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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.09/09.16.2015 X PGHCITYPAPER XXXX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX XX PGHCITYPAPER

NEIGHBORS WANT RELIEF FROM GUN VIOLENCE 06

GETTING EXPERIMENTAL WITH THE VIJAY IYER TRIO 19

QUANTUM THEATRE’S OPERATIC TAKE ON THE WINTER’S TALE 29


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015


Sound Series:

Television

EVENTS

9.25 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Co-presented with WYEP 91.3FM Tickets $30 / $25 Members and students | visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

9.11 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

The Warhol welcomes Television to the Carnegie Music Hall in Oakland for a rare North American performance. The current band features Tom Verlaine and Jimmy Rip on guitar, Fred Smith on bass, and Billy Ficca on drums. The band has had a profound impact on American and British post-punk and indie rock, and its seminal debut album Marquee Moon (1977) is on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time and is number 3 on Pitchfork Media’s list of the best albums of the 1970s.

9.18 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! The Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television, a project of Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for the Arts in Society. Tickets $10 / $8 Members & students

SOLD

OUT

10.14 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AN EVENING WITH LUNA The Warhol entrance space Tickets $25 / $20 Members and students

Live! On Stage Jonathan Richman, featuring Tommy Larkins on the Drums! 11.4 – 8pm The Warhol entrance space | Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot | visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

We welcome highly influential singer-songwriter Jonathan Richman, who has been performing consistently over the past 30 years, beginning with his pioneering band the Modern Lovers in the early 1970s. The band’s minimalist approach and forthright songs were influenced by The Velvet Underground and are often referred to as “protopunk” and credited for laying the groundwork for punk and new wave. N E W S

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10.17 – 8pm; VIP 7pm NIGHT OF 1,000 ANDYS Tickets $95/$85 Members; VIP $250 FREE parking in The Warhol lot

10.23 – 8pm RICHARD MAXWELL / NEW YORK CITY PLAYERS: THE EVENING New Hazlett Theater Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015


{EDITORIAL}

09.09/09.16.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns THEO SCHWARZ, KELECHI URAMA, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 36

GE T TO KN OW

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY D.J. COFFMAN}

[NEWS] can hear the pain in their voices 06 “You and how terrified people are.” — Councilor Theresa Kail-Smith on the uneasiness of residents over gun violence in city neighborhoods

[TASTE]

[MUSIC]

fact that Pittsburgh is getting 19 “The a visit from the trio — a free show, no less — ranks as a major event.” — Mike Shanley on the Vijay Iyer Trio’s City of Asylum appearance

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

did our inseparable gadgets 27 “How connect us emotionally to a man we’d never met?” — Al Hoff reviews the new doc Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine

Duclaw Serum Serum injects the Double IPA style with a fresh dose of big hop flavor. This medium- bodied amber nectar boasts a thin tan head, big hoppy floral bouquet, slippery, luxurious mouthfeel and strong 9% abv.

Named for the naval officer and War of 1812 hero who battled the British enemy on Lake Erie, our Commodore Perry India Pale Ale has a pretty dry sense of humor.

{ADMINISTRATION}

[SCREEN]

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] understanding of human nature 29 “His at the end of his life is deep to me.” — Quantum Theatre’s Karla Boos on William Shakespeare

[LAST PAGE] “Even if you’ve never worked on Captain America, some kid might want to see your take on that superhero. It’s kind of a cool thing.” — Comics artist D.J. Coffman on sketching for fans at Wizard World Comic Con

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} EVENTS LISTINGS 32 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 41 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 42 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 44

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Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing & Sales Assistant MARIA SNYDER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

come Christmastime.” — Celine Roberts on Maggie’s Farm Rum

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{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

might be an apple brandy for 15 “There fall, and a rum aged in port-wine barrels

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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Sometimes you want a beer, then you realize much crap you need how h to do before you call it a day. This is it. Nicely dosed with Big, Round Hop Flavors and a Toasty Malt Foundation to satisfy your every need. But it still lets you stay in the game to do what needs to be done. Yup.

Grapefruit IPA Electric Peel is an electric IPA that sends shocks of citrus hop flavors through a medium malt body amplified by grapefruit peel, leaving behind a bittersweet finish.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

“WE HAVE SOME PORTIONS OF OUR CITY THAT ARE VERY VOLATILE RELATIVE TO GUN VIOLENCE.”

Head to www.pghcitypaper.com on Thursday afternoon for our exclusive online interview with actor Lou Ferrigno, TV’s original Incredible Hulk. More on Wizard World Comic Con on page 47.

Pittsburgh City Council is back! Keep up with council on our blog at www.pghcitypaper.com

This week: Enjoy food from all over the world, music from California and architecture right across the river. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

We want to see your best/wildest and craziest photo from Wizard World Comic Con. We’ll select our favorite to win this signed copy of DJ Coffman’s comic Hero by Night and a CP T-shirt. Share your pics on Instagram with the hashtag #CPComicCon Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to Toby Keith on Sept. 26 at First Niagara Pavilion. Contest ends Thu., Sept. 17.

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{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Citizens like Ramele Davis say the city needs to do more to stop gun violence.

LOOKING FOR ANSWERS O

N PITTSBURGH City Council’s first

day back from summer recess, Hill District resident Ramele Davis was the only person there to testify. “I’m coming here today to ask you, will you please stand with me to stop these teenagers from shooting each other,” Davis said. “It’s getting worse. I’m getting scared to sleep in my house at night.” This summer, City Paper tracked the number of gun homicides in Pittsburgh between Memorial Day and Labor Day. According to the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, that number is down from last year. There were 16 firearm-related deaths between the end of May and the beginning of September, compared to 21 the summer before. But those numbers don’t tell the whole story, bureau officials say. Confirming

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

Davis’ city-council testimony, police say the number of shootings in Pittsburgh was up this summer — way up. As of Sept. 3, there were 83 non-fatal shooting in the city, compared to 60 last year.

Homicides might have dipped slightly, but gun violence is up in Pittsburgh this summer {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} “There’s been so many shootings every day, and sometimes multiple shootings in a day,” District 2 Councilor Theresa KailSmith said at the Aug. 28 council meeting. “You can hear the pain in their voices and how terrified people are.” The discussion at city council reflects

conversations happening in every neighborhood of the city. In Manchester, residents turn to Facebook to triangulate the location of the gunshots they hear. Last week, more than 100 Carrick residents gathered to talk about blight and crime in their neighborhood. “The murder rate is down, but the gun violence is not down,” says Pittsburgh Police Major Crimes Commander Larry Scirotto. “It’s disruptive to our community. While we’re happy to say we know we have a safer city, we have some portions of our city that are very volatile relative to gun violence.” The problem is somewhat self-contained. Police say that in most cases, the victims and perpetrators in these shootings are tied to criminal activity. But that doesn’t eliminate the fear of those living in


these communities who, from their livingroom couches, listen to the gunshots ring out nightly. The solutions for reducing gun violence remain varied. Some are calling for more economic opportunities. Others demand fewer guns. But many argue that the key to reducing violence means dusting off city laws and programs that have never been enforced. ON SEPT. 2, Davis was standing across the street from the Bedford Dwellings housing community, a few blocks from her home in the Hill District. On Aug. 13, 26-year-old Ramar Grant had been shot and killed in the housing development. “They shot him for nothing,” Davis says. “It’s fearful when it gets dark around here. You wonder if your kid’s going to come home.” Word travels fast throughout her neighborhood, Davis says. As soon as the yellow police caution tape goes up around the scene of a shooting, she says, many residents are already hearing rumors about the cause behind it. “The majority of things happening in the Hill District are because of these online videos. This group is disrespecting this other group,” says Davis, who explained that shootings are spurred when rival factions post videos on websites like YouTube insulting each other. Davis often worries about her children and others in the neighborhood, where she says they are being pressured or forced to join an ecosystem where arguments quickly turn to violence. “What they’re doing is they’re preying on the meek,” Davis says. “As soon as they step outside, people are shooting at them. Right now, some of them haven’t picked up a gun yet, but if people are shooting at them, it won’t be long before they go out and get a gun.” Throughout the summer, City Paper reporters often struggled to find people willing to talk about gun violence in their communities. The families of the victims killed in these shootings were also often unwilling to come forward. “They are afraid because they don’t know what’s going to happen,” says Andre Scott, a former Hill District resident, currently living in Wilkinsburg, who has known several of this summer’s victims. “People are becoming somewhat numb to it. [They think], ‘This happened, I’m going to mourn, then I’m going to post on Facebook and be done with it.’” His own cousin was shot and killed four weeks ago in Rankin, a Pittsburgh suburb also struggling under the weight of gun violence. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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LOOKING FOR ANSWERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

Join us as we welcome the new year! Experience

Our vibrant, egalitarian congregation embraces people from all walks of life. We welcome the LGBT community, students who will be away from home for the holidays, and anyone of any faith who would like to attend our services. Visit bethshalompgh.org for service times.

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“Death has definitely been on my doorstep this summer,” says Scott. “It’s disheartening.” Like Davis, Scott says the majority of the shootings this summer have been caused by disagreements. He also says several have been the result of attempted robberies gone wrong. “Shooting is the first option now,” says Scott. Activists often talk about how the lack of economic opportunities in the AfricanAmerican community has lead to the increase in violence. But those living in these communities say that nowhere has that been more apparent than in the number of shootings that have involved robberies. “It’s more, ‘I see you getting money. I want to take what you have and either you let me or you don’t,’” says Scott. But without guns, Scott says, many of this summer’s deaths might not have happened. On Sept. 2, police say, a 22-month-old baby was shot and killed in Fineview’s Allegheny Dwellings apartment complex, allegedly by Harrison Marshman, the boyfriend of the boy’s mother. Police say the suspect claims the shooting was an accident. “There’s so many random acts. Twelveyear-olds with guns, 14-year-olds with

guns,” says Scott. “One of the young men who got killed more recently ... was in the back seat adjusting the gun in his waistband and shot his friend in the front.” IN AUGUST, the police bureau announced

that they were reorganizing the robbery and homicide squads into one Violent Crime Unit in an effort to better combat violence throughout the city. That reorganization is underway and should be fully in effect by Sept. 15. Another new police initiative is actually an old one. Under the banner of the Group Violence Intervention Strategy, the bureau is working to implement David Kennedy’s violence-reduction model, which first came to Pittsburgh in 2008, under the name the Pittsburgh Initiative to Reduce Crime. “You have to reach people in a different manner and convince them not to arm themselves,” says Scirotto. “Trying to convince the youth or those involved in group violence to allow the police to do our part and be your protectors is a very difficult task.” Right now, the bureau is in the first

phase of the program, where it is identifying violent groups throughout the city. The next step will be reaching out to those groups. “It seems like there are longstanding feuds that may even go back two or three years,” says Scirotto. “Those longstanding feuds — that there’s no profit for the murder, there’s really no territorial advantage gained by the murder. It’s purely because one of your associates shot one of my associates, and now the retaliation leads me to you or one of your associates.” Scirotto says that gun control or creating harsher gun laws is not the key to tamping down on illegal gun-trafficking. Instead, he says, the justice system needs to enforce harsher sentences for those who violate existing firearms laws. “It seems like it is not very difficult to obtain a firearm in urban America, or anywhere for that matter,” says Scirotto. “Our victims or actors of gun violence, how many times have they been through the criminaljustice system? Fear is a great motivator, and if you’re not afraid of being detained, or incarceration for a firearms possession, soon enough they learn that there’s really

“DEATH HAS DEFINITELY BEEN ON MY DOORSTEP THIS SUMMER.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

Would you like to Participate in a fertility study? Volunteering couples are needed to join a research study in Monroeville You may qualify if you and your partner are: • A monogamous, heterosexual couple • Between the ages of 20-45 years old • Sexually active • Trying to conceive or using a non-vaginal form of birth control You will receive compensation for your time and participation. The device is for home use, and has been cleared for OTC use by the FDA. You will be asked to use the device in the privacy of your home. It requires two physician examinations for female participants. Call 412-200-7996 to see if you qualify.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015


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An Evening with Photographer Rania Matar Carnegie Lecture Hall September 15, 6:30–7:30 p.m. FREE EVENT Rania Matar discusses the images from her series A Girl In Her Room, which are on view at CMOA through September 28 in the exhibition She Who Tells a Story. Co-sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University's School of Art

cmoa.org

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Rania Matar, Christilla, Rabieh, Lebanon, 2010; Courtesy of the artist and Carroll and Sons Gallery, Boston.

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LOOKING FOR ANSWERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

EAT THE ENEMY 14.99

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black market, it is not legal.” no penalty for possessing a gun.” Gun-control advocacy group CeaseBut others argue that local governments can help address gun violence by crafting FirePA has long supported lost-and-stolenlegislation to address the illegal sale and gun legislation as a method for reducing gun violence. trade of firearms. “When a police officer traces a firearm “My focus has always been that if the gun isn’t available, perhaps we would buy back to the last lawful gun-owner, they [perpetrators] an extra 20 or 30 seconds usually say it was lost or stolen. They say, to resolve that conflict,” says Pittsburgh ‘We have no idea how it got into the hand of someone who killed someone,’” City Council President Bruce Kraus. says Rob Conroy, director of “Guns are so readily available, I organizing for CeaseFirePA. believe that’s where my efforts p a Am “This way, at least, the police should be focused. To protect tracking s can file a summary charge its citizenry is the first call of homicide r e m m su und fo e against them.” local government.” b n ca www. CeaseFirePA is currently And Kraus believes he online at per a fighting for a statewide losttook a step to protect the pghcityp .com and-stolen law. It’s also supcitizens of Pittsburgh when he porting a state bill implementhelped pass an ordinance that ing background checks in gun sales requires gun-owners to report when their firearms are lost or stolen. However, that has already begun circulating. “We at CeaseFirePA and any of us in the the law has yet to be enforced: The mayor’s office has said that it fears a lawsuit because, gun-violence prevention movement make according to state law, local municipalities no claims that there is one hard-and-fast are not allowed to regulate gun ownership. solution. But we’re pushing for the same “My argument is that when the firearm solutions we’ve been pushing for for the is not possessed legally, then we do have di- past several years,” says Conroy. “The numrective over it on a local level,” says Kraus. ber of homicides this summer has been “If a handgun has been stolen or sold on the completely insane.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

JENSORENSEN


The future of transit is now and we are working to improve your ride. Look for bus tracking technologies and other innovations to keep you better informed. Getting around town has never been so easy.

FUTURE OF TRANSIT IS NOW THE

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HEALTH PROBLEMS presents

PET of the

WEEK

Photo credit: JEFF GEISSLER

Dr. Jekyll Dr. Jekyll is a 4-year-old tri-colored Lionhead. The good doctor came to Animal Friends after her family could no longer take care of her and now, she is looking for a new place to set up her laboratory. This assertive scientist might take a while to warm up to you, but once she does, she’s sure to share all of her dastardly plans for world domination with you. Plans include: raiding the fridge for her favorite leafy greens like kale and spinach, sitting beside you on the couch while you watch TV and chewing wooden toys and cardboard boxes. If you’ve got a spare evil lair to fill, our Dr. Jekyll could be the perfect fit for you. Come visit the good doctor today!

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As Corizon exits, county-jail inmate claims he’s being denied treatment {BY RYAN DETO} CORIZON, THE former for-profit health-care provider at the Allegheny County Jail, is finally gone, but some inmates say they are still feeling the pain. Deven Turner, a 24-year-old inmate in jail custody, claims he has gone weeks without treatment to his injured left ankle. “My mobility is limited [and] I pretty much hop around in pain constantly,” wrote Turner in an Aug. 13 letter to City Paper. Turner writes that he has requested treatment for his ankle with medical staff multiple times, including five written requests, and has attempted to get nurses’ attention when they make their rounds to distribute medication. He adds that he has brought the issue up with jail officers on duty, but they threatened to lock him up for 72 hours in his cell if he persisted. “I have gone through all the proper channels and regulations [for] trying to get medical treatment, but still nothing,” wrote Turner. “The pain is unbearable, I need the proper medical attention for such a serious injury.” Steve Gruszewski, a former inmate in ACJ, was incarcerated in the county jail during the first week in August. He says he noticed the extent of Turner’s injury when speaking with him in the dining hall. “His foot was so swollen that it looked like it wanted to split open,” he says. Gruszewski adds that Turner’s shoe had rips down the sides and center to accommodate his enlarged foot. While Gruszewski was in jail, he says, Turner was mostly confined to a chair for four to five days. According to court documents, Turner was arrested on charges of theft from a vehicle and possession of an instrument of crime with intent, which is his only documented arrest in Allegheny County. He has been in custody since June 19. It is unclear how and where Turner injured his ankle, but Gruszewski remembers Turner saying he was injured during his arrest. CP reached out to Corizon’s director of external affairs, Martha Harbin, and she replied on Aug. 27 with this statement: “We are a physician-led company and our top priority is providing skilled and compassionate health care to our patients. …

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

At a recent vigil, Julia Johnson consoles Tomi Lynn Harris, whose son died at the Allegheny County Jail in January.

I can confirm Mr. Turner is receiving all medically necessary treatment.” Taro McCray, a current inmate in ACJ who knows Turner, called CP on Aug. 28. McCray said that Turner has not received medical treatment for his ankle, but he has been given crutches. County spokesperson Amie Downs says the county cannot provide specific information relative to an inmate’s medical condition due to federal law. (HIPAA privacy laws bar administration from divulging medical information without the patient’s consent.) On Aug. 14, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that a county judge ordered the jail health administration to provide necessary care to inmate Terry Crawford. The 43-year-old woman has a history of immunodeficiency disorders and was denied her medication, even though she requested attention from Corizon medical staff at least 10 times throughout the month of July, the paper reported. Shandre Delaney of the Abolitionist Law Center, a firm inspired by the struggle of prisoners, says that inmates in the county jail are retaliated against for requesting health care. Her son has been incarcerated in the jail and has said that he witnessed other inmates being denied care, even though Delaney says guards do not have the medical training to make those decisions. “Somehow, [officers] are allowed to be their own judge and jury,” says Delaney. As of Sept. 1, Corizon was gone. Allegheny Health Network (AHN) will be partnering with the county and providing full-time physicians and nurse practitioners to work at the jail. Allegheny County

“WE ARE FIGHTING FOR BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS.”

