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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.30/10.07.2015


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


EVENTS 10.2 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

10.17 – 8pm; VIP 7pm NIGHT OF 1,000 ANDYS Tickets $95/$85 Members; VIP $250 FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Richard Maxwell / New York City Players:

The Evening

11.4 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: LIVE! ON STAGE JONATHAN RICHMAN, FEATURING TOMMY LARKINS ON THE DRUMS! The Warhol entrance space Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

10.23 – 8pm New Hazlett Theater | Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students | visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

SOMEDAY IS NOW:

The Warhol partners with the New Hazlett Theater to present The Evening by playwright-director Richard Maxwell, who The New York Times recently referred to THE ART OF CORITA KENT theater auteur of his generation.” as “perhaps the greatest American experimental THROUGH APR 19 • 2015of a Divine Comedy-inspired triptych The Evening is considered the first installment that features signature Maxwell elements such a minimalist aesthetic and live music.

11.6 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN WITH AUTHOR AND FOOD HISTORIAN SUSAN ROSSI-WILCOX Free with museum admission

This performance contains adult subject matter and strong language. This performance was co-commissioned by The Warhol, Walker Art Center, On The Boards, and Performance Space 122 through the jointly awarded Spalding Gray Award. This performance is supported in part by an award through the National Endowment for the Arts and is a co-production of Kunsten FESTIVAL des Arts, with additional generous support provided by Greene Naftali Gallery and The Kitchen.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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If we got you any closer you would need a helmet.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


{EDITORIAL}

09.30/10.07.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns THEO SCHWARZ, KELECHI URAMA, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 39

GE T TO KN OW

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} {COVER PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON}

[NEWS]

are they going to relocate?” 06 “Where — Randall Taylor on the usefulness of an agreement to give Penn Plaza residents money to move from the housing complex in light of the city’s affordable housing crisis

[VIEWS]

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“I don’t know if English will ever become the official language of Pennsylvania, but I’m pretty sure that ‘idiocy’ is the official language of Daryl Metcalfe.” — Charlie Deitch on the latest antics by the conservative Republican legislator

[TASTE]

you’re a bartender, you can’t help but 18 “Ifbe interested in it.” — Butcher and the Rye’s Michael R. Anderson on brandy

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{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing & Sales Assistant MARIA SNYDER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

woodchuck w GUMPTION Legendary showman P.T. Barnum once noted, “everybody drank cider-spirits called ‘gumption’.” P Pairing the fresh juice of common eating apples with dry cider apples to bring you a bold and unique drinking experience.

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Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“It’s also awesome to have a group of friends that challenge you.” — Run Forever bassist Cassie Staub on band dynamics

{PUBLISHER}

[SCREEN]

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YO UR CR AF T BE ER

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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[ARTS]

didn’t want it to be about ‘I am 37 “ITheresa Brown, Super Nurse.’”— Theresa Brown on her new book, The Shift

[LAST PAGE]

from a country where they 55 “Coming were a persecuted minority, they’d never even seen a library.” — Whitehall Library Director Paula Kelly on the participants in the LEARN Bus program

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 42 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 50 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 51 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 53 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“THIS WHOLE THING HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO SHUT PEOPLE UP.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Photo-ops, fast-food stops and sly jabs. Each week we compile a list of ridiculous tweets from the politicians — and one reality-TV star — running for the Republican and Democratic presidential primary spots. Check our Blogh each Friday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Wake up and check out our #EarlyBurgh Instagram series showcasing earlymorning scenes throughout Pittsburgh. instagram.com/pghcitypaper

{PHOTOS BY AARON WARNICK}

This week: Zines, theater scenes and jazz queens. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

This week our #CPReaderArt comes from @jimamato01, who took this shot of PPG Place in Downtown. Tag your Instagram photos as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win a concert prize pack. Contest ends Oct. 1.

Residents of the Penn Plaza Apartments reached an agreement Sept. 28 to delay their pending evictions.

T

HE ISSUE OF affordable housing in Pittsburgh hit big this summer with the news that hundreds of residents were being evicted from the Penn Plaza Apartments in East Liberty. Officials responded promptly by holding a meeting to address anxious residents. City councilors, state representatives, county officials and Mayor Bill Peduto all attended. They seemed to be responding to East Liberty’s trend of losing low-income earners while gaining richer residents. Peduto promised residents that they “would be respected,” and vowed to use the occasion to make a “statement to developers that we do not do business this way.” The city’s affordable-housing task force also responded to the eviction, and the mayor’s office instituted meetings between the Penn Plaza residents’ tenant council and representatives of the buildings’ owner to try to reach an agreement that benefits the residents and future affordable-housing decisions. The buildings are owned by the Gumberg family, who

has extensive real-estate holdings — mostly malls and retail outlets — across the region. Last week, an agreement was reached that will see the Gumbergs, contribute to residents’ moving costs, among other things, appeasing many of the Penn Plaza residents.

Pittsburgh is starting to seriously address the affordable-housing crisis, but is it too late for the people who ignited the issue? {BY RYAN DETO} “This issue is bigger than us, so this deal helps to lay a great framework for more affordable housing in the city,” says Lillian Grate, president of the Penn Plaza tenant council. But critics question how this agreement can be considered a win for affordable

housing when it appears Penn Plaza residents will ultimately end up displaced from East Liberty. “People are never going to be able to duplicate that rent,” says current Penn Plaza resident Randall Taylor, of the belowmarket-rate rents of Penn Plaza. “Where are they going to relocate?” In early July, Pennley Park South, a Gumberg subsidiary that manages the Penn Plaza complex, issued 90-day evictions effective at the end of residents’ leases. Some residents have lived in Penn Plaza for more than 15 years. Some residents moved out soon after receiving the notices. No explanation was offered by the Gumbergs on the future of the buildings, and rumors started to circulate; many believed a big-box store would be replacing their homes, while others thought highend condos would take over. Peduto told City Paper in July that the Gumbergs planned to renovate the property as a combination of retail and housing. (A press release on the deal issued this past CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


Hops & Hopper Beer Event with Hopper Stories Thursday, October 10 Beer event: 6–8 p.m. Screening: 2–4 p.m. or 8–10 p.m.

On view through October 26, 2015

PET of the

WEEK

buy tickets at cmoa.org/hops Toast celebrated American artist Edward Hopper with beers from a selection of the best breweries in town. Enjoy folk tunes from local band The Hills and the Rivers and receive a souvenir pint glass.

Martin Garrido/Flickr, with modifications

presents

Up the fun and stay for a screening of Hopper Stories, a series of short vignettes by nine different directors using Hopper as muse.

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

cmoa.org

join us for a night of killer culture. ds Photo courtesy of Animal Frien

Thursday, October 29 Watch one of the greatest horror ďŹ lms of all time, Nosferatu, set to a live score penned and performed by musician George Sabol. Then, party 'til midnight with Pittsburgh's most cultured undead.

Arabella This gentle soul never expected to be homeless during her golden years. Lovely Arabella was brought to the shelter when her family could no longer afford to care for her. This peopleoriented older gal has few demands and is looking for a retirement home where she can be comfortable and feel secure. Arabella is hoping to spend her senior years in a settled environment and would make an ideal addition to a family with children over eight. Could it be yours?

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Nosferatu screening: 7:30–9 p.m. Halloween party: 9 p.m.–midnight

Culture Club is sponsored by

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LAND DEAL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

Monday confirms that plan.) On July 18, in response to the eviction notices, more than 140 residents voted to form a tenant council and elected representatives to meet with the city and the Gumbergs. Also following the eviction announcement, city officials began acting on affordable-housing plans. City Councilor Daniel Lavelle says that the affordable-housing task force, which was created in February, began to hold regular meetings only in the week following the formation of the Penn Plaza tenant council. Lavelle says that city councilors and their staff are planning to go neighborhood by neighborhood and identify each neighborhood’s affordable-housing concerns in the “very near future.” He adds that the city has hired outside consultants to determine what the best practices are in terms of creating affordable-housing legislation for Pittsburgh. Lavelle says the task force is looking beyond East Liberty because affordable housing is a city-wide problem. In fact, in Allegheny County, there are only 25 to 40 affordable and available rental units per 100 extremely low-income households, according to the 2015 Pennsylvania profile by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. City Council’s focus, according to Lavelle, is on ensuring that future communities are not displaced. “We are encouraging developers into looking to build [replacement properties] first, so residents can stay in the neighborhood,” he says. On Sept. 10, Peduto announced a plan to fund affordable housing in East Liberty, including possible funds for those displaced from Penn Plaza, according to a press release. Peduto’s chief of staff, Kevin Acklin, was also holding periodic meetings with representatives from the Penn Plaza tenants’ council and the Gumberg’s lawyers to reach an agreement on how best to address

The Penn Plaza Apartments has 310 rental units.

the potentially displaced. That agreement was released Sept. 28. And while the agreement addresses Penn Plaza residents’ concerns about immediate evictions and moving costs, it appears that those residents might not fit into any of the city’s affordablehousing plans. According to Grate, of the tenants’ council, the Gumbergs have agreed to provide as much as $ 1,600 to each household. This amount does come with conditions, she says, and some residents will not receive the entire amount. Penn Plaza consists of two large apartment buildings — one at 5600 Penn Ave. and the other at 5704 Penn Ave. — with 312 total units. Those living at 5600 Penn will be allowed to stay until the end of March 2017.

Those living in 5704 Penn have until the end of February 2016 to vacate. However, 20 units at 5600 will be made available for seniors and residents with children now living at 5704 Penn. According to the Sept. 28 statement from Peduto’s office, “the agreement creates a new standard for developments across Pittsburgh that threaten to displace long-term residents.” Also as part of the deal, the city has agreed to hire a consultant to help residents find new homes. The city says Penn Plaza residents will also be given a preference for rental units in the yetto-be-built Mellon Orchard site, a couple of blocks away from Penn Plaza. The Gumbergs have also committed to providing, to the affordable-housing fund, cash equal to 50 percent of any tax abate-

“THIS DEAL HELPS TO LAY A GREAT FRAMEWORK FOR MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN THE CITY.”

ment the company receives for future development of the Penn Plaza lot. The Gumbergs have also submitted an application to develop the Mellon Orchard site, with a commitment to making at least 30 percent of its units affordable for those earning up to half of the area’s average income. In exchange for vacating Penn Plaza, residents can receive money to help with relocation costs. According to the mayor’s office, residents living at 5704 Penn will receive $1,600, and residents in 5600 Penn will receive $800. Housing advocate Alethea Sims, of the Coalition of Organized Residents of East Liberty, is worried about the displacement of the Penn Plaza residents from East Liberty. She says that unless new, affordable housing complexes in the neighborhood start construction today, they will not be ready in time to accommodate all of the Penn Plaza residents. Two mixed-income developments are planned near the Penn Plaza site — the Mellon Orchard project and a development with about 50 units designated for low-income residents on the Larimer-East Liberty border. However, Mellon Orchard is still years from completion, according to East Liberty Development Inc. (ELDI) deputy director Skip Schwab. Stan Holbrook, a staffer at the Larimer Consensus Group, says there is a small possibility that the Larimer-East Liberty development could have some affordable units available by the time all Penn Plaza residents are kicked out in 2017. But that possibility is complicated by other requirements of the project. About half of its more than 300 units are guaranteed to those who will be forced to move from the nearby East Liberty Gardens public-housing project when it is torn down. Additionally, the waitlist for subsidizedhousing units in East Liberty is currently two to five years long. “Unfortunately, in many respects, we CONTINUES ON PG.10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


FREE thursday nights IN OCTOBER, 3–8 p.m.

Get your FREE flu shot at the museums on October 8! Free flu shots are limited to the first 300 requests. Must be 18 years of age or older. Normal parking fees apply. Parking is $6 per car after 3 p.m. Admission to paid Carnegie Museum of Art and Carnegie Museum of Natural History programs is not included.

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This flyer is being distributed by the Plum Borough School District as a public service. This is not a school program. All inquiries regarding this event/program should be directed to Education at 412-345-7300 x501.

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LAND DEAL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

are late,â€? says Lavelle of the city’s actions on affordable housing. “Hopefully, there is some assistance for [Penn Plaza residents] to ďŹ nd new homes immediately.â€? Lavelle hopes that some help will come from a bill he is introducing that would bar landlords from discriminating against Section 8 voucher-holders. When the evictions were announced, Penn Plaza had 41 units that were occupied by Section 8 voucher-holders. ELDI’s Schwab says that this seems to be an issue of unfortunate timing. He says that more mixed-income and affordable developments are planned for East Liberty, but several are still in the planning process. “It is deďŹ nitely a timing thing,â€? says Schwab. “That is why we are trying to ďŹ nd more affordable units.â€? But the mayor and council have other options. According to Zoning Department administrative specialist Rachel Salem, any major changes to the properties’ purpose would require a zoning change. If the Gumbergs want to convert the Penn Plaza lot to a mix of retail and housing, a zoning change would have to be approved by a city-council vote and the mayor’s signature. Asked if mayor or council would con-

sider using zoning as leverage against the Gumbergs, Lavelle says, “That is a legitimate question.â€? And while community members are upset with the agreement, Bill Bartlett, of the advocacy group Action United, says that the residents voted to accept the terms of the deal. He says “it is a great deal,â€? and he is “happy for the residents.â€? Bartlett also thinks the city’s affordablehousing discussion is headed in the right direction. “It is awesome that the city is saying we have an affordable-housing problem and trying to ďŹ x it,â€? he says. Penn Plaza tenant council representative Taylor disagrees. “This whole thing has been designed to shut people up,â€? he says. He believes, given the difďŹ cult circumstances of ďŹ nding a comparable below-market-rate unit in East Liberty, that most Penn Plaza residents will take the $1,600 check. But tenant-council president Grate says that many critics of the agreement are not solely focused on the residents and are more concerned with the larger issues affecting East Liberty: “We just fought for the residents, and I feel we got a good deal.â€? RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NO PARTY

Philly judge running as independent for Pa. Supreme Court {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} JUDGE PAUL PANEPINTO is the first inde-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

pendent candidate to run for the state Supreme Court since 1993. In campaigning for the upcoming November election, he says he’s offering voters 25 years of judicial experience on the bench and a nonpartisan approach to the highest court in the commonwealth. “This is an effort to say to the people [that] you have a choice: those nominated by a political party … or someone … not beholden to … a party label,” says Panepinto, of Philadelphia. “The political parties want to exclude other [candidates] from going to the people. I don’t know why I didn’t do this before, but it just hit me like a bolt of lightning that it’s the right thing to do.” The independent affiliation is relatively new for Panepinto: He admittedly ran as a Republican in past elections, including a 2009 bid for the Supreme Court. But now he’s asking voters to put aside party affiliations in the Supreme Court race. Pennsylvania is one of only six states where judicial candidates run on party lines. “I think voters should look at the record of a person,” says Panepinto. “How long have they been a judge, what areas does he handle, has he ever been cited for any judicial ethics or any issues? I haven’t as a lawyer, and I haven’t in 25 years as a judge.” The election will fill a record number of vacancies. Panepinto will face off against Democrats Christine Donohue, Kevin Dougherty and David Wecht, and Republicans Judith Olson, Michael George and Anne Covey. Voters will pick three. As of Sept. 14, Panepinto had spent $ 50,000 of his own money on the campaign. He’s put another $ 150,000 into his campaign fund. “I believe in this effort, and I’m willing to do what I have to do. I’m not depending on other people to support it,” Panepinto says. “It’s a commitment I made to Pennsylvania — to work to get the position where I feel I can make a difference.” But Panepinto also admits he has sought endorsements from organizations like the “family-friendly,” pro-life Life PAC and the Fraternal Order of Police, though he says these groups wouldn’t impact his rulings on the bench. “I’m Catholic and I’m pro-life, but I follow the law. Whatever the law is, that’s

what I follow,” says Panepinto. “If you’re pro-life and the jury gives you a death penalty, I can’t not enter in the death-penalty sentence. As a judge, I have to do that. The Constitution is what I have to follow.” And Panepinto is critical of former Supreme Court jurists, both Republicans and Democrats. When Panepinto ran as a Republican for the open Supreme Court seat, he was defeated by Republican candidate Joan Orie Melvin. Since then, Melvin has been convicted of using legislative and judicial staff for campaign work, and sentenced to three years’ house arrest. Her fellow justice, Democrat Seamus McCaffery, resigned after he was linked to the statewide pornographic-email scandal. These scandals have paved the way for an independent candidate to run, says Lynn Marks, executive director of Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts, a court-watchdog organization. While Marks’ group does not weigh in on candidates, she did note that Panepinto has run as a Republican in several elections. “It’s timely to have an independent nonpartisan candidate in light of the recent turmoil on the court,” says Marks. “While it’s significant, I don’t think it should be overestimated.” Panepinto acknowledges that people might question his party change, but he urges voters to look at his record. He’s served as a judge in criminal, civil and family courts. In listing his qualifications, he highlights his work with truancy, his efforts to speed up case adjudication, and his involvement in helping children get adopted. He’s also getting support from colleagues like Judge Cheryl Allen, a Republican who also ran for the Supreme Court during the primary. “It takes a tremendous amount of courage to attempt to pave an independent path to the court. We really do need a committed independent on the bench,” says Allen. “They have to be free of politics. They have to remember that they’re there to serve the people of the commonwealth. Unfortunately, we’ve seen justices removed from the bench either for disciplinary or criminal charges. These people did not uphold the law.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

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wants English to be the official language of the state of Pennsylvania … again. The plan would force all written state materials to be printed only in English. It would also force state and local governments to conduct all business in English. He’s tried this kind of thing before. He held a hearing on the matter at which he refused to let state Rep. Leslie Acosta, a Latina Democrat from Philadelphia, use her allotted two minutes to ask a question. It seems he got a little pissy when she actually used some of her time to speak in Spanish and decided to cut off her microphone. Meanwhile, Metcalfe allowed his own invited speakers to espouse the typical ’Merica-based “logic” about how this will actually help Spanish-speaking residents assimilate better to the U.S. One of those speakers was Bob Vandervoort, the leader of a group called ProEnglish, which the Southern Poverty Law Center describes as “a nativist extremist group.” Further, the SPLC says Vandervoort is also the “former head of the white nationalist group Chicagoland Friends of American Renaissance.” When confronted with the facts, Metcalfe offered this defense, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: “There was an email that was put out alleging that somebody was a white nationalist, which is quite a bit different than a white supremacist, and to say that somebody is a nationalist and that they are for the independence of their country and a patriot to defending their country is a lot different than somebody saying somebody is a racist. … And for whoever said the man was white to be begin with, that person was actually the racist tying his skin color to his patriotism and what he stands up for for the country.” I don’t know if English will ever become the official language of Pennsylvania, but I’m pretty sure that “idiocy” is the official language of Daryl Metcalfe. Normally I’m quick to chalk up Metcalfe’s antics to just more theater of the absurd, but it speaks to a bigger issue staring us in the face. At a time when Pennsylvania is operating without a budget and the federal government is facing yet another government shutdown, guys like Metcalfe are wasting their time holding hearings over divisive, obstructionist nonsense like English-only bills. And it’s no better in Con-

gress, where Republicans like Beaver County’s own Keith Rothfus think a government shutdown is a perfect tool to negotiate the defunding of Planned Parenthood. What do any of these things have to do with providing basic services to taxpayers and constituents? Using elected office to further one’s own personal beliefs is nothing new, but the levels at which it has crippled government seem to be at an all-time high. Legislators appear less willing to abandon their cockamamie ideological bullshit in favor of compromising on actual important issues — like passing timely budgets, providing adequate education funding, clearing a path to affordable health care and making sure all people are treated fairly and equitably. Instead, we’re left with Metcalfe shutting off people’s microphones and shouting them down (like he did with openly gay state Rep. Brian Sims when Sims tried to make a statement in favor of marriage equality last year), and God-loving, hate-mongering county clerks in Kentucky who refuse to do their job, because it flies in the face of their personal beliefs. We deserve better than this and we haven’t had it in a long time. Am I mainly talking about ultra-conservative Republicans? Yeah, I guess I am. But there are reasonable legislators out there on both sides of the aisle who have vastly different personal beliefs than mine who are still willing to govern with an open mind instead of with obstructionist tendencies. A prime example: state Rep. Mike Follmer. From my research, there’s not much Follmer and I would agree on ideologically speaking. But when confronted with facts about medical marijuana, Follmer took it upon himself to do his own research, changed his mind and has become one of the biggest champions of this bill. Why? Because it was the right thing to do. It’s hard to make meaningful gains in government when most of the time is spent parsing crap legislation meant to appease the citizenry sitting with closed minds and open mouths out on the farthest right. Want proof? Here are two statements that are true about Pennsylvania politics right now: Metcalfe’s English-only legislation will never become law, and we still don’t have a state budget. Which one have you heard more about in the past week?

