 3418 Penn Ave, Lawrenceville 412-586-5060 or www.pittsburghjuicecompany.com • • • • • • • •

It’s no coincidence that Pittsburgh Juice Company — founded by siblings Naomi and Zeb Homison, the latter a national yoga champion — is attached to a hot-yoga studio. But you don’t have to undergo sweaty stretching to treat yourself to PJC’s cold-pressed juices, smoothies, juice shots and raw vegan snacks. _________ 2nd: Amazing Café, South Side 3rd: East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze

903 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412 471-THAI (8424) Full Bar with Thai Beer, Thai inspired cocktails, a variety of Sake, and more! DOWNTOWN HAPPY HOURS Monday - Wednesday 5pm - 7pm LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Saturday 11:30am - 3pm DINNER HOURS: Monday - Thursday 5pm - 10pm; Friday and Saturday 5pm - 10:30pm; Sunday 5pm-9pm

www.nickysthaikitchen.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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+ PEOPLE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Male Athlete Andrew McCutchen

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THE AMOUNT OF FUN HE HAS WHILE PLAYING THIS GAME IS INFECTIOUS.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


PLACES BEST MALE ATHLETE

ANDREW MCCUTCHEN Pittsburgh Pirates {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

A

S A JOURNALIST, I’m supposed to

be unbiased when it comes to the people I cover. I’m not supposed to play favorites or show my affinity for one side or another. But when it comes to the center fielder for the Pittsburgh Pirates, those rules fly right into the Allegheny like a towering moonshot from PNC Park in July. As a lifelong baseball fan, I love Andrew McCutchen, and I’m not alone. McCutchen was voted Best Male Athlete by readers of City Paper. At first, the reason seems like a simple one: He’s really good at playing baseball. But it’s more than that. We love Andrew McCutchen because he loves the game of baseball so much. Sure, it’s his job and he gets paid really well for it, but this guy really loves the game; he says it with his words and his actions. I’m writing this less than 12 hours after the Pirates were ousted from the postseason by Jake Arrieta and the Chicago Cubs. I hated the wild-card system when I woke up this morning. The Pirates are the second-best team in baseball and their season is over after one game. But then I found these words written by McCutchen in an Oct. 6 essay about

this very topic: “A lot of people are saying that it’s unfair that we have the second-best record in baseball, and we have to face Cy Young contender Jake Arrieta in a door-die game. There’s some debate about whether it should be a best-of-three, or maybe they should do away with divisions altogether. “I understand where those people are coming from, but my feeling is this: What kind of a champion says, ‘Man, I’m just hoping for the easiest road possible …’ … That’s not why we play this game. … The wild-card system might not be perfect, but you can’t deny that it’s a heck of a lot of fun.” The amount of fun McCutchen has while playing this game is obvious and infectious. In May, when he was in a slump and only batting .228, McCutchen started laying down in the dugout and doing some weird hand gestures. He went right out and hit a double. Prior to each game this year, McCutchen also led the team in another pregame ritual: dancing in the dugout while teammates drumm ed o n b en c h es , buckets and coolers. However, his best moment of the year came on Sat., Oct. 3, versus the Cincinnati Reds, a game I was lucky enough to witness from the stands, despite the fact that the Buccos lost that night. The Reds’ Adam Duvall launched a home-run ball into the right-center field bleachers. After several seconds passed, the fan who got that ball threw it back onto the turf at PNC. McCutchen calmly walked over to the ball, picked it up and fired it into the Allegheny River. With a love for the game like that, how could he not be anyone’s favorite?

WE LOVE ANDREW MCCUTCHEN BECAUSE HE LOVES THE GAME OF BASEBALL SO MUCH.

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Best Drag Performer Sharon Needles

BEST SOCIAL MEDIA PERSONALITY

PITTSBURGH DAD www.pghdad.com • • • • • • • •

Curt Wootton hits a cultural nerve with his sitcom-style portrayal of the typical yinzer known as Pittsburgh Dad. Anyone who knows and loves this city is reminded of a loved one when Wootton’s character sighs over a PennDOT project, or threatens to ship his kid off to a psychologist if he becomes a Ravens fan. _________ 2nd: Rick Sebak 3rd: Mark Madden

usually includes a picture of Julia Johnson. Whether the issue is police brutality, LGBTQ inclusion or prisoner health, the young activist can usually be found at the center of any local controversy with megaphone in hand. _________ 2nd: Jasiri X 3rd: Vanessa German

BEST DAY TRIP

OHIOPYLE STATE PARK 724-329-8591 or www.dcnr.state.pa.us • • • • • • • •

BEST ACTIVIST

JULIA JOHNSON

a video Watch w with intervieNeedles Sharonline at on ghcity www.pr.com e p a p

SEE N STORY O PG. 37

• • • • • • • •

When the media attends a local protest in Pittsburgh, coverage

An hour or so drive from the city, Ohiopyle is a choose-your-ownadventure destination, with something for everyone. Go whitewater rafting, bike the Great Allegheny Passage, hike to Cucumber Falls or swim in the Youghiogheny River. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater (the second-

CDEI TCH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M CONTINUES ON PG. 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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F AMILY O WNED S INCE 1979 ONLY 20 MINUTES FROM T! THE POINT!

BEST OF PEOPLE+PLACES

2nd: Fallingwater 3rd: Lake Erie

BEST NONPROFIT

HELLO BULLY www.hellobully.com • • • • • • • •

WE ARE

PITTSBURGH’S

ORIGINAL PET HOTEL

H FIRST to offer dog boarding in a household setting with daily walks H FIRST to develop & feature playgroups for all guests, & at no extra charge!

H CLEAN & DRY indoor rooms H No hosing down here! H Areas hand cleaned daily!

H FIRST to accept only fixed dogs to reduce ambient stress & guarantee safe play.

H Climate-controlled space H Calm, no-stress atmosphere

H FIRST & ONLY with 24-hour live-in manager.

H Continuous staff supervision

H FIRST & ONLY to provide a supervised and balanced daily program, 24/7/365, in a calm, clean, home-style setting.

WE PICK UP & DELIVER!

H 4 - 6 daily outdoor breaks H Supervised daily playgroups

2nd: Bike Pittsburgh 3rd: Arcade Comedy Theater

BEST DRAG PERFORMER

SHARON NEEDLES

COUNTRY LANE& Pet PETSupplies HOTEL www.countrylanepethotel.com info@countrylanepethotel.com Bus. Hours 7:30a - 6:00p daily

(412) 824-7991

BOARDING | DAYCARE | GROOMING | PET SUPPLIES 1075 3RD STREET | NORTH VERSAILLES PA 15137 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

RICHARD PARSAKIAN • • • • • • • •

As the owner of Eons vintage clothing store in Shadyside, you could say fashion is in Richard Parsakian’s blood. But through his involvement with organizations like the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force, Planned Parenthood and the local arts community, he’s as well known for his philanthropy as for his excellent fashion sense. _________ 2nd: Kiya Tomlin 3rd: Tori Mistick

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST BIRDING HOTSPOT

SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS BOROUGH PARK Reason: So many birds!

www.sharonneedles.com • • • • • • • •

Aaron Coady, a.k.a. Sharon Needles, is Pittsburgh’s favorite drag queen, but Needles is certainly not confined to the city limits. A nationally and internationally known performer, she’s toured throughout the U.S., Europe, Australia and Canada. She’s also graced the cover of OUT and IDOL magazines and was the winner of RuPaul’s Drag Race season four. _________

BEST PLACE TO HIDE FROM ZOMBIES

Mancuso’s

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Since 2005, Hello Bully has been rescuing, rehabbing and re-homing frequently maligned American pit-bull terriers, including animals that were once used in dog-fighting and could now use a friendly couch instead. Donations go toward medical care, spaying and neutering, and the Hello Bully Halfway House, which helps rescued dogs make the transition to a forever home. _________

2nd: Bambi Deerest 3rd: Lola LeCroix

TO ALL OF GREATER PITTSBURGH!

BEST FASHION ICON

place winner) is close by and, if you’d like to extend your trip, make a reservation at an area cabin or B&B. _________

MONROEVILLE MALL • • • • • • • •

In George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, the 1978 horror film that depicted people fending off zombies from inside the Monroeville Mall, only two survive. Today, a strategist might advise against holing up in a space that provides the undead with ample room to surround it, but Pittsburghers are nothing if not loyal to the old ways. _________ 2nd: House of the Dead, Lawrenceville 3rd: Frick Park

BEST LOCAL MASCOT

THE PIRATE PARROT www.pirates.com • • • • • • • •

The Pirate Parrot was hatched at Three Rivers Stadium on April 1, 1979. Since then, he has spent his summers cheering on the team, posing for pictures, launching hot dogs and taunting the opposition. These days, he’s one of the most well-known figures to ever wear a Buccos jersey. _________ 2nd: Iceburgh, Pittsburgh Penguins 3rd: Steely McBeam, Pittsburgh Steelers

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD LANDMARK

CATHEDRAL OF LEARNING Oakland • • • • • • • •

With its dozens of authentically outfitted Nationality Rooms, the Cathedral of Learning pays homage to worldwide cultures from Armenian to Japanese to Welsh. The gothic tower, CONTINUES ON PG. 38


Piercing Co.

Pittsburgh’s Original Body Piercing OAKLAND 115 Oakland Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-687-4320

SOUTHSIDE 95 S 16th St, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-6077 {PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Taking it to the streets: Julia Johnson

BEST ACTIVIST

JULIA JOHNSON {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

I

F YOU’VE BEEN to a rally or march over the past year, read or watched any of the media coverage of the local #blacklivesmatter movement or the protests at the Allegheny County Jail, you’ve definitely heard Julia Johnson’s name. “I live this every day. These issues affect me. It hurts me so much, and the only way I can alleviate the pain I feel is by taking action,” says Johnson. “Even though I know [that], in my lifetime, I’m not going to see all of the changes I feel are necessary to have a world that is not so oppressive — while I’m on this earth, it’s important for me to do my best, and to fight, not only for myself, but for others around me, and to leave a better world for the next generation.” So it comes as little surprise that the East Liberty resident was recognized by City Paper readers as this year’s Best Activist, a new category inspired by the swell of activism throughout the city.

At 23, Johnson might seem young to be the face of activism in Pittsburgh, but she says the city’s youth are a large part of the movement. A passion for community organizing was ingrained in her early by her mother. She says her passion for social justice was officially solidified after reading Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong, a 1995 book by sociologist James Loewen. “That was such a revelation to me. It was just an explanation for why there’s so much hurt in the world, why there are so many problems, and why our politics are broken,” says Johnson. “Columbus came to the Americas and created this system of oppression for people of color, for women and poor people. It was really crystalized with that book, and it galvanized me to learn more

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Happy 5th

about why the world is the way it is, and to take action and try to change it.” After six years of volunteering her time in different community-organizing efforts, this year Johnson secured a full-time position with New Voices Pittsburgh: Women of Color for Reproductive Justice. “Julia represents a rejuvenation of the fierce activist spirit in Pittsburgh that is putting black women and girls at the center of social-change movements,” says La’Tasha Mayes, one of the organization’s founders. Johnson, too, has taken note of the growing enthusiasm for activism across the city, and she hopes it continues. “The #blacklivesmatter movement has had a domino effect across other movements and really has galvanized people to take action,” says Johnson. “It’s the first time I’ve seen in my lifetime such a huge swell of people who are educating themselves actively, who are really having tough conversations about their role in the problems we face in society. It’s a beautiful thing to witness.”

4765 LIBERTY AVE. | BLOOMFIELD 412.681.0111

R NU T TAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER.COM

“I LIVE THIS EVERY DAY. THESE ISSUES AFFECT ME.”

Birthday PDC Friday October 23rd Wine and Dance Event 7pm Wine tasting and pastries 7:30pm Dance lesson Open dance party till 10pm $15.00 • BYO wine

Classic Rock Explosion Sunday October 25th Pro and student showcase! 5:30pm doors • 6pm Show Reception to follow light refreshments included $10.00 Aerial e Showcas

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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BEST OF PEOPLE+PLACES full of classrooms and offices, rises above Oakland, and inside, its great hall would give Hogwarts a run for its money. _________ 2nd: Point State Park 3rd: Duquesne Incline

BEST LOCAL MALE ATHLETE

SEE N STORY O PG. 34

ANDREW MCCUTCHEN • • • • • • • •

The dreads might be gone, but the swagger and talent are still there. Cutch, as he is affectionately known, continues to put up MVP-caliber numbers, and this year led the Buccos to another playoff berth. And while we all miss those magical dreads, at least they were auctioned off to benefit Pirates Charities. _________ 2nd: Sidney Crosby 3rd: Neil Walker

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST DOG

CHARLIE

SNUGGLEPUMKINS Reason: He’s the best, slobber and all! BEST LOCAL FEMALE ATHLETE

MEGHAN KLINGENBERG • • • • • • • •

Before she was a starting defender for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team, Klingenberg played the sport she loves at Pine-Richland High School. So, while the rest of the world “discovered” her during her exceptional play at this summer’s World Cup, locals in the know have been fans for years. _________ 2nd: Swin Cash, New York Liberty of the WNBA 3rd: Lisa Horton, quarterback of the Pittsburgh Passion professional football team

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2015

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do IN PITTSBURGH

October 14 - 20 WEDNESDAY 14

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Menopause the Musical THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 2p.m. & 7:30p.m.