Manager William McKain implied that Corizon was an obstacle to making sure medical staff were seeing to inmates properly, and expressed confidence that he and his staff will perform better than the for-profit health-care company. “They are my employees now,” says McKain, speaking of the jail’s medical staff. “I have direct control now. We believe we can facilitate the proper care.” According to McKain, the total budget to run the jail, health care will be $ 2-3 million more a year than the previous $12 million Corizon contract. AHN will provide a full-time staff of three physicians, two psychiatrists and eight nurse practitioners, in addition to some rotating part-time specialists for the jail, according to AHN family-medicine chairman Dr. Bill Johnjulio. To monitor that care, county officials highlighted seven positions (director of nursing, health-services administrator, quality-control manager, etc.) that McKain says will provide “appropriate leadership” and ensure proper medical care of inmates. However, all of these positions are currently filled by county-jail employees, and by people who previously worked for Corizon or an earlier provider, Allegheny Correctional Health Services. Both providers have had lawsuits filed against them relating to inadequate health care during their tenures. Before holding a vigil for those who have died while in ACJ custody, activist Julia Johnson, from ACJ Health Justice Project, sent a petition of more than 1,700 signatures calling for the firing of warden Orlando Harper and a full investigation of county-jail staff, to determine who has been responsible for the denial of health care to inmates. “We are not fighting for luxurious medical care,” says Johnson. “We are fighting for basic human rights.” RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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For information Call: (724) 872-1670 N E W S

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THE VEGETABLES WERE HEAVENLY, AS ONLY PEAK SUMMER PRODUCE CAN BE

HUMMUS FOR ALL TASTES

{BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

If you’ve visited the Market Square farmers’ market Downtown, chances are you’ve seen Hello Hummus. With a line of tasting samples lined up along its booth, Hello Hummus has become a fixture of the local market since it joined in 2013. Since then, the enterprise has expanded to six different markets throughout the area during the Mayto-November season. “I think it’s great to support local businesses,” says Savannah Moon, Hello Hummus’ market manager. “You get better products.” Currently, Hello Hummus offers 14 varieties of its small-batch hummus. Each is cooked by owner Zouhair Mkais, who got his culinary start making Moroccan dishes with his mother, using ingredients purchased in the markets of Casablanca. “We try to source everything from local farms and vendors,” says Moon. “We use the freshest ingredients we can find. We don’t use any preservatives.” Ingredients for the various flavors of hummus include: chickpeas, freshsqueezed lemon, black beans, eggplant, squash, zucchini and tahini, a paste made from ground, toasted sesame seeds. Moon’s current favorites are the roasted-beet and lemon-cilantro varieties. A less-traditional creation is peanut butter and chocolate. And come fall, be on the lookout for seasonal varieties like pumpkin pie and sweet potato. “We have a lot of unique flavors,” says Moon. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.hellohummus.co

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FEED

Local artist st David Bernabo will ill be screening his is feature-length th documentary ry

Food Systems (Chapter 1: A Night Out), about the changing Pittsburgh food scene, from the 1970s to today. Screenings are Wed., Sept. 23, and Sun., Sept. 27, at Row House Cinema. Tickets ($12) are available in advance at www.foodsystemsfilm.com.

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CONTINENTAL

FLAIR

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

P

ORTUGUESE NATIVE Toni Pais was probably Pittsburgh’s first celebrity chef. Well over a decade ago, he rose to renown with Baum Vivant, a traditional fine-dining establishment that regularly topped local “Best Of” lists. Two more popular restaurants followed. Café Zinho, on a side street off Ellsworth Avenue, was intimate and eclectically decorated, reviving a bit of Shadyside’s bygone bohemian vibe. Café Zao in the Cultural District — zinho being Portuguese for little, zao for big — was more polished, elegant and upscale. Today, Baum Vivant and Café Zao are gone, and only Zinho remains of this wellregarded trio. But don’t let Café Zinho’s size and almost domestic coziness fool you: This is not homey food, but rather a refined combination of Portuguese and Continental cuisines, with a strong emphasis on seafood, as befits Pais’ native, coastal culture. The starters are especially appealing, and Jason decided to order an array of small plates in lieu of an entree.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Beet timbale, with goat cheese and caramelized-onion apples; blood orange; and fig and blueberry

Goat cheese baked in puff pastry with Brazil nuts and Asian pear sauce was luscious, the tanginess of the chevre a pleasant change from the more usual baked brie. The nuts were scanty, but not particularly missed. The sauce was light, creamy and almost superfluous.

CAFÉ ZINHO 238 Spahr St., Shadyside. 412-363-1500 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-11 p.m. PRICES: Soups, starters and salads $7-11; entrees $16-32 LIQUOR: BYOB

Octopus tentacles were sautéed with garlic, onions, peppers and tomatoes in a pleasing Mediterranean preparation. The vegetables were heavenly, as only peak summer produce can be, but the tentacles’ tenderness flirted dangerously with mushiness. A better fit for this dish would have been the smoky notes and crisp edges of octopus that has been grilled.

Beet and goat cheese timbale (“tower,” for the non-francophone among us) was a pleasing presentation, alternating discs of pale pink and deep crimson in a tall stack. But — yet again, a “but” — the flavor was a bit flat, the orange vinaigrette not tart enough to make an impact with the sweet beets and mild cheese. Angelique found this dish altogether too sweet, almost dessert-like. But the last of our small plates, pheasant terrine, was fully successful. The fowl was firm and somewhat rich, complemented by whole-grain mustard that was suitably bold and sweetly contrasting pickled red onions. Cornichons were a touch sweet as well, somewhat duplicating the role of the onions, but we’ll chalk that up to personal preference. Crab cakes had very little binder, with the upside being strong crab flavor; the downside was that a good, wellseasoned binder can add flavor depth and dimension, and this was missing. To some extent, the chilled chimichurri aioli made up for it with its combination


of herbal intensity and creamy richness; we slathered it liberally on each cake. This was a good example of Zinho finding ways to offer local favorites with a Portuguese accent. Similarly, a lamb burger topped with brie and caramelized onions is Zinho’s answer to that Pittsburgh restaurant staple, the burger. The patty was big and juicy, but underseasoned, and though it was pink in the middle with no char on the outside, it had a touch of that gamy lamb flavor, as if overdone. But the tangy melted brie; sweet, soft onions; and big, pillowy bun helped mask these deficits with their rich tastes and textures.

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

RUM ON A ROLL Maggie’s Farm has raked in more awards than any other rum distillery

The past year has been a busy one for Maggie’s Farm Rum founder/owner/head distiller/bartender/janitor Tim Russell. Maggie’s has raked in more awards than any other rum distillery, including a Best in Class award from the American Craft Spirits Association, where Russell’s Queen’s Share Double Barrel Rum received the only gold medal awarded to any rum in the competition. The rum is unique because it’s made from the “tails” (the leftovers) of rum batches, then redistilled into a single spirit. The process was passed to him by a master distiller on Grand Cayman, who learned it from a Jamaican state distiller. Aging in a virgin toasted-oak barrel, and finishing in a used rum barrel from another distillery, gives this young rum an uncommon depth of flavor.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

40 Craft Beers

The first hit is free.

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BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

Actually, so are all the others.

Dining companions sampled some of Zinho’s other seafood offerings. Signature mariscada — Portuguese shellfish stew in a tomato broth — offered too-firm scallops and clams, and filet of salmon was also overdone, taking on a fishy flavor. Café Zinho, once one of Pittsburgh’s most creative restaurants, now coexists with newer concepts, younger chefs and the bolder, brasher trends of the moment. Does that mean time has passed it by? We think not; Toni Pais’ personal take on classic Continental cuisine might be conservative by today’s standards, but it remains appealing, and the restaurant itself stands apart from trendiness, its offhand brand of shabby chic still uniquely resplendent after all these years. Only overdone meats and timid flavors marked Café Zinho as behind the standards of today’s robust local restaurant scene, especially at top-tier prices (and note: it’s cash or personal check only). INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

RUSSELL’S DEDICATION IS REFLECTED BY THE SHINY COPPER OF HIS BRAND-NEW STILL. Sous chef Dounia Touil works with Cafe Zinho owner Toni Pais

ontap w

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

Last Saturday, Russell released his first batch of Queen’s Share since taking home the gold in February. He doubled the quantity of his original release of 50 bottles and has another 100 bottles on the way, but due to limiting factors in production, there won’t be a large amount available at any one time. It all makes for one very restricted commodity. Russell’s dedication is easily reflected by the shiny copper of his brand-new still, which will be running by the end of September. With more production volume, Russell can experiment without fear of falling behind on his flagship products, his spiced and white rums. As for what’s next, there might be an apple brandy for fall, and a rum aged in port-wine barrels come Christmastime. Russell also plans to focus more on aged and single-barrel products. On Sept. 11, a limited release of his single-barrel gold rum will set the stage for more to come. As for a possible expansion, Russell is looking at 2016. “At this point,” he says, “I’m the only one doing the production, whether it’s bottling, corking, distilling or labeling. By next summer, something will have to give.” CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3212A Smallman St., Strip District. www.maggiesfarmrum.com

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FEATURING FRESH AND DELICIOUS HATCH, NM CHILE PEPPERS ROASTING ALL DAY! BUY THEM FRESH OFF THE PLANT OR HOT OUT OF THE ROASTER. CASA REYNA AND VARIOUS OTHER LOCAL FOOD VENDORS WILL ALSO BE ON-SITE, OFFERING DELICIOUS MENU ITEMS MADE WITH THE HATCH CHILE PEPPER.

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Slice…Nice Because of our abnormal obsession with using the re BEST INGREDIENTS out the and making everything weH possibly can FROM SCRATC we created Award Winning Pizza, Salads, & Hoagies.

4TH ANNUAL

11AM TO 8PM

SUNDAY, SEPT. 20

REYNA FOODS INVITES EVERYONE TO THE FARM!

BEECHVIEW Craft Bottle, Domestic Beer & Wine Available!

WHITE OAK FARM

3314 WAGNER ROAD, ALLISON PARK JOIN US FOR A DAY OF FOOD, DEMONSTRATIONS, LIVE ENTERTAINMENT, ARTISTS, MERCHANDISERS, CRAFTERS, HAYRIDES, KIDS ZONE, WALKING TRAIL AND MORE. TICKETS $7 IN ADVANCE, $10 AT THE GATE. CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER FREE. FREE PARKING. RAIN OR SHINE. LIKE REYNA FOODS ON FACEBOOK OR VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.REYNAFOODS.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION. SPONSORED BY REYNA FOODS. LUNCH BUFFET EVERY DAY (11:30AM-3:00PM)

Coriander INDIA BAR & G GRILL

2128 BROADWAY AVENUE Phone: 412-531-1068

CARNEGIE BYOB, No Corkage Fee! 108 E. MAIN STREET Phone: 412-276-0200

@PGH_Slice

@sliceonbroadway

@sliceonbroadway

For full menu visit us at

sliceonbroadway.com

BURGH’ERS. 100 Perry Highway, Harmony. 724-473-0710. This organic, farm-to-table restaurant with a thoughtful selection of all-American sandwiches, burgers (including veggie and bison), hot dogs and sides offers something for everyone. Try a Pittsburghneighborhood-themed burger — “Mexican War” with chilies and avocado, the “Polish Hill” with a pierogie — and don’t miss the shoestring-style rosemary fries. JE CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “openkitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers smallto-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and Europeaninfluenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE DISH OSTERIA. 128 S. 17th St., South Side. 412-390-2012. This South Side venue offers excellent, authentic, regional Italian fare and serious cocktails in an alluring, intimate setting. There is antipasti (from land and sea), then a half-dozen pastas, a couple of meat dishes and seafood items comprise the entrees. Except some seasonal variation. LE

3 OFF BUFFET ½

$

Buy 2 adult buffets, get $3 off (VALID 7 DAYS A WEEK) With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Buy any entrée, get a 2nd entrée of equal or lesser value ½ off. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Now Featuring!

FULL BAR OPEN TIL 10PM

2201 Murray Ave Ave, Squirrel HI HIll | CORIANDERINDIANGRILL.COM 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

Dorothy 6 Blast Furnace Café {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} is short and simple, fearlessly blending homey foods like pierogis and meatloaf with more gastro-pubby fare, such as salmon croquettes and a beet-arugula salad with orangemint dressing. A comfort food worth trying: meatballs stuffed with mozzarella. KE

DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE DOROTHY 6 BLAST FURNACE CAFÉ. 224 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-464-9023. This eatery offers satisfying fare, skillfully prepared. The menu

Burgh’ers {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-262-2920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a

New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J EIGHTY ACRES KITCHEN AND BAR. 1910 New Texas Road, Plum. 724-519-7304. Diners at this rustic-chic restaurant will find well-prepared contemporary American cuisine, with an emphasis on seasonal and local. Most dishes involve a classic main ingredient — salmon, say, or pork chops — set off by just one or two distinctive flourishes, such as piquillo chimichurri or pineapple salsa. KE EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-6660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-683-4004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends in sophisticated casual dining while still offering an atmosphere of off-the-beaten-path funkiness. While some dishes emphasize unusual juxtapositions of ingredients, such as a lobster-andwhite-bean purée alongside fish, CONTINUES ON PG. 18


Now Open! PAN RESTAURANT | Lower Lawrenceville 3519 Butler Street, Pittsburgh PA 15201

WI NN ER OF BE ST PR EV IE W DI SH - Pittsburgh 15 au Rest rant Week 20

Open 7 days a week for Dinner Brunch Saturday 11am-4pm and Sunday 10am-4pm | Late Night Happy Hour Saturday 10pm-Midnight

www.panasianpgh.com | 412-325-3435

the studio on fifth at wqed

anything but common The Studio on Fifth is one of the region’s premier rental spaces. The Studio has full production capabilities, is a very versatile space and enables you to create the atmosphere you desire for your event. Anything is possible at The Studio on Fifth. For more information, call 412.281.5140 or visit commonplea-catering.com. N E W S

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

TAKE OUT | DELIVERY | ORDER ONLINE PARTY ROOM AVAILABLE

Everyday Noodles {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

(Call for Reservations)

or fig in a “rustic marsala sauce,” other dishes are of the moment, with pistachio dust atop duck cannoli or deep-fried gnocchi. KF

Dine-In, Take-Out, Catering CRANBERRY (724) 772-9191

GREENTREE (412) 278278-4848 4848

Visit us @ www.tamarindpa.com

SQUIRREL HILL 1900 Murray Ave.

SAVOR AUTHENTIC FLAVORS FROM OAXACA & MEXICO CITY AT THE MEXICAN UNDERGROUND IN THE STRIP

Tel 412-521-1313 • Fax 412-521-1223

OAKLAND 328 Atwood St. Tel 412-621-6889 • Fax 412-621-6890 Mon-Thur 11am-10pm / Fri-Sat 11am-11pm / Sun Noon-10pm

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5 OFF 8 OFF

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VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT

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NOT VALID ON DELIVERY

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SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

FREE 10% OFF TOTAL PURCHASE PARKING WITH $30 PURCHASE OR MORE

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT

$2 MAX PER TABLE.

NOT VALID ON DELIVERY

ONLY VALID ON DINE-IN

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers. We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

LIVE HORA LATIN FELIZ! (HAPPY HOUR) MUSIC FRIDAY SEPT 11TH: TANGO ARGENTINO SUNDAY SEPT 13TH: BOLERO MEXICANOS to celebrate “Mexican Independence Day”

Every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM. • 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

now open 7 days a week!

PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-661-3334. This Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, in either a traditional cream-wine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE

SOCIAL. 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-362-1234. This casual eatery at Bakery Square offers upscale pub grub: Pizzas, sandwiches and salads have ingredients that wouldn’t be out of place at the trendiest restaurants, but preparations are un-fussy. Or be your own chef, with the checklist-style, build-your-own-salad option. For dessert, try a custom ice-cream sandwiches. KE

SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic RUMFISH GRILLE. summaries as “jammy” 1155 Washington and “muscular,” Pike, Bridgeville. encouraging an 412-914-8013. The www. per pa entirely new approach kitchen offers a pghcitym o .c to food selection. The modern yet comfortable restaurant’s offerings take on seafood, offering include tapas, hearty distinctive appetizers and meat dishes with an array of a few signature entrées. There international seasonings, and a is also a build-your-own entrée mix-n-match, create-your-own option, in which a dozen fish and shellfish (plus a few meat options) section for mixed grill. KE can be combined with interesting SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., sauces, starches and vegetables to Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, create a custom dinner, whether sub and snack joint with fare your tastes run to truffle jus or for all: vegetarians, vegans and mac-n-cheese. LE carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, SMILING BANANA LEAF. steak sandwiches, pierogies — 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. much of it made from locally 412-362-3200. At this absolute sourced ingredients. J jewel-box of a restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams dishes rather than Thai-inflected Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. Chinese food. Grilled meat 724-591-5688. This suburban appetizers are beautifully eatery offers honest, seasoned, and the pad Thai straightforward Japanese offers a lively balance of cooking without hibachi ingredients. The assertively spicy theatrics or other culinary pumpkin curry features a special influences. Besides the wide variety of Thai gourd. JF sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth entrees incorporating udon, Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5656/ Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF 412-362-6198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different THE YARD. 736 Bellefonte St., menus in the same building. Soba Shadyside. 412-709-6351. This offers pan-Asian fusion (from gastropub offers a variety of Korean barbeque to Thai corn grilled-cheese sandwiches: thick chowder and Vietnamese hotslabs of bread combine with at and-sour shrimp) in a minimalist least a dozen kinds of cheese yet elegant restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, and many more fillings including eggs, sausage, crabmeat, several focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s varieties of bacon, pierogies, a perennial finalist in City Paper’s fries and pasta. KE “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE

FULL LIST ONLINE


LOCAL

“WE ACTUALLY IMPROVISE MAINLY WITH RHYTHM.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

SPOTLIGHTING SONG

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BEN BEDFORD and TOM BREIDING 7:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. Sunburst School of Music, 5843 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. $22.50. www.burghsong.com N E W S

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BREAKING

BARRIERS Musician Tom Breiding {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK BARRY}

For songwriter Ben Shannon, there’s something special about playing to a small room. “There is a quality to the listening that happens in a room where there’s no TV, no bar, and you can actually see,” he says. “I can feel the ripples of the words of my songs in the audience, and I respond to that. It brings out the very heart of the song.” There’s arguably no shortage of opportunities to see local and national singer-songwriters in action — touring artists are regularly brought in by WYEPFM, Calliope and other organizations. But Shannon also wanted to see these sorts of artists showcased in a more intimate setting on a regular basis. On Sept. 19, Shannon and fellow musician Christopher Mark Jones will launch BurghSong, a new monthly series intended to highlight both national and Pittsburgh-area folk artists in a small-room setting. “I liken it to a poetry reading where the attention is really on the story, on the song itself,” Shannon says. The inaugural concert will feature Ben Bedford, from Illinois, and locally based Tom Breiding. The show will also serve as the release event for Breiding’s new album, River, Rails or Road, and the companion documentary, River, Rails or Road: Tom Breiding’s Wheeling, about the singer’s work with the United Mine Workers Union and his dedication to the labor movement. The series will be held at the Sunburst School of Music, in Squirrel Hill. Shannon is excited about the location, both because of its size (it seats around 50 people), and because — while the neighborhood offers plenty of places to grab dinner or a drink — it is not generally a destination for live music. Currently, BurghSong is booked through May 2016 (individual and season tickets are available), with some time off in the winter months. While Shannon wants to provide a new stage for deserving artists, his primary hope is that the event becomes a celebration of the art of the song. “It all starts with a song. Even if it’s totally dressed up with a full band, at its heart it is words strung together and crafted for effect,” he says. “And I feel like that effect is really magnified in this setting.”