I’M PRETTY SURE THAT “IDIOCY” IS THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGE OF DARYL METCALFE.

C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FUTBOL SEASON {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

SO-CALLED EXPERTS have long proclaimed soccer as America’s sport of the future. It is definitely the most popular sport in the world, but like the metric system, we refuse to adopt it. It’s kind of like the claims Dippin’ Dots has been making about the future of ice cream since the 1980s. So far, neither prognostication has come to fruition. Nevertheless, I went to see for myself what the future of American sports looks like by attending a Pittsburgh Riverhounds professional soccer game. My first observation: Highmark Stadium is the crown jewel of the Monongahela River. The 3,500-seat soccer mecca is snugly placed between the Mon on one side and Mount Washington and West Carson Street on the other. When I go to a new stadium, I find myself looking for ways to peek in and watch for free. The developers of this field must have had cheap people like me in mind when they designed it, because you cannot get a glimpse in. (Unless, of course, you decide to risk scaling the harrowing hillside.) This was a big night in the Pittsburgh soccer world — the last regular-season home game, against the Rochester Rhinos. The night was so significant that even Mayor Bill Peduto was in attendance, sans the “mayor” sash I wish he would wear like Diamond Joe Quimby does on The Simpsons. The Goodyear blimp even hovered above the festivities. Although it was there for aerial footage of the Pirates-Cubs game across the river, I pretended it was aware of the playoff implications of this match, too. The Hounds desperately needed a win or a tie to keep their 2015 United Soccer League playoff hopes alive. Standing in their way was the once-beaten Rhino squad. As the contest began, a group of about 50 people seated behind the goal started making a ruckus. These people are the soccer diehards known as the Steel Army. This unofficial branch of the Pittsburgh military sings, chants and beats on percussion instruments from the beginning of the match until it’s over, roughly 90 minutes later. Part enthusiastic college pep squad and part soccer hooligans, this rowdy ensemble makes the experience even more enjoyable. They even used the word “jagoff” in one of their chants; they are impossible not to love. Soccer still has not caught on in this country. Maybe it is because no one is crashing a car into a cement barrier at 180 mph, or because no one is getting a helmet driven into their head by a 260-pound linebacker who runs faster than a Smart Car.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

We like fast action and violence, subtleties be damned. It does take some getting used to — for instance, the clock ticks up instead of counting down, and it is not absolute. The referees will let the squads play on after time expires as long as it looks like there’s a play going. Announcements concerning sponsors are made while the ball is in play. So I watched the first 69 minutes and no one had scored. Then the Steel Army and the thousands in attendance disrupted the silence. The Hounds’ Lebo Moloto, the attacking midfielder from South Africa, got a pass from Robert Morris grad and Canadian Miro Cabrilo and booted it past the outstretched arms of the Rochester goalie. After an almost 70-minute scoring drought, my scant knowledge of the sport led me to believe it was a safe lead. But with only seven minutes to go, Rochester tied it up to dampen the enthusiasm. Stupid Rhinos, I hate them so much. The deadlock forced the Hounds into a must-win final game on the road in the Keystone Derby against the Harrisburg City Islanders. A 2-1 victory that night propelled the Riverhounds into the Eastern Conference playoffs, where they’d take on the New York Red Bulls II: the poor man’s version of the New York Red Bulls. The Riverhounds lost 4-2 in overtime. Highmark Stadium is one of those places in the city that you have to see to believe. A British soccer announcer from the BBC remarked that this stadium is the most beautiful soccer stadium he has ever seen. High praise, even from a snarky Brit. Yes, there are cheap seats: They start at $10 for standing-room-only tickets. High-end seats — for the Sewickley and Fox Chapel crowd — are only $20. It’s time to get on board. The future of American sports has arrived, complete with a state-of-the-art stadium that even sells Dippin’ Dots. Buy them and watch the game — it will feel like you boarded a time machine and are hurtling into the future! I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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HEIRLOOM’S PENNE ALL’AMATRICIANA WAS AMONG THE BEST WE’VE HAD

GOOD CUPS {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} As far as Phil Johnson is concerned, there’s really only one goal for this year’s Pittsburgh Specialty Coffee Week, slated for Oct. 19-25: exposure. “This event is about building a community and getting people aware of the specialty-coffee industry,” says Johnson, roaster and buyer for Commonplace Coffee Company, which has several local locations. “There are not a lot of people talking about specialty coffee, and we want to foster that culture and hopefully expand the reach of specialty coffee and all the exciting things you can do with it.” According to Johnson, specialty coffee is an “industry term,” with products rated on a scale by the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Starbucks is a brand of specialty coffee that everyone knows, but the goal of the week is to highlight local purveyors. “Specialty coffee is more than just a latte,” Johnson says. “There are a lot of things that go into creating this cup of coffee, and the programming during the week will allow people to learn as much as you want to about the process. … We try to do justice and honor to the entire supply chain, from the grower to the roaster to the barista who prepares your cup of coffee.” Unlike other products, the handling of coffee from farm to cup can greatly affect the end product. “Take wine, for instance,” Johnson says. “A vineyard grows its grapes, makes its wine, bottles it up and ships out a finished product. They have complete control over the quality. But coffee has each of these distinct parts, and if it gets screwed up at any level, the quality can suffer.” In addition to Commonplace, other venues participating in Specialty Coffee Week are: 4121 Main, in Bloomfield; KLVN Coffee Lab, in Munhall; 21st Street Coffee, in the Strip District; Constellation Coffee and Espresso a Mano, both in Lawrenceville; Café d’Amore, in the Strip and Lawrenceville; and Tazza d’Oro, in Highland Park. Johnson says events range from espresso-tastings and a home-brewing workshop to a lecture and Q&A session providing insights on the steps it takes to get coffee from the grower’s farm to the cup. There will also be a competition between local latte artists and even a “worst cup of coffee” contest. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For a complete list of events go to www.pghcoffeeweek.com. N E W S

REFINED

DINING

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

EAVER IS TRULY a standout among the county seats surrounding Allegheny — a riverfront city with an august history, small-town feel, impressive architecture and gracious streets. Third Street, Beaver’s broad main thoroughfare, features two solid blocks of all kinds of businesses, including some fairly urbane restaurants. A recent addition is Heirloom, whose website touts a fresh and local take on “modern European cuisine.” Perhaps the website was exaggerating, or perhaps it hasn’t kept up with the kitchen, whose offerings when we dined were mostly Italian and American with a smattering of international options. A few are vegetarian, but a focus on meat was apparent in the house-smoked barbecue section, as well as the house-cured bacon and pancetta. Pulled pork appeared in a number of guises; we tried it on a flatbread

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Crostini with cucumbers and house-cured bacon

with smoked gouda and buttermilkfried onions. The crust trended toward cracker-like crispness rather than doughy chew, but it wasn’t too brittle. The pork was of very good quality, tender but with some extrasmoky, nearly charred shreds. Though

HEIRLOOM

690 Third St., Beaver. 724-770-9062 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sat. 2-10 p.m. PRICES: Small plates, sharing plates, soups and salads $8-13; large plates $12-25 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED the barbecue sauce was a touch sweet, the ultra-crispy onion straws balanced it with their salty savor. A crab tostada was simple, perhaps too simple: just a small scoop of shredded crab atop a small round of fried tortilla,

topped with a couple of thin slices of avocado and diced tomato. The presentation was beautiful, the tostada was gloriously crisp, the crab was fresh and succulent, and the avocado was soft and ripe. But these component flavors and textures failed to meld and add up to more than the sum of their parts. Lime wedges helped a little, but bolder seasoning, or even a light sauce, was needed to pull this dish together and make it sing. Chicken saltimbocca was also elemental, but this preparation wasn’t lacking, thanks to beautifully tender breasts topped with sage leaves, thinly sliced pancetta and a lemon-butter sauce that was light yet luscious. Mashed potatoes on the side were rustic and rich, while green beans were brilliant green and crisp, barely cooked but not tough. Certain pasta dishes are offered as entrees, and there is also a build-yourown pasta option. CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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From the entrée menu, Heirloom’s penne all’Amatriciana was among the best we’ve had anywhere, including a cherished home recipe. The rich flavor of perfectly ripe, roasted tomatoes, at the peak of their season, bloomed throughout the sauce, which was studded with both bacon and pancetta — the former meaty and smoky, the latter more delicate and salty — both in fine dice and in abundance. Just writing about it makes us wish we could taste it again, right now.

Hora Feliz

@casareynamex

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

“BRANDY IS MUCH MORE FINESSEDRIVEN THAN WHISKEY.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

The fruit liquor makes a comeback

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242

BRANDY ANEW

Our son was richly rewarded for his restraint in ordering from the buildyou-own pasta menu, adding bacon to Alfredo sauce to create a slight variant on classic fettucine Alfredo. The sauce displayed the perfect balance between sweetly creamy and salty notes, with a texture that was luxurious but not heavy or clumpy. Heirloom is proud of its from-scratch approach, though it can result in some timing issues. But when a large party ordered shortly before we did, slowing our order, the chef made it up to us with a complimentary dessert. From the three choices (surprisingly, Dine-In, Take-Out, Catering none chocolate) on a regularly rotating list, we chose an apple turnover. Warm from the oven, it featured a light, flaky crust filled with soon-to-be-seasonal apples. Adding to its appeal, it was lightly spiced rather than cinnamon-bombed, and topped with good vanilla ice cream. This was a superb finish to an allaround excellent meal. Downtown Beaver can now add fine dining to its list of already considerable charms.

$2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

• 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

When you hear the word “brandy,” the image that comes to mind is probably a bit musty. Old men in smoking jackets, perhaps, or snifters atop stacks of decaying leather-bound books. While rye and gin have become darlings of the American craft-cocktail world, that bottle of brandy has long remained at the back of the cabinet. Now, thanks to new distillers and enthusiastic bartenders, brandy is starting to get some serious love. “If you’re a bartender, you can’t help but be interested in it,” explains Michael R. Anderson, bar manager at Butcher and the Rye. “Brandy represents something that is made in an artisan way.” The category, which is defined only as a spirit distilled from fruit, includes everything from traditional French cognac to South American pisco. Though brandy is central in many countries’ drinking cultures, it’s long been overshadowed in America by another brown spirit. Anderson runs a decidedly whiskeyoriented bar program but talks enthusiastically about brandy’s rich mouthfeel and its “maritime fog” qualities. One new distiller, Copper & Kings, has him particularly excited. The Louisville, Ky.-based distillery crafts grape and apple brandies that are making their way into the Pittsburgh market. Though Copper & Kings distills its brandy in classic copper-pot stills, its other methods (like blasting rock music in the barrel room to vibrate the wood and aid the aging process) are anything but traditional. Local distillers are getting into the brandy game as well. Maggie’s Farm made a small batch of pear eau de vie last year and might experiment with others. Wigle Whiskey is currently aging a peach brandy and a Calvados-style apple brandy (both distilled from local fruit) that will be released in the next two years. “Brandy is much more finesse-driven than whiskey,” says Anderson. That finesse extends to the glass, where the spirit makes for elegant spins on classic cocktails, like Butcher’s Applejack Sazerac. And on a cool fall evening, a brandy old-fashioned is just right.

Monday & Thursday

(Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

On the RoCKs


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALLA FAMIGLIA. 804 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown. 412-488-1440. The Italian restaurant is an elder statesman of Pittsburgh fine dining, but hardly stuck in the past. The frequently changing menu is anchored by classics like beans and greens and a meatball appetizer, plus its signature item: a double-cut veal chop, available in three refined preparations. LE AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE APSARA CAFÉ. 1703 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-251-0664. This storefront restaurant offers primarily Cambodian food alongside Thai and a limited Chinese selection, with a menu balanced between unfamiliar and familiar dishes. For less common fare, try Cambodian puffed rice squares, or saramann, cubes of chuck slow-simmered in a thick, warmly spiced coconut-milk sauce. KF

New MENU New COCKTAILS New MUSIC

Tan Lac Vien {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} get much better than Daphne’s shish kebab. KF DINETTE. 5996 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thin-crust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE

BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. A bar that serves well-designed retro chic with its whiskey and beer, Brillobox is (for now) the cool place to be. The menu isn’t lengthy, but it’s broad: Choose from bar staples or more inventive (and veggie-friendly) specialties such as Moroccan roasted-vegetable stew or herbed polenta wedges. JE DAPHNE. 5811 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-1130. Outside seating is a plus here, but the well-prepared Turkish food is a year-round asset. The menu is familiar — hummus, falafel, gyros, shish kebab — but the execution is notable and the flavors rich. Lamb features as sausages, chops and a burger, and grilled chicken breast doesn’t

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grille GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean cuisine, including in-house chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushi-like rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stir-fry) to spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF

(with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE

J.W. HALL’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD INN. 2284 Broadhead Road, Aliquippa. 724-375-6860. This old-fashioned, family-style steakhouse offers a satisfying, well-executed menu of surf-and-turf favorites, including broiled shrimp appetizer, langostinos and prime rib. The menu’s emphasis on steak and seafood rises to special occasions, while plenty of pasta dishes, sandwiches and pub-style appetizers accommodate regulars. LE

CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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Beechview

2056 Broadway Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15216

412.344.4700

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails –

casarastapgh.com

422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

JAMESSTREETGASTROPUB.COM

IMPRESSIONZ. 6008 Broad St., East Liberty. 412-362-7134. This family-run Jamaican restaurant specializes in island cuisine — and welcoming service. The menu offers the island specialty, jerk chicken, and a variety of fish preparations (including jerk), as well a few stews and curries. For a tender meat dish, don’t miss the well-prepared goat curry or the ox-tail stew. KF

LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-251-0031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE

HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN POSOLE, MENUDO, SOPES, TACOS, CEVICHE AND MUCH MORE.

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LUNCH BUFFET EVERY DAY (11:30AM-3:00PM)

Coriander INDIA BAR & G GRILL

40 Craft Beers w

ontap

w

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

3 OFF BUFFET ½

$ 24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

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Buy 2 adult buffets, get $3 off (VALID 7 DAYS A WEEK) With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Buy any entrée, get a 2nd entrée of equal or lesser value ½ off. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Now Featuring!

FULL BAR OPEN TIL 10PM

2201 Murray Ave Ave, Squirrel HI HIll | CORIANDERINDIANGRILL.COM +

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OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Reservation R T Take-Out Free Delivery F Catering C

Ramen Bar

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Japanese Cuisine

Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

TAKE OUT | DELIVERY | ORDER ONLINE Piacquadio’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

PARTY ROOM AVAILABLE (Call for Reservations)

Oakland 414 South Craig St. AM PM Mon-Sat 11 -9 Sun 12PM-9PM

Squirrel Hill 5874 1/2 Forbes Ave. AM PM 5860 Forbes Ave, 15217 • Squirrel Hill

ions tions and preparat “Different combina ts.” at dazzled our palle th l ea m a te ea cr to per Approved

CALL (412) 521-5138 521-5899

Tel 412-521-1313 • Fax 412-521-1223

OAKLAND 328 Atwood St. Tel 412-621-6889 • Fax 412-621-6890

D

412-421-9529 412-421-2238

RESERVATION • TAKE-OUT FREE DELIVERY • CATERING

NNING SAND W WI S! HE IC

SQUIRREL HILL 1900 Murray Ave.

AWA R

- Pittsburgh City Pa

Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

NorthSide Sandwich ars Running! Winner 4 Ye

Mon-Thur 11am-10pm / Fri-Sat 11am-11pm / Sun Noon-10pm

www.sichuan-gourmet.com

5 OFF

$

ANY PURCHASE of $30 or more

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT. NOT VALID ON DELIVERY. SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

8 OFF

$

ANY PURCHASE of $50 or more

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT. NOT VALID ON DELIVERY. SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

10% OFF

TOTAL PURCHASE

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT. NOT VALID ON DELIVERY. SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

HAPPY HOUR

11/2 /2 O OFF FF A ALL LL DRAFTS & $2 OFF MUNCHIES

Mon-Thurs 5-7 • Fri & Sat 4:30-7:30

BLACK & GOLD FOOTBALL SUNDAYS OPEN DAILY • 11AM - 1:30AM

862 WESTERN AVE. 412-321-4550 themoderncafe.com

LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straight-up, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE

(bulgogi, jerk chicken), and the humble, hand-held taco becomes a palette for recombining world cuisines, one tortilla at a time. Try the Pittsburgh taco, with well-seasoned French fries, sriracha-ranch slaw and strips of grilled steak. KE SOUTH SIDE BARBECUE COMPANY. 75 S. 17th St. South Side. 412-381-4566. Graduating from a food truck, this venue offers barbecued meat — enormous wings, St. Louis-style ribs, and pulled pork and chicken, also available as sandwiches. The adventurous can try the “bar-b-cone,” a waffle cone filled with mac-and-cheese, pulled pork and slaw, topped with sauce. KE

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

SUKHOTHAI BISTRO. 5813 Forbes OISHII BENTO. 119 w Ave., Squirrel Hill. r e p a p pghcitym Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-521-8989. This .co 412-687-3335. Bamboo restaurant merges the walls and a low counter traditional flavors and with colorful cloth cubes for preparations of Thailand seating denote a place for with modern European-bistro moderately priced Japanese food, aspirations. The menu features including sushi. Oishii also adds an assortment of curries and rice a few Korean dishes for variety and noodle dishes, peppered with and spice; those seeking a little a few more intriguing options heat might consider bulgogi, among the chef’s specials and the Korean BBQ. JF entrée lists. KF PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake baked-noodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in old-fashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE SIRENA TACO JOINT AND BAR. 3909 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-0329. Take some classic Mexi-Cali combos, add some trans-national twists

TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8888. This Vietnamese restaurant offers the popular pho and bun entrees, but also less-common dishes. The menu has a section of com tam (“broken rice”) dishes, including some topped with a fried egg; there is also a jellyfish salad with pickled carrot and daikon. Another worthy entrée was banh xeo, savory crepes filled with shrimp, sautéed pork and vegetables, or try the make-yourown summer roll option. FK YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF


LOCAL

“WE WROTE AND ARGUED FOR LIKE A YEAR-AND-A-HALF.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY WOEHREL}

SWEET FESTIVITIES

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LAYER CAKE MUSIC & ART FESTIVAL 1 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, 422 Foreland St., North Side. $15-20. Ages 18+. 412-904-3335 or www.jamesstreetgastropub.com N E W S

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SEEKERS {PHOTO COURTESY OF TIMOTHY COX PHOTOGRAPHY}

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

Festival musician Crystal Lee Morgan

When considering a music festival, certain images might spring to mind: hot midsummer days in West Coast locales; big-name electronic acts and DJs playing all night, for days and days, in the desert; exorbitantly high ticket prices and corporate sponsorships. The Layer Cake Festival, happening Oct. 3 at the James Street Gastropub, on the North Side, isn’t quite on that scale. But what it does have in common is a plethora of live musical acts and a selection of visual artists who will be painting in real time, alongside the performing musicians. The inaugural Layer Cake Festival boasts three stages: one in the gastropub’s “speakeasy,” one in the ground floor and one in the secondfloor ballroom. Each floor will be hosted by a local comedian, including Stoph Edison, who’ll emcee the speakeasy stage. “I’m super-excited to be part of the Layer Cake Fest,” says Edison. “There are some really great people involved and it’s an honor to have been pulled into the fray.” The Layer Cake Festival focuses heavily on local musical acts, including Grand Piano, Weird Paul, Decaffeinated Grapefruit, Chet Vincent, Bat Zuppel, Crystal Lee Morgan, The Me Toos, Isada Tariq, Flock of Walri and more. The festival will be sponsored by Brooklyn Brewery, which will treat festival attendees to free beer tastings all day, and a $5 draft special. The Layer Cake Festival is also brought to fans with the cooperation of the national campaign for Bernie Sanders 2016. “The campaign for Bernie Sanders reached out to me several weeks ago in regards to having a table at the event,” explains the festival’s organizer, an artist who goes by the alias Ziggy Sawdust, and operates Ziggy Sawdust Productions. Though Sanders won’t actually be at the festival, volunteers will handing out information on the presidential hopeful and registering people to vote. But don’t worry if Sanders (or politics in general) isn’t your thing. As Sawdust notes, “These candidates are reflections of my own personal political views, but do not necessarily reflect the views of everyone involved with the festival.”

