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PET PROJECT: GET THE LOWDOWN ON DOGS, PIGS, RATS, PET PSYCHICS AND A CAT WHO PEES IN THE TOILET 16


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EVENTS 6.12 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

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6.19 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BETTY DOUGLAS & CO. The Warhol theater Tickets $10 / $8 Members & students

6.24 - 4:30 TEACHER WORKSHOP Three ACT 48 Credit hours available. Tickets $35; FREE parking in The Warhol lot

8.8 – 2pm JOSH & GAB Warhol theater Free with museum admission

Get the real story. Only at The Warhol. PEARLSTEIN I WARHOL I CANTOR

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

From Pittsburgh to New York • Through Sept 6, 2015 Leonard Kessler,, Andy Andy Wa Warhol, o Dorot Dorothy h Cantor, and Philip Pearlstein on Carnegie Institute of Technologyy campus, ca. 1948, courtesy of the Arch ves of Archi of American American Art, A Smit S hsonian Institution. =hkhmar<Zgmhk%Ngmbme^]!Lmn] n rh_\Zmla^Z]Zg][Z\d"%*2. * .&.0%\hnkm^lrh_ma^Zkm ^ blm'

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The future of transit is now and we are working to improve your ride. Look for bus tracking technologies and other innovations to keep you better informed. Getting around town has never been so easy.

FUTURE OF TRANSIT IS NOW THE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


{EDITORIAL}

06.10/06.17.2015 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 23

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE, MIKE SCHWARZ, AARON WARNICK

{ART}

[MAIN FEATURE]

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Ever wonder what it would be like to have a pet pig or train a cat to use the toilet or exactly what a pet psychic does? We answer these questions and more in City Paper’s first-ever Pet Issue.

[NEWS] goes far beyond Iggy Azalea.” 06 “This — Anne Lynch of Three Rivers Community Foundation on criticism of Pride organizers, the Delta Foundation

[VIEWS]

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“I’m going to argue that worms are better than pets. At least environmentally speaking.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the colony of fertilizer-producing worms living in his basement

[TASTE]

whole, steamed red snapper was 25 “A delivered in a light gravy accented with flecks of pumpkin.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Leon’s Caribbean Restaurant

[MUSIC] through a phase of wanting to 29 “Ibewent the best and the smartest, and I’ve kind of let that go.” — Mitski, on moving past her “academic” musical background

[SCREEN]

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“The jokes range from smart to silly to raunchy, but everything moves quickly.” —Al Hoff reviews Spy

[ARTS] “If these ideas are packaged in comedy 42 that works, people laugh and they think, too.” — Connor McCanlus on his improv troupe LGBTQ*Bert

[LAST PAGE] an inspiration to see a dog 63 “What like Lulu.” — Marci Anderson on the reaction of hospitalized children visited by Lulu, a greyhound that survived a traumatic injury

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 61 NEWS

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“THIS HAS OPENED UP A CONVERSATION THAT HAS BEEN SIMMERING FOR THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS.”

Take a peek inside the homes of some unique pets at www.pghcitypaper.com … pssst, this includes a really cute pig. Read our full story on page 18.

Hear from the founders of Roots Pride Pittsburgh on our #Blogh, and check back for more coverage of Pittsburgh Pride. www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Organizers of Roots Pride Pittsburgh Joy KMT and Michael David Battle

TAKING HOLD

This week: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Neko Case and a 150-mile bike ride. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

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Editor’s note: As this story was going to press, Pittsburgh Pride headliner Iggy Azalea cancelled her concert at Saturday’s Pride in the Street event. We’ll have more details as they become available at www.pghcitypaper. com.

this is violent, this is erasure,” Battle says. “We were like, ‘Wow, this is stuff we’re usually saying.’ This is the first time we saw the community galvanize like that.” Battle and KMT are trying to build on that momentum to create an alternative to Pride — called “Roots Pride Pittsburgh” UST HOURS after the Delta Foundation — which is pitched as both a protest of announced Iggy Azalea as the head- Delta and as a more inclusive celebration liner of this year’s pride festivities, the ensuing backlash caught the attention of two local black LGBT activists. But what surprised Michael David Battle and Joy KMT wasn’t so much that people were angry over Delta’s decision to hire {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} Azalea, who has been accused of sending racist and homophobic tweets that have of LGBT people of color and other marsince been deleted. Instead, they were surprised by the ginalized groups. And they’ve racked up systemic criticism that began to emerge some impressive supporters: from Pittsof Delta Foundation itself, the organizer burgh City Council President Bruce Kraus of Pittsburgh Pride. Critics accuse Delta of to the local chapter of the Gay, Lesbian catering mostly to affluent, white gay men. and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), People were saying, “This is oppressive, among other organizations.

J This week’s #CPReaderArt photo (taken from a kayak!) from instagrammer @artteach18, who captured an interesting perspective of the Carnegie Science Center’s USS Requin submarine. Tag your Instagram photos as #CPReaderArt, and we just might regram you. Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to see Fall Out Boy and Wiz Khalifa at First Niagara Pavilion on July 2. Contest ends June 18, 2015.

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Roots Pride event grows out of increasing discontent with Delta Foundation

Part of their critique of Delta is that it claims to be the “leading LGBT organization in Western Pennsylvania” and to serve as “a vigilant catalyst for change,” according to Delta’s website. Yet much of its resources are essentially devoted to Pride itself, not investing in advocacy efforts or the rest of the community. Critics also argue that Delta’s title as a “foundation” is at odds with its spending priorities. Of the $929,689 the nonprofit spent in 2013, $18,549 went to “awards and grants,” Delta’s most recent federal filing shows. Fundamentally, though, Roots Pride supporters say Delta simply doesn’t represent marginalized groups within the LGBT community, and often cite the Delta board’s overwhelmingly white male composition as evidence of that. But some people connected to Delta defend the organization against the criticism that it is not inclusive and seem puzzled by that assessment. “If there was any exclusion, I don’t CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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TAKING HOLD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

think it’s intentional in any way,” says Jim Sheppard, a current Delta board member. Sheppard argues that Delta has been hugely successful in growing Pride to include “an allied community we wouldn’t normally share a party with.” Indeed, Pride now attracts nearly 100,000 attendees each year. The argument Delta has successfully made, Sheppard notes, is “‘We’re just like you’ … it changes hearts and minds.” But for some Roots Pride supporters, the idea that members of the LGBT community should be normalized is part of the problem. KMT (pronounced k’met) makes the argument this way: “The material reality of queer/trans people of color in this city is different than the material reality of a cis, white gay man … people all over are grappling with, ‘How do we make a society and culture that honors and respects all of us?’” It’s a question organizers of the nascent Roots Pride are just starting to tackle.

says she has been promised grants that never came through.) Also among the critics is the Pennsylvania Youth Congress, the first statewide LGBT organization to publicly disavow Delta. Executive director Jason Landau Goodman, who has been to every Pride festival in the state over the past six years, says at $450 per nonprofit to set up a table at PrideFest, Delta’s pride is the most expensive in the state by a margin of hundreds of dollars. “It can keep emerging groups out of the arena, if you can’t afford the price tag,” says Goodman, who says there were years his organization could not afford to participate on its own. “In Pittsburgh, [Pride] has become a very professional production with highvalue features” and entertainment, Goodman says. Philadelphia, by contrast, “is very rooted in the local community [with] all sorts of different events, speakers and community gatherings.” Still, Goodman says, it isn’t uncommon for big-city Prides to focus mostly on largeTHE FUNDAMENTAL problem that Roots scale parties. “Prides have generally lost Pride is dealing with — the exclusion that distinctive political appeal.” of marginalized communities — Delta board president Gary is undeniably complicated. But Van Horn would not agree to one reason it has attracted be interviewed for this story. down wider support, many argue, Instead, he asked questions For a run ide Pr is that resentment of the be submitted by email; he of Roots , s t n h eve g r u Delta Foundation has long b did not reply to emailed s t Pit List festered under the surface. questions by press time. see Short “This goes far beyond But in a statement issued page 49 Iggy Azalea,” says Anne Lynch, May 18, Van Horn defended operations manager for Three the decision to hire Azalea, and Rivers Community Foundation, an wrote that Delta has brought in Aforganization that distributes money to rican-American performers for Pride; has LGBT organizations, among other causes. advocated on behalf of the trans commu(Lynch’s organization has given $250 to nity; and has supported Latino and blackRoots Pride.) “This has opened up a conver- pride celebrations. (For her part, Latino sation that has been simmering under ev- Pride founder Tara Sherry-Torres says she erything for the last several years.” “does not consider them supporters.” She The critiques are “certainly not new,” says Delta’s only support was including agrees Vanessa Davis, who heads the local her events in their promotional materials, chapter of GLSEN and who announced that something “I didn’t ask for.”) the group would not march in the Pride pa“We believe that the push-back is part rade this year. of a larger discussion happening across “I recognize that the Delta Foundation America as it relates to race and gender,” has done a really great job of growing Pride reads Van Horn’s statement. “We believe events,” Davis says. “They also do program- that same conversation needs to happen ming for Pittsburgh Red for World AIDS here in Pittsburgh and today reached Day and have also done some political- out to several community leaders about advocacy work as well and work with law facilitating a discussion about race and enforcement. [But] I just don’t know how gender specifically as it relates to the one asserts itself as the leading LGBT or- LGBT community.” ganization when a lot of what they do is But some Roots Pride supporters say throw parties. They don’t work with youth Delta has already signaled it isn’t interpopulations whatsoever.” ested in that conversation. Davis counts herself as a Roots Pride “[Delta’s] Pittsburgh Pride never realsupporter, though she acknowledges ly took a look into the community to see GLSEN has received about $2,000 from Del- what we needed” says Kenny McDowta to sponsor events in the past. (She also ell, a leader in Pittsburgh’s “house and CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


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TAKING HOLD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

ball” subculture, which consists mainly of LGBT people of color. He argues that Delta could facilitate a Pride that includes events geared toward the ballroom community. “You’re never going to please everybody, but the more you include people in that discussion, the better.” Dan Catanzaro, a Delta board member who recently left the board, says the board tries to be inclusive. “We tried to get all colors and races on that board,” he says. But Pittsburgh is “not a racially diverse city” and “most other boards reflect this.” Asked about Delta’s funding priorities (just 2 percent of its 2013 spending went to grants), Catanzaro says it’s an “interesting, debatable question.” And while “everyone might not agree with it,” Catanzaro adds, “Delta brought an amazing amount of awareness of our community to the rest of the Pittsburgh community and to state legislators, and what is that awareness worth?” ROOTS PRIDE organizer KMT, a mother of five who says she has “never been above the poverty line,” argues the kind of awareness that Delta promotes doesn’t include her. It’s not intentional, but

“symptomatic of structural injustices,” she says. “Creating our own spaces is a political act.” So far, Roots Pride consists of a townhall meeting, a protest of the Pride in the Streets party, an intergenerational paint/water-balloon fight, and a healing circle and river walk. “We’re talking about more than just partying,” says Battle, a Roots organizer. “It’s about celebrating our lives and lived experiences.” But not everyone within the black LGBT community agrees with Roots Pride’s approach, perhaps highlighting the difficulty of uniting groups that have been historically marginalized. “To create a pride that already exists, it’s a slap in my face,” says Pittsburgh Black Pride founder Flecia Harvey, who protested at a recent Roots press conference. “Our pride is for the whole black community.” KMT says that criticism of Roots Pride is partly because “the lack of resources makes you not want to trust everybody.” “I think our community deserves more than one celebration in a year,” she says. “We’re not just a black Pride.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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gested celebrating the worms who live in a bin in my basement and eat my food scraps. Spirited debate ensued. It was decreed that we would not, in fact, include worms, because: (1) worms are not warm and fuzzy and (2) I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cry if one of them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or, indeed, all of them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; died. Fair enough. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to argue that worms are better than pets. At least environmentally speaking. Conventional pets are in many ways an environmental disaster. The authors of the 2009 book Time to Eat the Dog: The Real Guide to Sustainable Living contended that a single, medium-sized dog has the environmental impact of two SUVs, and a cat the impact of a compact car â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in either case, a bigger environmental footprint than the average person in some developing countries. Critics have noted that while those impact calculations were based largely on such petsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; meat-intensive diets, the ďŹ&#x201A;esh in dog and cat food is mostly meat-industry byproduct, not whole cows raised expressly for the delectation of Mr. SnufďŹ&#x201A;es. Still, the food and other care products that are grown, processed, packaged and shipped for the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estimated 70 million pet dogs and 70 millionsome owned cats plainly have a sizable impact. Moreover, a study published in 2013, in the journal, Nature Communications, estimated that cats kill up to four billion wild birds and at least 6.3 billion other mammals a year. (Many of the killers are feral cats, which are the blowback of pet ownership.) Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poop: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estimated that cat and dog waste totals million of tons in the U.S. each year â&#x20AC;&#x201D; toxic stuff that threatens watersheds, and even the air, with bacterial contamination. Even in a best-case scenario, this waste clogs our landďŹ lls with dog feces and 2 million tons of clay cat litter each year. San Francisco once estimated that 4 percent of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residential waste was dog turds. Worms, by contrast, ask so little, and give so much in return. Nine years ago, I mail-ordered a batch of red wrigglers, or eisenia fetida. Ever since, that same vermiculture colony (several generations on) has been turning my householdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tea leaves and banana peels into a couple pounds of high-quality fertilizer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or worm castings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; each month.

{PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Squiggles rolls over a lot, but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really fetch, or anything.

Vermicomposting is quite easy. A good primer is Mary Appelhofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book Worms Eat My Garbage, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly about feeding the little guys regularly (plant matter only â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no meat or dairy, please) and keeping them well covered in shredded paper. The only drawback is a tendency to draw fruit ďŹ&#x201A;ies. I recommend a four-tray worm bin, which lets the worms migrate upward toward the freshest food and facilitates harvesting worm-free poop from the bottom tray. Some apartment dwellers keep small worm bins under the kitchen sink, but worm castings are such potent fertilizer that vermiculture is even done commercially. Locally, for instance, Hazelwood resident Matt Petersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; company Full Circle Soils supplies castings to businesses including the East End Food Co-op and Construction Junction. (Two pounds go for $3.50.) Meantime, even as Fido and Fluffy are shipping their poop off to landďŹ lls, my worms are keeping my household food scraps out of the waste stream. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good deed: According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Americans discard 35 million tons of food a year. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than one-ďŹ fth of what the nation trucks to landďŹ lls, where its decomposition is a signiďŹ cant source of the potent greenhouse-gas methane. And while regular composting is also a good way to deal with food waste, vermicomposting is a much quicker path to turning lemon rinds into fertilizer. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true, of course, that some of my worms are dying even as you read this. But as to my lack of emotional attachment to these invertebrates: Who really needs another reason to cry?

WORMS ASK SO LITTLE, AND GIVE SO MUCH IN RETURN.

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S B Y R O L AN D S WE E T. AUT HE N T I C AT I ON O N D E M AND.

NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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Michael Kevin Meadows, 43, entered a drug store in Beaver, W.Va., wearing full camouflage and a paintball mask, and started spraying pepper spray to take down employees. According to a criminal complaint, he then walked forward and stepped into the cloud of pepper spray. He staggered out of the store empty-handed, but surveillance video led police to him. (Beckley’s The Register-Herald)

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A man in an assisted-living facility in Norristown, Pa., lost his housing subsidy after officials discovered a prostitute under his bed. Uri Z. Monson, the facility’s financial director, said the man, believed to be in his 70s, was a “more mobile gentleman” than other residents and bought alcohol for them, using his profits to pay for prostitutes. (Associated Press)

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Four months after a U.S. intelligence employee landed a personal quadcopter drone on the roof of the White House, the Secret Service apprehended Ryan MacDonald, 39, for flying a drone across the street from the White House. MacDonald was asked to land the device, about the size of an iPad, and complied. The White House was locked down for more than an hour. (Associated Press)

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Police in Lake Havasu City, Ariz., reported that Nolan Pollard threw a T-shirt at a low-flying drone, causing it to fall to the ground and break. Pollard explained that he reacted because he was scared when he saw the drone

flying toward his face. Police cited him for criminal damage. (Lake Havasu City’s News-Herald)

poachers to track protected Roosevelt elk. (The Economist)

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Army officials blamed a data link for causing controllers to lose track of a drone being used “in support of increased force-protection measures” at Colorado’s Fort Carson. The 4-pound drone crashed in a civilian’s yard 12 miles from the military base. “I couldn’t figure out who owned it, so I wrote my telephone number on a piece of paper … and held it in front of the camera, thinking someone would call me if they wanted it back,” Colorado Springs resident Ronald Fisk said. No one responded, so Fisk called police. (Colorado Springs’s The Gazette)

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New Justice Department guidelines for government-operated drones ban flying them “to engage in discrimination” against targets on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexual orientation and “gender identity.” Unmanned aerial surveillance also cannot legally be used to monitor activities protected by the First Amendment. (The Washington Times)

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Washington state Sen. Pam Roach introduced a bill making the use of a drone to commit a felony an aggravating action that would add a year to a prison sentence. “Nefarious drone enterprise” would join carrying a firearm (up to five years extra), trying to outrun a police car (one year) or being armed with a crossbow or hunting knife (six months). Roach said she fears drones could be used to smuggle drugs into prisons, help burglars scout empty houses or enable

After Christopher Panayiotou, a suspect in the murder of his wife, delivered the eulogy at her funeral in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, local media reported that he plagiarized her eulogy by cutting and pasting from a 2010 online tribute by another man to his wife. (Associated Press)

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Hoping to reduce road accidents involving animals, police in the United Arab Emirates unveiled a plan to fit stray animals with glow-in-the-dark vests. The initiative, launched by Umm Al Quwain Municipality with the slogan “protecting road users from stray animals” (not “protecting stray animals from road users”), will rely on Animal Welfare to figure out which animals will wear the fluorescent vests and how to get the vests on them. (UAE’s The National)

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Walking faster could save 5,592 lives if a major tsunami hit the Pacific Northwest, according to geographers reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. They estimated that 21,562 residents of coastal communities in Oregon, Washington and Northern California would not make it to safety walking at 2.5 mph. But walking at 3.5 mph would drop the death toll to 15,970. The report noted that people in vulnerable coastal areas who feel the quake have about 15 minutes to reach higher ground before a wall of water 30 to 40 feet high washes ashore. (Associated Press)

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Iran’s religious authorities banned spiky hairstyles, declaring that they encourage homosexuality and Satanism. “Any shop that cuts hair in the devil-worshipping style will be harshly dealt with and their license revoked,” said Mostafa Govahi, the head of Iran’s barbers’ union. “Tattoos, solarium treatments and plucking eyebrows are also forbidden.” (Britain’s The Local)

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China has banned unofficial weather forecasts by individuals and organizations. State media said the measure is necessary to prevent public panic in advance of major weather events. Amateur meteorologists risk fines up to $8,000 or imprisonment. Critics said the ban is part of a government clampdown on independent sources of information that challenge official versions of events, such as last year’s ban of phone apps that provided pollution readings from the U.S. embassy in Beijing. (BBC News)

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Oil tycoon Harold Hamm, the founder of Oklahoma City-based Continental Resources, told a University of Oklahoma dean that he wanted certain scientists there dismissed because they were studying links between oil and gas activity in the state and the nearly 400-fold increase in earthquakes. “Mr. Hamm is very upset at some of the earthquake reporting to the point that he would like to see select OGS [Oklahoma Geological Survey, part of the university] staff dismissed,” Larry Grillot, dean of the school’s Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, who emailed colleagues after a meeting with Hamm. Grillot confirmed the request but said no action resulted. (Bloomberg News)

LAGUNITAS SUCKS NOW E L B A L I A V A D N U O R R A E Y OZ NR’S IN 12 WWW.LAGUNITAS.COM 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


CAMP BOW WOW PRESENTS

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Sorry, but due to the nature of the event, pets will not be permitted.

