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NORTH SIDE NOTES: DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL KEEPS ON GROWING 26

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EVENTS 7.27-7.31 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Ultra Violet Pop – Ages 8-10 Presented in connection with Year of the Family.

8.1 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS Presented in connection with Year of the Family. Free with museum admission

8.6 – 1:30-5pm ANDY’S BIRTHDAY Birthday-themed art activities Free with museum admission

8.8 – 2pm JOSH & GAB Warhol theater Presented in connection with Year of the Family. Free with museum admission

8.15 – 2pm & 7pm SOUND SERIES: ANIME’BOP! ENSEMBLE The Warhol theater Tickets 2pm FREE; 7pm $15 / $10 student & senior

Get the real story. Only at The Warhol. PEARLSTEIN I WARHOL I CANTOR

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL}

07.08/07.15.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, JESSICA HARDIN ZACCHIAUS MCKEE, MIKE SCHWARZ, AARON WARNICK

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 27

THE SEASON’S Hottest Action

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[NEWS]

down to either going to jail 06 “Itor acomes funeral.” — Jessica Hawkins weighs the risks of treating her daughter with illegal medical cannabis

[NEWS]

long as people are taking care 16 “As of the animals they have, I don’t have a problem with it.” — Pittsburgh City Councilor Darlene Harris on making it easier to raise livestock within city limits

passion is to build my community.” 22 “My — Michael Blackwell, on Café on the Corner, his new deli in Marshall-Shadeland

[MUSIC]

‘What do we already have 26 “Iherethought, that is underutilized?’ And that’s

music.” — Organizer Cody Walters on the origins of the Deutschtown Music Festival

[SCREEN]

the ever-present paparazzi scrums, 39 “In Winehouse looks nothing less than a terrified trapped animal.” — Al Hoff reviews the new documentary Amy

NATALIE COLE SATURDAY • JULY 18 • 8PM

Khalifa returns home — Check 63 Wiz out Mike Schwarz’s super-sized photo from the July 2 show and check out our full slideshow featuring Wiz and Fall Out Boy at www.pghcitypaper.com

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An American performing legend, Cole is an acclaimed singer and songwriter with awards to prove it and hits like “THIS WILL BE,” “INSEPARABLE,” and “OUR LOVE.” With more than 40 years in the entertainment industry, she shows no signs of slowing down.

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The true definition of a diva begins and ends with Patti LaBelle. For more than 40 years, she has been a pillar in R&B music with hit songs like “ON MY OWN,” “SOMEBODY LOVES YOU BABY,” and “LADY MARMALADE!”

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THIS WEEK

“IT COMES DOWN TO EITHER GOING TO JAIL OR A FUNERAL.”

ONLINE

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See a family’s struggles with their daughter’s Dravet syndrome and their fight for the medical marijuana that could help her. Read our news feature at right. www.pghcitypaper.com

Want to keep chickens but unsure of zoning laws? Don’t understand the urban agriculture legislation jargon? We’ve linked to helpful tools at www.pghcitypaper.com. Read about the new laws on page 16.

Wiz Khalifa returned to his hometown on July 2 for the Boys of Zummer Tour with Fall Out Boy. Check out page 63 and see more photos from the show on our website.

This week: Appreciate the Whiskey Rebellion legacy, don a summer hat for a garden tour, and witness Asia through the lens of the Silk Screen Festival. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to Hozier at Stage AE on July 28. Contest ends July 16. 6

MEDICAL

DECISIONS Jessica Hawkins breaks the law every time she gives her child her medicine and she has no intention of stopping {BY JESSICA HARDIN}

F

OR MANY Americans, the days leading to the Fourth of July are uneventful. Maybe there’s an extra trip to the grocery store or a bit of planning for a neighborhood gathering. But in the Hawkins family, the week is filled with repeated warnings. Every year, in early July, Jessica Hawkins cautions her young daughter Antania about the imminent “boom booms.” For most, fireworks are enjoyable, but for Antania, they can trigger a series of intense seizures from which the child would require days to recover. This year, however, 10-year-old Antania was expected to enjoy the holiday’s quintessential activity, thanks to medicine she’s not legally allowed to take, and to a combination of desperation and gall on the part of the tight-knit family who chooses to give it to her. After trying about 20 FDA-approved drugs to prevent Antania’s seizures, Hawkins and her mother, Nina Mitchell, took Antania and her brother, Lucciano, to Colorado in search of medical cannabis oil. In the past 18 months or so, anecdotal evidence has surfaced that the oil, extracted from a marijuana plant, can help children with crippling seizure disorders like Antania’s. In Colorado, the medicine is legal. In Pennsylvania, at least for the time being, it is not. Antania Hawkins experienced her first seizure at age six months. She was soon

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Jessica Hawkins comforts her daughter Antania.

diagnosed with Dravet syndrome, a rare form of intractable epilepsy (seizures that can’t be controlled by medication) that has slowed Antania’s development, rendering her predominantly nonverbal and dependent upon a wheelchair. The condition is the result of a gene mutation that causes the child to experience hundreds of seizures each day. “A splash of water, a dog barking, a doorbell, sunshine, pain — anything that could startle her,” says Hawkins, enumerating Antania’s seizure triggers. Her seizures range in severity; some

are indicated by the slight drop of her head and last several seconds. Others — grand mal seizures — cause Antania to fall to the floor, leaving her unresponsive for several minutes. “Her teeth are fake, because she’s smashed her face so many times,” Hawkins explains. The South Hills family has vowed to exhaust any option that holds the slightest potential for relief. As a result, the Hawkins have traversed physical distances and experimental depths. Their resolve drove them to Miami Children’s Brain Institute, and even to the realm of CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

MEDICAL DECISIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

LECTURE:

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This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Non-members: $5 Go to www.phlf.org for more information about PHLF membership.

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veterinary medicine, in order to explore the benefits of bromide, a sedative used to treat canine epilepsy. Their efforts have largely left them disappointed. “[Antania’s] been on over 19 FDA-approved different medications and she’s allergic to nearly all of them. She’s been on every diet possible. She’s had every treatment you could possibly think of for epilepsy. They have failed,” Hawkins explains. “We’ve looked above and beyond, under every rock that you could think of, for a possible solution.” This past fall, when the Hawkins’ younger son began experiencing seizures, the family grew desperate. “When Lucci started seizing in October,” says Mitchell, “we were out of options.” The family learned that Jessica’s two-year-old son, Lucciano, also carries the gene mutation that causes his sister’s intractable epilepsy. That led the family to Colorado in December. Prior to their trip, Hawkins and her mother had been in contact with Dr. Alan Shackelford, a medical-marijuana evaluation doctor in Denver. Under the care of the Harvard-trained physician, Antania obtained access to Remedy, a strain of cannabis in the form of an orally administered oil. She received six drops of Remedy under her tongue twice a day. Remedy is high in cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical compound found in marijuana that is believed to have medical benefits, and is low in THC, the component responsible for cannabis’ psychological effects. Shackelford tells City Paper that “Dravet syndrome is characterized by an al-

teration in the way that sodium and potassium move across the cell membrane in nerve cells to convey information. CBD seems to correct [that alteration] to an extent.” Shackelford says identifying the most effective medication depends upon finding the proper strain of cannabis for each individual condition. “The THC content depends on what it is in the original plant. It’s not that you can easily adjust the THC or CBD content,” he says. After the trip, the family returned to their South Hills home with several week’s worth of medication. They noticed changes in Antania almost immediately, and she improved with prolonged use of the oil. “For the first time, she didn’t have any seizures for four days. She got up out of her wheelchair and walked for the first time without falling,” Hawkins explains. Despite having been unable to move her right side, “[Antania] lifted her arms up to hug me.” Nina Mitchell gushes, “That was the greatest feeling.” Antania’s prolific progression became evident in her schoolwork as well. “She went from 25 percent of completing her work at school to 85 percent,” explains Hawkins. While Antania experienced noticeable improvements when she began using the medication, Hawkins says she needs continued treatment. “She’s not healed, she’s not perfect, but she’s better,” Hawkins says. “We don’t have the access here to what we need to get her to as perfect as possible.” Thus,

“SHE’S NOT HEALED, BUT SHE’S BETTER.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015


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MEDICAL DECISIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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Jessica Hawkins and her mother, Nina Mitchell, helping Antania walk

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

finding the most effective medication will ter of the National Organization for the require tinkering with the oil’s THC and Reform of Marijuana Laws. “Corruption of CBD content and, of course, the liberty to morals of minors or endangering welfare do such experimenting. of children are potential charges she would They returned to Colorado in Febru- face for using a Schedule 1 drug for mediciary to procure a larger supply of the can- nal purposes.” nabis oil. Additionally, Hawkins could face fedThe sustained usage of the medication eral felony charges because “any transhas given Antania’s family the opportu- portation of controlled substances over nity to finally get to know her. Her family state lines triggers federal jurisdiction,” members cherish the simple insights they Nightingale explains. were unable to gain during the first While he doubts that local or decade of the child’s life. federal law enforcement would “She loves music. My dad specifically target the family, mpse plays music for her. She sings, “Custody is not dependent li g a t e G ia ‘I’m happy,’” says Mitchell on criminal charges or of Antanlife lovingly. And sure enough, criminal activity,” he says. Hawkins’linein an on o at when “The Cha-Cha Slide” Thus the combination of a e only vid hcity fills the living room of AnChild Protective Services inwww.pg om tania’s great-grandparent’s vestigation and an unsymc r. e p pa home, the young girl smiles pathetic judge could legally wide and raises both of her remove Antania and Lucciano arms to dance. Antania is predomifrom Hawkins’ care. nantly nonverbal, but since this winter, Even a seemingly innocuous situashe has been able to construct simple sen- tion like a traffic stop could draw the attentences expressing wants, likes and dislikes. tion of law enforcement. “I dressed her in tutus and sparkles and “Those are some real risks you can’t sequins,” Mitchell explains, “but she tells us plan for or account for,” Nightingale says. she likes Spider-Man and the color blue.” “The consequences would be the same as if there was an active investigation. THE JOY THE family shares in Antania’s There’s a very real, genuine risk anyone considering medicinal cannabinoids in progress is offset by the legal risks. Medical marijuana is illegal in Penn- Pennsylvania faces because you need a sylvania, and significant risk accompa- reliable, steady supply to be administered nies the family’s decision to bring the on a regular routine basis.” The family faced a legal issue this medication across state lines and adminyear when Hawkins, who has been open ister it to Antania. Giving the child the medication could regarding Antania’s use of medical mariresult in “a wide variety of felonies and juana, faced truancy issues at her daughmisdemeanors,” says Patrick Nightingale, ter’s school. For more than five years, Antania has a criminal defense attorney and executive director of Pittsburgh NORML, a local chap- participated in Pittsburgh Public Schools’ CONTINUES ON PG. 12


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MEDICAL DECISIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

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Since she began communicating with her family, Antania has expressed interest in Spider-Man.

Program for Students with Exceptionalities. Due to the severity of her daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seizure disorder, Hawkins makes daily assessments of Antaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health to determine whether she will attend school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we wake her up out of a sleep, she has nonstop seizures. If sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up in the morning, she goes to school. Waking her up in the morning would put her into a status seizure that could last days,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no way Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to stress her body even more by sending her to school.â&#x20AC;? While the school systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies remain strict, faculty members serving students with disabilities strive to make these policies work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parents can have up to three unexcused absences,â&#x20AC;? explains David Lott, the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s principal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because we serve a clientele of medically fragile students, we work very closely with the parent. In most cases, the parent has given us permission to talk to doctors, and we will help the parent as much as possible and get those doctor excuses sent over to us.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had a problem, and this will be her sixth year in school,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re aware of [Antania] being sick, of us getting her to school when we get her to school. If sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sick, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going to send her to school.â&#x20AC;? However, on April 29, Hawkins received a summons to appear before District Magistrate Jim Motznik for a truancy issue. The notice describes three unexcused absences that took place in September and October 2014, more than six months prior to the summons.

Shortly before the truancy summons was issued, Hawkins says Antaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social worker reported her to Child Protective Services and pushed for the truancy charge. She says Motznik quickly dismissed the charge and indicated he would do the same for his child if the situation called for it. Motznik told City Paper he could not talk about cases that he has presided over. The social worker was also approached by CP and was not given permission to speak about the case on the record.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A VERY REAL RISK ANYONE CONSIDERING MEDICINAL CANNABINOIDS IN PENNSYLVANIA FACES.â&#x20AC;?

IF THE OIL helps

the Hawkins children, and the legal risks are so high in Pennsylvania, why not just move to Colorado? The question underestimates the level of care Antania requires, and the comprehensive family unit that has evolved to meet her needs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A day in the life of being a caretaker for her requires way more than two or three people. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave her by herself,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins says. Mitchell, Antaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandmother, lives with Hawkins and her children and stays home to care for them while Hawkins works full time. Mitchellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents live several houses down the street and offer support, especially with Lucciano. Despite the number of helpers, Hawkins describes the balancing act as â&#x20AC;&#x153;almost impossible.â&#x20AC;? More than the simple relocation of a nuclear family, a move to Colorado would require uprooting a delicately arranged system of support. These limitations force the family to face the risks while waiting for Pennsylvania CONTINUES ON PG. 14


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law to catch up with other parts of the country. In Pennsylvania, a medical-marijuana bill (Senate Bill 3) that would treat a broad range of medical conditions passed the Senate in May with overwhelming support. However, once it entered the state House, the bill was placed in the House health committee, where many feared it would languish without a fair hearing. In the past couple of weeks, however, the bill has gotten new life. The Senate bill was moved to the House rules committee, chaired by state Rep. Dave Reed (R-Indiana County), who is more receptive to the bill than are other Republicans in leadership. And last week, the committee announced the creation of a commission to help ensure the passage of a medicalmarijuana bill. “SB 3 is the framework,” explains Rep. Ed Gainey, one of the members of the special commission. The creation of the commission reflects the priority given to the issue and the committee’s desire to pass an effective bill. “I want us to push something that other states want to follow,” Gainey says. Republican state Sen. Mike Folmer, one

of the original sponsors of the Senate bill, says he wants to pass a bill that’s “going to be broad enough to help as many Pennsylvanians as possible.” Folmer says medicalmarijuana laws in states like New York and New Jersey have so many restrictions that they are “basically nonfunctional.” Gainey believes a functional law is imminent. “We have the votes right now to pass the bill,” he says. A new law can’t come soon enough for Hawkins. She has done her part to gain support by talking about Antania’s personal struggles publicly and on social media. “Every day we make videos, take pictures,” Hawkins says. Her advocacy represents just one voice in a collective of families across the state who have stepped forward to fight for medical cannabis. “Patients and advocates formed this kind of alliance,” she says. “There are thousands of us.” And while there is strength in numbers, Hawkins has to stand alone when deciding whether to take the legal risks of giving her child the medicine she needs. But in the end, she says, it’s really no choice at all: “It comes down to either going to jail or a funeral.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Don’t Lose Your Edge

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Jody Noble-Choder holds one of her 18 chickens in her Highland Park yard.

HARVESTING CHANGE

Modifications to existing laws will make urban farming easier in city limits {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} IN HER HIGHLAND PARK yard-turned- backyards. Its Facebook page has nearly small-farm, Jodi Noble-Choder tends to 1,500 likes. “It’s like an edgy garden tour,” Noblenearly 20 hens and, after the recent arrival of some new hatchlings, a whole family Choder says with a laugh. The tour has more than a dozen stops now, up from just of ducks. “There are five ducklings, cute as can six or seven a few years ago. But, Noble-Choder knows that be,” she says. what’s going on in her own backNoble-Choder says she began yard isn’t technically legal. chicken farming in 2009 bes “I’m still illegal,” she cause she was a “Martha Find linkctive ra te in says. “I definitely plan to Stewart devotee.” n a to ap get legal once the regulazoning mion of “Martha had chickens, rs and a ve law in tions are changed, and our so I had to get them,” she new e th t a organization is definitely says. “I had been saving sh li plain Engghcity going to encourage people chicken-coop plans, but .p w ww m to go out and get legal, once neither [my husband nor I] paper.co we get into a more sensible had any carpentry skills. We regulatory schema.” ended up buying a dog house The days of keeping chickens from Lowe’s.” Now she is somewhat of a chicken con- and bees on the down-low might soon be noisseur, or in her words, an “addict.” Her gone. More lenient amendments to the current coop is an Amish-made structure, city’s agriculture-zoning laws passed a housing several varieties of chicken, in- preliminary vote of Pittsburgh City Councluding gold-lace Wyandottes, Easter Egg- cil on June 29. And, as of press time, supers, Splash Marans, and Black Australorps. porters of the bill and city council memNoble-Choder is also an organizer of the ur- bers anticipated final passage on July 7. ban-chicken movement: She leads a group The changes will make urban agriculture a called Chicks in the Hood, which facili- resident’s right, rather than an exception to tates tours of chicken coops in Pittsburgh the law, making the process for residents to CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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HARVESTING CHANGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

who owned 5 acres or more; in recent history, only one property in Stanton Heights qualified. He says about nine complaints regarding chickens or bees came through the mayor’s 311 line in 2010. “That led us [to take action] in 2011 to allow for residents to keep poultry or beehives,” Dash says. But since that time, only 13 people have applied for variances to raise bees or poultry; 10 have been approved. (In 2011-2013, city planning still received about nine complaints per year.) According to supporters of the new legislation, the approval process is cumbersome, taking months and hundreds of dollars. “It was really nerveracking. You feel like you’re going to court,” says Jana Thompson, who went through the permit process in 2011 to keep bees and chickens on her Mexican War Streets property. When all was said and done, she said it cost about $300 and took about four months. “I’m one of the few people who went through the hassle.” Thompson heads the organization Pittsburgh Pro-

Poultry People (P4) and helped advise the city on the proposed changes. Danko-Day and others tasked with overhauling the city’s current laws knew the number of applicants didn’t add up. “What happened was because of the cost and rigorous process, a lot of people said, ‘To heck with it. I’m going to save my time and just talk to my neighbors myself,’” says Stephen Repasky, president of Burgh Bees, an organization which also collaborated on the new law. The nonprofit’s mission is to promote beekeeping in Allegheny County. “[The new changes are] going to bring a lot of beekeepers out from underground, so to speak,” says Repasky, who adds that he could easily think of 25 “underground” beekeepers within city limits. Under the new regulations, the cost and process will change greatly — a 10-12 week process will be reduced to one day, and a $340 fee will be reduced to a one-time payment of $70. “It might be a couple of papers and a site plan that needs to be drawn, but we’ll have instructions for that,” Danko-Day says. The

“THIS ISN’T ABOUT PEOPLE TOYING WITH THEIR HOBBIES. THIS IS ABOUT FOOD. THIS IS SERIOUS STUFF.”

planning commission will “come out and inspect once your chicken coop or goat pen is up. They’ll make sure it’s what you drew in your site plan.” Residents with 2,000 square feet — including any structures — will be able to have two beehives, along with either five chickens, five ducks or two miniature goats. For 10,000-square-foot lots, two regularsized goats are permitted with chickens or ducks and bees. All goats must be dehorned and the males neutered; goats must be in pairs. Regardless of lot size, the law requires secure enclosures for animals, and the Department of Permits, Licenses and Inspections, as well as the Bureau of Animal Control, will be charged with enforcing restrictions. The animals’ quarters were of particular concern to Councilor Darlene Harris, who added language to the bill last week. “I didn’t think it had enough about where the animals would reside,” Harris said, comparing her concern to legislation she championed in December regarding the safety of dogs. “I wanted to make sure that they were [in] covered, well-ventilated, dry, predator-resistant and properly maintained [enclosures].” Another councilor with concerns is City Council President Bruce Kraus, who repre-

Photo credit: Jordan Beckman

become the keepers of their own backyard farms significantly easier and cheaper. “I think it removes barriers for those participating in urban agriculture,” says Councilor Natalia Rudiak, who supports the legislation. “I’ve heard anecdotally that there are a lot of residents harboring illegal bees and chickens on their properties, and we need to bring those out of the darkness and into the light.” Also on the line is the expansion of zoning districts for agricultural activities, including highway commercial districts (such as West Liberty Avenue and Banksville Road) and neighborhood industrial and commercial districts (such as Baum Boulevard and Frankstown Avenue). One implication of the law’s expansion is that privately owned vacant lots could be used for agriculture. “I’m excited about having more people do that on private land,” says Shelly DankoDay, the City Planning Department’s openspaces specialist. “We have a lot of vacant land that’s not being utilized.” Prior to 2011, there were no hard-andfast rules on livestock in the city. According to Andrew Dash, assistant director of strategic planning for the city, the code was interpreted to say that livestock wasn’t allowed, except for residents

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015


sents a district with varying types of neighborhoods — from the roomier Hilltop to the cramped South Side. “I don’t think my neighbors would be real happy if I put two goats outside,” Kraus said during the June 23 hearing. His concern was that while his property in South Side meets the square-footage requirement, his house is included in that measurement. “I would like to talk about lot size as it includes actual structures,” he said to the city-planning representatives who presented the bill. Kraus has not returned calls seeking additional comment on his reservations with the new legislation. But, there really hasn’t been much opposition, says Danko-Day. “It’s such a change from 2011, when it was a controversy, and people were coming and testifying,” she says.”We had a public meeting this year with 130 people, and we didn’t hear anybody say anything that was negative. We’re only a couple of generations removed from these activities in the first place. I think people are realizing [that].” Councilor Harris shared that sentiment. “Growing up, I had ducks, chickens. I’ve had animals around me all my life,” said Harris who was raised in Spring Hill, where

Noble-Choder’s Indian Runner duck and its ducklings

she says it used to be farmland. “It’s like being in the country in the city. As long as people are taking care of the animals they have, I don’t have a problem with it.” For others, the issue is about food sovereignty, access and public health. “We’re trying to have a code that lines up our history with our future,” says Dawn Plummer, director of the Pittsburgh Food

Policy Council of Penn State, which collaborated with city planning on the changes. “We absolutely think hunger is a critical issue in the city and region. Having access to growing food and keeping small livestock connects you to the source of your food, which is critically important and speaks to regional challenges of high obesity and chronic diseases.”