AROUND A TABLE in Bloomfield’s Thai Gourmet, the members of Run Forever laugh and tease over tom yum soup. It’s a birthday dinner for drummer Tom Moran, and a reunion: Moran, who recently relocated to Philadelphia, is in town for a band photo shoot. They’re also here to talk about their new record, and when frontman Anthony Heubel goes on semi-fictional tangents (“Things were different in those days,” he says of the group’s beginnings. “You could buy candy for a penny!”), his band-mates — including bassist Cassie Staub and guitarist/ pianist Jeremy Sessa — gently rein him in. The bill comes, and fortune cookies are cracked open. A well-composed fortune can apply to anyone and, as they’re read aloud by everyone but Sessa — who hates fortune cookies — they apply just as readily to the life of a band. “Great works are performed not by strength but by perseverance” Run Forever was born soon after Heubel and Staub moved to Pittsburgh from Erie, in 2009. At first, it was essentially Heubel’s {PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON} solo project — he’s still the primary songRun Forever: (clockwise from top left) Tom Moran, Cassie Staub, Anthony Heubel, Jeremy Sessa writer. But, Staub says, “As the songs developed, he started adding people. ... I really easily the band’s best. [hadn’t] played an instrument until then.” “He kind of had a crazy amount of RUN FOREVER Soon, they met Moran. (“And what luck,” faith in us,” says Sessa of Hansen, who RELEASE SHOW Heubel deadpans, “for the next three years, was unfazed by the fact that they wanted WITH OUTER SPACES, FUN we almost had him in the band.”) After a to record most songs analog, and a lonHOME, TEETH LIKE YOURS few years of rotating lineups, Moran made ger-than-expected recording process. 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 18. Assemble, 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5. 412-432-9127 his membership official, and recruited Ses“We’re spoiled,” Staub agrees. “When or www.assemblepgh.org sa. “We made him get a piano, and … the rest we were like, ‘How about we make this reis history,” Heubel says. cord analog?’ he was like, ‘Yeah, sure!’ And On Oct. 9, the band will release its third (the release show is Oct. 18). And thanks to we were like, ‘How about we have two profull-length, Run Forever, on Huntington maturing tastes, musical chemistry and the ducers?’ and he was like, “Yeah, sure!’ Most Beach, Calif.-based label No Sleep Records support of No Sleep owner Chris Hansen, it’s labels would have been like, ‘Are you crazy? CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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FORTUNE SEEKERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

We don’t have time for that.’” “Fear and desire are two sides of the same coin” Run Forever’s music has always been characterized by raw emotion, but Heubel’s songwriting has sharpened, cutting to the heart of the fear/desire dichotomy. On Run Forever, big dreams are threatened by life’s grind; good relationships quietly sour, heartache masquerades unsuccessfully as indifference. Past releases have dealt in emo, folk and pop-punk, and some of that remains. But on the whole, this is solid indie rock, bringing to mind Bright Eyes and Death Cab for Cutie. “We’ve listened to the same music throughout the span of [making] Run Forever,” Heubel says, citing Conner Oberst, A.A. Bondy and Pedro the Lion. “I think we’re ... heading in a direction where what we like is lining up with what we’re playing.” Moran adds that they’ve backed off on the relative aggression of earlier output. “We got bored with it real quick,” he says. “As we were writing [Run Forever], there were 25 or 30 songs ... that we kept cutting and cutting. The ones that worked out are ... on the softer side, and it felt natural to go to that.” Ultimately, the goal was to make something that felt right. “We wrote and argued and wrote and argued for like a year-and-ahalf,” Moran says. “It sucks [having ideas] rejected, and it sucks to reject.” But, Staub adds, “It’s also awesome to have a group of friends that challenge you, that you trust to help create a clear vision.” “Chances are present to make huge personal gains” Thanks to recent attention from national music blogs — Brooklyn Vegan and Stereogum both premiered songs — the band seems primed for whatever the “next level” is in a post-major-label world. But it’s not going to anyone’s head. “It’s cool to have something to show my parents,” Moran shrugs. “I’m not sure how much it matters in the real world, when you’re on tour.” They’re quick to acknowledge the people who have supported them from the beginning, who see the band on every tour; who, Moran says, “for some reason have our back.” But they want to do things their way, even if that means making choices that may seem counterintuitive, like turning down big tours that would promise exposure. As Heubel puts it, “We just have a very strong vision of where we want to be as a band and what we consider successful, rather than just what makes the most money and gets the most people to hear our music.” So what does the future hold for Run Forever? Only time will tell. But one can’t help but wonder what answers were contained in Sessa’s discarded cookie fortune. M W E L S H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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RE: BUILT

AS SOMEONE WHO GREW UP IN THE AGE OF VINYL AND STARTED RELEASING MUSIC ON CDS AND CASSETTES, HOW DO YOU THINK THE CHANGE TO ALL-DIGITAL HAS AFFECTED ROCK MUSIC? I don’t really know. It’s changed it in a lot of ways. I don’t really have a view on it.

{BY NICK KEPPLER} BOISE, IDAHO’S Built to Spill became one

of a slew of once-indie rock bands that signed to major labels in the ’90s. Since 1997, the members have been workhorses for Warner Bros. Records, releasing lo-fi, indie-sounding rock propelled by singer/guitarist Doug Martsch’s gruff vocals and wavy, even gruffer riffs. The band is touring in support of its eighth album, The Untethered Moon. Through a muffled connection —and amidst some technical difficulties — Martsch took the time to speak to City Paper. YOUR NEW ALBUM SOUNDS LIKE IT’D FIT NICELY WITH YOUR ’90S WORK. HOW DO YOU SEE THE BAND’S EVOLUTION OR LACK OF? We just kind of do what we want to do. I don’t see a trajectory to it. AND YOU RECORDED THIS ONE WITH A NEW RHYTHM SECTION. HOW DID THAT COME ABOUT? Well, in the fall of 2012, the old rhythmsection guys both quit at the end of the tour. They were burnt out for different reasons. They’d both had enough of it, and we had

DO YOU THINK IT MAKES MUSIC MORE COMPETITIVE? DO YOU THINK IT WOULD BE MORE DIFFICULT FOR SOME KIDS FROM BOISE TO MAKE A CAREER OUT OF MUSIC TODAY? I feel like the more people who can do it, the better. I think making a living off music is not that big a deal. I think people make their best music when they’re not making a living off of it, when they have a day job and work on their music at night. {PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHEN GERE}

Built to Spill (Doug Martsch, left)

to replace them. We got a couple guys who were part of our crew to replace them.

BUILT TO SPILL

WITH HELVETIA, CLARK AND THE HIMSELFS 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 4. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $22-25. 412-821-4447 or mrsmalls.com

I READ THAT YOU RECORDED AN ALBUM IN 2012 AND SCRAPPED IT. WHY WAS THAT SHELVED? We recorded in the summer 2012. I did the rhythm section and I did quite a bit of overdub. Then we did a tour and those guys quit, and then I decided to bag the record and start over with those new guys. It made more sense and would work a little better. WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO GO INTO THE STUDIO AND LAY OUT AN ALBUM? As soon as I have a batch of songs that are ready to go. When we went in the studio in 2012, we didn’t really practice that much. We were going to try to elaborate on them in the studio. Sometimes, that’s the idea. Sometimes, we like to work things out a lot before we go into the studio, which is what we ended up doing [for The Untethered Moon]. The songs we were working on were very well rehearsed.

DID YOU MAKE YOUR BEST MUSIC WHEN YOU HAD A DAY JOB? I think it may have been because I was younger. I don’t know about that. I don’t think an artist who has all day to work on their art makes better art. That’s all I will say, and it’s a lot different from that. It’s not really a job. It’s something people do to escape work. WHEN I WAS IN HIGH SCHOOL, OWNING AN ALBUM BY BUILT TO SPILL OR YO LA TENGO WAS A MARK OF SOPHISTICATION. DO YOU STILL FEEL COOL? I’m so fucking cool. BUILT TO SPILL CAME AROUND IN A TIME WHEN THE LINES BETWEEN ALTERNATIVE AND MAINSTREAM WERE BEING BLURRED. DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO BE A BAND THAT APPEALED TO COLLEGE STATIONS AND PEOPLE REALLY INTO MUSIC? When I started, I was definitely under the impression that only people who were really, really into music could get into us, who were passionate about it. I never thought we were a mainstream act, or I had any ability to be in a mainstream act.

“I DON’T THINK AN ARTIST WHO HAS ALL DAY TO WORK ON THEIR ART MAKES BETTER ART.”

WHAT DOES THE TITLE, THE UNTETHERED MOON, MEAN? Nothing. I mean, it means something. It’s open to interpretation. I SAW THAT THERE’S NOTHING WRONG WITH LOVE IS COMING OUT ON VINYL AGAIN. WHAT PROMPTED THAT? I don’t know. Sub Pop, who has our old catalog, did it. I don’t know why they did it. I don’t talk to them about it. DO YOU EVER LISTEN TO YOUR OLD RECORDS? Nope. Every so often, I will go back to figure something out to play live, but that’s it.

DO YOU THINK YOUR PEERS IN THE ’90S ROCK SCENE ARE STILL MAKING GOOD MUSIC? You know what, I really just listen to old soul music and old reggae music. I don’t really listen to modern music at all. Those old [physical] formats of music are kind of symbols for things I like. I still listen to a few of my friends’ bands, but otherwise I don’t give a fuck. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ACTION! PR}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Kadavar

[POP/ROCK] + THU., OCT. 01

Although Alabama-based Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires is fairly new, forming in 2010, the band has been making some big noise. So much so that it caught the attention of semi-legendary Sub Pop Records, which released the band’s fantastic sophomore effort Deconstructed in May 2014. The album has steadily climbed the charts, becoming a favorite of both fans and critics, thanks to its confident punkish rock ’n’ roll with plenty of soul thrown in for good measure. Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires performs tonight at The Smiling Moose with Pujol and Jay Wiley. Troy Michael 10:15 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4668 or www.smilingmoose.com

[COUNTRY] + FRI., OCT. 02 You can call him a throwback, although MC Lyte maybe purist is a better fit. For more than 20 years, Wayne “The Train” Hancock has been burning up the highways delivering his blend of “retro” country to the masses. Hancock, who plays tonight at Club Café with special guest Jayke Orvis, isn’t your daughter’s country music. His music is more like the teardrop-inducing sound that your grandpappy listened to while sitting on the porch swing on a hot, dusty summer afternoon. Hancock represents a time when lyrics meant everything, and the vocals had to be passionate and pained, or the song meant nothing. TM 9 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $16. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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[HIP HOP] + SAT., OCT. 03 Hip hop has historically been a male-dominated genre, not just because so many rappers are men, but because of the misogyny that permeates a lot of lyrical content. However, there are more women in the genre today — and likely more than there would have been if it wasn’t for the undisputed pioneer of feminist hip hop, MC Lyte. In 1988, her debut album Lyte As a Rock challenged the sexism of the rap world and opened doors for female emcees. MC Lyte, also a DJ, actress and philanthropist, is headlining this year’s VIA Main Event at Spirit, with support from XXYYXX, Jessy Lanza, Lower Dens and DJ Selecta. Downstairs, there will be the Discwoman Showcase, highlighting artists who have benefited from MC Lyte and other trailblazing women. Andrew Woehrel 8 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $30-35. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

[METAL] + SAT., OCT. 03 Almost 50 years after British hard rock bands like Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath made their most genre-defining albums, modern psychedelic stoner rockers are still trying to reproduce that retro sound. Berlin’s Kadavar is a three-piece of bearded, long-haired young men who look back to the late 1960s and early ’70s for musical inspiration. The band is playing at The Smiling Moose tonight, with like-minded Pittsburghers Outsideinside and Cruces, and similarly stylized Texans The Well. AW 10:15 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-14. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com


Allen’s Haunted Hayrides & Tavern of Terror in Smock, PA, invites you on a 1 mile ride in a straw filled wagon through haunted woods, cornfields, and our haunted barn. The haunted house takes you through a variety of classic horror ranging from Frankenstein to Dracula to Carnivale to X-Files!!

The Haunting begins Fridays and Saturdays at Dusk. The last wagon leaves @ 10pm or until all victims have ridden! The Haunted Corn Maze will also be open Thursdays October 24th and 31st. Sunday’s “No Scare” Family Days: 1:00-4:00 $8.00 per person. This includes Hay rides, Corn Maze, Candy Hunt, Pony Rides, and a Petting Zoo. TEXT 91944 for Spooky specials. Open Every Weekend thru October 31!

Beacon Hotel

Eons

15+ ACRE Haunted Corn Maze and House for only $13.00 per person.

Eons Fashion Antique, celebrating 30 years, offers a complete line of origi-

Allen’s Haunted Hayrides

nal vintage clothing from the 1900’s - 1980’s for men & women to create your period Halloween fantasy. 20’s Gatsby to 70’s disco & more. Choose from suits, tuxedos, dresses, vests, bow ties, neckties, jewelry, cufflinks, hats, western shirts & boots, shoes, & leather. Why rent when you can own for less?

Evil Dead The Musical Bloody hysterical and one helluva fun night out! The record-breaking musical comedy takes the elements of Sam Raimi’s cult classic films--

EONS FASHION ANTIQUE 20TH CENTURY VINTAGE CLASSICS

5850 ELLSWORTH AVENUE • SHADYSIDE facebook.com/eonsfashion • 412.361.3368

$

2 OFF

with this coupon

fearforest.com 330.824.3141 Lordstown, Ohio A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

Evil Dead, Evil Dead 2 & Army of Darkness - then combines them to make one of the craziest theatrical experiences of all time! JOIN US! Tickets at trustarts.org.

Fear Forest Fear Forest is open weekends in October through Halloween, Get the scare of your life with 4 Terrifying attractions, The ISANATARIUM Haunted House, the PSYCHOPATH trail, The FORBIDDEN Cornfield, the area’s best Haunted Hayride. Located in Lordstown Ohio, visit fearforest.com for pricing and dates of


Freddy’s Haunt s

Thursday through Sunday October 1st–31st 192 Mc Cune R d. • Aliquippa 724 -65 0 - 0 0 5 0 www.fr eeddyshaunt ddyshaunt s.ne t

operation. “THE FEAR STARTS HERE!

Freddy’s Haunts Come to Freddy’s Haunts for your Halloween Scare! Featuring an indoor trail over 1/2 mile long and much more! Open Thursday though Sunday from Oct. 1st through 31st. Each Thursday is for our Charity Riders with all proceeds going to Riders for Their Benefits. Parking is free. www.freddyshaunts.net

Fright Farm 26 years of fear! Fright Farm is Pennsylvania’s Premiere profes-

sional Haunted Attraction, with distinct attractions, including Dead End Hayride, Hallow Grounds, Frightmare Mansion, and Terror Maze! So come on out and join the many people who have made Fright Farm and annual Halloween season tradition. For more information visit: www.frightfarm.com

two haunted attractions by wagon or foot for a factor of fright and fear. Karaoke/DJ, live bands; Benefits the Autism Society of Pittsburgh. For more info visit: hauntedhillshayride.com/ 724-382-8296; Facebook: Haunted Hills Hayride

Haunted Hills Hayride

The Hollow of Horror is a Terrifying maze trail that takes about 30 minutes to complete IF YOU TAKE ALL THE RIGHT TURNS! Open Fridays and Saturdays in October from 7pm-10pm. Cost is $15 per person and is not recommended for chil-

Haunted Hills Hayride and The Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (16th Annual); N. Versailes, PA. Journey through the woods at our

Hollow of Horror

TRANS-ALLEGHENY LUNATIC ASYLUM

OPEN WEDNESDAY THRU SUNDAY HAUNTED HOUSE: HYSTERIA | FLASHLIGHT TOURS ZOMBIE PAINT BALL 71 ASYLUM DRIVE | WESTON, WV 26452 304-269-5070 | WWW.TALAWV.COM A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


dren. Brought to you by Red Carpet Mini Golf 2200 Old National Pike, Washington, pa 15301

EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler Join the ghosts, goblins and ghouls for the Spooky Kooky Costume Contest presented by ScareHouse, held October 25 during the EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler! Not ready to run 10? Grab a friend for the relay and split the distance! Costumes can be individual, relay teams, or groups – the choice is yours! http://www.pittsburgh10miler.

org/costumecontest

www.mollystrolleyspittsburgh.com

Pittsburgh Terror Trolley Tours

ScareHouse

Come aboard the Terror Trolley and hear tales of Pittsburgh’s deepest, darkest secrets. With a City so rich in history, industry and corruption there are bound to be stories of murder, mystery and disaster. We reveal the legends of those that still haunt the streets seeking revenge. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays throughout October 7:00pm & 9:00pm. Tours depart from Station Square. Call if you dare! 412-391-7433 or visit

Hollow of Horror! Open Fridays & Saturdays in October 7pm-10pm • $15 per person

Named as one of America’s best Haunted Houses by Travel Channel, USA Today, and Guillermo del Toro. Pittsburgh’s Ultimate Haunted House partnered with LEGENDARY (Jurassic World, Crimson Peak, Dark Knight Trilogy) to create 3 terrifying attractions for one price. Buy tickets from scarehouse.com for lowest prices and shortest wait.

Terror Town Located in the heart of Pittsburgh,

Open p Everyy Weekend thru October 31!

The Beacon Haunted Corn Maze 15+ ACRE Haunted Corn Maze and House for only $13 per person. Come for the evening and enjoy our Concession Stand with lots of Goodies! The Bon Fire and even an Icy Miller Lite! Sunday’s “No Scare” Family Days: 1:00-4:00 $8 per person. Includes: Hay rides, Corn Maze, Candy Hunt, Pony Rides, and a Petting Zoo

231 Beacon Rd, Renfrew, PA 16053 (724) 586-6233 www.gotothebeacon.com

Every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday in October!