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Saturday, July 25, 2015 3:00 PM – 9:00 pm

RAFFLES

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• Live Music BY • Buffettman and the Fruitcakes Good Guys Band • First Light

Proceeds Benefit Animal Rescue League

Presented By

Tickets $75 a person or $125 a couple (Ticket price includes food and activities.)

for tickets go to www.animalrescue.org/parrothead Limited tickets available, advance purchase only. NEWS

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Pet Issue

Mayor Bill Peduto and his girlfriend, Caitlin Lasky with Lilly, their recently adopted Boston terrier {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

T

FIRST DOG

Pet adoption breeds happiness for Peduto, Lasky {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

HERE’S A REASON Pittsburghers have seen a more chipper Mayor Bill Peduto around City Hall recently: a Boston terrier named Lilly. Peduto and his girlfriend, Caitlin Lasky, adopted the terrier from the Humane Society of Western Pennsylvania on April 1. Since that time, they say, the dog has been a ray of sunshine in their lives. “We’re both totally happier,” says Lasky. “I’m so in love with animals in general, but she’s just made us both extremely happier.” “I’m stressed out quite a bit,” says Peduto. “But she’s such a mellow dog, it’s hard to be stressed out around her.” As a result of their experience, Peduto has become a strong advocate for pet adoption. At the several animal shelters throughout the Pittsburgh area, there are thousands of dogs, cats, birds, rabbits and reptiles in need of good homes. “The shelters have plenty of great dogs,” says Peduto. “If you’re looking for a specific breed before you decide to purchase through a breeder, look, go to the different shelters. If you’re like us, you’ll find a great dog looking for great people.” The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that


five in 10 dogs and seven in 10 cats in animal shelters are euthanized because there are not enough people to adopt them. ASPCA estimates the number of stray cats throughout the country to be around 70 million alone. The cost of adopting a dog or other pet can be affordable. Peduto and Lasky adopted Lilly from the Humane Society on the North Side for $155, which included getting the dog spayed, a health check-up, microchip identification, shots and de-worming and flea treatments. “She’s a North Side girl,” Peduto says of Lilly. “She’s amazing. She came with all parts assembled. She’s house-broken. She’s crate-broken. She doesn’t bark.” However, new pet parents should also be prepared for a few surprises. Lilly was brought to the Humane Society by an elderly woman who could no longer take care of her. The terrier suffers from an autoimmune problem that prevents her eyes from producing tears. “When we got Lilly she had ulcers on her eyes,” says Lasky. “She couldn’t see very well. We have to put four drops in her eyes three times a day, and she had to see an ophthalmologist, and it cost us more than we were expecting but she’s totally worth it.” Lasky and Peduto have nursed the 3-year-old Lilly back to health and have seen an improvement in her demeanor as well. “When we got her, she couldn’t walk up or down stairs,” says Peduto. “She used to be very tentative. Now she just runs up and down them. Her vision’s not completely back, and it won’t come back, but she’s better.” Adopting a pet can be a difficult process depending on the shelter a person visits. Before finding Lilly, Peduto and Lasky were working with a Boston terrier rescue group that required them to give references, as do some shelters. Some shelters also do home inspections and check-out the family’s veterinarian. “I grew up with adopted dogs,” says Lasky. “Some places are so difficult that I think it can deter people from adopting, but the Humane Society is really reasonable. You can tell they really cared, but they didn’t make it impossible.” Due to Lilly’s relaxed temperament, Lasky and Peduto are interested in taking her to visit local nursing homes or training her to be a therapy dog. “We’d like to make her a therapy dog, she’s really chill with kids and older adults,” says Lasky. “You have to

PET ADOPTION RESOURCES {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

EVERY DOG DESERVES A GRANDMA

Humane Society of Western Pennsylvania Adoption fees: $5 (mice, gerbils and hamsters) to $325 (puppies six months and under). 1101 Western Ave., North Side. 412-321-4625 or www.wpahumane.org/adopt

Animal Rescue League Adoption fees: $60-150 for dogs and up to $80 for cats. 6620 Hamilton Ave., Larimer. 412-345-7300 or www.animalrescue.org

Located between Station Square and 10th St Bridge. Easy access from North Shore and Downtown.

Adoption fees: $75 (cats), $100 (dogs), $150 (puppies up to six months). 35 Wabash St., West End. 412-928-9777 or www.animaladvocates.net

Animal Friends Adoption fees: $60 (rabbits), $75-$100 (cats), $75-125 (dogs). 562 Camp Horne Road, Ben Avon Heights. 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org

We've got your tail covered®

Animal Care and Welfare Inc. Adoption fees: $50 for cats and $200 for dogs. 316 Noll Road, Georgetown. 724-573-4665 or www.animalcareandwelfare.org

go through a lot of training, but there are also places you can take dogs, like nursing homes.” For now, they’re soaking up the positive impact the Boston terrier has had on their life, and spreading the word about pet adoption in the hopes other Pittsburghers will do the same. “If you want a dog immediately, go down to the shelter and there are plenty of dogs looking for a home,” says Peduto. “If you’re looking for a specific type or breed, give it time and that dog will come to you.” “If you’re on the fence about it and you have the time and home where you’re able to do it, definitely do it,” adds Lasky. “It’s totally worth it.” RNUTTAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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WEEK

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Heather Long with her pot-bellied pig and two rescue pit bulls Photo credit: Linda Mitzel Photography

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WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

Dogs and cats are great, but they’re not the only choices for pet owners {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} IN A STORY about unique pets, the tale of

Frankencat would typically be odd enough to stand on its own. The one-eyed feline — which was found as a stray with an eyeball hanging out — once wrapped his tail around the leg of a completely blind pit bull, who was in his final days, and assisted him around the house. But while Frankencat might show a softer side to the geriatric rescue-dog crowd, he sometimes has to get a bit rougher with Doc, the newest member of the small zoo that Pete Finnagan and Heather Long tend. “Our cat handles Doc really well,” says Long. “Whenever [Doc] bites his tail, he just slaps him.” Doc is an oinking, sniffing, Cheerioeating pot-bellied pig that is just slightly smaller than Long and Finnegan’s three rescue pit bulls named NeNe, Candy and Diamond. “We started fostering him this past winter,” says Long, who officially adopted the pig from the Animal Rescue League in March. “Before we adopted him, I kind of wanted to see what life with a pig would be like because I’ve heard so many stories. Sure enough, a lot of them are true.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

“But, if you’re able to adapt your life to stressed. But for the most part, she says, evmake it work with them, then they’re really eryone has adapted really well. Long and Finnegan are not alone in fun animals.” And adapt they have. Doc has his own adopting battered, unwanted, strange room, complete with a full-sized closet and exotic animals. Last year, the Animal where he sleeps — because “he likes small Rescue League adopted out 7,000 animals, and categories on its website range spaces” — and a balcony where he suns from the usual dogs and cats to himself. His closet bedroom is full the not-so-usual companions of blankets and random things nly -o e of barnyard animals, hermit that he carries there; the day n li n Our o ill take crabs and peacocks. that City Paper met him, he video w side Another local rescue for had carried a plastic spork a peek ines of the homue pets: an often scoffed-at animal into his sleeping quarters. iq some un has grown to a rather large Long says Doc’s previous y it c h g www.p .com network. Founded in 2004 by owner dropped him off at the paper Lindsay Pulman, her husband rescue after realizing the work and a few friends, the Pittsburgh he entailed. Rat Lovers Club averages about 150 “It turns out that pigs are a lot more work than they look to be on TV,” rat adoptions per year. “They’re very nice, very safe pets. Most Long says. Another way that Long and Finnegan people think that they’re dirty, but rats have adapted is that they play the role of re- are very fastidious about [cleaning] themlationship police between their mild-man- selves,” says Pulman, a retired vet-tech supervisor who now owns 43 rats. “I’m a fosnered pit bulls and the ever-curious pig. “He does like to sometimes bite their ter failure. When they come in, they don’t feet and tails. It seems to be kind of a game ever leave.” Pulman and her club have become for him,” says Long, who is on alert for her pit bulls, making sure they don’t get part of a nationwide rat-rescuing network.


AMAZING DOG DAYS

of Summer!

Heather Long kisses her one-eyed rescue cat named Frankencat.

Because rats can breed every 21 days, “rat hoarder” situations sometimes arise. Her organization once became part of a “rattie train,” she says, that helped transport more than 400 rats from an upstate New York home to places that could foster them. Ali Sutch is one of Pulman’s rat converts. She adopted three from the club — Sinbad, Malcom and Dewey. Like Long and Finnegan, she is building her own small zoo; along with her rats, she has a cat named Claire — which she keeps separate from the rats — and a leopard gecko named Shelby. Like the pig, the rats have their own

room, which houses a 5-foot-tall, two-story cage with several hammocks and nooks. She has little harnesses and leashes for when she takes them to the park, and without fail, she says, someone always makes a comment: “Eww, gross! Is that a rat?” “What is that, a hamster?” But she loves them. “They’re great because I’m a college student, and I don’t have the time or money right now to have dogs,” Sutch says. “They’re affectionate and love attention, and you can train them like a dog. They’re just like little manageable dogs.” AMURRAY@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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store owner. The proprietor of Burtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Total Pet, he also fancies himself a philosopher and evangelist. With a background in animal husbandry and degrees in both chemistry and zoology, Patrick, who has eight stores locally, espouses good nutrition both for humans and their pets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good health,â&#x20AC;? says Patrick, who blogs about this subject and other pet-related issues at www.totalpetstores.com, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ultimately comes down to what we put into our body.â&#x20AC;? The same is true for our pets. The only difference, according to Patrick, is â&#x20AC;&#x153;our pets canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell us how they feel, and when we do notice something, like hot spots, we take them to the vet and the vet prescribes medicine, but it could probably have been avoided by feeding them better food. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet nutrition is just as complicated as human nutrition and it all begins with diet.â&#x20AC;? What amounts to good nutrition, in Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes, is what exactly makes up the food that one is feeding their pet. Cheap pet foods, the ones that people are most familiar with, contain high amounts of carbohydrates, bad for a pet like a dog or a cat because they are obligate carnivores, meaning that their saliva doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t contain amylase, necessary to break down carbohydrates while chewing. In the absence of amylase, the carbohydrates arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t digested and they are ultimately broken down by

acid, resulting in gum disease. Shorter life span is another side effect of poor nutrition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of the older dogs that I see,â&#x20AC;? says Patrick, â&#x20AC;&#x153;could probably have their lives extended 5 to 10 years if they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fed cheap pet food.â&#x20AC;? Most of the cheap pet food, he says, is around 60 percent carbohydrates. Cats need around 60 percent protein and dogs need around 70 percent protein. The problem is not necessarily that pet owners donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand this. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the marketing by pet-food companies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Manufacturers are selling things they shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;? he says. Patrick suggests that certain liberties are taken when labeling ingredients. When a pet-food company, for instance, â&#x20AC;&#x153;advertises that their food contains such and such percentage of real meat, what they mean is raw meat, which is 70 percent water, so really, pound for pound, your pet isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t getting the proper amount of protein.â&#x20AC;? Even with the knowledge that most pet food is mislabeled, there are cost issues involved in feeding your pet better. One three-pound bag of Back to Basics, grainfree formula can cost as much as $80. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But,â&#x20AC;? asserts Patrick, â&#x20AC;&#x153;you can pay that now or you can pay that at the vet.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so important for merchants to know what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re selling, and some might say that I indoctrinate my managers,â&#x20AC;? he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But because of that, you know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting the truth.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;PET NUTRITION IS JUST AS COMPLICATED AS HUMAN NUTRITION.â&#x20AC;?

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


F AMILY O WNED S INCE 1979 ONLY 20 MINUTES FROM T! THE POINT!

WE ARE

PITTSBURGH’S

ORIGINAL PET HOTEL

{PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOHN CALDWELL}

Lars handling his business

COOL CAT

From swimming to potty-training, Lars the cat is one-of-a-kind {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} WHEN DEANNA ALKO and her husband

John Caldwell went looking for a cat, they needed a feline who could keep up with and adapt to life with their active dogs — a pair of giant waterloving Leonbergers named Medley and Anchor. Their search took them to Animal Friends, in Emsworth, where they met a 5-month-old gray-and-white cat named Lars. The couple, who say they take their pets everywhere, happened to have their dogs with them, so the cat and dogs met on the spot; the introduction was slow, but went pretty smoothly. “We needed a cat who was willing to be around these two big, loveable giants, and Lars seemed to fit the bill,” Alko says. “After two weeks, there was total harmony.” But having a good temperament wasn’t Lars’ only attribute. He also came with a fearless spirit that allowed him to be up for anything. For example, Alko

and Caldwell do a lot of water training with Melody and Anchor, and Lars, who walks with ease on a harness, would accompany them to the water. He had his own life jacket and mini surfboard and would often ride on the front of a kayak. But that got the couple wondering. “We thought, ‘Would he like swimming?’” Alko says. “So we just thought, ‘Let’s give it a try.’” “He loves it. We found out he’s a very good swimmer. In fact this past April we were on the kayaks and Lars, who was tethered, jumped off the boat and pulled it to shore.” Intrigued by his carefree, daring nature, Deanna and John began investigating what type of animal Lars was. They would discover he was a Norwegian forest cat, a hearty breed of Norse cat that was often used to chase mice and rodents on Viking ships. “It turns out they were Vikings who loved to swim and were very serious

“NO, WE DIDN’T TEACH HIM HOW TO FLUSH.”

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PET ISSUE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

FIRST TUESDAY OF EACH MONT H IS

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See mored n photos a Lars f videos o n at in actio hcity www.pg m co r. e p a p

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Lars relaxes on the beach with Melody and Anchor.

about their job,” Alko says with laugh. But Lars’ amazing feats are not limited to the outdoors. Not a fan of the smell of cat litter or its often unfriendly effect on the environment, Alko says they decided to teach Lars how to use the toilet. Using a device called a “Litter Quitter,” which sits on the toilet bowl and weans

cats off litter, Lars was litter-free after several months. Now he goes to the bathroom — to do all of his business — without any special device. “It did take awhile, almost nine months, but he got it,” Alko says. “And, while they can learn how, no, we didn’t teach him how to flush.” C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


TALK TO THE ANIMALS

Pet communicator wants to tell you what’s on your pet’s mind {BY MARGARET WELSH} WHEN RENEE TAKACS discovered that she could communicate with animals, she had already been lending her telepathic skills to humans, in the form of intuitive consultations, since the early 1990s. One day, while finishing some readings for a family, one client joked, “Next time you’ll have to talk to our dog, he has issues.” “My little intuitive voice said, ‘Do it,’” Takacs recalls. “I plopped down on the floor and I looked at the dog and closed my eyes, as I would prepare to connect with a person. I asked the dog, ‘Is there anything you want to tell me?’ And I went into a loving, receptive listening mode. And boom, I started to receive impressions, which is what telepathy is.” Among other things, the dog expressed missing the taste of bacon, which amazed the family: The dog’s bacon treats had been on the grocery list for weeks, they said, but everyone kept forgetting to pick them up. “I remember driving home and thinking, ‘Oh my gosh, I just talked to a dog,’” Takacs says, laughing. Now, Takacs offers pet-owners insight into the lives of their animals. “I believe in giving the animal a voice,” she says. After asking the pet for permission to talk, and after gathering a bit of information, “I invite the person to step in and ask any questions they have to ask, or tell their animal friend anything they want to tell them,” she says. Clients come to her seeking insight into everything from the animal’s history to behavior and health problems. Some want communication with a deceased pet, which is a service that Takacs — who has honed her skill though meditation and a 20-year yoga practice — does provide. And, surprisingly, she finds it easier than communicating with a living pet. “There’s less to be concerned about when our spirits go into the higher realm. We don’t have a physical body anymore, so we only have [the] part of us, or the pet, that is its loving spirit,” she

Pet communicator Renee Takacs

explains. “People will say, ‘Well, does my cat or dog miss me?” And the truth is, no. They feel they’ve fulfilled their purpose of being a companion in our life — their job is done.” Naturally, Takacs is sometimes met with skepticism, but she doesn’t mind: The evidence, she says, speaks for itself. “I invite skepticism, because I think it’s important that we’re discerning.” In addition to basic pet communication, Takacs also offers “energy baths,” which take into account the energies of both the pet and the owner. “What I’ve found is that if an animal is having a behavior problem, 90 percent of the time, it’s connected to their person. Their person [may be] going through some stress or illness, and — through natural, unconditional empathy — our pets are like sponges,” she says. “We can do some energy work together to read your emotional energies so your cat isn’t always taking on your stuff.” Takacs has clients across the country, all of whom she works with over the phone. This may seem counterintuitive, but Takacs finds it easier and less distracting than in-person meetings. “Telepathy works at a distance, that’s the definition of it. It’s like tuning into a particular radio station and getting the clarity for that particular animal. I set the intention for that particular dog, and boom, it just happens,” she says.

Providing Safe and Fun Daycare Since January 2002

“I REMEMBER DRIVING HOME AND THINKING, ‘OH MY GOSH, I JUST TALKED TO A DOG.’”

Consistent playgroups & knowledgeable staff Proven safety standards & procedures We “KNOW” our dogs—how they play & interact Teach & foster appropriate play behavior

412-566-1083 2726 Penn Avenue fun@bowwowdoggiedaycare.com Like us on Facebook: Bow-Wow Doggie Daycare

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CAT AND GOWN

Pennsylvania college lets students matriculate with pets MOVING TO college for the first time involves a staggering number of goodbyes. To family, home, high school friends, homecooked meals and clean showers. Washington and Jefferson College, however, has removed one particularly challenging goodbye from the list. Thanks to a program that began in the school’s Monroe Hall, students at the Washington, Pa. institution no longer have to bid farewell to Fido as they adjust to college life. After taking over as president in 2005, Tori Haring-Smith introduced an initiative to establish a pet-friendly residence hall at W&J. A lover of animals and an avid animal-rights supporter, Haring-Smith experienced undergraduate life in the company of her cat and wanted to give her students the opportunity to being the family pet to college. Despite initial concerns from the student-life staff, the initiative to create a pet-friendly residence hall was met with enthusiasm from the student body and administration. With about 25 student pet-

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE

{BY JESSICA HARDIN}

Alex and See-More graduate

owners currently living in Monroe, this year marks the program’s 10th anniversary. “Students see this program as a privilege and so they are very responsible,” says Karen Oosterhous, director of communications at W&J. Students wishing to bring a pet to campus must meet a number of requirements. For example, students may only bring pets that have been in the family for at least a

year. Animals must also have up-to-date vaccinations and proper pet licensing. “These requirements emphasize responsible pet ownership,” Oosterhous explains. Additionally, the program is arranged to provide support to petowners. Students that do not own pets or were not able to bring their pets to school may elect to live in Monroe Hall. Those choosing to live in the community with pets and their student owners offer help and support to their pet-owning peers, as the rigor of the academic year may pose challenges for student pet-owners. But the program does more than foster community on campus. Oosterhous believes the pet program bolsters the morale

of W&J students. Other students love to visit Monroe, walk the dogs and even pet-sit. “Having a pet at school is a source of unconditional support as students face the different challenges college can bring,” says Oosterhous. “The campus’ dogs and cats are like rock stars.” A specific group of students benefits from this privilege in a unique way. W&J boasts a strong pre-veterinary program. A substantial percentage of students in this field elect to bring their pets to campus. “This allows them to integrate the academic, the emotional and the social. It’s a terrific way to serve the whole student,” says Oosterhous. Recent graduate Alex Norris says her cat See-More aided in her unique transition to college. “As a transfer student, I didn’t make friends with the incoming freshmen, like all the others did,” Norris says. “I would be able to say things like, ‘I brought my cat with me.’ He helped me to make friends.” For the residents of Monroe Hall, graduation marks a conclusion for student pet-owners and the pets themselves. To commemorate this ending, well-behaved pets may participate in commencement activities and cross the graduation stage with their student owners. Graduating pets, donning tiny caps and tiny gowns, receive a treat and a little diploma to honor their commitment to bringing their student owners a small slice of home. “[See-More] went to school with me for three years,” says Norris. “We joked that he earned it just as much as the rest of us.”

“THESE REQUIREMENTS EMPHASIZE RESPONSIBLE PET OWNERSHIP.”

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Bloodline is a new member of the Flying Dog pack of beers. Bloodline is brewed with blood orange peel and blood orange juice and hits the perfect balance between citrus sweetness and bitterness. Available year round at your Local Distributor, Tavern and Six Pack Shop. Flying Dog Brewery, Frederick, Maryland is one of the fastest-growing regional craft breweries in the mid-Atlantic. Only 201.1 miles from downtown Pittsburgh. For more from Flying Dog Brewery visit:

flyingdogbrewery.com

Cat Around Town

FELINE EXCLUSIVE GROOMING

Justine Cosley CERTIFIED MASTER FELINE GROOMER

1850 Homeville Road Village Shopping Center | In The Arcade

WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122

412-466-PURR cataroundtown@gmail.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


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THE RED SNAPPER IN PUMPKIN SAUCE WAS A STAND-OUT

DOGGIE{BY DINERS ASHLEY MURRAY} Closing the door on those sad eyes is difficult. Does Fido think you’re leaving forever? There’s a Pittsburgh restaurant that went to great lengths to cure this separation anxiety for dogs, and their humans alike. “We went through the procedure to create a separate dog patio,” says Ryan Moore, director of events and operations, at Double Wide Grill in the South Side. That’s because the Allegheny County Health Department doesn’t allow “live animals” within a restaurant’s “operational area” or in any “immediate adjacent areas inside the premise” — with the exception of service animals … and “edible fish, crustacean, shellfish or fish in aquariums.” “I think we’ve given a destination for a lot of pet owners who don’t want to leave their pet at home,” Moore says. “This allows the dogs and their humans to sit and enjoy a relaxed menu.” And, he doesn’t just mean a menu for humans. Offerings from a special doggie menu include chicken breast, a beef patty, an organic dog biscuit and tofu “for the vegetarian dogs,” he says. “Generally we’re dog people. Mine’s lying on the floor of my office right now,” says Moore, who owns a 6-year-old boxer/ lab rescue named Izzy. “A lot of our customers are [dog people], too.” The restaurant will close 24th Street on June 28 for its third annual Lucky’s South Side Dog Festival with activities, fundraisers and games that will include an owner/dog look-alike contest and a contest for the “furriest” human.