MONDAY 19

Pentimento

Chicago

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 7:30p.m.

The Zombies Odyssey & Oracle Live

CHICAGO

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

HEINZ HALL DOWNTOWN MONDAY, OCT. 19. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

An Evening with That1Guy

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 15 Mark Twain Tonight by Hal Holbrook

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Dan Savage’s Hump Tour

All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 16

21+ Night: Back to the Future

THE ROW HOUSE CINEMA Lawrenceville. Tickets: humptour.com. Through Oct. 17.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. Visit carnegiesciencecenter.org to register. 6p.m.

Kaskade

31ST STREET MOVIE STUDIOS Strip District. Tickets: pittsburghedm.com. 7p.m.

Peter Frampton Raw, An Acoustic Tour

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall.

Where to live

The Rite of Spring

Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show.

SATURDAY 17

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BACKSTAGE BAR/THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free show. 6p.m. SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The String Cheese Incident

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

SUNDAY 18

NOW LEASING

Roger Humphries

Sanctuary

HEINZ HALL Downtown. Night of 1,000 Andys 412-392-4900. Tickets: ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM pittsburghsymphony.org/classics. North Side. 412-237-8300. Through Oct. 18. Tickets: warhol.org. 7p.m.

Metalachi

TUESDAY 20

find your happy place

walnut capital.com S C R E E N

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THE BEST IN CITY LIVING

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THE PAST IS OVER — BUT, OF COURSE, IT NEVER REALLY IS

GET OVER THE HUMP! There are times you will likely feel uncomfortable watching Dan Savage’s HUMP! Film Festival, the second annual touring collection of amateur-porn shorts. But that’s OK. Even Savage, the Seattle-based “no-topic-embarrasses-me” sex-advice columnist admits you will have those moments watching this collection, most of it made specifically for this touring show. “It’s rare for people to watch porn that takes them outside their comfort zone,” Savage says in promotional material for the film. “At HUMP!, straight people watch gay porn, vanilla people watch kinky porn, gay people watch lesbian porn. And people laugh, they gasp, sometimes they cover their eyes. But at the end of every y film people clap and cheer. eer. It’s moving and wonderful and newcomers don’t expect it.” For me, that moment nt happened during a moneyoneyshot facial during an all-male reenactment of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.” ears.” It was unexpected: pected: I laughed, I wi winced. wince nc d nce But watching that out-of-mycomfort-zone was part of the experience. Experiencing such moments with an audience has to be an all-togetherdifferent bedroom full of bears. The collection of films Savage has put together for HUMP! flows nicely, even as you’re never quite sure what you’ll see next. As with any anthology, there are films that you’ll love and some you won’t care for. But here, the good outweighs the bad, starting with the breezy short, “No Artificial Sweetners,” which tells the story of a couple’s first time together with no dialogue — just a catchy pop song that you won’t be able to get out of your head. And while the title of “Butthole Lickin’” is sure to generate snickers, the actresses in it turn in brilliant, funny work, and it was easily my favorite film. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL 6:30, 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 15, and Fri., Oct. 16; and 5, 7, 9 and 11 p.m. Sat., Oct. 17. Row House Cinema, Lawrenceville. www.rowhousecinema.com

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Barred and loving it: Participants of HUMP!

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

SELECTIVE

MEMORY {BY AL HOFF}

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OISY BATTLES get plenty of atten-

tion. We are relieved when the tumultuous times end, but in moving forward, there can be a tendency to disregard lingering traumas. The past is over — but, of course, it never really is. This unresolved psychic aftermath is the space that Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou explores in Coming Home. It’s a quiet, well-acted melodrama, adapted from a section of Geling Yan’s novel, and decidedly more small-scale than Zhang’s notable earlier work: 1990s arthouse favorites like Raise the Red Lantern and To Live, and later martial-arts spectacles such as Hero and The House of Flying Daggers. Coming Home begins during the Cultural Revolution. Yu (Gong Li) is a teacher, and her teenage daughter, Dan Dan (Zhang Huiwen), is angling for the lead in a propagandist ballet titled “The Red Detachment of Women.” Complicating matters is the fact that Lu (Chen Daoming), Yu’s husband and Dan Dan’s father, has escaped from prison, where he has

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

Yu (Gong Li) waits for her husband to come home.

been held for undisclosed crimes against the state. If either should encounter Lu, officials warn, they should immediately turn him in, or face dire consequences — an admonition each woman responds to differently.

COMING HOME DIRECTED BY: Zhang Yimou STARRING: Gong Li, Chen Daoming, Zhang Huiwen In Mandarin, with subtitles Starts Fri., Oct. 16. Regent Square

CP APPROVED But most of the film takes place after the Cultural Revolution. Lu has been “rehabilitated” and released, and he openly returns home. But it is to a broken family: an adult daughter who never knew him, and a wife suffering from trauma-induced amnesia who fails to recognize him. Events of the past have also estranged mother and daughter. In some ways, Coming Home could be a classic Hollywood studio melodrama

(in which amnesia was a popular, if inexplicable, narrative catalyst), where we watch to see if true love can restore memories and mend broken relationships. But Zhang’s work also functions on other levels. It is a critique (if somewhat oblique) of the Cultural Revolution, its rigidity, corruption and even capriciousness, that resulted in millions of intimate tragedies like this one. And so too is it an allegory about China, a country that has moved on rapidly from the days of the Cultural Revolution, but remains scarred by those times. How does a nation process a devastating history — with wounds that defy healing, even when things have supposedly returned to normal? Institutional amnesia is no solution. But Zhang’s film finds light in this post-revolution pain. His characters are damaged, but there can still be growth, forgiveness and an admirable resiliency. This shadow-shrouded present is brighter than the dark past, but viewers should still pack plenty of tissues. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM CAPSULES CP

REPERTORY A BULLET FOR THE GENERAL. In Damiano Damiani’s 1966 Western, Mexican gun-runners and an American mercenary join forces — or do they? The film continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series: Patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti. Dinner at 7 p.m.; screening at 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 15. Parkway, McKees Rocks. $9. Reservations required at 412-766-1668.

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK ANIMATION SHOW OF SHOWS. This touring program of international award-winning animated short films offers 11 new works, spanning a variety of techniques: hand-drawn, stop-motion, computer-generated and painted clay. Fri., Oct. 16, through Sun., Oct. 18. Melwood THE APU TRILOGY. Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray’s three films comprising this masterful trilogy — Pather Panchali (1955), Aparajito (1956) and The World of Apu (1959) — have been recently restored. The gorgeously filmed black-and-white dramas depict the coming-of-age of a young Bengali named Apu, and the recently independent India. The deeply humanist films gently mark the transition from traditional to modern, from rural to urban. Ray’s work also helped spark a rise in “world cinema,” films produced outside of Europe and the U.S. In Pather Panchali, the young Apu is left in the care of female relatives when his father seeks work in the city. In the sequel, Aparajito, teenage Apu and his family have moved to the city. And The World of Apu depicts Apu seeking work as a writer, and a romantic relationship, during a fateful journey to a rural village. In Bengali, with subtitles. Pather: 7:30 p.m. nightly, Mon., Oct. 19-Wed., Oct. 21; 3:15 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Aparajito: Oct. 22-26. World: Starts Oct. 24. Harris ATTACK ON TITAN: PART II. Shinji Higuchi’s live-action film is adapted from Hajime Isayama’s manga. In it, a young man may be the only hope against giant humanoid Titans who are preying on humans. 7:30 nightly, Tue., Oct. 20; Thu., Oct. 22; and Tue., Oct. 27. Hollywood BRIDGE OF SPIES. Steven Spielberg directs this docudrama, set during the Cold War, about a lawyer (Tom Hanks) who works to free a U.S. pilot held by the Soviets as a spy. Starts Fri., Oct. 16 CRIMSON PEAK. A woman marries to escape her family, but discovers her new home might be haunted. Mia Wasikowska stars in Guillermo del Toro’s gothic thriller. Starts Fri., Oct. 16

NORMA RAE. Martin Ritt’s 1979 drama is the sentimental story of the tough gal (portrayed by Sally Field) who takes on the evil textile mill in her grim Southern town and wins union representation for the mill workers. The screening concludes a monthly series of films about labor and social justice presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 15. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomesteadfoundation.org HEART LIKE A HAND GRENADE. John Roecker directs this new doc that looks at pop-punk band Green Day during the recording of American Idiot. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 15. Hollywood

99 Homes

99 HOMES. Like a modern economic horror story, Ramin Bahrani’s drama takes us back to 2010, when places like Orlando, Fla., were being ravaged by the housing crisis. A time fraught with terrors like foreclosures and evictions, as well as monsters like speculators and flippers making a fast buck. Laid-off construction worker and single dad Dennis Nash (Andrew Garfield) is tossed from his modest home by the shark-like Rick Carver (Michael Shannon), who handles foreclosures for a bank. Nash is so desperate to regain his house, and to be something more than a loser struggling to live in a motel room, that he agrees to do some basic rehab work for Carver. The odd couple quickly develops a mutually beneficial working relationship, and Carver mentors Nash to undertake more profitable, if unpleasant, jobs, such as evicting families or running reimbursement scams. But the higher on the financial ladder Nash ascends, the further his soul drops into the void. And for viewers, this fast-paced film, which crackles with good performances, the tension is waiting for the inevitable moment when Nash is forced to pick a side between money and morality. Not that the system has to make any tough calls: The film is a scathing indictment of the messy “bailout” of big money that heaped more miseries on folks at the bottom. There’s nothing particularly subtle about 99 Homes (Bahrani’s earlier films

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include the much more spare Chop Shop and Man Push Cart) and it eventually falls victim to narrative contrivance. But it’s a real-life scary tale we’d be wise to heed. (Al Hoff) REEL ABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL. This mini-fest presents five recent films that highlight stories of people with disabilities. Oct. 22-29. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. Complete schedule and tickets at www. JFilmPgh.org. REEL Q. The 30th annual gay and lesbian film festival continues through Sat., Oct. 17. The closing-night film is the director’s cut of the 1998 drama 54, about the infamous New York City disco. This version restores more than 30 minutes of footage, including material depicting a bisexual love triangle, and more gay and illicit-drug content. See www.reelq.com for complete schedule and ticket information. Harris THAO’S LIBRARY. Elizabeth Van Meter’s new documentary depicts the friendship that develops after she sees a photograph of a disabled Vietnamese woman running a makeshift library in a small village, and reaches out to provide more books. In English and Vietnamese, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Oct. 16. AMC Waterfront

TREMORS. It’s Kevin Bacon vs. giant land worms in this 1990 horror comedy from Ron Underwood. Screens as part of Brew Cinema series. 6:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 16. Hollywood MODERN TIMES. In Charlie Chaplin’s 1937 classic, The Tramp is enmeshed (often literally) in the machinery of the industrial world — on an assembly line, in jail and inadvertently leading a labor march — along the way to making cause with a fellow outcast (Paulette Goddard). This special event presented by Alloy Pittsburgh, Rivers of Steel and Treading Art includes a Carrie Furnace tour, dinner, beer and an outdoor screening. 5-9:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 17. Carrie Furnace, 115 W. Braddock Ave., Rankin. $30. Tickets at www.showclix.com JOE BOB’S HALLOWEEEN PARTY with TRICK OR TREAT. Noted comic, author and TV host Joe Bob Briggs presents this 1986 horror film about a dead, devil-worshipping rock star who will do anything to return to life. Charles Martin Smith’s cult classic, to be screened in 35 mm, features appearance from real, still-living rock stars Gene Simmons and Ozzy Osbourne. The evening also includes a raffle and costume contest. 8 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.) Sat., Oct. 17. Hollywood. $12 THE SHINING. It seemed like a great opportunity for writer Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) and his family:

FREEHELD. A New Jersey police lieutenant fights to secure pension benefits for her domestic partner. Julianne Moore and Ellen Page star in Peter Sollett’s docudrama. Starts Fri., Oct. 16

CONTINUES ON PG. 72

GOOSEBUMPS. Two teens try to round up the monsters accidentally let loose from author R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps series. Starts Fri., Oct. 16

Goodnight Mommy

(2015) 10/14 @ 7:30pm, 10/15 @ 10:00pm - The most talked about horror film of the year...dark, disturbing, and beautiful. _________________________________________________

Heart Like a Hand Grenade (2015) 10/15 @ 7:30pm - Inside look at the recording of Green Day’s seminal record American Idiot. One day only! _________________________________________________

Brew Cinema: Tremors (1990) Local beer, an exclusive poster, and the movie. _________________________________________________ Hollywood Halloween Party 10/17 @ 8:00pm - Joe Bob Briggs in person to introduce a 35mm screening of Trick or Treat (1986). Food, costume contest, and more! _________________________________________________

Silents, Please!