All of the bill’s supporters acknowledge that public awareness is going to be key. Grow Pittsburgh, a nonprofit that educates youth and runs small farms in neighborhoods considered to be food deserts, will hold a backyard goat-keeping workshop in late August. One reason for the workshop, says Marisa Manheim, of Grow Pittsburgh, is that a lot of people want goats for their milk, but there’s a lot to learn. For instance, a person either needs to send his or her goat for a “conjugal visit” or order sperm and artificially inseminate it themselves. “In order to actually have milk, you’re kind of going through a lot of extra effort,” she says. “You have to have a pregnant goat that carries to term, and then there are babies to deal with. It’s not the same as getting a dog.” But there are advantages, she assures; for instance, goat manure, which “is full of nitrogen.” Thompson, the Mexican War Streets resident, is happy the changes are getting a strong reception. “I can’t believe this might actually be over soon,” she says. And, she minces no words about her views. “This isn’t just people toying with goofy little hobbies, this is about food,” Thompson explains. “This is serious stuff.” A M U RRAY @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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t›͛ٛ½ÊÊ»®Ä¦¥ÊÙW®ããݐçÙ¦««ƒÙƒ‘ã›ÙÝ͊ Do people tell you that you should have your own reality show? Do you know somebody in the Pittsburgh area that is doing something so interesting, strange, wonderful, or life changing that the world needs to know about it?

Well here’s the chance for YOU or SOMEONE YOU KNOW to become a reality TV star!

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S B Y R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE N T I C AT I ON O N D E M AND.

Jamie L. Gordon, 30, told police she was “struck in the head with a bowling ball” by a robber, who took $2,100 from the safe at the bowling alley where she worked in Decatur, Ill. When the manager arrived and gave permission to view the surveillance video, officer James Weddle observed Gordon pick up a bowling ball and “strike herself twice in the back, left side of her head,” then drop to the floor, where she remained for 13 minutes until another employee found her. Confronted with the evidence, Gordon admitted taking the money and gambling away most of it on the bowling alley’s slot machines before conking herself on the head “to make it look like she had been robbed.” (Decatur’s HeraldReview)

owners parking inoperative vehicles backward so officials can’t read license plates, which Florida requires only on the rear. If the vehicle tag isn’t visible from the street, the measure requires the owner to write down the information with 2-inch-tall letters and post it where city code-enforcement inspectors can easily see it from the street. (Jacksonville’s The Florida Times-Union)

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While police searched for drugs at the Akron, Ohio, home of Andrew Palmer, 46, a United Parcel Service driver delivered a package, addressed to Palmer, containing four pounds of marijuana. (Cleveland.com)

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Canadian authorities deported Tom Rolfe, 24, for fixing cracks in the wall of his girlfriend’s Edmonton apartment. Even though the British man, visiting on a tourist visa, was doing the repairs for free, officials pointed out that immigration rules prohibit tourists from performing any work that a Canadian could be hired to do. (Ottawa Sun)

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Warren Jones, a city councilor in Jacksonville, Fla., introduced a bill making it illegal for homeowners to back into their own driveway. Jones said the proposal would crack down on the visual blight caused by

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China is resorting to public humiliation to punish smokers. Besides increasing the fine for smoking in public buildings to 200 yuan ($32.20), officials post the names of those who break the law three times on a website to shame them. (The Washington Post) Police reported that a 28-year-old man was grilling on his patio in Buffalo Grove, Ill., when his upstairs neighbor complained about the fumes coming into his apartment. When the man ignored him and continued grilling, the upstairs neighbor “retorted by throwing a stool and chair down” to the patio, police said. (Chicago Tribune)

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Police arrested Anh Nguyen, 42, after she argued with a department-store manager in Newark, Calif., over the price of a Michael Kors purse. She succeeded in getting a discount, but then “began to scream and curse at the manager” because she was still unhappy with the price, police Cmdr. Mike Carrol said. When a loss-prevention officer tried to escort Nguyen from the store, she reportedly threw a temper tantrum and bit the officer’s leg. (San Jose Mercury News)

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Adam Hirtle, 30, told police in Colorado Springs that he removed his boot and shot himself in the foot on purpose because he wanted to see how it felt. After satisfying his curiosity, he “placed his boot back on his foot and then intentionally shot himself in the foot” a second time, police said. (The Denver Post)

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After spending 46 years without knowing her father’s identity, Melonie Dodaro, a social-media consultant in Kelowna, British Columbia, turned to Facebook and located him in just 72 hours. Cees de Jong, originally from the Netherlands, has been living in Thailand for the past 16 years, performing as an Elvis impersonator, an actor and a musician using the name Colin Young. “I guess he’s very, very well-known and a little bit famous in Europe,” Dodaro said, adding she plans to visit her father and his two children, Elvis and Priscilla. (CBC News)

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Transit police who nabbed Timothy Chapman, 35, for evading a $2.10 subway fare in Boston found $7,000 in his pocket. (Boston Herald)

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Newcomers to rural Loudon County, Va., are causing sanitation problems by not tending to their septic systems or not knowing that the systems need to be cleaned out regularly. “Let’s just say there are folks from Eastern Loudon that had, say, lived in suburbia their entire lives, had been on public water and sewerr their entire lives, they move out to some beautiful eautiful little hamlet … and all they really know now when they

buy their house out here is, ‘cool, well and septic, no water bill,’” Algonkian District Supervisor Suzanne Volpe said. “Most of them don’t realize that there’s a problem until the kids come in from the backyard and go, ‘The ground’s all muddy back there, Mom, and it smells funny,’ and by that point they have a serious problem.” (Washington’s WTOP Radio)

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A Welsh bus company promoting its new fleet of buses posted ads on the back of them showing an apparently topless woman holding a sign saying, “Ride me all day for £3.” Outrage on social media prompted an apology from Cardiff-based New Adventure Travel, which explained the slogan was “a little tongue in cheek,” but promised to remove the ads “within the next 24 hours.” (Britain’s The Guardian)

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Florida environmental officials announced a two-year, $1.6 million project to remove an estimated 90,000 used tires from the ocean off Fort Lauderdale. The tires, among 700,000 dropped in 1972, were intended to attract fish and provide a foundation for corals. Instead, few corals grew, and the tire bundles broke apart and drifted into natural reefs, killing coral and creating a lifeless vista that stretches 35 miles. “There are just tires for as far as you can see,” Broward County biologist Pat Quinn said. “They’re piled on top of each other up to five feet deep.” (Associated Press)

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PARKER’S OFFERS NOTHING BUT SANDWICHES FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

CORNER SPOT {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Michael Blackwell is a longtime resident of Marshall-Shadeland. But he’s spent even longer as a professional chef — his entire adult life. So his contribution to the neighborhood was to start a restaurant. Blackwell and his wife, Lateresa, opened Café on the Corner last September in a building owned by neighboring New Hope Church (where Blackwell is an elder). The building once housed a nuisance bar, and it still has the old-school tin ceiling, wooden bar and mirrored shelves. But bottles of hot sauce have replaced the vodka, and the café is pleasantly day-lit, with plenty of tables and even a couple of couches in back. Blackwell calls his place an “upscale deli” serving soups, sandwiches, salads and such Southern specialties as gumbo, shrimp and grits, and jambalaya. Blackwell, who grew up in the Hill District, says he broke color barriers in Pittsburgh by becoming an executive chef here in the early 1970s. He’s worked around the country and all around town, most recently at the North Side’s Bistro to Go. Now — with generous hours of 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Tuesday to Friday, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays — he’s focused on turning his café into “a safe place” and community hub for the mostly residential neighborhood. Blackwell caters, too, and would like to expand his tiny kitchen area into an adjoining garage. “My passion is to build my community, and that’s why I’m here,” he says.

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Papagiorgio meatball sandwich

SANDWICH KING {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2700 Shadeland Ave., MarshallShadeland. 412-415-3672

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FEED

Mark your our calendar for or the all-out, two-day, o-day, one-bridge celebration ration of brined and vinegared red foods. Picklesburgh h is Fri., July 17, and Sat., July 18 18, on the Rachel Carson Bridge, D Downtown. Expect demonstrations on home pickling; cocktails with pickled ingredients; food from dozens of vendors; entertainment; a giant pickle balloon; and, for the committed, a pickle-juice-drinking contest. See more info at www.picklesburgh.com.

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HOUGH SUPPOSEDLY invented by a British earl, the sandwich seems as all-American as, er … frankfurters or pizza. Yep, if there is one thing we Yanks are good at, it’s taking a good idea and running with it. If there’s another thing, it’s packing all manner of meats, cheeses, vegetables and condiments between two slices of bread — or rolls, or buns, or pretzels — to create a hand-held meal. There is no shortage of sandwichmakers in the Pittsburgh region, including Parker’s. Run by Luke Parker with his mother, Roseann, Parker’s offers nothing but sandwiches for breakfast, lunch and dinner, seven days a week. It’s located just off Potomac Avenue in the space once occupied by Dormont Dogs, which we mention not just because Pittsburghers do that, but because that erstwhile business was a pioneer to which Parker’s pays tribute. Dormont Dogs was the first establishment, lo-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

cally, to blur the line between humble street food and an upscale meal by offering hot dogs with artisanal ingredients and gourmet toppings. Now that practice is so prevalent that it’s hard to remember when it was new and exciting. But Parker’s pays homage with a daily dog from its predecessor’s

PARKER’S PGH 2911 Glenmore Ave., Dormont. 412-344-7264 HOURS: Mon. 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Tue.-Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. PRICES: $3.50-6.75 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED menu of elaborate concoctions named after local streets. The day we visited, it was the Wisconsin Dog, with four kinds of cheese: so good. This kind of local awareness is central to the appeal of Parker’s. All sandwiches are

made from locally sourced ingredients, and Parker is committed to getting them just right, such that his meats come from three different butchers, and his breads from four different bakeries. And while such princely treatment usually translates into kingly prices, at Parker’s, all this comes crazy cheap, with nothing on the menu over seven bucks and many items under six. The menu is sensibly divided into breakfast sandwiches and thence by main ingredient: ham & bacon, turkey, chicken, meatball and veggie. Options range from the timeless BLT to such experiments as the “Magic Beans,” comprised of chicken, bacon, cream cheese, sprouts and sriracha on a pretzel bun. And if nothing on the menu quite suits your fancy, you can build your own custom sandwich; examples are displayed on a board on one wall. Feeling lucky? Opt for the Dirty Harry: Parker picks the bun, meat, cheese and


condiment, and you enjoy it! We were drawn to the Barkley’s Golf Swing largely by the promise of Alabama white-lightning sauce, which we thought might be a version of the state’s oddly delicious mayonnaise-based barbecue sauce. Parker’s was pink with hot sauce and less peppery than the real deal, but it was plenty zesty for provolone, thick cut pickles and even thicker cut — no, carved — chicken. Aside from its locally sourced ethos, Parker’s other signature move is a special steam press that freshens rolls while melting cheese and rendering meats juicier. Toasted sandwiches are great, of course, but steaming works better than you’d ever expect, and in this case, it resulted in juicy white meat and a sandwich that really held together. Angelique went with the Hambino, an everything bagel stuffed with ham, bacon, cream cheese, cheddar, sprouts, tomato and brown mustard. While this could have been a jaw-buster, each ingredient was applied judiciously, and the bagel — again steamed, not toasted — was soft enough to yield to each bite.

st Pittsburgh’sA BVeiew!

On the RoCKs

Brunch With

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

EVERY SUNDAY

DRAAI LAAG BREWING UPSIZES

Farm Fresh All Summer Long

10am to 2pm

“Wild beer” specialist expands production, adds biergarten

Parker’s pretzel buns come from the South Side’s Pretzel Shop, another local pioneer, serving sandwiches on pretzel buns long before anyone else caught on. Actually a halved pretzel, this bun was much more than a brown, salt-studded crust. Its depth of flavor worked perfectly with the timeless combination of ham and Swiss. The ham was closer to deli meat than was the chicken, but it was also meaty and on the thick side. Parker’s vibe is cozy and friendly, helped by a traditional lunch-counter setup where everything is made in front of you while you sit, and the proprietor’s personal service was above and beyond. When our son asked for “The King” — peanut butter, bacon and banana on a bagel — Parker ran all over Dormont to procure a banana rather than disappoint him with “We’re out.” The sandwich was worth the effort, its potential mess somehow neatly contained and tantalizingly balanced between sweet, salty and savory. Elvis knew what was what, and so does Luke Parker. Crown him the Sandwich King.

They say the cream rises to the top. And as Draai Laag Brewing has proven, so do funky Belgian ales. Despite eschewing advertising and refusing to make anything resembling an IPA, the five-year-old Millvale brewery has built a loyal following in Pittsburgh and beyond. And this summer, Draai Laag is offering more ways to enjoy its delightfully unconventional beer. “It’s very humbling to realize that we have yet to push what we can do in this field,” says founder Dennis Hock. That’s an impressive statement, considering that Draai Laag already specializes in all things strong, sour and strange. Unlike most craft breweries, Draai Laag focuses on the yeast, which Hock calls “the most important thing in beer.” He harvests wild yeast strains and subjects them to rigorous testing and experimentation, blending varieties to create layers of deep, challenging flavor. Draai Laag’s boundary-pushing ethos and devotion to a great product rather than the bottom line — “we’re not money-hungry people,” says Hock — has paid off. The brewery already sends tons of wild beer to Philadelphia and regularly fields requests from distributors in other states. This summer, Draai Laag will expand production to a facility in Allison Park, allowing more room for barrel-aging and experiments with fermentation. It is also in the midst of a brewery-wide rebranding, which includes overhauling its labels and switching to better-quality bottles. And from Thu., July 9, to Sat., July 11, Draai Laag holds the grand opening of its Biergarten, complete with food trucks and plenty of wild beer. This adds about 2,000 square feet of outdoor drinking space, and the barnlike structure is meant as “a farmhouse presence” in concrete-heavy Millvale. The Biergarten, like the taproom, will be open on Thursdays and Fridays from 5-10:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 3-10:30 p.m. The free grand opening takes place during regular hours. And all this is just the tip of the iceberg. “We haven’t hit our peak yet,” says Hock. “You’re going to see a lot more beer in 2016.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“WE HAVE YET TO PUSH WHAT WE CAN DO IN THIS FIELD.” Luke Parker, his mom Roseann Parker and chef Matt Fignar

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

40 Craft Beers w

ontap w

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

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Monday & Thursday

(Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

$2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

• 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 @casareynamex 24

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

now open 7 days a week!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an open-minded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF

Kavsar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE GIA VISTO. 4366 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-374-1800. The menu at this welcoming Italian restaurant ranges from simple classics to elegant inventions. Whether it’s a fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime red sauce, or a perfectly cooked salmon on a Mediterraneaninspired bed of beans and vegetables, the fare exhibits the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF

DINETTE. 5996 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thin-crust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE EVEREST. 4042 Saw Mill Run Blvd., Brentwood. 877-650-2694. At this Nepalese restaurant, diners can expect momos, the region’s characteristic dumplings, here filled with chicken or vegetables, and served with dipping sauces. Also on the menu, variations on dishes associated with Indian cuisines, such samosas, sambar soup, rice pilafs and curries. JF FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hot-doggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable,

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Bocktown Beer and Grill HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tuna-andavocado spring rolls. LE HARTWOOD RESTAURANT. 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500. This restaurant,

situated in a charming reclaimed Victorian building, pulls off being both upscale and casual, with a fresh and original seasonal menu. Appetizers are as varied as Chinese-style pot stickers and scallop tacos, while entrees include pastas, fish and chops. There is also a selection of burgers and sandwiches. KE HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane wine bar and tapas restaurant, Ibiza is the sister restaurant to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but includes delicacies from Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive dining experience. KE KAVSAR. 16 Southern Ave., Mount Washington. 412-4888708 or 412-488-8709. The varied cuisine of the old Silk Road is available at this Uzbekistan restaurant. The menu reflects the country’s time as a Soviet Socialist republic, with beef stroganoff and blini-like crepes rolled around savory fillings, and its proximity to China, evident in many dishes based upon noodles and dumplings. K


Coriander

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

INDIA BAR & GRILL

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Gia Visto {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} LADLES. 516 Pittsburgh St., Springdale. 724-274-5230. This cozy eatery in the Allegheny Valley offers superb soups and Italian-American favorites. Soups are homemade, as is much of the pasta (served with a variety of red sauces). A standout item is the “raviogie,” a mash-up of meat ravioli and potato/cheese pierogie, available with butter and onions or marinara sauce. KE LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-2510031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE

PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-8724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-741-9457. At this revamped hotel, the offerings reflect a balance between time-honored dishes such as turtle soup and more modern fare, like a crabmeat-stuffed quesadilla. Steak-lovers will be pleased, but adventurous burger fans should check out the Light Up Night burger, topped with blue crabmeat, bacon, avocado and pepper-jack cheese. LE

THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former lunchroom, Thai MEDITERRANO. 2193 Gourmet is the Babcock Blvd., North www. per pa casual, no-nonsense Hills. 412-822-8888. pghcitym .co and no-frills member of This Greek estiatorio Pittsburgh’s Thai restaurant offers hearty, homestyle club. The prices are on the low fresh fare in a casual, yet end, but the food quality is high refined, setting. Salads, appetizers and the portions are huge. The (many of them less-familiar) and decor mixes Asian themes with casseroles are on offer as well as diner kitsch in a delightful way. JF heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg of lamb VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. and stuffed tomatoes. LF 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412394-3400. The venerable Italian PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. restaurant from Greensburg now www.pamelasdiner.com. There has a Downtown outpost. In this are many reasons to recommend this popular local diner mini-chain: elegant space, some classic dishes are updated; a few favorites, like the cheery atmosphere; the oldturtle soup are retained; and the fashioned breakfasts featuring fresh mozzarella bar deserves raisin French toast, fried potatoes to become a classic. Try the and corned-beef hash; and light, distinctive pizza, with a layered, crispy-edged pancakes so good cracker-like crust. LE that President Obama had them served at the White House. J WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. PARIS 66. 6018 Centre Ave., Eschewing the epic list of East Liberty. 412-404-8166. This dishes most Chinese-American charming bistro is both less restaurants proffer, this pretentious and every bit as attractively decorated storeimpressive as the frou-frou front venue sticks to a modest French fine dining of yore, number of basics with a few offering both light lunch fare less-typical dishes, such as (croques and crepes) and serious Singapore mai fun (a dish of dinners. Expects classics such as stir-fried rice noodles) or sha salade Niçoise, frog legs and cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish exquisitely prepared meats, plus from China’s Gansu province) JF a cocktail list. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

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ALL LUNCHES

$

ENTRÉE 3 OFF BUFFET ½ OFF ENTRÉ

Buy 2 adult buffets, get $3 off (VALID 7 DAYS A WEEK) With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Buy any entrée, get a 2nd entrée of equal or lesser value ½ off. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Coriander India Bar & Grill

MON TUE-THU FRI-SAT SUN

$

8-$10

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107

2201 Murray Ave, Squirrel HIll | CORIANDERINDIANGRILL.COM

LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

FALL INTERNS WANTED City Paper’s editorial team is seeking several interns for the fall. Please send résumé, cover letter and writing samples to the appropriate editor listed below by July 23, 2015. Each internship includes a small stipend. No calls, please.