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Red snapper with steamed cabbage and beans and rice

TOP OF THE HILL {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2339 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-390-1111 or www.doublewidegrill.com

the

FEED

The Bloomfield Saturday Market is back, and Sat., June 13, is Pet Day. The Animal Rescue League will be on hand to talk about pet health, and you can boost yours by picking up some fresh fruit and vegetables. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Liberty Avenue, between Winebiddle and Gross streets

F

OR DECADES after the upheaval of

1960s urban renewal, Pittsburgh neighborhood identities stayed pretty static. Other than steel-related decline and the South Side’s gradual rise from the ashes, if you knew the city in 1975, you pretty much still knew it in 2000. But that’s all changed now. It’s still changing, in fact, so fast that we can hardly keep track of the formerly moribund neighborhoods morphing into red-hot markets for housing and hipster storefronts. The latest sparks seem to be igniting in the agglomeration of southern neighborhoods lately united under the name “Hilltop” — the South Side Slopes, Mount Washington, Allentown, and vicinity. With visionary ideas like the Hilltop Urban Farm transforming the site of a former public-housing project, plus the

wave of new housing pushing up from the South Side Flats to the Slopes and the ascendance of Grandview Park, the Hilltop is experiencing a surge of creative investment not unlike that which took Lawrenceville by storm 15 years ago.

LEON’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT 823 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown. 412-431-5366 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $6-14 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED And so we arrived at East Warrington Avenue to eat at Leon’s Caribbean Restaurant. It wasn’t hip and it sure wasn’t fancy — just a couple tables, a take-out counter and a matter-of-fact menu board

— but it’s just a few blocks from the great unsung Grandview Park, and a sunset picnic beckoned. Leon’s menu consists of the usual Caribbean array of curried and jerked meats and seafood, peas and rice, and fried plantains, plus a couple dishes we hadn’t tried before, like steamed fish in pumpkin sauce. We ordered a lot — more, as it turned out, than we knew, since Leon’s modest prices belied its generous portions. Our Styrofoam containers strained under their loads. The beef and chicken patties were standard fare, with a slowly building spice, but Jason was a bit disappointed that the crust wasn’t even a bit flaky. Escoveitched chicken, on the other hand, was fantastic. Fried wing pieces were soaked in a tangy vinegar sauce studded with lightly pickled onion, CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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Serving Breakfast & Lunch

Hora Feliz (Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

Did d yo you know you kno k now n ow we off ow offer... offer ffer... • B Breakfast Br reakfast kf t All Alll l D Day • Vegetarian Options • Gluten-Free • Preservative Free • Sausage & Angus Beef • Locally Home-Grown Vegetables • And so much more

• 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

pepper and carrot strips. The vinegar canceled any crisp in the chicken’s crust, but the very worthy trade-off was that it had been absorbed through the skin into the meat, adding plenty of punch to every bite. Jerk shrimp wasn’t so successful. The smallish shrimp were plump enough, but they took on none of the flavor of the jerk sauce, which was hot with notes of warm spices like allspice and cloves, but somehow, nonetheless, kind of bland, as if the flavors hadn’t had a chance to sink in. Classic jerked meat is dry-rubbed or marinated, but here it seemed that cooked crustaceans were merely dunked in sauce, meaning there was little opportunity for them to absorb the flavors.

now open 7 days a week!

1718 Mt. Royal Blvd Mt. Royal Plaza | GLENSHAW Next to Shaler Middle School

www.colecafe.com (412) 486-5513

Leon Rose steams cabbage.

Curry tilapia was also disappointing. The fish tasted, well, fishy, and the mild-tothe-point-of-bland sauce couldn’t hide it. Back in the plus column, however, the fish in pumpkin sauce was a standout. For this dish, we ordered red snapper, and were delighted when a whole, steamed fish was delivered in a light gravy accented, not dominated, with flecks of pumpkin. The effect was just to add a little earthy balance to the succulent seafood, which rightfully retained center stage. The “peas” (actually, beans) and rice that came with both fish dishes served as satisfying sops to the sauce. Ultra-tender oxtail reposed in a thick, mahogany-brown sauce that looked a bit like the jerk sauce, but had a touch of sweetness and little heat. Tender, buttery shredded cabbage worked well as a side, a deferential but not too reserved companion to the rich main dish. Entrees were also served with a square of sweet, firm cornbread that was suitable as dessert after milder dishes but served equally well as a balm for spicier ones. Caribbean restaurants in Pittsburgh have come and gone, perhaps not surprising considering our geographical distance from the source. But Leon’s timing just might be right, and its food satisfactory enough, for it to prosper as the Hilltop rises. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

COCKTAILS ON DRAFT

Pittsburgh taps into a trend The bartenders at Mount Washington’s The Summit must hear it constantly: “You have vodka on draft?” Amidst the bar’s familiar lineup of craft beers, a Tito’s tap-handle certainly stands out. And though straight liquor doesn’t flow from it, the fresh and spicy Moscow Mules that do are even better. The Summit is one of a growing number of Pittsburgh bars using their draft systems for more than beer. “Draft cocktails are super-convenient for service,” says Summit co-owner Shane Witt. The Summit was already selling tons of Moscow Mules (thanks largely to its house-made ginger beer), so a draft version was the next logical step. Witt ferments fresh ginger juice, sugar, water and yeast in a small home-brewing-style keg, then adds the vodka and hooks it to a specially fitted draft line. When someone orders a Moscow Mule — as someone does more than a hundred times a week — the bartender simply fills the signature copper mug and finishes it off with lime and candied ginger.

“IT LETS US PROVIDE A CRAFT PRODUCT WITH CONSISTENCY.” Cocktails on draft have been gaining popularity around the country for a few years now, and speed of service isn’t the only reason. “It lets us provide a craft product with consistency,” explains Adam Henry, of Squirrel Hill’s Independent Brewing Company. Like The Summit, the IBC first experimented with kegging cocktails out of necessity, as the beerfocused bar wasn’t staffed to make them to order. However, Henry quickly realized that he could use the technology to deliver a better drink. To that end, he selects cocktails that require effervescence, like an Indian-spiced Dark & Stormy or a Spanish-style gin and tonic. On draft, Henry’s cocktails are fizzy, fast and consistently delicious — a win all around. Kegged cocktails have also popped up around town at spots like Butcher and the Rye and The Commoner. Though not all cocktails should go on draft (I hope I never see egg whites coming out of a tap), they’re an exciting addition to Pittsburgh’s already dynamic drinking scene. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallops-threeways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF COCA CAFÉ. 3811 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-621-3171. This café is somehow hip but not pretentious. Variety predominates: The omelets alone include smoked salmon, wild mushroom, roasted vegetable, sun-dried tomato pesto and four-cheese. (Coca also caters to vegans, with options like scrambled tofu in place of eggs.) JF GAUCHO PARRILLA. 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-709-6622. Wood-fired meat and vegetables, paired with delectable sauces, make this tiny Argentinebarbecue eatery worth stopping

ALL LUNCHES

Twisted Thistle {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} at. The beef, chicken, sausage and seafood is all infused with flavor from the wood grill. Add-on sauces include: chimichurri; ajo (garlic and herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the charred-pepper pimenton. KF GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-781-2546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — are traditional, not made up to satisfy eclectic contemporary tastes. The cannelloni alone merits a visit to one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyfriendly dining rooms. KE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Gaucho Parrilla LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-3221106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar (meat and fish, pot pie,

pasta Bolognese) while applying up-to-the-minute sensibilities to the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF

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1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

Takeout & Delivery Authentic Thai Food

PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, Robinson. 412-494-3366. Papaya offers a fairly typical Thai menu — from pad Thai to panang curry — augmented by sushi and a few generic Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the side of reliability than excitement, but the presentations show that the kitchen is making an impression. KE

Hours: Mon -Thurs : 3pm - 9pm Fri & Sat : 11am - 9pm Sun : 12pm - 9pm

PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood Newburg lasagna and veal with artichokes, peppers, olives and wild mushrooms over risotto. But don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with gourmet options. KE ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-2434348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bone-marrow

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11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE

1 12 Abbeyville Rd. (412) 833-1888 www.thaifoodsouthhills.com

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Reservation R Take-Out T Free Delivery F Catering C

Ramen Bar

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Japanese Cuisine

40 Craft Beers

Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

w

ontap w

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Oakland 414 South Craig St. AM PM

Friday

Mon-Sat 11 -9 Sun 12PM-9PM

Squirrel Hill 5874 1/2 Forbes Ave. AM PM 5860 Forbes Ave, 15217 • Squirrel Hill CALL (412) 521-5138 521-5899

Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

412-421-9529 412-421-2238

RESERVATION • TAKE-OUT FREE DELIVERY • CATERING

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

Coriander INDIA BAR & GRILL

$

ENTRÉE 3 OFF BUFFET ½ OFF ENTRÉ

CALL: 724.224.9224 VISIT: NATRONABOTTLING.COM FOLLOW: NATronABOTTLING 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

Buy 2 adult buffets, get $3 off (VALID 7 DAYS A WEEK) With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Buy any entrée, get a 2nd entrée of equal or lesser value ½ off. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Coriander India Bar & Grill

2201 Murray Ave, Squirrel HIll | CORIANDERINDIANGRILL.COM

Pino’s Contemporary Italian {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LE

TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE

ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn is dominated by Taiwanese Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. dishes, including a variety of This tiny family-run storefront seafood items. In place of the café packs in the regulars. Most thick, glossy brown sauces begin their meal with an order of which seem all but inevitable fresh spring rolls, before moving at most American Chinese on to authentic preparations restaurants, Rose Tea keeps of pho, noodle bowls and things light with delicate fried-rice dishes. The sauces that are more menu is small, but the like dressings for atmosphere is lively their fresh-tasting and inviting. JF ingredients. KF www. per a p pghcitym TSUKI JAPANESE .co SALT OF THE EARTH. RESTAURANT. 11655 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. Frankstown Road, Penn 412-441-7258. Salt embodies Hills. 412-242-0188. Most of the a singular vision for not just myriad sushi rolls on offer center eating, but fully experiencing on just a handful of raw options, food. The ever-changing but rounded out with traditional compact menu reflects a hybrid cooked ingredients such as eel style, combining cutting-edge and shrimp. The menu offers the techniques with traditional full gamut of maki, from classics ingredients to create unique like cucumber or tuna to truly flavor and texture combinations. original creations, some of them Salt erases distinctions — just short of gimmickry. KF between fine and casual dining, between familiar and exotic TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market ingredients, between your party St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This and adjacent diners. LE cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, offers above-average SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., fare, reasonably priced. Alongside Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun the contemporary American Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — flavors are numerous Asiansimple but not austere — and to inspired dishes, such as soup made peruse its menu is to explore the from kabocha pumpkin. From cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia po’boy oyster appetizers to crab and Singapore. The Pangan cakes and over-sized short ribs, ikan is a house specialty, and each dish is carefully conceived the Malaysian kway teow and prepared. KE (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever VILLAGE TAVERN & have without a tourist visa. JE TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. welcoming, and satisfying Italian 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. restaurant is a reason to brave the 412-665-2770. The menu offers West End Circle. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, variety within a few narrowly legumes and veggies, all rich with constrained categories: antipasti, warm spices. Order the sampler pizza and pasta, with the pasta platters for the best variety of section organized around seven flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, noodle shapes, from capelli to a honey-based wine that is the rigatoni, each paired with three perfect accompaniment. KE or four distinct sauces. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE


LOCAL

“SOMETIMES YOU JUST HAVE TO LISTEN TO BEETHOVEN’S ‘MOONLIGHT SONATA’ AND CRY.”

BEAT

{BY SHAWN COOKE}

FREESTYLE FITNESS

UNEARTHING

EMOTION

Mitski: “I want to make things that people can relate to.”

{BY CARALYN GREEN}

T

HERE’S THIS moment in Mitski’s “Drunk Walk Home” — the seventh track on her breakthrough album, Bury Me at Makeout Creek — where the ground opens up and swallows Mitski whole, then spits out her anguish into something newer and fiercer and more fully realized. A plaintive “I’m starting to learn I may never be free” is followed by pounding distortion and a bottomless scream that escapes from a haunted, unguarded place. It’s a volcanic eruption in an album of simmering stoicism. Bury Me at Makeout Creek — yes, that is a Simpsons reference — earned a spot on many year-end best-of lists, leading to a re-release this April on Don Giovanni Records, home to female-fronted DIYers Screaming Females and Waxahatchee. It’s confessional folk with an anthemic Pinkerton sensibility. It soars as much as it crumbles. For the recent SUNY Purchase grad with two precious chamberpop albums already under her belt, Bury Me at Makeout Creek is a wild ride that comes from a place of newfound vulnerability. “I don’t want to make anything not honest, because I think people can ultimately hear that or see that,” says Mitski, ”and I want to make things that people can relate to.”

YOU’VE BEEN DESCRIBED AS HAVING AN “ACADEMIC MUSICAL BACKGROUND.” WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? In my case, it felt like I already knew what I wanted to do or had something inside me, and then going to music school just gave me all these different tools to do that more smoothly. It means not having to ask for help as much.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KENNETH BACHOR}

Your parents’ calisthenics included squats, lunges, pull-ups and crunches. But Rhyme Calisthenics wants to give young rappers a workout of freestyling, lyricism, delivery and message-making. The rap regimen, which becomes the basis for a competition once or twice a year, blends the fierce aggression of rap battles with game-show conventions. This weekend, at the 2015 RhymeCal “Summer Slam” Finals, 16 MCs will converge at Altar Bar to beat the “Wheel of Skillz.” Established local rap figures Real Deal, Nuke Knocka and Dr. HollyHood will be on hand to judge the proceedings. Created by local rapper Thelonious Stretch and James Armstead Brown in 2007, RhymeCal pits MCs against each other — and against the intimidating wheel. It’s a colorful, six-foot-tall wheel with 12 of Stretch’s challenges scattered throughout the spokes. These challenges tap into every facet of hip-hop training, from crafting themes (“The Message”) to word-specific freestyling (“Word Bank”) and self-deprecation at its most direct (“Mirror Match,” in which competitors direct insults toward themselves in a mirror). Each challenge requires immense preparation before show time, and, according to Stretch, forms the basis for RhymeCal’s “calisthenics” component. “That’s why we call it Rhyme Calisthenics — it takes work. The name is about what you do before the event,” Stretch says. Some local MCs have taken the training from RhymeCal to find wider success outside of Pittsburgh: Stretch cites Real Deal, who participated in one of the early RhymeCal events, as now one of the country’s great rap battlers. Another local MC by the name of Mac Miller managed to draw a modest following after participating in a 2009 RhymeCal event. But Stretch stresses that RhymeCal is more about positivity and self-betterment than eviscerating your opponent, as you might be required to do in a straightup rap battle. In 2011, RhymeCal hosted two youth programs, and Stretch plans to put similar wheels in after-school programs and community centers all over Pittsburgh as a platform to teach kids the art of rapping. “I want this to be a template,” Stretch says. “I want this to be a stepping stone for kids to get out of the bullshit.”

MITSKI

WITH ELVIS DEPRESSEDLY, ESKIMEAUX, THE INCANDESCENTS

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

6:30 p.m. Wed., June 17. The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.druskyentertainment.com

RHYMECAL “SUMMER SLAM” FINALS MC COMPETITION. 9 p.m. Fri., June 12. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20-30. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com NEWS

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HOW HAS YOUR MUSIC CHANGED SINCE LEAVING THAT ENVIRONMENT? I’ve come to understand that songs don’t have to be difficult or “smart” to communicate something. A lot of that has to do with ego. A lot of trying too hard comes from feeling like I’m not heard or feeling like I don’t matter. I’m not the white boy. I’m not in a position to be heard whatever I make. So I went through a phase of wanting to be the best and the smartest, and I’ve kind of let that go. Not because I no longer have the desire, but a lot of simple things or things that are attached to feminine CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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UNEARTHING EMOTION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

qualities, I suppose, for better or worse, are de-legitimized. And just writing a song about being infatuated with somebody is simple, but it’s effective sometimes, and it shouldn’t be seen as “less than.” YOU DID AN INTERVIEW WITH BILLBOARD WHERE YOU TALKED ABOUT INDIE-ROCK ELITISM AND DE-LEGITIMIZING YOUNG GIRLS’ MUSIC FANDOM. WHAT ARE YOU A FAN OF THAT YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO DEFEND? There are lot of hardcore classical pieces that are thought to be so cliché that if you’re in the modern world, you should be above it. You’re supposed to understand atonal music and be really into Schoenberg. There’s this trend, I guess, in thinking that melodic music or things that make you feel good are not intelligent. But sometimes you just have to listen to Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” and cry. WHAT GIRL CAN’T RELATE TO THE LINE FROM YOUR SONG “TOWNIE”: “I’M NOT GOING TO BE WHAT MY DADDY WANTS ME TO BE … I’M GOING TO BE WHAT MY BODY WANTS ME TO BE.” WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THOSE TWO WAYS OF BEING? When I wrote that, in my mind it had double meaning. There’s the straightforward: I refuse to follow what is expected of me. But that thought also stemmed from the fact that I spent my whole life trying to be what people wanted me to be, or live up to whatever was expected of me. Just trying. And so that line also reflects a really sad acceptance. HOW DO YOU MANAGE TO BE A TOURING MUSICIAN AS AN INTROVERT? Honestly, it can be hard sometimes. I think I need to restructure how I perform, because every night it’s a purging process. This is probably not healthy, because every night I basically relive what I wrote. You have your inside self, your private face, and you have your public face. And when I perform I’m basically exposing my private face really brutally. And then I’m supposed to walk off stage and really quickly put on this public face. But sometimes switching that quickly is quite difficult. WHAT’S MAKING YOU HAPPY RIGHT NOW? Being able to support myself at least a little bit doing I think what I’m best at makes me happy in the broad sense. But it’s less about “happy,” because “happy” has connotations of laughing and being ecstatic and it’s not really about that. It’s about being OK, or being able to get through it, or having those little moments of comfort that make everything else worth it. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

NEW RELEASES {BY MARGARET WELSH}

DIVORCE LIFERS HEAD2WALL RECORDS WWW.DIVORCETHEBAND.COM

As one might expect from a band called DIVORCE, this local four-piece delivers the angst. Unabashedly emo (in a good way), LIFERS is rife with hooky Kinsella-brothers worship, but also has a big, atmospheric sound that brings to mind the most recent Title Fight record. Produced with just the right amount of grit by Matt Very (who has a real ear for these things), the record was quietly released last September, and is now being reissued on 12-inch vinyl. Worth checking out, if you missed it the first time around. DIVORCE ALBUM RELEASE SHOW 7:30 p.m. Fri., June 12. The Slit, 831 W. North Ave., North Side. $5

SILENCIO SHE’S BAD SELF-RELEASED WWW.DELSILENCIO.NET

With a Twin Peaks reboot on the horizon, it’s an appropriate time to put out an entire record inspired by the show. The follow-up to 2012’s Music Inspired by the Works of David Lynch & Angelo Badalamenti, She’s Bad (which features a range of contributions by artists like Chris Isaak guitarist Hershel Yatovitz and Rick Nelson of the Afghan Whigs) further delves into a theme that — in less capable hands — could be limiting, at best. Led by guitarist Kirk Salopek, the band meticulously blends lounge-y noir-jazz, dark surf and ethereal vocals to create a sound that is unmistakably Lynchian. It’s a pleasure for fans, but stands on its own as well. The same way that Badalamenti’s music sometimes shows up in unexpected places, adding a touch of the surreal (yoga teachers love that dude), incorporating She’s Bad into your everyday life will make you feel like you’re living in a movie. MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 12TH REGENT SQUARE THEATRE 1035 SOUTH BRADDOCK AVENUE (412) 682-4111 PITTSBURGH

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


THROUGH

SUNDAY! HEADLINERS 6/10 6/11 6/12 6/13 6/14

MILO GREENE RHIANNON GIDDENS RICHARD THOMPSON NEKO CASE BENJAMIN BOOKER

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POINT STATE PARK • GATEWAY CENTER • CULTURAL DISTRICT

LITERARY ARTS ART + TECH RSVP FOR FREE SEATING AT TRUSTARTS.ORG/TRAFLIT

RSVP FOR 40+ SESSIONS AT TRUSTARTS.ORG/TRAFCREATE

Jasiri X + 1Hood Media, Hip Hop Kim Chestney, Power of Intuition Dreams of Hope, LGBTQ

Pittsburgh Technology Council in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University and the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival Unbridled ingenuity with innovators and creatives from around the country.