A FILM BY ELIZABETH VAN METER

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari & Nosferatu

10/18 @ 3;00pm & 7:00pm - Both with live music by The Andrew Alden Ensemble! _________________________________________________

TICKETS: JFilmPgh.org

Rocky Horror Picture Show 10/17 @ Midnight - With live shadowcast by the JCCP. STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16

PRESENTED BY

WEST HOMESTEAD AMC LOEWS WATERFRONT 22 300 West Waterfront Dr amctheatres.com

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Pather Panchali, The Apu Trilogy a care-taking gig at an isolated mountain hotel. But the place is wicked haunted, and soon the little family, including wife (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd), are in grave peril of losing their minds — and lives. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 17. Manor THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI. A classic of early cinema and the German Expressionist movement, Robert Wiene’s 1919 film depicts the titular mad doctor who travels with a somnambulant assistant whom he employs in a series of murders. The influential film — noted for its bizarre, off-kilter sets, striking costumes and hypnotic creepiness — will be presented with a live score performed by the Rochester, N.Y.-based Andrew Alden Ensemble, a contemporary electronic chambermusic group. 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. Hollywood. $8 ($15 double-feature with Nosferatu)

against the triad gangs, in Herman Yau’s 2013 martialarts actioner. 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 20. Parkway. Free THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN’T DIE. After a car accident, a doctor keeps his girlfriend’s decapitated head alive while he searches for a “donor body.” Joseph Green directs this 1962 horror film. 7:40 p.m. Tue., Oct. 16. Row House INVASION OF THE BEE GIRLS. Watch out for the ladies — and for heavens’ sakes, stay out of their beds — in Denis Sanders’ 1973 sexually charged horror film. 9:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 20. Row House

NOSFERATU. In this 1922 silent-film Dracula re-telling from F.W. Murnau, the vampire Orlock (Max Schreck) travels to England in search of new victims. The film will be presented with a live score performed by the Rochester, N.Y.-based Andrew Alden Ensemble, a contemporary electronic chamber-music group. 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. Hollywood. $10 ($15 double-feature with Cabinet) LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. How do you deal with a singing, man-eating plant? Frank Oz directs this 1986 adaptation of the 1982 Off-Broadway musical, itself adapted from a 1960 film. The film stars Rick Moranis and a slew of comic actors, including Steve Martin, John Candy and Bill Murray. Oct. 18-19. Row House NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. George Romero’s 1968 depiction of flesh-munching was ground-breaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility: no heroes, no easy resolutions — something terrible is just outside the door, and it’s gonna get us. Oct. 18-19. Row House HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL. Vincent Price stars in this 1959 horror classic from William Castle. Price plays an eccentric rich man who offers five strangers $10,000 each if they can spend just one night locked down in a mansion with an eerie history. Oct. 18-19. Row House RIVER’S EDGE. A teenager kills his girlfriend, then shows his friends the body, to mixed reactions, in Tim Hunter’s shades-of-grey 1986 drama. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about rivers. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. Regent Square A BUCKET OF BLOOD. Roger Corman’s 1959 schlocker depicts a sculptor whose works contain a gruesome secret. 6 p.m. Tue., Oct. 20. Row House IP MAN: THE FINAL FIGHT. In post-war Hong Kong, the legendary Wing Chun master goes fist and foot

Modern Times ZOMBIE. “When the earth spits out the dead … they will return to tear the flesh of the living.” That’s the truth in Lucio Fulci’s 1979 undead-o-rama, in which zombies run amok on a Caribbean island. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 21. Hollywood BACK TO THE FUTURE, PART 2. In this sequel to the popular time-traveling, family-fixing 1985 comedy Back to the Future, Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) gets sent to the future — actually, right now, Oct. 21, 2015 — to prevent his son from being tossed in prison. Robert Zemeckis directs this 1989 film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 21. AMC Waterfront, $5 BACK TO THE FUTURE, BACK TO THE FUTURE PART 2 and BACK TO THE FUTURE PART 3. Celebrate the arrival of the future — Oct. 21, 2015, as depicted in the events of Part 2 — with all three films charting the time-travel adventures of Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox). Robert Zemeckis directs all three. Wed., Oct. 21, through Fri., Oct. 23. Row House BRIGHT STAR. English-lit majors know that this story about the 19th-century Romantic poet John Keats isn’t going to end well. But Jane Campion’s account of his youthful love affair with Fanny Brawne is so sublimely seductive that Romantics and romantics alike may well hope it does. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 22. Melwood


[BOOKS]

HE SHOWS LITTLE, AND DARES TO TELL LESS, THAN MOST MODERN PAINTERS

GIRL POWER Five years in, the Pittsburgh Zine Fest is virtually a local institution. But even some of its supporters saw something was missing. Hence this week’s inaugural Feminist Zine Fest Pittsburgh, four days of feminist-themed readings, workshops, zine-making, a film screening and a dance party. “The Zine Fair is awesome, but we noticed over the years that there aren’t many women or transgender people there,” says Erin Oh, co-founder of the Zine Fair and an organizer of the Feminist Zine Fest. The new fest’s events, all free, take place at venues including Highland Park’s Union Project and Lawrenceville’s Spirit. Guests and presenters will include out-of-towners — zinesters like Erie native and high school sophomore Moe Williams, who launched her Cutthroat Cutie zine in May. She’s hosting a workshop at the fest’s main event, Sun., Oct. 18, at Oakland’s Frick Fine Arts Building. “The workshop is about what it means to be a young person in the zine scene and what it means for me to have feminism be a part of the zine I write,” says Williams. Cutthroat Cutie’s first self-published issue included extensive criticism of her school’s dress code. She now runs a school committee dedicated to changing that code. “It’s important to get inspired at a young age and be passionate about things.” What does feminism mean to Williams? “Girl power, but not in a sense where other genders are excluded. It involves social justice and women’s issues, but it’s not just about gender. It’s about race and sexual identity,” she says. “As we’ve gone through the process of organizing the festival, we’ve learned that feminism means different things to all of us,” says Oh. One thing is clear: Feminism can’t be limited to a list of parameters. Nor can the fest be limited to one day. It can’t even be limited to zines. “The film we’re screening is called Boy I Am, and it follows three transgender individuals as they prepare for transitioning,” says Oh. “It talks about how they each understand feminism as they’re transitioning. We’re showing this film because we’re very interested in creating dialogue between transgender people and people who identify as feminists because there is overlap. We want to be really intentional about making that overlap bigger and understanding each other better.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FEMINIST ZINE FEST PITTSBURGH Thu., Oct. 15-Sun., Oct. 18. Various venues. Free. www.feministzinefestpgh.tumblr.com N E W S

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An issue of Moe Williams’ zine Cutthroat Cutie {IMAGE COURTESY OF MOE WILLIAMS}

{BY JULIA WEST}

[ART REVIEW]

WELCOME BACK,

HOPPER {BY STUART SHEPPARD}

{LEISSER ART FUND, COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

Edward Hopper’s etching “Night Shadows” (1921)

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ANY AMERICAN masters have contributed to this country’s cultural identity, but only a rarefied few have built its essential foundation. The poetry of Walt Whitman, the essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson and the music of Louis Armstrong are all sui generis to the American ethos. In the visual arts, there’s one artist who is perhaps the least known, but the most recognized of all these giants, the painter Edward Hopper. Hopper’s works, most famously “Nighthawks” (1942), have so infused the creative psyche of this country that to describe all of the artists, film directors, writers and designers he has influenced could fill an entire book. A show exploring him, CMOA Collects Edward Hopper, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, is an opportunity for discovery that no American adult, and especially, no Ameri-

can child, should miss. Although “Nighthawks” is not part of this show, it does contain several of his masterworks, and several pieces never displayed in public before. Though he’s often called the ultimate realist, it appears, as you walk through this exhibition, that Hopper is

CMOA COLLECTS EDWARD HOPPER

continues through Oct. 26. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

actually one of the ultimate abstract painters. What makes this seeming contradiction possible is his absolute concentration on the sublime, which he evokes by the passionate exclusion of the prosaic: He shows little, and

dares to tell less, than almost any modern representational artist. Among the 17 works on view — all from the Carnegie’s collection — are many important paintings and watercolors. But it is the etchings that make this exhibit such a visceral experience. Some of them are among the most seminal in their medium. “Night Shadows” (1921) shows a solitary man surrounded by darkness, wading into the reflected light of a hidden streetlamp, virtually being swallowed by his own solitude in a mysterious urban landscape. The viewer is positioned above, as if standing on a filmmaker’s crane, in a way that presages film noir cinematography by two decades. Even more psychologically intense is “Evening Wind” (1921), which depicts a lone woman, kneeling naked on a bed, startled, perhaps, by the wind-blown CONTINUES ON PG. 74

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curtains violating the room and almost clutching her. This woman is any woman — and every woman — of the modern American sensibility. We can see ourselves in any of Hopper’s works, something we could never do in those of the past European masters. Like Whitman, Emerson and Armstrong, Hopper realized how fortunate we were not to have millennia of precursors as the European artists did: We became perhaps the last major culture able to invent its own national character. It was these etchings that led directly to Hopper’s originality and greatness as a painter. “After I took up etching my painting seemed to crystallize,” he remarked. And it was at this point in his career that he began to gain some recognition. The Carnegie proudly points out that the Carnegie Institute exhibited him several years later, but fails to mention that in 1924, it rejected him flatly. Had it accepted him then, the Carnegie might have given him the imprimatur of national recognition he was desperately seeking, but would not find for many years. Apparently, Hopper held no umbrage as he submitted again, the Carnegie eventually accepted him, and he came to Pittsburgh to judge for its 1939 International Exhibition. (CMOA Collects also includes the first painting Hopper ever sold, 1911’s “Sailing.”) Among the paintings displayed is the iconic “Cape Cod Afternoon” (1936), a portrait of an old Cape house, unconventionally viewed from the rear, in varying degrees of shade, stark below a brilliant sky. As with the aforementioned Night Shadows, Hopper loved to heighten the isolation of his subjects by contrasting them against some distant illumination, imbuing the character of light with an innate sadness. Perhaps nowhere does Hopper capture a purely American identity better than in works such as “Roofs of Washington Square” (1926), a watercolor depicting an array of rust-colored air vents and chimney stacks atop an apartment building that only his eye would find arresting. But as he portrays it, the view attains a striking emotional intensity. Hopper was proud to wrest our aesthetic consciousness away from the school of French painting dominant at the turn of the 20th century, and to enable us to appreciate what he called “our native architecture with its hideous beauty.” As you step into Gallery One of the Carnegie and become surrounded by his work, you can easily see why Hopper is so intrinsic to the American ethos. His influence is everywhere, because what he discovered and captured with his art was something already there before us, but which nobody had quite seen before. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[COMICS]

LINING UP {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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The local comics scene is booming, and ToonSeum exhibit Drawn in Pittsburgh is a good place to catch up. Curated by comics expert Wayne Wise, Copacetic Comics’ Bill Boichel and comics artist Joyana McDiarmid, it’s a roomful of framed work by about 30 area practitioners (mostly recent stuff, often excerpts of longer pieces). The quality is high, and little feels generic. Artists range from established talents like Mark Zingarelli — exhibiting a 1990 piece for Harvey Pekar’s fabled American Splendor series — to selfpublishing up-and-comers like Rachel Masilamani and Garrett Free. The styles range from LG Miller’s lush, retro ripping yarn “Hecock, The Last Hour” to Kirkland Glover’s wry, scrawled-in-graphite “The Trip to Morgantown.” There’s fantasy (in Chloe J. Newman’s “Appetite Lost”, a monster discovers pizza) and everyday fun, as with the girl pals of Caitlin Rose Boyle’s “An Itty Bitty Summoning.” Even for individual working artists, the subject matter can range similarly: Marcel Walker, for instance, contributes an emotionally wrenching true-story excerpt from “Chutz-POW! Superheroes of the Holocaust” alongside an out-there superhero tale, “Hero Corp, International.” Most of the work is pen-and-ink, though there’s plenty of digital output, too. Still, the biggest distinction might be between work that’s elliptical or expressionistic and more straightforward narratives. Cynthia Lee’s mysterious “Hands” and Teryl Binkney’s “Tiny Tales,” its word balloons filled with non-verbal symbols, nicely contrast series like Jim Rugg’s nationally known Street Angel and D.J. Coffman’s The God Child. In either case, though, most of Drawn in Pittsburgh does draw you in. DRAWN IN PITTSBURGH continues through Sun., Oct. 18. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

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Two Drawn in Pittsburgh artists with new publications are Joe Wos and Daniel McCloskey. Wos’ self-published The Three Little Pigsburghers is a picture book retelling “The Three Little Pigs” entirely in Pittsburghese, complete with Dahntahn, Arn City beer and a big bad wuff. Area native Wos’ transcription of the traditional working-class patois (“alunamin cans” is a favorite) is as charming as his drawings of the Steelers-jersey-garbed porcine siblings. Though nominally a kids’ book, Piggsburghers is one adults will enjoy too (www.mazetoons.wix.com). New from McCloskey is rather more adult fare: the first issue of Free Money, a planned series whose kick-ass heroine works as a one-woman demolition crew in a somewhat dystopian future Pittsburgh. It’s good edgy fun, gracefully drawn, with an outer-space subplot prepared to burst in any second (www.danielmccloskey.com). DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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From left: Javier Manente, Carter Ellis, Michael James, Michael Greer and Mason Alexander Park in Pittsburgh CLO’s Altar Boyz

ALTAR’D STATES {BY TED HOOVER}

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I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

FAIRY TALE {BY TED HOOVER}

IT’S ODD: I’m not much of a fan of Gilbert

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& Sullivan, who composed their landmark light operas during the reign of Queen Victoria, but I actually enjoy Iolanthe. So much so that I’ve purchased a recording and occasionally play it in the car. Iolanthe is your usual nearly impenetrable G&S nonsense (or “topsy turvy” as aficionados call it). This one’s about a

Plus

May 12 - 15

The evening is a concert presented by the Altar Boyz, a Christian boy band out of Ohio giving the final performance of its nationwide Raise the Praise tour. The singers plow their way through 12 numbers in 90 intermissionless minutes, with an occasional scene where we learn how they found each other and, ultimately, what’s going to happen when the lights go down for the last time. Del Aquila’s book is funny and sharp, and the music by Adler and Walker both lampoons and salutes high-octane pop rock. And all of it is put together with the simple goal of being insanely entertaining.