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF BART BABINSKI}

The Vijay Iyer Trio (Iyer, center)

HEN THE Vijay Iyer Trio per-

formed at the Detroit Jazz Festival a few years ago, something about the music became apparent to this writer’s ears. The band was floating along, playing a two-chord vamp. But it wasn’t a getthe-audience-groovin’ kind of vamp. Nor was the trio spinning its collective wheels while figuring out where to go next. They were toying with the groove, making it sound slightly out of sync. Bassist Stephan Crump straddled his rhythmic role with a harmonic one. On drums, Marcus Gilmore seemed to stretch time even as he held it together. Iyer didn’t need to unleash a complex melody to lift the energy. The trio was already lifting it together. Speaking to Iyer by phone a few weeks ago, that memory from 2011 begged the question of whether they did actually toy with the elasticity of the music. “We’ve been examining and experimenting with how to sustain a rhythmic feeling, create a certain dance impulse in the music,” says Iyer. “What we tend to do rather than

improvise with a lot of chord changes is we actually improvise mainly with rhythm. In a way, we try to keep the pulse grounded and still communicate. We try to keep it alive. In a way, our main focus is groove and texture.”

CITY OF ASYLUM JAZZ POETRY CONCERT FEAT. THE VIJAY IYER TRIO

7:45 p.m. Sat., Sept 12. West Park (off North Avenue), North Side. Free. 412-323-0278 or www.cityofasylum.org/event

Earlier this year, the trio released Break Stuff, an album with a title that acts as a musical description rather than a command. “On paper, a break seems like next to nothing, but in practice it can be the moment when everything comes to life,” Iyer explains in the liner notes. The trio, “tend[s] to make music out of breaks: building inside them, moving through them, looping them, embellishing, flexing and warping them.”

This uninhibited approach is one of the reasons that Iyer’s trio is among the country’s most engaging acts in modern jazz, and the recent recipient of Jazz Artist and Jazz Group of the Year in downbeat magazine’s Critic’s Poll. The fact that Pittsburgh is getting a visit from the trio for City of Asylum’s annual Jazz Poetry Concert — a free show, no less — ranks as a major event. Among the dozen tracks on Break Stuff, Iyer also pays tribute to three masters: Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Whether it’s the playful melody of Monk’s “Work,” revamping ’Trane’s “Countdown” (a simple theme that birthed one of the saxophonist’s most complex solos), or Strayhorn’s emotional “Bloodcount,” the music pays tribute while it also pays it forward. The band’s previous albums have included interpretations of everyone from ’70s R&B band Heatwave and Michael Jackson to obscure pianist Herbie Nichols. Hearing them together with Iyer’s originals, one gets the feeling that the music could go in CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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BREAKING BARRIERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

any direction. To the pianist, that’s a given. “That’s the history of music in the first place,” Iyer says. “I got this way by apprenticing with other musicians who did that, and by studying the history and studying the music. To me it’s a continuum, and it’s a community. Being part of this community, it actually values that sensibility, that idea of bringing something to the table that’s not already there.” Iyer’s skill at bringing new elements to the table has resulted in myriad projects and support for them. He holds a professorship at Harvard University, with an artistin-residence post beginning next year at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. All this is in addition to receiving a fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation in 2013 (often called the “genius grant”), which awards a stipend of $625,000, paid out over five years. Prior to the trio’s most recent album, Iyer debuted on the long-standing jazz label ECM with Mutations, a series of original pieces where he played piano and electronics in tandem with a string quartet. While not exactly jazz, it was marked by the same exploratory nature as his work with the trio. The results sometimes sounded like contemporary new music, while at other times evoking the more ambient collaborations of David Bowie and Brian Eno. For the Jazz Poetry Concert, the trio will perform a set, and Iyer will also collaborate with saxophonist Oliver Lake — who organized the program — together with the poets Terrance Hayes, Heather McHugh and Harris Khalique. The pairing of poets and Iyer’s music has been well documented through his collaborations with wordsmith Mike Ladd. Of their politically charged works, the most intense and moving was 2013’s Holding It Down: The Veterans’ Dreams Project, which featured minority veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars telling their stories over music. Iyer refers to Lake, who is perhaps best known as a member of the World Saxophone Quartet, as a “longtime hero and friend of mine.” The pianist collaborated with his group Trio 3 last year on Wiring, where Iyer contributed the extended “Suite for Trayvon (And Thousands More): Fallacies.” His skill at controversial topics and rendering them with intensity and grace make him a natural for City of Asylum, an organization that shelters and supports exiled poets and writers. His busy schedule has the potential to leave sleep out of the picture, but even this is something Iyer brushes aside. “The music is actually energizing. Often after playing, I’m not tired,” he says. “In a way, it becomes its own way of replenishing and rejuvenating.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

NEW RELEASES {BY MARGARET WELSH}

DREAM PHONE DREAM PHONE (SELF-RELEASED) DREAMPHONESOUNDS.BANDCAMP.COM

The only review of Dream Phone that really matters is the one I just heard from the guy working behind the counter at a local coffee shop: “Dream Phone rips.” The local super-ish group — featuring members of The Lopez, Roulette Waves, Harlan Twins, etc. — is fast becoming a fan favorite, and with good reason. On the whole, Dream Phone resembles the harmonyladen, gray-day retro surf rock that we’ve heard lately from the likes of Chastity Belt, but a song like “Someone to Love” — which has the feel of The Pretenders covering The Kinks — is a reminder that artists have been going retro since forever, to great effect. Bottom line: This record rips. DREAM PHONE ALBUM-RELEASE SHOW. 9 p.m. Sat., Sept. 12. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $7. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

THE CREW OF THE HALF MOON RAYS HILL (SELF-RELEASED) WWW.THECREWOFTHEHALFMOON.COM

In terms of elapsed time, this EP from the Johnstown, Pa.-based three-piece is short. But it does an impressive job of packing in the range of this band’s capabilities. Bookended by straightforward neoAmericana, the middle of the record takes a dramatic turn, venturing into ’90s alt-rock territory. (“The Party After the Show” sounds like something Billy Corgan would have played on his recent acoustic tour). By the band’s own admission, it can’t be pinned down: “Whatever we like, we play,” as its Facebook page states. This lends itself to some disjointedness, but overall, Rays Hill is a solid effort. MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE CREW OF THE HALF MOON EP-RELEASE SHOW. 9 p.m. Thu., Sept 10. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $7. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net


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pt. 18 Join us Se W IRURXUQH[ KW LJ Q NO-KIDS

Meet Carnegie Mellon University’s robot, Herb, and explore the science of robotics with local experts! Live music, cash bars, snacks available for SXUFKDVHIRXUçRRUVRIH[KLELWVDQGVFLHQFHIXQ 9LVLW&DUQHJLH6FLHQFH&HQWHURUJIRUGHWDLOV DQGWRUHJLVWHU &RVWLQDGYDQFHGD\RIWKHHYHQW

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CARA ROBBINS}

Shaun Fleming, a.k.a. Diane Coffee

GOOD BUZZ {BY NICK KEPPLER} HE’S FROM Southern California and he’s lived in New York City, but the place where modern-day glam rocker Shaun Fleming, a.k.a. Diane Coffee, feels most comfortable is, oddly, Bloomington, Ind. “Bloomington is one of the most beautiful places there is,â€? says the 28-year-old former drummer of Foxygen. Fleming followed his partner, who has his roots in the college town (population 80,405). “We have a little house. I can sit by the ďŹ re. It’s perfect.â€? He even recruited his touring band from the local music scene.

DIANE COFFEE

WITH DELICIOUS PASTRIES, MANTIQUES

LEETSDALE

2 $3 $4 $

Lite Bottles DURING PITTSBURGH PRO FOOTBALL GAMES

22 oz. Drafts .50 Lite DURING PITTSBURGH

NORTHSHORE 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

PRO FOOTBALL GAMES

16 oz. Lite Cans

DURING PITTSBURGH PRO FOOTBALL GAMES

8 p.m. Wed., Sept. 16. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-586-4441 or spiritpgh.com

Fleming’s preference for John Cougar Mellencamp country is surprising. From his wardrobe of vintage clothes to his owing blond locks to the dreamy, rollicking, guitarrock sound of his debut, My Friend Fish, Fleming comes across as the reincarnation of Mick Ronson. Yet the move helped him gain distance from Foxygen, a band he’d provided with beats since high school. Fleming grew up in the same afuent Los Angeles suburb as Foxygen’s central duo, Sam France and Jonathan Rado. Fleming got his ďŹ rst taste of show business as a child voice actor, working on a variety of Disney productions. “It was a good way to get out of school,â€? he recalls, “and the fridge in the green room always had Jell-O pudding.â€? By high school, Fleming’s interests had

turned to music. France and Rado “knew I could drum a beat, so they asked me to drum at one of their shows,â€? Fleming recalls. One gig lead to another, and when the neo-psychedelic band signed to Jagjaguwar (which, incidentally, is headquartered in Bloomington), Fleming went along for the ride. This is how he found himself living in a cramped New York City apartment with Rado. It wasn’t exactly the lifestyle of The Velvet Underground. “I couldn’t afford much,â€? he recalls. “I didn’t leave the apartment. I lived on chicken in a can.â€? He adds, “It was like living in a closet. Rado collects a lot of gear. It was oor-to-ceiling music gear, three-fourths of which didn’t work.â€? The claustrophobic lifestyle did give him the focus to record My Friend Fish. “I thought I was just putting down songs,â€? says Fleming, who played most of the instruments and recorded on laptop and iPhone tools. “I didn’t know until I was done that it was a record.â€? Western Vinyl released the album in 2013, and Fleming decided to stamp the name Diane Coffee on his solo work, after Diana Ross and “Mr. Coffee,â€? a song by Nathan Pelkey, a lo-ďŹ Texas singer-songwriter he admires. Whereas My Friend Fish had a spacey vibe similar to Foxygen, the second Diane Coffee effort, Everybody’s a Good Dog — released this month — is sunnier and popfriendly, inspired by the fresh air and open space of his new environment. “I think the lyrics are more thoughtful, though,â€? says Fleming. “My Friend Fish sounded darker, but some of the songs were sillier.â€? As for the goofy album title, it’s a family in-joke, Fleming says. “My dad and stepmom adopted a bunch of dogs at the same time. They’re a little crazy. They jump off the walls. My dad would calm them by stating, ‘Everybody’s a good dog!’â€? I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS

REGISTER TODAY!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JABARI JACOBS}

Julia Cooper | Photo by Archie Carpenter

Classes Begin September 8 ‡ Ages 3-18

Students at Pittsburgh CLO Academy can choose from tap, ballet, hip hop, musical theater, voice, acting, piano & more!

pittsburghCLO.org · 412-281-2234

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! September 19 · 2:00pm & 7:00pm September 20 · 2:00pm at The CAPA Theater

Adults $25 · Children (11 & under): $15

visit pittsburghCLO.org/education or call 412-281-2234

The Internet [PUNK] + FRI., SEPT. 11

[NOISE ROCK] + WED., SEPT. 16

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PHIL SHARP}

The hardcore sub-genre known as Since his split from Kim Gordon (yeah, not “powerviolence” is a distressing name for an ready to move past that), Thurston Moore extremely harsh and aggressive style of thrash. has become a notorious figure to those who And despite its innocuous name, Chicago’s consider themselves Team Kim. But that doesn’t Weekend Nachos is a prime example of some of change the reach of Moore’s influence as a the fastest and briefest punk rock around. member of Sonic Youth. The music he’s put However, the band still has a good sense of out on his own is of a mellower sort than, say, humor: On Record Store Day earlier this year, Daydream Nation (the same could be said it released a 7-inch record of Weezer covers — of latter-day Sonic Youth records), but the played just like Weezer. The member’s nofoundation of dissonant noise remains. If nonsense take on extreme music is refreshing in you’re ready to forgive, go see (the) Thurston a world of po-faced, corpse-painted metal dudes Mo0re Baand (spelling and syntax at the taking themselves too seriously. Tonight at request of the artist) tonight at Club Café. Clay Rendering will also perform. MW 8 p.m. The Shop, Weekend Nachos is supported by Concealed Blade, 56 S. 12th St., Radium Girls, South Side. $30. Honeymoon and 412-431-4950 (the) Thurston more. Andrew or www.clubcafe live.com Woehrel 7:30 p.m. Mo0re Baand 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $8. [REGGAE] + 412-951-0622 WED., SEPT. 16 The secondyoungest of reggae [NEO SOUL] + legend Bob TUE., SEPT. 15 Marley’s 11 Syd tha Kid, the children, Ky-Mani primary force and Marley performs voice behind the electro-soul group tonight at Mr. The Internet — Small’s Theatre performing tonight with Truth & Rites with Isaiah Small at and Funkle Aaron Mr. Small’s Theatre Project. It can’t be — has all the easy for one of Bob swagger you would Marley’s sons to expect from a develop a musical former member of identity that is Odd Future. As a producer/DJ in that alwaysnot totally overshadowed by his father: controversial, now disbanded hip-hop collective, Ky-Mani’s first album, 1996’s Like Father, Syd usually got less attention than Tyler the Like Son, consisted entirely of covers of his Creator and Earl Sweatshirt. But here, she (along father’s songs. He’s since moved away from with Matt Martians) gets the spotlight, and Bob’s influence and developed a style of thank God. The Internet’s third release, Ego his own, which takes a more brooding and Death, will likely rank near the top of many a introspective contrast to his father’s more year-end list, for the same reason another Odd positive vibes. While Bob is remembered as one Future associate, Frank Ocean, won the hearts of the defining singer-songwriters of reggae of critics back in 2012: It’s makeout music for the music, Ky-Mani is trying to secure his place as thinking millennial. Margaret Welsh 8 p.m. a hip-hop, R&B and dancehall artist in his own right. AW 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18-20. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com $22. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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September 11th -13th FRIDAY: 6PM-9PM SATURDAY: 12PM-7PM SUNDAY: 12PM-7PM

The festival will be held on Penn Avenue from 22nd to 27th Streets. For the full list of entertainment check out our website!

stripdistrictworldfestival.com Top Notch Entertainment Featuring:

DESPERADO EAGLES TRIBUTE BAND

GRANATI BROTHERS KENNY BLAKE THE FREEDOM BAND MELANIE MERINEY

MIA Z.

FROM NBC’S THE VOICE

Contact Information: 412-377-2923 or info@stripdistrictworldfestival.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

The RAND Corporation is recruiting middle and high school students to participate in a research study to learn about what you think about shopping in convenience stores. Participation requires attendance at a single, 60 minute session at the RAND study site in Pittsburgh. Students will each be compensated $25.00 for completing the study procedures. Reimbursement for parking or transportation is also provided. If you are interested and want to find out more, please call 412-545-3005. Enrollment is limited. The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

ROCK/POP THU 10 LAVA LOUNGE. Playoff Beard, The Challenged. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Langhorne Slim & the Law w/ Twain. Millvale. 412-821-4447. SMILING MOOSE. Green Jelly, Fist Fight in the Parking Lot, The Filthy Low Down, Super Fun Time Awesome Party Band. South Side. 412-439-5706.

FRI 11 31ST STREET PUB. Desolate, Sam Biles, Sathanas Headroy. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. The Armadillos & Danny Rectenwald’s All Star Jamboree. Strip District. 412-251-6058. CHALFANT COMMUNITY CENTER. DJ Terry Kicks & Friends. East Pittsburgh. 412-277-0693. HARD ROCK CAFE. Rush Tribute. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOLIDAY PARK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Spoken For. Holiday Park. 412-445-5282. LINDEN GROVE. No Bad Juju. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. The Soul Survivors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. REX THEATER. Greensky Bluegrass w/ American Babies. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERPLEX AT SANDCASTLE. Red Hot Chilli Pipers, The High Kings, We Banjo 3, JigJam, The Willis Clan, Screaming Orphans, Gaelic Storm, Makem & Spain Brothers. Part of Pittsburgh Irish Festival. Fri.-Sun. West Homestead. 412-422-1113. SMILING MOOSE. The Struts, Highly Suspect. Early. ThreeRiver Revival, Matt Logie, The Feel-Good Revolution. Late. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Randy Baumann’s Thunderbird Ramble. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 12 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Steeltown Band. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. CHALFANT COMMUNITY CENTER. DJ Terry Kicks & Friends. East Pittsburgh. 412-277-0693. CLUB CAFE. Get To The Chopper!!!, The Neverweres, VSG. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. The Full Counts & The Dirty Charms. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

LA CASA NARCISI. Austin Drive. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. MEADOWS CASINO. Mercedez. Washington. 724-503-1200. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Here Come The Mummies w/ Gene The Werewolf. Millvale. 412-821-4447. OBEY HOUSE. The Bo’Hog Brothers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PETER’S PLACE RESTAURANT. Moose Tracks. Bridgeville. 412-221-5000. ROBERT’S ROADSIDE INN. Sound Mined. Beaver. 724-775-0200. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Waiting for Ray. Ross. 412-364-8166. SMILING MOOSE. The SpacePimps, Survay Says!, Firestarter, Look Out Loretta, Danvers. Early. Lady Beast, Cruces, Outsideinside. Late. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Slightly Stoopid w/ The Expendables. North Side. 412-229-5483. STRIP DISTRICT. Eagles Tribute. Strip District. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. ELM w/ Deaf Scene. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VALLEY HOTEL. King’s Ransom. Clairton. 412-233-9800.

SUN 13 THE BEACH ROOM. EZ Action. Finleyville. 724-348-7022. CLINTON COMMUNITY PARK. The Dave Iglar Band. Clinton. 412-487-8326. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

MON 14 CLUB CAFE. Carla Bianco & Angela Sheik. South Side. 412-431-4950.

TUE 15 31ST STREET PUB. Teenage Bottlerocket, Pears, Thundervest, Latecomer. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Brave Baby w/ Orange Mammoth, Robin Vote. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Internet w/ Isaiah Small. Millvale. 412-821-4447. SMILING MOOSE. Northern Faces, Can’t Dance, August Is Home, Hear Tonight. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 16 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. Homestead. 412-368-5225.

MP 3 MONDAY

BLUE SOUL TEN

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAYE GREENE}

We want to know what you think about Convenience Stores

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

Each week, we bring you a new track by a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Blue Soul Ten, a project of producer/composer Claye Greene. Stream or download “Drive,” from The Unspoken Warrior, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com


DJS

EARLY WARNINGS {PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL WILSON}

CLUB CAFE. (the) Thurston MoOre Baand w/ Clay Rendering. South Side. 412-431-4950. PALACE THEATRE. The Bronx Wanderers. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SMILING MOOSE. Fit For Rivals. Early. Low Cut Connie, JontiTrot. Late. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Of Monsters & Men w/ Oh Land. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Burnt Sugar Arkestra. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

REGGAE FRI 11 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown {FRI., OCT. 23}

Windhand {THU., NOV. 12}

COUNTRY THU 10

Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

FRI 11 ANDYS WINE BAR. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CLUB CAFE. Sam Brooks. South Side. 412-431-4950. LEMONT. TakeTwo. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Jazzed Owls. West End. 412-458-0417.