Michelle Naka Pierce, Poetry Anjali Sachdeva, Creative Nonfiction Words Without Walls, Reading

JUNE 11+ 12

JUNE 13+ 14

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SALON-ATMOSPHERE.COM HOURS: Tuesday – Thursday: 11am – 8pm, Friday – Saturday: 9am – 4pm

3000 W. LIBERTY AVE | DORMONT | 412-343-5490

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FAT WRECK CHORDS}

Spike Slawson (second from left)

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

LECTURE: CELEBRATING PITTSBURGH: ITS CHARACTER AND SIGNIFICANCE This presentation of 72 images, so rich in detail, was created in 2008 for the Frick Art & Historical Center’s exhibition, “A Panorama of Pittsburgh: Nineteenth-Century Printed Views.” Following an overview of Pittsburgh’s physical development, the presentation concentrates on a series of 19th-century lithographs, watercolors, prints, and even a letter that were made to describe, publicize, and promote the city. It concludes with a fast-paced tour of 21st-century Pittsburgh, showing how the 19th-century lives on in notable landmarks. Memorable quotations from David McCullough (author/ historian), Walter C. Kidney (author), David Lewis (urban planner), and Clyde Hare (photographer), among others, help define Pittsburgh’s unique character and significance. About the presenter: Louise Sturgess is the Executive Director of PHLF. Louise works with fellow staff members, docents, and many trustees to raise funds for, create, and implement various educational programs––school tours, architectural design challenges, lectures, membership tours, and publications featuring regional history and architecture. Louise is a fifth generation Pittsburgher, a graduate of Bucknell University (English and Economics), and an employee of PHLF since 1981.

This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Non-members: $5 Go to www.phlf.org for more information about PHLF membership.

TUESDAY, JUNE 16 • 6:00 - 8:00 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

Our First Shipment of Trees & Shrubs Have Arrived!

Cavacini Garden Center

Spring Has Sprung! All Annual Flowers Have Arrived PETUNIAS • BEGONIAS • GERANIUMS You Must See Our Variety of Hanging Baskets, Perennials & Vegetable Plants OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE 100 51st 51 st STREET • L AWRENCE VILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill. 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

UKE PUNK {BY MIKE SHANLEY} THE LAST TIME Spike Slawson returned to

his hometown, he played for a crowd of thousands. Unfortunately, they didn’t respond enthusiastically. Slawson blew into town with Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, a San Francisco band that specializes in punked-up, irreverent covers of all genres, including classic rock. In 2006, the Pittsburgh Pirates organization thought that the band would be a great act to follow a Bucs game at PNC Park on Fireworks Night. To call it a bad pairing would be an understatement. Pittsburghers love “Stairway to Heaven,” and the slightest bit of irreverence toward it can turn 35,000 people against you. Not that Slawson was unaware. He spent his early years in Pittsburgh. (Full disclosure: We went to the same high school.) “Led Zeppelin is like King James and ZoSo is like the Bible,” he explains on the phone from the road. “Taking the piss out of that song, [the audience] wasn’t feeling that. And then there was dead silence after that one, which was really weird because there were a lot of people out there. “That disapproval took me back to being in public elementary school in Pittsburgh and playing Little League before my parents knew that I needed glasses: I was really bad at it. In hindsight I’m kind of glad that’s what happened. Approval from those people would’ve been a lot worse.” Time has done nothing to dim Slawson’s irreverence. Take his current band, Uke-Hunt, which in name alone has an air of bawdiness to it. The moniker “was a catalyst for me,” he says. “That was the reason

to do the entire project, and the fact that I had a bit of experience and a modest skill set on the [ukulele] from having played it on an R. Kelly song in my other band.” Once he settled on a name, Slawson found some empathetic friends to back him up. To get the act together, they busked in San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, which would strengthen any musician’s resolve. “Public space in San Francisco poses a real challenge. There are some unhinged people out there,” he admits.

UKE-HUNT

WITH THE GIMMIE FIVE, THE SCRATCH N’ SNIFFS 9 p.m. Sat., June 13. 31st Street Pub, 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10-12. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com

It worked. Slawson tackles some of the classics, though this time, the selections are “more attenuated to my particular musical taste, which is, like, outsider pop and some ’60s punk,” he says. The band’s self-titled debut covers a wide range, from the Kinks’ “Animal Farm” to Skeeter Davis’ “End of the World” and the often-covered country classic “Green, Green Grass of Home.” While his experiences in Pittsburgh weren’t always the brightest, a summer at Chatham’s Art and Music children’s camp had long-lasting effects. That was where he met a kid named Manny Theiner, now the inexhaustible supporter of underground music. It was Theiner who gave Sean Slawson, not yet a punk, his nickname. “We were pretty marginal figures there,” Slawson says. “He had the idea one day that we should call each other dog names. When I look back on it now, it’s pretty ingenious.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF POONEH GHANA}

J U N E 17 | 21+

Twin Peaks

[PROG ROCK] + FRI., JUNE 12 Ozric Tentacles performances are designed to be a sensory overload. Aside from the proggy voyage through the cosmos, the band brings along a wildly dynamic audio-visual show that looks like Windows Visualizer on PEDs. For more than 20 years, the Ozrics have endured under the umbrella of Ed Wynne, despite near-seismic lineup changes and no major-label backing. This year, the band returned with its first double album since 1990’s sprawling breakthrough LP Erpland. The Ozrics perform at the Rex Theater tonight with Jonathan {PHOTO COURTESY Scales OF SCOTT ROBINSON} Fourchestra. Shawn Cooke 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-20. 412-381-6811 or www.rex theater.com

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., JUNE 13 What’s left to say about Neko Case’s voice? It has a face-melting strength and malleability, and it’s the first quality of her music that people like to talk about. But for us to really care, she has to be singing about some interesting things, too. (Celine Dion also has an incredible voice.) On her excellent mouthful of a sixth album, The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, Case explores a broad, open range of emotions, from missed connections (“Calling Cards”) to witnessing child abuse at an airport (“Nearly Midnight, Honolulu”) and gender-flipping badassery (“Man”). She performs a free show tonight at the Three Rivers Arts Festival’s Dollar Bank Stage. Rhiannon Giddens, Benjamin Booker and more will perform throughout the week; see website for full

NEWS

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schedule. SC 7:30 p.m., Point State Park. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.3riversartsfest.org

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., JUNE 16 Tim Kinsella can hardly sit still. This could describe both his prolific career with Owls, Joan of Arc and Cap’n Jazz and a recent music video for “Issues,” which featured Kinsella dancing around in the nude. He’s kept plenty busy this year during a residency with Joyful Noise Recordings — throughout the year, the label is shipping out a limited number of “subscriptions,” which include four vinyl records’ worth of new music (including two full-length albums), a new book and an art object. Tonight, he’ll run through some of his residency work at Ozric Tentacles Howlers Coyote Café with Jimmy Whispers and Boys. SC 9 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerspittsburgh.com

[ROCK] + WED., JUNE 17 Twin Peaks is steeped in nostalgia for a time before its members were born. The young Chicago rockers channel Iggy (Pop, not Azalea), Thin Lizzy and many more fuzzed-out, guitardriven bands of the ’70s. Last year’s Wild Onion continued the trajectory of brisk, sun-drenched garage rock and power pop from the band’s debut, Sunken. As its name and most recent album title suggest, it’s mostly fun and games with Twin Peaks. The band takes Brillobox tonight with The Wire Riots and Dumplings. SC 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8-10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

M A I N F E AT U R E

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TA S T E

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MUSIC

J U N E 12 | 21+

J U N E 18 | 21+

comedy show !

J U N E 2 5 | 21+

J U N E 19 | 21+

WITH ORTEGA

J U LY 18 | A L L A G E S

FUERTE

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

PEOPLES BLUE'S OF RICHMOND

06|12

david liebe hart

07|25

BIG SOMETHING

06|13

MATTHEWE. WHITE

cornmeal

08|04

06|14

08|14

WILD ADRIATIC

velvet acid christ

09|16

TROMBONESHORTY AND ORLEANS AVE

10|24

SUICIDE GIRLS

06|19

W/ caustic, mindless faith, and stoneburner

06|15

W/ cg3

06|16

SCOTT BRADLEES

POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

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ARTS

SPACE EXCHANGE W/ JEFF BERMAN AND BLINK

BLACKHEART BURLESQUE 11|17

butler st. sessions

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06|17

FLOW TRIBE

06|24

HONEYHONEY

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THU 11 LAVA LOUNGE. Charm & Chain, The Elemental. South Side. 412-431-5282. REX THEATER. Platinum, Sotto Voce, Bye Bye Byrd, Jason Deutsch & Guests. South Side. 412-403-7126.

FRI 12 31ST STREET PUB. Shocktroopers, Children of October, August Ruins, Lady & the Monsters. Strip District. 412-391-8334. APIS MEAD & WINERY. Gone South Lite. Carnegie. 412-478-9172. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. The Red Western, Robin Vote. Strip District. 412-362-0201. CLUB CAFE. Kalob Griffin Band w/ The Soil & the Sun. South Side. 412-431-4950. FRANKIE I’S. Code Whiskey. Washington. 412-657-2642. HAMBONE’S. The HBonez Rock n’ Roll Revival w/ Memphis Mike Metzger, Frankie “eyelashes” Fornsalio. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Love Letters, Jason McCann, Jeremiah Clark. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Damn Long Hairs, Emergency Broadcast, We Hold Hands & We Jump, The Sideways Trees. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Red Wanting Blue w/ Morningsiders, Dan Getkin. Millvale. 412-821-4447. OAKS THEATER. Chris Denem’s Neil Diamond Tribute. Oakmont. 412-828-6311. PARK HOUSE. MJx3. North Side. 412-224-2273. PNC PARK. Totally 80s. North Side. 412-321-2827. REX THEATER. Ozric Tentacles. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERTOWNE BREWING COMPANY. Paul & Gilkey. North Side. 724-519-2145. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Uptown Rhythm & Brass. Ross. 412-364-8166. SIDEBAR. Weapons Of Choice, Bunny Five Coat, Hells Fire Sinners, Bill Jasper Acoustics. Rayburn Twnsp. 724-919-8276. THE SLIT. DIVORCE, Fun Home, Rchrd Prkr, YRS. North Side. 814-553-2928. SMILING MOOSE. Wilhelm, Down They Fall, Can’t Help It, Cynamtic, I Fight Fail (Early). Liquified Guts, Darkapathy, Grizzly Amputation. South Side (Late). 412-431-4668. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. Field Report w/ André Costello & The Cool Minors. South Park.

36

STAGE AE. Flogging Molly, Gogol Bordello w/ Mariachi El Bronx. North Side. 800-745-3000. THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Richard Thompson. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-281-8723.

SAT 13 31ST STREET PUB. Uke Hunt, The Gimme Five, The Scratch ‘N Sniffs. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BIG MIKE’S TAVERN. Ridgemont High 80’s. Etna. 412-784-1940. CLUB CAFE. Smokin’ Section (Early). Skobo, White Light Spectrum, In The Presence of Wolves (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE.32-20 Fully Loaded Blues. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GATORS GRILLE. Antz Marching (Dave Matthews Band Tribute). Glenshaw. 412-767-4110. HARVEY WILNER’S. Bridgewater Station Band. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Legendary Hucklebucks, Hells Fire Sinners, Bill Jasper Acoustics. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LEMON TREE LOUNGE. The GRID. Oakdale. 724-926-9965. MOONDOG’S. theCAUSE. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Blankets for Laura, Roulette

Waves, Anna Azizzy, Plaid Noise, The Monsters. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Asylum, Meat Puppets w/ Honeyriders. Millvale. 412-821-4447. NIED’S HOTEL. Nied’s Hotel Band w/ Mia Z. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. OAKS THEATER. Bo Wagner’s Frank Sintatra & Sammy Davis Jr. Tribute. Oakmont. 412-828-6311. THE R BAR. The Bo’Hog Brothers. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERTOWNE BREWING COMPANY. Big Treble. North Side. 412-322-5000. SMILING MOOSE. The Scratch n Sniffs, Nervous Aggression, Crisis In America, The Anti-Psychotics, Mindless Chaos. Benefit for Derek Dolls (Early). Oak, Corpse Light, CANT Oak, Corpse Light, CANT, Horehound. South Side (Late). 412-431-4668. THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Neko Case. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-281-8723. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cornmeal Cornmeal w/ The Sharrows. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Gone South. Clairton. 412-233-9800.

SUN 14 HARTWOOD ACRES. Randall Baumann’s Hartwood Ramble feat.

Scott Blasey, Rob James, Casey Hanner. Allison Park. BRILLOBOX. Twin Peaks 412-767-9200. w/ The Wire Riots, Dumplings. HIGHMARK STADIUM. Steve Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. Miller Band w/ Don Felder. CLUB CAFE. The Iguanas w/ Station Square. 412-224-4900. Ben Valasek & The Growlers. MOONDOG’S. Weapon-X, Prime South Side. 412-431-4950. 8, The Whisky Rebellion. Blawnox. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. 412-828-2040. Mike Adams at His Honest Weight, PITTSBURGH WINERY. Bridge Lampshades, YRS & Colton Reigel. City Hustle w/ Kyle Lawson. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Strip District. 412-566-1000. MR. SMALLS THEATER. SMILING MOOSE. Solarburn, Wicked Inquisition, Daisyhead. South Side. Old Lords. Millvale. 412-431-4668. 412-821-4447. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. PENN AVENUE MAIL Velvet Acid Christ, CENTER. Sam Ferrella Caustic, Mindless & The Holidays w/ Faith, Stoneburner. www. per a p Southside Jerry. East pghcitym Lawrenceville. .co Liberty. 412-824-6650. 412-682-0177. SMILING MOOSE. Mitski, Elvis Depressedly. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions w/ CG3. Lawrenceville. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. The 412-682-0177. Hawkeyes. South Side. 412-481-4800. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Flow Tribe. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. CLUB CAFE. Lloyd Cole. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Tim Kinsella w/ Jimmy Whispers & Boys. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta SMILING MOOSE. First Blood, Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. No Reason To Live, Hand Of Zeus, HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Fizzle Last Breath of Man. South Side. & Pop w/ DJ Soulfulfella & Soul 412-431-4668. Miners. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

WED 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 15

TUE 16

MP 3 MONDAY DENDRITIC ARBOR {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

ROCK/POP

DJS

WALKER’S BAR. Strange Brew. Ambridge. 724-457-0662.

SAT 13 THE BRONZE HOOD. Sweaty Betty. Robinson. 412-787-7240. THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. Strange Brew. Greensburg. 724-205-6402.

SUN 14 HARMONY INN. Sweaty Betty. Harmony. 724-452-5124. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Ron & The RumpShakers. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808.

JAZZ THU 11 CITIPARKS FARMER’S MARKET BEECHVIEW. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Beechview. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Antoinette Manganas & No Ordinary Soul. Strip District. 412-913-3516.

FRI 12

FRI 12

SAT 13

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Nugget. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Touching Without Feeling. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

WED 17

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

FRI 12

THU 11

SAT 13

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s song comes from Dendritic Arbor, from its new record, Romantic Love. Stream or download this week’s Free MP3 on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

BLUES

ANDYS WINE BAR. J. Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LONA’S RESTAURANT & PUB. RML Jazz. Franklin. 814-432-7010.

GROWN & SEXY II. Eric Johnson & The fabulous A Team. Strip District. 412-251-0615. IRON CREEK BAR & GRILLE. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. 412-564-5292. LEMONT. Sheena w/ Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Max Leake. Observatory Hill. North Side. 412-255-2493. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 14 SAHARA TEMPLE. Tony Campbell & Smooth Jazzsurgery. Braddock. 412-271-0502.

MON 15

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

HIP HOP/R&B

TUE 16

SUN 14 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. New Kids On The Block w/ TLC, Nelly. Uptown. 412-642-1800.

HEINZ HALL. Roger Humphries, David Budway, Sean Jones, Dwayne Dolphin, Ramsey Lewis, Kurt Elling, Jeff Grubbs & Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.


EARLY WARNINGS

FRI 12

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALICE BAXLEY}

MEADOWS CASINO. Michael Christopher Band. Washington. 724-503-1200.

SAT 13 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeremy Fox. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

CLASSICAL FRI 12 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 13

Girlpool

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 14

{THU., AUG. 13}

Girlpool Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield {THU., SEPT. 03}

WED 17

Swervedriver

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side {TUE., SEPT. 29}

Yo La Tengo Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

A celebration of Pittsburgh jazz & its jazz legends. Downtown. 412-322-0800. KATZ PLAZA. Reggie Watkins. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Jeff Berman & Blink. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 17 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CLUB. Lucarelli Jazz w/ Peg Wilson. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 11 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Paul from Wine & Spirits. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Rhiannon Giddens. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-281-8723.

FRI 12 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

SAT 13 WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. Southside American. North Side. 412-235-7796.

SUN 14 ANDYS WINE BAR. Heather Kropf. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL.

NEWS

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Benjamin Booker. Point State Park. Downtown. 412-281-8723.

WED 17 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 12 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE R BAR. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

DAVID BENNETT & DANIEL MAY. Andys Wine Bar, Downtown. 412-773-8884. ERICA WASHBURN & JUSTIN WALLACE. Songs of Emily Dickinson: Music by Wallace, Butler, Copland, & more. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

OTHER MUSIC THU 11 RIVERS CASINO. The Lava Game Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 12 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. You Bred Raptors? North Side. 412-904-3335. RIVERS CASINO. Tony Janflone Jr. North Side. 412-231-7777. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. David Liebe Hart, Crunk Witch, Weird Paul. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 13

THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Stanwix St. stage. Downtown. 412-281-8723. THE TIME BOMB SPOT. Oriel & The Revoluters. Shadyside. 724-289-0755. WESTMORELAND COUNTRY CLUB. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Export. 724-327-2345.

MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Friends in Harmony. A local volunteer semiprofessional choral group, will perform one-hour summerthemed program. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RIVERS CASINO. Darryl & Kim Askew. North Side. 412-231-7777. SCHENLEY PLAZA. The Church in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-303-7472.

SUN 14

SUN 14

SAT 13

MARKET SQUARE. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Downtown. 412-471-1511.

SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Azucar. South Side. 412-481-4800.

COUNTRY

GOOSKI’S. Tropical Trash, Broughton’s Rules, (((mircrowaves))). Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Metal Revival 2. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

THU 11 CLUB CAFE. Elizabeth Cook w/ Joe Zelek. South Side. 412-431-4950.

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What to do June 10 - June 16 Betty Who

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival POINT STATE PARK, GATEWAY CENTER & CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. Free event. Through June 14.

CMOA Culture Club: Opening Party, Jaqueline Humphries CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. Free event. For more info visit cmoa.org. 7p.m.

Mary Poppins BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through June 21.

THURSDAY 11

Elizabeth Cook / Joe Zelek CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 12 Ozric Tentacles

IN PITTSBURGH

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Rhyme Cal Summer Slam

Mary Poppins

Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

JUNE 10 BENEDUM CENTER

SUNDAY 14

Steve Miller Band

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

HIGHMARK STADIUM Station Square. 412-224-4900. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 412-325-7241. 7p.m.

Rik Emmett HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

Flogging Molly / Gogol Bordello STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Daisyhead SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Photo courtesy of Steven Richards

WEDNESDAY 10

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

TUESDAY 16 Pittsburgh Jazz Celebration

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900.Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

David Liebe Hart THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Rob Zombie STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Red Wanting Blue / Morningsiders / Dan Getkin MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 13

Lloyd Cole The Clarks STAGE AE North Side. All ages show.

Cornmeal

Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Where to live

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. NOW LEASING

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

BESTT

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Studio, 1 And 2 Bedroom Urban Apartments

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Find your happy place

Micro, 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments

Beacon on CCommons, ommons, Forbes Terrace, Walnut on Forbes, and Howe Street

Upscale urban rentals • 412-683-3810 • walnut capital.com Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, East Side & South Side

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


A GENTLE SUMMER GET-AWAY FOR YOUNG AND OLD

AGENT AWESOME {BY AL HOFF} Since her breakthrough a couple of years back, Melissa McCarthy has struggled to find the right vehicle for her comedic talents, a beguiling mix of sweetness, weirdness and physicality. But her reunion with director Paul Feig (Bridesmaids, The Heat) in the espionage spoof Spy is her golden ticket: She owns this movie in every which way.