NEWS INTERN The news intern will pitch and write stories for both the print and online editions, as well as assist news reporters with research and fact-checking. Basic writing and reporting experience required. Apply to editor Charlie Deitch, cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com.

MULTIMEDIA INTERN The multimedia intern will produce content for our digital platform at pghcitypaper.com. The right candidate must be capable of working in the field as well as in the office. Necessary skills include: recording and editing audio and video, writing and copy-editing, as well as a working knowledge of social media. Apply to multimedia editor Ashley Murray, amurray@pghcitypaper.com.

MUSIC INTERN The music intern will have a working knowledge of the local music scene and assist the music editor by writing new-release reviews and previews of upcoming shows, as well as artist features. Apply to music editor Margaret Welsh, mwelsh@pghcitypaper.com.

ARTS INTERN The position is focused on reporting and writing about local people, performances, artworks and events, in fields including but not limited to theater, visual art, literature, dance, comedy, and film and video. Apply to arts editor Bill O’Driscoll, driscoll@pghcitypaper.com.

PHOTO INTERN The photo intern will work for both City Paper’s print edition and its promotions department. We are looking for a photographer with an artistic eye who can tell a story through images. Editorial work will include shooting assignments to supplement the paper’s news and arts coverage. Promotions duties include taking photos at City Paper-sponsored events. Weekend availability is required. Apply to editor Charlie Deitch, cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com.

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LOCAL

“WE’RE DOING THIS FOR THE LOVE OF LOCAL MUSICIANS AND THE NORTH SIDE.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Visit www.singerbots.com for more information.

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NORTH SIDE {BY MARGARET WELSH}

SOUNDS {PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN SOLTESZ}

Meeting of Important People performing at last year’s festival (top); Festival-goers at the outdoor park stage in 2014 (left)

F

ROM THE VERY beginning, the Deutschtown

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RANDY STROTHMAN}

Eric Singer’s business is building robotic musical instruments, but not those spooky animatronics that mock-play guitar while blinking once in a while. Singer’s orchestrions — the 1800s term for a set of automated musical instruments — are made up of actual instruments mechanically equipped to perform a composition automatically. So what exactly does that mean? “The instruments can play anything,” says Singer, founder of the Pittsburghbased SingerBots. “They play whatever’s composed for them.” So, a musician composes a song on basic production software, but instead of playing the notes back, the program activates the physical playing actions on the orchestrion. Simple enough. In April, Singer completed the largest work of his career, an orchestrion for the Lido nightclub in Paris. Comprising roughly 45 instruments, including percussion, piano and a seriously robust xylophone section, the Lido Orchestrion will perform compositions every night as the opening band for the cabaret show over the next 10 years. In action, it looks like a haunted band room. Singer has been building these robotic instruments since 2000, when he founded the League of Electronic Musical Robots (LEMUR), a collective dedicated to building automated instruments. His first was the GuitarBot in 2002, a set of four strings with notched devices that zip up and down the individual strings like little slot cars. (On YouTube, search for “EmergencyBot TV Theme” for a good introduction.) In 2009, Singer returned to Pittsburgh — he attended Carnegie Mellon as an undergrad— and founded SingerBots, a company fully dedicated to building robotic music instruments. In his 15-year career, he’s built hundreds of instruments for a variety of clients, including jazz guitarist Pat Metheny, They Might Be Giants and the Smithsonian National Gallery of Art. For Singer, musicality and infallibility are the two priorities for a great orchestrion. They need to sound good and they can’t make mistakes. You might think that robotic infallibility would make the performance lifeless, but Singer scoffs at that idea. “I’ve never walked in and found them having their own jam session,” says Singer. “There’s always musicians involved in this process. I just see it as another extension of the possible ways to make music.”

Eric Singer {PHOTO COURTESY OF SINGERBOTS}

DANCING TO THE BOT

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

Music Festival grew faster than expected. In 2013, Cody Walters — a resident of the North Side’s Deutschtown neighborhood for the better part of a decade — decided to create a small, multi-venue music event. He had organized a few autumn bar crawls in the area, and friends suggested he put together something in the summer. “I didn’t want to do another bar crawl, so I thought, ‘What do we already have here that is underutilized?’ And that’s music,” he says. The original plan was for 12 bands to play at three different well-established venues, including the Allegheny Elks Lodge, the Park House and James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy. It ended up with 12 stages and roughly 50 bands. “We started talking about it, and other venues hopped on board,” Walters remembers. “We


decided to shut down the street and have a stage there. I had a wonderful group of volunteers who came out and contributed different ideas, and every band we talked to was completely on board with playing this goofy festival.” Since then, the festival has expanded exponentially. Last year, there were 80-plus bands and 15 stages; this year’s schedule features more than 125 bands playing at 24 different stages. The line-up is a who’swho of local acts, including — to name a very few — Cello Fury, Beauty Slap, Slim Forsythe, Chrome Moses, the Weird Paul Rock Band and Fist Fight in the Parking Lot. But there are a few touring bands on the bill, too, including The Fed, from Washington, D.C., and The Appleseed Collective, from Ann Arbor, Mich. In addition to the more traditional music venues, shows will be held at Arnold’s Tea, Bistro to Go, Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, and elsewhere. Walters also encourages festivalgoers to check out the new outdoor venue at Penn Brewing, as well as the various non-music family activities provided by organizations like Artists Image Resource and City of Play.

DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL 11 a.m.- midnight, Sat., July 11. Various locations, North Side. Free. Visit www.deutschtownmusicfestival.org for information and a full schedule.

“None of us are professionals at this. I’d never booked a band before in my life,” Walters says of the logistical challenges that come up with such a large event. “It can be taxing at times. At every step there’s one more thing. But there are 10 things that we did last year [that] we [now] know how to do. So the new [things are] much easier to deal with.” The festival is free, though Walter notes that in coming years, organizers might start charging for some evening events, largely for crowd-control reasons. (This year he expects about 15,000 attendees.) Thus far, bands have played on a volunteer basis. Financial resources, provided by various sponsors and fundraising efforts, primarily go toward things like sound systems for venues that don’t normally host live bands. But Walter also hopes to provide musicians with some monetary compensation this time around. “We aren’t out to make a profit or make money off the backs of musicians,” he says. “We’re doing this for the love of local musicians and the North Side.” As for how its neighbors feel about the festival, Walters says the reception has CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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NORTH SIDE SOUNDS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

been overwhelmingly positive. “It really is a well-behaved event,” he says, recalling how, last year, he got up early the day after the festival to clean up. “I got down to the street and [it] was cleaner than it normally was,” he recalls with a laugh. “We put a call out and said, you know, ‘This isn’t a Kenny Chesney concert, people live in this neighborhood, please be respectful, and treat it as if you were a neighbor.’ And everyone amazingly did that.” To cut down on parking issues, attendees are encouraged to park at the stadiums, take the T from Downtown, or utilize the shuttle buses that will be looping around the North Side throughout the day.

July 10

Blue Oyster Cult

with Special Guest

Gene The Werewolf July 12

Matt Kearney with Special Guest

Judah & The Lion

3WS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RANDY STROTHMAN}

Slim Forsythe

Musician and Deutschtown resident Joe Dep — a member of the bluegrass outfit Shelf Life String Band, which will perform at noon at the outdoor Park Stage, in Allegheny Commons East — hopes that the festival will serve as a gateway to a more vibrant North Side music scene. “Right now we only have a few venues that offer music on a given night. It would be nice [if], instead of just one day in the North Side, [people would] come over more often,” says Dep, who, along with his band, hosts a weekly bluegrass jam at the Park House. “You could just imagine the fun a person could have: They could go to this place to hear jazz, or this place to hear bluegrass, or this place to see rock ’n’ roll. I think the goal is to make it something like that, where people want to keep coming back to the North Side for the music.” From the beginning, Walter’s goal has been to promote the neighborhood, the bands and the venues, all at once. And so far, he’s been happy with the results. “There was a moment the first year where I just stood there and looked at the crowd and it was just absolutely amazing,” he says. “I like to say, ‘It’s impossible to see every band you want to, but you’re guaranteed to see someone you’ve never seen before.’” MWE L SH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

WHAT COMES AFTER {BY IAN THOMAS} Aly Spaltro released Ripely Pine, her debut full-length, under the moniker Lady Lamb the Beekeeper. On After, her sophomore effort, she is Lady Lamb. Diving into After, which is best taken as a whole, it is apparent from the first track that the tightening of her name is just one of many demonstrations of the focus she’s gained between releases. Written and arranged on breaks in her last tour, After delivers more succinctly on everything Ripely Pine promised. It plays like a mulligan, a second attempt to capture everything the debut sought. On the strength of Spaltro’s confidence, it succeeds. Teamed once again with co-producer Nadim Issa, Spaltro’s distinctive arrangements come in waves that feel less beholden to the tenets of song structure than to her own peculiar instincts. After finds Spaltro in better control of those instincts. As strong as it was, Ripely Pine, in its weakest moments, played like a polished demo. This time around, Spaltro’s juxtaposition of brassy outbursts and sunny washes of organ against her own capable guitar work — equally likely to manifest itself as a jagged, toothy crunch or a salt-encrusted surf melody smuggled whole off the boardwalk — sounds more carefully considered. While her songwriting, obtuse yet evocative, still feels deeply autobiographical, Spaltro has found an effective counterweight in After’s exploration of themes of universality, imbuing the album with empathy and balance. It allows her to stake a claim rather than ponder her position. Finding metaphor in the biological is still Spaltro’s hallmark, but by dissecting the commonality of experience, in addition to her own past, her songwriting has achieved a deeper level of humanity. As always, Spaltro proves herself a deft surgeon, peeling just enough flesh away to reveal the vividness of the viscera common to our shared bodily condition, but not so much that she interrupts the display of every heart pumping its blood a little differently. She states her unique position best on “Spat Out Spit,” the album’s highlight: “We are filled with the gore / From long before / And I’m through starting wars / To make you see me as a warrior.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LADY LAMB with WAYNE BECK, ORANGE MAMMOTH 8 p.m. Wed., July 15. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com.


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF TAN CAMERA/KIMI SELFRIDGE}

Mr Twin Sister

STEADY CHANGE {BY SHAWN COOKE} MR TWIN SISTER is a band perpetually in

transition. Two years ago, the Long Island musicians just went by Twin Sister; now, they don’t. Two years ago, the band was signed to one of the biggest indie labels in Domino; now, it releases music via its own Twin Group label, with assistance from indie label Infinite Best. After the lukewarm reception and sales of the band’s 2011 debut, In Heaven, Mr Twin Sister has since written off that record and moved toward a polished, serpentine repurposing of the ’80s calling cards on last year’s self-titled LP. But throughout all the recent shifts, the band has maintained the same lineup since day one. Most writing about Mr Twin Sister refers to it as a “democracy” with no central creative genius, so a song can originate from anyone in the band. Three members take the lyrical duties — Andrea Estella (vocalist), Eric Cardona (guitarist/ vocalist) and Dev Gupta (keyboardist) — but bassist Gabe D’Amico and drummer Bryan Ujueta can just as easily lay down a track’s groundwork. “Our process can get a little bit messy, but, at our best, we work like a team of designers,” D’Amico says in an email. “We take turns at the helm directing tracks; whoever’s got the strongest opinion takes a guiding role, the rest of us stepping back and playing supporting parts.” No two Mr Twin Sister tracks are conceived by the same formula, and given the band’s propensity for finding new approaches, that’s one thing that might not change. It’s no accident that Mr Twin Sister depicts protagonists grappling with identity — from the name change down

to the lyrics, it’s a record that packs a lot of questions and internal tugs-of-war. On the stunner “Blush,” Estella asks “Is there even a real me / Or am I just a series of nights?” On “Out of the Dark,” she proclaims, “I am a woman, but inside I’m a man / And I want to be as gay as I can.” These doubts and uncertainties mirror the norm of consistent change for Mr Twin Sister. ”We joke about how every one of our releases feels like a transitional record to us, and that we’re always saying, ‘This next one is going to be where we arrive at our destination,’” D’Amico explains. “But, of course, the subtext to that kind of conversation is that we will always be in transition, and that fact is part of our identity.”

412-259-8628 435 Broad Street SEWICKLEY, PA 15143 SEWICKLEY,

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OHIOPYLE

MR TWIN SISTER

Go extreme rafting on the Upper Yough or an exciting ride on the Lower Yough

8 p.m. Sun., July 12. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12-15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

Learn to kayak or stand up paddleboard

WITH MOON KING

Perhaps this might be why D’Amico is coy about what the next record, which he suggests could be ready in a few months, will sound like. Mr Twin Sister masterfully turned sounds and instrumentation we associate with ’80s kitsch into something that felt right in 2014. D’Amico says that the band was conscious of the line between “iconic and ironic,” but cites gear like the ’80s’ bestselling keyboard — the Yamaha DX7 — as a valuable sonic tool for any time period. Mr Twin Sister will continue to perfect this sweet spot, but don’t expect the band to get boxed in. “We’re voracious consumers of sonic information and our palate is ever-expanding,” D’Amico says. “But we are very discerning about what is worth adding to that palate.”

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I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS

THIS WEEK 7/10:

Liturgy

LIVEWIRE + RATM2 {PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN SHEA ADAMS}

AC/DC AND RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE TRIBUTES

7/17 Get the Led Out + River Trail Acoustic

[POST-GRUNGE] + THU., JULY 09 (THREE DAYS GRACE) AND SAT., JULY 11 (HINDER)

MELLON SQUARE CONCERT SERIES IS BACK!

MELLON SQUARE For more info visit:

www.bobfm969.com www.qburgh.com

SUMMER CONCERT

MELLON SQUARE PARK (DOWNTOWN)

S E R I E S

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS! EVERY THURSDAY - Now thru Aug. 27th • Noon-1pm

This Thursday, JULY 9: LIONS IN AMERICA Next Thursday, JULY 16: THE NIED’S HOTEL BAND 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

Shore Drive, North Side. $35. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com). Hinder: 8:30 p.m. (1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $21-23. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com)

Some of us at City Paper were sadder than most (at least most in the music press) about the [METAL] + TUE., JULY 14 cancellation of Nickelback’s North American Sure, machine can defeat man on Jeopardy tour — seriously. It’s a hard thesis to articulate (or for a tollbooth gig), but no robot will ever in 200 words, but I can boil it down to five: replace Liturgy’s Greg Fox again. The band Nickelback is not the worst. Not even close. tried to use a drum machine instead of its Chad Kroeger and his band rode the postsuperhuman drummer at shows after 2011’s grunge tsunami to monumental success, and Aesthethica came out, but nothing was the they’ve been largely resented for it ever since. same. To promote a reissue of the band’s debut, Nickelback has been bashed for not deviating Renihilation, frontman Hunter Hunt-Hendrix much from a lucrative template, but how can was able to round up Fox and the full band for you blame them? Kroeger has mastered the a quartet tour — which stopped in Pittsburgh derivative, corny, gravelly pop-rock song that last October. Tonight, Liturgy tears through Taylor Swift could turn into diamonds. There’s its latest crushing album, The Ark Work, at something oddly empowering about liking Brillobox Yvette. SC 9:30 p.m. x with support from Y Nickelback in 2015; it’s t’s a clear-eyed middle Lawrenceville. $12-14. 4104 Penn Ave., Lawre finger to the consensus sus with total 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net ww disregard for what constitutes good taste — or for what your [RAP] + TUE., JU JULY 14 friends might think. So this This year, we’ve all been bowing week, relish the opportunity portunity to down to Kendrick Kendri Lamar for see Nickelback-lite: Three Days his complex take tak on socially Grace (Stage AE) — a conscious rap (and (a rightly so), band with lyrics on a but Talib Kweli has been doing kindergartener’s reading ding this stuff for ages. ag Although he level, according to a recent doesn’t quite have an openingh study — and Hinder ((Altar Bar Bar), r), the-BET Awards-level platform, Awards which features a singer ger who Kweli has doubled doub down on wishes his lover could d trade places the activism to become one with his cousin the next room over, of our more mo important so it would be acceptable ptable to … outspoken rappers. His outspo you know. Both shows ws could The Midsummer be fun to hear “thatt one Night’s Dream song,” but you Tour stops by might just feel Altar Bar tonight a suffocating with Space emptiness, after Invadas, Palermo realizing that Stone, Chris Nickelback has Allen and DJ at least 10 of Selecta. SC “that one song.” 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Get well soon, Ave., Strip District. Chad. Shawn Talib Kweli $23-25. 412-206Cooke Three {PHOTO COURTESY OF DOROTHY HONG} 9719 or www. Days Grace: thealtarbar.com 6 p.m. (400 North


“a new kind of radio”


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} Month. South Side. 705-957-2319. Clock Reads. Late. South Side. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. 866-468-3401. COOPER’S LAKE CAMPGROUND. Blue Oyster Cult. South Park. STAGE AE. Jane’s Addiction, The Band Jam. Featuring Mind’s CLUB CAFE. Sol Cat w/ Essential Failure, Radkey. North Side. I, Lions In America, TeraChain Sky, Machine, The Van Allen Belt. 412-229-5483. The Nied’s Hotel Band, & many South Side. 412-431-4950. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE more. Slippery Rock. 724-283-1500. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. RESTAURANT. Sputzy. Bridgeville. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB Warped Tour. Featuring 412-221-5202. & SPEAKEASY. Psylo Joe, Ian Knuckle Puck, The Wonder Years, THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mia Gordon’s Electric 4 w/ Poogie Silverstein, We Came As Romans, Z Band w/ Folkhammer. Bell. Deutschtown Music The Kenneths, Emarosa, Have Lawrenceville. Festival Kickoff Party. Mercy, Neck Deep, Hundredth, 412-682-0177. Ballroom. North Side. & many more. Burgettstown. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The 412-904-3335. 724-947-7400. Dave Iglar Band. New LINDEN GROVE. . w ww per JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Brighton. 724-494-1578. No Bad Juju. Castle a p ty ci h pg The Bo’Hog Brothers. Warrendale. Shannon. 412-882-8687. .com 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. BAYARDSTOWN The Show, Spadefish, Apex SOCIAL CLUB. La Misa Gibbon, The Plot Twist, Lusting. 31ST STREET PUB. Helsott, Negra, Juan Diego, Pandemic. Millvale. 866-468-3401. Strip District. 412-251-6058. Dreadeth, Tartarus. Strip District. OAKS THEATER. Katie Hate. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Heather 412-391-8334. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. Kropf. Regent Square. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Totally THE R BAR. Nick Sea & The Blue 412-247-1870. 80s. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. Tops. Dormont. 412-942-0882. CLUB CAFE. The Ike Reilly BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Jack Millz. Assassination w/ Johnny Stanec. On The Water & Cousin Boneless. North Side. 267-932-8760. Early. Tommy Magik & the Strip District. 412-251-6058. SMILING MOOSE. Bloody Wonderfulls, Stone Cold Killer. Diamonds, Daily Grind, The Next CLUB CAFE. Vibe & Direct, The CD release. Late. South Side. 866-468-3401. COOPER’S LAKE CAMPGROUND. The Band Jam. Featuring Mind’s I, Lions In America, TeraChain Sky, The Nied’s Hotel Band, & many more. Slippery Rock. 724-283-1500. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LUANNE’S ROUTE 68. Code Whiskey. Industry. 724-643-6508. MOUSETRAP. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver. 724-796-5955. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Show, Kleptosonic, Court IV, We Were Telepathic. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. The Vince Agwada Band. Last show. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERS CASINO. Shelley Duff Duo. North Side. 267-932-8760. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Johnny Vann. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Torn n Frayed. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. ZAMBONI SPORTS BAR & GRILL. Driven. New Kensington. Each week, we bring you a new track from 724-212-7468.