SAT 12

FRI 11

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 13

JAZZ

THU 10

SUN 13

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MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ky-Mani Marley w/ Truth & Rites, Funkle Aaron Project. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

Peelander-Z

HIP HOP/R&B

SAT 12

WED 16

The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side

ANDYS WINE BAR. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BISTRO 9101. Aaron Lewinter. McCandless. 412-318-4871. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger CLUB CAFE. Choo Jackson Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip w/ Sav, Cadet, DJ Afterthought. District. 412-281-6593. South Side. 412-431-4950. CITY OF ASYLUM. Vijay Iyer Trio. North Side. 412-323-0278. JAMES STREET www. per GASTROPUB & EXCUSES BAR & a p pghcitym SPEAKEASY. Lucarelli GRILL. Bill Toms & .co Brothers w/ Peg Wilson. Hard Rain. South Side. North Side. 412-904-3335. 412-431-4090. RIVERS CASINO. Dwayne MOONDOG’S. The Nighthawks. Dolphin. North Side. 412-231-7777. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia MOONDOG’S. Noah Wotherspoon w/Jason Born. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. WICKED FOX. Eric Johnson & Dan Wasson. Fox Chapel. 412-794-8255. ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & CHURCH. Dr. James Johnson, Jr, SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Pamela Johnson, Lou Schreiber, Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. James Johnson III. North Side. 412-904-3335. 412-231-0454. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Neon Boilermaker Jazz Band. Swing X-Perience. South Shore Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

BLUES

THE FRANKLIN CENTER. The Flow Band. Aliquippa Arts & Music Festival. 724-378-2882. KELLY’S IRISH PUB & CARIBBEAN ISLAND. The Flow Band. Beaver. 724-728-0222.

Lucinda Williams

SAT 12

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

SAT 12

{WED., OCT. 14}

ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Nugget. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

WED 16

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. Lawrenceville. 412-408-3248. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Lucinda Williams

FRI 11

BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Touching Without Feeling. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ NIN. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. SMILING MOOSE. DJ Adam Social. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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LINDEN GROVE. Stonehorse. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

FRI 11

Riverfront Park. South Side. 724-331-7335.

MON 14 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 16 ALPHABET CITY TENT. Roger Humphries & RH Factor. North Side. 412-323-0278. ANDYS WINE BAR. Heather Kropf. Downtown. 412-773-8884. RIVERS CLUB. Rick Purcell. Downtown. 412-391-5227. WILLIAM PITT UNION. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Oakland. 412-402-9522.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Jason Aldean w/ Cole Swindell, Tyler Farr & Dee Jay Silver. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. MEADOWS CASINO. Ruff Creek. Washington. 724-503-1200.

SAT 12

ACOUSTIC

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA W/ ITZHAK PERLMAN. Selections from “Cinema Serenade,” including “As Time Goes By” from “Casablanca,” the love theme from “Cinema Paradiso,” the tango from “Scent of a Woman” as well as music from Offenbach, Liszt, Brahms & others during the concert. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

THU 10

SUN 13

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 11 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. Carlos Barata. North Side. 484-788-3877. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The T Sisters & The Blind Spots. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 12

(80’s, 90’s and beyond!)

Two Finalists Each Week $200 GRAN GRAND PRIZE!

THU 10 RIVERS CASINO. Rebecca Kaufman & the Groove Doctors. North Side. 412-231-7777.

$

2

.50

Coors Light

RIVERS CASINO. Backseat Driver. North Side. 412-231-7777.

$

3

.00

Fireball Shots

TIL MIDNIGHT

SAT 12

S C R E E N

Finals: Oct. 22

S x Weeks Six e of o QualiFication ual al F cat on New Music Category Each Week

OTHER MUSIC

MCCANDLESS TOWN HALL. The Holidays. McCandless. 412-364-0616.

2015

VOICE SOUTHSIDE

Begins: Sept. 10

CHOIR OF TRINITY COLLEGE. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120.

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FRI 11

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JEREMY BRUNS, ORGANIST. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

ELWOOD’S PUB. Tony Germaine. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. PETER’S PLACE RESTAURANT. Bill Couch. Bridgeville. 412-221-5000.

THE R BAR. Tom & Katie Show. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

CLASSICAL

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JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

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What to do IN PITTSBURGH

Sept 9 - 15 WEDNESDAY 9 CORNINGWORKS: Beckett & Beyond

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Pittsburgh Irish Festival

POINT PARK UNIVERSITY Downtown. Tickets: dancerstrust.org or 412-392-8000. Through Sept 13.

SEPTEMBER 11 RIVERPLEX, SANDCASTLE

NEW HAZLETT THEATER North Side. All ages show. Tickets: showclix.com. Through Sept. 13.

Slightly Stoopid

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Mushroomed / (Hed) Pe

The Doubleclicks

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

The Cry / Lost Element

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 10 Jim Jefferies

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND Oakland. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Here Come the Mummies

PHOTO CREDIT: ALLPOINTSIMAGES.COM

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Until the Ribbon Breaks CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

FRIDAY 11

Pittsburgh Irish Festival RIVERPLEX, SANDCASTLE. Tickets: pghirishfest.org. Through Sept. 13.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

Cinema Serenade

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 13 Jason Aldean: 2015 Burn It Down Tour FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

Wizard World Comic Con Pittsburgh DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER

Where to live

Downtown. Tickets: wizardworld.com. Through Sept. 13.

Juniper 6 / Caress of Steel City (Rush Tribute Band)

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

Greensky Bluegrass NOW LEASING

with American Babies

David Duchovny

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 12

TUESDAY 15

GEORGE R. WHITE PERFORMANCE STUDIOS,

BACKSTAGE BAR/THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free show. 5p.m.

Dancers Trust Performance

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

Joe Badaczewski

find your happy place

walnut capital.com

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


TALK SHOW {BY AL HOFF}

HOW DID OUR INSEPARABLE GADGETS CONNECT US EMOTIONALLY TO A MAN WE’D NEVER MET?

Those bemoaning the noisy state of public political discourse these days would be well served by Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville’s documentary Best of Enemies. The film takes a look at an antecedent of where we are today, namely the series of live televised debates that ABC News ran during its coverage of the 1968 presidential conventions.

TECH HEAD

For the left: Gore Vidal

CP APPROVED

To facilitate a discussion, ABC hired two well-known intellectuals of opposite political stripes: William F. Buckley Jr., publisher of the conservative National Review, and liberal novelist Gore Vidal. It was rancorous from the very first words, when Vidal asked about the Republicans: “Can a political party based entirely on greed …” Subsequent debates grew more contentious, until the infamous moment that Buckley lost his cool and physically threatened Vidal. Appalling behavior but “good TV,” and the film notes this moment as significant in the eventual coarsening of political discourse (provided, ironically, by a pair of eggheads). And in a broader sense, Buckley and Vidal also ushered in the now-familiar era of “identity politics,” as each staked out a side, not in the party, but around issues. This film is a must for those interested in politics, media and the intersection of the two, but it’s also a fascinating (and weirdly entertaining) sliver of American history that warrants a look by all. Starts Fri., Sept. 11. Regent Square AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

With the distressing scenes of refugees amassing in Hungary, the time is right to catch a littleseen Hungarian film from spring,

White God. It is, in part, a critique of European institutions that categorize humans as “better” and “lesser,” though in this case, the role of the displaced and exploited is played by hundreds of stray dogs. Now on DVD and Netflix.

{BY AL HOFF}

This man wants to sell you a phone: Steve Jobs

A

LEX GIBNEY, the award-winning documentary filmmaker (Enron, Taxi to the Dark Side), takes a look at the co-founder, visionary and CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs. Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine isn’t one of Gibney’s muckraking pieces: It’s reminiscent of The Armstrong Lie, his 2013 examination of the Lance Armstrong scandal. In both films, Gibney asks: Who are these extraordinary flawed people we mythologize, often blindly, and what makes us complicit in this process? Gibney constructs his film — on one level a basic biographical profile of Jobs and Apple — from archival footage, supplemented with contemporary interviews with former colleagues and business journalists. Much of it is familiar to anybody who has kept tabs on Jobs’ career. Jobs remains a fascinating figure of irreconcilable dualities: the kind of rich guy who quotes Bob Dylan at shareholder meetings. Gibney ponders: “Behind the scenes, Jobs could be ruthless, deceitful and cruel. Yet he won our hearts by con-

vincing us that Apple represented a higher ideal. It was not like other companies — it was different.” Indeed, the best parts of the film are when Gibney steps back from bio-doc mode and asks: What about us? How did we capitulate to the Apple myth, pushed by Jobs, that this money-grubbing, megahuge, bad-practices global corporation

STEVE JOBS: MAN IN THE MACHINE DIRECTED BY: Alex Gibney Starts Fri., Sept. 11. Hollywood

wasn’t that? That by purchasing a $500 factory-made phone we were somehow exerting our own individual wonderfulness? How did our inseparable gadgets connect us emotionally to a man we’d never met? When Jobs died in 2011, there was a “global wake” (#thankyousteve), as strangers clustered outside Apple Stores, holding iPads

on which they had “lit” a “candle.” Some interviewees cite Jobs’ gift for storytelling, or for selling the future. But perhaps most critically, Jobs’ pitch linked the user to the product with an explicit intimacy — a “personal computer,” a machine that was you. So now we love our iPhones as valued component of ourselves, these miracles of man-machine symbiosis, defined by as many vexing dualities as Jobs was. They connect and isolate us from each other and the world; they free us from time and place, while enslaving us to them. (Gibney describes his own constant compulsive reaching for his iPhone as being “like Frodo’s hand to the ring.”) So, maybe we reach for Apple’s slogan: “Think Different” (presumably created before the availability of grammar apps). The proliferation of Apple products has certainly impacted most of our lives. Whether for good or bad is likely too binary, as well open to interpretation. But we can all agree that our iThings have made this LifeThing different. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Sat., Sept. 12. Parkway. Free

FILM CAPSULES CP

BLACK DIAMONDS. Catherine Pancake’s 2006 documentary examines the environmental and health costs of mountain-top coal mining, as practiced in states like West Virginia. The film is presented by the Environmental Justice Film Series and Sembene — The Film & Arts Festival. 6 p.m. Sun., Sept. 13. Sanger Hall, Chatham University campus, Shadyside. Free. www. sembenefilmfestival.org

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK ALFRED AND JAKOBINE. This new documentary from Jonathan Howells and Tom Roberts follows 84-year-old Alfred as he drives an old London taxi across the United States to reunite with his former wife, Jakobine. In the 1950s, the pair had impulsively driven the very same taxi car on a global adventure, but their crazy adventure and love had not lasted. Starts Fri., Sept. 11. Parkway, McKees Rocks

JOHNNY GUITAR. Joan Crawford stars as a very formidable Old West saloon owner, wrongly accused of crimes. But she isn’t so strong when her old flame, Johnny Guitar, turns up. This Nicholas Ray Western melodrama is a veritable cinematic hothouse of Freudian themes, blazing color photography and deliciously campy performances. The 1954 film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series, “What Were They Thinking?” 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 13. Regent Square

LEARNING TO DRIVE. A woman with a failing marriage takes driving lessons from a Sikh instructor with relationship troubles of his own. Patricia Clarkson and Ben Kingsley star in Isabel Coixet’s dramedy. Starts Fri., Sept. 11. Manor THE PERFECT GUY. After breaking up with her boyfriend, a woman meets the perfect guy. But could his perfection be hiding something? David M. Rosenthal directs this domestic thriller starring Sanaa Lathan, Morris Chestnut and Michael Ealy. Starts Fri., Sept. 11. THE VISIT. A single mother finds the household routine disrupted after her two kids return from visiting at grandma’s house. M. Night Shyamalan writes and directs this thriller. Starts Fri., Sept. 11. A WALK IN THE WOODS. Ken Kwapis directs this adaptation of the best-selling Bill Bryson book about hiking the Appalachian Trail. It’s something of a late-life crisis for Bryson (Robert Redford), who impulsively decides to tackle the 2,200-mile trail. He finds a companion in his estranged pal from decades ago, Stephen Katz (Nick Nolte), who hasn’t done as well as Bryson professionally, personally or physically. It’s a slow-motion road trip, but the film never hits a comfortable stride. The two leads are distracting: The gee-shucks Bryson role doesn’t suit Redford’s life-long career of playing capable outdoorsy dudes, and Nolte is a wheezing, sweating, shaking, lobster-pink mess who seems one stubbed toe away from a Medevac. Maybe it’s what you get when two old guys walk through the woods, but the pervasive thread of sexist drivel that runs through this movie isn’t very illuminating, especially when it’s played for easy laughs. In fact, a lot of the

ZTwoFor Zachariah (2015) - 9/9 @ 7:30pm men and a young woman find themselves in an

emotionally charged love triangle as the last known survivors of a nuclear disaster. _________________________________________________

Zombie Night: Shock Waves (1977) 9/10 @ 7:30pm

Visitors to a remote island discover that a reclusive Nazi commandant has been breeding a group of Zombie soldiers. _________________________________________________

Steve Jobs; The Man In The Machine

(2015) 9/11 @ 7:30pm, 9/12 @ 7pm, 9/13 @ 4pm, 9/16 @ 7:30pm - A look at the personal and private life of the late Apple CEO, Steve Jobs. _________________________________________________

Love Live! The School Idol Movie

(2015) 9/13 @ 7pm - Japan’s beloved anime series about 9 high school girls comes to the big screen. Giveaways, and live performance too! _________________________________________________

More films and showtimes TBA, check www.thehollywooddormont.org for more!

A Walk in the Woods material feels massaged to fit a generic movie template. When it’s convenient to the story, the trail is packed; other times it’s bizarrely empty. (In real life, the trail is notoriously over-used.) Also, a bear scare is so badly edited — the animal is clearly in another time and space — that there isn’t a lick of concern. I dream of super-long walks, and have been vicariously inspired by other movie hikes, including treks along The Camino (The Way) and Pacific Crest Trail (Wild). But Walk in the Woods never conveys the sense of adventure, accomplishment and camaraderie — all tempered, of course, with various miseries — that a grand walk promises. This film hardly motivated me to walk to the bus stop. (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY ROBOTS. This new 40-minute large-format documentary feature from Mike Slee looks at friendly and helpful robots. Some machines help around the house; others do chores in space. The film also visits the labs where scientists create these new, and often increasingly human-like, machines, as well as the DARPA Robotics Challenge, where searchand-rescue robots “compete” in mock disaster scenarios. Rangos Omnimax, Carnegie Science Center ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Paul Thomas Anderson series. Boogie Nights (1997 dramedy depicts crazy times in the Los Angeles porn biz in the late 1970s), Sept. 9-10. Magnolia (1999 ensemble drama weaves together the stories of several Southern Californians), Sept. 9-10. Punch-Drunk Love (2002 drama about a troubled, lonely man, starring Adam Sandler), Sept. 9-10. There Will Be Blood (period drama from 2007 in which a man finds oil, and loses his soul), Sept. 10. Bill Murray series. Caddyshack (this 1980 comedy is the greatest movie ever made about golf, gophers and groundsmen), Sept. 11-13 and Sept. 15-17. Groundhog Day (a Pittsburgh weatherman finds his day repeating in this 1993 comedy), Sept. 11-15 and Sept. 17. Lost in Translation (an aging movie star and a young woman become friends while visiting Tokyo, in the melancholic comedy from 2003), Sept. 11-14 and Sept. 16-17. Stripes (joining the army seems like a good idea for a couple of layabouts, in this 1981 comedy), Sept. 11-17. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9 ZOOLANDER. Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson star as rival male models in this 2001 comedy directed by

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

Stiller. Also, one of the models has been brainwashed to carry out a political assassination. Screens as part of the Rooftop Shindig Summer Film Series, presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. Doors at 6 p.m.; music by Balloon Ride Fantasy at 7 p.m.; film at dusk. Wed., Sept. 9. Top of Theatre Square Garage, Seventh Street and Penn Avenue, Downtown. Free and bring-your-own-chair.

BADGES OF FURY. Jet Li stars in this 2014 actioner in which two Hong Kong cops work on solving a series of murders related to an aspiring starlet. 7 p.m. Tue., Sept. 15. Parkway. Free THE FIFTH ELEMENT. Bruce Willis stars as a cabbie who gets mixed up in an epic battle to save mankind from destruction. Luc Besson directs this 1997 sci-fi actioner set in the 23rd century. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 16. AMC Waterfront. $5

GALAXY QUEST. The infinite nature of Star Trek spin-offs is its own self-parody, but the topic is still ripe for skewering, and it’s been done with great affection in Dean Parisot’s 1999 comedy. The aging, bickering stars of TV space drama Galaxy Quest find themselves whisked into outer space by their adoring fans from planet Thermia, who have intercepted earth’s TV transmissions. These aliens think the hack actors are real (they have re-built the Quest ship for their use), and now in this comedic house of mirrors, the crew must “act” to save the Thermians from invading aliens. It’s all a delicious send-up of the sci-ficon fanatic world taken to its most ridiculous, yet logical, extreme. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 9. AMC Waterfront. $5 (AH) SHOCK WAVES. Zombie Nights — a monthly evening of film, caricatures and makeup — kicks off with this 1977 feature about an island on which a forHorror of mer Nazi commander has Dracula been breeding zombies. Ken Weiderhorn directs this film, which stars John Carradine, Peter Cushing and Brooke Adams. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 10. Hollywood DRIVE-IN MONSTERAMA. The two-day, all-night monster-movie event returns for its ninth year. On Fri., Sept. 11, it’s a night of tribute to Vincent Price in four Edgar Allan Poe adaptations: The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), The Masque of the Red Death (1964), Tomb of Ligea (1964) and The Haunted Palace (1963). The Sat., Sept 12, program kicks off with enough vampires to keep you up ’til dawn: Horror of Dracula (1958), Dracula Has Risen From the Grave (1968), The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967) and Son of Dracula (1974). Gates open at 7 p.m. Also, 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7. $10 per person each night (kids under 12 free with adult). Overnight camping available for additional charge. Route 66, North Vandergrift. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein.com EDUCATION INC. Brian Malone directs this recent documentary that examines public-school education, and particularly its troubles with funding and the movement to privatize public education. 6 p.m.

The Perfect Guy ADULT SWIM DRIVE-IN. Catch unaired episodes of Squidbillies, Robot Chicken, Tim and Eric’s Bedtime Stories, Black Jesus and Mike Tyson Mysteries, outdoors, on the big screen. OK, it’s the parking lot of the Pittsburgh Zoo, and the screen is an inflatable one, but this touring show promises more fun than staying home and watching cable. Plus, it’s 18-and-older, so no kids interrupting. Also on hand: food trucks, contests, prizes. 8:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 17. Pittsburgh Zoo parking lot, Highland Park. Free. RSVP required at www. adultswimpresents.com.

ONGOING MERU. In 2008, three of the world’s best climbers — Conrad Anker, Jimmy Chin and Renan Ozturk — attempted to summit the Meru peak in the Himalayas. Meru is “only” 21,850 feet high, but it’s topped by a sheer rock “fin,” and reaching the top has remained elusive. It is considered an “impossible climb” because summiting requires a variety of climbing skills (on ice, rock and wall), at high altitude, and while carrying all one’s equipment. And in this case, while also filming the effort. (Chin co-directed Meru with his wife, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi.) The film follows the three as they prep and hit the mountain in 2008, and are eventually forced to turn back 100 meters from the top. As they ponder whether to try again, the climbers are sent reeling by life-changing events, and the film shifts from an adventure doc to intimate examinations of risk-taking, the camaraderie of climbing and how to balance dreams with realities. A must for armchair alpinists, who can come just for the spectacular climbing footage, but nearly everyone will find this thoughtful window into pursuing extreme vocations fascinating. Manor (AH)

CP


[COMEDY]

OLD SCHOOL

“IS WHISPERING NOTHING?”