Super-secret spy-scootering: Melissa McCarthy

CP APPROVED

McCarthy portrays Susan, a desk jockey at the CIA who after asserting herself (lean in, girl!) gets a field assignment to simply “track and report” on some European baddies. Despite being disguised as a series of middle-aged frumps, Susan winds up befriending a villain (Rose Byrne) and goes deep undercover, neatly smashing all pre-existing expectations. Because, yeah, Susan was always smart, quick-witted, attractive and kick-ass — that’s the world’s bad for not noticing. The plot is just an excuse to give the well-known cast, which also includes Jude Law, Allison Janney, Jason Statham and Bobby Cannavale, a chance to flex their own comedic skills (often by mocking their usual roles) — and to introduce a mostly-new-to-us, winning British comic actress, Miranda Hart (Call the Midwife), as Susan’s CIA buddy. The jokes range from smart to silly to raunchy, but everything moves quickly, steered by the hard-working McCarthy. Spy joins this summer’s other big hit, Mad Max: Fury Road in presenting characters who are strong, capable women (some even middle-aged!). Maybe you won’t notice because you’re cheering for McCarthy and her gal pals here, but some feminism just got real — and funny. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE FRONT LINE Hun Jang’s 2011 war drama depicts the final battle that determines the border between North and South Korea. In Korean, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Tue., June 16. Parkway, McKees Rocks. Free

FRIENDSHIP

CIRCLE

{BY AL HOFF}

W

{PHOTO COURTESY OF © 2014 GNDHDDTK}

Summer buddies Anna and Marnie

.HEN MARNIE Was There is the

latest (and perhaps last) lushly animated feature from Japan’s Studio Ghibli. After the retirement of its two famed co-founders and directors, Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away) and Isao Takahata (Grave of the Fireflies), the animation house is reputedly scaling back production. If so, this current release may serve as a bittersweet reminder of a creative team that produced consistently fine entertainment, noted as much for its sensitive storytelling as its gorgeous animation. When Marnie Was There, directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi, is adapted from the 1960s British young-adult novel by Joan G. Robinson. (Yonebayashi’s 2010 film The Secret World of Arietty was also adapted from a classic English children’s tale, The Borrowers.) In it, we meet Anna, an unhappy, somewhat sickly 12-year-old girl, whose foster parents send her to the country for the summer. Anna spends her time feeling sad and sketching an object of fascination in the sleepy town — a large, abandoned

mansion perched on the edge of a marsh. Then she spies an occupant in the house, a lively blonde-haired girl named Marnie. They quickly bond, and though Anna finds Marnie and the house (which sometimes is not dilapidated) somewhat mysterious, having a friend is wonderful. The two girls share their troubled pasts and

WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE Directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi Evening screenings: in Japanese, with subtitles; daytime screenings: dubbed in English Starts Fri., June 12. Regent Square

CP APPROVED presents — both are bright, creative children who feel neglected by their parents, and removed from their peers; among the secrets they share are those that eventually lay bare the essence of Anna and Marnie. The story is relatively simple, toggling between lazy summer days and the occasionally dreamlike adventures of the girls. (Is Marnie a ghost? An imaginary

friend? Just another odd child?) There’s a bit of mystery: The Gothic-lite narrative of Marnie trades in many of the genre’s hallmarks (weird old mansion, flowing hair and dresses, mistreatment by mean servants and a hinted-at traumatic event). But the main story is really the emotional development of Anna, as the summer teaches her to like herself, and to embrace those she had previously shut out. The film is resolutely sweet and affirming, though the story doesn’t shy away from the darker sides of life — death, illness, sadness, isolation. These aspects are gently woven through the tale, and of course, mitigated by life’s pleasures: kindness, sunshine, laughing together, even the heady anticipation of slicing into a plump fresh tomato. The relationship themes and time vagaries of Marnie are likely too complex for very little kids, but older children may find much to relate to in Anna’s tale. And, of course, the hand-drawn animation is rich and exquisite. A gentle summer get-away for young and old. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK ENTOURAGE. What’s not to love about Doug Ellin’s big-screen adaptation of his since-retired HBO comedy? How about: no plot; no fresh characterizations; way too many “celebrity” cameos; jokes that are repetitive and shrill; and a pervasive bro-ness that reads both offensive and so-last-decade. Blown up large, the slightly mocking tone the 30-minute TV show offered — mildly sending up the vapid entertainment industry and the dubiously talented meatheads out to conquer it — simply becomes a tonedeaf celebration of the same. (However: If you loved the TV show, you should dig the movie, which is simply an extra-long episode, broadcast years out of date.) (AH) I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS. After her dog dies, Carol (Blythe Danner), a still-spry widow of a certain age, re-examines her comfortable, but stagnant life. She strikes up a friendship with her pool cleaner (Martin Starr), tries speed-dating and meets a handsome stranger (Sam Elliott). Brett Haley’s dramedy is pleasantly low key, with plenty of humor from Carol’s card-playing pals (including Rhea Perlman and Mary Kay Place). And don’t let its older protagonist put you off: A movie about re-energizing your life is suitable for all ages. Starts Fri., June 12. Manor (AH)

MELLON SQUARE CONCERT SERIES IS BACK!

MELLON SQUARE For more info visit:

www.bobfm969.com www.qburgh.com

SUMMER CONCERT

MELLON SQUARE PARK

LIVE FROM NEW YORK! It seems an impossible task to document 40 years of an everevolving show like Saturday Night Live, but Bao Nguyen gives it a go with his new documentary. It’s a chronological history recounted through clips and contemporary interviews with cast and crew members, hosts and various observers. Nguyen manages a nice mix, from amusing backstage anecdotes to sharper critiques around the show’s diversity failings. As someone who hasn’t watched SNL regularly since the original-cast years (when it was a rare slice of weird on TV), I actually appreciated the condensed nature of the information: It effectively showed how the show has adapted over the decades, pivoting from the early, more free-form days through pop-culture riffs and an increasingly role in political satire aimed at

(DOWNTOWN)

S E R I E S

Soaked in Bleach

(2015) - 6/11 @ 7:30pm New documentary about the death of Kurt Cobain. _____________________________________________________

The Grateful Dead Movie (1977) 6/12 @ 8pm Classic documentary followed by live performance by

Fungus. Film also screens 6/16 @ 7:30pm. _____________________________________________________

Adrenalin

(2014) - 6/13 @ 7:00pm & 9:30pm The BMW touring car story. Hosted by BMW Car Club of Pittsburgh. Tickets are $10 and includes chance for door prizes. _____________________________________________________

Breakfast and a Movie - 6/14 @ 10:30pm Featuring the movie Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), buy tickets by 6/11 for catered brunch.

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS! EVERY THURSDAY - Now thru Aug. 27th • Noon-1pm

This Thursday, June 11: WOLVES IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING Next Thursday, June 18: SCHEER ELEMENT 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

Film also screens 6/15 @ 7:30pm _____________________________________________________

Pirates of Penzance (2015) - 6/14 @ 2:00pm Opera directed by Mike Leigh.

_____________________________________________________

The Marquee on Main Street and Out of Print - 6/14 @ 7:00pm Two films celebrating independent movie theaters. Name your own admission price!

the viral-video generation. 7 p.m. Thu., June 11; 6 and 8 p.m. Sat., June 13; and 5:30 and 7:15 p.m. Sun., June 14. Parkway, McKees Rocks (AH)

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Million Dollar Arm, Wed., June 10 (Schenley) and Sat., June 13 (Riverview). The Sandlot, Thu., June 11 (Brookline); Fri., June 12 (Arsenal); and Sat. June 13 (Grandview). Maleficent, Sun., June 14 (Schenley); Tue., June 16 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., June 18 (Brookline). The Refugees of Shangri-La, Wed., June 17 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks. net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Arnold Schwarzenegger series. Conan the Barbarian (classic fantasy swordsand-sandals actioner from 1982), June 9-10. Kindergarten Cop (1990 comedy about an undercover cop), June 10. The Running Man (1987 sci-fi thriller about deadly game show), June 10-11. Predator (Arnold vs. freaky alien in this 1987 action pic), June 11. Forbidden Love series. Her (Spike Jonze’s futuristic 2013 tale about a man in love with an operating system), June 12-14 and June 16-18. Lolita (Stanley Kubrick’s classic 1962 adaptation of the Nabokov novel), June 12, June 14 and June 16-17. Gone With the Wind (epic 1939 romance set amid the Civil War), June 1315 and June 18. Moulin Rouge (colorful 2001 musical romance set in the famed Paris nightclub), June 12-13 and June 15-18. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9 TRACING OUTLINES. Cayce Mell’s new featurelength documentary tells the story of Betty Rockwell, the 21-year-old society woman (and Mell’s grandmother) who in 1941 vaulted well ahead of her time by founding Pittsburgh’s first gallery of modern art. 6:30 p.m. Wed., June 10. Free. Harris JURASSIC PARK. It’s been nearly 30 years since dinosaurs — well, those impressive digital creations we encountered in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 actioner — stalked this earth. Get caught up before the new Jurassic World opens later this month, and ponder anew the perils of messing around with science. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 10. AMC Loews. $5 HOMEMAKERS. Filmed mostly in Pittsburgh, Colin Healey’s comedy depicts a wild child (a fierce and fearless Rachel McKeon) who flirts with settling down after inheriting a ramshackle house in Bloomfield. It’s loosely plotted (a bit mumblecore-ish), but beneath the chaos Healey makes some cogent points about identity, growing up and forming community. 8:30 p.m. Wed., June 10, and 8 p.m. Fri., June 12. Harris. Free (AH) GHOSTS OF AMISTAD: IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE REBELS. This recent hour-long documentary from local filmmaker Tony Buba is based on The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom, Pitt historian Marcus Rediker’s book about the famous 1839 shipboard slave revolt. The film follows a 2013 journey to Sierra Leone, in which Rediker and colleagues sought out living descendants of those taken aboard the Amistad, as well as the site of Lomboko, the former slave-trading depot. 6:30 p.m. Thu., June 11. Harris. Free SOAKED IN BLEACH. Benjamin Statler’s new docu-drama looks at the life and death of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, drawing from the investigative work of private detective Tom Grant, who was hired by Courtney Love to track down the missing musician days before he was found dead. Statler combines contemporary interviews with dramatic


recreations and audio tapes Grant made in 1994 to suggest that Cobain’s death may have been a murder set up to look like a suicide. Grant offers some loose speculation and points out problems with the crime scene, and while he doesn’t outright accuse her, Grant doesn’t have much good to say about Love. The film, which is reminiscent of a Dateline crime episode, teeters between fascinating and ghoulish, and will most interest fans of both real-life mysteries and Nirvana. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 11. Hollywood

1953 comedy from Howard Hawks, Marilyn Monroe portrays the seemingly dim-witted Lorelei, who, as her name suggests, knows how to ensnare men; Jane Russell co-stars. The film continues a monthlong, Sunday-night series of American classics. 8 p.m. Sun., June 14. Regent Square SALT OF THE EARTH. Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado’s recent documentary profiles renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado, whom Wenders calls “a social photographer and a witness to the human condition.” Salgado’s visually dramatic, provocative and emotionally laden blackand-white portraits belie the static, two-dimensional nature of the medium; they are so charged with life, even his photos of unspeakable horror and tragedy. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Mon., June 15, through Thu., June 18. Harris (AH)

CP

THE UMBRELLA MAN. Michael Grasso’s 2014 drama, set in 1983 Pittsburgh, finds a couple distraught after the death of their son. The dad finds solace in pursuing various conspiracy theories, especially that of “the umbrella man,” a mysterious figure associated with the John F. Kennedy assassination. 8:15 p.m. Thu., June 11, and 8 p.m. Sat., June 13. Harris. Free THE GRATEFUL DEAD MOVIE. Directed by Jerry Garcia, this 1975 concert film provides just a tiny fraction of the band’s five-night stand at the Winterland Ballroom, in San Francisco. Grateful Dead tribute band Fungus will play after the screening. 8 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m. for food and drinks), Fri., June 12. Hollywood. $12 PROGRESSION. Lawrenceville’s long-running, real-life annual progressive dinner is the setting for this zesty 2014 ensemble comedy, the debut feature from local filmmakers Gab Cody and Sam Turich. The tone is equal parts screwball and romantic, as a mismatched set of neighbors traipses from one house to the next, more engrossed in the cascade of socially awkward situations than in the lovingly prepared dishes. 5:30 p.m. Sat., June 13. Harris. Free (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

CP

THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE. Walter Huston, Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt

I’ll See You In My Dreams embark on a grimy venture deep into the Mexican mountains on a mad search for gold in John Huston’s riveting and entertaining morality play about the pursuit of wealth. Shot on location, this may be one of the grimiest, dustiest films that ever came out of Hollywood’s golden age. 11 a.m. Sun., June 14, and 7:30 p.m. Mon., June 13. Hollywood (AH) PIRATES OF PENZANCE. This English National Opera version of the classic Gilbert and Sullivan light opera (pirates!) is directed by Mike Leigh. 2 p.m. Sun., May 14. Hollywood OUT OF PRINT / THE MARQUEE ON MAIN STREET. Two documentary films that profile the efforts to

keep single-screen theaters alive. Julia Marchese’s recent Out of Print is a feature-length film that focuses on the New Beverley Cinema in Los Angeles. Also screening is local filmmaker Chester Lampman’s new 35-minute film, “The Marquee on Main Street,” which profiles three Pittsburgh-area single-screen theaters: The Oaks, in Oakmont; the Hollywood, in Dormont; and The Strand, in Zelienople. The challenges — and rewards — of running such a venue in the age of Netflix and the like are discussed. Tickets are name-your-own-price, with proceeds going to the Friends of Ambridge Family Theater. 7 p.m. (6 p.m. cocktails), Sun., June 14. Hollywood GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES. In this delightful

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. In Steven Spielberg’s 1981 film, our square-jawed hero, archeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), tackles everything from giant boulders to snakes and conniving Nazis. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 17. AMC Loews. $5 CC & COMPANY. If you can only see one bikerexploitation film starring Western PA’s own gridiron legend Joe Namath and Ann-Margaret, make it this 1970 flick from Seymour Robbie. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 17. Hollywood BIGFOOT THE MOVIE. In this new, locally produced comedy-horror film from Jared Show, three guys from Ellwood City have to sort things out when Bigfoot comes to town. The film features plenty of well-known Western Pennsylvanians including Curt Wootton (“Pittsburgh Dad”), comedian Jim Krenn, WDVE’s Mike Wysocki and former news anchor Darieth Chisolm. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 18. Hollywood

Vincent: A Special CMOA Theatrical Presentation Written by Leonard Nimoy Performed by James Briggs, Starry Night Theater Company

June 13 at 8 p.m. June 14 at 2 p.m. Critics labeled Vincent van Gogh's work madness. His brother wants to set the record straight. "A memorable and moving production... Briggs is masterful in the role.” –BroadwayWorld.com Tickets on sale now at CMOA.org/vincent-play Sponsored by:

cmoa.org

| one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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[ART REVIEW]

POINT MADE

“BUT IT’S A GOOD VULNERABLE.”

The Point, with its state park, is best known for hosting amusements like the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. With varying degrees of success, the four public artworks in this year’s festival, by four visiting artists, offer historical counternarratives to the site’s fairground atmosphere. In text accompanying the installations, curator Nadine Wasserman (who’s also a CP contributor) emphasizes the Point’s colonialera history of war and culture-clash. Rudy Shepherd’s “Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber,” for instance, is meant to address the Point’s “more sordid history,” writes Wasserman, but also contemporary “ prejudice, racism, everyday disdain.” The craggy, 14-foot-tall sculpture stands unmissably on the park’s city-side lawn. But while Shepherd’s masked, body-suited interpretive dance at the Rock’s June 13 “induction ceremony” was kind of a wash-out, everybody seems to grasp that the sculpture is partly tongue-in-cheek, partly in earnest. And, you know, it’s worth a try. Michael Arcega’s “Baby: Corps of Rediscovery” is ambitious in concept, meant to reverse Lewis and Clark’s imperial journey (which began in Pittsburgh) by sailing eastward through America’s waters. Arcega’s outrigger canoe is a beautiful object, but in its meditative but easy-to-bypass location near the Fort Duquesne Bridge, it’s more visual aid than complete work. “Baby” is surely more effective in action than on display. The text is also key to understanding Fernando Orellana’s “Confluence.” It’s 60 crude, hospital-style beds with sod mattresses — some adorned with dog sculptures — installed in the park’s heavily trafficked reflecting pool. The work’s lovely symmetries are contemplative — and wrenching, too, once you learn it memorializes the millions of Native Americans who died after encountering European explorers and colonists. (See rolled-up blankets: Think germ-warfare smallpox.) Michelle Illuminato’s interactive “Lost + Found Factory,” in the old tourist-board cottage on Liberty Avenue, honors the Point’s industrial and mercantile heritage by promising to create replicas of important objects visitors have lost. Artists sitting in the big glass front window cut, stitch and glue fabric and paperboard; users’ order forms, with sometimes-touching stories about vanished heirloom jewelry and such, are available for reading. In the age of 3-D printing, you might think individual objects would feel less special; in the era of a purportedly “dematerialized” digital economy, you’d wonder how much objects matter at all. “Lost + Found” suggests the emotions that reside in tangibility. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL continues through Sun., June 14. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.3riversartsfestival.org

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Michael Arcega’s outrigger canoe “Baby: Corps of Rediscovery” {PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

[COMEDY]

LAUGHING AND GAY {BY JULIA WEST}

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE RUBINO}

LGBTQ*Bert (back row, from left): James Jamison, Michael Quigley, John Feightner, Mike Buzzelli, Frank McDade and Abby Fudor (coach). Front: Ashley McKinney, Connor McCanlus,, Kayleigh Blanchette and Matt Salinger.

ON’T TAKE comedy lightly. At-

tempting humor onstage before an audience toes the line between thrilling and terrifying. After all, a failed joke can choke the noise from a room and leave behind a resounding awkwardness. It isn’t pretty. Now imagine upping the anxiety factor by requiring use of a quick wit to improvise scene after scene of unrehearsed, thought-provoking humor that is at once funny and poignant, presenting ideas on modern culture, minorities and queer life. It takes guts, but someone’s got to do it. Pittsburgh’s first and only all-gay improv group, LGBTQ*Bert, began as a oneoff production in the shadow of PrideFest two years ago. “There were a handful of gay performers, and we decided to all perform together,” explains LGBTQ*Bert founding member Connor McCanlus. Now it’s a PrideFest tradition. This week, the group performs at Steel City Improv and as part of Arcade Theater’s ArGAYde

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

Comedy Show. LGBTQ*Bert now includes Kayleigh Blanchette, Michael Buzzelli, John Feightner, James Jamison, Frank McDade, Ashley McKinney, Michael Quigley and Matthew Salinger. The group wants to book

LGBTQ*BERT 8 p.m. Fri., June 12. Maker Theater, 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $5. 412-404-2695

PRIDE AT THE ARCADE includes: Gayme Show Night (10 p.m. Fri., June 12); Arcade Hootenany, with Connor McCanlus and improvisers including Q*Bert (8 p.m. Sat., June 13); and ArGAYde Comedy Show, also including McCanlus and Q*Bert (10 p.m. Sat., June 13). Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. www.arcadecomedytheater.com

shows throughout the year. “We don’t wait until February to see black comics,” says McCanlus, also a noted local stage actor for troupes including Bricolage and

barebones productions. “Why should we only perform during PrideFest?” Not only is comedy a boys’ club, says McCanlus, but it’s a straight, white boys’ club, and LGBTQ*Bert works to remedy that. While the current line-up is, admittedly, all white, “We want to make sure that there are voices heard from all minority groups,” McCanlus says. LGBTQ*Bert doesn’t shy away from anything. On stage, gays and homophobes alike become exaggerated characters, along with teens, parents, and couples shopping at IKEA. Nothing is sacred. “We can’t be afraid to make jokes,” says McCanlus. “That’s how we make progress.” In April, in Claysville, Pa., a group of at McGuffey High School students organized an anti-gay day. Participants arrived at school boasting their unified disdain for the LGBTQ community by wearing flannel and writing the words “Anti-Gay” across their hands. The students flooded social media with photos


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[DANCE]

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FRINGEARTS}

STREET DANCE {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Jasmine Hearn

of their flannel-clad group. LGBTQ*Bert had a simple but meaningful rebuttal. “For a show [at April’s Art All Night], we all wore plaid shirts,” explains McCanlus. LGBTQ*Bert recreated the flannel-heavy photo that the anti-gay students posted online. “They’re dressed exactly like us,” says McCanlus. “You can put the photos side by side as proof that there’s no difference between gay people and straight people,” he says. “If I stand on a street corner, not many people are going to listen. But if these ideas are packaged in comedy that works, people laugh and they think, too.” Others have taken notice. “I feel like they know that they’re doing something special and cool, and I think that makes them more invigorated and passionate than your average team,” says Abby Fudor, who’s director and a co-founder of Arcade and an LGBTQ*Bert coach. “LGBTQ*Bert takes the stage as an entire team. It’s not just a few people, it’s nine people, men and women. When they take the stage, there might be someone in the audience who sees Q*Bert perform and feels that his or her voice is important, their view of the world is important.” Fudor points to the way LGBTQ*Bert opens each show as something that sets them apart. It begins with a suggestion. “Sometimes we ask audience members to name the gayest word they’ve heard,” says McCanlus. “Like chartreuse, or unicorn. It’s a starting-out point.” Rather than launch immediately into a scene, the group mills about the stage, discussing the suggestion from a first-person perspective. So “unicorn” can turn into a sarcastic reminiscence about hot-pink Lisa Frank binders, and provide a tiny bit of insight into a performer. “During a rehearsal,” explains Fudor, “the group started talking about a certain type of underwear. One of the girls told a story about how she was wearing that underwear the first time she was with a girl, and I just thought it was so personal and great,” she says. LGBTQ*Bert member and — full disclosure — McCanlus’ boyfriend, John Feightner, likes getting personal with the audience upfront. “We wanted to do something at the start of the show to get our personalities across,” he says. “We’re telling people something about ourselves even before we step on stage, which is that we’re gay. Now we’re trying to work on a more personal relationship with the audience.” But all of this has to add to the fear of going on stage and performing. When asked whether this form makes him feel even more vulnerable, Feightner says, “Yes. But it’s a good vulnerable.” Besides, fear is half the fun of comedy.