ROCK/POP THU 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 11

FRI 10

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH SNIDER}

BUNNY FIVE COAT

a local artist. This week’s song comes from

SUN 12

Bunny Five Coat; stream or download

CLUB CAFE. Mr Twin Sister, Moon King. South Side. 866-468-3401. HARTWOOD ACRES. Mat Kearney. Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

“Old Town,” from the EP Anymore, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

New MENU New COCKTAILS New MUSIC S IC US LI VE M U AY TH UR SD S

THURSDAY JULY 16/10PM MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPERS THURSDAY AUGUST 20/10PM IMPOSSIBLE COLORS, THE LENTILS

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

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Start your weekend off with LIVE MUSIC ON THE ROOF TOP at

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Finish Last, The Otis Wolves, Danvers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 360. Nils Lofgren. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. My Cardboard Spaceship Adventures, Instead of Sleeping, Amplifiers, Come Summer. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE ROO BAR & GRILL. Instant Gators. McKeesport. 412-259-3766. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Brummy Brothers, Machete Kisumontao, Shelf Life String Band. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. STAGE AE. Christina Perri, Colbie Caillat w/ Rachel Platten. North Side. 800-745-3000.

MON 13 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 14 BRILLOBOX. Liturgy w/ Yvette. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Electric Citizen, Mondo Drag, Slow Season, Carousel. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Joe Fletcher, Stephen Lee, Dick Whiskey & the Bottle Openers, Ricky Steece. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Every Friday LATE HAPPY HOUR PARTY! Enjoy $3 Coors Light 34oz Drafts!

$3 Jose Cuervo Silver Margaritas. 1401 EAST CARSON STREET SOUTH SIDE | 412-481-3203 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

WED 15 SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 10 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Shad Ali, Fam Ross Rad, 54th Regiment, ABoiz, C.Brown, Jonny Evans, Tone Fach, Crown Boyz. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

BLUES FRI 10 NEW CASTLE DOWNTOWN AMPHITHEATRE. Sweaty Betty, Mandolin Whiskey, Crossroads Blues, C B Trio, Miss Freddye’s Blues. Benefits Wounded Warriors. Performance is outside, bring a chair. New Castle. www.visitlawrencecounty.com. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Benny Benack. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SAT 11

IRON CREEK BAR & GRILLE. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. 412-564-5292. NIED’S HOTEL. Shot O’ Soul w/ Benny Benack. Lawrenceville. . w w w 412-781-9853. CATTIVO. aper p ty ci h g p NOLA ON THE Waxahatchee w/ .com SQUARE. Strange Brew. Pinkwash. Lawrenceville. Downtown. 412-471-9100. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Lady Lamb, Wayne Beck, Orange Mammoth. South NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Side. 866-468-3401. Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Pathogenesis, Gothmog, Tartarus, Incinerate Creation. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059.

WED 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 15

JAZZ

DJS THU 09

ALL SUMMER LONG 7-9PM

S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Fizzle & Pop. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RIVERS CASINO. Bobby V. North Side. 267-932-8760.

FRI 10 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 11 BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Touching Without Feeling. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 267-932-8760. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

THU 09

ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo & Charlie Sanders. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS WINE BAR. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Pablo Villegas. East Liberty. 412-624-4129.

FRI 10 ANDYS WINE BAR. Bronwyn Wyatt Higgins. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MOON PARK. RML Jazz. Moon. 412-370-9621. RIVERS CASINO. Elevations. Presented by MCG Jazz. North Side. 267-932-8760.

SAT 11 ALLEGHENY COMMONS. Neon Swing X-Perience. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. 724-331-7335.


EARLY WARNINGS {PHOTO COURTESY OF PATRICK CRAWFORD/BLACKLETTER}

Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

Lydia Loveless

WED 15 ANDREW BAYNE MEMORIAL LIBRARY. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Bellevue. 412-766-7447.

COUNTRY MON 13 PALACE THEATRE. Dwight Yoakam. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

CLASSICAL THU 09 SMOKEY ROBINSON & PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

[MON., JULY 27]

SAT 11

Lydia Loveless

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. BBQ & music, including Bernstein, Beethoven, Schubert & more. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall [SUN., AUG. 30]

SUN 12

Taj Mahal [SUN., OCT. 04]

AEOLIAN WINDS. Part of the Bach, Beethoven & Brunch series. Mellon Park, Shadyside. 412-255-2493. SARAH WANNAMAKER. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

Built to Spill

TUE 14

The Palace Theatre, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs, Jeff Grubbs, Mark Lucas & Cliff Barnes. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Sheena & Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Kenia. Observatory Hill. North Side. 412-255-2493. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

SUN 12 ANDYS WINE BAR. Blink. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

MON 13 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 14 KATZ PLAZA. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange plays Reggie Watkins. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 15 ANDYS WINE BAR. Heather Kropf. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC

SEVICHE. Jason Kendall Duo. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

WED 15

FRI 10 BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Unknown String Band. Strip District. 412-362-0201. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Malcolm Holcombe. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CARSON CITY SALOON. Gina Rendina. South Side. 412-481-3203. CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. CLUB CAFE. Callan - Reunion, Mark Dignam. Early. South Side. 866-468-3401. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Brooke Annibale. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 11 31ST STREET PUB. Robert Fireball Mitchell, Bill Jasper Acoustics, Fry Jones, Jana Bates. Strip District. 412-391-8334. SCOOPS & MORE. Bill Couch, Moose Tracks. Oakdale. 412-249-8979.

WED 15 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

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PITTSBURGH WINERY. Christian Lopez Band. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

FRI 10 CITY THEATRE. Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. South Side. 512-785-6255.

SAT 11 CITY THEATRE. Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. South Side. 512-785-6255. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Deutschtown Music Festival Kickoff Party. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

WED 15

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo

TA S T E

THU 09

EAST END COOPERATIVE MINISTRY COMMUNITY HOUSE. Eddie Watkins Jr. East Liberty. 412-571-2328.

FRI 10

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OTHER MUSIC

SUN 12

REGGAE

THU 09

NORBERT LEWANDOWSKI. Performance by Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble’s cellist, presenting his program “Got Tone?”. Repertoire will include David’ Lang’s “A World To Come”, works by Phillip Glass & Andy Akiho. City Theatre, South Side. 888-718-4253.

+

CITY THEATRE. Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. South Side. 512-785-6255.

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What to do July 8 - 14 WEDNESDAY 8

Mudhoney/ The Cynics/ The Nox Boys

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

Kiernan McMullan/ Caleb Lovely

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 9

2015 Whiskey Rebellion Festival DOWNTOWN WASHINGTON. Free event. For more info visit whiskeyrebellionfestival.com. Through July 12.

Thursday Night Icons: Smokey Robinson with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org/icons. 7:30p.m.

Powerman5000/ Soil

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Gallery Crawl

Smokey Robinson

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, Cultural District. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org/crawl. 5:30p.m.

JULY 9 HEINZ HALL

Christian Lopez Band

Gypsy

PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through July 19.

Jane's Addiction

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Three Days Grace

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Otherwise

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9:45p.m.

FRIDAY 10

Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh 2015

980 LIBERTY AVE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Over 21 event. Tickets: trustarts.org/cosmo. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY 11

Station Square Summer Jam: Livewire & RATM2

Steve Miller Band

HIGHMARK STADIUM Station Square. With special guest Matthew Curry and His Band. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or

MAIN STREET STAGE Station Square. Free event. All ages show. 6p.m.

Where to live

NOW LEASING

Hinder

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

SUNDAY 12

The Girls Night Out, Boys Can Come Too Tour with Christina Perri, Colbie Caillat & more. STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Mr Twin Sister/ Moon King

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 14

Talib Kweli "The Midsummer Night's Dream" Tour

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m. NOW LEASING

BEST

CITY

APARTMENTS

& TOWNHOMES NOW LEASING

Find your happy place

call 412-325-7241. 7p.m.

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38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


DAVE BOYLE’S CRIME THRILLER MAN FROM RENO OWES MUCH TO RAYMOND CHANDLER

SAD SONG {BY AL HOFF}

SILK SCREEN Amy Winehouse

CP APPROVED

You think you know Amy Winehouse — that she was famous, talented, a mess. That’s all true, but what Asif Kapadia’s heartbreaking documentary profile Amy lays bare are the complicated ways that those aspects intertwined to undo the British singer, who died of alcohol poisoning in 2011, at age 27. The film’s first half recounts Amy’s rise, the future star still a nervous but effervescent teenager, charting a course to becoming a contemporary jazz singer and songwriter. In 2003, she records an LP, Frank, and soon after that, things begin to fall apart. She begins a tumultuous, drug-fueled relationship with scenester Blake Fielding-Civil, and becomes a tabloid fixture for her antics. A drug intervention fails (“I said, no no no”). In 2006, the soul-infused Back to Black sells a bazillion copies, and the deeply troubled Winehouse is catapulted to stardom. From there, except for a handful of bright spots, it’s a shocking downward spiral, with seemingly every painful personal and professional moment captured on camera. For Amy, Kapadia employs the same style he did in his excellent 2010 documentary Senna, about the Formula One driver. Eschewing talking heads and narration, the story is told through available footage (from TV broadcasts to personal cell-phone video), over which identified but unseen participants in Winehouse’s life recount what happened and what went wrong. There’s blame to go around: the music industry’s greed, messy family dynamics and Winehouse’s self-destructive tendencies. And we’re not off the hook: Winehouse found fame at a time when a disastrous concert wasn’t an event seen by a few, but a must-see moment, uploaded to TMZ or YouTube to be enjoyed by millions as a perverse form of entertainment. We’re there somewhere in the ever-present paparazzi scrums, with their strobe-like flashes; Kapadia slows down that footage, so Winehouse looks nothing less than a terrified trapped animal. The film opens with a 14-year-old Winehouse goofing off with friends at a birthday gathering, before delivering a fantastic off-the-cuff rendition of “Happy Birthday.” It’s a moment of exhilarating talent and promise that will dog you throughout this sad film, and likely linger afterward. Starts Fri., July 10. AMC Waterfront and Manor

From top, clockwise: Brahmin Bulls, Man From Reno and Futureless Things

{BY AL HOFF}

P

ITTSBURGH’S Silk Screen Asian

American Film Festival, newly moved to summer, returns for its 10th year, beginning Fri., July 10, and running for 10 days. The festival will present more than two dozen films, recent features from Asia, the Middle East and the U.S., at Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ theaters. Tickets for most screenings are $10. For the complete schedule, see www. silkscreenfestival.org. Below are reviews for some of the festival’s offerings. Four films are booked for the opening night, Fri., July 10. Theeb (7 p.m. Regent Square, $20) recounts the adventures of a Bedouin lad who, in 1916, along with his older brother, decides to help a British soldier they encounter in the Arabian desert. That is followed at 9:15 p.m. by Dearest, a Chinese drama based on a true story about a couple who search for their only child after he is abducted. At North Oakland’s Melwood, in the main screening room, it’s Fandry, the story of a lower-caste boy in India who strives to achieve beyond his pre-

determined social status (8 p.m.). At 8:30 p.m., A Picture of You, about a pair of Chinese siblings who uncover secrets about their mother, screens in Melwood’s auxiliary classroom screening space. TANGERINES. The action takes place in 1990, in the war-torn Abkhazia region of Georgia, where all the natives have fled, except for two older men, bringing in the tangerine harvest. Their work is interrupted

SILK SCREEN ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL Fri., July 10-Sun., July 19 Regent Square, Harris and Melwood

by the arrival of two injured soldiers — each from opposite sides of the conflict. The neutral farmers must negotiate their own safety, and convince the two soldiers that they’d all be better served working together. A quietly powerful film with

an oft-repeated, rarely heeded message about the futility of border wars and the strength of shared humanity. Zaza Urushadze’s drama was nominated for Best Foreign Film at the 2015 Oscars. In Estonian, Russian and Georgian, with subtitles. 4:30 p.m. Sat., July 11, and 8:45 p.m. Thu., July 16. Regent Square RED AMNESIA. An older Chinese widow values her independence, puttering about the city, but grows increasingly unnerved by mysterious threatening phone calls and small acts of vandalism near her apartment. Her grown sons assume senility, but her investigations take her into the country, and into the past, where the surprising answer lies. Xiaoshuai Wang’s thriller mines China’s tumultuous 20th-century history, finding, as always, ripple effects from long-ago actions, particularly those that once seemed wise and advantageous, but are now accepted as poor decisions. In Mandarin, with subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Sat., July 11, and 9 p.m. Fri., July 17. Regent Square CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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SILK SCREEN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

Jaws

(1975) 7/8 @ 7:30pm, 7/9 @ 7:30pm It’s the 40th anniversary of this timeless Spielberg classic.

___________________________________________________

A Poem Is A Naked Person (1974) 7/10 @ 7:30pm, 7/11 @ 4pm, 7/12 @ 7pm, 7/13 @ 7:30pm Critically acclaimed doc. about musician Leon Russell gets its first release, directed by Les Blank.

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Stung

(2015) 7/10 @ 9:30pm, 7/11 @ 7pm, 7/14 @ 7:30pm Killer wasps mutate into seven foot tall predators.

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Shock Treatment

(1981) 7/11 @ 10pm - Musical black comedy follow-up to Rocky Horror, with live shadowcast by JCCP.

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Rocky Horror Picture Show 7/11 @ Midnight with live shadowcast by the JCCP!

BRAHMIN BULLS. In Mahesh Pailoor’s dramedy, an estranged father and son reconnect in Los Angeles. Somewhere between dad’s overbearing nature and the son’s immaturity are enough shared experiences for the two to bond, as well as jumpstart their respective stalled lives. Nothing surprising here, but this is a pleasant-enough, low-key film. 2 p.m. Sun., July 12, and 8:45 p.m. Wed., July 15. Melwood

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MAN FROM RENO. Dave Boyle’s crime thriller owes much to Raymond Chandler — namely, the novelist’s use of iconic California cities; a cast of mysterious, morally compromised characters; and a particularly convoluted and sprawling plot. A beautiful Japanese mystery writer runs away from her book tour to hole up in a San Francisco hotel, where she meets a handsome Japanese man who soon disappears, leaving behind a suitcase. Meanwhile, just outside of town, a sheriff is trying to sort out who another disappearing Japanese man is. Eventually, the writer and the sheriff pool their resources, but it only gets more complicated. In English, and Japanese, with subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Sat., July 11, and 2 p.m. Sun., July 19. Melwood

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

LIVE FROM UB. Pittsburgh native Lauren Knapp’s vibrant documentary explores the small but growing rock scene in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, highlighting the relationship between music and the country’s democratic revolution in the late 1980s and early ’90s. Knapp interviews producers, label-owners, a member of parliament and, of course, musicians, who strive to incorporate their cultural heritage into what was long regarded as a threatening art form. For Westerners, the idea of rock ’n’ roll as a revolutionary force is a bit faded: Live from UB is a reminder of how exciting music can be. In English, and Mongolian, with subtitles. 5 p.m. Sun., July 12, and 7 p.m. Sat., July 18. Melwood classroom (Margaret Welsh) FUTURELESS THINGS. Kyung-mook Kim’s dark comedy and sly cultural critique presents about a dozen loosely linked vignettes, all featuring workers in a convenience store somewhere near Seoul, South Korea. The mostly young cashiers, who include a North Korean, a struggling actor, a diligent student and a shiftless caretaker, deal with a variety of customers, both friendly and irritating, and their stressed-out boss. While tapping humor found in the real-life miseries of such low-wage grind jobs, the film also occasionally slips into goofy weirdness: One employee becomes trapped in a parcel, and there is a song-and-dance number, because why not. In Korean, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Tue., July 14, Melwood classroom and 8:45 p.m. Thu., July 16, Melwood AH O F F @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK THE GALLOWS. High school students ill-advisedly restage a play — the very same one in the very same place where someone was murdered 20 years earlier. Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing direct this horror thriller. Starts Fri., July 10 MINIONS. The jabbering break-out stars of Despicable Me get their own feature film, which traces their history of serving various villains. Kyle Balda and Pierre Coffin direct this animated comedy. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., July 10

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A POEM IS A NAKED PERSON. In the early 1970s, filmmaker Les Blank (Burden of Dreams) and musician Leon Russell collaborated on a film, ostensibly about Russell’s career and musical process. But the two fell out, and the film was never released until now.