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

While he is, sadly, best known as the former AFLAC Duck, Gilbert Gottfried has spent 45 years as one of our funniest, loudest and dirtiest standup comics. Gottfried, who’s also been in countless movies and TV shows, spoke to City Paper about his past, his present, his podcast and Bill Cosby. See the full interview at www.pghcitypaper.com.

A BIG BREAK FOR YOU WAS A GUEST SPOT ON THE COSBY SHOW. WAS THAT A WATERSHED? HAVE YOU KEPT IN TOUCH WITH BILL DURING HIS TIMES OF TROUBLE? Oh, yes [laughing]. Sometimes he drops pills over at my house to hold onto. Somebody told me that Bill Cosby was a fan of mine. So I had an audition to do a guest spot on The Cosby Show and before I had a chance to read, the person in charge of the audition said, “Bill said he was looking for this guy.” He didn’t even know me by name but he wanted me on the show. SO BILL COSBY REALLY HELPED YOUR CAREER? Yeah, and I didn’t have to drink anything to get it. YOUR AMAZING COLOSSAL PODCAST FEATURES GUESTS AND STORIES OUT OF OLD HOLLYWOOD. IT SEEMS A BIT ODD BECAUSE YOU’RE PRETTY OLD-SCHOOL AND DON’T STRIKE ME AS A PODCAST GUY. I still don’t quite know what I’m doing. I like old Hollywood. I like old show biz. But what makes it tough is, everybody I want to talk to is dead or is dying. I had [actor and comedian] Jack Carter scheduled to do the show. He had to cancel out the week of the show because he was going into the hospital and that was it, you know. [Carter died June 28, at age 93.] SO YOU’RE NOT SCHEDULING TOO FAR IN ADVANCE? Right. I’ve become like the grim reaper [laughing]. I was originally going to call it The Before It’s Too Late Show. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GILBERT GOTTFRIED Fri., Sept. 11-Sun., Sept. 13. Pittsburgh Improv, 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, West Homestead. $22. 412-462-5233 or pittsburgh.improv.com N E W S

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Gilbert Gottfried {PHOTO BY ARLENE GOTTFRIED}

HAVE YOU ALWAYS LEANED TOWARD EDGIER COMEDY? I was always leaning toward edgier stuff. But as far as being dirty, the first few years of doing this, I went out of my way to avoid the dirty words because I wondered what were they laughing at, the joke or the word?

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sing-ular: cast members of The Winter’s Tale

[STAGE]

TAKING THE BARD BAROQUE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

W

HEN KARLA BOOS began adapt-

ing The Winter’s Tale as a Baroque opera, her biggest challenge, ironically, was Shakespeare’s words. And not because she dislikes them. “I worship Shakespeare,” says Boos, whose Quantum Theatre stages the Bard regularly. Rather, the difficulty was that Shakespeare’s plays are, to put it mildly, full of words, and Boos would have to cut most of them to accommodate all the music. “I thought arias would be a lot of text,” she admits today. But while crafting the show with music director Andres Cladera and members of Chatham Baroque, she learned that arias by the likes of Handel and Bach usually include just four lines of lyrics. Initially, Quantum’s artistic director found it “horrifying” to reduce dialogue like jealous King Leontes’ famous “Is whispering nothing?” speech to a handful of words. “I freaked out,” she says. But eventually, she found that the music — like the piece from

Vivaldi’s Bajazet she matched to Leontes’ speech — contributed its own magic. Ultimately, Boos had to cut about three-fourths of the play’s dialogue. She and her collaborators set the text for the arias to nearly 50 compositions by Baroque masters, and the opera’s recitatives

QUANTUM THEATRE PRESENTS

THE WINTER’S TALE Sept. 16-Oct. 3. Union Trust Building, 501 Grant St., (10th floor), Downtown. $40-55. www.quantumtheatre.org

to their own original, Baroque-style numbers. Quantum’s The Winter’s Tale receives its world premiere Sept. 16-Oct. 3. It will be performed by 11 singers and a 10-piece period orchestra, with choreography and movement by Attack Theatre, in the ornate music hall of Downtown’s landmark

Union Trust Building. Recasting a classic play as a Baroque opera is an ambitious experiment, but not an unprecedented one. The “pastiche opera” — in which new words are set to music borrowed from another work — was common in the Baroque era (roughly 1600-1750). Boos herself was inspired to approach Shakespeare this way by seeing The Enchanted Island, the Metropolitan Opera’s 2011 Baroque pastiche of The Tempest. Winter’s Tale begins with Leontes impulsively destroying his family: accusing his innocent wife of adultery and condemning his infant daughter to death. But through a series of unlikely, even fantastical events (rampaging bear, aristocrats disguised as shepherds, a statue coming to life), some form of order is restored. Some critics have seen Winter’s Tale’s blend of comedy and tragedy as problematic, and the 1611 play is not frequently staged. But Boos is drawn to late Shakespeare. “His understanding of CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday blogh.pghcitypaper.com go faster M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

GYPSY

a musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and a book by Arthur Laurents.

SEPT. 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 2015 Fridays and Saturdays at 8:00 PM, Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM TICKETS ARE $18.00, $10.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

Opening Night September Music Director:

AND RES C L A D E RA

Stage Director:

KARLA BOOS

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(through Oct. 3)

Quantum presents a world premiere Baroque opera set with Shakespeare’s text, in English. The Winter’s Tale sweeps breathtakingly from tragedy to comedy and along the way visits kings and queens, dancing shepherds, a most extraordinary statue, and one notoriously hungry bear, before it reaches its stunning, magical conclusion.

THE UNION TRUST BUILDING

501 Grant Street

quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

TAKING THE BARD BAROQUE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

human nature at the end of his life is deep to me,” she says. “All the later plays are about redemption. ... In these later plays, what was lost, is found.” One criticism of the play, she notes, is that Leontes is driven mad by jealousy instantaneously. But Boos says, “I find that to be the most realistic thing ever, that somebody goes crazy in one second.” And as to the play’s drastic swings in tone, Boos contends that in stories about human behavior, it’s tonal cohesion that is deceptive. But mainly, she considers this tightly structured but wildy embellished play’s penchant for extremes of light and dark to be a perfect match for the emotionalism of Baroque music. Boos and her team began work on the adaptation a year ago. Frequent Quantum collaborator Cladera (Candide, Maria de Buenos Aires) and members of Chatham Baroque — which, like Quantum, is celebrating its 25th year — contributed their encyclopedic knowledge of the Baroque canon. Chatham Baroque members Andrew Fouts (violin), Patricia Halverson (gamba) and Scott Pauley (theorbo) are part of the show’s 10-piece orchestra. The cast includes such out-of-town talents as baritone and baroque specialist David Newman, as Leontes, and internationally acclaimed bass-baritone Eugene Perry, as Antigonus. Locally based artists include mezzo-soprano Raquel Winnica Young, as Hermione; tenor Robert Frankenberry, as Polixenes; and countertenor Andrey Nemzer, as Autolycus. With all that, and four dancers from Attack Theatre also onstage, this is Quantum’s costliest production ever, says Boos, and it was made possibly only by a commission from the Benter Foundation. Quantum creates site-specific theater, often repurposing such non-traditional spaces as old warehouses or parkland. Partly because of opera’s acoustic demands, Winter’s Tale will live in the Union Trust Building, the century-old landmark built by industrialist Henry Clay Frick. The office building’s 10th floor theater — lately used mostly for corporate events — has a balcony and chandeliers, and will seat 260 for this show, for which Quantum (with set designs by Tony Ferrieri) has built a gilded, Baroque-style supplementary stage. Yet Boos also promises to “explode” the production’s carefully crafted Baroque veneer. She’ll do that largely through a combination of Attack’s contribution, Susan Tsu’s costumes (think huge wigs woven with blackbirds) and Joe Seaman’s video projections. To make Shakespeare’s newly sung lyrics legible, the show will include supertitles projected above the stage. But overall, Boos says, she’s going for “barely controlled hysteria” and “brilliant excess.” DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[ART REVIEW]

TOONED IN {BY ONASTASIA YOUSSEF}

While Donald Trump turns the race for the 2016 presidential election into a punchline, the ToonSeum takes jokes and presents them as a powerful vehicle for change. Slinging Satire: Political Cartoons and the First Amendment, curated by Rob Rogers, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette cartoonist and ToonSeum board president, courageously takes on civil rights, racial inequality, terrorism and the impact of art on politics. The provocative ery exhibit features digital For a gall g prints donated by 20 of Slingin ns, rtoo renowned artists from Satire ca w. newspapers and online go to ww er ap publications across pghcityp .com the country, including the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune and The Boston Globe. The most striking part of the exhibit is “Je Suis Charlie,” a tribute to those fallen in the Al Qaeda attack at French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo this past January. Featured artists grapple with grief and anger surrounding the incident. They also examine the ironic relationship between art — an aesthetic pursuit of pleasure and expression — and violent religious extremism. “He Drew First,” by David Pope, is a simple but sharp composition in which a masked man with a smoking rifle stands wide-eyed. “He drew first,” he argues, as a lifeless journalist lies in a pool of blood and ink with his glasses, pen and drawing harmlessly resting beside him. However, Islamist terrorists aren’t the only ones placed under the microscope. Big-grinned politicians and everyday citizens go head-to-head in each cartoon as they debate about immigration, the Confederate flag, abortion, marriage equality and more. Guy Bado’s “He’s the Racist!” is a humorous drawing of men from different races and cultures pointing to one another, blaming the person next to him for the irrational animosity. The pointing fingers in the image create a line of motion that goes round and round, reflecting the exhibit itself that travels in a ring around the room, reflecting a cycle of hatred that’s as seemingly inescapable as it is intolerable. Satire is a powerful tool that highlights the absurdity of conflict, and guests will leave amused and moved by the talents of these cartoonists. Slinging Satire is a must-see that reminds audiences that it’s OK to laugh at one another, as long as we all agree to get along. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SLINGING SATIRE: POLITICAL CARTOONS AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT continues through Sun., Sept. 20. Toonseum, 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org


[PLAY REVIEWS]

CHEKH’ED OUT {BY TED HOOVER}

AS WITH SO MUCH that’s awful in my life, the blame can be traced to Anton Chekhov. Not only did he write all those ridiculous plays, but now when contemporary playwrights start to age they decide to write “Chekhovian.” Christopher Durang did it with the pitiable Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, and here’s the equally lamentable The Country House, by Donald Margulies, making its local premiere at The REP. The show opened on Broadway in 2014, and eked out a month’s run, which, I assure you, is miraculous. We meet up with a family of theater people headed by Anna Patterson, a leading actress of the American stage. She and her clan have gathered to mourn the loss of Cathy Patterson, whose early death from cancer has brought to the surface unpleasant, buried emotions, which, over the course of two acts, will be talked about … endlessly. It’s The Seagull and Uncle Vanya, and that trademarked Chekhovian blend of autumnal regret and what purports to be comedy. But what it really is is a bunch of rich white people moaning. I don’t want to focus too much on what an awful play this is; I’d rather talk about the lovely REP production. But you can’t appreciate the cast and crew’s good work unless you understand the bloated corpse they’re asked to animate. I know that sounds harsh, but when this play wasn’t dull it was trite; the fact that the characters ironically admit they sound like clichés doesn’t make them less cliché. And the final, god-awful scene is substandard playwriting like I haven’t experienced since I stopped judging amateur playwriting festivals.

THE COUNTRY HOUSE continues through Sept. 20. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $10-29. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

But happier news. Director John Amplas has helped a remarkable cast navigate these treacherous waters: Maggie Carr as the brittle, brilliant granddaughter, and Christopher Josephs as her all-too-human father. David Cabot has the worst role — a childish, petulant brat — but finds ways to make us care. And Cary Anne Spear is luminous as Anna. Playing outsiders are a clear-eyed but bruised Marie Elena

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

David Cabot and Cary Anne Spear in The REP’s The Country House

O’Brien and Paul Anthony Reynolds, as a man trapped between the present and the past. They all just need to move to a better house.

EDUCATING RITA continues through Sept. 19. Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $13-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

CLASS ACT

{BY GERARD STANLEY HORNBY} WILLY RUSSELL’S Educating Rita has one

unchanging set. But thanks to the onstage chemistry between Karen Baum and Marty Giles, PICT Classic’s production of this seminal examination of the English class system and personal education keeps the audience’s eyes fixed firmly for its entire running time. Rita comes to Frank, a university professor stuck in a rut of boozy academic ennui, hoping to break free of her working-class stagnancy by “knowing everything.” The Pygmalion-like clash of cultures provides a spectacle of hilarity and touching sentimentality as the two realize that what they both hope to find is not that different. Baum and Giles bounce off each other and command the space they’re in with electric dialogue and fantastic asides. “Howard’s End?” the unknowing Rita howls. “It sounds filthy!” The 1980 play originally starred Julie Walters; its popular 1983 movie adaptation paired Walters with Michael Caine. PICT’s production, directed by Alan Stanford, both pays homage to earlier incarnations and recapitulates the

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play’s unique capture of English vernacular, with working-class worries pitted against middle-class melancholy. As British native myself, I felt that the production’s attention to detail regarding English culture was deeply impressive, and something that an American audience should not take for granted. (The Greenwich Time Signal “pips” of BBC Radio 4, softly playing in the back of Frank’s office, were a well-researched nuance.) Such details often pass unnoticed, but this play offers such vivid insight into the class cultures of the United Kingdom that PICT audiences should strive to take in every sight and sound. It is with a tinge of ironic sadness, however, that Stanford prefaced the performance by announcing PICT’s foreboding of lack of funding, drawing attention to the symbolic shaded tones of the budget-conscious black-and-white programs. (The company recently canceled a planned fall production of The Tempest.) Given a play like Rita, which examines how rewarding and liberating is the love of literature and the arts, it is troubling that PICT should be threatened by insufficient support. Every member of the audience felt that watching the play, and more of us should, too. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Brooktree Health Services A Holistic Approach to Drug & Alcohol Treatment

09.1009.17.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ FRI., SEPT. 11

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KENT NOBLE}

{BODY ART}

SEPT. 11 Meeting ti off the Marked

Specific treatment programs offered by Brooktree Health Services include: • Partial Hospitalization Program • Intensive Outpatient • Outpatient Services • Greater Pennsylvania Sober Living

We use a variety of therapeutic techniques, including: • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy • Didactic Group Therapy • Motivational Interviewing • Family Therapy Conveniently located in Wexford

Brooktree Health Services 6500 Brooktree Road Wexford, PA 15090 724-935-0460

Recovery is a journey, not a destination. 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

+ THU., SEPT. 10 {WORDS}

you are reading Padlock Monthly!” he says. “None of you have a Facebook picture of you behind a secure door going, ‘Fucking yeah!’” The Australian-born, Los Angeles-based comic tours internationally. His Freedumb

M.O.M. Productions and Pinnacle Tattoo present the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Marked – Tattoo, History & Arts Expo at the Monroeville Convention Center this weekend. Enthusiasts can get tattooed on site by one of the nearly 120 tattoo artists from all over the world; view tattoo antiques and collectibles from Mike Skivers’ Tattoo History Museum; and attend a Q&A and storytelling session with veteran artists. Kelechi Urama Noon-10 p.m. Also noon10 p.m. Sat., Sept. 12, and noon-7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 13. 209 Mall Plaza Blvd., Monroeville. $15 (free for children 14 and under). 412-531-5319 or www. meetingofthemarked.com

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{EXHIBIT} With baseball’s regular season In the mid-20th century, when winding down, and the Pirates “modern” Pittsburgh was in the hunt, it’s a fine time for taking shape, who were the Philip Beard to discuss Swing (Van Buren Books). The Pittsburghbased novelist’s latest (now out in paperback) depicts a lifelong SEPT. 12 friendship between HACLab a legless Korean Pittsburgh War veteran and a fatherless 10-yearold boy that’s cemented by their mutual love for the 1971 Pirates. Beard appears tonight at the Mount Lebanon Public Library. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. 16 Castle Shannon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. Free. 412-531-1912 or {IMAGE (CIRCA 1961) COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY ARCHITECTURE ARCHIVES} www.mtlebanon library.org thinkers influencing this Tour brings his cheerfully rude “urban revitalization”? style to the Carneige Music {COMEDY} Planning giant Robert Hall of Oakland tonight. BO Jim Jefferies is particularly Moses and Jane Jacobs — 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., impatient with gun-owners Oakland. $39.50. 877-435-9849 an influential critic of largewho say guns are all about scale, pro-highway schemes or www.ticketmaster.com personal security. “None of


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

Since 1993, the Dancers’ Trust Fund has helped retired Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancers transition to life after the stage. Founded by former PBT dancer Ernest Tolentino and friends of PBT, the Fund offers tuition assistance and other services to a number of former dancers. The annual Dancers Trust production serves as its largest fundraiser. This year’s production, Sept. 12 and 13 at Point Park University’s George Rowland White Performance Studio, features the dancing and choreographic talents of several current PBT company members along with guest artists from Texture Contemporary Ballet and Point Park’s Conservatory Dance Company. The eight works include an excerpt from Texture artistic director Alan Obuzor’s “Life, Love & Jazz”; the ballet classic “Diana and Actaeon Pas de Deux”; and Garfield Lemonius’ tour de force “Flight.” Also on the program are new ballets from PBT dancers Cooper Verona, Yoshiaki Nakano (pictured), Jessica McCann, Julia Erickson and Alejandro Diaz. And PBT dancers Diana Yohe and Corey Bourbonniere’s “If You Don’t Wanna Love Me” is set to music of the same name by English singer-songwriter James Morrison. Says Yohe: “We tell a story about the ups and downs in a relationship and how even through it all, we are drawn to each other.” Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 12, and 2 p.m. Sun., Sept. 13. 201 Wood St., Downtown. $15-25. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

{MUSIC AND POETRY} With a wink, City of Asylum calls its 11th annual Jazz Poetry concert “MacArthurs in the Park”: It’s apparently the first time three recipients of the MacArthur Foundation’s “genius grants” have taken the same stage. Those would be jazz pianist and composer Vijay Iyer; poet Heather McHugh; and Pittsburgh-based poet Terrance Hayes. After a set with his Vijay Iyer Trio, Iyer (see interview, page 19) will perform in collaboration with the poets (including Pakistan’s Harris Khalique and Belgian graphic novelist Shamisa Delaunay) and famed saxophonist and Jazz Poetry stalwart Oliver Lake. And the park? That’s West Park, where last year COA first hoisted a huge tent to host some 800 guests for this free event. Reservations are suggested. BO 7:45 p.m. West Park (off East North Avenue), North Side. Free. 412-323-0278 or www. cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

District on the second Sunday of the month. This flea market specializes in fashion (including vintage stuff), handcrafted goods (from soap to jewelry), housewares and furniture. Also expect local food vendors, live artmaking, pop-up fitness and more. The happening even encompasses neighboring businesses Marty’s Market and Wigle Whiskey — and street parking is free on Sundays. BO 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 2300 Penn Ave., Strip District. www.neighborhoodflea.com

Neighborhood eig i hb bor orho hood od Flea

{MUSIC}

{TOUR} The Mexican War Streets House & Garden Tour claims to be “the oldest and finest house tour in the city of Pittsburgh,” and it’s hard to argue on either count. In its 46th year, the tour predates most of the city’s contemporary neighborhood-revitalization efforts, and its stock of lovingly restored 19th-century domiciles — and their often fabulous hidden-from-the-