PrideFest’s annual dance showcase is among the best ways to catch up with local dance talent. But even this free showcase has been touched by the controversy surrounding PrideFest this year. The choice of rapper Iggy Azalea as festival headliner generated outcry over allegations of homophobia and racism on her part, and reignited claims that festival producer The Delta Foundation is not inclusive enough of all parts of the LGBT community. [Editor’s note: As this issue went to press, Azalea had dropped out of the festival.] Several LGBT groups have boycotted the festival, and an alternate protest and celebration, Roots Pride, is planned (see page 6). But, though most PrideFest attractions will go on as scheduled, at press time, one company had dropped out of the June 14 dance showcase. “We wish to remain neutral in this time of chaos and confusion,” says Duane Binion, artistic director of True T Entertainment. “However, we do agree with our audience request that we do not participate in PrideFest.” The seven remaining acts in the seventh annual free dance showcase, curated by Richard Parsakian, will perform from 1:30-5 p.m. on two outdoor stages. Dancer/choreographer Jasmine Hearn presents the Pittsburgh premiere of her 10-minute solo “the most of us.” Set to music by Beyoncé and Bonnie Raitt, the solo was inspired by a break-up, says Hearn. Pillow Project artistic director Pearlann Porter and writer/poet John Lambert collaborate on Porter’s new work, “In just so many words.” The eight-minute piece contrasts superficial words drawn on an oversized paper gown worn by Porter that is slowly torn off, with more substantive words revealed painted on Porter’s skin. Duo Anna Thompson and Taylor Knight, a.k.a. slowdanger, perform their work-in-progress “exchange,” in which they take turns generating looped sound produced by one dancer’s body while the other responds through movement. Texture Contemporary Ballet presents excerpts from artistic director Alan Obuzor’s “Eclipse” and his “Unchanging Change.” The troupe will also reprise Brynn Vogel’s “Let Me Go” and Amanda Summers’ “Fool’s Paradise.” Completing the showcase will be PrideFest newcomer Jean-Paul Weaver’s 10-minute male duet “Flè”; dancer/choreographer Weylin Gomez’s untitled improvisational solo that contrasts animalistic and feminine movement qualities; and Anthony Williams’ new nine-minute work-in-progress inspired by his experiences in Pittsburgh.

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PRIDEFEST DANCE SHOWCASE 1:30-5 p.m. Sun., June 14. Stages on Liberty Avenue at Sixth and 10th streets, Downtown. Free. www.pittsburghpride.org

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

FUNNY GUY {BY TED HOOVER} BUYER & CELLAR is making its local pre-

miere at Pittsburgh Public Theater. But it’s confusing, so pay attention. In 2010, Barbra Streisand published My Passion for Design, a book in which she details the design, construction and outfitting of a home she built in Malibu. One of the joint’s many interesting facets is that when it came time to create storage space for all her stuff, she didn’t just stow it on shelves; she designed a 19th-century Parisian street in her basement, with various shops along the path to display her wares. There’s a doll shop, antique store, clothing boutique, etc. That’s the reality. Here’s the fiction: Playwright Jonathan Tolins figured that because Streisand had a mini-mall with only one customer, it would need one employee. He imagines an out-of-work actor, Alex Moore, hired to dress up like an old-timey clerk and wait on the lady of the house whenever she comes in pretending to shop. Buyer & Cellar, then, is a one-man show in which an actor plays, among others, Moore, Streisand, James Brolin and Moore’s boyfriend Barry. The script is a slight meditation on the cost of fame, but mostly an excuse for Tolins to unload a boatload of jokes about celebrities.

BUYER & CELLAR continues through June 28. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-56. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

It’s a testament to Tolins’ comedic ability that even if you, like someone I won’t mention, didn’t spend your high school years locked in a bedroom listening to Streisand’s music, you’ll still “get” the show as much as I … er, as much as that person I won’t mention. I purposefully took a friend who knows nothing about Babs (why I even talk to him is another discussion), and he had a great time. A lot of the credit goes to Tom Lenk, as Alex. You’d know him from Buffy and Angel, and he’s such a charming, engaging performer that, with Don Stephenson’s felicitous direction, the production acquires a certain depth that is, perhaps, not evident in the writing. I might not have agreed with all of his characterizations (a few of which are a hair short of caricature), but the sum total of Lenk’s work is a wholly fun and funny evening of theater.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER}

Tom Lenk in Buyer & Cellar, at Pittsburgh Public Theater

CLASS ACTS {BY STUART SHEPPARD} WHAT BETTER to showcase Throughline

Theatre Company’s 2015 theme of “Method in Madness” than its production of The Ruling Class, which provides an eclectic night of megalomania, lust, greed and murder, delivered in a simple production comprising song, dance and serious acting? This staging of the 1968 satire by Peter Barnes stays fairly faithful to the original. Most of the messages still resonate, and much of the classic dialogue still works. (“Tricky business marrying a man who thinks he’s God.” “Happens all the time.”) The action concerns the evolving — or devolving — sanity of the 14th Earl of Gurney, ably played by Everett Lowe, who over the course of two-and-half hours must

THE RULING CLASS continues through Sat., June 13. Throughline Theatre at Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15-20. 888-718-4253 or www.throughlinetheatre.org

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

transmogrify between incarnations of Jesus Christ and Jack the Ripper. Because his voice lacks the plectrum distinctness to deliver the messianic verbal barrages required, Lowe is more convincing as sinister Jack, in Act II, than manic Jesus in Act I. However, Lowe is utterly convincing in portraying Jack’s malefic silences.

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The cast plays multiple roles, retiring to chairs along the back of the stage, where it becomes a de facto Greek chorus that can still comment, sing or — in the case of Jenny Marlarkey, as Lady Gurney — offer a poignant wink after being murdered. Michael Petrucci steals the scene when he appears as McKyle, the rival “electric Jesus,” delivering, literally, thousands of volts of energy. And Luke Chamberlain is a convincing twit as Dinsdale, who would make any Monty Python fan happy. Director Don DiGiulio keeps the pace moving, fun and engaging, which is good when you have a 150-minute book. But one might question certain inconsistencies, such as the range of British accents — from the barely present to the cockney of Laura Barletta’s Grace Shelley, who also has a beautiful singing voice — and the anachronism of Lowe’s Jesus costume. Peter O’Toole’s cassock and cincture in the 1972 film version work much better than Lowe’s modern bathrobe — which looks like a gift from your Aunt Edna — especially contrasted with the Edwardian garb sported by the rest of the cast. But these are small flaws in an entertaining show.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

HISTORY TOUR {BY TYLER PLOSIA} BASED ON the 1941 Thomas Bell novel of the same name, Out of This Furnace tells the type of half-forgotten American

story that isn’t quite a relic. But it’s definitely a reminder of a different time. Set between 1900 and the 1940s, it’s a minor epic about coming to America and the rites of passage that assimilation entails. Much of the content of playwright Andy Wolk’s 1979 stage adaptation makes it prime material for reviving, especially in Pittsburgh: The action takes place mostly in quintessential mill town Braddock. It’s proletarian, an early example of working-class American literature and theater. It’s an immigrant story, covering three generations of Eastern Europeans in Pennsylvania — from straight off-the-boat laborers to their accent-free union-organizer grandchildren. It’s a turn-of-the-century memory play and a Depression-era story of survival all knit into one. A new production by Unseam’d Shakespeare Co. lacks any major faults. The design is terrific, including an intentionally oppressive steel-mill set with complementary sound. The acting, under the direction of Lisa Ann Goldsmith, is strong throughout. Charles “Chuck” Beikert humanizes the self-made but selfish Djuro, an ambitious immigrant who begins the family’s journey in America. And Mary Dobrejcak, a quiet but confident woman who knows struggle and tragedy, is played with charm and ease by Kate Falk.

OUT OF THIS FURNACE continues through June 27. Unseam’d Shakespeare at the Studio Theatre, Cathedral of Learning, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $15-30. 412-621-0244 or www.unseamd.com

However, billing Out of This Furnace as a modern American classic won’t help its trudging, familiar storyline. It’s difficult not to recall similarly themed plays set in the same era — O’Neill’s The Hairy Ape comes to mind — that deliver similar messages but manage to do so with the sort of pointed dialogue, singular characters and, most of all, the exceptional story that this play lacks. Both in the show’s program and on its website, the Unseam’d Shakespeare team states that Out of This Furnace is back by popular demand. (The company previously revived it in 2008 and 2011.) No doubt it’s a hometown favorite thanks largely to its historically minded representation of the working class in Pittsburgh. But while Unseam’d’s execution of the material is strong, the material itself leaves something to be desired. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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AN EVENT DEDICATED TO IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR & VISIBILITY OF THE LGBT COMMUNITY. Pittsburgh’s Independent

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD C CI P Proudly promoting responsible citizenship a professional law enforcement through and mutual accountability since 1997. Dr. Emma Lucas-Darby, Chair • Mr. Thomas C. Waters, Vice Chair Mr. Elwin Green • Ms. Karen McLellan • Ms. Leshonda Roberts • Mr. Sheldon Williams Ms. Elizabeth C. Pittinger, Executive Director Ms. Elizabeth F. Collura, Esq., Solicitor 816 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15219 412-765-8023 Voice • 412-765-8059 Fax • www.CPRBpgh.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

6/10: PITTSBURGH PROGRESSIVE LAUNCH PARTY 6pm 6/10: BETTY WHO 7pm 6/12: G2H2 6pm 6/12: Indecent Divas II: The Second Coming 7pm 6/12: Paint Monkey Pride Night featuring Keith Haring 7pm


TWO STAGES OF ENTERTAINMENT, OVER 150 VENDORS, A CHILDREN’S ACTIVITY AREA AND MUCH MORE!

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6/12: Pub Crawl 8pm 6/13: Pride in the Street

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Animals don’t care who you are or who you love. Neither do we... as long as you love them! Animal Rescue League Board A D Director Frank Tallarico & hhis husband, Kyle Cunningham, hi ccelebrate their anniversary ce b adopting a kitten at by P Pittsburgh Pridefest 2014.

6620 Hamilton Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412.345.7300 www.animalrescue.org

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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.1106.18.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

MATTRESS FACTORY JUNE 11 Jacqueline li Humprhies

+ FRI., JUNE 12

Art by Jacqueline Humphries

Hosted by the Mattress Factory,

Lisa Cibik and Bernie Kobosky

{STAGE}

TICKET INFO AT WWW.MATTRESS.ORG

+ THU., JUNE 11 {ART} For her first solo exhibition in nearly a decade, opening tonight, internationally exhibited artist Jacqueline Humphries unveils new abstract paintings, created specifically for Carnegie Museum of Art galleries. Her silver canvases react to natural light to create images es that are constantly shifting, while her black-light works, hung ung in a darkened room, are e excited by ultraviolet bulbs to create an immersive fluorescent scent experience. Joseph Peiser 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit bit continues through Sept. 28. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. akland. $12-20. 412-622-3131 31 or www.cmoa.org

technologies with classic techniques. An opening reception is tonight. JP 6-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-681-5449 or www.filmmakers.pfpca.org

{COMEDY} Comedian-magician Justin Willman, host of the Food Network’s Cupcake Wars and a guest on Ellen and The

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CGI Technologies and Solutions Inc. CrawfordEllenbogen LLC First National Bank Giant Eagle Jones Day Susan + Scott Lammie Maher Duessel CPAs McGuire Woods, LLP NEXTPittsburgh Nancy + Woody Ostrow Pittsburgh City Paper Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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Pittsburgh Steelers PJ Dick & Trumbull PNC Bank PwC Radiant Hall Studios Schell Games LLC Tata Consultancy Services Uber UPMC & UPMC Healthplan Whirl Publishing Wigle Whiskey Yelp

For PhAb Now!, Pittsburgh Filmmakers ers Gallery enlisted six local artists who use e photography as a vehicle for abstract expression. Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, pila, Todd Keyser and Barbara Weissberger er all break with the tradition ition of realism to create experimental images es that play with light and combine sophisticated ed

They proudly call themselves “a cabaret duo with sass and questionable class.” Now Indecent Divas II: The Second Coming revisits the performers we first met last year, at Off the Wall Theater. Tonight and tomorrow, at ModernFormations Gallery, Anna Elder and Rebecca Covert offer a whole new show with songs on the bawdy and raunchy side. The guest star is “international boylesque diva” Smokin’ McQueen, with musical support from Dan Jennie Dorris and Burgon, Je Sapp. Bill O’Driscoll Kevin Sapp 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., June 13. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $20. www.facebook.com (search www.faceb “Indecent Divas II”)

SAT., JUNE 13 + SAT {EXHIBIT} {EXHIBIT

{ART}

91.3 WYEP + 90.5 WESA A-1 Realty, Inc. AIO - Associates in Ophthalmology All in Good Taste Productions Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff Allegheny Health Network Amcom Office Systems Anonymous AudioCARE Systems, Inc. Vivian + Bill Benter Lisa Cibik + Bernie Kobosky

Tonight Show, plays the first of six shows at Pittsburgh Improv tonight. Don’t expect any rabbits out of a hat or quarters in your ear. Willman prefers tricks like turning a computer mouse into a live rodent. His current tour features brandnew material, so even if you’re a fan there’ll still be surprises. JP 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., June 14. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, Homestead. $17 (ages 18+). 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

JUNE 11 Justin Willman

Few books have made such a universal impact as Eric univer Carle’s The Very Hungry Car Caterpillar. The Ca beloved 1969 picture b book is an early step b on o nearly everybody’s reading journey, so r don’t be embarrassed d if you’re just as excited as your kids for today’s world fo premiere of the pr traveling Very Eric tra Carle exhibit, at the Ca Children’s Museum Ch of Pittsburgh, coorganized with the Eric orga Carle Museum of Picture


sp otlight

Controversy over this year’s PrideFest headliner, rapper Iggy Azalea, and over PrideFest organizer the Delta Foundation (see news story, page 6), has sparked a noteworthy alternative to the long-running LGBTQIA-themed festival. [Editor’s note: As this issue went to press, Azalea had dropped out of the festival; no alternative programming had yet been announced.] Roots Pride Pittsburgh is a four-day celebration created by local activists to honor what they call a more inclusive vision of the LGBT community in regard to race, class and gender. So, this year’s incarnation of PrideFest includes: Friday’s Pittsburgh Pride Pub Crawl ($30); Saturday’s planned big party on Liberty Avenue, Downtown. Then, Downtown on Sunday, there’s both the annual PrideMarch (noon) and the free, family-oriented, carnival-style Pride in the Street (1-6:30 p.m.), also on Liberty. The brand-new Roots Pride Pittsburgh, meanwhile, starts Fri., June 11. First comes a town-hall meeting focusing on LGBT people of color in Pittsburgh, at the Hill District’s Blakey Building. On the lighter side, Friday’s Intergenerational Paint Party is a water-balloon fight that starts at 6:30 p.m., in Schenley Park. (Wear all white.) On Saturday, to coincide with PrideFest, comes the Shut It Down protest, starting at Downtown’s Renaissance Hotel. And Roots Pride wraps on June 14 with a Healing Circle and Riverwalk, which begins at 2:30 p.m. at the Point. Bill O’Driscoll PrideFest: www.pittsburghpride.org. Roots Pride: www.rootspridepgh.wix.com

Book Art. Play-and-learn stations allow visitors to interact with Carle’s classic characters and his colorful world. JP 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 20. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-14. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

{SPORT} Back then, it was “base ball.” People just had less need for compound words in the 19th century, the time to which Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village harks with

written by the late Leonard Nimoy, who himself toured it extensively after its 1981 premiere. The play, which paints Van Gogh as an inspiring symbol of passion, is performed tonight and tomorrow in the Carnegie Lecture Hall. JP 8 p.m. Also 2 p.m. Sun., June 14. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $30. 412-622-3288 or www.cmoa.org

($6-12; free for kids under 5). www.heinzhistorycenter.org/ meadowcroft

{TALK} Heard enough about starving artists? So had Andrew Simonet. The Philadelphiabased choreographer launches Artists U, a free, grassroots, artist-run program for “building sustainable artist lives.” Says Simonet: “I want to talk about why artists are poor, and why they shouldn’t be.” He offers analysis, solutions — and hope — in “Let’s Change It

+ TUE., JUNE 16 {MUSIC} The Pittsburgh Jazz Celebration boasts big names in a big program composed entirely of songs either written or made famous by a Pittsburgh talent. The show, at Heinz Hall, is presented by MCG Jazz, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and WQED Multimedia. It begins with a sextet featuring drummer and local legend Roger Humphries, bassist Dwayne Dolphin and trumpeter Sean Jones honoring such predecessors as Kenny Clarke and Art Blakey, and performing work by the likes of Tommy and Stanley Turrentine and Earl “Fatha” Hines. The second half features the PSO — with guests like famed pianist Ramsey Lewis and vocalist Kurt Elling — performing new arrangements of numbers by Billy Strayhorn, George Benson, Ahmad Jamal, Billy Eckstein and others. The evening’s host is nationally known actress and singer Gloria Reuben. BO 8 p.m. 800 Penn Ave., Downtown. $24.75-79.75 (gala and concert: $250). 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH}

JUNE 13

Very V Eric Carle

Vintage Base Ball Day. This site of the oldest human habitation in North America, also noted for its recreations of historic villages, hosts three games played under 1860s rules by vintage-baseball outfits the Pittsburgh Franklins, the Somerset Frosty Sons of Thunder and the Addison Mountain Stars, who’ll wear period-appropriate uniforms and gloves. Also expect live 19th-century music by the group Home Front, baseballappropriate refreshments (hot dogs, popcorn) and kid-friendly games. BO Noon-5 p.m. 401 Meadowcroft Road, Avella, Pa. Free with admission NEWS

Up,” today’s talk at Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, presented by the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. BO 4:30-6 p.m. 1000 Madison Ave., North Side. $5. Register at www.pittsburghartscouncil.org.

{STAGE} As part of its exhibition Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples, Carnegie Museum of Art presents the one-man play Vincent. James Briggs, who has performed the role in a dozen cities, plays Vincent’s brother Theo — an art dealer and the artist’s sole supporter during his lifetime — who argues for Vincent’s legacy. Vincent was +

M A I N F E AT U R E

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Indecent Divas II: The Second Coming way to hear the stories behind local news- and culture-makers. Tonight, the real-life-storytelling series hosts Brandi Fisher, founder of the Alliance for Police Accountability. The grassroots organization strives to create a working relationship between the community, police and government officials. Also taking the stage at the Hill House Kaufmann Center is local writer EbonyDawn Davis. BO 7 p.m. 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. $5. 412-392-4400 or www.hillhouse.org

+ WED., JUNE 17

Vincent

The Living Room Chronicles is a TA S T E

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This year, CitiParks’ Dollar Bank Cinema in the Park, known for cineplex-friendly fare, introduces a new program. Spark! is a series of films telling stories from diverse cultures. (It’s part of Mayor Peduto’s Welcoming Pittsburgh initiative.) Spark! continues tonight with a free screening of The Refugees of Shangri-La. The 2014 documentary by Doria Bramante and Markus Weinfurter explores the plight of the 75,000 Bhutanese refugees who have settled in

JUNE 13

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America — many of them in the Pittsburgh area. A concert by the Ferla-Marcinizyn Guitar Duo precedes the film. BO Concert at 7 p.m., screening at dusk. Flagstaff Hill, Schenley Park, Oakland. Free. www.citiparks.net

+ THU., JUNE 18 {WORDS} Cave Canem was founded in 1996, as a home for African-American poets. It’s found a home-away-fromhome at City of Asylum/ Pittsburgh, which since 2010 has hosted a free annual reading by poets affiliated with the group. Cave Canem 2015 features the group’s nationally known co-founders, Cornelius Eady and longtime University of Pittsburgh professor Toi Derricotte. Also on the always-lively, tented outdoor program are Amber Flora Thomas and Willie Perdomo. A set by jazz pianist Tom Roberts precedes the reading; a book-signing follows. BO 7:30 p.m. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. RSVP at www.cityofasylum.org. CLASSIFIEDS

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FRIDAY JUNE 12 Chris Denem’s

Neil Diamond Tribute

Chris Plays all your favorite Neil Diamond Hits.