3An6ntuhal

For most people, the hayride lasts 30 minutes. for others, it lasts a

Redd C R Carpet ptM Miniature t G Golf lf 2200 Old National Pike Washington, PA 15301

NOT RECOMMENDED FOR CHILDREN!

lifetime! $15 PER RIDE OR COMBO PRICE $25 FOR BOTHTHE BOTH THE RIDE ANDT AND THE TOUR (CASH ONLY) *MUST PURCHASE BOTH AT THE SAME TIME TO GET THE COMBO PRICE

TAVERN OF TERROR THE AREA’S NEWEST HAUNTED ATTRACTION! 2434 PITTSBURGH ROAD • SMOCK , PA • 15480 724.677.2589 • WWW.ALLENSHAYRIDES.COM A D V E R T I S I N G

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PA – this 30,000 sq ft underground layer is a cannibal-infested nightmare! Roam through what feels like - miles of maze into their underground town. Deemed “One of PA’s most active paranormal locations” by the PA Department of Paranormal Investigation… Terror Town should be on your MUST VISIT list for 2015. www.terrortownpgh.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum: Pittsburgh10miler.org

The Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum presents: ASYLUM AFTER DARK.

$10 OFF: 10offCP

TH

16NUAL AN

The legendary haunted house was named one of the country’s TOP TEN haunts by Travel Channel. In addition to the haunted house, TALA offers flashlight tours, Zombie Paintball, and overnight ghost hunts. Visit www.TALAWV.com for complete list of events and details.

Zombies of the Corn Shoot live zombies that can’t shoot back! Fight through our corn maze & haunted trailers S’mores, bonfires, ghost story tellers...great family fun! www.zombiesofthecorn.com

HAUNTED HILLS

HAYRIDE and d tthe h

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL OCT. 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 , 11, 16, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31

“One OF America’s BESt HAuNTED HOUsES!” Travel Channel, USA Today, Elijah Wood

Open: 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays. LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE! Admission Only $12 to Each Attraction or $17 for Both

724-382-8296 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com See website for $3 OFF Coupon

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) North Versailles, PA 15137 1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart

Group rates & private campfire sites available

FREE PA R K IN G!

Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh. A D V E R T I S I N G

NO LONG LINES WHEN YOU BUY ONLINE! SCAREHOUSE.COM S U P P L E M E N T


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 01 BRILLOBOX. Oberhofer w/ Honduras. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Little Green Cars. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 02 CLUB CAFE. Wayne ‘The Train’ Hancock w/ Jayke Orvis. South Side. 412-431-4950. CROATION FRATERNAL UNION. The Bo’Hog Brothers. Conway. 724- 869-3266. GATOR’S LOUNGE. Stone Giant w/ Fonic & 13 Stories. Jeannette. 412-377-7025. NIED’S HOTEL. Ann Feeney, Slim Forsythe, Armadillos, Turpentiners, Bryan McQuaide. Woody Guthrie Tribute. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THE NIGHT GALLERY. Deradoorian, Prayher, Thousandzz of Beez, KMFD. Lawrenceville. 724-777-7922. PALACE THEATRE. Arlo Guthrie. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

REX THEATER. TAUK. South Side. 412-381-6811. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Moose Tracks. West End. 412-458-0417.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARVEY WILNER’S. Eddie & the Bruisers. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Turbo AC’s, Two Man Advantage, Thunder Vest. Bloomfield. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. 412-682-0320. Steeltown Band. Early. MICKEY’S PLACE. Gone King’s Ransom. Late. Fox South. McKees Rocks. Chapel. 412-963-0640. 412-771-7606. BEAVER FALLS PARK HOUSE. Mary TURNERS CLUB. Dave Lemanski. North Side. Iglar’s Guys Nite Out www. per 412-224-2273. pa Band. Beaver Falls. pghcitym PITTSBURGH WINERY. .co 724-843-7576. Brooke Annibale. Strip BLACKBERRY District. 412-566-1000. MEADOWS FARM. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD Nameless in August, Ferdinand GRILLE. Eagles Tribute. Ross. the Bull, Midnight Rooster, 412-364-8166. Morgan O’Kane. Benefit for ROCK ROOM. Unholy Two, CHS Food Pantry & Blackberry Chiller. Polish Hill. 412-478-1436. Meadows Farm. Natrona Heights. SMILING MOOSE. Kadavar, 412-246-1686. Cruces. South Side. 412-431-4668. BRILLOBOX. Bully w/ Heat, Dead THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Soft. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. Jonathan Scales Fourchestra. CLUB CAFE. Grievous Angels. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Early. Action Camp, Rouge Satellites, Dumplings, Middle Children. Late. South Side. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. 412-431-4950. Psychic Heat, Will Simmons & the Upholsterers, The Tortillas. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Built To Spill w/ Helvetia, Clarke And The Himselfs. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. STAGE AE. Hollywood Undead w/ Crown The Empire, I Prevail. North Side. 412-229-5483.

SAT 03

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 04

MP 3 MONDAY

THE SEMI-SUPERVILLIANS

BAJA BLUE

MON 05 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Imelda Marcos, Choir, Lithe Lungs, Oroborean Bitch. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 06 STAGE AE. Grace Potter w/ Rayland Baxter. North Side. 412-229-5483. CLUB CAFE. The Claudettes w/ The Depot Angels. South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 07 CLUB CAFE. Saintseneca w/ The Sidekicks, Yowler. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Pentagram w/ Electric Citizen, Satan’s Satyrs, Brimstone Coven. Millvale. 412-821-4447. SPIRIT. Seoul, Young Ejecta, Metacara. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

Each week we bring you a new song by a local artist. This week’s track comes from The Semi-Supervillains. Stream or download “Bad News,” from the band’s new release, Here Comes Trouble, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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Give your next cocktail a delicious jolt. Mix WAVE Baja with blue raspberry citrus soda and plug into great flavor.

VODKA

WAVEVODKA.COM | PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY ©2015 WAVE™ FLAVORED VODKA 30% ALC/VOL (60 PROOF) BOTTLED BY BARTON DISTILLING COMPANY, LOUISVILLE, KY. PRODUCT OF USA.

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

WED 07

DJS

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FRI 02 BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB PITTSBURGH. Olin, Patricia, Soul 2 Seoul, Lady Fingers. Part of Via Fest. Downtown. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 03

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. STAGE AE. Flux Pavillion, Wilkinson & Diskord. North Side. 412-229-5483.

SUN 04 CLUB CAFE. Michal Menert w/ Marcelo Moxy & WillDaBeast. South Side. 412-431-4950.

TUE 06 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Beats Antique’s Creature Carnival w/ Moon Hooch, Pinky D’Ambrosia. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

HIP HOP/R&B SUN 04 SPIRIT. MC Lyte, XXYYXX, Jessy Lanza, Lower Dens. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

WED 07 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Height Keech, Sketch tha Cataclysm, Warren Britt, The Dumplings, Moemaw Naedon. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

BLUSH SPORTS BAR. Shari Richards. Jam session. Downtown. 412-281-7703.

JAZZ

SAT 03

BROAD STREET BISTRO. Mark Passaro. North Versailles. 412-829-2911. MOONDOG’S. Youth Blues Challenge. Jason Born, 2015 Youth Blues representive will open the day with a set from his band. Five youth acts will follow. After the competition, an all ages jam will be offered. Blawnox. 724-888-6183.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Shari Richards. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Lucarelli Brothers w/ Peg Wilson. Strip District. 412-281-6593. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff & Eric DeFade. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Rick Purcell & Sheena. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Yellowjackets. North Side. 412-323-4000.

The 2015

VOICE SOUTHSIDE

MON 05 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 06 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange w/ Chris Parker 4. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 07

EVERY THURSDAY!

Finals: Oct. 22

Six Weeks of QualiFication ual al F cat on New Music Category Each Week (80’s, 90’s and beyond!)

Two Finalists Each Week $200 GRAN GRAND PRIZE! $

2

.50

Coors Light

$

3

.00

Fireball Shots

TIL MIDNIGHT

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

The Dirty Nil

“Smite”

FRI 02

SUN 04

SAT 03

These are the records edhochuli bassist Jon Ahn can’t stop listening to:

ANDYS WINE BAR. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT SAND HILL. Sweaty Betty. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-6500.

BLUES

HEAVY ROTATION

THU 01

ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Phat Man Dee & the Cultural District. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

of

TUE 06

ANDYS WINE BAR. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff & Eric DeFade. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. RIVERS CLUB. The Gurwin/ Heryford Project. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 01 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

FRI 02 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800.

TUE 06 THE R BAR. Tom & Katie Show. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

Greys

“If Anything” 1994!

“FUCK IT”

Des Ark

& Brassed Off. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 412-434-7222.

SUN 04 ACADEMY CHAMBER ENSEMBLE. The first concert in the Chamber Music at Old St. Luke’s 2015 - 2016 season. Old St. Luke’s, Scott. 412-969-7072. DANIEL GOODE. International Poetry Room, 2nd Floor. “Interpolations” featuring the premiere of a new series of short operas for solo voice performed by the composer, three early songs from The Tempest, plus the premiere of “Marx Bro.” Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3105. DUQUESNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Power Center Ballroom. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6000. ELENA ULYANOVA. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-371-7447. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Presenting Sinatra & Beyond w/ Tony DeSare. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

MON 05

“Don’t Rock the Boat, Sink the Fucker”

EMERSON STRING QUARTET. Performing pieces by Haydn, Shostakovich, & Brahms. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

TUE 06 WED 07 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

of the Rings, & Brassed Off. Linton Middle School, Penn Hills. 412-434-7222.

FRI 02

MONIQUE MEAD, ANDRES CARDENES. Carnegie Hall. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. OVREARTS BRASS ENSEMBLE. Free Concert celebrating CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Family Weekend at the University Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound of Pittsburgh. Heinz Chapel, System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. Oakland. 412-624-4157. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Presenting Sinatra & Beyond w/ Tony DeSare. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. PALACE THEATRE. Guy Penrod RIVER CITY BRASS: BRASS AT & Jimmy Fortune. Greensburg. THE MOVIES. Featuring music 724-836-8000. from Oscar-winning film scores & epic blockbusters including Star Wars, Batman, Superman, Lord of the Rings, & Brassed Off. Carson THE CHAMBER Middle School, ORCHESTRA OF McCandless. PITTSBURGH. . w ww per 412-434-7222. a p ty Campbell Memorial ci h pg .com Chapel. New work by Pittsburgh composer ANONYMOUS 4. Calvary Nancy Galbraith, as well Episcopal Church, Shadyside. as two works of Mozart: Piano 412-661-0120. Concerto No. 9 “Jeunehomme” PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY w/ the Pittsburgh Symphony ORCHESTRA. Presenting Orchestra’s pianist, Rodrigo Ojeda, Sinatra & Beyond w/ Tony & the charming Symphony No. 29. DeSare. Heinz Hall, Downtown. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-392-4900. 412-477-9842. RIVER CITY BRASS: BRASS RIVER CITY BRASS: BRASS AT AT THE MOVIES. Featuring THE MOVIES. Featuring music music from Oscar-winning film from Oscar-winning film scores scores & epic blockbusters & epic blockbusters including Star including Star Wars, Batman, Wars, Batman, Superman, Lord Superman, Lord of the Rings,

REGGAE FRI 02

COUNTRY SUN 04

CLASSICAL THU 01

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 03

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. FUSE@PSO concert performing Beethoven + Coldplay. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RIVER CITY BRASS: BRASS AT THE MOVIES. Featuring music from Oscar-winning film scores & epic blockbusters including Star Wars, Batman, Superman, Lord of the Rings, & Brassed Off. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-434-7222.

WED 07

ADAM LIU. Cello player presents Music 101 program, “East Meets West”. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC THU 01 TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. Krar Collctive. East Liberty. 412-665-2770.

FRI 02 DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Dr. Rachel Whitcomb. PNC Recital Hall. Uptown. 412-396-1633. SPIRIT. Jenn Gooch, Molly Soda, Eartheater, Moor Mother Goddess, Lex Brown, Audra Wist, Submistress. Women in Sound Zine Release. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Anjroy, Man’DANCE, Inner Scepter. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 03 BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Grand Bon Rien. West Homestead. 412-461-6188. PUB & PIZZA. Mike Flaherty. Mt. Lebanon. 412-344-5566.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do IN PITTSBURGH

Sept 30 - Oct 6 WEDNESDAY 30 MADBALL

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Hollywood Undead

ALTAR BOYZ

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE, DOWNTOWN THROUGH DEC. 20.

Built to Spill

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Warren Hayes

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

MONDAY 5

THURSDAY 1

Iron Chic

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Caravan Theatre of Pittsburgh Presents Lower Ninth

ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM Hill District. All ages show. Tickets: showclix.com. Through Oct. 4.

Born Cages

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Tickets: hauntedhillshayride.com. Through Oct. 31.

SATURDAY 3 Layer Cake

FRIDAY 2

JAMES ST. GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY North Side. Over 18 show. Tickets: showclix. com/event/layercake. 1p.m.

NORTH VERSAILLES.

NRITYAGRAM DANCE

16th Annual Haunted Hills Hayride

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ENSEMBLE

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org/dance. 8p.m.

Flux Pavilion with Wilkinson & Diskord STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

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DogtoberFEST 2015

Altar Boyz

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: clocabaret.com. Through Dec. 20.

THE WATERFRONT Homestead. Free event. 11a.m.

SUNDAY 4 Trax Farms 46th Fall Festival

Guy Penrod with Jimmy Fortune

TRAX FARMS South Hills. Free admission. For more info visit traxfarms.com. Every weekend through Oct. 25

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TUESDAY 6

FUSE@PSO: Beethoven + Coldplay HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org/fuse. 5p.m.

Kenny Blake

BACKSTAGE BAR/THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free show. 5p.m.

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LIFE AND{BYLIMB AL HOFF}

IT’S MACGYVER IN SPACE INTERTWINED WITH A NASA PROMOTIONAL REEL

In 2007, in a small North Carolina town, Shannon Whisnant bought the contents of a storage locker. Among the haul: a meat smoker, in which he discovered a partially mummified human leg. An inveterate huckster, Whisnant was delighted, sensing opportunities for fame and fortune. But it turned out the leg had an owner — amputee John Wood — and he wanted it back. Whisnant refused, and Bryan Carberry and J. Clay Tweel’s documentary Finders Keepers recounts the wacky-buttrue story of how two men fought over one leg.

CP APPROVED

It’s my leg: John Wood

At first, Finders seems like it’s going for mockery — look at these laughable hillbillies — but it quickly settles into a more thoughtful examination of deeper issues. For both men, the leg is a symbol of trying to reclaim some lost sense of self; Wood is a recovering addict and Whisnant a sad clown, and each has serious daddy issues. The leg battle exposes fault lines in their families, and casts an ugly light on our culture’s insatiable desire for fame. The directors mostly let Whisnant, Wood and their families tell the story, which provides a real-life seriousness to counterbalance the archival clips from sensational TV shows covering the case. Finders Keepers is truly entertaining — a real-life mash-up of Storage Wars, Intervention and Judge Mathis — but it’s a sobering, cautionary tale, too. Starts Fri., Oct. 2. Hollywood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In Jules Dassin’s 1955 French classic, Rififi, four men plan a perfect heist — then it goes wrong. This stylish black-and-white noir film, featuring a famous silent crime scene, is being re-released in a restored version. Oct. 2-6. Harris

SPACE IS THE PLACE At least the scenery is nice: Matt Damon is stranded on Mars.

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HINGS WE knew about Mars: It’s

140,000,000 miles away, it’s cold as hell and it ain’t the kind of place to raise your kids. But after screening The Martian, we now know that you can raise potatoes, if you know a little something about botany. Ridley Scott’s film, adapted from Andy Weir’s novel, sets up a nail-biter of a premise. When a storm forces scientists to abandon their research lab on Mars and return to Earth, one of the team is left behind. They think he is dead, but it’s a technical glitch on his bio-meter. So when the dust settles, Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is in quite the pickle. The lab provides shelter, food, water and oxygen, but only for a limited time. And worse: Nobody back on Earth knows he’s still alive! So begins The Martian’s basic structure of establishing a problem, solving it and moving on to the next. Need food? Jury-rig a greenhouse. Discover you left somebody on Mars? Get rocket scientists working to

bring him back. The action cuts between Watney, on Mars, and Earth, where NASA, with admirable sang froid, also corrals its resources. It’s MacGyver in Space intertwined with a NASA promotional reel.

THE MARTIAN DIRECTED BY: Ridley Scott STARRING: Matt Damon Starts Fri., Oct. 2. In 3-D, in select theaters

The Martian is so relentlessly optimistic about people and institutions that it feels jarring and old-fashioned in our otherwise cynical times. It’s a real testament to problem-solving — “I’m gonna have to science the shit out of this,” says Watney — and an unabashed celebration of being smart. (Why not take the kids? It might get them excited about STEM and can-do-ism. There are a couple of f-words, but really, what else is there to say when you discover you’ve been left behind on Mars?) The film is a bona fide crowd-pleaser

and a good deal funnier than you’d expect, but it misses the mark on being great. At 141 minutes, it’s too long, especially when there are few narrative surprises. The action on Earth is simply quality-TVmovie, despite a decent cast; the film’s best parts are Watney puttering about on Mars (“Everywhere I go, I’m the first.”). And the last reel lacks the punch we’ve been waiting for; it’s heavy with explanation rather than weightless with emotion. In fact, any exploration of the psychological costs — the horror and loneliness — is curiously absent from the everquippy Martian. Isolation is crippling and outer-space isolation is the worst. (See Silent Running, Moon, even Damon’s other recent space journey in Interstellar.) Even the equally even-keeled and affable Tom Hanks went bonkers in Castaway, and that was a balmy tropical island! This is a super-sunny approach to deep-space problems, even though Mars is pretty far away from the sun. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK ATTACK ON TITAN: PART I. Shinji Higuchi’s liveaction film is adapted from Hajime Isayama’s manga. In it, a young man may be the only hope against giant humanoid Titans who are preying on humans. (Part 2 screens later in October.) 7:30 p.m. nightly, Wed., Sept. 30, Thu., Oct. 1, and Wed., Oct. 7. Hollywood THE INTERN. The stressed-out head (Anne Hathaway) of a hip New York clothing website gets a new intern, a well-dressed, well-organized 70-year-old man (Robert DeNiro), who turns out to be just the ticket. This latest relationship comedy from Nancy Meyers (Something’s Gotta Give) tackles friendship rather than romance, and is far less sugary for it. It burbles along on the charm of its stars — DeNiro has thankfully toned down his sometimes frantic comic stylings. In the jumble of its predictable narrative about work, family and the benefits of carrying a handkerchief, The Intern finds space for this May-December friendship to grow. Not that any of it is truly believable, but who cares when Meyers makes good on her signature cameo: the dreamy home interiors, all with perfect linens, just-so bricks and old-butmodern brownstone kitchens. (Al Hoff) REEL Q. The 30th annual festival of gay and lesbian films kicks off its 10-day run with Peaches Christ’s All About Evil, a 2010 horror comedy starring Natasha Lyonne and Mink Stole. 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 8. Harris THE RESURRECTION OF JAKE “THE SNAKE” ROBERTS. Jake “the Snake” Roberts was one of pro wrestling’s biggest stars in the 1980s and ’90s; he’s also been one of its biggest tragedies — a drug addict and alcoholic who has spent decades sliding into decline. Now Steve Yu’s new film documents Roberts’ struggle to climb out of that hole. In 2012, Roberts reconnects with his old friend and pro wrestler “Diamond” Dallas Paige, who has spent his postwrestling years as a motivational speaker and health and fitness guru. Paige moves Roberts into his Atlanta home, where he undergoes daily drug tests and workouts. The film is an honest portrayal of what Roberts goes through, both his triumphs and failures. Roberts also works to mend relationships with his family. It occasionally gets a little hokey, but so does life. Roberts comes into this project naked and stripped of the ability to bullshit, and his desire to improve his life is believable. By the end of this film, you’ll hope he does, too. Starts Fri., Oct. 2. AMC Waterfront (Charlie Deitch)

CP

SICARIO. An FBI agent (Emily Blunt) joins a task force fighting drug traffickers at the U.S.-Mexican border. Denis Villeneuve directs. Starts Fri., Oct. 2 TIME OUT OF MIND. Down-and-outer George (Richard Gere) becomes truly homeless and, with a fellow shelter denizen (Ben Vereen), tries to navigate New York City’s services and re-connect with his estranged daughter (Jena Malone). Not much more than that happens, and what does unfold does so very slowly and with deliberate distance. Director Oren Moverman (The Messenger, Rampart) shoots long, wide and through windows; George himself is passive and details about him emerge infrequently. We’re more apt to hear conversations around George — offscreen banalities of nearby New Yorkers which underscore how he is both within and without “normal” human interaction.