A Poem Is a Naked Person It’s a loose affair, combining haphazardly identified people, places and events, shot between 1972 and 1974, mostly in Oklahoma. We see Russell in concert, attending a wedding, hanging out with fans. Russell was working on what would become Hank Wilson’s Back, and he’s deep into country gospel, old-timey music and the LP’s sort-of namesake, Hank Williams. Several scenes depict Russell recording or noodling with various musicians, many of them much older and better-coiffed opposites of Russell’s long-haired hippie crew. But there’s also folks philosophizing — about creativity, capitalism. A snake eats a chicken and a little girl sings Three Dog Night’s “Joy to the World.” There are on-the-dustystreet interviews with assorted Oklahomans, including a glass-eating man whom the film’s press kit claims is famed fugitive D.B Cooper. A building is imploded and a couple talks about how things have changed. Oh, and George Jones and a short-haired Willie Nelson each performs one of his songs. Russell fans should eat this up — scenes of the performer being dickish are well balanced by fantastic musical numbers. And so should fans of weird vintage Americana, as Blank (who died in 2013) delivers a free-form essay on America circa 1973, pairing the free-wheeling high life of a famous, iconoclastic performer with scenes from rural Oklahoma, each weird and normal in its own way. 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 10; 4 p.m. Sat., July 11; 7 p.m. Sun., July 12; and 7:30 p.m. Mon., July 13. Hollywood (Al Hoff) SELF/LESS. Tarsem Singh’s thriller starts off with a decent enough premise. A wealthy, selfabsorbed super-rich man named Damian (Ben


Kingsley) is dying of cancer. He hears of a specialized clinic where his mind can be transferred into the body of younger man, a donor of sorts, and then the world will still benefit from his acquired knowledge and wisdom. (That’s the pitch anyhow, because the Damian we meet is a ball-breaking real-estate mogul, and the world doesn’t need those guys reborn in perpetuity.) Old Damian signs up and emerges as a beefy younger Damian (Ryan Reynolds). Everything is super, until Damian starts getting weird “bleedthroughs” from the donor brain: scenes of Middle East combat, a family, a water tower shaped like a pumpkin. This leads him to investigate, which leads him — and this film — into a rather lifeless (life/less), by-the-numbers chase actioner. It’s a shame, because I’d hoped for a more provocative thriller, with some exploration of the essence of self, mind-and-body connections, bio-ethics, God-playing, the literal life advantages available only to the rich … None of this really comes up; instead, young Damian just instantly becomes a better, different person than old Damian, and the whole affair becomes a hack actioner interlaced with “family matters” sentimentality. Not sure how the director of such visually arresting films as The Fall and The Cell turned in something this dull, but maybe he got his brain swapped out. Starts Fri., July 10 (AH) STUNG. Harking back to the classic giant-bug films, Benni Diez’s tongue-in-cheek horror film profiles wasps. Giant 7-foot-tall wasps. Wasps that have the temerity to show up and ruin a garden party. They make fast — and gross — work of the guests, until only a hardy few are left to take on the super-sized stingers: the caterer, a wisecracking bartender and the booze-swilling mayor (played with droll perfection by Lance Henriksen). It’s not as funny, sharp or scary-fun as you’d want it to be, but if you need an old-fashioned, drive-in-caliber experience, this should fulfill the lower-bar expectations. 9:30 p.m. Fri., July 10; 7 p.m. Sat., July 11; 7:30 p.m. Tue., July 14; and 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 16. Hollywood (AH) TERMINATOR GENYSIS. I could make a long list of unfortunate consequences that occur when time travel disrupts the normal course of history. And if Terminator Genysis is any guide, one of those problematic outcomes is that time can hold an infinite number of Terminator sequels, and that we just might see them all. Alan Taylor’s sci-fi actioner sets up in the familiar Terminator timeline. But then, through the miracle of made-up science, the story is re-arranged so that when Kyle Reese (a wooden Jai Courtney) goes back to 1984 to save his mom, Sarah (Emilia Clarke, Game of Throne’s Kahleesi), she doesn’t need saving. And, now her best bud is a T-800 (Arnold Schwarzenegger)! Anyhow, some more time-folding, and these people and machines are running away from those other people and machines, and then, like a squaredance, everybody changes positions and people are now machines and the heroes are villains, and Google is the new Skynet, and — seriously, who cares? I wish I could say that the action at least makes up for the incoherent plot, but it’s car chases, running to beat a ticking clock and two naked Schwarzeneggers fist-fighting (kinda cool, I guess, if you’re into that). And as for special effects, this is the second time in a month I’ve seen the Golden Gate Bridge destroyed, and that liquid-metal Terminator morphing was way cooler last century. In 3-D in select theaters (AH)

ONGOING THE OVERNIGHT. New to Los Angeles and seeking friends for themselves and their little boy, Alex (Adam Scott) and Emily (Taylor Schilling) are thrilled to meet an interesting parent, Kurt (Jason Schwartzman), at the playground. Kurt invites Alex and Emily to dinner at his house, along with his wife, Charlotte (Judith Godrèche). The evening goes great: Food, wine, the kids go to sleep, the weed comes out … and then, things gradually turn odd. Writer-director

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has a horizontally split frame, the top half shot by Ivette Spradlin and the bottom by Athena Frances Harden. The sequences (most only a few seconds long), were shot on smartphones, twice a day, over four months in 2014 while Harden was farm-sitting in Oregon and Spradlin remained in Pittsburgh. Chronological but nonnarrative, it’s a fascinating study in perception and in temporal connection despite a geographic divide. Also at this month’s Film Kitchen, curated by Matthew Day, is “Diamonds in the Rough,” Dominique Carino’s surprisingly candid 15-minute peek at life inside Helfer’s Jewelry, a family-owned business located Downtown. And Mike Rubino and Andy Kelemen show “Of Duckpins and Destinies,” a light-hearted seven-minute hangout with some of the characters who bowl in Beaver County’s last duckpin league, based in Monaca. 8 p.m. Tue., July 14. Melwood. $5. 412-681-5440 (Bill O’Driscoll)

Jellyfish Eyes Patrick Brice’s film is a part wacky sexcapade, part contemporary comedy of manners. It’s a light sendup of self-conscious moderns, who are endlessly analyzing their parenting, their presentation, whether they come across as cool. In the end, all four individuals and both sets of couples get a run-through the wringer of self-assessment, drunken discovery and awkward confessions. (Only the two kids have a quiet night.) The material and themes are quite familiar — the angst of affluent, married thirtysomethings — but Overnight has some laughs (plus a couple of “shock” moments), and it’s largely sympathetic to its characters. Starts Fri., July 10. Parkway, McKees Rocks (AH)

be winners out of spite), July 8-9. Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (Will Ferrell stars in this 2006 comedy about NASCAR drivers), July 8-9. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (Frank Capra’s classic 1939 film in which an idealistic young man tries to fight political corruption), July 9. Road Trippin’ series. The Wizard of Oz (the 1939 classic about a little girl from Kansas and her journey through Oz), July 10-12 and July 14-16 (the midnight Fri., July 10 screening is “Dark Side of Oz,” in which Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon will be synced to the film). The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (drag queens travel across the Australian outback in this 1994 comedy), July 10-14 and July 16. Dumb & Dumber (two dimwits take a cross-country journey, in this 1994 Farrelly brothers comedy), July 1013 and July 15-16. Easy Rider (1969 hippie classic in Peter Fonda and Dennis Hooper take their choppers on the road), July 10-16. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9

JELLYFISH EYES. This new film from Japanese writer-director Takashi Murakami is an odd mix of earnest and loopy, high concept and low-budget ideas, and live action and animation. It’s set in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami and the subsequent crisis at the Fukushima power plant. Young Masashi and his mother move from the evacuation area to a new town, and Masashi struggles with a new school and missing his dad (lost in the disaster). That part makes sense, and it’s worthy of exploration. But, in another part of town, scientists, garbed in black capes, are working on a machine that needs the negative energy of children to fuel it. To facilitate this, they have secretly bequeathed all the town’s kids with F.R.I.E.N.D.S., special toy-like cute monsters. Masashi gets one — it sort of looks like a jellyfish and loves cheese — but is dismayed to discover the other kids use their F.R.I.E.N.D.S. in fighting matches. Somewhere in all these kooky set-ups, Masashi learns to move past his grief, make friends (real,

THE GREAT OUTDOORS. Dan Aykroyd and John Candy star in Howard Deutch’s 1988 comedy about a vacation ruined by rowdy relatives. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 8. AMC Waterfront. $5 TWO-MINUTE FILM FESTIVAL: THE SILVER SCREEN. The films have been completed — this year’s theme was “The Silver Screen” — and are ready to be screened in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s outdoor sculpture courtyard. Think of it as a high-end drive-in. 7:30 p.m. (food, drinks and activities); 9:15 p.m. film screening. Thu., July 9. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. www. cmoa.org. $15 (includes one drink)

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CINEMA IN THE PARK. Cesar Chavez, Wed., July 8 (Schenley) and Sat., July 11 (Riverview Park). Cantiflas, Thu., July 9 (Brookline); Fri., July 10 (Arsenal); and Sat., July 11 (Grandview). The Lego Movie, Sun., July 12 (Schenley); Tue., July 14 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., July 16 (Brookline). X-Men: Days of Future Passed, Wed., July 15 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free

THE 400 BLOWS. Adolescence is presented unsentimentally, but not without poignancy, in François Truffaut’s semi-autobiographical 1959 film. Antoine is a lively Parisian teen, no better or worse than any other, but through the carelessness of adults, he falls through the cracks. Truffaut’s careful direction and keen sense of empathy make this beautifully constructed film feel loose and natural, until we are jolted — not by events, but by one unforgettable shot. Continues a month-long, Sundaynight series of black-and-white widescreen films. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Sun., July 12. Regent Square (AH)

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. The American Experience series. All the President’s Men (1976 journo-docudrama recreates the investigation of the Watergate scandal by Washington Post reporters Woodward and Bernstein), July 8-9. Major League (1989 comedy about a hapless baseball team that decides to

FILM KITCHEN. The monthly series for independent artists features three very different documentaries. The most unusual is “You Are Gone, I Am Here,” a sort of dual video diary that recently won Best in Show at the Three Rivers Arts Festival’s Juried Visual Art Exhibition. The 22-minute work

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Terminator Genysis lower-case ones), teach those friends to stop abusing their F.R.I.E.N.D.S., and thwart the evil plans of the black-caped scientists, who at one point, unleash “classic” fighting F.R.I.E.N.D.S. — one who looks like a sexy manga girl and the other vaguely Godzillashaped. So, it’s a good message, I guess, wrapped up in some offbeat paper. In Japanese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 15. Hollywood (AH) SUMMER RENTAL. Carl Reiner directs this 1985 comedy about an overworked man (John Candy) whose relaxing vacation goes off the rails. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 15. AMC Loews. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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“IN OUR VIEW, IT IS A STATE-OF-THE-ART OFFICE COMPLEX.”

[BOOK REVIEWS]

LIT BRIEFS

{ BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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Scatter, Feed (Seven Kitchens Press). Several poems in Ellen McGrath Smith’s latest chapbook are titled after yoga poses. That’s fitting, because even as these 18 poems continually surprise, they seem to strive for a kind of balance. As Smith writes in “Warrior II”: “Forget you once had angles, let / your head engulf the rest of you ... Every angle is a curve if you can push it to its end and then / a little more.” Smith can be plainly poignant, as in “Because the Wind”: “[S]omewhere in Greece, a man is so lonely he photographs roses / and sends them / to what he imagines a woman must be.” In “The Rain [Mainly] Falls,” she waxes visionary: “In less than two hours, roiling in the swamps / of their own glands, the people in the room morphed into every / living creature, then, in human form again, rolled from the shells / of their own corpses into fetal balls, plugged into lotus leaves / like batteries, stood, considered mountains, and went home.” Often, these verses seek repose and rebirth after pain. A highlight is “Corona: The Apples in Winter,” a sophisticated longer poem that evokes sensuality, transience, loss and decay.

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Local Conditions (Coleridge Street Books). Its title and cover image — an old photo of a flooded downtown — might suggest that Kristofer Collins’ new chapbook traffics in a certain melancholy. Rather, these 25 poems are baldly honest, true to the sort of stream-of-consciousness exploration that in “My Wife Goes to War With the Deer” skips from the speaker’s wife complaining about deer eating her backyard to: a marauding groundhog; Whitman nursing Civil War soldiers; and PTSD. “When My Daughter Is Born,” in particular, is practically a cure for the sentimentality its title might evoke. Collins also offers straightforward scene-setters like “Heaven” (about a bar) and character sketches (“Ruth”). In “Poem for M. Callen,” the speaker is “hoping to score / A direct hit on some childhood traum and salvage the waste / Of it, dragging the soaking thing on to that most barren of shores — / The blank page.” And while Collins’ poems often traffic in gritty anecdotes from Pittsburgh’s streets and taverns, he also impresses with the haunting “The Old Stories”: “I tell you there is love / But often I am not certain. ... I have / Not taken a new name, but still I am different.”

{IMAGE COURTESY OF FAROS PROPERTIES}

Architect’s rendering of proposed change to Allegheny Center Mall: Even a modestly designed landscape for this outdoor plaza will improve upon its previous status as a blank concrete expanse.

WILL THE CENTER HOLD?

[ARCHITECTURE]

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

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HE HISTORIC CORE of the North Side, old Allegheny City, did not disappear gradually. By 1960s, the decades-old commercial area within Allegheny Commons was coming down rapidly, to be replaced by the sprawling, inward-focused Allegheny Center Mall and a handful of widely spaced, undistinguished office and residential towers. Within just a few years, a complete reconfiguration removed nearly all inner streets and converted the perimeter of the street grid into a (still square) high-speed loop. Though this area was re-imagined as a Modernist utopia, it, like arguably all of the North Side, never regained its previous vitality. Allegheny Center Mall itself faltered as a retail enterprise, but eventually subsisted as an office building, albeit one with a ghostly sense of underpopulation. Recently purchased by Faros Properties, of New York, it is now the focus of a substantial renovation and rebranding as Nova Center,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

a high-tech hub. New tenant leases show promise. The question remains whether planned changes will alter the architectural quality of the mall and improve the fate of the greater neighborhood.

THE QUESTION REMAINS WHETHER PLANNED CHANGES WILL IMPROVE THE FATE OF THE GREATER NEIGHBORHOOD. In 2006, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh’s Charm Bracelet Project commissioned several urban-design brainstorming initiatives to re-imagine places and events on the North Side. Doug Suisman, an internationally known, California-based planner hired for the project, suggested that the North Side would benefit substantially if planners would put the old street grid back in place, even if the return of Federal Street

necessitated slicing through the middle of Allegheny Center Mall. However, citing the mall’s sizable and costly underground parking garage, as well as its substantial communications infrastructure, Faros managing partner Jeremy Leventhal argues that such a dramatic and expensive cut “is not the best way to make improvements.” Leventhal understands the paradoxical nature of the building. “The original construction of the project [in the 1960s] did cause a lot of problems,” he admits in an interview. “It was not well thought out.” Nonetheless, he says, “in our view, it is a state-of-the-art office complex.” It’s also “one of the largest and most significant urban-renewal projects close to a downtown in the U.S.” Faros is making some convincing headway in community outreach and a broad spectrum of incremental alterations. “We are listening to people who have been in the community for a long time,” says


Leventhal. Chris Siefert, deputy director of the Children’s Museum, appreciates the comparatively novel approach. “They’ve been very open with us,” he says. An early result of the communicative approach is that, in October, Nova Center will collaborate with the Children’s Museum to host tech festival Maker Faire on the mall’s vast, soon-to-be redesigned plaza. And the roster of planned and possible changes is considerable. Leventhal rattles off a continuing list. “We’ve thought about wayfinding … placemaking … community [buy-in] … pedestrian traffic … bike lanes … green spaces … retail uses such as restaurants,” he says. Faros has hired three different local architecture firms — Strada, Desmone Associates and Perkins Eastman — to work on different elements of the complex. “Just in terms of capacity, there’s a lot to work on,” says Leventhal. The multiplicity of firms “allows them to be more efficient [and to express different] viewpoints.” And initial designs show a seemingly widened pedestrian path through the building along Federal Street’s former axis, even if the full street is not reconnected. Perhaps the real need for Allegheny Center is a redesign of traffic patterns and a return to two-way traffic in the ring around Allegheny Center, as East Liberty underwent with Penn Circle a few years ago. As Mayor Bill Peduto has said, “East Liberty took a decade before the streets started to become two-way again. … What we need to do is start with a community process.” Leventhal agrees, though he is hopeful that process will be faster. With the elevated expectations of a high-tech hub and the mayor’s echoing mantra, “Good enough is not good enough,” one could still easily argue that one of the city’s most difficult building complexes needs a radical redesign, with visionary plans from architects who are internationally recognized for innovation, the way architects Diller Scofidio and Renfro completely reconstituted portions of New York’s Lincoln Center in two projects over the past 12 years. Instead, we are getting a deliberate, incremental approach from a handful of local favorites. Not bad, but not as exciting as Allegheny Center’s rebranding campaign asserts. Chris Siefert is willing to give current plans a chance. “It’s hard to tell from the drawings,” he says, “but I think it’s going to be greatly improved.” Then again, if current plans do well, everybody wins. If they don’t prove to be much of an improvement, it will always be possible to make more drastic alterations in the future. That’s a bit of circumspection that old Allegheny City deserved but never received.

thursday, july 9 7:30

p.m. picnic food and cash bar

9:15

p.m. screenings begin

$15 ($10 carnegie museums of

pittsburgh members), includes one drink token buy tickets now at

www.cmoa.org/2015-2MFF Drawing inspiration from the silver paintings featured in CMOA’s exhibition Jacqueline Humphries, on view through October 5, the theme for this year’s 2-Minute Film Festival is "The Silver Screen." Humphries uses metallic pigments in many of her works, layering it with a chalky black to create complex surfaces she has compared to the aesthetics of film noir.

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join us under the stars in the cmoa sculpture court to see exactly how much can be accomplished in a mere 120 seconds!

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FRIDAY, JULY SHOW-STOPPING

10 PARTY

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[OPERA]

RAISED VOICES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} GIVEN THAT HE heads Opera Theater of

Pittsburgh, it’s no surprise that Jonathan Eaton loves classical opera. Listen to him gush about The Marriage of Figaro, which he calls (only half-jokingly) “the high point of Western Civilization” and (not jokingly at all) “Mozart at his very, very best.” But Eaton knows that, like other classical art forms, opera — its core repertoire forged in the 18th and 19th centuries — struggles to engage contemporary audiences. “We feel that opera is in danger of becoming a museum art form,” says Eaton. “We all love museums, [but] unless we keep reviving the medium, the medium will fossilize.” Opera Theater’s strategies include staging all its shows in English, a variation from traditional practice. Another is its “music that matters” series of commissioned full-length operas addressing contemporary issues, starting with one in its annual festival-format season, SummerFest. A New Kind of Fallout, with three performances July 18-26, is inspired by the work of Silent Spring author Rachel Carson and dramatizes the dawn of the modern environmental movement. “Music that matters” already has at least one convert: Tammy Ryan, the acclaimed Pittsburgh-based playwright (Lost Boy Found at Whole Foods) whom Eaton recruited two years ago to write the opera’s libretto.

OPERA THEATER SUMMERFEST July 10-Aug. 2. Twentieth Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. Most seats $25-75. 412-386-9687 or www.otsummerfest.org

7 PM VIP PARTY MAIN EVENT 9 PM UNDER 30

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Prior to that, Ryan had seen only one opera. The two-year process of researching and creating Fallout left Ryan with a new appreciation for opera. “For me, not only can opera contain the ‘big themes,’ but even more exciting to me it can elevate the ordinary … so we can see ordinary struggles, conflicts, relationships that we all deal with play out on a higher plane,” she writes in an email. Fallout isn’t a Carson bio: The Springdale, Pa.-born scientist and author’s estate is protective of her life story, says Ryan. So Ryan and noted New York-based composer Gilda Lyons structured A New Kind of Fallout (its title referencing Carson’s view of indiscriminate pesticide spraying) as a fictional story about a pregnant young woman who in 1962 is driven to action by reading Silent Spring. Complication: Her husband creates

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CATHERINE ACETO}

Benjamin Robinson and Rachel Eve Holmes star in SummerFest’s Damn Yankees.

ads for pesticide manufacturer Better Life Chemical Company, which brands Carson a “nutcase.” Lyons’ music, to be performed live by an 11-piece orchestra, blends period-style TV jingles (think Mad Men) with “glowing, wavelike atmospheric textures” and big, soaring vocal solos, says Opera Theater music director Robert Frankenberry. The cast, directed by Eaton, features soprano Lara Lynn Cottrill and lyric baritone Christopher Scott. In other SummerFest news, this season — again entirely housed at Oakland’s landmark Twentieth Century Club — has been expanded from three weeks to four. Other highlights include a production of Strauss’ rarely staged final opera, Capriccio (July 25-Aug. 2); it’s the world premiere, says Eaton, of a re-orchestration of the work for a 21-piece orchestra. SummerFest also offers a novel production of Adler and Ross’ classic Broadway musical Damn Yankees (July 11-Aug. 1), with most of the roles genderreversed. The kid-friendly production The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (tickets: $5-10) is performed all four Saturdays. And there are six installments of the International Recital Series, with singers highlighting the repertoires of six different countries. And let’s not forget The Marriage of Figaro itself. SummerFest offers a production of Mozart’s classic comic opera with an 18-piece orchestra backing visiting baritone Chad Armstrong and soprano Adriana Velinova. And, furthering its mission to engage new audiences, SummerFest also mounts Figaro Redux, a slightly shorter, moderndress adaptation, each of whose three acts is set in a different performance space in the building. Eaton directs both versions. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015


Opens Friday!