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

street gardens — is perhaps unrivaled in town. The day-long self-guided tour of 11 houses and gardens includes a food-truck midway. BO 11 a.m.-5 p.m. North Side $18 (online) or $20 (Monterey Street ticket booth, at

SEPT. 17 Amanda man and da Van da Van Story Lewis

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West North). www.mexican warstreets.org

is a lauded touring exhibit of work by women photographers from Iran and the Arab world. Its highlights include A Girl in Her Room, Rania Matar’s series depicting teenage girls at home. Matar, born in Lebanon, came to the U.S. in 1984 but has since taught photography to teenage girls in Lebanese refugee camps. She visits today, courtesy of the museum and the Carnegie Mellon University School of Art Lecture Series, for a free talk on A Girl in Her Room at Carnegie Lecture Hall. BO 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-268-2409 or www.cmu.edu/art/lectures

{SCREEN} Lately, we’ve heard more about the “death of coal” than about the inestimable damage that mining and burning coal cause to people and the land. Part of that destruction is from mountaintop-removal mining, widely practiced in states including West Virginia, and the subject of Black Diamonds, West Virginia-based Catherine Pancake’s 2006 documentary that’s been called “riveting” (The Washington Post) and “searing” (Village Voice). It screens tonight at Chatham University, courtesy of the Environmental Justice Film Series and Sembene — The Film & Arts Festival. BO 6 p.m. Sanger Lecture Hall, Chatham campus, Shadyside. Free. www.sembenefilmfestival.org

+ THU., SEPT. 17 {CONTEST} If they’re not careful, it could turn into Pittsburgh’s twist on Drunk History: The ACLU’s Pittsburgh branch hosts Civil Li-BEER-ties: A Constitution Day Pub Quiz, at East End Brewing Co. Compete for prizes based on your knowledge of the Bill of Rights, the Constitution and civil

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{FLEA}

{TALK}

In its second May-to-October season, the Neighborhood Flea continues livening up the Strip

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liberties in general. There will be two rounds of 15 to 20 questions each, and prizes. Hint: You probably should bone up on the 18th and 21st amendments. BO 7-9 p.m. 147 Julius St., Larimer. Free. 412-681-7736 or pghinfo@ aclupa.org

SEPT. 13

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BERNADETTE KAZMARSKI}

like Moses’ — are the two big names checked in press materials for HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. The new Carnegie Museum of Art show incorporates archival materials, a salon-style discussion space and contributions from architects-in-residence over, under to explore the historical debate about what a city should be. The show opens today. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-19.95. 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

She Who Tells a Story, now at the Carnegie Museum of Art,

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Receptionist-turned-operasinger Amanda Van Story Lewis makes her Pittsburgh debut tonight at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. Lewis trained at Howard University (home of renowned dramatic soprano Jessye Norman) before moving to Pittsburgh and taking a variety of odd jobs, including a stint as Mayor Peduto’s receptionist. Now, the soprano is pursuing her dream with a performance of Mozart, Schubert, Debussy, Negro spirituals and more. Guests are invited to a dessert reception with Lewis after the performance. KU 7:30 p.m. 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $10-12. 800-838-3006 x1 or www.carnegiecarnegie.com

{SCREEN} If seeing unaired episodes of shows like Robot Chicken, Squidbillies, Mike Tyson Mysteries, Tim and Eric’s Bedtime Stories and Black Jesus outdoors, on a big screen, is your thing, you’re in luck. The 2015 Adult Swim Drive-In begins its 15-city national tour in (of all places) the parking lot of the Pittsburgh Zoo. The 18-and-over show, with its 40foot inflatable screen, includes food trucks, trivia contests, prizes and more. Expect on-site tie-ins from corporate sponsors including Cricket Wireless and Paramount Pictures. BO 8:30 p.m. Zoo Parking Lot Road, Highland Park. Free. RSVP required at www. adultswimpresents.com.

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

310 Allegheny River Blvd. MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

OAKMONT | 412-828-6322

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER BELL, BOOK & CANDLE. A CALL FOR INFORMATION ON PRIVATE PARTIES.

FULL BAR and KITCHEN

theoakstheater.com

FRIDAY, SEPT 11TH GENE COLLIER with host CHUCK KRIEGER

SATURDAY, SEPT. 12TH G-13 BAND FRIDAY, SEPT. 18TH SATURDAY,, SEPT. 1199TTHH

with Reb Beach WINGER, WHITESNAKE

FRIDAY, SEPT. 25TH

romantic comedy about what happens when you fall in love w/ a witch. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 19. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE COUNTRY HOUSE. At her Berkshire estate, Broadway Grand Dame-turned-summer stock star, Anna Patterson, hosts a houseful of guests on the weekend before rehearsals begin at the famed Williamstown Theatre Festival. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. EDUCATING RITA. A two-person Pygmalion-style drama that examines England’s class system, institutional education & the nature of self-development & of personal relationships. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 19. Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland. 412-561-6000. THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY. A madcap adventure about love, life & man’s eternal love affair

w/ golf. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 19. Apple Hill Playhouse, Delmont. 724-468-5050. GODSPELL. The classic musical by Stephen Schwartz, presented by Retro Red Theatre. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Sept. 21. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-561-8400. THE IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. A fully improvised Shakespearean masterpiece based on one audience suggestion. Fri., Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. KING LEAR. Shakespeare’s classic presented by Shakespeare in the Parks. Various locations. Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. www.pittsburghshakespeare.com. MUSIC IN MOTION. A concert event featuring songs from your favorite animated films. Sat., Sept. 12, 12 & 7:30 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262.

Enjoy food from all over the world, music from California and architecture right across the river Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

NUNSENSE. A musical comedy. Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 13. Geyer Performing Arts Center, BRITSBURGH COMEDY SPOT. Scottsdale. 724-887-0887. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, PIRATES OF THE MON 2015. Downtown. 412-339-0608. Presented by the Gemini COMEDY OUTSIDE? Theater Company. Sun, WHAT?! 8 p.m. Bayardstown 1-3:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. Social Club, Strip District. Thornburg Community Center, www.bayardstown.com. Crafton. 412-243-6464. DAVID KAYE W/ JOHNNY DAM. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. FESTIVAL. A festival of one 412-462-5233. acts from playwrights SETH COCKFIELD & across the country. For OWEN STRAW. W/ a full schedule, www. Norex Belma, hosted pittsburghnewworks. by John Dick Winters. . w org. Sun, 2 p.m., w w 8 p.m. Bayardstown aper p ty ci h Sat, 4 p.m. and g p Social Club, Strip District. .com Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. 412-610-2052. Thru Sept. 27. Carnegie Stage, Carnegie. A WINTER’S TALE. Attack ALWAYS B SHARP Theatre, Chatham Baroque MUSICAL IMPROV. 10 p.m. & Quantum Theatre join The Maker Theater, Shadyside. forces to present Shakespeare’s 412-404-2695. “A Winter’s Tale”. Sun, 7 p.m. MATT STANTON’S MAJOR and Wed, Thu, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru LEAGUE VARIETY HOUR. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Oct. 3. Union Trust Building, Downtown. 412-339-0608. Downtown. 412-362-1713. ROBBIE SHERRAND. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. [FUNDRAISER] STEEL VALLEY FIRE COMEDY NIGHT. Featuring Aaron Kleiber, Sean Collier, Mike Wysocki, & Brian Linsenbigler. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library of Homestead, Homestead. 412-398-5061.

COMEDY THU 10

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 11

SAT 12

GESTALT IMPROV. 9:30 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. USS IMPROVISE - STAR TREK. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

Billy Joel Tribute

MON 14 COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SATURDAY, NIEDS HOTEL BAND SEPT. 26TH MIA Z & JESSICA BITSURA RADICAL TRIVIA EVERY SUNDAY @ 7PM

Great prizes!

JAM NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY BEGINNING SEPT.17 WITH HERMIE GRANATI AND BRYAN COLE. TH

THE OAKS THEATER IS AVAILABLE FOR SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH SERVICE RENTAL. CALL 412.828.6322 FOR DETAILS.

TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNIE LEE FIELDS}

Head back to idyllic childhood summer days with a giant water-balloon fight. The Great American Water Balloon Fight gives you a chance to raise money to help fight global poverty … by fighting your friends with water balloons. There will also be carousel rides and photo booths, and food vendors standing by to fortify you for battle. 11 a.m-2:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 12. Schenley Plaza, 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25-30. www.greatamericanwaterballoonfight.org

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of CONTINUES ON PG. 36


“Untitled� (watercolor, 2015), by Phiris “Kathy� Sickels. From the exhibition The Pittsburgh 10, at Panza Gallery, Millvale.

NEW THIS WEEK BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Panoptica. Photos by Jessica Kalmar. Opening reception September 11, 5-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-648-1376. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Figurative 3. Featuring work by Steven Boksenbaum, Patricia Barefoot & Mary Weidner. Opening reception September 13, 2-5 p.m. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Collections. Painting by Mike McSorely. Opening reception September 11, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. JOHN HERMANN JR. MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM. Germany in War Time - What an American Girl Saw & Heard. Ten paintings by Mary Ethel McAuley. 100 years ago, in October 1915, Mary Ethel McAuley & her mother arrived in Berlin. For two years, the younger McAuley, at age 19, painted scenes &wrote about the lives she observed in war-torn Berlin for the Pittsburg Dispatch. Opening reception September 11, 6-9 p.m. Bellevue. 412-761-8008. MARTHA GAULT ART GALLERY. Terrains. Work by Richard Melvin.

VISUALART

Tue., Sept. 15, 5-7 p.m. Slippery Rock. 724-738-4209. MERRICK ART GALLERY. The Beaver Art Group Exhibition. 20 local artists showing their work. Opening reception September 13, 1-4 p.m. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Annual Members Show. Feat. juried works created by North Hills Art Center members in oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel, pottery & mixed media. Opening reception September 12, 7-9 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Pittsburgh 10. New work from Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Kathy DePasse, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris Sickels, David Sparks, Susan Sparks, Dirk VandenBerg & Francine VandenBerg. Opening reception September 12, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site speciďŹ c artwork by the German/ Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Andy’s Toybox. A playful installation of Warhol’s paintings, prints, & photographs from the late 1970s

& 1980s. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Landmarks. Pen & ink by Mary Jean Stabile. Downtown. 412-263-6600. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. Dashain. Dashain is the kite ying & ďŹ ghting celebration related to harvest time in Nepal. Katy DeMent, will be displaying the kites she made throughout the year while working w. Nepalese refugees at Brashear High School, the Larimer Community Garden & the Mt. Oliver Community Garden. GarďŹ eld. 412-432-9127. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Donald Wonderling & Mara Rago. Works in acrylics & photography. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Brenda Stumpf & Daria Sandburg. Multimedia works by the artists. BloomďŹ eld. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward

Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s inuences. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s ďŹ rst solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Oakland. 412-622-3131. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRAMEHOUSE. As Good As the Guys: Women Photographers in Pittsburgh. 15 local artists practicing photography in the region w/ a small group of their forebears in the city, at a time when the medium was CONTINUES ON PG. 37

September 12, 2015–May 2, 2016 Heinz Architectural Center Untangling Pittsburgh’s complicated relationship with modern architecture and urban planning. Organized by Boston-based architects-in-residence over,under. Opening Roundtable & Reception: Friday, September 11, 2015, 6:30 p.m.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

the 18th Century Frontier. During the Grand Army of the Republic the mid-18th century, thousands served local Civil War veterans of settlers of European & African for over 54 years & is the best descent were captured by Native preserved & most intact GAR post Americans. Using documentary in the United States. Carnegie. evidence from 18th & early 19th 412-276-3456. century sources, period imagery, & BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large artifacts from public & private collection of automatic rollcollections in the U.S. and Canada, played musical instruments & the exhibit examines the practice music boxes in a mansion setting. of captivity from its prehistoric Call for appointment. O’Hara. roots to its reverberations in 412-782-4231. modern Native-, African- & BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Euro-American communities. Preserved materials reflecting Reconstructed fort houses the industrial heritage of museum of Pittsburgh history Southwestern PA. Homestead. circa French & Indian War & 412-464-4020. American Revolution. Downtown. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF 412-281-9285. NATURAL HISTORY. Animal FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Secrets. Learn about the hidden CENTER. Ongoing: tours of lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ raccoons & more. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. fine jewelry exhibition that brings HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this together scientific fact & pop Tudor mansion & stable complex. culture in a showcase of wearable Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in & decorative arts related to outer the surrounding park. Allison Park. space, space travel, the space age, 412-767-9200. & the powerful influence these KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the topics have had on human other Frank Lloyd Wright house. civilization. Dinosaurs in Their Mill Run. 724-329-8501. Time. Displaying immersive KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. environments spanning the Tours of a restored 19th-century, Mesozoic Era & original fossil middle-class home. Oakmont. specimens. Permanent. Hall of 412-826-9295. Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & MARIDON MUSEUM. precious stones from all over Collection includes the world. Population jade & ivory statues Impact. How humans from China & Japan, are affecting the as well as Meissen environment. Oakland. porcelain. Butler. 412-622-3131. www. per a p 724-282-0123. CARNEGIE SCIENCE pghcitym o .c MCGINLEY HOUSE & CENTER. H2Oh! MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Experience kinetic Historic homes open for water-driven motion & tours, lectures & more. discover the relations between Monroeville. 412-373-7794. water, land & habitat. How do NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of everyday decisions impact the Sky. Explore the power & water supply & the environment? grace of the birds who rule the Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome sky. Majestic eagles, impressive (planetarium), Miniature Railroad condors, stealthy falcons and their & Village, USS Requin submarine & friends take center stage! Home more. North Side. 412-237-3400. to more than 600 birds from over CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie demos & more. North Side. Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare 412-323-7235. examples of pre World War II NATIONALITY ROOMS. iron-making technology. Rankin. 29 rooms helping to tell the story 412-464-4020 x 21. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL University of Pittsburgh. HISTORY. Explore the complex Oakland. 412-624-6000. interplay between culture, nature OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. features 1823 pipe organ, Garfield. 412-223-7698. Revolutionary War graves. Scott. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ 412-851-9212. costumed guides feat. this restored OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. stagecoach stop. North Versailles. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion 724-238-4983. site features log house, blacksmith DEPRECIATION LANDS shop & gardens. South Park. MUSEUM. Small living 412-835-1554. history museum celebrating PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY the settlement & history of the MUSEUM. Trolley rides & Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. exhibits. Includes displays, 412-486-0563. walking tours, gift shop, FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Run. 724-329-8501. Washington. 724-228-9256. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer stained-glass windows. Flower Show. Watch as model Downtown. 412-471-3436. trains chug through living FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by landscapes & displays of lush Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on foliage & vibrant blooms. 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

Featured at the Bridgeville, Edgewood & Irwin locations. (Small animals only. No dogs please.)

8 convenient locations!

TOTA LP ETSTO R E S.C O M

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

HOW TO PRUNE LIKE A PRO MARTHA SWISS GARDEN WRITER & DESIGNER Pruning is one of the least-understood gardening tasks, yet is critical for a healthy and attractive landscape. Knowing when to prune is just as important as knowing how to prune. When done correctly, pruning can rejuvenate overgrown trees and shrubs, increase plant vigor, and improve appearance. Proper formative pruning also gets young trees and shrubs off to a good start, resulting in healthier and more beautiful assets in the landscape. This class will cover pruning tools and techniques for trees and shrubs. This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Visit www.phlf.org to join! Non-members: $5.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 • 6:00 – 7:30 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

36

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

412-471-5808

indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS THU 10 - MON 14

BRITSBURGH. Celebrating Britain w/ traditional foods, performances & games. Various locations. For a full schedule visit www. bacpgh.com.


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

dominated by men. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Bird’s Eye View of Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Environs. Showing James T. Palmatary’s 1859 print. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Traffic Lights. A light-andsound exhibition by Jakob Marsico. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Behind the Curtain. Work by Elizabeth Fortunato & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Stranded in the Underworld. New works by Brian Holderman & Jeremy Beightol. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Art & Soul. An exhibit of spiritual & socially conscious art by Benjamin Creme, artist, author & founder of Share International. Garfield. 412-952-7974. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias & Ethan Frier created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MINE FACTORY. being (human). New works by Zack John Lee, Gianna Paniagua, Ben Quint-Glick & Rose & Sara Savage ask what it means to be human. www.theminefactory. com. Homewood. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. glassweekend ‘15. Work by

FRI 11 - SAT 12 UKRANIAN FOOD FESTIVAL. Pierogies, Stuffed Cabbage, Kielbasa, Halushki, Borscht, Ukrainian Pastries & more. 11 a.m. and Sat., Sept. 12, 11 a.m. SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-527-5359.

FRI 11 - SUN 13 LEBANESE FOOD FESTIVAL. Food, games, & entertainment, including performances by Tony Mikhael, as well as the Lebanese Children’s Dance Group. 11 a.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 11 a.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 12 p.m. Our Lady of

Japanese Master Hiroshi Yamano, Robert Bender, Jeremy Lepisto, Chad Holliday, Matthew Day Perez, Wesley Rasko, Nathan Sandberg, Dolores Barrett, Lucy Bergamini, Jen Blazina, Jane Bruce, Melanie Feerst, Erica Rosenfeld, Melissa Schmidt & Beth Williams. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NEMACOLIN GALLERY. A Midsummers Night. A solo exhibition w/ work by Paul McMillan. Nemacolin. 412-337-4976. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. In the Making. An exhibition highlighting the creative processes used by ten local, national & international artists participating in Neu Kirche’s public art programs. North Side. 412-322-2224. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Pittsburgh’s Point. Showing the first photo of Pittsburgh’s “Point” taken from atop Mt. Washington in 1896. See the low level city, antique bridges & river commerce. Many other historic photos & cameras. Spirits, Good & Evil: Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. From the Victorian Era. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Age-Specific. An exhibit by the Artist of the Year showing the aging of the 1960s generation. Printmaking 2015. An exhibit of new work by regional artists represents a wide variety of printmaking processes including intaglio, photogravure, wood cut, linoleum cut relief, silkscreen, collagraph & monotype. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. PhAb Now! Photography by Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, Todd Keyser & Barbara Weissberger. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Out of the Archives & Into the Gallery. An exploration

Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-278-0841. STRIP DISTRICT WORLD FESTIVAL. Food & music from around the world. Visit http://stripdistrictworldfestival. com/ for a full schedule. 6-9 p.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 12-7 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 12-7 p.m.

SAT 12 SEWICKLEY HARVEST FESTIVAL. At Broad & Thorn Streets. 25th Year of art, crafts, children’s games & fun, music & great food. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 412-741-4015.

of history & historic artistic technique in glass. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINTBREEZEWAY. Kamili. An exhibition of work by Hannibal Hopson & Amani Davis that reflects their mission to use recycled materials & let the objects determine the form & message. Point Breeze. 412-770-7830. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves II. A juried exhibition of works by local artists based in Pittsburgh. Closing reception w/ Eric Shiner on September 12, 5-7 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MEDIA ARTS GALLERY. Selections 2015. A media arts faculty exhibition w/ work by Christine Holtz, Cigdem Slankard, Jessica Kalmar & Lauren Zito. Downtown. 412-397-3813. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. London/ Pittsburgh. A solo exhibit w/ work by photographer, Mark Neville. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE TOONSEUM. Slinging Satire: Political Cartoons & the First Amendment. A collection of political cartoons from more than a dozen Pulitzer-winner & work from magazines, websites & newspapers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. Bill Pfahl: A Retrospective. Oil & pastel paintings that will include urban landscapes, figures & portraits by Bill Pfahl. Glass Entomology. An array of glass insects & marbles by Michael Mangiafico w/ collaborative work w/ Ed Pinto. Iron Gate Gallery. Farmington. 800-721-0177. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. ZEKE’S COFFEE SHOP. New Works by Alberto Almarza. East Liberty. 412-670-6231.