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The Intern Time seems designed to be an experiential advocacy piece, challenging viewers to confront homelessness, both as a primed outside observer and from inside George’s struggle. A laudable goal, but too often the film felt like a primer, as homelessness is explained (shelter life, can-picking, paperwork), while George works through a checklist of typical indignities. And Gere is never wholly convincing as the rock-bottom George, particularly when paired with Vereen, who does great work here as a motor-mouthed former jazzman. Starts Fri., Oct. 2. Regent Square (Al Hoff) THE WALK. Robert Zemeckis’ film recounts the dramatic events in 1974, when French high-wire artist Philippe Petit (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) walked between the two World Trade Center Towers. This same feat was recounted in the award-winning 2008 documentary Man on Wire. In IMAX 3-D, in select theaters; in general release Oct. 9.

REPERTORY REFLEKTOR TAPES. Kahlil Joseph’s new documentary goes behind the scenes of the making of Canadian band Arcade Fire’s Reflektor album. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 30. Manor CONTINUES ON PG. 36

Goodnight Mommy (2015) 9/30 @ 10:00pm, 10/1 @ 10:00pm, 10/2 @ 9:30pm, 10/4 @

5:00pm, 10/5 @ 7:30pm, 10/6 @ 9:00pm - The most talked

about horror film of the year...dark, disturbing, and beautiful. _________________________________________________

Attack on Titan Pt. 1

(2015) 9/30 @ 7:30pm, 10/1 @ 7:30pm, 10/7 @ 7:30pm - Live action adaptation of the Japanese anime. Mind blowing visual effects! _________________________________________________

Troll 2 25th Anniversary screening with Best Worst Movie

10/3 @ 7:30pm - Documentary about one of the worst movies ever made, Troll 2 (1990) which screens @ 9:30pm. _________________________________________________

Finders Keepers

(2015) - 10/2 @ 7:30pm, 10/3 @ 4:00pm, 10/4 @ 7:30pm, 10/6 @ 7:00pm - A man purchased a grill at an auction. Inside the grill was an amputated leg. What follows is an funny, tragic, and insightful story. _________________________________________________

Rocky Horror Picture Show 10/3 @ Midnight - With live shadowcast by the JCCP!

_________________________________________________

The Laws of the Universe

(2015) 10/4 @ 2:00pm - New Japanese anime film!

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

- A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

WORKSHOP: HOW TO FRAME A WALL MICHAEL WETMILLER Wood framing is the structural skeleton of your home. If you are planning a remodeling project that includes opening walls or adding on, this workshop will help you tackle the job in a safe and structurally sound manner. Students will learn safe use of hand and power tools, layout, measuring, cutting, and ultimately how to frame a wall with a door opening. About the presenter: Michael R. Wetmiller is a Pennsylvania-Registered Home Improvement Contractor specializing in interior renovation. He grew up in a family of tradesmen and attended a four-year carpenter’s apprenticeship training program. He became a Journeyman Carpenter in 1999. Michael has worked in both commercial and residential construction in all phases from foundations to finish carpentry. This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Visit www.phlf.org to join! Non-members: $5.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7 • 6:00 – 7:30 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

The Resurrection of Jake “The Snake” Roberts KILLER KLOWNS FROM OUTER SPACE. Really, what more to you need to know? Aliens who look like clowns terrorize a small American town in this 1988 cult classic from Stephen Chiodo. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 30. AMC Waterfront. $5 BILL & TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE. In Stephen Herek’s 1989 comedy, two student doofuses (Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter) show how to ace history class — by building a time machine and checking out the past in person. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2, and 9:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 8. Row House Cinema THE ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL TOURING PROGRAM. You won’t know beforehand exactly what you might see in this collection of independent short films, but if past years’ programs are any guide, odds are the offerings will be pretty good. This is the 53rd annual outing of the festival’s touring program, which compiles prize-winning shorts — animated, narrative, experimental and documentary — into two two-hour programs. As part of the RADical weekend, the price is certainly right: free. Program A: 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2, and 8:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. Program B: 8:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2, and 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. Melwood

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THE LOOK OF SILENCE. Documentarian Joshua Oppenheimer returns to Indonesia in this follow-up examination of the lingering effects of the war atrocities committed in the 1960s, previously covered in his 2012 film, The Act of Killing. In Indonesian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2, and 5:45 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. Parkway. Free

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LISTEN TO ME MARLON. Hear actor Marlon Brando tell his own story, in his own words, in Stevan Riley’s new bio-doc. Using archival material, including exclusive access to Brando’s personal archive (including hours of audio), the film recounts Brando’s notable professional and personal lives. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2; 8:15 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3; and 6 p.m. Sun., Oct. 4. Parkway. Free

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AMERICAN PSYCHO. Director/screenwriter Mary Harron brings Bret Easton Ellis’ infamous satirical yuppie-slasher novel to the screen in this 2000 film. Harron successfully pitches this story of a privileged young investment banker (Christian Bale) who kills compulsively somewhere between black comedy, horror film and a rumination on the self, the selfobsessed and fantasy. Spared most of the gruesome detail of the book, the film is minimally a wicked satire of 1980s conspicuous consumption in Manhattan, rich with vignettes of business-card one-upmanship and absurdly trendy restaurants. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2. Oaks (AH)

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SPIES LIKE US. In John Landis’ 1985 comedy, Dan Aykroyd and Chevy are patsies for some CIA diversionary nonsense in the Soviet-Afghanistan mess. Oct. 2-4, Oct. 6 and Oct. 8. Row House Cinema SWINGERS. Doug Liman’s 1996 comedy features Jon Favreau and Vince Vaughn as hipster buddies in L.A.’s then-trendy swing scene. Oct. 2-8. Row House Cinema THELMA AND LOUISE. After a bar scene goes bad, two working-class gals (Susan Sarandon, Geena Davis) go on the lam in this revisionist 1991 road movie from Ridley Scott. Oct. 2-5 and Oct. 7-8. Row House Cinema WAYNE’S WORLD. The two hosts (Mike Myers, Dana Carvey) of a public-access music show get a taste of the big time, in this 1992 comedy from Penelope Spheeris. Oct. 2-8. Row House Cinema ALFRED AND JAKOBINE. This new documentary from Jonathan Howells and Tom Roberts follows 84-year-old Alfred as he drives an old London taxi across the United States to reunite with his former wife, Jakobine. In the 1950s, the pair had impulsively driven the very same taxi car on a global adventure, but their crazy adventure and love had not lasted. 4 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3, and noon, Sun., Oct. 4. Parkway. Free TROLL 2 25th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. Get the hilarious backstory behind the making of the 1990 horror film Troll 2, and how it later developed a cult following among devotees of bad cinema, with the 2009 documentray Best Worst Movie. Then, enjoyably suffer through the vegetarian-horror masterpiece that is Troll 2. Best, 7:30 p.m.; Troll 2; 9:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. Hollywood THE BABADOOK. A single mother, stressed by caring for her troublesome young son, begins to suspect that a monster is inhabiting their house. Jennifer Kent directs this Australian indie horror thriller from last year. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 3. Manor THE AFRICAN QUEEN. Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn are the mismatched couple on this adventurous — and romantic — river journey through war-torn East Africa. John Huston directs this popular 1952 film. The film begins a Sunday-night, monthlong series of films about rivers. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 4. Regent Square SCREAM. Wes Craven’s 1996 horror film had its tongue firmly in cheek, riffing on the conventions of slasher films, while still sticking the knife in the back of its unsuspecting teen victims. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 7. AMC Waterfront. $5


[DANCE]

GODS AND GRACE

HOSPITALS ARE NOT GOOD FOR PATIENTS

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NRITYAGRAM DANCE ENSEMBLE performs SAMYOGA: AN ODE TO LOVE 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org N E W S

+

[BOOKS]

PATIENTS AND

VIRTUES {PHOTO COURTESY OF NAN MELVILLE}

{BY KELECHI URAMA}

India’s Nrityagram Dance Ensemble at work

The first of four dance programs included in the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s India in Focus festival welcomes one of India’s premiere classical-dance troupes. Nrityagram Dance Ensemble performs its work Samyoga: An Ode to Love, on Sat., Oct. 3, at the Byham Theater. The show opens the Pittsburgh Dance Council season. Nrityagram is a proponent of Odissi, a sacred, traditional dance form that dates to 200 BCE. In Samyoga: An Ode to Love, dancers Surupa Sen and Bijayini Satpathy will showcase Odissi’s meticulous hand and arm movements, isolated torso movements and the sensual grace that give it the illusion of ancient temple sculptures come to life. Set to original music by Pandit Raghunath Panigrahi, performed live, the work comprises solos and duets choreographed by Sen on themes of confluence and togetherness. “We have been dancing together for the past 22 years and have developed a special chemistry on stage,” said Satpathy, speaking by phone recently from San Francisco, where the company was performing. Sen created the 90-minute Samyoga to celebrate that longtime partnership, says Satpathy. “Nrityagram is a unique kind of [dance] school,” says Satpathy, who joined the school in 1993. “The training is modeled after the ancient student-teacher relationship where you live and learn with the teacher. Learning is almost a way of life.” In Nrityagram, Satpathy says, she found a more intense level of training than at her former school in Orissa, the birthplace of Odissi. The training solidified her understanding of Odissi and made her a better dancer. In keeping with tradition, Samyoga begins with an invocation dance. It is followed by an abstract duet that showcases Odissi’s lyricism and technique. Then each of the women performs “expressional” solos based on a 12thcentury love ballad where the dancers take on the characters of Hindu demi-gods and lovers Krishna and Rahad. Sen, as Rahad, will dance a solo of heartache and betrayal over Krishna. Satpathy, as Krishna, will dance one in which he cajoles Rahad into forgiving his indiscretions. The two dancers then come together for the program’s final duet about the Hindu deity Shiva and his form of half-man and half-woman.

T

HERESA BROWN is trying something new. The local nurse and author is currently on a regional book tour for The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients’ Lives (Algonquin Press Chapel Hill), her new memoir that takes place over one 12hour shift in an oncology ward. Unlike her previous book, Critical Care: A New Nurse Faces Death, Life, and Everything in Between, which covered her first year as a nurse, The Shift focuses on her patients. “I didn’t want [The Shift] to be about ‘I am Theresa Brown, Super Nurse,’ but about the richness of [patients’] stories,” says Brown. Brown was formerly an English professor at Tufts University. She moved to Pittsburgh in 2005, when her husband took a teaching job at the University of Pittsburgh. She used the opportunity to make a career change, completing Pitt’s one-year accelerated nursing program and becoming an RN at a local hospital. (For privacy reasons, she declines to name the hospitals she’s worked.) And she began chronicling her experiences in an opinion column in The New York Times. Brown, who now lives in Point Breeze with her husband and three kids, structured The Shift to give it a novelistic arc. She used two stories that occurred over one real-life shift, about “Sheila,” a patient she assumed was OK but wasn’t, and “Mr. Hampton,” a patient she worried about who turned out to be fine. She pulled the stories about “Candace,” the difficult patient, and the elderly “Dorothy” from memories of past shifts. (All the patients were

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Theresa Brown at home in Point Breeze

given pseudonyms.) With The Shift, which the Wall Street Journal called “an engrossing human drama,” Brown pushed herself to write about her patients more empathetically. She doesn’t shy from noting how difficult patients like Candace, who insisted on scrubbing her hospital room with Lysol wipes, could make her job. But she also offers insight into their thought processes, reminding us — and herself

— how uncomfortable the patients must be, away from home and dealing with debilitating diseases. Brown came to a troubling realization: Hospitals are not good for patients. In The Shift, we see how patients’ sleep is disrupted when Brown must perform tests or retrieve blood work, and the difficulty she has giving individual attention to all four people under her care. “Hospital administrators with their CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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PATIENTS AND VIRTUES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

“WE SET THINGS UP TO WORK FOR US.” OCTOBER 10 THROUGH NOVEMBER 1, 2015

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org 1300 Bingham Street, South Side

It’s a sentiment echoed by Doug Weaver, “Ray” in the The Shift. Weaver was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia in 2009, and has become a friend of Brown’s. He speaks highly of Brown and the other nurses who tended to him during his hospital stay, but he much preferred the home-based care he received after a bonemarrow transplant. “I didn’t feel like I was being treated like a number,” he says. Brown’s Times column covered previously unexplored issues like doctor-nurse bullying, and larger ones like health-care reform, earning her an invitation to the White House in 2009 to meet President Obama and attend an event in support of the Affordable Care Act. However, she plans to continue writing about nursing and health care, and will chronicle her experiences with home-based care. In The Shift, she advocates for issues that directly affect nurses, like less charting; “alternates” who would allow them to take breaks; and more people helping to transport patients. “It takes a lot of people to work with ailing human bodies,” Brown says. But along with that stress, Brown illustrates the camaraderie between nurses, who pitch in to help each other whenever they can. As she declares in The Shift, “This is nurse’s work, and it’s a privilege to do it.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

[ART REVIEW]

REBIRTHS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

Brenda Stumpf’s mixed-media work “Didymous (The Twins)”

NO GOOD DEED GOES UNPUNISHED

eyes on the bottom line seem to think that nurses can stretch infinitely, like rubber bands,” Brown writes in The Shift. But “the more patients an individual nurse cares for, the smaller the amount of TLC per patient.” In hospitals, Brown says, patients are subject to hospital workers’ schedules. She points to lab work: Patients are awoken at 4 or 5 a.m. for blood draws, so that the results are ready when doctors make their rounds at 10 a.m. “We set things up to work for us,” Brown says. Overall, The Shift is less an indictment of hospitals and more a celebration of the tenacity of nurses and patients living under stressful circumstances. Brown writes fondly of her coworkers, who are overworked and often go uncompensated for lunch breaks they never take. Nonetheless, last year, Brown tried something else new professionally. She left her job as a hospital nurse and switched to home-based care, working with a single patient in his or her own home. “It’s been eye-opening,” Brown says. “People in their homes have more privacy and dignity.”

For her exhibit Between Worlds, Brenda Stumpf has created paintings, sculptures, charcoal sketches, ink drawings and elaborately dimensional works combining layers of acrylic, gesso, wire, leaves, flowers, fabric and lace. But although the media that she employs swings from one end of the pendulum to the other, the ideas she communicates at Box Heart Gallery are strongly consistent. Particularly prevalent is the theme of ends leading to beginnings, growth emerging from decay and, ultimately, life following death. The smallest works are the only ones revealing purity of color, blood-red ink scrawled on paper, scratches clean and bright and delicate, vivid tendrils clambering over small pages. A duet of sketches represents a longer series titled “Fifty Days at Niflheim” — lightless charcoal, chalk, pastel and pencil dense and dark and still but full of movement, hinting at mountains considering the possibility of volcanos, waves debating whirlpools. A handful of paintings are centered upon absence, giving up even the ghost to present the shadow and space left behind. Three similar pieces are a trinity, each centered upon a woman no longer present, providing a glimpse of the missing through the echo of her form. Colors of earth, blood and rust drip from a halo of stained and murky ivy, waving and wafting in an invisible breeze so we might envision a complete being through the mere suggestion of her hair floating on the wind. Another handful of large-scale mixed-media works on canvas are the showstoppers, each dominating an entire wall of the small gallery, and facing each other. “Strewing of the Besen” splits a yellowed vintage slip up its torso from the hem, the rift left by the imagined shears overflowing with desiccated roses. The frock in “Didymous (The Twins)” is fully cleaved from stem to stern, pulled open above a junkpile of twisted brambly wires and mechanical tentacles, petrified leaves and fossilizing shells. But from this apparent wreckage has sprung a single rose, strong and proud and reaching through and between that which has been torn apart. The undercurrent in these works is the capability for continuance, the chance at a needle of vitality hidden within a haystack of disintegration, the vastness of life and its refusal to be limited. It’s a beauty that’s rough and uneasy, but all the more potent for its challenge. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BRENDA STUMPF: BETWEEN WORLDS continues through Oct. 30. Box Heart Gallery, 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com


SINGING OUT

[PLAY REVIEWS]

FLOOD LINES

{BY ALAN PETRUCELLI}

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

BEFORE THE LIGHTS dim, the songs of spirit

River Gulf Outlet Canal. But that’s not what Lower Ninth is about. Gresh has said he considers the community’s displacement analogous to what happened in the Lower Hill District in the 1960s, not to mention the current situation with East Liberty’s Penn Plaza Apartments.

welcome audience members with joyful noise; vows of jubilation; no more crying, no more tears; and the promise that Jesus will save our souls. Choir Boy promises hope. Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play is set in Charles R. Drew Prep School, an elite boarding school for young African-American men, whose crest features an angry bird and the Latin phrase acta non verba (actions not words). The play focuses on Pharus Young, a promising and overambitious student who struggles over his love of Christ, his love/hate for his mother and his love/hate for four other schoolmates. Pharus is steadfastly dedicated to his school, even risking expulsion when he refuses to name the boy(s) who call(s) him derogatory names. Sandwiched in every waking moment and movement is his obvious homosexuality, which rears its naked head a few too many times. Did I say naked? Not literally. There are crucial scenes in which the

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

TEN YEARS AGO, the Lower Ninth Ward was

still soaked in destruction following the flooding of New Orleans, one of the worst disasters in U.S. history. Beau Willimon’s one-act 2007 take on the indelible image of African-American survivors clinging to rooftops is less about the event than about relationships. The Caravan Theatre of Pittsburgh’s production of Lower Ninth, directed by Edwin Lee Gibson, effectively peels back the levels of those relationships in a crisp, music-filled hour. Spoiler alert: I won’t. Since Lower Ninth is a play of discovery and identity, plot details — even full descriptions of the characters — would give away too much. Maurice Redwood adds macho to the tetchy young E-Z; Jomo Ray brings gravitas as the Bible-misquoting Malcolm; and Sam Lothard towers as the menacing, if deceased, Lowboy.