IN

March 18 & 19

ALTAR BOYZ

continues through Dec. 20. Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret at The Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $39.75-44.75. 412-456-6666 or www.clocabaret.com

ALICE WONDERLAND

January 22 & 23

AH, AUTUMN … a time when the nights begin to draw in, and a touch of frost chills the air. In defiant response, Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret presents the highvoltage, high-concept 2005 off-Broadway hit Altar Boyz in a production sure to blast away the cold. Kevin Del Aguila wrote the book and Gary Adler and Michael Patrick Walker supplied the music and lyrics for this bright, relentlessly energetic parody, which became the ninth-longest-running off-Broadway show in history.

CLO Cabaret director and choreographer Carlos Encinias is something of an Altar Boyz alum, having directed several productions around the country as well as having appeared in the show during its off-Broadway run. That goes a long way in explaining why this production is so slick and precise; on some level, Altar Boyz is also a contemporary dance show (the boys never stop moving), and Encinias does a masterly job recreating Christopher Gattelli’s original choreography, which is ferociously danced by Carter Ellis, Michael Greer, Michael James, Javier Manente and Mason Alexander Park. Each of these five gets a chance to shine on his individual solos, with a superb band comprising Robert Neumeyer, Catie Brown and RJ Held. Their comedy scenes also deservedly get a lot of laughs, but I return again to their work as dancers and the remarkable job they do. This production is sure to chase away those autumnal blues.

November 5 - 7

[PLAY REVIEWS]

Seriously Adventurous Theater

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CLASSIC ALBUMS LIVE PERFORMS

Pink Floyd Dark Side Of The Moon Note for Note. Cut for Cut.

Visit classicalbumslive.com for more information

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31 • 8:30PM Orchestra $30, $24 Loge $30; Balcony $24

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

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young shepherd, Strephon, born of mortal father and fairy mother. He loves shepherdess Phyllis, but because of his otherworldly parentage all kinds of trouble happens — including the entire House of Lords becoming his political slave. Like I said: wacky! But the music’s lovely and sometimes that can be enough, especially, I find, in traffic jams. For the Pittsburgh Savoyards (the local group dedicated to the G&S oeuvre) and its production of Iolanthe, the music is by far the most successful element of the evening.

IOLANTHE

PalacePA

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

continues through Sun., Oct. 18. Pittsburgh Savoyards at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $25. 412-734-8476 or www.pittsburghsavoyards.org

The reasons begin, as usual, with music director Guy Russo conducting a full, live orchestra. The show’s almost nonstop scoring, with folks in the pit sawing and blowing away for more than two hours, and Russo keeps them working as a solid ensemble. The show has definitely been cast with a focus more on vocal talent than acting chops. But that’s completely understandable for G&S. (I shudder to imagine a production that reversed those priorities.) A few roles in Iolanthe have been double-cast; the night I saw the show, Sarah College, Brennan A. Bobish and Rachel Good were charming as a troika of lithesome fairies, while Mark F. Harris sang the role of Strephon with a strong, clear voice. Mia Bonnewell’s Phyllis is a forceful stage presence and a lovely singer as well, and we’re left wishing she had more to do, which is also true for Jezebele Zbozny-DelPercio in the title role. The show’s brightest spots, however, are provided by John Teresi and Zach Luchetti as a couple of clueless British twits. Not only do they sing with powerful, expressive voices, but these two guys know how to play comedy. Their scenes together are the highlight of the production.

this update of the hilarious Much Ado About Nothing. Nineteen-sixties Italy provides a visually pleasing aesthetic and a strong vehicle for the action. With live music, dance, visual effects and electric dialogue, this is a lavish production. Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Drama has clearly done its research in culturally reinterpreting this play, and there are times when viewers have to remind themselves that it’s a university production they’re watching. The play revolves around the secretly plotted marriage of the unknowing Benedick (Josh Grosso) and Beatrice (Molly Griggs), a plan led by Prince Don Pedro (Chris Garber). Grosso’s and Griggs’ Benedick and Beatrice are a pair armed to the teeth with Shakespearean wit, and the two actors bounce off each other with skillful command. The audience loved Grosso’s monologues, and for good reason: His delivery was first-rate and his characterized interactions with those in the front row was delightful. It is a war of wits watching him and Griggs, and the audience’s heads swivel back and forth as if it were a tennis match. In the Bard’s silliest and most light-hearted play, there is a lot of potential for fun on stage. And from the start, CMU’s School of Drama wanted to impress. The opening scene is a sensational ensemble effort depicting a busy Italian town; there’s a band playing, a priest on a bicycle, and a military parade. The audience doesn’t know where to look.

THIS IS A LAVISH PRODUCTION.

Balcomb Greene (1904–1990), Organic Forms, 1939, Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches, Anonymous Gift with additional funding from the William Jamison Art Acquisition Fund, 2005.27

Your country. Your art. The Westmoreland Museum of American Art Grand Reopening Community Day Sunday, October 25 America has always been about open spaces, new frontiers and room to roam. And now, so are we with thousands more square feet and hundreds of new works of art in a collection more expansive, dynamic and accessible than ever. So come connect to your heritage and discover what moves you. For more info, visit thewestmoreland.org Community Day is generously supported by Jack Buncher Foundation Presenting Sponsor

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

BARD ITALIANO {BY GERARD STANLEY HORNBY}

DIRECTOR ANTHONY MCKAY has given

Shakespeare a swinging makeover in

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

continues through Sat., Oct. 17. Philip Chosky Theater, Carnegie Mellon campus, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-28.75. 412-268-2407 or www.drama.cmu.edu

At times, there were fears that the show relied too heavily on the aesthetic. And although the production was impressive, the cast’s delivery of Shakespeare’s language wasn’t in any way updated in the same way as was every other aspect. A difficult job, yes, but one that can be done. On the other hand, the actors’ manipulation of setting and props was knit together in an exciting and accomplished ensemble effort, with a lot of laughter as a result. This is a Shakespearean farce of foolish asides and mistaken identity. The audience loved watching it because, quite simply, it’s a lot of fun. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST & PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE COMPANY PRESENT

[BOOK REVIEW]

SHARES {BY FRED SHAW}

Obsession needn’t always be a bad thing. In a stimulating essay, noted poet Tony Hoagland argues that poetic obsession can be “nothing less than a blessing,” and that “a poet without a compelling, half-conscious story of the world may not have a heat source catalytic enough to channel into the work of a lifetime.” Readers will find these thoughts well represented in Phillip Terman’s newest Autumn House Press publication, Our Portion (New and Selected Poems). Using two decades’ worth of narrative verse that warmly coalesces around influential life moments, Terman’s found a sweet spot from which he rarely strays. In 233 pages, Our Portion nicely encapsulates Terman’s oeuvre with well-crafted writing that often incorporates aspects of Jewish faith into poems centering on family and nature. It’s a very readable, nonformulaic overview of the Barkeyville, Pa., resident and Clarion University professor’s work. “What We Pass On” utilizes a parent’s perspective on heritage: “I was a Bilfield, my mother begins, / starting with the name her father / gave her, before I was a Terman. / She is sitting at the kitchen table, / facing the clock with the Hebrew letters, / its poorly tuned motor a perpetual moan / in the background when the house / is full, louder when she’s alone / among furniture and portraits. / The names of Jews, she says, were for / their occupation, what they did.” It’s one poem of many filled with emotional resonance, a history lesson on the suffering of distant family members the speaker never had a chance to meet. While moments of Terman’s work can feel like a visit to a foreign country, with Yiddish phrases interspersed and no glossary supplied, it remains accessible. One favorite is Terman’s depiction of a first restaurant job in “Lobsters,” describing a hellish kitchen where a black cook shouts about the heat while, “chugging a dripping bottle of Stroh’s / as I lined dirty dish after dirty dish / onto the rack to be conveyed into / the machine, underage and overtime / paid off the clock …” It’s a coming-of-age poem stunningly full of accurate imagery some readers will know too well. While “Oil City Serenade” illuminates a Pennsylvania town down on its luck, it’s the stunning series of poems concerning the sudden loss of a beloved brother in “To a Scientist Dying Young” that highlights Terman’s writerly collection, a wise and sympathetic Our Portion.

AUGUST WILSON’S DIRECTED BY

Mark Clayton Southers

NOVEMBER 13-15&19-21•AUGUST WILSON CENTER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.1510.22.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

• Seats 41-56 Passengeers • Stereo, DVD & Monitors • Air Ride • Air conditioning • Restrooms • Wi-Fi upon Request

by James Lapine, weaves together several iconic fairy tales for a wry take on human desire. Cinderella, Red Ridinghood, Jack, a witch, a baker and his wife and an insincerely romantic prince all take the Pittsburgh Playhouse stage starting tonight. Point Park’s Conservatory Theatre Company production features a student cast, directed by Zeva Barzell. BO 8 p.m. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $12-24. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

Art by Laurie Trok

• Seats 40-41 Passengeers • High Back Reclining Seats • Stereo/CD/Aux Line-In • Rear Storage Area • Air conditioning

OCT. 16

INTERVAL NTE TERV R AL RV

+ FRI., OCT. 16 {ART}

• Seats 11-39 Passengeers • High Back Reclining Seats • Stereo/CD/Aux Line-In • Rear Storage Area • Air conditioning

+ THU., OCT. 15

• Seats 30 Passengers • Park Bench Seats Reserve our newest addition to our • Stereo/CD/Aux Line-In • Air Conditioning fleet now for your special event! • Rear Porch • Removable Sides

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

{STAGE} When Hal Holbrook began performing his one-man show Mark Twain Tonight, Twain himself was only 44 years buried, and Holbrook himself self was not yet age 30. That was in 1954. Twain Tonight is now the longest-running show w in the history of American theater, including three turns on Broadway. In this year of Twain’s 180thh birthday, the muchhonored Holbrook, now 90, brings his signature work to the Byham Theater. He portrays Twain presenting a selection of his writings, which might include anything from commentary on the Bible to scenes from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and which focus on the celebrated author and wit as social critic. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $51.75-99.75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SMEETA MAHANTI}

• Seats Up to 30 Passengeers • Wrap-Around Seating • Premium Sound W/Aux input • 46” & 34” Flat Screens w/ DVD • LED & Rope Lighting • Built-In Coolers

{STAGE} Whether you adored or ignored last year’s film adaptation, here’s your chance to see Into the Woods in its

Laurie Trok is best known for her intricate cut-paper sculptures, like the memorable floor-to-ceiling works in a recent exhibit at SPACE. But her new solo show at The MINE Factory is something of a spin-off. INTERVAL features cut-wood forms based on the forms cut away from her drawings on paper, and which function both as shapes and as paint surfaces. INTERVAL also includes Trok’s first exhibited works on canvas as well as work from her Paper Ball Project, which aims to create Pr 1,000 cut-paper pieces of art 1,0 based on the lines generated base crumpling paper into balls. by cr The opening reception is o tonight. tonig BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Oct. 28. conti 201 N. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. Free. P www.laurietrok.com

{STAGE} Women face many gender-related challenges, like the struggles of balancing motherhood and a career, and the stigma around choosing nontraditional paths. It’s an issue that playwright Andrea Lepcio (Looking for the Pony) tackles in Tunnel Vision, starting tonight by Off the Wall Productions at Carnegie Stage. Tunnel Vision, directed by Melissa Maxwell,