DANCE THU 10 - SUN 13

BECKETT & BEYOND. Staged on a floating landscape, 3 tethered travelers explore what’s tangible, what dissolves, & in the end, what might bind us to our temporal world & to each other. Glue Factory Project. Thru Sept. 12, 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 2 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

SAT 12 - SUN 13 DANCERS’ TRUST PERFORMANCE. Proceeds benefit

the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancers’ retirement fund. 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 2 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-8000.

MUSIC FESTIVAL HAZELWOOD

FUNDRAISERS THU 10 WOMEN & CHILDREN OF UGANDA PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT. Photography by Maranie Rae. Proceeds benefit the Project to End Human Trafficking. 6 p.m. Square Cafe, Regent Square. 412-244-8002.

SEPTEMBER

FRI 11

CONCERT

LIVE BAND THURSDAYS!

25+ ACTS, TWO DAYS

THURSDAY SEPT 10/10PM PLAYOFF BEARD, THE CHALLENGED

25-26

PAINT NIGHT. Paint night party to raise money for GPCCD women’s softball team, Yinzers, to go to the National Softball Association of the Deaf tournament in CA in August 2016. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Association for the Deaf, Downtown. 412-251-8628.

PANIC! AT THE DISCO, MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA RAEKWON & GHOSTFACE KILLAH + 23 MORE

SAT 12

BEST FRIENDS BALL. Dinner, dancing, visits from adoptable animals all to benefit the Western PA Humane Society. 6-11 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-321-4625. FALL FOR YOUR LIBRARY. At The Pavilion. Evening of delicious food, fabulous wine, & more in recognition of 25 years of service to the community. 6 p.m. Leopold Lake Park, Imperial. 724-695-8150. GREAT AMERICAN WATER BALLOON FIGHT. Proceeds to benefit Team Tassy, which works to prepare & place the poor in Haiti into jobs so that they can pull themselves out of poverty forever. 11 a.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 626-800-6153. JEREMIAH’S PLACE 5K RUN/ WALK. Benefits Jeremiah’s Place, Pittsburgh’s only relief nursery. 9 a.m. Riverview Park, North Side. 412-924-0726. PRESIDENT’S CHALLENGE 5K RUN/WALK/WHEEL. At Steelers Quay by Gate A - River Walk on North Shore. The Pittsburgh Steelwheelers, a nonprofit sports organization for the physically disabled, welcomes all walkers, runners and wheelers to this 5k. 9 a.m. 412-487-7644. WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES. The international men’s march to Stop rape, sexual assault & gender violence. Meet at the Mckean Lot, 5050 Liberty Ave. 4:30 p.m. 301-524-9668.

Tickets available @THRIVALFESTIVAL.COM PRESENTED BY UPMC ENTERPRISES

THURSDAY SEPT 17/10PM YOUNG RAPIDS, GRAND BELL THURSDAY SEPT 24/10PM BARNYARD STOMPERS $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

BEER OF THE MONTH Westeernnnsylvania’s P Lager

$15.95 $16.79

SUN 13

CYCLE FOR LIFE. Event w/ 31 & 62 mile route options for novice or experienced cyclists. Benefits The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 8 a.m. Settler’s Cabin Park, Robinson. 412-321-4422. FARE WALK FOR FOOD ALLERGY. 9:30 a.m. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 703-563-3084. WALK FOR CHILDREN W/ APRAXIA OF SPEECH. 9 a.m.

CANS

BOTTLES

Northern Beer Trader 190 Rochester Road Pittsburgh, PA 15229 412-931-4272

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-343-7102.

MON 14 ST. BARNABAS CHARITIES GOLF CLASSIC. Proceeds benefit the 115-year-old St. Barnabas Free Care Fund that provides more than $6 million in free care annually to residents at St. Barnabas’ Gibsonia, Valencia & Beaver nursing & living assistance facilities. 1 p.m. Butler Country Club, Butler. 724-444-5521.

POLITICS THU 10 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 10

3 POEMS BY.. Poetry Discussion on three poems by Rainer Maria Rilke. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

COMMUNITY PICNIC. Bring JULIE LONG. Visit from the a covered dish & hear local author of Rooville. 6 p.m. writers read. If you would like Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. to read, bring your own work. 412-741-3838. www.LVWonline.org 3-5 p.m. A NIGHT W/ PHILIP BEARD. St. Michael’s of the Valley. Author Philip Beard will 724-238-9411. discuss his new book, Swing, which uses the 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates as the STEEL CITY SLAM. Open backdrop of a story about mic poets & slam poets. an unlikely friendship between 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. a legless veteran and Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri a 10 year-old boy. Pizza and Bar, East 7:30 p.m. Mount Liberty. 412-362-1250. Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. www. per CAROLINE CARLSON. “THE PITTSBURGH pa pghcitym Part of Penguin ANTHOLOGY” BOOK .co Bookshop Young LAUNCH. 7 p.m. Writers Series. 6:30 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. Penguin Bookshop, 330-618-4405. Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

TUE 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 11

ALEXIS ROTELLA. An Evening of Haiku & Other Brief Eastern Forms. Local poet Don Wentworth opening. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

SAT 12 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

SUN 13 LIGONIER VALLEY WRITERS’

WED 16

KIDSTUFF THU 10 - WED 16

VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn exhibit featuring activities inspired by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Thru Sept. 20 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 12

PENNY ARCADE. Kids comedy show. Second Sat of every month,

1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 14

MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

“beat paths” National Beat Poetry Festival, East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield CRITIC: Rob Shepherd, a writer

FRI 11

and former tutor from Morningside

WISE WALKS. 1-2 mile walk around the neighborhood and learn a little about Oakland, & the Library. Fri. Thru Nov. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 12 14TH ANNUAL KATIE WESTBROOK 5K AND DOG WALK. Proceeds from the race benefit the Student Bar Association Centennial Endowed Scholarship Fund. 9-11 a.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6186. GUIDED NATURE HIKE. Join a Park Ranger for a walk & learn about the local flora & fauna. Pre-registration recommended at www.alleghenycounty.us/parks. Minnow 1 Shelter. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Deer Lakes Park, Tarentum. 724-265-3520. LIVELIKELOU BIKE RIDE. A scenic 52 mile group ride. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. The Pump House, Homestead. 412-680-5405. MUSHROOM WALK. The Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club’s Identifier Fluff Berger leads a walk. 10 a.m. Sewickley Heights Park, Sewickley. 412-741-7536. ORIENTEERING, NAVIGATION & MAP READING. Join a Park Ranger to learn essential navigation skills outdoors. Pre-registration recommended at www.alleghenycounty.us/parks. Patrol 1 Shelter. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 724-327-0338. WISE WALKS. 30 to 45 minute walks to enjoy fall. Water & snack provided. Meet at the Pie Traynor Field in North Park. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

WED 16

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 10 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

EVENT:

OUTSIDE

TUE 15

38

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

WHEN: Sat.,

Sept. 05 The poets read their own work, and sometimes the work of other people, including somebody named William Shakespeare — whoever that is! It’s an event for people who are inspired by people who teach them to write more dynamic forms of poetry. They don’t observe the rules about meter or scansion and all that stuff, but there is a definite flow to it. They generally like repeating words or phrase to make their point, and in terms of images, they jump all around. I really enjoyed Jim D. Deuchars’ performance. B Y K E L E C H I URA M A

Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. IAVA VETTOGETHER W/ VLP. 5 p.m. Claddagh Irish Pub, South Side. 412-481-8200. INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS GRADUATE SCHOOL FAIR. 20 top Master’s & PhD programs in international affairs, including Pitt, Harvard, Georgetown, & Columbia, will be present to speak to prospective students. 6 p.m. William Pitt Union, Oakland. 412-648-7640. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. PREPARING FOR FALL & WINTER GARDENING. A workshop on how to prepare, plant, manage & extend the harvest of a variety of hardy vegetables hosted by The Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture. 6-8 p.m. Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery, Wilkinsburg. www.mygardendreams.com/.

FRI 11 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CARNEGIE CRAWL & JAZZ. Gallery crawl followed by Jazz at 3rd Street. Second Fri of every month, 5-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 9 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

CATHERINE EVANS GALLERY TALK. Chief Curator of Carnegie Museum discusses ‘As Good as the Guys: Women Photographers in Pittsburgh’. 6 p.m. FrameHouse, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. COCKTAIL CUP CHAMPIONSHIP. Pittsburgh’s best bartenders meet at the final round of the cocktail showdown. 5 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-235-7796. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. SHOULD PENNSYLVANIA BE NEXT? SCIENTIFIC & LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS IN THE MEDICAL MARIJUANA DEBATE. Feat. an interdisciplinary group of experts discussing the aspects of the debate on whether medical marijuana should be legalized in Pennsylvania. Presenters include Dr. Barry Logan, Patrick Nightingale, Thomas Perko, Dr. Fred Fochtman & Dr. Cyril Wecht. Africa Room, Duquesne Union. 1-4:30 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-1330. WOMEN BUSINESS LEADERS BREAKFAST SERIES. “Fast & Furious: Innovation for Low-tech Companies” w/ Meredith Meyer Grelli, Co-Founder & Co-Owner, Wigle Whiskey. 8 a.m. Laughlin Memorial Library, Ambridge. 412-365-1253.


SAT 12 ANNUAL GENEALOGY PROGRAM. Kenneth White from the Archives & Records Center of the Diocese of Pittsburgh will share information about doing genealogical research at the Diocese, including the types of information found there & how to access it. 2 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832. BACKSTAGE BLOCK PARTY. Behind-the-scenes access to City Theatre’s shops and stages, featuring a Penn Brewery beer sampling, food trucks, hands-on activities, next season preview, music, door prizes, & more. 1 p.m. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. CARRIE FURNACES PHOTO SAFARI. The 3-hour photo safaris will be led by Ivette Spradlin, a Cuban-American photographer, video artist & educator. 1-4 p.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. CITY OF CHAMPIONS SPORTS HISTORY TOUR. Visit historic Pittsburgh sports locations & interactively learn the history of the teams & the famous players & the sports legends that make Pittsburgh the City of Champions. 10 a.m. Station Square, Station Square. 412-323-4709. DYNAMIC PUBLIC SPEAKING--TOASTMASTERS 2.0. Enhance your speaking & negotiation skills. Email to valuekaszak@yahoo.com to register. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-553-5235.

*Stuff We Like {PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

A FAIR IN THE PARK. Featuring 112 of the best artisans, showcasing their wares in Mellon Park amid food trucks, live entertainment, children’s activities, & craft demonstrations. 1 p.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 1 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 1 p.m. Mellon Park, Shadyside. 412-965-5848. MEETING OF THE MARKED TATTOO, HISTORY & ARTS EXPO. 12 p.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 12 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 12 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-531-5319. PITTSBURGH IRISH FESTIVAL. Traditional & contemporary entertainment, Irish food, marketplace, children’s activities, storytelling, Irish dance workshops & performances, ceili dancing, Mass, musical instrument demos, & live music. For a full schedule, visit www.pghirishfest.org. 4-11 p.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 11 a.m.11 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Riverplex at Sandcastle, West Homestead. 412-422-1113. WIZARD WORLD COMIC CON. Appearances by David Duchovny & more. 3 p.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 10 a.m. and Sun., Sept. 13, 11 a.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 646-512-5022.

Leona’s Ice Cream Sandwiches These delicious, locally made ice cream sandwiches are huge: Half of one will fill you up, but good luck stopping. Flavors change frequently with the season. Vanilla Bean/Peanut Butter is a current must-have. www.leonaspgh.com

Public-Supply Notebooks Perfect for back-to-school, and the proceeds go toward art programs for the New York City schools. public-supply.com {PHOTO BY RYAN DETO}

FRI 11 - SUN 13

ALEXIS TEXAS ADULT SUPERSTAR

Old-School Commitment to Architecture Even though nobody on the street can see it, the top of the Duquesne Light Building, on Seventh Street, Downtown, boasts this exquisite detail of the Pittsburgh Coat of Arms.

MAYWEATHER VS BERTO Story Corps App Story Corps is a national project that records people’s stories from all walks of life. This app lets you record your stories on your phone and automatically loads them into the Library of Congress and the Story Corps databases.

CHEERLEADERS PITTSBURGH 3100 LIBERTY AVENUE PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-281-3110

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

EDIBLE TEACHING GARDEN FIELD DAY. Join the Master Gardeners to learn about the successes of the summer as well as learning techniques applicable to home gardens. 12-1 p.m. Edible Teaching Garden, Point Breeze. THE FRONTIER OF PENNSYLVANIA & THE WHISKEY REBELLION. Learn about frontier life in Pennsylvania in the mid- to late-1700s. Then our Park Rangers will tell the story of the Whiskey Rebellion. The program will culminate with a demonstration of flint and steel fire-making. 2-3 & 4-5 p.m. Oliver Miller Homestead, South Park. 412-835-1554. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. LET’S MOVE FAMILY FUN DAY. Physical activities & games for the whole family. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. OPEN HOUSE PALACE THEATRE TOURS. These one-hour tours will include facts & trivia about the former Manos Theatre, a vaudeville & movie house that opened September 2, 1926. No reservations required. 9:30-11 a.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PARSEC MEETING. Monthly meetings for Pittsburgh’s Science Fiction & Fantasy Organization feature guest speakers & discussions. Second Sat of every

month, 1:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-287-0896. THE MEXICAN WAR PITTSBURGH WINE TOUR. 12 p.m. STREETS HOUSE & Pennsylvania Wine Cellar, Station GARDEN TOUR. Historic Square. 412-323-4709. home tours. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. RUST BELT CULINARY TOUR. www.mexicanwarstreets.org. Visit a renovated church hall, a NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. modernized mill bar, & other Local small businesses, food revamped treasures of the still trucks, live music & workshops gritty mill towns to savor culinary at 23rd Street & Penn Avenue. delights that reflect the region’s Second Sun of every month, rich heritage. 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 Station Square, Station Square. Strip District, Strip District. 412-323-4709. PFLAG PITTSBURGH. Support, SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. education & advocacy for Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing the LGBTQ community, family follows. No partner needed. & friends. Second Sun of Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. every month, 2-4:30 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Third Presbyterian Mt. Washington. Church, Oakland. 412-683-5670. RADICAL TRIVIA. SECOND SATURDAY . w ww per Trivia game hosted a p AT THE SPINNING ty ci h pg by DJ Jared Evans. .com PLATE. Art exhibits w/ Come alone or bring various musical, literary & a team. Sun, 7 p.m. artistic performances. Second Oaks Theater, Oakmont. Sat of every month Spinning Plate 412-828-6322. Gallery, Friendship. SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES: SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. RABIES. Learn about one Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, of the oldest known & most 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. highly fatal diseases. 1 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve, SWING CITY. Learn & practice Rector. 724-593-6105. swing dancing skills w/ the Jim SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman of local crafters & dealers selling School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. 724-417-0223.

SUN 13

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 14 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PITTSBURGH MEETING. Monthly meeting. Second Mon of every month, 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR CREATIVE REUSE BANTAM NIGHT. Raffle, silent auction, DJ, food trucks, & hat-making. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-473-0100. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SLOVAK HERITAGE. From the Velvet Revolution to the European Union. Bozena Hilko, instructor for the WPSCA Slovak language classes & native of Slovakia, will give a brief history of what transpired in Slovakia during this period. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. TAI CHI. Please register. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Nov. 16 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

TUE 15 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. AN EVENING W/ PHOTOGRAPHER RANIA MATAR. Rania Matar discusses her series A Girl In Her Room, which documents her life through the lives of those around her. 6 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3316. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB MEETING. The topic is a mushroom cooking demonstration. 7 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

WED 16

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session w/ literary conversation. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE HISTORY OF PITTSBURGH JAZZ. Discussing the development of jazz in this area & the lives & music of Johnny Costa, Mary Lou Williams, Billy Strayhorn, Billy Eckstine & Henry Mancini. Hosted by The Historical Society of Mount Lebanon & presented by Judy Sutton & Max Gonano of the Sen. John Heinz History Center. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. STORING YOUR FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES. A workshop taught by Penn State Master Gardeners. 6-7 p.m. Edible Teaching Garden, Point Breeze.

WOMEN, ADVOCACY, & ACTION. Located in the Mellon Board Room. Networking event w/ women leaders working in the field of political & social advocacy. Co-sponsored by the YWCA Young Leaders Board. Wine & cheese networking reception followed by a panel discussion. 6 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1878.

AUDITIONS AMERICAN GIRL FASHION SHOW 2015 MODEL SEARCH. More information on modeling requirements at www.jlpgh.org. September 12, 11 a.m. -3 p.m. at Learning Express Toys. Galleria Mall, Mt. Lebanon. 781-640-7933.

CRANBERRY ARTIST’S NETWORK. All regional artists are invited to enter up to two pieces of original art that answer the question: “What are you thankful for?” This can be anything from loved ones or possessions to more abstract concepts like nature or health. For more information, visit www.cranberryartistsnetwork.com. Thru Sept. 30. FELLOWSHIP 16 INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION. Call for submissions of photography from any eligible local photographers. For more info & to submit, visit www.silvereye.org/ fellowship16. Thru Oct. 26. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA CONSERVANCY The Western Pennsylvania Conservancy is seeking volunteers for a variety of tasks, including clerical work, photo cataloging and helping with its community gardens. Whether you have a lot of time or only a small amount, WPC has an opportunity for you to get involved. For more information on volunteer opportunities, visit www.waterlandlife.org.

CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for dancers, boys & girls, for the Nutcracker. Audition slots on September 26 at for 5-12 year olds at 1 p.m. & 13 years old + at 2 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-8887. GREENSBURG CIVIC THEATRE. Accepting applications for directors for its winter & spring productions. Candidates should send a theatre resume including directorial references by September 14 to info@gctheatre.org or by mail to: Greensburg Civic Theatre, 951 Old Salem Road, Greensburg PA 15601. 724-836-1757. HARMONY SINGERS. All voices are needed. Performance experience & the ability to read music are preferred but not required. Thru Sept. 20. 412-833-6341. THERAPY DOG TESTING. Therapy dog testing. Dog must be at least one year of age. Information on our testing procedure can be found on the web at www.therapydogs. com. Testing date September 19, beginning at 9:30 a.m. To schedule an appt. call Robin Peterson at 814-425-7185. Conneaut Lake Bark Park. 814-382-2267.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943.