LOWER NINTH

continues through Sun., Oct. 4. Caravan Theatre in the Kaufmann Center of the Hill House Association, 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. $15-20. 412-392-4400 or www.showclix.com

The shoestring budget does not prevent Gibson, Caravan artistic director John Gresh and their production team from putting on a fine show. Terry Jachimiak II designed both the lighting and the raked rooftop stage; Cheryl El-Walker’s costumes are her usual high quality; and Nik Nemec well manages the stage at the Hill House Association’s Elsie Hillman Auditorium.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TERRY DANA JACHIMIAK II}

Jomo Ray (left) and Maurice Redwood in Lower Ninth, at Caravan Theatre

Disclaimer: As a white person, I have some difficulty with portrayals of AfricanAmerican life by privileged white guys. I’m not saying that Willimon, best known as the showrunner for the American version of House of Cards, is either untalented or insensitive. But there’s too much “in the ’hood” kind of vibe that belies the reality of that ward, which boasted the highest percentage of black home-ownership in New Orleans. And just to set the record straight, NOLA actually “dodged a bullet” with Katrina. It was not the hurricane but a flood of bad engineering that nearly destroyed the city. There were multiple breaches of many levees, attributed to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ poor design and maintenance, all exacerbated by the Corps’ Mississippi

OCTOBER 9 • AUGUST WILSON CENTER

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PLAY REVIEWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

students take showers (which, like the beds, emerge magically out of Lindsey B. Mayer’s amazing set). But it’s a disservice to the play and insulting to the audience to have them strip to their underwear, then remove the underwear to reveal dance belts. Moreover, though the play promises hope, its soul seems lost. Somewhere here is a daring, adventurous and courageous exploration of racial inequality, the American-American educational system and gay acceptance … tough issues, melded with riveting a cappella gospel music, delivered with fractious verve. Unfortunately, McCraney ornaments his work with so many stereotypes (including “colored-people time” and the shocking size of black penises) and preaches to the choir so relentlessly that the work’s chaotic restlessness suffers.

CHOIR BOY

continues through Oct. 11. The REP at Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $25-30. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Still, the acting is solid, buoyed by Tome Cousin’s taut direction. As Pharus, Tru Verret-Fleming spills hormones and emotions with reckless abandon; his roommate (and his only true friend) Bobby is subtly portrayed by Justin Lonesome. Equally compel-

ling is LaTrea Rembert as Junior, who commands the stage with grace and agility. In 105 intermissionless minutes, Choir Boy blends self-delusion with harsh reality in its telling of the pain and discovery of becoming a man. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

HAND-CRAFTED {BY TED HOOVER}

WHEN FOLKS SAY, “They just don’t write plays like that anymore,” it’s plays like Dulcy they’re talking about. Written in 1922 by Pittsburgh natives George S. Kaufman and Mark Connelly, Dulcy is three acts, nearly a dozen performers and one purpose — to make you laugh. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Co. gives the show an airing, surely its first locally in at least 50 years. Dulcy is what used to be called a flibbertigibbet; a chatty, slightly silly young woman easily ruled by whim. She hosts a weekend party for her husband’s business associate, but her tone-deaf social skills lead to her invite rival suitors of the same woman, strangers with secrets, and lots more. Dulcy’s got a big heart, but her belief that everything works out brings disaster. In 2005, Playwrights presented another

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forgotten Kaufman play, The Butter and Egg Man, which I enjoyed tremendously. Dulcy isn’t quite up to that level of rollicking fun. It’s diverting, with plenty of the legendary Kaufman humor, but its three acts give us too much time to notice the dated quality of both the characters and dialogue. I’m intrigued by director Corey Rieger’s attempts to mitigate that. He’s reset the play in 2015, but without updating the lines or characters … so you’ll have people with smartphones saying things like “I mayn’t, sir.” I admit I had some trouble with that dissonance. The role of Dulcy — in an excellent performance by Melessie Clark — hasn’t aged well over the past century. In 1922, her scatterbrained whimsy is adorable; in 2015, she seems to need medication.

DULCY

continues through Oct. 11. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $22.50-30. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com

Rieger does a great job keeping this large cast on task and up to speed. It’s a talky play, and he makes sure the pace doesn’t flag. In addition to Clark’s performance, I enjoyed Wali Jamal’s scene-stealing turn as a put-upon butler, and Gayle Pazerski and Sara Fisher as mother and stepdaughter, both of whom get sidetracked by romance. Luke Chamberlain makes a lot of his nerdy accountant, and Rieger himself is big fun, playing a pompous screenwriter outlining his latest (and most ridiculous) screenplay. As a Kaufman fan, I’m happy to see even his obscure works, and I salute Pittsburgh Playwrights for providing the opportunity. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

In Collaboration with Pennsylvania State University

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by NSangou Njikam Directed by Kikora Franklin Directed by Steve Broadnax

DEMONSTRATIONS

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Presenting Sponsors:

Additional Support

October 1-11 Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday at 7:30 PM. Saturday & Sunday Matinees at 3PM.

In collaboration with: Innovation Works, Faros Properties, Hack Pittsburgh, Assemble, TechShop Pittsburgh and Urban Innovation 21

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

The Falk School/University of Pittsburgh 4060 Allequippa Street • Pgh, PA 15213

JUKEBOXED IN {BY ALAN PETRUCELLI}

BIG GIRLS don’t cry. But at Saturday’s matinee of Jersey Boys, one apparently intoxicated big girl had big problems: She made so much noise, yelled and screamed and cried out the show’s dialogue and lyrics, that police hauled her out of the Benedum. Ain’t that a shame. Still, I couldn’t take my eyes off this PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh show. But not for the right reasons. How Jersey Boys won the 2005 Tony for best musical is one of life’s unsolved mysteries. Yet people flock. Pittsburgh has now welcomed three touring productions within four years, and the musical seems to have gotten under most audiences’ skin. Most. Jersey Boys is a “jukebox musical”; it uses previously written material from a specific group, thus saving a fortune, and (usually) making it a fortune. Unlike Mamma Mia!, which employs Abba tunes to tell a new story, Jersey Boys narrates the ups and downs of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, as related by each performer in a selected “season.” There are cute cartoon backdrops by Michael Clark, deft direction by Des McAnuff and music by Bob Gaudio and Bob Crewe.

JERSEY BOYS

continues through Sun., Oct. 4. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40-130. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

But while Jersey Boys is told by a cast imitating the group, the performers are so pedestrian they are interchangeable. Though Valli and his pals may have had hits, the music employs such cloying sounds that many of the songs sound the same, as well. And though signage warns the audience that the show uses “authentic, profane Jersey vocabulary,” even the f-word bores after its 657th use. Oh, what a night. I did enjoy two things: learning that the song title “Big Girls Don’t Cry” came from a John Payne and Rhonda Fleming Western (Tennessee’s Partner), and that book authors Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice dramatized one true, poignant moment. When Valli learns that his 22-year-old daughter died of a drug overdose, a priest consoles him. “Don’t blame yourself,” the holy man says. “Who then?” asks Valli, a cardboard box of his daughter’s belongings in his arms. Actually, I enjoyed three things. Let’s not forget the arresting antics of the obnoxious big girl. Bye bye, baby! I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Jacqueline Humphries, Untitled, 2014, Courtesy the artist and Greene Naftali, New York

Forum 75

Closing October 5 An extensive presentation of all new atmospheric paintings in shimmering silver and black-light pigments from the acclaimed contemporary painter.

cmoa.org

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.0110.08.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., OCT. 01 {STAGE}

The Duquesne University Red Masquers — at 102, the city’s oldest theater troupe — christens the school’s brandnew theater space with a great American play. Local stage veteran Mark Yochum plays Willy Loman in the Red Masquers’ production of Death of a Salesman, directed by Duquesne theater-arts program director John E. Lane. The cast for the Arthur Miller classic includes Curt Wootton (best known for playing YouTube sensation Pittsburgh Dad) as Biff Loman. Tonight’s the very first performance of any kind at Duquesne’s $5.5 million, 120-seat black-boxstyle Genesius Theater. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 18. Duquesne campus, Uptown. $5-15. 412-396-4997 or squareup.com/ market/genesius-theater

+ FRI., OCT. 02 {SCREEN} If you’re into indie film, you’re almost guaranteed to see something you love at the touring Ann Arbor Film Festival. In its 53rd year, the

OCT. 08

Leslie Pietryzk

Michigan-based fest’s touring program includes a rich international selection of shorts, from experimental pieces to animation, documentary and narrative work. At Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room, the showcase is divided into two programs, each shown nightly today and tomorrow. And thanks to the Allegheny Regional Asset District’s RADical Days, all four screenings are free. BO 7 and 8:30 p.m. Also 7 and 8:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 3. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. www.cinema. pfpca.org

{SCREEN}

McKees Rocks’ plucky Parkway Theater is soliciting interest in three recent documentaries by offering multiple free screenings of each this weekend. Two are wellreviewed theatrical releases: The Look of Silence, Joshua Oppenheimer’s second exploration of Indonesian genocide, and Listen to Me Marlon, Stevan Riley’s look at Marlon Brando through the famed actor’s trove of personal audio recordings and visual materials. And festival favorite Alfred and Jakobine is Jonathan Howell’s attempt to document the denouement of his parents’ love story, which began with high adventure (a round-the world trip by taxicab) and ended, decades ago, in heartbreak. See the theater’s website for showtimes. BO Screenings continue through Sun., Oct. 4. 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. Free. 412-7661668 or www.community reelartscenter.org

{ART}

OCT. 06

FUSE@PSO

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

Exhibits opening for this month’s Unblurred gallery crawl, on Penn Avenue, include Pittsburgh Glass Center’s Indagare, featuring resident artist Therman Statom, known for his life-size glass ladders, chairs and small-scale houses. Most Wanted Fine Art marks its eighth anniversary with On the Ropes, new work by


FreeEvent Richard Blanco calls Pittsburgh “the faraway home … I’ve never been to.” Indeed, the search for home is a key theme for the 2013 inaugural poet. Born in Madrid to Cuban emigrants, Blanco grew up in Miami, and his work has been heavily colored by his family’s sense of a lost homeland. In 1998, his poetry found a home at the University of Pittsburgh Press — which also published 2012’s Looking for the Gulf Motel, the collection that preceded his surprise selection as the fifth inaugural poet, and the first to be Latino, an immigrant or openly gay. Blanco, 47, lives in Maine, but hasn’t been home much since that frigid January day. Reached by phone in Connecticut, where he’s currently teaching at Wesleyan University, he says he now spends 80 percent of his time traveling to readings at venues from hospices to the historic reopening of the U.S. embassy in Havana. On Oct. 2, the Madwomen Reading Series hosts Blanco’s first-ever Pittsburgh reading, at Carlow University. Expect poetry and readings from his 2014 memoir The Prince of Los Cocuyos. And he’ll pursue his mission as the Academy of American Poets’ first education ambassador: “I’m delighted for poetry itself as much as for my own career, just how the doors have opened up for poetry because of those seven minutes at the inauguration.” Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 2. Antonian Hall, Carlow campus, Oakland. Free. 412-578-6346

Danielle Bartone and Jason Sauer. BOOM Concepts has edgy, interactive fun with the VIA festival’s Games Salon. Assemble hosts Maggie Lynn Negrete’s Apothecary of Interactive Healing, an attempt to crowdsource healing. And the Irma Freeman Center opens Black Out the Sun, Douglas Duerring’s series of prints documenting an epic staged battle, complete with horses and weaponry. BO Most venues are open 6-9 p.m. 4800-5400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield. Free. www.pennavenue.org

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petals, or crawling across tables laden with pastries. Forbidden Fruit: Chris Antemann at Meissen is the work of Antemann, an artist raised in Johnstown who since 2011 has been in residence at Germany’s Meissen, Europe’s oldest maker of porcelain. Her figurines hark to the 18th century, when porcelain was the ultimate luxury item, though her works like The Love Temple, The Pleasure Garden and Paradise Chandelier have a contemporary sensual twist. The exhibit opens today at the Frick Art & Historical Center. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Free. www.the frickpittsburgh.org

The They’re heyy re saucy, these little he porcelain figurines, por orrcel celain ain fi figur g ines, their nipples red, flirtatiously nip handing each other flower han

{MUSIC} Get medieval with Anonymous 4 as it kickstarts Renaissance & Baroque’s 2015-16 concert season. Anonymous 4 was created out of a desire to hear what medieval chant and polyphony would sound like when sung with female voices, and its 1992 recording, An English Ladymass, was the first recording of medieval music to appear on the Billboard’s classical charts. The New York-based a capella quartet, which is celebrating its final tour, will perform pieces from more than 20 recordings at Calvary Episcopal Church. Kelechi Urama 8 p.m. 315 Shady Ave., Shadyside. $20-35. 412-361-2048 or www.rbsp.org 412 361

nationally known conductor who at June’s FUSE blended Brahms and Radiohead — again mashes up the old and the new, blending Beethoven’s famous symphony Eroica with songs from the Coldplay catalog. The concert at Heinz Hall culminates with a spirited rendition of Beethoven’s Finale: Allegro molto

dies. Pietryzk, whose own husband died when she was 37, is based in Alexandria, Va. Her University of Pittsburgh Press reading and book-signing tonight is at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, and it’s free. BO 7 p.m. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. 412-383-2493

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Forbidden Fruit: Chris Antemann at Meissen

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A rare st staging of Leonard Bernstein’s one-act opera Bernste Trouble in Tahiti highlights Bernstein tribute that the Bern Resonance Works / opens R Pittsburgh’s third season. The Pittsbur work is a critique of 1952 wo postwar American suburbia; production, featuring a the prod seven-piece chamber orchestra, seven-p mezzo-soprano Kara stars me Cornell and baritone Andrew Cummings. Performances Cummin tonight tonigh and tomorrow of Resonance’s The Bernstein Res Project, at Shadyside’s Pr Rodef Shalom R Congregation, also C include selections from i Candide and West Side C Story and more. BO S 8 p.m. Also 3 p.m. Sun., Su Oct. 4. 4905 Fifth Ave., Ave Shadyside. $15-40. www.resonanceworks.org www

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We dug out our / kidneys, put them in the bucket, then / waited for rain you said the weatherman / promised. On the beach, we lay tangled like the leashes of euthanized / house pets, red trails from our bodies / tied together at points, then keeping / a passionate, rational distance.” Poet Daniel Khalastchi, a first-generation

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Iraqi-American who’s also Jewish, works at the University of Iowa. Tonight, at East End Book Exchange, he reads from his new collection, Tradition (McSweeney’s) along with local poet Don Wentworth. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. www. eastendbookexchange.com

combined with Coldplay’s anthem “Viva la Vida.” A 5 p.m. happy hour precedes the show. KU 6:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30-35. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

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+ THU., OCT. 08 Leslie Pietryzk has published two novels, but her first story collection is particularly personal, and wrenching. This Angel on My Chest, the winner of this year’s Drue Heinz Literary Prize, is a series of 10 stories, each about a different young woman whose husband unexpectedly

{MUSIC} Beethoven meets Coldplay at the second installment of FUSE@PSO, hosted by series creative director Steve Hackman (pictured) and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Hackman — a

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Yo! Suffering from Breaking Bad withdrawal? Drusky Entertainment presents a fix in the form of one superfan’s parody, One Man Breaking Bad, at Altar Bar. Los Angelesbased Actor Miles Allen plays all of the show’s iconic characters in a one-man re-enactment of the entire AMC series about a methdealing high school teacher. Allen got his start after his Breaking Bad impressions on YouTube garnered more than a million hits and led to sold-out runs at comedy festivals in Melbourne and Edinburgh. KU 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20. www.thealtarbar.com

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THEATER THE BERNSTEIN PROJECT. The centerpiece of the program is the one-act, Trouble in Tahiti, a critique of American post-war materialism & an expression of the universal longing for love & meaning. Also selections from Candide & West Side Story, art songs & short instrumental works. 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 4, 3 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. CHOIR BOY. The story of Pharus, the enthusiastic leader of the Charles R. Drew Prep School choir, whose ambitions & emerging sexuality place him at odds w/ his classmates & the school’s longstanding code of honor. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 11. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK. A play based on the diaries of a teenage girl during WWII. WedSat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 25, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. DULCY. Though she has good intentions, calamity follows Dulcy wherever she goes. Sat, Sun, 3 p.m. and Thu, Fri, Sun,

Zines, theater scenes and jazz queens Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

go according to plan. Thru Oct. 4, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 11. Pittsburgh 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. Oct. 4. Strand Theater, Zelienople. www.pghplaywrights.com. FOREVER PLAID. A musical review 724-742-0400. THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS: that pays homage to the closeharmony male singers of the THE MUSICAL. A musical about 1950’s. The “Plaidsâ€? are four musicals. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, young, eager, male singers who 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 4. The Theatre never made it to their ďŹ rst big gig Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. due to a fatal car crash. Returning THE OUTGOING TIDE. In a from the afterlife, they are given summer cottage on Chesapeake a chance to fulďŹ ll their Bay, Gunner has hatched dreams. Sun, 2 p.m. and an unorthodox plan to Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru secure his family’s future Oct. 10. South Park but meets w/ resistance Theatre, Bethel Park. from his wife & son, w. w w 412-831-8552. who have plans of per ghcitypa p JERRY’S GIRLS. their own. Oct. 1-3, .com Broadway hit w/ some of 7:30 p.m., Sun., Oct. 4, the most memorable songs 2 p.m. and Oct. 10-12, for women from the songbook of 7:30 p.m. Apple Hill Playhouse, acclaimed composer Jerry Herman. Delmont. 724-468-5050. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 4. THE WINTER’S TALE. Attack Red Barn Theater, Allison Park. Theatre, Chatham Baroque & 724-773-7150. Quantum Theatre join forces to LOWER NINTH. A play dealing w/ present Shakespeare’s “A what happened after the levees Winter’s Taleâ€?. Wed, Thu, Sat, 8 p.m. broke during Hurricane Katrina. Thru Oct. 3. Union Trust Building, Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 4 p.m. Downtown. 412-362-1713. Thru Oct. 4. Hill House, Hill District. 412-392-4400. THE MUSIC MAN. A con man comes to a Midwestern town w/ a scam using a boy’s marching THE DEATH SHOW. An improvised band program, but things don’t comedy funeral. Featuring

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opening act Chello Kitty. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOHN EVANS, JIMMY MERRIT. 8 p.m. American Legion Post #113. 814-623-5741. YOUR LIFE: THE MUSICAL. An improvised Broadway-style musical all about a lucky member of the audience. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

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DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. An improv show feat. Second City alumni, Jethro & Kristy Nolen improvising w/ guests. BYOB. First Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOHN EVANS, JIMMY MERRIT, DAVID KAYE. 7:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden, Belle Vernon. 412-920-5653.

MON 05 COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, BloomďŹ eld. 412-682-9603. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

WED 07 DAVID KAYE, MIKE WYSOCKI. 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

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The ďŹ rst hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. In its fifth year, the Pittsburgh Zine Fair returns to the Union Project with a day of crafts, zine-making, zine booths and live music. Zines are self-published (often photocopied) works that can be anything from comics to cookbooks. This form of radial information-sharing ducks the normal publishing process, allowing anyone and everyone to make their own publications. 2-8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 4. 801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. Free. www.pghzinefair.com

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A ďŹ ne jewelry exhibition that brings together scientiďŹ c fact & CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


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“Les Fleurs du Mâle” (archival photograph on velvet rag watercolor paper, 2013), by Steven Miller. From the exhibition Les Fleurs du Mâle, at Revision Space, Lawrenceville.

NEW THIS WEEK BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League Multimedia Exhibit. Opening reception October 3, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. Let’s Be Thankful. An open art show sponsored by the Cranberry Artist’s Network. Opening reception October 7, 6-8 p.m. Cranberry. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Black Out the Sun. Photography by Douglas Duerring. Opening reception October 2, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. parallelgenres. Christine Barney, John Burton, Granite Calimpong, Bernie D’Onofrio, Jen Elek, Saman Kalantari, David Lewin, David Royce, Margaret Spacapan & Cheryl Wilson Smith exploring an interconnected set of parameters through different genres. Opening October 2. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PERCOLATE. Inner.Outer. Space. Artwork by Kate Bazis, James Gyre, Tilley Hawk, & Tommy Bones Werner. Opening reception October 3,6-9 p.m. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Aqueous International Exhibition. Showing original artists’ work in water-based media from around the world. Opening reception October 3, 5-8 p.m. Friendship.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures 4: Travis K. Schwab: Lost and Found. Three new paintings, large portraits of Warhol, flanked by a variety of smaller canvases painted from the lost photobooth strips & books. Glycerine & Rosewater.