OCT. 21 Anthony Anth An thon th ony y Marra

original form, as a stage musical. The acclaimed 1986 show, with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book


sp otlight

It’s been six years since the untimely death of Michael Jackson. Love him or hate him, the eccentric music icon left behind a body of work that few in history can approach. From No. 1 hits, albums and videos to sold-out concerts and global superstardom, Jackson was a key part of the past half-century of pop culture. On Oct. 17, at Shady Side Academy’s Hillman Center for Performing Arts, the touring show King Michael: A Glorious Tribute to The King of Pop celebrates Jackson’s life from his early days with his brothers in The Jackson 5 to his megahits of the 1980s, ’90s and 2000s. Love Productions’ multimedia production features top Jackson impersonators including Grammy Award-winning singers and Broadway dancers, plus urban acrobats and a gospel choir performing his biggest hits, including “Billie Jean,” “Beat It,” “Thriller,” “Man in the Mirror” and more. Add Jackson’s most recognizable dance moves and choreographic routines, and the tribute should appeal to any fan of Jackson’s artistry. Broadway World called the production “spectacular.” This performance is its Pittsburgh premiere. Steve Sucato 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 17 (family activities at 6:30 p.m.). 423 Fox Chapel Road, Pittsburgh. $16-30. 412- 968-3040 or www.shadysideacademy.org

celebrates the feminine through a journey of selfacceptance and redemption. The world-premiere production stars Lisa Ann Goldsmith and Elizabeth Ruelas. Kelechi Urama 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 31. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $25-35. 724-873-3576 or www. insideoffthewall.com

can browse displays of vibrant, colorful flowers and view the interactive, fairy-tale-inspired miniature world of the Garden Railroad. The Fall Flower show runs three weeks. KU 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 8. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $11-15 (free for children under age 2). 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL G. WIEGMAN}

{MUSIC} The unconventional music and choreography of Igor Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring caused the audience to riot at its 1913 premiere, in Paris. However, Rite is now considered one of the most important musical works of the 20th century. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra presents The Rite of Spring as part of its BNY Mellon Grand Classics series at Heinz Hall, with guest conductor Yan Pascal Tortelier. A pre-concert talk accompanies each show, and the Three Rivers Young Peoples Orchestra performs one hour before Sunday’s performance. KU 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 17, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-94. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

It’s not often a novel is called “a flash in the heavens that makes you look up and believe in miracles.” But that’s how The Washington Post described Anthony Marra’s award-winning 2013 novel A Constellation of Vital Phenomena. The New York

{EXHIBIT}

OCT. 17

2015 Fall Flower Show {PARTY} Those wacky kids at new multipurpose hotspot Spirit are getting in on the Halloween action. The Psychedelic Monster Maze is an interactive attraction that includes Ian Brill’s immersive light installation “Labyrinth” and visual attractions by the Locomotive Explosive collective, DJ Keebs and Spirit staff. Nightly draws through

Bill Burr

Oct. 31 include live performers and DJs; tonight, for instance, see weird-jazz singer Phat Man Dee and the circus antics of the Stranger Dangerous Sideshow; on Saturday, expect disco from DJ Jarrett Tebbets. The Maze runs six nights weekly, with special musical guests highlighting big parties Oct. 30 and 31. BO 8 p.m.1 a.m. Continues through Oct. 31. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $7 (all-ages through 9 p.m.). 412-586-4111 or www.spiritpgh.com

+ SAT., OCT. 17 {EXHIBIT} Explore Kiku-no-hana — that’s Japanese for “chrysanthemum” — at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens’ 2015 Fall Flower Show. This year’s show spotlights the unique ways the blooms are traditionally grown in Japan, and their importance in Japanese culture. Visitors

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Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwriterseries. wordpress.com

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headlines in a performance rescheduled from July. Tickets from that show will be honored. KU 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $7.50-17. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

The Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh, founded in 1981, is finally getting its first independent, dedicated home, including meeting, exhibition and classroom space. Today, the Squirrel Hill facility holds its grand opening, including the premiere of a new, original exhibit. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy is a photographic and multimedia show honoring and commemorating local Holocaust survivors. This evening’s event at Squirrel Hill Plaza also includes presentation of the first annual Holocaust Educator Award. BO 5-7 p.m. 826 Hazelwood Ave., Squirrel Hill. $18 (free for Holocaust survivors, children and students). 412-421-1500 or www.holocaustcenterpgh.org

Bill Burr’s been busy. The Los Angeles-based comedian co-starred in Black and White, with Octavia Spencer and Kevin Spacey, and dropped his fourth hour-long standup special on Netflix last year. F Is for Family, an animated series he created and stars in, debuts on Netflix in December. He

OCT. 15

Mark Twain Tonight

+ WED., OCT. 21 {COMEDY} “I could hit my head in the bathtub ... bleed out, and three days later a cat will eat my face. I don’t have a cat, but when a single woman dies alone, a cat appears,” says Jen Kirkman in her Netflix special I’m Gonna Die Alone (and I Feel Fine). Tonight, the Los Angeles-based comedian, author, and podcaster visits the Rex Theater, where she

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Times bestselling novel, Marra’s first, is set during the Chechen conflict. The California-based writer, also the winner of the University of Pittsburgh’s 2015 Fred R. Brown Literary award, reads tonight at the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. The free event, cosponsored by the University Store on Fifth, is at Frick Fine Arts Auditorium. KU 8:30 p.m. Schenley Plaza,

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also hosts the popular podcast Bill Burr’s Monday Morning. Rolling Stone’s “undisputed heavyweight champ of rage-fueled humor” comes to Heinz Hall for a pair of performances. The 7 p.m. show is sold out. KU 7 and 9:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $49.25. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

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THEATER BETWEEN WORLDS. Work by THURSDAY OCT 15 /10PM LONE WOLF CLUB, BRENT & CO., JAYWALKER THURSDAY OCT 22 /10-11PM ALLINALINE THURSDAY OCT 29 /10-11PM EMO NIGHT $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

Brenda Stumpf. Thru Oct. 30. BoxHeart Gallery, Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. DEATH OF A SALESMAN. Presentation of a classic by the Duquesne University Red Masquers. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 18. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-4997. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK. A play based on the diaries of a teenage girl during WWII. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 25, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

THE GAME’S AFOOT. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 18, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. Community Presbyterian Church of Ben Avon, Ben Avon. 412-734-2050. INTO THE WOODS. A musical storybook mash up presented by Conservatory Theatre Company. Rockwell Theatre. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. IOLANTHE. Gilbert & Sullivan’s play about forbidden love. Presented by Pittsburgh Savoyards. Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 18. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. NABUCCO. Verdi’s classic opera. Presented by Pittsburgh Opera.

Ghostbustin’, zine-makin’ and play-watchin’ all weekend long Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

Fri., Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 18, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE NIGHT ALIVE. Tommy has made a mess of things: he’s living low in Dublin, just getting by on odd jobs & doing his best to avoid his ex-wife & kids. But when he rescues a mysterious woman, an escape out of the squalor is possible. Tue, Wed, Sun, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. PRELUDE TO A KISS. A fairy tale romance is challenged by the appearance of a mysterious old man at the wedding reception of two young lovers. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 16. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

[THEATER]

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. Presenting the kitschy rock ‘n’ roll sci fi gothic classic. Sat., Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. THE SECRET GARDEN: THE MUSICAL. 11 year old Mary Lennox returns to Yorkshire to live with reclusive Uncle Archibald & his invalid son, Colin. The estate’s many wonders include a magic garden which beckons the children & spirits from Mary’s past. Presented by The Heritage Players. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Seton Center, Brookline. http://www.bphp.org/. TEN-MINUTE PLAY FEST. A selection of 12 short plays by playwrights & actors of varying experience. Sun., Oct. 18, 6 p.m. Community Activity Center, Garfield. 412-956-6468.

COMEDY THU 15

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

MICHAEL PALASCAK, DOMINIQUE, CLAYTON ENGLISH, ANDY ERIKSON & IAN BAGG. Last Comic Standing Live Tour. 8 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 16 COMEDY ROYALE. Short form improv competition where the audience is the judge. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE DRAFT IMPROV. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. GHOSTBUSTERS LIVE READ. Staging of the classic 80s film, performed by local actors & comedians. Featuring Sean Collier, Terry Jones, Jethro Nolen, more. BYOB. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

pittsburghzombiefest.com

NOON - 8 PM

Admission: $10.00 Kids under 12* free PITTSBURGH’S BEST BANDS Klaymore Motorpsychos Dethlehem )LVWÀJKWLQWKH3DUNLQJ/RW /DG\%HDVW 7KH%ORRG\6HDPHQ

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF THERESA MARTUCCIO}

Live music, hot mulled cider and toasted-cheese sandwiches kick off the

Ten Minute Play Festival, an evening of 12 short plays. The event focuses on providing Please bring a non-perishable donation for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

an affordable and welcoming environment for patrons and artists. Some of the playwrights and actors are honing their skills, while others are trying their hands at drama for the first time. With fun as the first priority, the evening promises to be a laid-back theater experience. 4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. Garfield Activity Center, 113 N. Pacific Ave., Garfield. $3-5. 724-699-2613

COMEDY ROULETTE: NEARLY NUDE COMEDY HALLOWEEN EDITION. Tim Ross, Blair Parker, Day Bracey, Alex Homyak, John Dick Winters. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEATH SHOW IMPROV. Using information gathered from an audience member, The Death Show shows their funeral & what leads up to it. 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. ELECTRIC SLIDEZ: POWERPOINT THROWDOWN. give PowerPoint presentations to slide decks they’ve never seen CONTINUES ON PG. 81


Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Voyage to Vietnam. An immersive exhibit celebrating the Vietnamese Tet Festival. Opening reception LEWIS BLACK. October 17, 10 a.m. 7 p.m. Palace www. per 5 p.m. North Side. a p Theatre, Greensburg. pghcitym 412-322-5058. o .c 724-836-8000. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. 724-329-8501. Local & out-of-town comedians. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Captured by Indians: Warfare & Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. Assimilation on the 18th Century OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Frontier. During the mid-18th Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, century, thousands of settlers of South Side. 412-431-5282. European & African descent were TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. captured by Native Americans. SCIT resident house teams Using documentary evidence from perform their brand of long 18th & early 19th century sources, form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. period imagery, & artifacts from The Maker Theater, Shadyside. public & private collections in 412-404-2695. the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to AN EVENING W/ JEN KIRKMAN. its reverberations in modern 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. Native-, African- & Euro-American 412-381-6811. communities. Reconstructed fort before. BYOB. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. HOUSE TEAM MEGAMIX. Long-form improv comedy showcasing two Arcade house teams: Warp Zone & Change Machine. BYOB. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MACHENATION. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

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“Untitled” (porcelain with a celadon crackle glaze, 2015), by Jennifer Thomas. From the exhibition Potters’ Pots, at Fireborn Studios, South Side.

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Warhol By The Book. An exhibition on Warhol’s book work, from early student-work illustrations to his commercial work in the 50s. Opens October 10. North Side. 412-237-8300. GALLERIE CHIZ. Pour It On. Work by Tony Landolina & Nancy McNary Smith. Opening reception October 16, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. HOLOCAUST CENTER, UNITED JEWISH FEDERATION. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy Project. A photographic/ multimedia exhibit honoring & commemorating local Holocaust survivors. Opening reception October 18, 5-7 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1500. ON THE SKIDS. The Hunt. An exhibition of illustrations by Abby Diamond & Sean Coxen. Opening reception October 17, 7-9 p.m. Knoxville.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures 4: Travis K. Schwab: Lost and Found. Three new paintings, large portraits of Warhol, flanked by a variety of smaller canvases painted from the lost photobooth strips & books. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic

paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER. Humanae/I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Mosiac Works. Works by Stevo. Downtown. 412-325-6766. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Panoptica. Photos by Jessica Kalmar. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League Multimedia Exhibit. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXWOOD BOUTIQUE. Between the Lines. New & recent works by Jerome D’Angelo. East Liberty. 412-363-2993. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s influences. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public officials & business leaders. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARRIE FURNACE. Alloy Pittsburgh. Temporary site-based artworks by Rose Clancy, Oreen, Cohen,

Sarika Goulatia, Nick Liadis & Scott Turri. Rankin. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Amazing Artists Pittsburgh. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry, Patrick Schmidt, Sandra Moore, Carolyn Carson & Dimeji Onafuwa. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. Let’s Be Thankful. An open art show sponsored by the Cranberry Artist’s Network. Cranberry. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. A Nightmare on Liberty Avenue. Spooky group art show feat. 14 Pittsburgh artists. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. CULTURAL TRUST GALLERY. India in Focus. A six week festival celebrating Indian arts, dance, music, theater, more. Downtown. 412-456-6666. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FIREBORN STUDIOS & GALLERY. Potters’ Pots. The works of 28 Pittsburgh artists. South Side. 412-488-6835. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Forbidden Fruit. Porcelain figurines in the 18th century style by Chris CONTINUES ON PG. 83

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LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A fine jewelry exhibition that brings together scientific fact & pop culture in a showcase of wearable & decorative arts related to outer space, space travel, the space age, & the powerful influence these topics have had on human civilization. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium),

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houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall Flower Show. Be transported across the globe in Phipps’ Victorian glasshouse to explore the sensational Japanese tradition of mum growing. Runs through

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*Stuff We Like

Humanae/I AM AUGUST The skin color of each portrait in this outdoor photo exhibit is matched to a Pantone color, serving as a great visual reminder that not everything is so blackand-white. August Wilson Center, Downtown

1989 Ryan Adams’ full-length cover of the Taylor Swift album turns bubblegum pop on its head and gives it some edge.

The Alibi Like NPR’s Serial, this podcast from the U.K.’s Sunday Telegraph examines a true crime story — the unsolved murders of two women. www.soundcloud.com/ daily-telegraph/sets/the-alibi

Evan Williams Bourbon While the PLCB racks it closer to the bottom shelf than the top, its bite and character make it arguably the best deal between Old Granddad and Woodland Reserve.