STARRING:

EVERYTHING’S COMING UP ROSES S!! Kim Zimmer

Robert Newman

FFrom rom om “Guiding Light”

July July Ju ly 10 - 19 19

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org Groups 412-325-1582

At the Benedum Center

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH REARDON}

From left to right: Betsy Marinucci, Lori Comber, Margi Swellie, Leighann Calamera and Krista Strosnider in Swingtime Canteen, at South Park Theatre

[PLAY REVIEW]

SWING-ALONG {BY TED HOOVER} DID YOU EVER hear of Charles Busch? A

New York playwright and performer, he made his name writing plays parodying/ saluting the “bitch goddess” divas of Hollywood and, in drag, always played the leading lady. Some of his titles include Psycho Beach Party, Die, Mommie, Die! and Vampire Lesbians of Sodom. So it was surprising to see that South Park Theatre, the quintessential summer theater, was staging a Busch show. Having directed out there myself and knowing the audience, I felt sure they’d end up as surprised as me. As it turns out, Busch tricked us both. Swingtime Canteen (co-written with Linda Thorsen Bond and William Repicci) is the least Busch-like of any Busch play I’ve seen.

SWINGTIME CANTEEN continues through July 18. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive and Brownsville Road, South Park. $15. 412-831-8552 or www.southparktheatre.com

We’re in the middle of World War II, in London, for a USO tour featuring five American dames, led by fading movie star Marian Ames. It’s a big night because their usual stage show is going to finish with the gals joining in on international radio broadcast to our boys overseas. The plot is hardly important as Swingtime Canteen is, in truth, a revue of music from the ’40s: “How High the Moon,” “I Don’t Want to Walk Without You,” “You’ll Never Know,” “Sing, Sing, Sing” and many more, including an Andrew Sisters medley

comprising 12 songs. In between the numbers there’s some sniping and one-upping, but it’s really about the music. The only telltale Busch element is the character of Ames (a role Busch himself stepped into during the show’s premiere Off-Broadway run, in 1995). It could be played straightforwardly and sincere, as South Park’s Margi Swellie has done. But it’s also a part ripe for camp … especially Busch’s trademark elegant yet lowbrow hamming. I salute South Park Theatre’s use of a live five-piece band led by musical director Melody Sharp. I’ve sat through too many shows where the “orchestra” is one person on a Casio keyboard. So hearing some brass, bass, reed and drums — from the rotating pit band of Kirk Howe, John Chaisonn, Brandon Kandrack, Marino Galluzzo, Dakota Kaylor and CJ Young — is an unexpected pleasure. Director Joe Warik resists the temptation of Busch’s camp possibilities and leads his company to play “sincere” whenever they get the chance. It’s a perfectly respectable choice and, if I think about it, I’m not sure the South Park audience is particularly interested in seeing a parody of World War II patriotism. I do wish, however, that Warik had driven the show with more urgency. Far too often, the low energy and slow pace makes it feel as if his enjoyable performers — Swellie, Krista Strosnider, Betsy Marinucci, Lori Comber and Leighann Calamera — are visiting the show rather than inhabiting it. But I happily mention Comber’s rollicking rendition of “His Rocking Horse Ran Away.” And when the five women join forces for a lovely medley of songs dedicated to their sweethearts, the effect couldn’t have been more enchanting. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Wood Street Galleries 07.10–09.06.15 Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl Friday, July 10, 5:30–10pm After the Crawl Live Performance of Tekton & Latitude Peirce Studio, 805 Liberty Avenue 9:30pm doors, 10pm start $10 at door. Cash bar inside. 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. A project of:


1. Wood Street Galleries

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Pattern and Noise | D-Fuse D-Fuse are a London-based artist collective with more than 15 years of history in installation, film, experimental documentary, photography, live cinema performance and architectural projects. In recent years much of their practice has focused on environmental issues. Pattern and Noise is D-Fuse’s first solo exhibition in the US. Artists Mike Faulkner, Matthias Kispert, Paul Mumford and Toby Harris use the two floors of the gallery to explore the different themes central to their work.

2. SPACE

805-807 Liberty Avenue Third Floor*

Wall Paintings | Curated by Robert Raczka 12 artists will each create a large painting directly on the walls of the gallery. This will be a live art event with the artists working in the gallery throughout the day of the Gallery Crawl, with the gallery open to the public during the day, culminating in the evening reception during which the artists will be completing their paintings. Music with DJ Dave Zak Party Time Window SPACE | Thinkerers by Randy Gilson (A Randyland project) The Thinkerers are a series of more that 200 original pieces of art created with colorful and unique faces, hand-painted on reclaimed slate tiles to bring back to life the energy of a material as old as the Earth itself.

3. 820 Liberty Avenue

Community Supported Art Preview Performances Come get a sneak peek of the New Hazlett Theater’s upcoming CSA performances.

4. Tito Way

Members of the Pittsburgh chapter of ASMP will be displaying photos from their commercial and personal work.

Grand Unveiling: Pittsburgh Murals and New Student Art

811 Liberty Avenue

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Live Improv comedy every half hour! Every half hour catch a brand new improv show at the Cultural District’s award-winning comedy theater!

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

Multimedia Nature | Students from Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild A showcase of poster-sized nature images, digitally photographed in and around Pittsburgh.

808 Penn Avenue

11. Exchange Way

20. Bend Yoga Stop in for some Downtown Dog! Free mini classes from 5:30–6 and 6–6:30. Pre-register at info@bendyoga.com

21. 709 Penn Gallery* 709 Penn Avenue

Ashley Jean Hickey: I’ve Been Out Walking A mixed media exhibition featuring abstract paintings and conceptual sculptures inspired by the woods.

IPhone Alley | Dennis Childers A photographic observation of Exchange Way.

12. Summer Night Market

22. 707 Penn Gallery

The Magenta Foundation invited Carnegie Mellon University and Pittsburgh Filmmakers photography faculty to assemble an exhibition representative of the work coming out of both institutions. This group show represents students who are passionate about the medium and work in a non-traditional manner. #CRAFT YOUR MIND | Daniel Baxter A whimsical approach to the topic of mental health.

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Trophy Cam | Matthew Forrest Site-specific installation with a live web feed.

28. Triangle Park

Outside of the Fairmont

Self Portraiture | POP ART Presented by the Students of Pittsburgh CAPA The burgeoning talent of the latest art stars from Pittsburgh CAPA present their unique one-off pop art self-portraits.

crawl after dark

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As Best I Can Remember | Travis Mitzel As Best I Can Remember is a recreation of memories from moments witnessed in passing.

Lindsey Smith & Soul Distribution, DJ SMI

24. Backstage Bar 655 Penn Avenue

Light, Color, Abstraction by Nadya Lapets An exploration of natural and imaginary worlds. Live Country music by Slim Forsythe 5:30-7:30pm

25. Boutique 208* 208 Sixth Street

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August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Avenue

Visit TrustArts.org/cosmo for details. Event Sponsors: BPU Investment Management Inc., UPMC, UPMC Health Plan

D-Fuse performance 10–11:30pm

$10 cover. Doors open at 9:30, doors close at 10pm. Roar 9:30pm Harris Theater, 807 Liberty Avenue

7th St. and Penn Avenue

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7pm VIP, 9pm General Admission Tickets $25-$125

Peirce Studio, 805 Liberty Avenue

707 Penn Avenue

23. Katz Plaza

937 Gallery, 2nd floor

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27. 600 Liberty Avenue

Chimera | Women and the Grotesque

212 Ninth Street

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Deconstructed plates throughout the entire evening. Executive Chef Jason Shaffer will also be doing a cooking demonstration at 7 and 8pm of how to make the “perfect” gnocchi.

19. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

10. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

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“Inti.Mate” Solo Exhibition | Sidney Mullis Sidney Mullis creates performance-based video projections of invented animals.

Stop by Boutique 208 to enjoy live music and art.

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819 Penn Avenue

9. Arcade Comedy Theater

14. 943 Liberty Avenue

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17. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

18. Future Tenant

13. 937 Liberty Avenue

A retrospective exhibit featuring wall-sculptures and paintings form the past two decades.

928 Penn Avenue

5:30–9pm (Free) The Harris Theater will be screening the “Best of the 2015 Film Kitchen Contest.”

5. Social Status

805 Liberty Avenue

Office of Public Art will give FREE guided tours of the artwork on the roof of the Convention Center from 5–5:45 pm.

914 Penn Avenue

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership presents the Summer 2015 Night Market featuring Pittsburgh’s most creative independent vendors!

6. Shaw Galleries*

pittsburghartscouncil.org/public-art/public-art-events/event/289

8. Harris Theater

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107 Sixth Street

The Office of Public Art will host a lecture with artist Tony Tasset at 6pm. Limited seating so REGISTER ONLINE

Wearing a Different Hat: Attorneys in Sports, Business, Politics and the Arts Come vote in the for your favorite attorney who has distinguished themselves in another field or discipline.

Fourth Floor ASMP (American Society of Media Photographers)

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26. Braddock’s American Brasserie

Fourth Floor Foyer

925 Liberty Avenue

“Deeper than Rap” by Grits Capone Deeper than Rap is an exhibit by Grits Capone that blends influences from ancient African societies and pop culture juxtaposed against some of Hip Hop’s most prolific figures through digital collage.

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16. Neighborhood Legal Services

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab 717 Liberty Avenue

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7B:1 | Anthony Musmanno Portrait studies of people in impoverished areas of the world. Calligraphy Guild of Pittsburgh

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15. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Room 406

809 Liberty Avenue

812 Liberty Avenue

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7. Trust Arts Education Center

601 Wood Street

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Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

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In this adventure film-gone-awry, actress Tippi Hedren decided to make a movie with 150 lions, tigers, and other untamed animals. Noel Marshall | USA | 1981 | 102 min Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Throwdown $5 admission, show starts at 10pm Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

Improvisers, public speakers, and comedians give PowerPoint presentations for slides they’ve never seen before. Karaoke with Rock ‘n Ray the DJ and YOU 10–2am August Henry’s City Saloon, 946 Penn Avenue

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.0907.16.15

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOAN BEARD}

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

JULY 11 Anastasia Higginbotham

+ THU., JULY 09 {TALK} If you’ve yet to visit the fabulous reclaimed strip-mine that is the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, try tonight. Gardening experts Doug Oster and Jessica Walliser — who co-host KDKA radio’s “The Organic Gardeners” every Sunday morning — give a talk titled “How to Grow a LowMaintenance Perennial Garden Organically.” A reception precedes the lecture; a book-signing follows. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. (6 p.m. reception). 799 Pinkerton Run Road, Oakdale. $25. Registration suggested at 412-444-4464, x227

Center in Pittsburgh CLO’s production of Gypsy, the timeless musical by Stephen Sondheim and Jule Styne. Gypsy tells the story of Mama Rose and her fanatical desire to push daughters Louise and June into the fading spotlights of vaudeville, and includes such classics as “Everything’s Coming Up Roses,” “Together, Wherever We Go” and “You Gotta Get a Gimmick.” JP 8 p.m. Continues through July 19. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-68. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo. culturaldistrict.org

{MUSIC} 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $20-38. 888-718-4253 or www.kinetictheatre.org

+ FRI., JULY 10 {STAGE} There are stage mothers, there are monstrous stage mothers, and then there’s Mama Rose. Tonight, Kim Zimmer steps into the iconic role at the Benedum

Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble begins its 40th season as a champion of contemporary avant-garde music. This first weekend’s program features a world premiere: Toronto-based composer Kieren MacMillan’s The Gray Cat and the Flounder (16 Bits About Bernadette). The commissioned eveninglength work, performed by a sextet, employs instrumental

JULY 11

Other Books Other Worlds

{STAGE} Fans of Sherlock Holmes know that he sent his nemesis, Moriarty, tumbling over Reichenbach Falls. Charles Marowitz’s 1987 play Sherlock’s Last Case takes things up six years later, when a death threat delivered by the late villain’s daughter sends Holmes and Watson off on another adventure. Tonight, the play gets its Pittsburgh premiere in a Kinetic Theatre production at the Charity Randall Theater. David Whalen, noted for playing Holmes in productions at PICT Classic, takes the title role. Joseph Peiser 8 p.m. Continues through July 26.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

Art by Lena Loshonkohl


FreeEvent Art by Gabe Felice {IMAGE COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST}

Alphonso Sloan might be the only Art Institute of Pittsburgh graduate who’s a veteran Pittsburgh policeman. The Zone 5 patrolman is also a veteran of curator Robert Raczka’s live art-making exhibitions; at the latest, Wall Paintings, a dozen artists will each get nine hours to adorn a 10-foot-square patch of SPACE Gallery wall. Sloan’s planned theme is police brutality: Working in acrylics, in his street-art-influenced style, he’ll evoke recent deaths of unarmed black men in police custody and the protests they sparked. Gallerygoers can watch the artists from 1 p.m. until the 10 p.m. conclusion of July 10’s Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Gallery Crawl. Sloan, for one, enjoys an audience while he paints: “You’re actually not just doing artwork, you’re performing.” Indeed, performance heavily complements the exhibits at tonight’s 20-venue crawl, from improv sets at Arcade Comedy Theater to Inti.Mate, Sidney Mullis’ solo exhibition of performance-based video projections at Future Tenant, depicting the mating rituals of invented animals. Even Pattern and Noise, at Wood Street Galleries — the first U.S. solo exhibition by London-based multimedia collective D-Fuse — is capped by a D-Fuse performance that’s part of Downtown’s late-night Crawl After Dark. Revelers can also enjoy the Trust’s swanky annual Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh party, at the August Wilson Center, with this year’s theme “Circus After Dark.” Bill O’Driscoll Crawl: 5:3010 p.m. (free). Crawl After Dark and Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh are ticketed. Fri., July 10. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

music, cartoons, songs, puppetry and more to memorialize the late Bernadette Callery, a longtime librarian, educator and arts patron. A catered BYOB reception follows tonight and tomorrow’s performance. PNME’s four-week season on City Theatre’s main stage continues with a July 15 Wednesday Showcase, then a new program next weekend. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., July 11. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $10-25 (free for first-timers). 704-806-7800 or www.pnme.org

Towell, Lena Loshonkohl and Co Bappe. Using methods ranging from interactive software to wheat-pasting, each artist creates his or her own book to tell a story of imaginary worlds and childhood adventure. After

JULY 11 Matt&

{ART} tonight, the show is open by appointment. JP 6-9 p.m. Exhibition continues through July 31. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. www.unsmokeartspace.com

{ART}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Most art exhibits are curated or juried. Tonight’s Pittsburgh

Do you dream of being an improv comedian? Well, tonight could be your big break if you’re at the Matt& show at Arcade Comedy Theater. Matt Holmes is a Philadelphiabased performer and teacher whose daring routine involves pulling an audience member on stage and performing an entire improv show with him or her. He’s toured the show nationally, and tonight is his Pittsburgh debut. In addition, Holmes will teach two workshops during the day at Arcade’s education space. JP 8 p.m. 811 Liberty

JULY 11 Artist’s Choice Ch i Exhibition E

with instrumentalists and a stage crew. Rodgers and Hammerstein would certainly be impressed. JP 8 p.m. 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. $12-15. 412-828-6322 or www.theoakstheater.com

Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

{STAGE} Usually with a musical, the only people permitted to have no idea what will happen is the audience. At tonight’s performance of Premiere Unscripted Musical Comedy, at the Oaks Theater, even the cast will be in the dark until the first note is hit. After gathering suggestions from the audience, the Premiere cast improvises a full two-act musical, complete

{CRAFTS} Divorce Is the Worst (Feminist Press) is the first in author and illustrator Anastasia Higginbotham’s planned series of feminist children’s books, Ordinary Terrible Things, dealing with common childhood crises. Today, the

critically acclaimed native of Washington, Pa., visits the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh to share originals of her artwork, which she makes from materials from the reycling bin. This is a handson collaging event for kids and adults, not a reading or signing, but it’s sure to provide insight into Higginbotham’s creative process. BO Noon3 p.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. Free with admission ($13-14; free for kids under 2). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

sp otlight “Well, it starts out with one person sitting on their steps. And then another brings wine and someone — it’s stoopin’. / They call it stoop sittin’ out here. ‘We’re stoopin’ tonight!’” From a series of meetings with community groups on the North Side — part of a City of Asylum/Pittsburgh residency — internationally famed jazz musician Oliver Lake gleaned phrases and anecdotes that limned life in that set of distinct but intertwined neighborhoods. It’s come together as Stoop Is a Verb, an hour-long mix of music, poetry and dance that premieres tonight in COAP’s Alphabet City Tent. Lake, actress Tami Dixon and poets Terrance Hayes and Tameka Cage Conley will perform Lake’s seven spoken-word pieces backed by his quintet. There’s also dance by Gia T. Cacalano. Lake knew the North Side from his 10 years organizing COAP’s big annual Jazz Poetry concert, but creating the COAP-commissioned Stoop still taught the New Jersey-based musician something. “There is such a great sense of community there,” he says by phone. “The final summation is that they wouldn’t live anywhere else.” BO 8 p.m. Sat., July 11. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. Reservations at 412-323-0278 or www.cityofasylum.org

{ART} There’s no easier way to go on an adventure than by reading a book. Other Books Other Worlds, a mixed-media group show opening tonight at UnSmoke Systems Artspace, features local artists David Newbury, Brad and Stephanie

N E W S

Art by Aaron Regal

{COMEDY}

+ SAT., JULY 11 The art of Andy Warhol has always possessed a childlike simplicity, so it’s no stretch that he created a series of paintings specifically for children. Andy’s Toybox, opening today at The Andy Warhol Museum, is an interactive exhibition for children of all ages based on a series of works Warhol created for a Swedish gallery. Along with viewing the art, visitors can dress up and pose for photographs, build castles, race toy cars and play with other toys from the museum’s collection. JP 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 27. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. 412-2378300 or www.warhol.org

Society of Artists show lets the artists themselves pick. For the Artist’s Choice Exhibition, Panza Gallery welcomes work by 83 artist members, including Karen McKee, Aaron Regal, Kathryn Sickels and Polly Mills Whitehorn. The exhibit continues the celebration of PSA’s 50th year; the opening reception is tonight. BO 6-8:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through July 24. 115 Sedgwick St., Millvale. Free. www.pittsburgh societyofartists.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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JULY 10TH 7:30PM 0PM PM PUNK ALTERNATIVE

Special Guests

PANAMA LEMON PLEDGE

JULY 11TH MUSICAL COMEDY

FRIDAY JULY 17 Bad Movie Nite

OF A BEAR CALLED PADDINGTON. The story of a rare bear from Peru. All ages. At Looking Glass Theater. Fri, Sat, 1:30 p.m. Thru July 11. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. BREWED. A gritty take on gender roles, fairy tales & family drama. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 10. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-489-5840. CHICAGO THE MUSICAL. The classic musical presented by the Theatre Factory. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 26. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. GIRLS ONLY: THE SECRET COMEDY OF WOMEN. A show about what women talk about when men aren’t in the room. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

THE GRAY CAT & THE FLOUNDER. A commission in memory of Bernadette Callery. The performance includes instrumental music, cartoons, songs, theatre, puppetry & imagined ballet. Presented by the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. Fri., July 10, 8 p.m. City Theatre, South Side. 888-718-4253. THE GREAT AMERICAN SONGBOOK. The Heritage Players present this show celebrating the music of Gershwin, Porter, Berlin, more. Sat., July 11, 2 & 6 p.m. and Sun., July 12, 2 p.m. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. MUCH ADOE ABOUT NOTHING. The Unrehearsed Shakespeare Project’s “Much adoe about Nothing” performed using the unrehearsed cue script technique. Sat., July 11, 4 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 773-208-7848. Sun., July 12, 4 p.m. Harrison Hills Park, Natrona Heights. At the Mansion. Also, Mon., July 13, 6:30 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 773-208-7848.