A site specific artwork by the German/Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER. Humanae/I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Mosiac Works. Works by Stevo. Downtown. 412-325-6766. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Panoptica. Photos by Jessica Kalmar. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOXHEART GALLERY. Brenda Stumpf & Daria Sandburg. Multimedia works by the artists. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BOXWOOD BOUTIQUE. Between the Lines. New & recent works by Jerome D’Angelo. East Liberty. 412-363-2993. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s influences. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public officials & business leaders. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARRIE FURNACE. Alloy Pittsburgh. Temporary site-based

artworks by Rose Clancy, Oreen, Cohen, Sarika Goulatia, Nick Liadis & Scott Turri. Rankin. CULTURAL TRUST GALLERY. India in Focus. A six week festival celebrating Indian arts, dance, music, theater, more. Downtown. 412-456-6666. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Figurative 3. Featuring work by Steven Boksenbaum, Patricia Barefoot & Mary Weidner. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Behind the Curtain. Work by Elizabeth Fortunato & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Collections. Painting by Mike McSorely. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Art & Soul. An exhibit of spiritual & socially conscious art by Benjamin Creme, artist, author & founder of Share International. Garfield. 412-952-7974. JAMES GALLERY. Second Nature. Works based on based on an organic reality- plants, pods, shells & cells by Eileen

RICHARD BLANCO FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 , 2015 Rosemary Heyl Theatre, Antonian Hall, Carlow University Reading at 7:30 p.m. ( book table at 7 p.m.) Reception and book signing following the reading. Free and open to the public. Free parking. Valet available. For more information, please contact Sarah Williams-Devereux at sewilliams412@carlow.edu or Jan Beatty at jpbeatty@carlow.edu

Richard Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in US history — the youngest, first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. He was recently commissioned by the State Department to write a poem for the ceremonial re-opening of the U.S. Embassy in Cuba. This poem, Matters of the Sea / Cosas del Mar, was released as a bilingual chapbook by the University of Pittsburgh Press.

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pop culture in a showcase of wearable & decorative arts related to outer space, space travel, the space age, & the powerful influence these topics have had on human civilization. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015

Run. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. The Mysterious Nature of Fungi. An overview of these mysterious organisms that are found almost everywhere on this planet & are the cause of both bliss & blight. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. Isabella D. Stoker Graham Collection. Heritage glass from her estate. L E Smith & the Spence Family: Four Generations. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living

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Braun, Carla Ciuffo, David Henderson, Pam Longobardi & Carrie Seid. West End. 412-922-9800. JOHN HERMANN JR. MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM. Germany in War Time - What an American Girl Saw & Heard. Ten paintings by Mary Ethel McAuley. 100 years ago, in October 1915, Mary Ethel McAuley & her mother arrived in Berlin. For two years, the younger McAuley, at age 19, painted scenes &wrote about the lives she observed in war-torn Berlin for the Pittsburg Dispatch. Bellevue. 412-761-8008. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal & Marnie Weber created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. THE MINE FACTORY. The Landscape Problem. Presenting works by Akiko Kotani, Lenore Thomas, Chris McGinnis, Kara Skylling, Matthew Conboy, Deborah Hosking, Patrick Schmidt, Daniel Roth, Blaine Siegel & Linda PriceSneddon utilizing landscape — theoretically & or in an Art-Historical context— as a means to explore personal/

landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war

collective ideas through abstract imagery. Homewood. www.minefactory.com. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. In the Making. An exhibition highlighting the creative processes used by ten local, national & international artists participating in Neu Kirche’s public art programs. North Side. 412-322-2224. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Annual Members Show. Feat. juried works created by North Hills Art Center members in oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel, pottery & mixed media. Ross. 412-364-3622. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147 ext.-7. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Pittsburgh’s Point. Showing the first photo of Pittsburgh’s “Point” taken from atop Mt. Washington in 1896. See the low level city, antique bridges & river commerce. Many other historic photos & cameras. Spirits, Good & Evil: Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. From the Victorian Era. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Age-Specific. An exhibit by the Artist of the Year showing the aging of the 1960s generation. Printmaking 2015. An exhibit of new work by regional artists represents a wide variety of printmaking processes including intaglio, photogravure, wood cut,

effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570.

DANCE THU 01 - SAT 03 STUDENT CHOREOGRAPHY PROJECT. A showcase of original

linoleum cut relief, silkscreen, collagraph & monotype. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. In the Air: Visualizing what we breath. Photographs that show the effects of western PA’s air quality. Oakland. 412-681-5449. REVISION SPACE. Les Fleurs du Mâle. Photography & film by Steven Miller that pay homage to the French writer & political activist, Jean Genet. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. An exhibition distinguishing the historical & contemporary expressions of the Black Dandy phenomenon in popular culture. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Coding: We Are Always There. Exhibition of fiber art by Tina Williams Brewer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

choreography by the Conservatory’s top students. George Rowland White Performance Studio. Oct. 1-2, 8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 3, 2 & 8 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-8000.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 02 - SAT 03

HARVEST FAIR. 18 rooms filled w/ furniture, antiques, jewelry, sports team clothing & collectibles, holiday decorations, baked goods, home & garden sales, luggage, lamps, toys books, sporting goods, paintings, BBQ chicken, clothing shoes, designer clothing & accessories, mushroom sandwiches. All money raised is going other charities in the Pittsburgh region & abroad. 6-9 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Fox Chapel. 412-963-8243.

FRI 02 - SUN 04

XTREME HIKE. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s Xtreme Hike program takes hikers through some of the most scenic trails in the nation to raise funds & awareness for cystic fibrosis. Oct. 2-4 Seven Springs. 412-321-4422.


SAT 03 - SUN 04

FALL FLEATIQUE. Benefits the McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 4, 12-4 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

TUE 06 FROM “AT RISK” TO RESILIENT. “How Can a Multidisciplinary Community Support Girls & Young Women?” w/ Dr. Scyatta Wallace, Lynn Banaszak Brusco, Dr. Kathi Elliott, & Lynne Hayes-Freeland. Event proceeds support Gwen’s Girls. 4 p.m. The Priory, North Side. 412-904-4239.

WED 07 GO YARD: WEST HILLS BASEBALL. As a part of its Bantam Night series, Wigle Whiskey will donate 12% of sales that evening to the West Hills Baseball 11U team coached by Mike Scheider. 5:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-848-8047.

POLITICS SUN 04 HIT A HOMERUN FOR BERNIE. Bernie flyers, voter registration. 2:15 p.m. PNC Park, North Side. 412-802-8391.

LITERARY THU 01 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. MARGEE KERR. Discussing her book, SCREAM: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear. 6-9 p.m. The ScareHouse, Etna. 412-781-5885. WILEY CASH. Talk & book signing w/ author of A Land More Kind Than Home & This Dark Road to Mercy. 6:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

FRI 02 JOSEPH MUSSO JR. BOOK LAUNCH. Celebrate the launch of Joseph Musso, Jr.’s book “Apartment Building” & hear readings from Don Wentworth, Evan Swanson & others. 7 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220. KIMBERLY T. SUDERS. Discussing & signing her book. McCartney Library. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Geneva College, Beaver Falls. 724-847-6737.

SAT 03 COFFEE & SCIENCE FICTION DISCUSSION/BOOKSIGNING. 10 a.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 412-828-4877. POETRY AT THE PUMP HOUSE. Reading in honor of Thomas Merton & Philip Leveine. W/ Robin Clark, Fred Shaw, Peter Oresick, & Jonathan Robison. 1:30 p.m. The Pump House, Homestead. 412-831-3871.

SUN 04 FEAST DAY READING & TASTING. Jimmy Riordan will be reading from his translation of Francis Jammes’ novel Le Roman du Lievre. The reading will be accompanied by tasting of food inspired by the novel & the ceremonial melting of lead type used in the printing of the book. 6 p.m. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224.

MON 05 DANIEL KHALASTCHI, DON WENTWORTH. McSweeneys Poetry Series. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing young innovators to the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty. www.techshop.ws/pittsburgh.html.

THU 01 - SAT 03

PPG COLOR WEEK. Contribute to a big collaborative mural. Learn the CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Key) model of color mixing by layering silkscreen designs. Oct. 1-3, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 03

SATURDAY SENSORY STORYTIME. Storytime w/ songs & movements for children on the autism spectrum and/or sensory integration challenges. Registration required. 10:15 a.m., Sat., Nov. 7, 10:15 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 5, . w 10:15 a.m. Shaler North ww per a p ty ci h pg Hills Library, Glenshaw. .com 412-486-0211.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 04

TUE 06

INQUEERIOR. Queer poetry & movement featuring the moonbaby, Mario Ashkar Film, ru, Kamala Gopalakrishnan, Persian Pittsburgh & Brody Wood. 7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. THE MOTH. A themed story-telling series where all the stories must be true, be about the storyteller & be told w/o notes. Every show has a theme. First Tue of every month, 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 07 DR. BARBARA BURSTIN. Reviewing her two newest books, “Steel City Jews: A History of The Pittsburgh Jewish Community from 1840-1915” & “Steel City Jews in Prosperity, Depression & War 1915-1950”. 7:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

KIDSTUFF

STORYTIME ARTS & CRAFTS. ‘Fletcher & the Falling Leaves’ by Julia Rawlinson. 1 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve, Rector. 724-593-6105.

TUE 06

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing young innovators to the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m., Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. and Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty.

WED 07

STORYTIME! Join Museum Educators as they bring stories of art, artists & creating to life through animated readings. 2:30-3 p.m. and Wed., Oct. 14, 2:30-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 02

THU 01

ART FROM THE START. Art w/ your toddler or preschooler. 10:15 a.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

WISE WALKS. 1-2 mile walk around the neighborhood and learn a little about Oakland, & the Library. Fri. Thru Nov. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

*Stuff We Like

SAT 03

5K RUN/FUN WALK. Benefits the Aaron Slafka Memorial Service Award & PGAA. 7:30 a.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. www.greensburgh. pitt.edu. FALL FOLIAGE HIKE. Pre-registration recommended at www.alleghenycounty.us/parks. Meet at the tennis courts. 10 a.m.12 p.m. & 2-4 p.m. Settler’s Cabin Park, Robinson. 412-787-2750. MUSHROOM MANIA. Learn the art of local mushroom hunting. Meet at Nature Center. 10 a.m.12 p.m. South Park, South Park.

{PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

RICHARD BLANCO. At Rosemary Heyl Theatre, Antonian Hall. Reception & book signing after reading. 7 p.m. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-578-6346.

TUE 06

WISE WALKS. 30 to 45 minute walks to enjoy fall. Water & snack provided. Meet at the Pie Traynor Field in North Park. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

Louisa Street Runnel

WED 07

The city’s only runnel helps cyclists move their bikes up this Oakland staircase.

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

The Rocks Hang on to summer reading a while longer with this romantic mystery by Peter Nichols spanning 60 years.

OTHER STUFF THU 01

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

NIGHT AT THE RACES. 6 p.m. Homeville VFD, West Mifflin. 412-466-7773. WETHOPTOBER FEST. An evening of wet-hopped brews & hopped whiskey, tasty food & great conversation. Benefiting the projects that creatively reuse vacant lots through GTECH. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-736-0938.

BIOPHILIA: PITTSBURGH. A meet-up group dedicated to strengthening the bond between people & the natural world. Come discuss an enviromental topic & share ideas. First Thu of every month, 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. DAVID & GOLIATH: THE MARSHALL ISLANDS TAKES ON THE NUCLEAR POWERS. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh Law Building, Oakland. 412-716-1696. GUNNED DOWN: THE POWER OF THE NRA. PBS presents an investigation into the political power of the NRA in influencing U.S. firearms legislation. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RAW:PITTSBURGH PRESENTS MERGE. 7 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theater, Millvale. 412-821-4447. YOGA FOR RETURNING CITIZENS. Accessible to people at all levels of fitness. Wear comfortable clothing that allows you to move. Mats & props will be provided. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, East Liberty. 412-400-3773.

Breakfast at Micro Diner The best way to start the day on Mount Washington. 221 Shiloh St. {PHOTO COURTESY OF OLIVIA LOCHER}

SAT 03

I Fought the Law In this colorful and entertaining photo series, the Johnstown-born photographer Olivia Locher explores various wacky laws, including New Jersey’s apparent legislation against soup-slurping. www.olivialocher.com/ifoughtthelaw

THU 01 - SAT 03

TERROR TROLLEY TOUR. Hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh’s deepest, darkest secrets. Thu-Sat, 7 & 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 1 Station CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Square, Station Square. 412-391-7433.

FRI 02

ABRE TU NEGOCIO. Presented in EVENT: Spanish, this seminar is designed for new business startups & , entrepreneurs. Rockwell Hall. various venues 6-9 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-1633. CRITIC: , CELEBRATING HILARY an art student from MASTERS’ WORK. Memorial Squirrel Hill service to celebrate the life of the late award-winning writer & CMU WHEN: English professor. 4:30 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-2830. THE DIGITAL IN DESIGN & MAKING. Explore work of the firm & the use of digital tools I heard about the VIA Festival through fliers around the to create inspiring spaces & [Carnegie Mellon] campus. I went to the Block Party [in architectural artifacts. 6 p.m. EDGE Lawrenceville] on Saturday, and got to see the Girls Rock Studio, Garfield. 412-345-5005. performance, which is an organization that brings young EMSDC AWARDS GALA. Recognize Best in Class in Supplier girls together over the summer and teaches them how Diversity throughout the Eastern to play rock music. The two biggest acts [there] were Minority Supplier Development Princess Nokia and Ikonika. Princess Nokia was completely Council. 5:30 p.m. Rivers Casino, mind-blowing. There was so much variety in her set. North Side. 412-391-4423. Ikonika was fantastic. It was my first time seeing her FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional live. Most of the set were bangers in the sense that stuff American dance. No partner was “banged” together, but it was also very danceable. needed, beginners welcome, Tonight [in Garfield], I’ve gotten to see DJ Babyteeth and lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. see everyone dancing. [His music] was sort of hazy, with a Swisshelm Park Community relaxed flow. It was some really great stuff. The festival has Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. a really positive vibe, and you’ll go out to your friends and GHOST HUNTERS IN PITTSBURGH. Join Steve ask, “Why weren’t you here?” Gonsalves & Dave Tango from B Y K E L E C H I URA M A SyFy Channel’s hit show Ghost Hunters, & Brett McGinnis from Ghost Hunters Academy, on a Pittsburgh. 412-456-5000. 412-488-7490 ext. 226. ghost hunt at the haunted Carrie BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. ST. THOMAS MORE 26TH Furnaces. 6 p.m. Carrie Furnace, Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, ANNUAL ARTS/CRAFT SHOW. Rankin. 724-263-9603. Oakland. 412-683-2669. Featuring handcrafted items from PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Party DOGTOBERFEST 2015. Vendors, over seventy local artists w/ jewelry, w/ Phipps in one of the city’s most Ask-a-Vet booth, live music, wreaths & holiday items, soaps & unique nightspots w/ themed adoption information & a Pooch oils, wood crafts, hand knitting, cocktails & a live DJ. 7 p.m. Pride Parade Costume Contest. & more. The church will also offer Phipps Conservatory & 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Waterfront homemade soups & delicious food Botanical Garden, Town Center, Homestead. for take-out. 9 a.m. St. Thomas Oakland. 412-622-6914. 412-841-5073. More Church, Bethel Park. RULES FOR AN OTHER HORTICULTURE/ART 412-254-3595. SELF. Part of VIA THERAPY. Therapeutic SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Fest. A selection of ww. r w activities w/ nature Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing female-identified artists pe ghcitypa p & botanical topics. follows. No partner needed. who use a variety of .com 1:30-3 p.m. Boyce Park, Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace gaming platforms as a Monroeville. 724-733-4618. Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. site for performance & LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ 412-683-5670. critique. Co-curated by MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley SOUTH PARK WOMEN’S CLUB Heather Kelley. 5 p.m. Boom Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 CRAFT SHOW. Artisans & crafters. Concepts, Garfield. 412-802-7220. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Allegheny County LAYER CAKE ART & MUSIC South Park Fairgrounds, South FESTIVAL. 36 bands, 3 comedians Park. 412-833-1266. STATE OF THE FIELD & 15 live painters. 1 p.m.UKRAINIAN FOOD FESTIVAL. CONFERENCE: AFRICAN 2 a.m. James Street Gastropub Ukrainian food, baked goods, AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY, & Speakeasy, North Side. raffle baskets, eat in or take out PAST & PRESENT. CAUSE 20th free admission. 11 a.m. St. Vladimir Anniversary Conference. Earl Lewis, 412-904-3335. historian & president of the LET’S DANCE WEST AFRICAN Ukrainian Hall, South Side. Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, STYLE. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-913-8049. will deliver the keynote address. Downtown. 412-281-7141. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE This conference will bring together NIGHTCLUB 2-STEP. 7 p.m. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle specialists on different eras & Amoré Dance Club, Coraopolis. Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. aspects of black urban history 412-848-0918. 412-224-2827. from the transatlantic slave trade PA RESOURCE COUNCIL through the recent period of BACKYARD COMPOSTING 5TH ANNUAL PGH ZINE FAIR. deindustrialization. Fri-Sun, 12 p.m. WORKSHOP. workshop 2 p.m. Union Project, Highland Thru Oct. 5 Carnegie Mellon thoroughly covers the importance Park. 724-554-3790. University, Oakland. 412-268-2830. and benefits of composting, the BITTER SEEDS SCREENING. process, setting up a compost pile, Environmental Justice Film Series. proper maintenance & ways of AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE This film examines the epidemic using compost. 11 a.m. Mount DAY PARADE. 11 a.m. Downtown of one suicide every 30 minutes Lebanon Public Library.

VIA 2015 Festival

Paul Peng

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2 $2 $5 $

Lite Bottles

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Lite Bottles SATURDAYS ALL DAY

Lite Pitchers DURING PENS GAMES

Sun., Sept. 27

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


amongst some Indian cotton farmers. 6 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-2924. FAM CON 2015. Food trucks, live bands, Steel City Ghostbusters, Cosplay characters, Inflatables, Pop Culture Vendors, Hayrides, Caricature artists, Kids costume contest & much more. 12:30 p.m. The River at New Heights Church. 813-335-6718. FIGMENT. A participatory arts event showcasing art that encourages participants to play, dance, sing, create, engage, experiment & explore their environment. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Arsenal Park, Lawrenceville. 724-914-3323. RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SKETCH COMEDY VIDEO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP. W/ Erin Marie Davis & Nathan Edmondson. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223. “YOUR BODY ON STAGE” IMPROV WORKSHOP. W/ Nathan Edmondson. 2-5 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 05 COMPREHENSIVE SURVEY OF THE COMPLETE PSYCHOLOGICAL WORKS OF FREUD. Course taught by Thomas Janoski, Ph.D delving into Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Project for a Scientific Psychology, Studies on Hysteria, & many others. Every other Mon, 7 p.m. Thru June 21 Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center, Shadyside. 412-661-4224. MYBUSINESS STARTUP. Entrepreneurial training program designed for women entrepreneurs in the early stages of starting their own businesses. Mon, 6:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 30 Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TAI CHI. Please register. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Nov. 16 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

TUE 06 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. HOW JELLY ROLL MORTON INVENTED JAZZ. Author Jonah

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Winter will read his children’s biography, about famed jazz pianist Jelly Roll Morton. Jelly Roll’s music will be performed by pianist Tom Roberts, an expert in early jazz. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912. PET TENTS WORKSHOP. Create a hidey-hole, just right for any small pet, out of an old t-shirt. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PITTSBURGH CHEMICAL DAY 2015. Premier chemical industry event w/ Keynote speech by chemical industry leader Michael McGarry, robust educational forums targeting sales & sourcing professionals in the chemical industry, & more. 8 a.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-901-2074.