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 81

Nov. 8. Garden Railroad. Model trains chug through miniature landscapes populated w/ living plants, whimsical props & fun interactive buttons. Runs through Feb. 28. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570.

DANCE FRI 16 LUKE MURPHY/ATTIC PROJECTS. Luke Murphy develops bold choreography & a constantly shifting visual environment for his newest work, On Triumph & Trauma, a poetic exploration of a turning point in Irish history & identity. 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SAT 17 STEEL CITY KITTY BURLESQUE & VARIETY SHOW. 10 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Maker Faire Pittsburgh at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side CRITIC: Amanda Boyer, a student from Squirrel Hill WHEN: Sun.,

Oct. 11 I heard about [Maker Faire Pittsburgh] through some friends here and different events at Pitt. I came because I’m majoring in mechanical engineering, and I like things that are made, so this was interesting to me. [Today’s event] was really great. I thought it was fun seeing all of these tables together and everyone showing their stuff. There was a little bit of everything, and it was cool to see people united and making things. The crowd was good. [The faire] wasn’t particularly crowded, so it was easy to get around. My favorite part was a woodworking station, and [the owner] had this little wooden thing on wheels, that basically looked like the bottom of a Segway. He was pushing it around and it was playing music through a horn. That was really cool. [Today’s event] was awesome, and everyone should have come. B Y K EL E C HI U RA M A

FUNDRAISERS THU 15

from this event will be donated to the PA Breast Cancer Coalition. Event components include a live DJ, live music performances, & the fashion show. 7 p.m. Father Ryan Arts Center, McKees Rocks. 412-467-6373. NIGHT OF A 1,000 ANDYS. DJs, dancing & dressing as your favorite Warhol time period. 8 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

JAMIE’S DREAM TEAM 1ST ANNUAL GALA. Dinner & dancing w/ the Celebrities of Pittsburgh. Benefits Jamie’s Dream Team. 7 p.m. Lemont, Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LOCAL ON THE ROCKS. Cocktail competition benefiting the Baierl Family YMCA + Western Area YMCA. 6 p.m. Highmark Stadium, Station Square. ALYSIA BURTON 412-720-5195. STEELE. Presenting RHYTHMS OF photographic, LIFE CONCERT. auditory & Fundraising concert documentary works . for Sonny Pugar www per from her book & a p ty Organization. 7 p.m. pghci m multimedia project .co Meadows Casino, “Delta Jewels”. Washington. JVH Auditorium. 724-503-1200. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100. CIGARS, SIRS, SIRENS & SONG! BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. Benefits Stage Right. 7 p.m. This month’s selection is DiSalvo’s Station Restaurant, Everything I Never Told You Latrobe. 724-539-0500. by Celeste Ng. 6 p.m. GET YOUR ARTIST ON! Create Carnegie Library, Oakland. art & support the library w/ Elaine 412-622-3116. Bergstrom. 7-9 p.m. Baldwin THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY Borough Public Library, Baldwin. HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. 412-885-2255. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. THE CRUSH: SUPER PINK thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. EDITION CHARITY FASHION com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, SHOW. 100% of the net proceeds Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

LITERARY THU 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

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KATE DICAMILLO. Reception & book signing. 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. www. pittsburghlectures.org. NANCY CHRISTIE. “Corporate Writing 101.” 6:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS. Readers Celine Roberts, Ben Gwin, Matthew Newton & Robert Yune. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. RABBI AARON BISNO. Reviewing Genesis. 10:15 a.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

FRI 16 RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. This month’s selection is The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 19 THE SCIENCE OF FEAR. Join Margee Kerr, ScareHouse’s official sociologist & fear researcher & author of Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear, for a discussion on why we like to be scared. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 20 STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 21 ANTHONY MARRA. Lecture from fiction writer. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. JOSHUA DAVID BELLIN. “Writing Fantasy & Science Fiction Creatures” 6:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. TRADITIONAL LORE FROM EAST ASIA. Wendelin Gray leads an exploration of traditional stories from the Ming & Qing Dynasties, Noh & Kabuki dramas as well as several modern tales. 7-8:30 p.m. Monroeville Public Library, Monroeville. 412-372-0500.

KIDSTUFF THU 15 DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing young innovators to the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty.


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Antemann. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FRICK FINE ARTS BUILDING. Reverberations. The Department of Studio Arts faculty members show their work. University Art Gallery. Oakland. www.studioarts.pitt.edu. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Collections. Painting by Mike McSorely. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Black Out the Sun. Photography by Douglas Duerring. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JOHN HERMANN JR. MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM. Germany in War Time - What an American Girl Saw & Heard. Ten paintings by Mary Ethel McAuley. 100 years ago, in October 1915, Mary Ethel McAuley & her mother arrived in Berlin. For two years, the younger McAuley, at age 19, painted scenes & wrote about the lives she observed in war-torn Berlin for the Pittsburg Dispatch. Bellevue. 412-761-8008. MARTHA GAULT ART GALLERY. appetite: process & priority of consumption. A joint exhibition by Christian Benefiel & Jeremy Entwistle. Slippery Rock. 724-738-2020. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal & Marnie Weber created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169.

MINE FACTORY. The Landscape Problem. Presenting works by Akiko Kotani, Lenore Thomas, Chris McGinnis, Kara Skylling, Matthew Conboy, Deborah Hosking, Patrick Schmidt, Daniel Roth, Blaine Siegel & Linda Price-Sneddon utilizing landscape — theoretically & or in an Art-Historical context—as a means to explore personal/ collective ideas through abstract imagery. Homewood. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. parallelgenres. Christine Barney, John Burton, Granite Calimpong, Bernie D’Onofrio, Jen Elek, Saman Kalantari, David Lewin, David Royce, Margaret Spacapan & Cheryl Wilson Smith exploring an interconnected set of parameters through different genres. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Wabi Sabi N@. An exhibition of photography & clay by Lori Cardille and Maryann (Maruska) Parker. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Spirits, Good & Evil: Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. From the Victorian Era. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Age-Specific. An exhibit by the Artist of the Year showing the aging of the 1960s generation. Printmaking 2015. An exhibit of new work by regional artists represents a wide variety of printmaking processes including intaglio, photogravure, wood cut, linoleum cut relief, silkscreen, collagraph & monotype. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. In the Air: Visualizing what we breath. Photographs that show the effects of western PA’s air quality. Oakland. 412-681-5449. REPAIR THE WORLD’S WORKSHOP. Snapshots of Poverty. 5 area residents document their personal experiences in photographs that show the impact of poverty

in our community. East Liberty. REVISION SPACE. Les Fleurs du Mâle. Photography & film by Steven Miller that pay homage to the French writer & political activist, Jean Genet. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. An exhibition distinguishing the historical & contemporary expressions of the Black Dandy phenomenon in popular culture. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. A Very Long Engagement. The works collected in this exhibition emerge from lengthy encounters with string – whether knotted, netted, interlaced, woven or percussed. Created by six fiber artists, the works form a kind of network of linked ideas, processes, physical properties & material qualities. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x15. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Aqueous International Exhibition. Showing original artists’ work in water-based media from around the world. Friendship. www.artspace.org. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Coding: We Are Always There. Exhibition of fiber art by Tina Williams Brewer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

clues about exhibits around the Children’s Museum. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. OCTOBER STAR PARTY. 6:40 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Mushroom walk w/ WPMC Identifier John Stuart at the North Park Swimming Pool Parking Lot to look for Henof-the-wood & other wild fall mushrooms. 10 a.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

MON 19 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Story time, make-and-takes, planetarium & live demo shows just for preschoolers. Mon. Thru Oct. 26 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

TUE 20 WISE WALKS. 30 to 45 minute walks to enjoy fall. Water & snack provided. Meet at the Pie Traynor Field in North Park. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

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WED 21

DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing young innovators to the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty.

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed BeechwoodFarms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

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OTHER STUFF THU 15 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. CARNEGIE MUSEUMS OF ART & NATURAL HISTORY FREE DAYS. Free admission for select days. Thu, 3-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 DEATH & DYING: THE TIBETAN TRADITION. 7 p.m. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. AN EVENING W/ BOB MOSES, A CIVIL RIGHTS LEGEND & EDUCATION ACTIVIST. 4:30 p.m. Porter Hall at CMU, Oakland. 412-268-2830. G. TERRY MADONNA. A talk on “Pennsylvania’s Role in Presidential Politics—Past & Present.” Ferguson Theater. 7:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-836-7890. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: INCOME DISPARITY. Panel discussion. 6:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. URBAN HOMESTEADING: FERMENT THIS. Learn how to lactoferment &make your very own kimchi & sauerkraut. 6 p.m. Penn State Center Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-482-3464. CONTINUES ON PG. 84

BOOK COOKS. Chefs age preschool to grade 2 will develop an appetite for nutritious foods while being introduced to books that reinforce social & academic skills. Registration required. 6:30 p.m., Wed., Nov. 18, 6:30 p.m. and Wed., Dec. 2, 6:30 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. STORY TIME! Join our Museum Educators as they bring stories to life through animated readings, songs & stretches. 2:30-3:30 p.m. and Wed., Oct. 28, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE THU 15

MUSIC & MOVEMENT STORY TIME. Come dance, sing, or play an instrument. We will make a simple instrument or two, dance & hear some stories related to music. This 30 minute program is for children ages three through five to enjoy w/ their caregiver or parent. Thu, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Thru Oct. 22 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

Halloween costume for a chance to win prizes. 7 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. NOCTURNAL ANIMALS. An hour-long program on topics relating the natural world or the history of the parks. Pre-registration recommended at www.alleghenycounty.us/ parks.nGrant Shelter. 7-8 p.m. South Park, South Park.

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SAT 17

CAMPFIRE GHOST STORIES. Watch a Park Ranger build a campfire &then listen to some spooky stories. Wear a

INSECT INVESTIGATORS. Children in grades K-5 can get up close w/ a variety of insects to learn how they eat, sleep &

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play. Registration required. 11 a.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. VOYAGE TO VIETNAM COOK IT! An interactive cooking demonstration hosted by a local guest chef. Prepare easy, delicious recipes inspired by the exhibit Voyage to Vietnam: Celebrating the Tet Festivals. 1:30-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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FALL FOLIAGE WALK. Meet at Ranch House. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

FRI 16 WISE WALKS. 1-2 mile walk around the neighborhood and learn a little about Oakland, & the Library. Fri. Thru Nov. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 17 THE EMMAUS 5K SPIRIT RUN. 10 a.m. South Side Trailhead, South Side. 412-381-0277. OCTOBER STAR PARTY. Weather permitting. 5:30 p.m. Mingo Creek

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WINE 101. Over three weeks, we cover a variety of topics including factors in grape growing & wine making, characteristics of 7 key varietals, how to taste, wine service & storage & food & wine pairing. Thu, 6 p.m. Thru Oct. 22 Dreadnought Wines, Lawrenceville. 412-391-8502.

THU 15 - SAT 17 REELQ: PITTSBURGH LGBT FILM FESTIVAL. For a full schedule, visit www.reelQ.org. Thru Oct. 17 Harris Theater, Downtown. 412-682-4111.

THU 15 - SUN 18 FEMINIST ZINE FEST. Workshops, zines, dancing, discussions, films, more. Various locations. For a full schedule, http://feminist zinefestpgh.tumblr.com/. 7-10 p.m., Fri., Oct. 16, 8 p.m.-12 a.m., Sat., Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 18, 12-5 p.m.

FRI 16 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554.

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GENEAOLOGY LOCK-IN. This evening of hands-on online research through Ancestry Library Edition, Heritage Quest Online, more. Research volunteers will be on hand to help. Advance registration is required due to limited space. 6:30-10 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. REUNIFICATION FOR EVERYBODY? MINORITARIAN PERSPECTIVES ON GERMAN REUNIFICATION. Lecture by Priscilla Layne, assistant professor, Department of Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures. Wesley W. Posvar Hall. 3-5 p.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-624-4141.

FRI 16 - SAT 17 FOLK FESTIVAL WEEKEND. Live music, dance, ethnic food & performances by eight of North America’s premier Bulgarian folk dance ensembles. Oct. 16-17 West Mifflin Middle School. 412-461-6188. WE REFUSE TO BE ENEMIES: STRUGGLE FOR A JUST PEACE IN PALESTINE-ISRAEL. Hear first hand accounts of life in Gaza & the West Bank & learn why activists work for justice in the U.S. & Palestine. Oct. 16-17 Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-370-6125.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.14/10.21.2015

FRI 16 - SUN 18

SAT 17

MONSTER BASH OCTOBERFEST. A three day festival of classic horror, science fiction films & classic television shows. 200 tables of memorabilia for sale, a film festival & movie & TV star appearances. Oct. 16-18 DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, Mars. 724-238-4317.