Appreciate the Whiskey Rebellion’s legacy and don your summer hat for a garden tour Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

SHERLOCK’S LAST CASE. Spoof on Doyle’s beloved characters & themes. Presented by Kinetic Theatre. July 9-26. DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Charity Randall Theatre, Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Oakland. 412-225-9145. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SWINGTIME CANTEEN. PITTSBURGH IMPROV A Hollywood star & her JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. “gal pals” entertain Cabaret at Theater the troops overseas Square, Downtown. during a 1944 USO 412-325-6769. canteen show. Thu, Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, www. per pa 2 p.m. and Sat, pghcitym ALWAYS B .co 7:30 p.m. Thru July 18. SHARP. A Former South Park Theatre, SCIT Musical Improv Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. House Team returns to the THE TALE OF PETER stage for a night of improvised RABBIT & BENJAMIN BUNNY. musical comedy. 10 p.m. American Performing Arts The Maker Theater, Theatre Company. Children’s Shadyside. 412-404-2695. musical blending Beatrix Potter’s classic stories. Sat., July 11, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. and Sun., July 12, 2 p.m. SECONDHAND SKETCH. The Crystal Ballroom, Herminie. Sketch show w/ Krish Mohan, 724-527-7775. Derek Minto, Mindy Cooper, TARZAN. Presented by the Andy Roos, Sarah Wojdylak, Actors & Artists of Fayette County. Ian McIntosch & Zack Roach. July 9-11, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., 8 p.m. and Sat., July 11, 8 p.m. July 12, 2:30 p.m. Geyer The Maker Theater, Shadyside. Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. 412-404-2695. 724-887-0887.

COMEDY THU 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 10

FRI 10 - SAT 11

SAT 11

JULY 18TH

Etta Cox

[CULTURE]

JAZZ BAND

FRIDAY FFRI RIDAY JJULY 24 8PM Jim Krenn & Lee Terbosic

Doors open at 7pm!

SATURDAY JULY 25 Hermie Granati

MON 13

ROCK & ROLL

JULY 31ST

Johnny Angel and the Halos THE OAKS THEATERR IS AVA AVAILABLE LA L FOR SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH SERVICE RENTAL. CALL 412.828.6322 FOR DETAILS. TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253 50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

GESTALT/ STILL LIFE COMEDY SHOW. The most pretentious improv show in Pittsburgh. 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. JOE PETTIS. Underwear Comedy Party where comics perform in their skivvies. Free admission to anyone who comes in theirs. 10 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. UNSCRIPTED MUSICAL COMEDY. A full two-act musical built fromby a few basic ideas gathered from the audience. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322.

Come to Assemble and have a unique afternoon with the Afro-Latin drumming arts and culture of Cuba, Latin America, West Africa and Brazil. Nigerian Yoruba artist Adeniji Jemiriye will give a brief talk about Nigerian fashion and Yoruba arts and culture, and master conguero percussionist Noel Quintana will both perform and educate about the drumming arts. A drum jam session tops off Tambour de Caribye and gives participants a chance to join in music. The program, presented by Project: Tambou Cimarrón, is part of a month of activities presented by Café con Leche. For a schedule, visit www.cafeconlechepgh.com. 3 p.m. Sun., July 12. Assemble, 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. $6 suggested donation

COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 14 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 15 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, CONTINUES ON PG. 52


JULY 17 & 18

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ART Presented by fatheads “Lawrenceville” (mixed media on canvas, 2014), by Elizabeth A. Rudnick. Inspiration for the exhibition TREASURE/TRASH, at The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side.

NEW THIS WEEK 709 PENN GALLERY. I’ve Been Out Walking. Ashley Jean Hickey’s solo exhibition featuring new work inspired by the woods. Opening July 10, 6-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-377-3786. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Andy’s Toybox. A playful installation of Warhol’s paintings, prints, & photographs from the late 1970s & 1980s. Opens July 11. North Side. 412-237-8300. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Jack Ann Kate. Work by John McGinley, Ann Averback, Kate Bonello. Opening reception July 12, 2-5 p.m. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. THE GALLERY 4. Gamine. Work by Marlana Adele Vassar. Opening reception July 11, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. PANZA GALLERY. Artist’s Choice Exhibition. Members of the Pittsburgh Society of Artists present works of their choice. Opening reception July 11, 6-8:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PERCOLATE. Art by Neighborhood Youth Outreach Program kids. Artworks by children who participated in the Carnegie Museum of Art workshop. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. The Rights of Passage, Memory of Palestine. Work by Samira Shaheen. Opening

reception July 10, 6-9 p.m. Friendship.

ONGOING 4823 PENN AVE. Studies in Topophilia. Charcoal sketches on vellum by Carolyn Wenning. Garfield. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Treasure/Trash. Works by local artist Elizabeth A. Rudnick. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Work from these artists from their time as students at Carnegie Tech to their early days in New York. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site specific artwork by the German/Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Impractical Magic: The Other Side of Practical. Work from Art Institute students & alumni. Downtown. 412-263-6600. ART SPACE 616. Trace Elements. Work by William Earl Kofmehl III & Stephanie Armbruster. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. Aqui. An exhibition curated by Maritza Mosquera of works that exude place,

belonging & strength of vision & a premiere Cafe Con Leche’s short video “What does it mean to be a Pittsburgh Latin@?” Garfield. 412-432-9127. BE GALLERIES. Around the Body. Photography by Rebekah Alviani & Brenda Roger. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Works on Paper. Work by TJ Sheehan. More works in the adjoining “Different Strokes Gallery” by Ellie Brendlinger & Claire Hardy. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CITY-COUNTY BUILDING. Shared Border, Shared Dreams. A student exhibit that simulates living as undocumented immigrant in the U.S. Downtown. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

EXHIBITS

ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A fine jewelry exhibition that brings together scientific fact & pop culture in a showcase of wearable & decorative arts related to outer space, space travel, the space age, & the powerful influence these topics have had on human civilization. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Landscapes & Figure Drawings. Ceramic plates & platters by Kyle Houser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. High Voltage. Works by Ron Nigro, Aaron Regal & Bruce Senchesen. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILL HOUSE KAUFMANN CENTER. Nathan Schritter. An exhibit of work in traditional black & white photography of regional jazz greats. Hill District. 412-281-1026. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. sidewall: a mural project’s first annual group show. A show about the mural artists who participated in sidewall’s first year,celebrating their bodies of work beyond what

Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using

they have already shared in their murals. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. All Terrain Vehicle. Exploring the contemporary landscape through painting & photography. Bound. Woven fiber forms by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze. West End. 412-922-9800. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Lakevue. 724-316-9326. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Veiled Instinct. Work by Lauren Wilcox. At the Rum Room. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Dollirious - The Art of the Doll. Doll work of all mediums from more than 15 artists, celebrating the dark & unusual, spiritual, whimsical side of doll art. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NEMACOLIN GALLERY. A Midsummers Night. A solo exhibition w/ work by Paul McMillan. Nemacolin. 412-337-4976. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods. Work by Ron Donoughe. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. PhAb Now! Photography by Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, Todd Keyser & Barbara Weissberger. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Out of the Archives & Into the Gallery. An exploration of history & historic artistic technique in glass. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINTBREEZEWAY. Kamili. An exhibition of work by

documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape. This exhibit explores landscape painting in Britain form the Industrial Revolution to the eras of Romanticism.

Hannibal Hopson & Amani Davis that reflects their mission to use recycled materials & let the objects determine the form & message. Point Breeze. REVISION SPACE. Immediate Realities. Feat. work by international street artists & pop-surrealists. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. RUNAWAY STUDIOS. Hi Lo. Work on the anxieties of both loss & reclamation of identity, by Dianna Settles. Bloomfield. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. London/Pittsburgh. A solo exhibit w/ work by photographer, Mark Neville. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sips, Shots & Gulps. A national exhibition of handmade ceramic drinking vessels. W/ work by : Charlie Alessi, Mariana Baquero, Seth Charles, Christy Culp, Myka Hayden, Kyle Hendrix, Leslie Hinton, Molly Johnson, Madeline Klusmire, Lucien M. Koonce, Gretchen Kriner, Cassandra Loos, Carolyn Mimbs, Abbie Nelson, Maryann Parker, Caitlin Ross, Lindsey Scherloum, Ian Shelly, Molly Uravitch, Dallas Wooten & Lisa York. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Feat. the art of local artists Carolyn Pierotti, Chris Galiyas, Elizabeth Claire Rose, & Lora Finelli. Shadyside. 412-913-4966.

Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123.


MCGINLEY HOUSE & industry & community artifacts MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. from 1881-1986. Homestead. Historic homes open for tours, 412-464-4020. lectures & more. Monroeville. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ 412-373-7794. HISTORY CENTER. We Can MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS Do It!: WWII. Discover how MUSEUM. The Bryce Family Pittsburgh affected World War & the Mount Pleasant Factory. II & the war affected our region. Telling the story of the Bryce Explore the development of family & their contributions. the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. & the stories behind real-life “Rosie NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters the Riveters” & local Tuskegee of the Sky. Explore the power Airmen whose contributions made & grace of the birds who rule an unquestionable impact on the the sky. Majestic eagles, war effort. From Slavery impressive condors, to Freedom. Highlight’s stealthy falcons and Pittsburgh’s role in the their friends take center anti-slavery movement. stage! Home to more Ongoing: Western PA than 600 birds from www. per Sports Museum, Clash pa over 200 species. W/ pghcitym of Empires, & exhibits .co classes, lectures, demos on local history, more. & more. North Side. Strip District. 412-454-6000. 412-323-7235. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS NATIONALITY ROOMS. HISTORY CENTER. Museum 26 rooms helping to tell the commemorates Pittsburgh story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant industrialists, local history. past. University of Pittsburgh. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. Oakland. 412-624-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church MEMORIAL HALL. War in the features 1823 pipe organ, Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection Revolutionary War graves. of military artifacts showcasing Scott. 412-851-9212. photographs, uniforms, shells OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. & other related items. Military This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion museum dedicated to honoring site features log house, blacksmith military service members since shop & gardens. South Park. the Civil War through artifacts 412-835-1554. & personal mementos. Oakland. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY 412-621-4253. MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Maz’s Camera. See & touch the giant, heavy camera that snapped the photo of Bill Mazeroski rounding bases, winning the 1960 World Series that was made into his statue at PNC Park. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel

FULL LIST E N O LIN

ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

DANCE SAT 11 SO YOU THINK YOU CAN PRAISE. Performance by Freedom Unspoken Dance Ensemble. 6 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 10 MASQUERADE AT THE MONACO. A masquerade themed party offering table games & refreshments. Benefits Sisters Place. 7-10 p.m. Hotel Monaco, Downtown. 412-233-3903.

SAT 11 ART BREW. Food trucks, craft beer & arts w/ performances from the Beagle Brothers & the Mavens. Benefits the Sweetwater Center for CONTINUES ON PG. 54

#filter412 original iPhone art by City Paper photographer Heather Mull, published every Tuesday

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{2014 SELFIE BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

*Stuff We Like

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

the Arts. 21 & over only. On Bank St. in Sewickley. 6:30-10 p.m. www.showclix.com. BOW TIE FUN RUN 5K. Benefits the MAYA Organization. 8:30 a.m. Allegheny Commons, North Side. 412-945-7670. SLOBBERFEST. Games, activities w/ dogs welcome. Benefits Droopy Basset Hound Rescue. 11 a.m. 15581 Stewart Hill Rd, Union City. www.DroopyBassettRescue.com.

OUTSIDE EVENT: Opening of Veiled Instincts art show, with works by Lauren Wilcox, at Maggie’s Farm Rum Distillery, Strip District CRITIC: Zach Lee, 24, an artist from Polish Hill

SUN 12

Anthrocon

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX}

The annual convention of the fur-suited (and their tailed and eared allies) never fails to liven up Downtown. It runs July 9-12, and this year’s theme is Viking Invasion. Can. Not. Wait.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. GLIMPSES OF HUMLA. An event about the culture of Nepal w/ photography, music, food, handicrafts, a short film & stories from trips. Benefits the Humla Nursing Education Project. 2-5 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

Wayward Pines

WED 15 KARMA YOGA EVENT. Yoga class w/ proceeds donated to the Braddock Free Store. 7-8:15 p.m. Southminster Presbyterian Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-343-8900.

GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

Scally’s Golf Center

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

This Coraopolis facility is a great way to spend a Saturday afternoon, with mini-golf, a par-three pitch-n-putt course and a driving range with more than 100 tees. www.scallysgolfcenter.com

SAT 11

THE GLOBAL CORPORATE ATTACK ON JOBS, THE ENVIRONMENT, & LABOR RIGHTS. United Steelworker VP Tom Conway delivers the steelworkers’ annual Bernard Kleiman lecture. 1:30 p.m. The Pump House, Swissvale. 412-831-3871.

Community Gardens

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

reading. 7 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

paper pghcitym .co

THU 09 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

FRI 10 LORIG, POPE + O’NEILL, DE ALBA, MADDEY. Poetry

SAT 11 INVASIVE SPECIES: NATURE’S MOST WANTED. A walk & talk w/ a Park Ranger about invasive species. Learn how to identify & manage the most common species & about current conservation efforts. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Harrison Hills Park, Natrona Heights. 724-295-3570. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. A mushroom walk w/ Meet WPMC Identifier Dick Dougall. 10 a.m. Salamander Park, Fox Chapel. 855-494-3345.

SUN 12 SUMMER WOODY PLANT I.D. Tips & tricks to help you identify trees. 1 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve, Rector. 724-593-6105.

TUE 14 YOUNG NATURE EXPLORERS CLASS. Getting kids outside, exploring nature. Pre-registration required, 724-935-2170. Latodami Nature Center. Second Tue of every month, 9:30-11 a.m. & 1-2:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park.

WED 15

TUE 14 FULL PITTSBURGH T IS L CONTINENTAL E IN PHILOSOPHY READING ONwLww.

LITERARY

City residents without yards can still grow food thanks to community gardens all over town. Added bonus: Visitors love to walk through and admire them. One of our favorites? The Olde Allegheny Community Gardens on the North Side.

B Y J OS E P H P E I S E R

SAT 11

THU 09

July 03

They’re small compositions, they’re like little vignettes, so each piece is kind of telling its own story. They all have this common theme of human experience as well as color; each work is a mixed-media collage comprised of different elements. Some of them are hand-drawn, some of them are inkjet-printed, but all have this unifying theme of reddish color. If you go to a lot of other bars that are doing the same thing, it’s less of a gallery, it’s like a bar first and there’s just art on the walls. Here you have this area where it can become a full gallery and people can walk around. It’s a small place and a little out of the way, so it’s not attracting the normal “bar scene” crowd. You’re getting friends here or people interested in checking out the art.

LUPUS CHALLENGE: GOLF TOURNAMENT. 10:30 a.m. The Club at Nevillewood, Presto. 412-261-5886.

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WHEN: Fri.,

MON 13

This addictive sci-fi drama, produced by M. Night Shymalan, has all the ingredients of a hit: a compelling original story, quirky characters and tons of plot twists. Earlier episodes are available online. Thursdays on Fox. www.fox.com/wayward-pines

6-8 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

KIDSTUFF THU 09 - WED 15 VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn exhibit featuring activities inspired by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 11 M3: MATERIALS, MEDIA, AND ME! Explore a new material & make a project every

Saturday of the summer! For youth in 4th through 8th grade. Sat. Thru Aug. 29 Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. PENNY ARCADE: KIDS COMEDY SHOW. Second Sat of every month, 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 13 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 14 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. KIDSPLAY. Free educational programming w/ music, dancing & hands-on activities for preschool aged children. New theme every week. Tue, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Aug. 25 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511.

TUE 14 - WED 15 MAKING ART: TISSUE PAPER COLLAGE. Children get to create in one of Carle’s main styles of art, tissue paper collage, using their park surroundings as motivation. Led by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh staff. Registration required. Latrobe Shelter 1-3 p.m. and Wed., July 15,

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 09 DR. ALLAN ARMITAGE. A workshop on a variety of topics related to gardening w/ annuals, perennials & native plants. Botany Hall. Reservations required. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442, ext. 3925. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m.


Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING FOR BUSINESS. Seminar on strategies & best practices of successfully utilizing social media to expand your market reach. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

THU 09 - SAT 11 ST. SEBASTIAN PARISH FESTIVAL. Flea Market, multiple food booths, raffle, rides and games. Thru July 10, 6:30 p.m. and Sat., July 11, 5 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-364-8999.

THU 09 - SUN 12 ANTHROCON 2015. A convention for Furries w/ work groups, panel discussions, music, exhibits, merchandise sales, a “fursuit” parade, special guest speakers, dances, more. July 9-12 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000. WHISKEY REBELLION FESTIVAL. Downtown Washington, South Main Street. Celebration of the heritage & unique character of the region by focusing on the historical significance of the Whiskey Rebellion. Historic reenactments, period exhibitions & demonstrations, family fun, frontier art, heritage music & food. 3 p.m., Fri., July 10, 4 p.m., Sat., July 11, 10 a.m. and Sun., July 12, 11 a.m. Citizens Library, Washington. 724-223-4226.

FRI 10 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. ARTIST LECTURE: TONY TASSET. An evening w/ the artist of Magnolias for Pittsburgh, talking about his work in the public realm. 6 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-391-2060. CARNEGIE CRAWL & JAZZ. Gallery crawl followed by Jazz at 3rd Street. Second Fri of every month, 5-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 9 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233. COCKTAIL CUP COMPETITION. 3 cocktails from locals bartenders Jay

Denat from Butcher & the Rye, Craig Mrusek from Tender & Jen Mulero. 5 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-235-7796. COSMOPOLITAN PITTSBURGH. Games, performances, sideshow acts, music, art & a dance party. 7 p.m.-12 a.m. 412-456-6666. FIRSTFRIDAY ARTWALKS. Art, live music, shopping at local businesses & food trucks along the route on Ellsworth Ave. 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fri., Aug. 7, 5:30-8:30 p.m. and Fri., Sept. 4, 5:30-8:30 p.m. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554.

CROATIA PITTSBURGH SOCCER CLUB PICNIC. 12 p.m. Croatian Center Picnic Grounds, Millvale. 724-747-7203. KEEP PITTSBURGH BEAUTIFUL: PROTECTING OUR WATERWAYS. Take a virtual tour of our region’s rivers & streams, track how pollution enters our waterways, & learn how you can protect the health of our watershed from illegal dumping & littering. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. MEET THE ARTIST. Casual talk w/ Pittsburgh-based emerging artist Elizabeth A. Rudnick. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PARSEC MEETING. Monthly meetings for Pittsburgh’s

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE ARUNA PROJECT The Aruna Project is seeking volunteers to help with its First Annual Pittsburgh Aruna 5K Run for Their Freedom. This nonprofit organization works to raise awareness and funds to help enslaved women in South Asia. Help is needed on race day with set-up, tear-down, and food and water distribution to runners. Interested parties should contact Dara at daradechellis@gmail.com. For more information on the organization, visit www.arunaproject.com.

SUMMER FRIDAYS AT THE FRICK. Picnicking, tours, wine bar, yard games, music & different food trucks every week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

FRI 10 - SAT 11 THE PITTSBURGH THUNDERBIRDS. Competing in the American Ultimate Disc League. 7 p.m. and Sat., July 18, 7 p.m. Cupples Stadium, South Side. 330-979-9347.

FRI 10 - WED 15 SILK SCREEN FILM FESTIVAL. A showcase of Asian films & filmmakers w/ 30 feature films & 8 short films at the Regent Square Theater, Melwood Screening Room & Melwood Classroom. For more info, visit silkscreen festival.org. Opening red carpet gala, July 9, 6-10 p.m. July 10-19. Various locations.

SAT 11 ANNUAL GARDEN PARTY IN THE COURTYARD. Wine, beer, hors d’oeuvres, sweets, music & silent auction. 6-8 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669.