SATURDAY JUNE 133 Bo Wagner presents

Frank & Sammy

An adaption of Rona Jaffe’s 1958 bestseller about ambitious secretaries in the big city. Thru June 13, 8 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. BUYER & CELLAR. A one-man comedy about Barbara Streisand & the stuff she collects. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru June 28. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE DANCE ON WIDOW’S ROW. A romantic comedy about four widows. Thu., June 11, 7:30 p.m., Sat., June 13, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., June 14, 3 & 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood, Homewood. 412-431-0773. THE FULL MONTY. A rock musical presented by Split Stage Productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 13. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 1-88-71-TICKETS. HAMLET. Shakespeare’s classic presented by Food for Groundlings

& CCAC South Campus Theatre. June 17-20, 7:30 p.m. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-1100. HAPPILY NEVER AFTER. A romp over the river & through the woods. Presented by Musical Mysteries & More. Fri., June 12, 6:30 p.m. Lamplighter Restaurant, Delmont. 724-468-4545. Also, Sat., June 13, 5:30 p.m. Joseph Tambellini Restaurant, Highland Park. 412-221-5202. HOW THE OTHER HALF LOVES. A classic farce about 3 couples & two dinner parties. Wed, Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Thru June 12, 8 p.m. Thru June 13. Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland. 412-624-7529. MAKING GOD LAUGH. In 1980, 3 grown children all return home, where we learn of their plans & dreams as they embark on their adult lives. The show follows typical American family over the course of 30 years’ worth of holidays. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 27. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Neko Case and a 150-mile bike ride Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

MARY POPPINS. The troubled Bricolage & Real/Time Interventions. Wed-Sun, 7 p.m. Brooks family gets a little help Thru June 13. 722 Braddock Ave., from Mary Poppins. Fri, Sat, Braddock. 412-471-0999. 7:30 p.m. Thru June 27. THE SPELL OF SLEEPING Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. BEAUTY. Presented by South 724-773-9896. Park Children’s Theatre. Wed, THE RULING CLASS. After 10 a.m., Tue, 10 a.m. & the accidental suicide of 6:30 p.m. and Mon, his father, Jack Gurney, 6:30 p.m. Thru the 14th Earl of Gurney, June 24. South returns from the Park Amphitheater, asylum where he was South Park. www. per institutionalized to take a p ty 412-831-8552. pghci m his rightful seat in the .co VINCENT. Presentation House of Lords. Is Jack of the one-man play ready to rejoin society & written & originally performed is Parliament ready for a by the late Leonard Nimoy. Sat., paranoid-schizophrenic, who June 13, 8 p.m. and Sun., June 14, believes he is God? Presented 2 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, by Throughline Theatre Company. Oakland. 412-622-3131. Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Thu, Fri,

FULL LIST ONLINE

8 p.m. Thru June 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-71-TICKETS. SAINTS TOUR. Molly Rice’s site-specific play built for the neighborhood it occupies, taking the form of a bus & walking tour during which magical things happen. Co-presented by

THU 11 DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

THU 11 - SAT 13 [STORYTELLING]

FRIDAY JUNE 19 LYNDSEY SMITH & Soull D Distribution isi

ALWAYS B SHARP. A night of improvised musical comedy. 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LGBTQ*BERT & CHELLO KITTY. Improv comedy from Pittsburgh’s finest queer comedians. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

&

FUNK

SATURDAY JUNE 20 11AM CINEBRUNCH featuring FATHER OF THE BRIDE

FRI 12 - SAT 13 CHUCK KRIEGER. June 12, 8 p.m. and Sat., June 13, 7 p.m & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

ENJOY BRUNCH AND A MOVIE!

SUN 14

SATURDAY JUNE 27

5 MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC. Presented by Chicksburgh Comedy. 8 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Dr. Cyril Wecht

FAMED PATHOLOGIST DISCUSSES HIS ILLUSTRIOUS CAREER

THE OAKS THEATER IS AVAILABLE FOR SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH SERVICE RENTAL. CALL 412.828.6322 FOR DETAILS.

TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

THE HARVEY WALLBANGERS. Sketch comedy. June 11-13, 8 p.m. and Sun., June 14, 2 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

FRI 12

SOUL

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MON 15 The Oakland Planning and Development Corp. celebrates its 35th anniversary with An Evening of Oakland Storytelling. The stories will be curated with help from The Moth in Pittsburgh. While being regaled, enjoy hors d’oeuvres from fine-dining establishment Legume and cocktails from Grit & Grace. Proceeds benefit OPDC’s community-based work in the Oakland area. 6 p.m. Fri., June 12. Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, 201 N. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $50. www.opdc.org

COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long CONTINUES ON PG. 52


PITTSBURGH TATTOO COMPANY

“Elephant on a Sled” (hand-built, unglazed ceramics), by Charles Johnson. From the exhibition Bedtime Stories, at Future Tenant, Downtown.

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Impractical Magic: The Other Side of Practical. Work from Art Institute students & alumni. Opening reception June 17, 7 p.m. Downtown. 412-263-6600. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Raise the Flag. Spend Flag Day w/ uniquely American stories by American artists like Rembrandt Peale, David Gilmour Blythe, & Stuart Davis. Oakland. 412-622-3131. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Norwin Art League’s Show. Opening reception June 11, 7-9 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-1757.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Vascular Caverns. Papercut sculpture depicting abstracted, anatomical imagery by Gianna Paniagua. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. One Out of Many, One People. Works by Tamara Natalie Madden. An exploration of the vast cultural heritage of Jamaica. Downtown. 412-456-6666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. Works from Pittsburgh based artist, Cecilia Ebitz’s “Good Intentions”, inspired by the work & teachings of Corita Kent. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Work from

Pearlstein, Cantor & Warhol from their time as students at Carnegie Tech to their early days in New York. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site specific artwork by the German/Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART SPACE 616. Hereafter. Work by Ryan Lammie & Alisha Wormsley. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Only Perfect Quiet. Painting by Tony Cavalline. Barco Law Library Gallery. Oakland. 412-648-1376. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples. Van Gogh’s “Still Life, Basket of Apples” (1887),”Le Moulin de la Galette” (1886–1887), “Wheat Fields after the Rain” (1890), & Paul Signac’s “Place des Lices, St. Tropez”, visiting from the

Saint Louis Art Museum. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mara Light. Paintings inspired by the neo-classical, Renaissance & romantic eras by Mara Light. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. Cranberry Artists Network Member’s Show. http://www. cranberryartistsnetwork.com. Cranberry. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Bedtime Stories. A group show of artists working in a variety of media including painting, photography, sculpture & sound. Participating Artists: Aaron Blum, Olga Brindar, Ashley Cecil, Eric S Dickson, Gary Duehr, Charles Johnson, Michael Koehler, Victoria Mills, Josh Mitchel, David Stanger, Christopher Ruane, Sherry Rusinack & Wanda Spangler-Warren. Downtown. 630-388-8365. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Looking Forward, Looking Back. Work by Dennis Bergevin & Leonard Leibowitz. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Thoughts & Feelings. New & collected works by Ben Patterson, a

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THURSDAY JUNE 25/10PM PHAT MAN DEE’S BON VOYAGE PARTY $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

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The first hit is free.

Meet The Brewer June 11th z 6 - 8 PM

Actually, so are all the others.

$3.50 16 oz. Draft

Now Serving Brunch Sat-Sun 11am-3pm

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

NEWS

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Live Acoustic Music on Sundays 3pm-6pm CLASSIFIEDS

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 16 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

Live Music

EVERY THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY

Swing Dance Every Friday to a Live Band

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015

WED 17 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh!. Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

chalk pastel artist & painter. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Diane Grguras. New pastel paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Elements. Drawings & watercolors of bird nests w/ a focus on the natural & man-made materials incorporated into these architectural structures. The featured artists are Sue Abramson, Wendy Brockman, David Morrison & Kate Nessler. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. The Big Little Show. An exhibition curated by Sheila D. Ali w/ local & international artists: Abira Ali, Alberto Almarza, Bill Shannon, Dougie Duerring, Eliza Henderson, Etta Cetera, Katy Dement, Laverne Kemp, Lisa Demagall, Nino Balistrieri (ACBIII), Michael “Fig” Magniafico, Merrily Mossman McAllister, Ryder Henry, Sandra Streiff, Sheila Ali & Waylon Richmond. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. All Terrain Vehicle. Exploring the contemporary landscape through painting & photography. Bound. Woven fiber forms by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Lakevue. 24-316-9326.

DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th

LOCAL 412. Hands Up. A group show of national artists exploring the “hands up, don’t shoot” rallying cry that grew from the killing of Michael Brown. Friendship. 412-362-6132. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Grain Of Salt. Works by Lizzee Solomon. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. MCG Invitational Arts Exhibition. Showcasing the winners of the Friedberg Family Arts Scholarships: Jameelah Platt, Breanna Stanton, & Sarah Hudson. North Side. 412-465-0140. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! A mixed media show exploring the common teapot in uncommon ways. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. 2015 Regional Show. More than 40 artworks are on display, submitted by local amateur & professional artists. Mediums include oil, pastel, watercolor, fiber, stoneware & threedimensional pieces in metal. Ross. 412-364-3622. PERCOLATE. Quartet. Work by Katy DeMent, Samir Elsabee, Shamus Fatzinger & Nora Gilchrist. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods. Work by Ron Donoughe. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. REVISION SPACE. Scratching the Itch. Work by Travis K. Schwab. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. A World Imagined: Kelli Connell & Sara Macel. Photography that reflects on authorship, on photographic construction & on the ways in which we define

Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh

relationships through our subjective experiences of them. Closing reception, cocktails & a talk by curator, Leo Hsu June 13, 6pm. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Repetition, Rhythm & Pattern. Work by Kim Beck, Corey Escoto, Lilly Zuckerman, Megan Cotts, Brian Giniewski, Kate McGraw, Crystal Gregory, Alex Paik, Anna Mikolay, Helen O’leary, Lindsey Landfried & David Prince. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Selections From The Elgin Park Series. Photographs by Michael Paul Smith. Shaping New Worlds. A national exhibition of constructed photography. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream. Contemporary comics artists honor Winsor McCay’s work w/ original art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Zocto31’s Firmamental Coagulation. Painted works by Lorne Zeman. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Currently showing the whimsical creations of Jeff Brunner & the textural mixed media art of Dawn Pogany. Shadyside. 412-913-4966. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. The World Revolves Around You. Work by HC Gilje. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape. This exhibit explores landscape painting in Britain form the Industrial Revolution to the eras of Romanticism. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable


complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. The Bryce Family & the Mount Pleasant Factory. Telling the story of the Bryce family & their contributions. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Orotones. A display of glass plate images which have been enhanced w/ real gold-laced lacquers to bring a gilded-tone to the people & places depicted. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000

NEWS

animals, including many endangered species. Highland ALICE IN WONDERLAND Park. 412-665-3639. & A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S RACHEL CARSON DREAM. A journey through HOMESTEAD. A Reverence these two tales presented for Life. Photos & artifacts by the Laurel Ballet Performing of her life & work. Springdale. Company. 2 & 7 p.m. 724-274-5459. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL 724-836-8000. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. AN EVENING OF OAKLAND SENATOR JOHN HEINZ STORYTELLING. Oakland HISTORY CENTER. We Can Planning and Development Do It!: WWII. Discover how Corporation presents an evening Pittsburgh affected World of live storytelling in honor of War II & the war affected their 35th anniversary. our region. Explore the Stories will be curated development of the w/ support from Jeep, produced in The Moth. Hors Butler, PA & the stories d’oeuvres from www. per behind real-life “Rosie Legume/Butterjoint, pa pghcitym the Riveters” & local .co local beer & wine Tuskegee Airmen whose & cocktails by Grit & contributions made an Grace. Proceeds benefit unquestionable impact on OPDC’s work to build a better the war effort. From Slavery to Oakland. 6-8:30 p.m. Western Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s Pennsylvania School for Blind role in the anti-slavery movement. Children, Oakland. 412-621-7863. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. FREE TO BREATH LUNG Strip District. 412-454-6000. CANCER 5K. Raise awareness SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS & funds for the fight against HISTORY CENTER. Museum lung cancer. 8:30 a.m. North commemorates Pittsburgh Park Boathouse, Allison Park. industrialists, local history. 215-893-4279. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. LUPUS CHALLENGE SOLDIERS & SAILORS GOLF TOURNAMENT. MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Benefits The Lupus Foundation Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of Pennsylvania. The Club of military artifacts showcasing at Nevillewood, Presto. photographs, uniforms, shells 412- 276-1000. & other related items. Military ROCKING FOR RESIDENTS. museum dedicated to honoring A rock-a-thon w/ time spent in military service members since rocking chairs. A sing-a-long, the Civil War through artifacts “cake walk,” games, prizes & & personal mementos. Oakland. refreshments. Celebrity “Rock 412-621-4253. Stars” will include Mr. McFeely, ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Pirate Parrot, Steely McBeam, Features 5,000 relics of Catholic Elvis, more. Participating locations: saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. Marian Manor, Vincentian de ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN Marillac & Vincentian Home. CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka 12-3 p.m. 412-548-4056. Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. BIKE MS: ESCAPE TO THE Millvale. 412-407-2570. LAKE. An overnight bike ride WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. from Moraine State Park to Lake Learn about distilling & cokeErie in Conneaut, OH w/ a stop at making in this pre-Civil War Allegheny College for the night. industrial village. West Overton. Proceeds benefit Pennsylvania 724-887-7910. Keystone Chapter of the National MS Society. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-261-6347.

SAT 13

Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 17 WOMEN’S CENTER OF BEAVER COUNTY GOLF OUTING. Annual co-ed golf outing. All proceeds benefit domestic & sexual violence survivors. 7:45 a.m. Black Hawk Golf Course, Beaver Falls. 724-775-2032.

SAT 13

FUNDRAISERS POLITICS FRI 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 13

WED 17

THU 11 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 11 BILLIE NARDOZZI. Poetry reading. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. POETRY DISCUSSION GROUP: LINDA PASTAN. 7:30 p.m.

JOAN OF DARK. Signing her book, “Geek Knits”. 2 p.m. Rickert & Beagle Books, Dormont. 412-344-7444. LILLIE LEONARDI. Local author & retired policewoman reads from her book In the Shadow of a Badge. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292. ROBERT YUNE. Eighty Days of Sunlight Launch Party, also feat. Sherrie Flick & Jeff Condran. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

TUE 16 PITTSBURGH’S GOLDEN AGE OF ROCK N’ ROLL. Ed Salamon will be discussing his book & music in Pittsburgh from the 50s through the 70s. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

THE LIVING ROOM CHRONICLES. Featuring storyteller, Brandi Fisher. 7 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. ROBERT YUNE. A reading of his novel, “Eighty Days of Sunlight”. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

KIDSTUFF SAT 13 M3: MATERIALS, MEDIA, AND ME!. Explore a new material & make a project every Saturday of the summer! For youth in 4th through 8th grade. Sat. Thru Aug. 29 Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. PENNY ARCADE: KIDS COMEDY SHOW. Second Sat of every month, 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 13 - WED 17 VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn exhibit featuring activities inspired by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

SAT 13 - SUN 14

DANCE THU 11

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. WALK NOW FOR AUTISM SPEAKS. Autism Speaks’ signature fundraiser where participants can walk individually or form teams w/ family, friends & co-workers. 8 a.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-367-4571.

FRI 12 - SAT 13 INDECENT DIVAS II: THE SECOND COMING,. A cabaret duo & guest Smokin’ McQueen. Burlesque, live music, bawdy acts. June 12-13, 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

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POMODORo

SUN 14

MY GOOD SIDE & RETREAD/ TOGETHER/APART. Teena Marie Custer & Roberta Guido perform solo works of hip hop dancing. 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side.

Lite Bottles & 50 50 cent wings

2

Schmidt’s $ Tavern

Pizzeria & Ristorante

$7 Lite Pitchers ALL DAY EVERY DAY

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$2.75 20 oz

Lite Drafts DURING PIRATES GAMES EVENTS

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WORRIED New Book!

ABOUT WHAT YOU EAT? HOW ABOUT YOUR BODY IMAGE? EXERCISING TOO MUCH?

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

SUN 14 KIDSCAN FESTIVAL. Performances from Jeter Backyard Theater, The Josh & Gab Show, & In Between Theatre, as well as screen printing, magic, & games. 1 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Three Rivers Arts Festival Juried

Visual Art Exhibition at the Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown

MON 15 FAMILY BINGO NIGHT. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

CRITIC: Lin Yuhan, 22, a student from Oakland WHEN: Sat.,

June 06 This is my first year visiting the arts festival. I’m glad there are a lot of different mediums on display, but some of it is just hard to understand. The photography and paintings that involve a lot of colors stuck out to me the most. I think of looking at art as trying to solve a puzzle, but with more aesthetic satisfaction. The one I was really interested in was [Robert Sholties’] “Chaos in Paradise.” There was just something about Sholties’ world, how colorful it was. It made me think about sustainable development; how we as human beings think we are the superior species and we try everything we can to ruin the existing natural system. That connects to the idea of a paradise; we think of the world as this perfect place, but what we do every day has such a negative impact.

TUE 16 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

OUTSIDE FRI 12 PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: NORTHSIDE. Visit artwork in the Northside neighborhood, w/ guest speakers Syl Damianos & Chirs Siefert. 7 p.m. Buhl Community Park, North Side. 412-391-2060.

SAT 13 DIRTY GIRL MUD RUN. A 3.1 mile obstacle course run for women. 9 a.m. Steel City Raceway, Export. 970-390-6492. VINTAGE BASE BALL DAY. 3 games of baseball played w/vintage rules & uniforms. 12-5 p.m. Meadowcroft Museum of Rural Life, Avella. 724-587-3412. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Mushroom walk w/ WPMC member Kate Pavelle. 10 a.m. Camp Guyasuta, Sharpsburg. 412-781-6581.

B Y J OS E P H P E I S E R

shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 11

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. JUDAISM: A SUMMER SAMPLER. Taught by Rabbi Paul Tuchman. 7 p.m. Panera Bread, Downtown. HERB GARDEN WALK. 412-372-1200. Members from the Piccadilly PFLAG BUTLER. Support, Herb Club discuss herbs in education & advocacy for the the Beechwood garden. LGBTQ community, family & 2 p.m. Beechwood Farms, friends. Second Thu of Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. THE WESTERN 412-518-1515. PENNSYLVANIA www. per pa PUBLIC ART MUSHROOM CLUB. pghcitym o .c WALKING TOUR: Discuss mushrooms & DOLLAR BANK art w/ WPMC identifier THREE RIVERS ARTS Joyce Gross. 7 p.m. Beechwood FESTIVAL. Tour of the 2015 Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-781-6581. TRAF projects, including works by Michelle Illuminato, Rudy Shepherd, Fernando FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop Orellana, & Mike Arcega. for local, organic & Certified The tour will begin by Michelle Naturally Grown on Phipps Illuminato’s Lost + Found front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Factory along Liberty Avenue. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory 5:30 p.m. Gateway Center, & Botanical Garden, Oakland. Downtown. 412-391-2060. 412-622-6914. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. WEDNESDAY MORNING Learn a variety of dances from WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or

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the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WINE TASTING & TOUR. 6 p.m. La Casa Narcisi, Gibsonia. 412-335-2862. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

FRI 12 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CARNEGIE CRAWL & JAZZ. Gallery crawl followed by Jazz at 3rd Street. Second Fri of every month, 5-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 9 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID. A public education program that helps the public identify, CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.10/06.17.2015


A Vaping & ECigarette Convention at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center • Pittsburgh, PA

Try and buy new vape gear and eliquids from a variety of vendors!

PRESENTED BY

DIAMOND SPONSORS

Business to Business (B2B) - Registration Required - Sat. June 13th 9a-Noon

FREE to the Public (18+ Only) Sat. June 13th Noon-6p • Sun. June 14th Noon-6p FREE Battery safety & rebuilding classes! Plenty of THR Advocasy learning opportunities! PLATINUM SPONSORS

For details visit: VAPINGCC.COM NEWS

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 54

understand & respond to signs of mental illnesses & substance use disorders. This 8 hour course introduces participants to risk factors & warning signs of mental health problems, builds understanding of their impact & overviews common treatments. The target audience for this session is veterans, families of veterans, those who work w/ veterans. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912. PUBLIC ART PICNIC. Picnic & talk w/ Office of Public Art staff about the 2015 Three Rivers Arts Festival public artworks. 12 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-391-2060. SHADYSIDE STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL. Games, food, crafts & face painting. Proceeds benefit Sojourner House. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. SHARON NEEDLES’ BLACK RAINBOW. A punk/disco/ trash-pop queer pride party feat. performances by Sharon Needles, Mahogany La’Piranha & Kitty Klottsalot. Presented by Pgh Bro Club. 9 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400. SUMMER FRIDAYS AT THE FRICK. Picnicking, tours, wine bar, yard games, music & different food trucks every

week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

SAT 13 BABUSHKAS & HARD HATS TOUR. A presentation about the rise & fall of steel in Pittsburgh & guided tour of the Carrie Blast Furnaces, the Historic Pump House, site of the 1892 Battle of Homestead. Transportation will be provided from Station Square. 10 a.m., Sat., July 25, 10 a.m., Sat., Aug. 22, 10 a.m. and Sat., Sept. 19, 10 a.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. www.showclix.com. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. A DIVORCE WORKSHOP FOR WOMEN. A 4-hour workshop taught by a family law attorney, certified divorce financial analyst & life coach designed to educate women at any stage in the divorce process. Pre-register by June 11. Building 2. 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Medallion Wealth Management, Sewickley. 724-493-9695. HARMONY FIBER ARTS FESTIVAL & MARKET. A free, family friendly, single day festival that celebrates the many uses of fiber in the arts & craft world. 9 a.m. The

Center of Harmony, Harmony. 724-473-0983. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. MILKWEED & MONARCHS. Learn about monarchs & their habitat. 10:30 a.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

RECLAIM NORTHSIDE

ReClaim Northside is seeking volunteers to assist with installation and clean-up in Fineview’s Biggs Hillside Garden. The project is lead by Nicole Flaherty, a ReClaim Northside Ambassador. Volunteer are needed Sat., June 13, and Sat., June 20, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.gtechstrategies.org.