BALKAN DANCE PARTIES. live music by the BMNECC’s Otets Paissii band & guest ensembles. Folk dance experts offer lessons during the first hour. Third Sat of every month, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 21 Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

HEARTH

HEARTH is a nonprofit that provides transitional housing for homeless women and children. The organization is seeking volunteers for a variety of tasks, including: drivers for winter grocery trips, child care, preparation of apartments, and tutoring. For more information, see www.hearth-bp.org.

FIRST ANNUAL PSYCHEDELIC MONSTER MAZE. An interactive maze & installation, an immersive light installation, a piece from the Locomotive Explosive collective, DJ Keebs & staff. Music every night from different artists as well as pumpkin carving and contests on select evenings. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. and Tue-Thu, Sun, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Thru Oct. 31 Spirit, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

BETTER W/ AGE. A workshop on mature tree stewardship. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church, Regent Square. 412-371-8779 ext. 116. FALL FAMILY DAYS. A Revolutionary War encampment, a meet the author/book signing, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-836-1800. FINEVIEW STEP CHALLENGE. Race begins on Howard Street. 9 a.m. Fineview Neighborhood, Millvale. www.fineviewcitizens.org.

FINLEYVILLE ZOMBIE STOMP. Costume contest, Chinese auction & raffle, scavenger hunt, adult costume contest & live music from Gone South Band. Benefits Finleyville fire department, ambulance service, South Hills Pet Rescue & Washington County Humane Society. 11-2 a.m. Hackett Slovenian Club, Finleyville. 724-348-5503. FLAVOR OF PITTSBURGH. Taste your way through the foods that celebrity chefs, magazine writers & bloggers adore. Tour features samplings at local eateries & behindthe-scenes stories. 10 a.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-323-4709. GARDENING WITH ROSES. Learn about basic horticulture techniques, changing trends in rose gardens, sustainable, environmentally friendly gardening techniques & have a Q & A w/ the experts. Presented by the Mt. Lebanon Garden Tour Speaker Series & Pittsburgh Rose Society. 1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GREENFIELD BRIDGEFEST. Live music, raffle & bridge send off. 4 p.m.-12 a.m. 724-524-0191. HAUNTED HAT TEA & TOUR. Enjoy traditional tea followed by a tour of the mansion complete w/ ghost stories. At the Mansion. Reservations required by calling 412-767-9200. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HAY DAY FAMILY FALL FESTIVAL. Hay rides, maze, arts & crafts tent, barnyard petting zoo, pony rides, face painting, castle bounce, giant slide, balloon art, caricatures, puppet show, magician, games, more. Fairgrounds. 12-4 p.m. South Park, South Park. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. OPENSTREETS BRENTWOOD. An open space where toddlers to seniors can walk, bike, skate, dance, shop, socialize & participate in activities. Yoga, games, dance, more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Brentwood Library, Brentwood. 412-882-5694. PITTSBURGH BREWERY TOUR. Visit the three most iconic breweries in Pittsburgh. 11:30 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-323-4709. PREVIEW EVENT AT HOP FARM BREWING CO. Join the first class of chefs through the Smallman Galley restaurant incubator in this preview event, hosted by Matt Gouwens & Hop Farm, featuring small plates by each of the four chefs, paired w/ Hop Farm’s award-winning craft beers. 4 p.m. Hop Farm Brewing, Lawrenceville. 412-408-3248. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman


School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518.

SAT 17 - SUN 18

A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. DR. FAREED ZAKARIA. Speaking for The American Middle East Institute’s annual conference. 8 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Monthly meeting. 7 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

ORCHID SOCIETY OF SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA FALL FESTIVAL. An exhibit of blooming orchids, lectures, plant raffles, & orchid sales. 10 a.m.5 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 18, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 724-873-1904.

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CHILDREN’S HARVEST FESTIVAL. Children may try their hand at tin punch, corn crafts, doll making, butter churning, writing w/ a quill, sack racing, more. The giant leaf pile is a popular place FIRST ANNUAL PSYCHEDELIC for the kids. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Oliver MONSTER MAZE. An interactive Miller Homestead, South Park. maze & installation, an immersive 412-835-1554. light installation, a piece from the THE NATURAL PATH: Locomotive Explosive collective, DJ NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE Keebs & staff. Music every night & INTEGRATIVE CARE from different artists as well as CONFERENCE. Topics include: pumpkin carving and contests on Integrative Approach to Anxiety & select evenings. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m.Insomnia, naturopathic support for 1 a.m. and Tue-Thu, Sun, 8 p.m.men’s health, dietary supplements 12 a.m. Thru Oct. 31 Spirit, & nutrition for cancer patients. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Cooper Conference Room. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Hillman Cancer Center, Shadyside. 724-263-3603. ADOPTION & NARRATIVES RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game OF THE HUMAN. Two visiting hosted by DJ Jared Evans. scholars & two Pitt faculty Come alone or bring a members discuss narratives team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks of the human involved Theater, Oakmont. in conceptualizing 412-828-6322. adoption. Department SCAREHOUSE of English & Humanities www. per UNMASKED: Center. 3:30 p.m. pa pghcitym BEHIND-THEUniversity of Pittsburgh, .co SCREAMS TOUR. Oakland. 412-624-4141. Behind-the-scenes tour, a BACK TO THE FUTURE II mini-ScareHouse workshop on DAY. A screening of the movie, creating the spooky attraction; themed snacks, a hovering science light dinner at Church Brew experiment & a talk about the Works & seeing the action at The 2015 depicted in the movie vs. ScareHouse. Sun, 3-9 p.m. Thru reality. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Oct. 25 Station Square, Station Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Square. 412-323-4709. 412-531-1912. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. of local crafters & dealers selling Informal knitting session w/ literary unique items, from home made conversation. First and Third Wed foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 724-417-0223. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. COMPREHENSIVE SURVEY Union Project, Highland Park. OF THE COMPLETE 412-363-4550. PSYCHOLOGICAL WORKS OF THE PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE! FREUD. Course taught by Thomas 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Janoski, Ph.D delving into Beyond Greensburg. 724-836-8000. the Pleasure Principle, Project for a Scientific Psychology, Studies on Hysteria, & many others. Every other Mon, 7 p.m. Thru June 21 HOPE ACADEMY TEEN BAND. Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center, Seeking teen guitarists, bassists, Shadyside. 412-661-4224. percussionists, drummers & singers MT. LEBANON GENEALOGY for Hope Academy’s rock, pop, SOCIETY. Discussing family blues, jazz, folk band. Call to RSVP. history & picking up tips on Bring your instrument. October 17, research. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon 10 a.m. Thru Oct. 17. East Liberty Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-531-1912. 412-441-3800 x11. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s BEAUTIFUL CADAVER PROJECT. happening at the space & help Seeking playwrights to take part in

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a collaborative experimental writing project. The work written during the process will be produced in April 2016. To be considered as a participant, please email a 5 page writing sample & contact information to beautiful cadaverprojectpgh@gmail.com. Thru Oct. 16. 412-335-0978. BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. CHRISTMAS AROUND THE WORLD PARADE. Float entries are being accepted in the categories of commerical, non-profit & open. For more information, visit Inside ButlerCounty.com. Thru Oct. 30. FELLOWSHIP 16 INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION. Call for submissions of photography from any eligible local photographers. For more info & to submit, visit www.silvereye.org/ fellowship16. Thru Oct. 26. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. GHOULDILOCKS & THE THREE SCARES. Come dressed in costume & join Ghouldilocks & Little Bo Creep in a Halloween tale geared for children 2 to 8. Sat, 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-243-6464. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. Pittsburgh Society of Artists New Member Screening. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last two years. Drop off is October 18, 12:30-1 p.m. Thru Oct. 18. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. SIDEWALL MURAL PROJECT. Accepting mural submissions for the months January to June of 2016. Fill out submission form at sidewallproject.wordpress.com/ apply. Thru Nov. 1.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a cis woman in my mid 20s. I get a pang or a spasm of pain in a place deep in my clit/urethra area. I can’t pinpoint which part exactly. It takes me by surprise every time it happens, so I jerk around and press my crotch for a hot second — which doesn’t help, but it’s about the only thing I can do. This obviously does not look cool in public, and regardless of when it happens, the episode irritates me. Around four or five convulsions happen and then quickly it’s over. There’s no pattern — it happens at random times and anywhere from one to four times daily. It started about a week ago. It doesn’t hurt when I pee, apply pressure to the area, work out, masturbate or orgasm. I wonder if my lady spasms are associated with stress. I started a new job in September that I love, but it’s very demanding of my time, which has taken a toll on my mental and physical health (i.e., doing work things all fucking day, having no “me” time). What’s going on down there? What’s the solution? Will doing Kegels help me manage these spasms? (P.S. I’m a lesbian if that detail is helpful.) SUPER PERPLEXED ABOUT SPASMS MOSTLY

I shared your letter with Dr. Lori Brotto, an associate professor in the department of gynecology at the University of British Columbia. Brotto has done extensive research on vaginal/vulval pain and is a recognized expert on this subject and a lot of others. Brotto shared your letter with Dr. Jonathan Huber, an Ottawa-based gynecologist with expertise in treating genital pain. “SPASM definitely needs to see a physician as soon as possible to have her vulva and vagina examined,” Brotto and Huber wrote in their joint response. “The collection of symptoms she describes does not map perfectly onto any single diagnosis, so these ideas below are best guesses.” Before we get to those best guesses, a word of warning for the hypochondriacs in my readership: If you’re the kind of person who can’t read about mysterious symptoms and their possible causes without immediately developing those symptoms — particularly vaginahaving hypochondriacs — you might want to skip the rest of this response. OK, back to the good doctors … “Sudden onset, intermittent genital pain can be caused by a number of simple things, such as abrasions, an infection, an allergic reaction, buildup of smegma, dermatosis, etc.,” Brotto and Huber continued. “Although these things are unlikely to be the cause of her pain, they’re easy to rule out and treat, if necessary.” (“Wait just a minute,” I hear some of you crying. “Women don’t have problems with smegma — that’s just a dudes-with-foreskins* problem.” Brotto responds: “Women get smegma, too. We don’t hear about smegma in women because yeast infections get a lot more attention. But smegma in women is the same as smegma in men: a harmless buildup of skin cells and oils.”) “SPASM’s symptoms most closely map onto a condition called ‘interstitial cystitis’ (IC) or bladder pain syndrome,” Brotto and Huber explained. “IC is diagnosed when there is chronic bladder or urethral pain in the absence of a

known cause. It’s typically described as having the symptoms or sensations of a bladder infection, without actually having an infection. Although IC usually has a gradual onset and presents with pressure more often than pain, some women do describe a sudden onset, with pain as the most prominent symptom as opposed to pressure. Since IC often coexists with vulvodynia (vulval pain), dysmenorrhea (painful periods) and endometriosis (when endometrial tissue grows outside the uterus), if this individual has any of these other diagnoses, then IC may be more likely to account for her pain.” How can you determine whether it’s IC? “IC is best assessed by a urologist, who may choose to do further urine tests, like examination of urine under a microscope, and even a cystoscopy — putting a narrow camera through the urethra into the bladder to take a look.” Another possible cause: a urethral diverticulum. “It’s like an outpouching along the tube of the urethra,” Brotto and Huber wrote. “This is kind of like a dead-ended cave where urine and other debris can collect, which can possibly lead to infection and pain.” A gynecologist might be able to diagnose a diverticulum during a normal exam — just by feeling around — but you’ll most likely need to have a tiny camera stuffed up your urethra to diagnose this one too, SPASM. Moving on … “Some of her symptoms also sound like the beginnings of ‘persistent genital arousal disorder’ (PGAD), a condition of unwanted genital sensations and arousal in the absence of sexual desire. PGAD can be triggered by stress and temporarily relieved with orgasms. For some women with PGAD, it is related to starting or stopping a medication (especially antidepressants).” The good news: You don’t need to cram a selfie stick up your urethra to determine whether you’ve recently stopped taking antidepressants. More good news: There are treatments for all of these conditions. “In sum, we feel she should see a gynecologist first and possibly get a referral to a urologist,” Brotto and Huber concluded. “She also asks about whether Kegel exercises will help. Sometimes pelvic-floor dysfunction can contribute to vaginal/vulval pain, and seeing a pelvic-floor physiotherapist to learn proper pelvic-floor exercises (including but not limited to Kegels) can help. A good gynecologist will be able to test her pelvic-floor strength and control, and advise whether she should be seeing a pelvic-floor physiotherapist.” Follow Brotto on Twitter @DrLoriBrotto, and follow Huber @DrJonathanHuber. (P.S.: Lesbians, in my experience, are always helpful.)

P.S.: LESBIANS, IN MY EXPERIENCE, ARE ALWAYS HELPFUL.