Science Fiction & Fantasy Organization feature guest speakers & discussions. Second Sat of every month, 1:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-287-0896. PITTSBURGH’S PENNSYLVANIA MOTOR SPEEDWAY. Car racing. 7 p.m. Imperial. 412-279-7223. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. STEEL CITY SAMPLER: A RUST BELT CULINARY TOUR. 10:30 a.m. Station Square,

Station Square. 412-323-4709. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TROPICAL FOREST CONGO FESTIVAL. Family-friendly activities, instrument demos by students of the Duquesne University Mary Pappert School of Music, a taste of Africa w/ fruit samples from Café Phipps, & more. 11 a.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. WOMEN’S SELF CARE SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce stress, tackle anxiety & strengthen boundaries while building practical coping techniques & tools in a confidential, healing & supportive environment. Sat, 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300 ex. 129. YOGA FEST BLOCK PARTY. One-hour class is suitable for yogis of all levels & benefits the Greensburg Community. 8 a.m. Westmoreland County Courthouse, Greensburg. 412-431-7888. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

SAT 11 - SUN 12 PAPERMAKING & PRINTMAKING. Creating art w/ invasive plants. 10 a.m.1 p.m. and Sun., July 12, 12-3 p.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 724-327-0338.

SUN 12 AFROLATIN PERCUSSION W/ NOEL QUINTANA & ANTHONY MITCHELL, JR. Interactive presentations, master workshops, & theatrical performances showcasing AfroLatin folkloric music & dance. 3 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-373-6184. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SHOW. Over a 100 vendors. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Sun., Aug. 9, 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Sun., Sept. 13, 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 11, 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. MT. LEBANON LIBRARY GARDEN TOUR. Feat. diverse private Mt. Lebanon gardens for this self-guided tour. Free consultations w/ Penn State Master Gardeners & a Pittsburgh Rose Society Consulting Rosarian. Benefits Mt. Lebanon Public Library. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

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NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. presented by Eric Shiner, Local small businesses, Director at the Andy Warhol food trucks, live music Museum. 7:30 p.m. Church & workshops at 23rd Street of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. & Penn Avenue. Second 412-417-3707. Sun of every month, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 CARIBBEAN DANCE Strip District, Strip District. WORKSHOP. Learn dances PIES & PINTS. Behind from Puerto Rico, Haiti, the the scene tour of the first Dominican Republic & Cuba. community in the world Wed, 7-8:30 p.m. Thru being built for the study July 29 Assemble, Garfield. of sustainable living w/ 412-432-9127. innovated wastewater CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. filtration system, 400 solar Informal knitting session w/ panel array, & vast organic literary conversation. First and garden. Music from Brush Third Wed of every month, Creek. 4 p.m. Chatham 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, University Eden Hall Campus, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. DETROIT STYLE URBAN PITTSBURGH REPTILE BALLROOM DANCE. SHOW & SALE. Animals 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. on display & for sale to the Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. public. 9 a.m. and Sun., 412-242-4345. Aug. 16, 9 a.m. Harmar House, MOBILE ART W/ ROMIBO. Cheswick. 724-516-0441. An outdoor art program PRIDE BOWLING w/ ipads. Flagstaff Hill. LEAGUE. Seeking bowlers 10 a.m. Schenley of all levels. Every other Park, Oakland. Sunday. Every other 412-255-2539. Sun, 6:30 p.m. Forward THE PITTSBURGH Lanes, Squirrel Hill. . w ww per SHOW OFFS. A 412-337-0701. a p ty ci h pg meeting of jugglers RADICAL TRIVIA. .com & spinners. All Trivia game hosted levels welcome. Wed, by DJ Jared Evans. Come 7:30 p.m. Union Project, alone or bring a team. Highland Park. 412-363-4550. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, TAROT CARD LESSONS. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. GREENSBURG CIVIC The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. THEATRE. Applications are 724-417-0223. being accepted for directors & WSCC REGENT SQUARE choreographers for its 2015-16 GARDEN TOUR. A tour of Regent season of adult & Greasepaint Squares Gardens w/ brunch, an Players’ family productions. artist’s Plein Air competition & Candidates should send a art time for kids. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. theatre resume including Wilkins School Community directorial references by Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458. July 24 to info@gctheatre.org. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL 724-836-1757. PITTSBURGH MEETING. Monthly THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. meeting. Second Mon of every Auditions for the musical, “The month, 7 p.m. First Unitarian Secret Garden”. Seeking actors Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. ages 10 to adult. Prepare a short BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. monologue & song for the A support group for women musical, The Secret Garden. 30+. Second and Fourth August 9, 7 p.m. at the Seton Mon of every month Anchorpoint Center & August 10, 7 p.m. at Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. the Schoolhouse Arts Center. MOBILE ART W/ ROMIBO. 412-254-4633. An outdoor art program THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN w/ ipads. Sculpture garden. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. 2 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Seeking young singers from Oakland. 412-622-3131. 8th through 12th grades. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Prepared solo of your choice, Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing preferably a classical selection follows. No partner needed. (art song, aria, etc.) Carefully Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. selected works from musical Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. theater may be performed, Washington. 412-683-5670. but these should demonstrate a classical singing technique rather than belting. To CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, schedule an audition, call 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Emily Stewart at 412-926-2488. Center for Imagination, Auditions will be conducted Garfield. 412-924-0634. on August 27, after 3:30 p.m. “LIFE OF ANDY WARHOL Third Presbyterian Church, & HISTORY OF THE Oakland. WARHOL MUSEUM”. Lecture

WED 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS

MON 13

TUE 14

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

NEW CASTLE PLAYERS. Seeking 5 men & 3 women for a farce. July 20 & 21, 7 p.m. Annex theatre. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437.

SUBMISSIONS THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, showcasing independent authors from Southwestern PA & beyond. Entrants must complete the online entry form (www.theauthorszone.com) & submit payment by August 1, 2015 for their work to be considered. 412-563-6712. BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. JOHNSTOWN FILM FESTIVAL. Accepting original short films of 30 minutes of less. Any genre. All entries must be submitted on DVD, non blu-ray, & will not be returned. For more info, www.johnstownfilmfest.org. Thru July 18. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@ gmail.com. Ongoing. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Open to any artist, 18 & older, working in water-based media. Deadline July 13, digital entries only. For more info, visit www.pittsburgh watercolorsociety.com. Thru July 13. Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I entered into a civil union with another woman in Vermont in 2000. My ex and I were together until 2003, when we decided to go our separate ways. It is now 2015, and my new partner (who happens to be male) and I are expecting a baby and talking about getting married. We live in Texas. I know that there are ways to dissolve my civil union in Vermont, but I can’t get ahold of my ex (ex-wife? Ex-CUer?) to sign any of the forms. Neither do I want to, because frankly it was an abusive relationship and I still bear emotional scars. She used to stalk me until she finally moved back to the Pacific Northwest. Is there a way to dissolve my civil union without having to directly contact my ex? UNDOING NIGGLING COMPACT IN VERMONT ISN’T LEGALLY UNCOMPLICATED

Vermont played a groundbreaking role in the fight for marriage equality in the United States. (Spoiler alert: We won the fight on June 26, 2015.) A little history … Way, way back in 1999, before same-sex marriage was legal anywhere in the United States, the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples were entitled to the same “benefits and protections” as opposite-sex couples. Vermont’s highest court ordered the state legislature to come up with a solution. Instead of allowing same-sex couples to marry — a simpler fix legislatively but a more explosive one politically — in 2000, Vermont’s lawmakers created “civil unions.” Full marriage equality came to Vermont in 2009. So what became of your civil union after 2009, UNCIVILU? Did it become a marriage after same-sex marriage became legal in Vermont, like domestic partnerships did in Washington state? “Our marriage law didn’t automatically convert CUs to marriages,” said Elizabeth Kruska, an attorney in Vermont who handles family law. “And although civil unions were (and are) legal in Vermont, other states did not have to recognize them as legal unions. That’s where UNCIVILU has a problem. Her civil union is still legal and on the books here in Vermont. I’m pretty sure Texas didn’t recognize civil unions.” So if Texas doesn’t recognize your Vermont civil union, does that mean you’re in the clear? Sadly, no. “There is an interesting case from Massachusetts that hit this same issue square on the head,” said Kruska. “A couple got a civil union in Vermont, the parties then separated, and one of the people got married to a different person in Massachusetts. The court in Massachusetts said that the civil union invalidated the subsequent Massachusetts marriage.” Even if Texas doesn’t recognize your Vermont civil union — and it probably wouldn’t — Vermont would recognize your Texas marriage. “That would create a situation where the letter-writer, at least in one state, would have two legal spouses,” said Kruska. “And that’s not legal. So the smartest thing for UNCIVILU to do is to dissolve her Vermont civil union.” Kruska suggested that you contact legal service organizations in Vermont to find a lawyer who can help you. “UNCIVILU and her ex may both be able to participate in the hearings by telephone, since they live in other states and it would be burdensome for them to travel back to Vermont,” said Kruska. “And as an added bonus, UNCIVILU

wouldn’t have to see her ex in person.” Elizabeth Kruska works at rivercitylawyers.com in White River Junction, Vt., and blogs about legal issues at scovlegal.blogspot.com. In a former life, I was a staunch Republican and voted for antigay ballot initiatives. Then, after a bad divorce 18 years ago, I moved to another state and fell in with an artistic crowd. I became close friends with people with vastly different life experiences, and I’ve developed an entirely new attitude toward gay rights. My dilemma: When SCOTUS handed down its ruling making marriage a right for all, I congratulated all my non-straight friends on Facebook. One of those friends posted a note thanking me for “always being in [their] corner.” My asshole brother then commented that not only had I not “always” been supportive, in my previous life I campaigned against gay rights. Several non-straight friends jumped to my defense, stating that it couldn’t be true. I am ashamed of the person I was and have worked hard to be a better person. Is there any point in apologizing? DON’T HAVE A CLEVER ACRONYM

Anthony Kennedy, the Supreme Court justice who wrote the majority decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which recently legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states, also wrote the majority opinions in Lawrence v. Texas (2003), which declared laws against sodomy to be unconstitutional. Kennedy will obviously go down in history as a hero to the gay-rights movement — but his record isn’t perfect. Anthony Corbett Sullivan, a U.S. citizen, legally married Richard Frank Adams, an Australian citizen, in 1975 in Boulder, Colo. The men had been issued a marriage license by a county clerk who couldn’t find anything in state law that prevented two men from marrying. Sullivan and Adams applied for a spousal visa for Adams. Here’s the response the couple got — the entire response — on official U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services letterhead: “You have failed to establish that a bona fide marital relationship can exist between two faggots.” The couple sued. Kennedy, then a circuit court judge, heard their case — and he ruled against the “two faggots.” Sullivan and Adams had to leave the country to be together. Exactly 18 years passed between 1985, when Kennedy signed off on the deportation of Adams, and 2003, when Kennedy wrote his first major gay-rights decision. In Obergefell, Kennedy wrote that “new insights and societal understandings” changed the way many Americans — including a majority of Americans on the Supreme Court — see gay people. The same goes for you. And that’s exactly what the queer-rights movement has been asking of straight people all along. You can and perhaps should apologize to your gay friends for the antigay attitudes you once held, but they should immediately thank you for being the person you are now. You can be ashamed of the person you once were but proud of the person you are now — unlike Roberts, Alito, Thomas and Scalia, four men who are as shameful now as they ever were.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

On the Lovecast, the therapeutic potential of MDMA: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.08-07.15

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When novelist John Irving begins a new book, his first task is to write the last line of the last page. Then he writes the second-to-last line. He continues to work backwards for a while until he has a clear understanding of the way his story will end. Right now, Cancerian, as you hatch your next big phase of development, I invite you to borrow Irving’s approach. Visualize in detail the blossoms that will eventually come from the seeds you’re planting. Create a vivid picture of the life you will be living when your plans have fully ripened.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You have cosmic permission to lose your train of thought, forget about what was so seriously important and be weirdly amused by interesting nonsense. If stress-addicts nag you to be more responsible, tell them that your astrologer has authorized you to ignore the pressing issues and wander off in the direction of nowhere in particular. Does that sound like a good plan? It does to me. For now, it’s your sovereign right to be a wise and innocent explorer with nothing much to do but wonder and daydream and play around.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Even the most provocative meme cannot literally cause the Internet to collapse from overuse. It’s true that photos of Kim Kardashian’s oiled-up butt spawned a biblical flood of agitated responses on social media. So did the cover shot of Caitlyn Jenner in Vanity Fair and the YouTube video of a tiny hamster noshing tiny burritos and the season-five finale of the TV show Game of Thrones. But none of these starbursts unleashed so much

traffic that the Web was in danger of crashing. It’s too vast and robust for that to ever happen. Or is it? I’m wondering if Virgos’ current propensities for high adventure and rollicking melodrama could generate phenomena that would actually, not just metaphorically, break the Internet. To be safe, I suggest you enjoy yourself to the utmost, but not more than the utmost.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to acquire a new title. It’s quite possible that a person in authority will confer it upon you, and that it will signify a raise in status, an increase in responsibility or an expansion of your clout. If for some reason this upgrade doesn’t occur naturally, take matters into your own hands. Tell people to refer to you as “Your Excellency” or “Your Majesty.” Wear a name tag that says “Deputy Director of Puzzle-Solving” or “Executive Vice President of Fanatical Balance and Insane Poise.” For once in your life, it’s OK to risk becoming a legend in your own mind. P.S. It wouldn’t be a bad time to

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

demand a promotion — diplomatically, of course, in the Libran spirit.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Between now and July 22, your password and mantra and battle cry is “serendipity.” To make sure you are clear about its meaning, meditate on these definitions: a knack for uncovering surprising benefits by accident; a talent for stumbling upon timely help or useful resources without searching for them. Got that? Now I’ll provide clues that should help you get the most out of your lucky breaks and blessed twists: 1. Be curious and receptive, not lackadaisical and entitled. 2. Expect the unexpected. Vow to thrive on surprises. 3. Your desires are more likely to come true if you are unattached to them coming true. But you should formulate those desires clearly and precisely. On behalf of the Strange Angels in Charge of Uproarious Beauty and Tricky Truths, I am pleased to present you with the award for Most Catalytic Fun-Seeker and Intriguing Game-Changer of the Zodiac. What are your specific superpowers? You’re capable of transforming rot into splendor. You have a knack for discovering secrets that have been hidden. I also suspect that your presence can generate magic laughter and activate higher expectations and wake everyone up to the interesting truths they’ve been ignoring.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

“Who is that can tell me who I am?” asks King Lear in the Shakespeare play named after him. It’s a painful moment. The old boy is confused and alarmed when he speaks those words. But I’d like to borrow his question and transplant it into a very different context: your life right now. I think that you can engender inspirational results by making it an ongoing meditation. There are people in a good position to provide you with useful insights into who you are.

While making a long trek through the desert on a camel, British author Somerset Maugham passed the time by reading Marcel Proust’s novel In Search of Lost Time. After finishing each page, Maugham ripped it out and cast it away. The book weighed less and less as his journey progressed. I suggest that you consider a similar approach in the coming weeks, Taurus. As you weave your way toward your next destination, shed the accessories and attachments you don’t absolutely need. Keep lightening your load.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

What’s hard but important for you to do? What are the challenging tasks you know you should undertake because they would improve your life? The coming days will be a favorable time to make headway on these labors. You will have more power than usual to move what has been nearly impossible to move. You may be surprised by your ability to change situations that have resisted and outfoxed you in the past. I’m not saying that any of this will be smooth and easy. But I bet you will be able to summon unprecedented amounts of willpower and perseverance.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Franz Kafka produced three novels, a play, four short fiction collections and many other stories. And yet some of his fellow writers thought he

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): How can you fulfill your potential as an Aries? What strategies will help you become the best Aries you can possibly be? Now is an excellent time to meditate on these riddles. One of my Aries readers, Mickki Langston, has some stellar tips to inspire you: 1. One of your greatest assets is your relentless sense of purpose. Treasure it. Stay connected to it. Draw on it daily. 2. Love what you love with pure conviction, because there is no escaping it. 3. Other people may believe in you, but only sometimes. That’s why you should unfailingly believe in yourself. 4. It’s your duty and your destiny to continually learn more about how to be a leader. 5. Don’t be confused by other people’s confusion. 6. Your best friend is the Fool, who will guide you to laughter and humility when you need it most, which is pretty much all of the time.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

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was uncomfortable in expressing himself. Bertolt Brecht said Kafka seemed perpetually afraid, as if he were being monitored by the cops for illicit thoughts. Milena Jesenská observed that Kafka often wrote like he was sitting naked in the midst of fully-clothed people. Your assignment in the coming weeks is to shed such limitations and inhibitions from your own creative expression. What would you need to do to free your imagination? To get started, visualize five pleasurable scenarios in which you feel joyful, autonomous, generous and expansive.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I have gathered about me people who understand how to translate fear into possibility,” writes John Keene in his story “Acrobatique.” I’d love to see you do the same, Gemini. From an astrological perspective, now is a favorable time to put your worries and trepidations to work for you. You have an extraordinary capacity to use your doubt and dread to generate opportunities. Even if you go it alone, you can accomplish minor miracles, but why not dare to think even bigger? Team up with brave and resourceful allies who want to translate fear into possibility, too. What’s your secret beauty — the great thing about you that no one knows about? FreeWill Astrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

PUBLIC NOTICE

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on July 21, 2015, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for: Pittsburgh Greenway Baseball Field Upgrades General Prime

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Pittsburgh Public Schools Service Center Rehabilitation of the Service Center Loading Dock General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on June 29, 2015 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 ~ www.pps.k12.pa.us

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to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $70 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days?

You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or Text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 *Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015


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ACROSS 1. Hurl oath after oath 5. Fill with disgust 11. Org. with wands 14. Huge in scope, cast, and CGI expenses, likely 15. British singersongwriter McKay 16. Inept sort 17. MMA playlist? 19. Barn bird 20. Totally smitten 21. Body part shown off in a thong 22. Store whose products sound either like death metal bands or Tolkein elvish words 23. Basic idea 24. Zen riddle about a curving trajectory? 26. High card 28. In shape 29. Sport played in a monk’s garb? 34. Holiday Inn rival 37. Unaccounted for on base 38. Flash flood 40. Jump on the ice 41. Universal ___ 43. Untimely accident from a 180-degree turn? 45. Sailor’s reply 46. Just make (out) 47. Grizzly at a press conference? 52. Horned mountain dweller

56. ___ track (rap track intended to insult) 57. World Series of Poker star Elezra 58. Lunatic ex, say 60. Approved 61. Clogs things up with Friskies? 63. “___ pal and help me here” 64. Tiger’s cousin 65. “One more thing ...” 66. “Just pick one” 67. Beat out, as grain 68. Tuchus

DOWN 1. Get a better deal on the mortgage 2. Making a mockery of 3. Romcom that won seven Razzies 4. Old Toyota compacts 5. Stake for a hand 6. Pricing word 7. “Theaetetus” philosopher 8. Metalprocessing biggie 9. Make a comparison (to) 10. “___ Fleurs du Mal” (Baudelaire poetry collection) 11. Stiffed Lyft, say 12. Lumberjack, often 13. OneDayPay insurance company

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18. Recess classic that requires an extensive knowledge of shows 22. Polite interruption 24. Outfielder Matt of the Padres 25. Obama’s community building grp. 27. Attorney’s job 29. RelayRides rental 30. Have a lot of interest? 31. Redbook rival 32. Insurer of London 33. Seine makeup 34. Stink to high heaven 35. Room with a beer cooler and an HDTV

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36. “Solve for x” subj. 39. Piece of cake? 42. Drink served in pouches 44. Religious rationalist 47. Big name in burritos 48. Singer whose fans are called “Claymates” 49. Summer destination 50. Big name in glue 51. Seat selection if you want legroom 53. Overwhelmingly 54. Paris school 55. Native South Africans 58. Way to go? 59. Renuzit target 61. Scribble (down) 62. NYSE listings {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.08/07.15.2015

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

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{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Wiz Khalifa played to a packed house July 2 at the First Niagara Pavilion with Fall Out Boy. For more photos of Khalifa and Fall Out Boy, check out www.pghcitypaper.com.

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START YOUR WEEKEND EARLY THURSDAY NIGHTS AT RIVERS CASINO

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

July 8, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 27

July 8, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 27