WED 07 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session w/ literary conversation. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. CHRISTMAS AROUND THE WORLD PARADE. Float entries are being accepted in the categories of commerical, non-profit & open. For more information, visit Inside ButlerCounty.com. Thru Oct. 30. FELLOWSHIP 16 INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION. Call for submissions of photography from any eligible local photographers. For more information & to submit, visit www.silvereye.org/fellowship16. Thru Oct. 26. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the

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EL CÍRCULO JUVENIL DE CULTURA is a nonprofit that works with Hispanic and Latino youth, ages 6 to 12, to help develop and preserve their Spanish skills. Two-hour workshops are held every weekend at CMU. Volunteers must be Spanish-speaking and have applied for their Pennsylvania clearances. For more information, visit www.circulocmu.blogspot.com.

CELEBRATE THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF WOMEN’S HEALTH IN PITTSBURGH. Learn about The Midwife Center, the Three Rivers Milk Bank & Women’s Health Conversations. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-321-6880. DANCING IN THE STREET. The Latshaw Pops Orchestra w/ a group of 30 professional musicians, singers & dancers, performing music from Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons, Bee Gees, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, Temptations, The Supremes, The Imperials, Marvin Gaye, & more. 11:30 a.m. The Chadwick, Wexford. 724-853-4050. I NEVER LEARNED TO SPELL “SUCCESSFUL”. Lecture w/ Javier Soltero, Dietrich College ‘98. 12:30 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970. MADE IN WESTMORELAND. A tour of Kennametal Technology Center. 5-7 p.m. Kennametal, North Versailles. 724-532-1935 x210. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

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second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. MARKET SQUARE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM. A call to artists to submit new or already assembled artworks to the Market Square Public Art Program. Submissions are due October 5. www.marketsquarepublicart.com. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. Pittsburgh Society of Artists New Member Screening. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last two years. Drop off is October 18, 12:30-1 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

I’ve been dating this guy for almost two months. It’s been pretty good, except the sex isn’t really the best. I have this other male friend who has had a crush on me. Long story short: My friend made a move on me the other night. I told him I couldn’t, and he knew why, but to be honest, I was insanely turned on by his forwardness. He apologized, but a week later we hung out, and I told him that it really intrigued me, and we ended up having crazy cool sex — satisfying in all the ways the guy I’m dating isn’t. I haven’t told the guy I’m seeing about this and I don’t plan to. But I feel guilty. I keep rationalizing that we have never had a talk about exclusivity, and I therefore have no obligation to him. I want to keep fucking my friend, but I also enjoy dating this other guy. Am I an asshole? Am I obligated to disclose that I’m not interested in monogamy with him? TOO MANY INTRIGUES

Are you an asshole? That can’t be ruled out, TMI, but I can’t make a determination with the limited data you’ve provided. One asshole move — and cheating on Mr. Two Months was definitely an asshole move — does not an asshole make. We know this because while everyone is guilty of the occasional asshole move, not everyone is an asshole. Assholes are made when asshole moves come one right after the other. Anyway, while you might not have had a conversation with the guy you’re currently dating/cheating on about exclusivity, you wouldn’t feel guilty about what/who you did if you didn’t think Mr. Two Months was operating under the assumption that you two were exclusive. So the cheating was an asshole move and your rationalization, as you seem to be aware, is a pile of self-serving bullshit that’s equal parts transparent and unnecessary. Because as much as you like hanging out with Mr. Two Months, the sex hasn’t been good for you and you haven’t been good to him. Don’t negotiate a nonmonogamous agreement. End it.

off on. He says he’s too self-conscious to be dominant in bed. This stranger did all the things I wish my boyfriend would do. To test the waters, I casually mentioned an arrangement where we could sleep with other people, and he said he wasn’t into it. If I’m happy in my relationship, and the sex we have is consistently good, sometimes amazing, is that enough? Am I giving up on an aspect of my sexuality if I stay with him, or am I just looking for excuses to fuck other people? LIKES IT ALL ROUGH

A loving and supportive partner, a happy relationship and good sex that occasionally tips into the amazing column — yeah, most people would tell you that’s not only enough, LIAR, it’s a better relationship than the one they’re currently in, recently left or ever hope to find. But the fact that most people would like to trade places with you isn’t relevant, LIAR, because what you have with your boyfriend isn’t enough for you. You want love, happiness, stability and the freedom to fuck other guys — and you would want that freedom even if your boyfriend was capable of dominating you in the sack just the way you like. Seeing as you know this about yourself — seeing as you know that monogamy isn’t for you — making a monogamous commitment you know you can’t keep is an asshole move. So here’s what you’re gonna do: Tell your lovely, loving boyfriend that nonmonogamy is a nonnegotiable. You are willing, of course, to negotiate with him about the form your open relationship might take, but you must make it clear to him that a closed relationship is a recipe for disaster — because sooner or later, you will cheat on him. If he fights on that point, LIAR, if he tells you that he’s sure you’re capable of being monogamous, then you can tell him that by “sooner or later” you meant “last week, with this dude I met in a bar.”

“ONE ASSHOLE MOVE — AND CHEATING ON MR. TWO MONTHS WAS DEFINITELY AN ASSHOLE MOVE — DOES NOT AN ASSHOLE MAKE.”

I’m a straight 28-year-old female, in a relationship with my boyfriend for two years. We live together, and on the weekends we care for his kid. We are very much in love and have a supportive, happy relationship. I’ve always had a hard time being monogamous. In every relationship, I tend to get a wandering eye around the two-year mark. Recently I went by myself to see a friend’s band and ended up meeting a man I had an insane chemistry with. We spent the whole evening together and wound up making out before I literally ran away. The next day, stone cold sober, I called him, drove to his house, and we fucked like crazy. It was animalistic and intense, and I felt like a fucking porn star. It was awesome. My boyfriend and I have sex that I truly enjoy, and I usually get off, but he struggles to be dominant, rough or talk dirty, which are things I really get

I think your answer to BFF last week missed an essential piece of information. She refers to herself as engaging in “drunken” threesomes and hookups. I think she needs to examine her own behavior, not that of her roommate and FWB, and the fact that her relationships seem to be fueled by the effects of her alcohol consumption. I’m guessing her letter was fuzzy for a reason. It was probably written in a drunken haze. Nothing you say will get through to her unless you address her use of alcohol. ALCOHOL NOT THE SOLUTION

Full disclosure: I was drinking when I wrote my response to BFF. So just as it’s possible that alcohol played a role in the drama BFF described, it’s possible I neglected to point that fact out because I was a little drunky myself. On the Lovecast, Dan chats with trans pioneer luminary Kate Bornstein: Listen at savagelove cast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.30/10.07.2015


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.30-10.07

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The 20th century’s most influential artist may have been Pablo Picasso. He created thousands of paintings, and was still churning them out when he was 91 years old. A journalist asked him which one was his favorite. “The next one,” he said. I suggest you adopt a similar attitude in the coming weeks, Libra. What you did in the past is irrelevant. You should neither depend on nor be weighed down by anything that has come before. For now, all that matters are the accomplishments and adventures that lie ahead of you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A windbreak is a line of stout trees or thick bushes that provides shelter from the wind. I think you need a metaphorical version: someone or something to shield you from a relentless force that has been putting pressure on you; a buffer zone or protected haven where you can take refuge from a stressful barrage that has been hampering your ability to act with clarity and grace. Do you know what you will have to do to get it? Here’s your battle cry: “I need sanctuary! I deserve sanctuary!”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your fellow Sagittarian Walt Disney accomplished a lot. He was a pioneer in the art of animation and made movies that won numerous Academy Awards. He built theme parks, created an entertainment empire and amassed fantastic wealth. Why was he so successful? In part because he had high standards, worked hard and harbored an obsessive devotion to his quirky vision. If you aspire to cultivate any of those qualities, now is a favorable time to raise your mastery to the next level. Disney had one other trait you might consider working on: He liked to play the game of life by his own rules. For example, his favorite breakfast was doughnuts dipped in Scotch whisky. What would be your equivalent?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): October is Fix the Fundamentals Month. It will be a favorable time to substitute good habits for bad habits. You will attract lucky breaks and practical blessings as you work to transform overwrought compulsions into rigorous passions. You will thrive as you seek to discover the holy yearning that’s hidden at the root of devitalizing addictions. To get started, instigate free-wheeling experiments that will propel you out of your sticky rut and in the direction of a percolating groove.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Have you made your travel plans yet? Have you plotted your escape? I hope you will hightail it to a festive playground where some of your inhibitions will shrink, or else journey to a holy spot where your spiritual yearnings will ripen. What would be even better is if you made a pilgrimage to a place that satisfied both of those agendas — filled up your senses with novel enticements and fed your hunger for transcendent insights. Off you go, Aquarius! Why aren’t you already on your way? If you can’t manage a real getaway in the near future, please at least stage a jailbreak for your imagination.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Pablo Neruda’s Book of Questions consists entirely of 316 questions. It’s one of those rare texts that makes no assertions and draws no conclusions. In this spirit, and in honor of the

sphinx-like phase you’re now passing through, I offer you six pertinent riddles: 1. What is the most important thing you have never done? 2. How could you play a joke on your fears? 3. Identify the people in your life who have made you real to yourself. 4. Name a good old thing you would have to give up in order to get a great new thing. 5. What’s the one feeling you want to feel more than any other in the next three years? 6. What inspires you to love?

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The next seven weeks will NOT be a favorable time to fool around with psychic vampires and charismatic jerks. I recommend you avoid the following mistakes, as well: failing to protect the wounded areas of your psyche; demanding perfection from those you care about; and trying to fulfill questionable desires that have led you astray in the past. Now I’ll name some positive actions you’d be wise to consider: hunting for skillful healers who can relieve your angst and aches; favoring the companionship of people who are empathetic and emotionally intelligent; and getting educated about how to build the kind of intimacy you can thrive on.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You may have seen websites that offer practical tips on how to improve your mastery of life’s little details. They tell you how to de-clutter your home, or how to keep baked goods from going stale, or why you should shop for shoes at night to get the best fit. I recently come across a humorous site that provides the opposite: bad life tips. For instance, it suggests that you make job interviews less stressful by applying only for jobs you don’t want. Put your laptop in cold water to prevent overheating. To save time, brush your teeth while you eat. In the two sets of examples I’ve just given, it’s easy to tell the difference between which tips are trustworthy and which aren’t. But in the coming days, you might find it more challenging to distinguish between the good advice and bad advice you’ll receive. Be very discerning.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I am rooted, but I flow,” wrote Virginia Woolf in her novel The Waves. That paradoxical image reminds me of you right now. You are as grounded as a tree and as fluid as a river. Your foundation is deep and strong, even as you are resilient in your ability to adapt to changing circumstances. This is your birthright as a Cancerian! Enjoy and use the blessings it confers. (P.S. If for some strange reason you’re not experiencing an exquisite version of what I’ve described, there must be some obstacle you are mistakenly tolerating. Get rid of it.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Should I offer my congratulations? You have corralled a gorgeous mess of problems that are more interesting and provocative than everyone else’s. It’s unclear how long this odd good fortune will last, however. So I suggest you act decisively to take maximum advantage of the opportunities that your dilemmas have cracked open. If anyone can turn the heartache of misplaced energy into practical wisdom, you can. If anyone can harness chaos to drum up new assets, it’s

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Let’s say you have walked along the same path or driven down the same road a thousand times. Then, one day, as you repeat your familiar route, a certain object or scene snags your attention for the first time. Maybe it’s a small fountain or a statue of the Buddhist goddess Guanyin or a wall with graffiti that says, “Crap happens, but so does magic.” It has always been there. You’ve been subconsciously aware of it. But at this moment, for unknown reasons, it finally arrives in your conscious mind. I believe this is an apt metaphor for your life in the next week. More than once, you will suddenly tune in to facts, situations or influences that had previously been invisible to you. That’s a good thing! But it might initially bring a jolt. Send testimonies about how you’ve redeemed the dark side to: Sex Laugh, uaregod@ comcast.net.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On a windy afternoon last spring I was walking through a quiet neighborhood in Berkeley. In one yard there was a garden plot filled with the young green stems of as-yet unidentifiable plants. Anchored in their midst was a small handwritten sign. Its message seemed to be directed not at passersby like me but at the sprouts themselves. “Grow faster, you little bastards!” the sign said — as if the blooming things might be bullied into ripening. I hope you’re smart enough not to make similar demands on yourself and those you care about, Gemini. It’s not even necessary. I suspect that everything in your life will just naturally grow with vigor in the coming weeks.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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you. Is it possible to be both cunning and conscientious, both strategic and ethical? For you right now, I think it is.

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1. Comic Ansari 5. ___ off the handle 9. “The Hunger Games,” e.g. 13. Kyocera ___ (imaging systems company) 14. Tank gunk 15. Unit for light bulbs 16. Labs on a luxury cruiser? 18. Old Treasury offering 19. Backup singer on “The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill” 20. Peers deliberating the case of the missing cookies? 22. BEQ fan, likely 24. Rural mail letters 26. Stew veggie 27. Comprehend 28. Go against 30. Swear up and down 32. Scared mariner? 36. Apartment on the ground floor 37. “___ Man Yells At Cloud” (meme) 38. All-Star who was banned for the entire 2014 season 42. Really tiny mystic? 47. Somewhat uncommon 50. Try to get a lot of gigs, say 51. Anger

52. NFC East team 54. Tip of Europe? 55. “___ The Greatest Dancer” (Sister Sledge) 56. Contributor to Sherpa Monthly? 59. Bike tire meas. 61. The Donald’s replacement on “The Apprentice” 62. Epic tents? 66. Flower in a chain 67. Calla lily, e.g. 68. High-speed ___ 69. Web letters 70. Dodgers manager Ned 71. Award Tiger Woods won a record 21 times

11. Dad rock and J-Pop, e.g. 12. “Having said that ...” 15. Smooth and connected 17. Chest 21. Actress Diane of “Law and Order: SVU” 22. Duncan product 23. Not taken 25. A handful 29. 11th-century king of Denmark 31. Dinner’s on them 33. Stewbum 34. “___ About That Bass” 35. “Damn right!” 39. Green vehicles? 40. Undress

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with the eyes 41. Runs out of juice 43. Fish-eating hawk 44. “How long have you been standing there?” 45. Wild grp. 46. Popular tropical fish 47. Largest Saudi city 48. Point of Genesis? 49. Repair the sweater 53. “That’s a possibility” 54. Jason’s shipbuilder 57. Bit of smoke 58. Designer Saarinen 60. “Why not?” 63. Invoice no. 64. Wait for it! 65. Done with a wink {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

1. Comic Schumer 2. ‘70s-’80s Pakistani leader 3. Targets of some paparazzi 4. Actor Steve on “Modern Family” 5. Selfie stick, e.g. (one can hope) 6. Soccer star Carli 7. Brand that is almost 3/4ths of the frozen waffle market 8. Couldn’t sleep 9. Email heading: Abbr. 10. “Eek!”

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BUS TRIP {ABBY MENDELSON}

THEY PILE OFF two standard yellow school buses, roughly 80

people, all sizes and ages, wearing sweats and T-shirts; on their heads, some wear ball caps while others wear traditional multicolored Nepalese dhaka topis. Their eager, expectant faces gleam in the late-afternoon sun. They know they’re in for a treat — their monthly visit to something they never had in their native Bhutan: a visit to a free public library. “First, they had to learn what a library is,” Whitehall Library director Paula Kelly says, smiling at the people flooding through the doors. “Coming from an agrarian, rural culture, from a country where they were a persecuted minority, they’d never even seen a library, much less used its many resources.” While the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council’s LEARN (for Library Easy Access to Residents in Need) Bus program is noticeably robust, it was a decided slow starter. “At first,” Kelly says, “we couldn’t figure out why they weren’t coming. Then it hit us: They didn’t know what free is, what resources we have, what we could do for them. How we could make their lives richer, better.”

one person, one small refugee community at a time. Imagine victories made possible by gifted, dedicated people — GPLC and library staffers as well as hundreds of volunteers. For the Nepalese, and dozens of other groups, it is the promise of life, literacy and the pursuit of happiness that fuels their dreams on LEARN Bus night. Although LEARN Bus night lasts just 90 minutes, GPLC efforts spill out into the Nepalese’s Prospect Park neighborhood. Learning citizenship, literacy and general life skills. Along the way they pick up medical skills, too. Finding that many Nepalese were missing literacy classes because of chronically sick children, GPLC staffers sought to discover the reasons. For example, offers GPLC’s Special Projects director Becky Carpenter, when given an oral medication for her child’s ear infection, one mother did the obvious thing: poured the liquid in the child’s ear. Over more than 30 years, GPLC has tutored or otherwise helped some 4,300 people county-wide, people who work hard to care for their families, to become acculturated, to become citizens. “They are very aggressive about getting what America promises,” says

“THEY ARE VERY AGGRESSIVE ABOUT GETTING WHAT AMERICA PROMISES.” Together, GPLC and the Whitehall Library worked assiduously at presenting books, computers, CDs and DVDs, all available for loan, all for the asking. “Citizenship, in Hindi, is a favorite,” Kelly says, “as is All About the USA. English for New Americans. They watch YouTube videos from their homelands. And Facebook! They love Facebook.” As well as the multipurpose room, for its arts and crafts. Story time with the children’s librarian. Even the tabletop carrom games — an Asian cross between Parcheesi and Nok-Hockey. “For them, LEARN Bus night is a huge event.” It is as well for what Kelly calls a “sleepy little public library,” a clean, well-lighted 50-year-old building in a suburban, largely homogeneous neighborhood. Bring in a very different population — all of a sudden? “It took some doing,” she nods. “Some convincing. Some fundraising. But everyone here, from the people to the politicians, came to embrace it.” As did the Nepalese (the victims of ethnic persecution in Bhutan). “They’re glad to come. They’re eager to come. They’ve become comfortable enough to ask for things. I love that.” She pauses. “Over the last two years we’ve issued 170 new library cards. Imagine that.” Imagine that and more. Imagine these victories accomplished

GPLC spokesman Greg Mims. Echoes one man, in this country two years, now working, now supporting his family, “America,” he gestures, “is the greatest country in the world.” Tonight that greatness is figured in a special treat: the decidedly slapstick Gemini Children’s Theater presenting Tarzan-andJane sketches. In the packed all-purpose room, Tarzan performs simian stunts. While the adults smile indulgently, the children roar with laughter. Sliding into an outrageous lost-in-the-jungle bit, Tarzan and Jane act out questions useful to the emerging Americans — how to use a cell phone. How to read a map. How to speak to an Englishonly speaker. Jane is obviously lost, confused, a condition the Nepalese know well. Jane found, Tarzan beating his chest, the kids all race to the front of the room to dance with the pair. The music is loud, the kids raucous. Standing in back, Paula Kelly smiles. “You fall in love,” she gestures. “I may work here, but this is also personal. I’m making a difference for them. But they’re also making a difference for me.” She pauses. “LEARN Bus is the best night of the month for me.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 30, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 39

September 30, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 39