GAMES OF THE MIND. By F. J. Hartland. Fri., Sept. 11, 8 p.m., Sat., Sept. 12, 2 & 8 p.m., Thu., Sept. 17, 8 p.m., Fri., Sept. 18, 8 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 19, 2 & 8 p.m. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. MARKET SQUARE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM. A call to artists to submit new or already assembled artworks to the Market Square Public Art Program. Information session on September 10, 6-7 p.m. at the Greater Arts Council, at 810 Penn Ave., 7th Floor. Submissions are due October 5. www.marketsquarepublicart.com. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Is it legal for a man to procure the services of a dominatrix? In the kind of session I have in mind, there’s no nudity or sexual activity or contact involved. There’s not even any whipping or flogging or caning or hardcore BDSM stuff. I just want to see what it would be like to be bound and gagged. That’s it. So is it against the law to pay a woman to tie me up?

Trans women are women, RAHP, and some of them are great. You could date a trans woman, you could marry a trans woman, and you could have kids with a trans woman (through adoption or surrogacy). The only thing that stands between you and being with the kind of person you’re most attracted to (a trans woman), and having the other stuff you want out of life, is you.

BOY INTO NONSEXUAL DOMINATION

“The short answer is no, he’s not likely to be arrested for procuring the services of a Dominatrix,” said Mistress Justine Cross, a pro-Domme based in Los Angeles. “What BIND desires sounds totally legal and safe — he just needs to find a Domme who is reputable (check out her website, read her reviews) and knows what she is doing in the realm of bondage. That said, I’m not a cop or a lawyer.” Cross is, however, a business owner. She runs two dungeons in Los Angeles — and she consulted with a criminal-defense attorney before going into the professional domination business. “He assured me that what I do is A-OK,” said Cross. “And even though he had practiced for many years, he had never defended, nor did he know any other lawyer who had ever defended, a professional Domme. Since Dommes rarely find themselves in trouble for their work, it stands to reason that BIND, a future client, will be in the clear as well.” With the feds going after websites like Rentboy and myRedBook, how is it that professional Dominants and their clients aren’t routinely harassed by law-enforcement authorities? “We don’t offer sex or nudity in our professional BDSM work,” said Cross, “and this keeps us out of the ‘criminalized’ categories of sex work. In some places, the scene is more ‘underground,’ mostly because people still have a hard time understanding that some people just want to get tied up and not get a hand job, too.” Follow Mistress Justine Cross on Twitter @Justineplays.

I’m a straight man, age 33. I was in a mutually unsatisfying relationship with a woman in my 20s. I told her not long after we got together that I didn’t want to eat her pussy because I didn’t like her smell. I’d eaten other vulvas before and loved them. She wasn’t a week-between-showers kind of woman, and she was rightly hurt. Years later, I started listening to you and got religion. (And since she didn’t want to hear from me, I made my apologies by treating the women I date now better.) Since then, I’ve loved the smell of every woman’s pussy I’ve been fortunate enough to stick my nose in. But the question haunts me: How could I have handled that situation instead? What’s a sex-positive way to tell a pussy-having person their smell turns you off? I first thought of your advice for smelly dicks — tell him to take a shower — but for Americans, the smell of a vulva is tied up as much in misogyny as hygiene. I’m not sure how to approach this.

“PEOPLE STILL HAVE A HARD TIME UNDERSTANDING THAT SOME PEOPLE JUST WANT TO GET TIED UP AND NOT GET A HAND JOB, TOO.”

I’m a good-looking, fit, younger guy living in Southern California. I’m getting older, though, and have never been in love or had any kind of serious relationship. I’m straight, but in the past five years I discovered that sexuality is gray, not black or white. I learned this when I accidentally dove into the world of trans. I go on Craigslist and other sites and find local trans girls to engage with in sexual activity. It’s hard to describe why I’m into it, but I just am. Regardless, I’ve felt like this is an issue getting in the way of my quest to find a great woman and start a family. I’m caught between thinking my sexual addiction is hindering my advancement toward a family life and enjoying the rush and sexual gratitude I’m inundated with when I meet up with trans girls. Is it something I definitely need to put an end to, or has it become a part of me that I can’t deny and hide? ROCKS AND HARD PLACES

WONDERING HOW I FILL FEMALES IN NOW GRACIOUSLY

Telling someone with a pussy that their genitals smell funky is more complicated and fraught, as you’re already aware, than telling the same thing to someone with a dick. The culture has been telling women — and, yes, that tiny percentage of men who have pussies — that their genitals are unclean and stinky since basically forever. But there are legitimate medical issues that can make someone’s junk smell funky (and just not pussy-style junk), WHIFFING, and sometimes we need the people who can actually get their noses into our crotches to give us a heads-up. A bad vaginal odor can be a sign of bacterial vaginosis or even cancer. Here’s how you approach it: You ask yourself whether you’re the problem — think they smell bad? You’re the problem — and then you ask yourself whether sexual chemistry is the problem. (Don’t like this person’s particular smell and taste? Keep your mouth shut about their smell and taste, and end the relationship.) If you think it might actually be a medical issue, you say something like this: “Please don’t take this the wrong way, but your vagina and labia smell funky. That’s not an easy thing to hear, I know, and it’s not an easy thing to say. I know the misogynistic zap the culture puts on women’s heads about this — but I’m worried that it might be a medical issue, and I’d rather risk your anger than your health.”

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

Listen to Dan Savage every week at savage lovecast.com.

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SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.09-09.16

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hope it’s not too late or too early to give you a slew of birthday presents. You deserve to be inundated with treats, dispensations and appreciations. Here’s your first perk: You are hereby granted a license to break a taboo that is no longer useful or necessary. Second blessing: You are authorized to instigate a wildly constructive departure from tradition. Third boost: I predict that in the next six weeks, you will simultaneously claim new freedom and summon more discipline. Fourth delight: During the next three months, you will discover and uncork a new thrill. Fifth goodie: Between now and your birthday in 2016, you will develop a more relaxed relationship with perfectionism.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A “wheady mile” is an obsolete English term I want to revive for use in this horoscope. It refers to what may happen at the end of a long journey, when that last stretch you’ve got to traverse seems to take forever. You’re so close to home; you’re imagining the comfort and rest that will soon be yours. But as you cross the “wheady mile,” you must navigate your way through one further plot twist or two. There’s a delay or complication that demands more effort just when you want to be finished with the story. Be strong, Libra. Keep the faith. The wheady mile will not, in fact, take forever. (Thanks to Mark Forsyth and his book Horologicon.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Trying improbable and unprecedented combinations is your specialty right now. You’re willing and able to gamble with blends and juxtapositions that no one else would think of, let alone propose. Bonus: Extra courage is available for you to call on as you proceed. In light of this gift, I suggest you brainstorm about all the unifica-

tions that might be possible for you to pull off. What conflicts would you love to defuse? What inequality or lopsidedness do you want to fix? Is there a misunderstanding you can heal or a disjunction you can harmonize?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Is feeling good really as fun as everyone seems to think? Is it really so wonderful to be in a groove, in love with life and in touch with your deeper self? No! Definitely not! And I suspect that as you enter more fully into these altered states, your life will provide evidence of the inconveniences they bring. For example, some people might nag you for extra attention, and others may be jealous of your success. You could be pressured to take on more responsibilities. And you may be haunted by the worry that sooner or later, this grace period will pass. I’M JUST KIDDING, SAGITTARIUS! In truth, the minor problems precipitated by your blessings won’t cause any more anguish than a mosquito biting your butt while you’re in the throes of ecstatic love-making.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In this horoscope, we will use the Socratic method to stimulate your excitement about projects that fate will favor in the next nine months. Here’s how it works: I ask the questions, and you brainstorm the answers. 1. Is there any part of your life where you are an amateur but would like to be a professional? 2. Are you hesitant to leave a comfort zone even though remaining there tends to inhibit your imagination? 3. Is your ability to fulfill your ambitions limited by any lack of training or deficiency in your education? 4. Is there any way that you are holding on to blissful ignorance at the expense of future possibilities? 5. What new license, credential, diploma or certification would be most useful to you?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The story of my life features more than a few fiascos. For example, I got fired from my first job after two days. One of my girlfriends dumped me without any explanation and never spoke to me again. My record label fired me and my band after we made just one album. Years later, these indignities still carry a sting. But I confess that I am also grateful for them. They keep me humble. They serve as antidotes if I’m ever tempted to deride other people for their failures. They have helped me develop an abundance of compassion. I mention this personal tale in the hope that you, too, might find redemption and healing in your own memories of frustration. The time is right to capitalize on old losses.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s never fun to be in a sticky predicament that seems to have no smart resolution. But the coming days could turn out to be an unexpectedly good time to be in such a predicament. Why? Because I expect that your exasperation will precipitate an emotional cleansing, releasing ingenious intuitions that had been buried under repressed anger and sadness. You may then find a key that enables you to reclaim at least some of your lost power. The predicament that once felt sour and intractable will mutate, providing you with an opportunity to deepen your connection with a valuable resource.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “More and more I have come to admire resilience,” writes Jane Hirshfield in her poem “Optimism.” “Not the simple resistance of a pillow,” she adds, “whose foam returns over and over to the same shape, but the sinuous tenacity of a tree: finding the light newly blocked on one side, it turns in another.” You have not often had great access to this capacity in the past, Aries. Your specialty has been the fast and fiery style of adjustment. But for the foreseeable future, I’m betting you will be able to summon a supple

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

staying power — a dogged, determined, incremental kind of resilience.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The fragrance from your mango groves makes me wild with joy.” That’s one of the lyrics in the national anthem of Bangladesh. Here’s another: “Forever your skies … set my heart in tune as if it were a flute.” Elsewhere, addressing Bangladesh as if it were a goddess, the song proclaims, “Words from your lips are like nectar to my ears.” I suspect you may be awash with comparable feelings in the coming weeks, Taurus — not toward your country, but rather for the creatures and experiences that rouse your delight and exultation. They are likely to provide even more of the sweet mojo than they usually do. It will be an excellent time to improvise your own hymns of praise.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): There have been times in the past when your potential helpers disappeared just when you wanted more help than usual. In the coming weeks, I believe you will get redress for those sad interludes of yesteryear. A wealth of assistance and guidance will be available. Even people who have previously been less than reliable may offer a tweak or intervention that gives you a boost. Here’s a tip for how to ensure that you take full advantage of the possibilities: Ask clearly and gracefully for exactly what you need.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Why grab the brain-scrambling moonshine when you may eventually be offered a heart-galvanizing tonic? Why gorge on hors d’oeuvres when a four-course feast will be available sooner than you imagine? According to my analysis of the astrological omens, my fellow Crab, the future will bring unexpected opportunities that are better and brighter than the current choices. This is one of those rare times when procrastination may be in your interest.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): As I hike up San Pedro Ridge, I’m mystified by the madrone trees. The leaves on the short, thin saplings are as big and bold as the leaves on the older, thicker, taller trees. I see this curiosity as an apt metaphor for your current situation, Leo. In one sense, you are in the early stages of a new cycle of growth. In another sense, you are strong and ripe and full-fledged. For you, this is a winning combination: a robust balance of innocence and wisdom, of fresh aspiration and seasoned readiness. What are five conditions you’d need in your world in order to feel you were living in utopia? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


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NOW HIRING! PATIENT CARE COORDINATORS: Responsible for maintaining a caseload of patients: scheduling orders, communicating with patient regarding shipments, follow-up calls about compliance with medications & notifying the pharmacist and/or physician of issues and changes in patient’s condition. INSURANCE VERIFIERS: Responsible for verifying patient eligibility, coordinate benefits, run test claims and determine patient coverage/responsibility for services to be provided by our specialty pharmacy. PROCESSING TECHNICIANS: Responsible for setting up and entering prescription information into system and attaching images to patient profile.

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Join the Walgreens Specialty Pharmacy Team! • Non – retail pharmacy Environment • Competitive pay • Wide Range of benefits

To apply, visit: Jobs.Walgreens.com Search “Carnegie” to view and apply for open jobs within Specialty Pharmacy.

WE’RE HIRING! FULL-TIME CALL CENTER REPRESENTATIVES (LOAN COUNSELORS)

11 Parkway Center Pittsburgh, PA 15220 • 12PM-9PM Shift • $11.50/Hour + $1.00 Shift differential

• • • •

Paid Training, 8AM- 5PM Medical Benefits Regular Pay Increases Tuition Reimbursement Visit PHEAA.org/jobs to apply.

Walgreens is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to diversity in the workplace

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NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days?

PARTY FOULS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or Text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 www.smokingresearchgroup.com

*Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit

SMOKERS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $85 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

STUDIES

Smokers Wanted! The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health • Be willing to fill out questionnaires • not smoke before two sessions. Earn $150 for completing study.

For more information call 412-624-8975

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

ACROSS

1. Key with three sharps: Abbr. 5. Tackle 9. Room with tons of old shit and cobwebs 14. Cosmonaut Gherman 16. “Back in the day” 17. Teenage doll toy line 18. The host who tapped the keg before everyone got there was called for a ... 20. Car battery brand 21. Actor Morales 22. Beigish hue 24. Actor Penn 25. The guy who took all the LSD was called for ... 29. The guy with all the weed was called for 31. Actress Phylicia 32. “D’oh, ___ idiot!” 34. Guatemalan president Molina 35. Planks work them 36. Bad spot 38. Applies paint sloppily 39. Former Enron advisor turned Nobel Prize winner Krugman 41. The guy who rolled onto his back after passing out was called for being ... 44. Head candy 45. Word after home or bed 47. Acid-base indicator

48. Overplaying guitar guy Steve 50. Sierra ___ 51. Brain wave register: Abbr. 54. The cockblocker was called for ... 59. Fig. that says when the inflight entertainment is shut off 60. Man’s nickname that is a letter run 61. Excited state 62. Guy who took too long to make a move was called ... 68. Coloring stuff 69. Gaucho’s rope 70. Moves toward the gate 71. Big name in modeling? 72. Like movies borrowed from the library 73. Breadmaker’s wheat 74. Back end

DOWN

1. Grp. that oversees guns and rosés 2. Soccer announcer Hamm 3. Falcons on chyrons 4. “Catfish: The TV Show” host Max 5. Arrived 6. Strand in a lab 7. Plot of land 8. “You ___!” (“Darn tooin’”) 9. “Straight Up” singer 10. Uno + due

11. Do some hyping 12. “That’s impossible!” 13. McKinley’s assassin 15. Hipster’s scooters 19. Rejected 23. Panthers coach Rivera 25. Animal catchers 26. Morocco’s capital 27. Bit of Money 28. LOLcat picture, likely 30. ER pronouncement 33. Summon up 37. Org. in the first four Super Bowls 38. Vast hot wasteland 40. Pub heads 42. “___ the opinion that ...” 43. Frank Herbert classic

46. LBJ spot that ended with a mushroom cloud 49. Word in division 51. Biochemical catalyst 52. Itching condition 53. Hot spring 54. Director Almodóvar 55. Stayed home for lunch 56. Leaves for lunch 57. University in Medford 58. Down material 63. Off-roader with big tires: briefly 64. Missing piece? 65. Stump creator 66. 1000 G’s 67. Superlative ending {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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GREAT PAY FOR ONE DAY!

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Drivers WANTED Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.09/09.16.2015

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DRAWING A CROWD {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

AS AN INDEPENDENT comics artist, D.J. Coffman has tried to

live by two rules: put the work in and, if you want something, don’t be afraid to ask. He’s been putting the work in since 1995, when he would hustle his mini-comic, Yirmumah!, to comic-book stores like Eide’s, Downtown, and New Dimension Comics, in the North Hills. “I was making them just for fun, and at the time I worked in the city, and I spent my lunch hour taking them around to Eide’s and the other stores,” Coffman explains. “They didn’t really know what to do with them, but they eventually took them and they started to sell. I’d get a call to bring more. Now, I was spending more on gas then I was making on these comics, but I was getting my work out there and I got noticed. “I think artists are very humble people, but if we don’t say, ‘Hey, we’re here,’ if we don’t ask, then we’ll never get a yes or a no, and you’ll just be in obscurity. A lot of people have said, ‘How did D.J. get those things?’ And the truth is, I put the work in and I just asked.” Coffman put in more work between 1995 and 1998 by going to comicbook shows and meeting artists, writers and publishers. He got noticed and started working as an independent comics artist. He would later start publishing a comic book online (long before web comics were actually a thing) called Hero By Night, about a reluctant superhero and set in a fictionalized Pittsburgh called Steel City. He won the American Comic Book Challenge — “it was like the American Idol of comic books” — and a job with Platinum Studios before the company ceased publishing comics, in 2008.

{ART BY D.J. COFFMAN}

in this town, from Don Simpson and Ron Frenz, to indie guys like Mikey Wood. We have artists that range from mini-comics to Eisner Award winners. Pittsburgh has a neat comics scene going on.” The Wizard World Pittsburgh Creator Spotlight will feature Coffman,

“PITTSBURGH HAS A NEAT COMICS SCENE GOING ON.” So when he heard that Wizard World Comic Con was coming to Pittsburgh for the first time, he saw an opportunity. Wizard World, which put on its first convention in Chicago, in 1997, stages several shows a month across the country. It acquired the Pittsburgh Comic Con last year, and this will be the first of its annual shows in the city. And it also marks the first time a comic con will be held within city limits, rather than in Monroeville.

WIZARD WORLD COMIC CON Fri., Sept. 11-Sun., Sept. 13. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $35-75 (autographs and photo ops additional). www.wizardworld.com

Coffman says he was a bit concerned that if a national presenter came in, there wouldn’t be a chance for local artists to be featured, or that independent local artists might shy away. So he took the initiative to call convention organizers to pitch the idea of showcasing local artists. “I reached out to them because a lot of indie folks were reluctant [to attend], because it’s a bigger show and the prices are more expensive,” Coffman says. “So, I just told [the organizers] that I’ve been doing this for quite a long time, and I’m pretty connected with a lot of the other independent folks, and I said, ‘I can get you some of the core guys in town.’ “Some people don’t know if they could trust a big corporate comic con. But, I’ve worked with Wizard before in some other cities, and I felt they needed some support to help get some local artists. We have some legends

Simpson, Wood, Jim Rugg, Scott Hedlund, Shawn Atkins, Byron Winton and Barry Linck. Frenz, who worked for years at Marvel on titles including Spider-Man and Thor, will also be in attendance. Besides well-known comics artists, the show will feature several TV and pop-culture celebrities. Among them will be Star Trek’s William Shatner; David Duchovny, of The X-Files; Lou Ferrigno, of TV’s Incredible Hulk; Dean Cain, who played Superman on Lois and Clark; and Michael Cudlitz and Josh McDermitt (Abraham and Eugene, respectively) of The Walking Dead. (Check www.wizardworld.com for individual appearance schedules). “I think having pop-culture celebrities at these events does help bring more people in,” Coffman says. “I think if you know how to work it, it’s a good thing. And Wizard World definitely brings the thunder with guys like Captain Kirk.” Coffman will be selling his own works at the show, including his new Caliber Comics release, God Child — which he co-created with his girlfriend, Ally Monroe — about a pregnant lesbian who may either be carrying the Anti-Christ or the second coming of Jesus at the same time she’s dodging assassins sent by The Church. He’ll also be doing sketches for fans, of his work or other comic-book heroes, a practice he’s just recently started. “There was a time I didn’t feel comfortable drawing other people’s characters,” Coffman says. “But in that climate, everybody’s drawing everything. It’s about giving the fans what they want. Even if you’ve never worked on Captain America, some kid might want to see your take on that superhero. It’s kind of a cool thing.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 9, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 36

September 9, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 36