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

* For the record, quickly, before Tumblr explodes: Some women have penises! Some women with penises are uncut! A tiny percentage of uncut-penis-having women have poor personal hygiene practices and consequently have smegma under their foreskins! #TheMoreYouKnow On the Lovecast: It’s everyone’s favorite halfmulleted, hilarious lesbian … Cameron Esposito! Listen at savagelovecast.com.

pghcitypaper

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

10.14-10.21

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Many astronomers believe that our universe began with the Big Bang. An inconceivably condensed speck of matter exploded, eventually expanding into thousands of billions of stars. It must have been a noisy event, right? Actually, no. Astronomers estimate that the roar of the primal eruption was just 120 decibels — less than the volume of a live rock concert. I suspect that you are also on the verge of your own personal Big Bang, Libra. It, too, will be relatively quiet for the amount of energy it unleashes.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): For now, you are excused from further work on the impossible tasks that have been grinding you down. You may take a break from the unsolvable riddles and cease your exhaustive efforts. And if you would also like to distance yourself from the farcical jokes the universe has been playing, go right ahead. To help enforce this transition, I hereby authorize you to enjoy a time of feasting and frolicking, which will serve as an antidote to your baffling trials. And I hereby declare that you have been as successful at weathering these trials as you could possibly be, even if the concrete proof of that is not yet entirely visible.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): One afternoon in September, I was hiking along a familiar path in the woods. As I passed my favorite grandmother oak, I spied a thick, 6-footlong snake loitering on the trail in front of me. In hundreds of previous visits, I had never before seen a creature bigger than a mouse. The serpent’s tail was hidden in the brush, but its head looked more like a harmless gopher snake’s than

a dangerous rattler’s. I took the opportunity to sing it three songs. It stayed for the duration, then slipped away after I finished. What a great omen! The next day, I made a tough but liberating decision to leave behind a good part of my life so as to focus more fully on a great part. With or without a snake sighting, Sagittarius, I foresee a comparable breakthrough for you sometime soon.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Canadian author Margaret Atwood has finished a new manuscript. It’s called Scribbler Moon. But it won’t be published as a book until the year 2114. Until then, it will be kept secret, along with the texts of many other writers who are creating work for a “Future Library.” The project’s director is conceptual artist Katie Paterson, who sees it as a response to George Orwell’s question, “How could you communicate with the future?” With this as your inspiration, Capricorn, try this exercise: Compose five messages you would you like to deliver to the person you will be in 2025.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Every hour of your life, millions of new cells are born to replace old cells that are dying. That’s why many parts of your body are composed of an entirely different collection of cells than they were years ago. If you are 35, for example, you have replaced your skeleton three times. Congratulations! Your creativity is spectacular, as is your ability to transform yourself. Normally these instinctual talents aren’t nearly as available to you in your efforts to recreate and transform your psyche, but they are now. In the coming months, you will have extraordinary power to revamp and rejuvenate everything about yourself, not just your physical organism.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The coming weeks will NOT be a favorable time to seek out allies you don’t even like that much or adventures that provide thrills you have felt a thousand times before. But the near future will be an excellent time to go on a quest for your personal version of the Holy Grail, a magic carpet, the key to the kingdom or an answer to the Sphinx’s riddle. In other words, Pisces, I advise you to channel your yearning toward experiences that steep your heart with a sense of wonder. Don’t bother with anything that degrades, disappoints or desensitizes you.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Here’s actor Bill Murray’s advice about relationships: “If you have someone that you think is The One, don’t just say, ‘OK, let’s pick a date. Let’s get married.’ Take that person and travel around the world. Buy a plane ticket for the two of you to go to places that are hard to go to and hard to get out of. And if, when you come back, you’re still in love with that person, get married at the airport.” In the coming weeks, Aries, I suggest you make comparable moves to test and deepen your own closest alliances. See what it’s like to get more seriously and deliriously intimate.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some firefighters use a wetter kind of water than the rest of us. It contains a small amount of biodegradable foam that makes it 10 times more effective in dousing blazes. With this as your cue, I suggest you work on making your emotions “wetter” than usual. By that I mean the following: When your feelings arise, give them your reverent attention. Marvel at how mysterious they are. Be grateful for how much life force they endow you with. Whether they are relatively “negative” or “positive,” regard them as interesting revelations that provide useful information and potential opportunities for growth.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is a BBC TV mini-series set in the early 19th century. It’s the

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fictional story of a lone wizard, Mr. Norrell, who seeks to revive the art of occult magic so as to accomplish practical works, like helping the English navy in its war against the French navy. Norrell is pleased to find an apprentice, Jonathan Strange, and draws up a course of study for him. Norrell tells Strange that the practice of magic is daunting, “but the study is a continual delight.” If you’re interested in taking on a similar challenge, Gemini, it’s available.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): We humans have put buttons on clothing for seven millennia. But for a long time these small knobs and disks were purely ornamental — meant to add beauty but not serve any other function. That changed in the 13th century, when our ancestors finally got around to inventing buttonholes. Buttons could then serve an additional purpose, providing a convenient way to fasten garments. I foresee the possibility of a comparable evolution in your personal life, Cancerian. You have an opening to dream up further uses for elements that have previously been onedimensional. Brainstorm about how you might expand the value of familiar things.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You would be wise to rediscover and revive your primal innocence. If you can figure out how to shed a few shreds of your sophistication and a few slivers of your excess dignity, you will literally boost your intelligence. That’s why I’m inviting you to explore the kingdom of childhood, where you can encounter stimuli that will freshen and sweeten your adulthood. Your upcoming schedule could include jumping in mud puddles, attending parties with imaginary friends, having uncivilized fun with wild toys and drinking boisterously from fountains of youth.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): While still a young man, Virgo author Leo Tolstoy wrote that “I have not met one man who is morally as good as I am.” He lived by a strict creed. “Eat moderately” was one of his “rules of life,” along with “Walk for an hour every day.” Others were equally stern: “Go to bed no later than 10 o’clock,” “Only do one thing at a time” and “Disallow flights of imagination unless necessary.” He did provide himself with wiggle room, however. One guideline allowed him to sleep two hours during the day. Another specified that he could visit a brothel twice a month. I’d love for you to be inspired by Tolstoy’s approach, Virgo. Now is a favorable time to revisit your own rules of life. As you refine and recommit yourself to these fundamental disciplines, be sure to give yourself enough slack. In what part of your life are you doing less than your best? Why? FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


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SMOKERS WANTED

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED

for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University!

DO YOU SMOKE CIGARETTES BUT ONLY ON SOME DAYS?

To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $85 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

STUDIES

STUDIES

Smokers Wanted!

CONSTIPATION

The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

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(412) 383-2059 or Text “NONDAILY” to (412) 999-2758 or visit smokingresearchgroup.com *Studies for non-daily smokers who do want to quit or who do not want to quit N E W S

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1. Switch type 6. One on drugs 10. Cuervo of tequila 14. Awareness ribbon’s spot 15. Stuff of legends 16. Way back in the day 17. ___ cadet 20. Ditch Day organizers: Abbr. 21. Brock of Modest Mouse 22. Bird’s homes 23. NFL turnover, e.g. 24. Planks muscle 25. Parking ___ 33. Balanced bridge hand opening 34. Chest thumper? 35. Cooperstown bldg. 37. Cookie maker Spunkmeyer 38. Namely 39. Y-chromosome carrier 40. It’s bad in French 101 41. Oil supporter? 42. Restroom lineup 43. Crawl ___ 46. Some Linux machines 47. Ringo Starr’s drumming son 48. Cosmetician Lauder 51. Zero Hunger

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Challenge grp. 54. Sukkot celebrant 57. ___ Mountain 60. Preppie’s label 61. Zesty flavor 62. Danny of the Boston Celtics 63. Heroine in a Hardy title 64. Easter colors? 65. Fish for breakfast

DOWN

1. Your parents, with “the” 2. Veet rival 3. Makes a decision 4. Cylindrical hat with a tassel 5. Arrive, as by jet 6. Arm bone 7. Fountain drink choice 8. Viking name 9. Gun, as the engine 10. “Freek’n You” R&B group 11. Disagreeable task 12. Sing with nonsense syllables 13. Shockers in the deep 18. :, in analogies 19. Not doing anything 23. Some converted rustic houses, maybe 24. Hair line?

25. It’s the end of the world 26. Ready to pour 27. “Mack The Knife” songwriter 28. Possessive pronoun 29. Not as fusty 30. Train tracks 31. “Macbeth” title 32. Custard ingredients 36. Tell all, with “up” 38. Indent settings 39. Rock fossil Jagger 41. Opening remarks provider 42. Hit TV show about Olivia Pope’s

crisis management firm 44. Knocks over 45. Baja blue 48. Worry about one’s period? 49. Grande, Venti, or Trenta at Starbucks 50. Possessive on Chinese menus 51. Golfer Bob 52. Use a whetstone on 53. Units of work 54. Put a hex on 55. Falling-off point 56. Goes #1 58. Since 1/1 59. 2016 Olympics host {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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THIS JUST IN

{BY FRANCIS RUPP}

A look at local news online and on the tube

DOWN DOG

PUNCHING DOWN

In his monthly District 36 newsletter, state Representative and undertaker Harry Readshaw (D-Allegheny) features a column written by his dead dog entitled, “Around the town with Buster.” It’s not clear whether this is the ghost of Buster writing, or someone ghost-writing on Buster’s behalf. In a recent column entitled “Photobombed!,” Buster talks up the merits of animal-protection legislation that Readshaw is co-sponsoring, and digresses from the topic to a recent exchange with a jaunty relative. “My young cousin Pennie jumped up and gave Harry a smack on the kisser. What old dog mentored Pennie on this tactic to get some treats? I wonder … heh heh heh. Would have done it myself, but jumping up on laps isn’t so Buster’s apparition writes about responsible gun easy for me lately.” legislation, and why it’s wrong. This raises so many questions. For example: When dogs die and go to heaven, aren’t their legs “brandnew?” Also, is Buster on the payroll? So I took these pressing questions to Readshaw.

In a recent post on That’s Church, it’s Virginia Montanez v. the Ignorance of the People when she calls out egregious remarks by online commenters. In particular, she zeroes in on one person’s comment in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review regarding Mayor Peduto’s announcement that he will welcome Syrian refugees. “ … I read some comments and I really regret it, but I’m going to write about it and you’re going to read this and you’re either going to agree with me, or you’re going to go to bed tonight with a nagging feeling in your brain that you’re not being a good and decent member of the HUMAN RACE,” wrote Montanez. Shaming in the digital age is hardly new. But the piece entitled, “Bad, Human! Bad,” was a tipping point for Pittsburgh, and a sure sign that we’ve had it up to our bandwidth with the callous caterwaulers of comment sections. Full disclosure: I know Virginia, and she is a good human. And I have often experienced similar feelings of disgust when I regretfully dove headfirst into the Dumpster of humanity known as the “comment section.” But when does wielding the power of the press to shame become bullying? Laura Hudson wrote a great 2013 piece in Wired in which she discusses when Penny Arcade webcomic artist Mike “Gabe” Krahulik dealt with a troll who’d been harassing a reader, and how he responded by posting the man’s emails and Twitter handle to his website in order to publicly shame him. “… even if you think your bullying is serving a greater good, the fact remains that you’re still just a bully,” wrote Hudson.

IS BUSTER WRITING AS A GHOST? OR IS BUSTER CHANNELING HIS LITERARY MUSINGS THROUGH YOU? “I assume that you could take your pick, but the second choice is more accurate.” HAS BUSTER EVER DISAGREED WITH YOU ON ANY ISSUES? “If there were differences of opinion, the issue was subject to reaching a compromise. He always disagreed when I attempted to take him for a walk in 90-degree weather.” WHY DOESN’T BUSTER HAVE “NEW LEGS”? “Everyone does get ‘new legs’ when they go to heaven. But sometimes, in reminiscing, he refers to and uses the past tense.” What writer isn’t guilty of that from time to time? Taxpayers will be relieved to know that Buster is not on the payroll. Readshaw told me that Buster writes because he is concerned with delivering a message to constituents, and for additional “treats.” So he’s just like a living blogger! If his columns prove nothing else, it’s “Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.”

Mayor William Peduto gave his own endorsement and retweeted the link to the “Bad, Human! Bad!” post, which, to hammer the point a bit more, names the person Montanez called out. Furthermore, Peduto’s retweet was then retweeted by people including the social-media editor at the Pittsburgh PostGazette. Are you following? “Going after” public figures can be life-destroying, but think of the consequences for someone who is a private citizen. Montanez ought to know better. When she was outed as PittGirl several years ago, she lost her job. If someone dehumanizes Syrian refugees, should we, in turn, dehumanize them? We must employ better tactics than shaming private citizens to state our positions — however heinous someone’s comment may be. Shaming them might silence them, but worse, it could and has ruined lives, even for those who have expressed remorse, and who I believe are truly sorry. Does achieving vindictiveness outweigh the price a private person might pay for being singled out? And does any of this really help the people of Syria? I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 14, 2015  

2015 Best of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 41

October 14, 2015  

2015 Best of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 41