MINDFULNESS TRAINING. For Children, Youth & Families. 1-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-400-3773. PARSEC MEETING. Monthly meetings for Pittsburgh’s Science Fiction & Fantasy Organization feature guest speakers & discussions. Second Sat of every month, 1:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-287-0896. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting,

SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. WOMEN’S SELF CARE SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce stress, tackle anxiety & strengthen boundaries while building practical coping techniques & tools in a confidential, healing & supportive environment. Sat, 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300 ex. 129. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

SUN 14 DOGAPALLOOZA. Dog day in the park, featuring treats, food, & vendors. 12 p.m. Carnegie Park, Carnegie. 412-279-8318. THE JOY OF DEATH. Lecture by Rebecca Troup. Presented by The Theosophical Society. F117 Falk Hall. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. Local small businesses, food trucks, live music & workshops at 23rd Street & Penn Avenue. Second Sun of every month, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 11, Strip District. PLANT & ANIMAL INVADERS OF THE NORTHEAST. Learn how these invaders disrupt our native ecosystem & how to identify & responsibly slow their spread. 1 p.m. Powdermill

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Nature Reserve, Rector. 724-593-6105. PRIDE BOWLING LEAGUE. Seeking bowlers of all levels. Every other Sunday. Every other Sun, 6:30 p.m. Forward Lanes, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-0701. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

AUDITIONS AFTERSOUND:

FREQUENCY, ATTACK, RETURN. Artists & practitioners will be considered for an extended on-line exhibition that pushes the envelope of how sound might be visualized. Send your most innovative examples in the form of a high res image, video or url link to miller-gallery@andrew.cmu.edu. ROBOTO MONTHLY Deadline July 1. Miller MEETING. Meet w/ the Gallery at Carnegie Mellon Roboto board of directors University, Oakland. to find out what’s happening 412-268-3618. at the space & help guide its COMTRA THEATRE. Open future. Third Mon of every audition for “Two by Two”, month, 7 p.m. The Mr. to showcase vocal range Roboto Project, Bloomfield. w/ movement & cold readings. 412-853-0518. June 13, 12-2:30 p.m. & SCOTTISH COUNTRY June 14th, 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., Cranberry. Auditions for social dancing follows. No Seussical! the Musical. Shoes partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. for a dance audition. Ability and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal to play mulitple instruments Church, Mt. Washington. a plus. Bring a headshot. 412-683-5670. No appt. necessary. June 23, 6:30-10 p.m. & June 25, 6:30-10 p.m. Cranberry. ANNE MADARASZ. Speaking 724-773-9896. on the Bryce Brothers in THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. the Heinz History Center Auditions for “Seventh Collections. 7 p.m. Mount Annual Summer Broadway Pleasant Glass Museum. Revue”. Seeking performers 724-547-5929. ages 13-19. Please prepare CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, a one minute dialogue & 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman 32 bars of a Broadway song Center for Imagination, Garfield. of your choice. June 22 & 412-924-0634. June 24, 7 p.m. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. Auditions for the musical, INVENTION & NEW “The Secret Garden”. PRODUCT EXPOSITION. August 9, 7 p.m. Seton Center, Trade show showcasing Brookline. 412-254-4633. inventions, new products & THE JUNIOR innovations. 11 a.m.-5 p.m., MENDELSSOHN CHOIR Wed., June 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. OF PITTSBURGH. Seeking and Thu., June 18, 10 a.m.young singers from 3 p.m. Monroeville 8th through 12th Convention Center, grades. Prepared Monroeville. solo of your choice, 412-288-1343. preferably a . w ww per classical selection a p ty ci h pg CARNEGIE KNITS (art song, aria, etc.) .com & READS. Informal Carefully selected knitting session w/ literary works from musical conversation. First and theater may be performed, Third Wed of every but these should demonstrate month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. a classical singing technique Carnegie Library, Oakland. rather than belting. To 412-622-3151. schedule an audition, call DESIGNING YOUR NEXT Emily Stewart at 412-926-2488. FLOWERBED OR BORDER. Auditions will be conducted Led by Jill Barger, Master on August 27, after 3:30 p.m. Gardeners 6-7:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Mars Area Public Library. Oakland. 724-625-9048. THE PITTSBURGH DETROIT STYLE URBAN SAVOYARDS. Stage & BALLROOM DANCE. vocal auditions for “Iolanthe”, 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. June 22, 7:30-9 p.m. & June 24, Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 7:30-9 p.m. Prepare a song 412-242-4345. from either Gilbert & Sullivan THE PITTSBURGH (preferred), standard SHOW OFFS. A meeting musical theater or classical. of jugglers & spinners. All Accompanist provided. Bring levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. resume & headshot. No appt. Union Project, Highland Park. necessary. Our Lady of Victory 412-363-4550. Maronite Catholic Church,

MON 15

TUE 16

TUE 16 - WED 17

WED 17

FULL LIST ONLINE


*Stuff We Like

Carnegie. 412-734-8476. VALLEY PLAYERS OF LIGONIER. Auditions for “Oklahoma”. Prepare a singing audition piece of your choosing. An accompanist will be provided or you can bring your own instrumental CD to accompany you. Cold readings. June 13, 12-3 p.m. & June 14, 1-4 p.m. Ligonier Theater. 724-238-6514.

ANIMAL EDITION A Walk for a Dog

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST PARTY PRICES DRAFTT BEERS $1 $1.50 50 & $2 $2.25 25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLES  ALL NIGHT EVERY NIGHT

This app from Wooftrax, for iPhone or Android, raises funds for animal shelters based on users’ dog-walking habits. Power it up every time you take Fido out and make that walk count for more than just fitness.

WEDNESDAYS & THURSDAYS

{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

SUBMISSIONS THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, showcasing independent authors from Southwestern PA & beyond. Entrants must complete the online entry form (www.theauthorszone.com) & submit payment by August 1, 2015 for their work to be considered. 412-563-6712. BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedap coopzumba@hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer. com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com Ongoing.

NEWS

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

$2 WELL DRINKS + COORS LIGHT BOTTLES 2 FOR 1 LAP DANCES • 2 FOR 1 DRAFT BEERS ALL NIGHT LONG

FRIDAYS $4 VODKA MARTINIS ALL NIGHT LONG

OPEN LATE

Wednesday & Thursday 7pm-2am Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

Rodent-shaped bike racks in Squirrel Hill

clubcontroversy.com cl c u

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

1635 16 63 3 We 35 Westt C Carson r n St.ree St.reet | 412 412-471-5764 471 5764

BY POPULAR DEMAND, NOW OPEN ON WEDNESDAYS!

Cat Fishing: A Game For Cats

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

No, seriously. This isn’t a game for cat lovers; Friskies made a smart phone app for cats. Die laughing as your cat violently attacks the fish swimming on your screen.

Pup Night at PNC Park Dogs and baseball. How much more American can you get? PNC Park combines the two when it opens one section monthly for Pirates fans to bring their best friends.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

A big congrats to Caitlyn Jenner on her big reveal and lovely Vanity Fair cover! But I am having a crisis of conscience. On one hand, I support a person’s right to be whoever the heck they want to be. You want to wear women’s clothing and use makeup and style your hair? You look fabulous! You want to carry a pillow around with an anime character on it and get married to it, like a guy in Korea did? Congrats! You want to collect creepy lifelike dolls and push them around in a stroller, like a woman on Staten Island does? Great! But I’m confused where we draw the line. When a thin person believes they’re “fat” and then dangerously restricts their food intake, we can have that person committed. Most doctors won’t amputate your arm simply because you feel you were meant to be an amputee. But when a man decides that he should be a woman (or vice versa), we will surgically remove healthy body parts to suit that particular desire. Of course, we modify/enhance/surgically alter other body parts all the time. I guess I’m confused. Could you shine some light on this for me? I want to be less conflicted about sex-reassignment surgery. NO SURGERY FOR ME

Gender identity, unlike marrying a pillow or pushing a doll around in a stroller, is not an affectation or an eccentricity or plain ol’ batshittery. Gender identity goes to the core of who we are and how we wish to be — how we fundamentally need to be — perceived by others. Take it away, Human Rights Campaign: “The term ‘gender identity,’ distinct from the term ‘sexual orientation,’ refers to a person’s innate, deeply felt psychological identification as a man, woman or some other gender, which may or may not correspond to the sex assigned to them at birth. … Transitioning is the process some transgender people go through to begin living as the gender with which they identify, rather than the sex assigned to them at birth. This may or may not include hormone therapy, sex-reassignment surgery and other medical procedures.” Unlike people who have healthy limbs amputated or thin people starving themselves to death because they think they’re fat, transgender people who embrace their gender identities and take steps toward transitioning are almost always happier and healthier as a result. That said, transitioning is not a panacea. Just as coming out of the closet isn’t the end of a gay person’s struggles or troubles, transitioning — which may or may not involve surgery and/or hormones — won’t protect a trans person from discrimination or violence, or resolve other personal or mental-health issues that may exist. You seem pretty concerned about the surgical removal of healthy body parts. To which I would say: Other people’s bodies — and other people’s body parts — are theirs, not yours. And if an individual wants or needs to change or even remove some part(s) of their body to be who they are or to be happy or healthy, I’m sure you would agree that they should have that right. Again, not all trans people get surgery, top or bottom, and

many trans people change everything else but opt to stick with the genitals they were born with. (The ones they were born with tend to work better than the ones that can currently be constructed for them.) But unless you’re trans yourself, currently sleeping with a trans person or about to sleep with a trans person, NSFM, it’s really none of your business what any individual trans person elects to change. For me, it boils down to letting people be who they are and do what they want. Sometimes people do things for what can seem like silly and/ or mystifying reasons, while sometimes people do things for very sound and serious reasons. Unless someone else’s choices impact you in a real, immediate and material way, there’s no conflict for you to resolve. Accept that you won’t always understand all of the choices that other people make about their sexualities or gender identities — or their partners or their hobbies or their whatevers — and try to strike the right balance between minding your own business and embracing/celebrating the infinite diversity of the human experience. I’m a 23-year-old man. I left an abusive relationship a year ago, and I’m currently in therapy dealing with the fallout. This abusive relationship really affected me negatively. On the one hand, she was the first person I was ever really intimate with. And when I say intimate, I mean pretty much everything you can think of — from holding hands to kinky sex. I identify very strongly as a submissive man, but she coerced me to be way more dominant than I actually am, among other shitty things she did to me. This has made me even more desirous of expressing myself submissively in bed, because I never really got to be who I actually am. How can I explore my submissive desires in a place that doesn’t really have much in the way of BDSMrelated meet-ups, munches, clubs, etc.? How do I meet a Dominant who is respectful and kind? I may need more time away from relationships to recover and get my life in order, but being a submissive is more and more on the forefront of my mind.

“GENDER IDENTITY GOES TO THE CORE OF WHO WE ARE AND HOW WE WISH TO BE PERCEIVED BY OTHERS.”

SEEKING A DOMINANT

If you don’t live someplace with kinky clubs and social organizations — no classes, no munches, no dungeons — you have three options. 1. Look for kinky people in your area on kinky dating sites. Mention that you’re looking for kinky friends, too, not just dates or lovers, because a kinky friend could invite you to a private party in your area. 2. Date women you’ve met on non-kinky sites or in non-kinky venues and roll out your kinks in good time. I’ve been to lots of kink events, SAD, and I’ve met two kinds of people there: people who were always kinky and people who fell in love with someone kinky and then fell in love with kink. 3. Move someplace that has kinky clubs. On the Lovecast, Dan and Ophira Eisenberg discuss the wisdom of face tattoos: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.10-06.17

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I think it’ll be better if you don’t engage in much sacrifice, compromise or surrender in the next two weeks. Normally they are valuable tools to have at your disposal, but for now they may tend to be counterproductive. Judging from the current astrological omens, I suspect you need to be more commanding than usual, more confident in your vision of how to take action with maximum integrity. It’s time for you to draw deeper from the source of your own power, and express it with extra grace and imagination.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You will soon be escaping — or maybe “graduating” is the right word — from your interesting trials and tribulations. In honor of this cathartic transition, I suggest you consider doing a ritual. It can be a full-fledged ceremony you conduct with somber elegance, or a five-minute psychodrama you carry out with boisterous nonchalance. It will be a celebration of your ability to outlast the forces of chaos and absurdity, and an expression of gratitude for the resources you’ve managed to call on in the course of your struggle. To add an extra twist, you could improvise a rowdy victory prayer that includes this quote adapted from Nietzsche: “I throw roses into the abyss and say: ‘Here is my thanks to the monster who did not devour me.’”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I propose a Friends Cleanse. It would be a threeweek-long process of reviewing your support team and web of connections. If you feel up for the challenge, start this way: Take inventory of your friendships and alliances. If there are any that have faded or deteriorated, make a commitment to either fix them or else phase them out. Here’s the second stage of the Friends Cleanse: Give dynamic boosts to those relationships that are already working well. Take them to the next level of candor and synergy.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): After Walt Whitman published Leaves of Grass in 1855, he made sure it would get the publicity he wanted. He wrote anonymous reviews of his own book and submitted them to several publications, all of which printed them. “An American bard at last!” began the glowing review that appeared in one newspaper. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Virgo, you now have license to engage in similar behavior. You will incur no karma, nor will you tempt fate, if you tout your own assets in the coming weeks. Try to make your bragging and self-promotion as charming as possible, of course. But don’t be timid about it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you carry out the assignments I recommend, you will boost your charisma, your chutzpah and your creativity. Here’s the first one: Try something impossible every day. Whether or not you actually accomplish it isn’t important. To merely make the effort will shatter illusions that are holding you back. Here’s your second assignment: Break every meaningless rule that tempts you to take yourself too seriously. Explore the art of benevolent mischief. Here’s the third: Clear out space in your fine mind by shedding one dogmatic belief, two unprovable theories and three judgmental opinions. Give yourself the gift of fertile emptiness.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

In the 16th century, roguish French author Francois

Rabelais published a comic novel entitled The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel. In the course of his satirical story, a learned teacher named Epistemon takes a visit to the afterlife and back. While on the other side, he finds famous dead heroes employed in humble tasks. Alexander the Great is making a meager living from mending old socks. Cleopatra is hawking onions in the streets. King Arthur cleans hats and Helen of Troy supervises chambermaids. In accordance with the Rabelaisian quality of your current astrological aspects, Scorpio, I invite you to meditate on the reversals you would like to see in your own life. What is first that maybe should be last? And vice versa? What’s enormous that should be small? And vice versa? What’s proud that should be humble? And vice versa?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There’s no better time than now to ask the big question or seek the big opening or explore the big feeling. People are not only as receptive as they will ever be, they are also more likely to understand what you really mean and what you are trying to accomplish. Which door has been forever locked? Which poker face hasn’t blinked or flinched in many moons? Which heart of darkness hasn’t shown a crack of light for as long as you can remember? These are frontiers worth revisiting now, when your ability to penetrate the seemingly impenetrable is at a peak.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The writer Donald Barthelme once came to see the artist Elaine de Kooning in her New York studio. Midway through the visit, loud crashes and bangs disturbed the ceiling above them. De Kooning wasn’t alarmed. “Oh, that’s Herbert thinking,” she said, referring to the metal sculptor Herbert Ferber, who worked in a studio directly above hers. This is the kind of thinking I’d love to see you unleash in the coming days, Capricorn. Now is not a time for mild, cautious, delicate turns of thought, but rather for vigorous meditations, rambunctious speculations and carefree musings. In your quest for practical insight, be willing to make some noise. (The story comes from Barthelme’s essay “Not-Knowing.”)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “It is not only the most difficult thing to know oneself, but the most inconvenient one, too,” said American writer Josh Billings. I agree with him. It’s not impossible to solve the mystery of who you are, but it can be hard work that requires playful honesty, cagey tenacity and an excellent sense of humor. The good news is that these days it’s far less difficult and inconvenient than usual for you to deepen your self-understanding. So take advantage! To get started, why don’t you interview yourself? Go here to see some questions you could ask: http://bit.ly/interviewyourself.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “To look at a thing hard and straight and seriously — to fix it.” Aries author Henry James said he wanted to do that on a regular basis. He didn’t want to be “arbitrary” or “mechanical” in his efforts. I invite you to make this perspective one of your specialties in the coming weeks, Aries. Pick out a tweaked situation you’d like to mend or a

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Drug expert Jonathan P. Caulkins estimates that Americans are stoned on marijuana for more than 288 million hours every week. A U.N. report on global drug use concluded that Canadians consume weed at a similar rate. Among Europeans, Italians are No. 1 and the French are fourth. But I encourage you to avoid contributing to these figures for the next 12 to 14 days. In my astrological opinion, it’s time to be as sober and sensible and serious as you ever get. You have the chance to make unprecedented progress on practical matters through the power of your pure reasoning and critical thinking. Name two ways you think that everyone should be more like you. FreeWillAstrology.com.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sidney Lumet was an American director who worked on 50 films, including 14 that were nominated for Academy Awards, like Network and Dog Day Afternoon. Actors loved to work with him, even though he was a stickler for thorough rehearsals. Intense preparation, he felt, was the key to finding the “magical accidents” that allow an actor’s highest artistry to emerge. I advocate a similar strategy for you, Aquarius. Make yourself ready, through practice and discipline, to capitalize fully on serendipitous opportunities and unexpected breakthroughs when they arrive.

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half-spoiled arrangement you want to heal. Then pour your pure intelligence into it. Investigate it with a luminous focus. Use all your tough and tender insight to determine what needs to be transformed, and transform it.

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{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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{PHOTOS BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

Pet therapy: David Anderson and Lulu visit patients at Children’s Hospital.

RESCUE DOG {BY LAURA LIND}

“IT WAS A BAD DAY in the Anderson family,” David Anderson says, recalling the cold afternoon in January 2011 that changed his dog Lulu’s life forever. David and his wife, Marci, of Homewood, were staying at their rural cabin near Kittanning with their seven greyhound “children”— many of whom they had personally rescued from Spain. Lulu, a beautiful galgo (Spanish greyhound) with a coat like marble rye, returned from time outside. She stood quietly at the front door, waiting for someone to open it. David was horrified to see that Lulu was missing part of her front right leg. It was a clean break, at the elbow, but there were tendons hanging and lots of blood. “It was like a zombie movie,” David remembers. They never found the missing limb. Since it was a snowy day and the ground was covered, the Andersons figured Lulu must have stepped into a hole and snapped her thin leg off. Somehow, Lulu had hobbled home. “She wasn’t exhibiting any chaotic behavior,” Marci says. “She was just standing there …” “She was in shock,” David adds.

and the bandage was removed. The Andersons say that the accident didn’t affect Lulu’s personality. “She’s silly and sweet,” says David. “She’s like a walrus and a wildebeest,” Marci adds. David chuckles, “Like a one-dog wrecking ball.” Their goofy descriptions aside, Marci and David knew that Lulu had the right temperament to be part of the pet-therapy program at Children’s Hospital. Marci has been taking dogs to Children’s since 2001, and David has been going every week since 2009. Given David and Marci’s extensive dog-handling experience (Marci is president of rescue organization Steel City Greyhounds), they can easily spot which of their dogs might be a good fit for the program. In order for dogs to be accepted into the pet-therapy program at Children’s, they must pass a rigorous evaluation, including having their ears pulled, having an IV pole wheeled near them and having someone sit on them. If they snap or show a heightened startle response, they fail. In addition, prospective therapy dogs can’t jump, lick, bark or be hand-shy. Only one out of seven dogs typically passes the test. Five of the Anderson’s dogs have become therapy dogs, including Lulu, who was accepted into the program in 2012. Lulu’s somewhat unusual injury has been an asset in this program, because she can be of particular help to children who have lost a limb themselves. “I think one of the neatest things about a case like Lulu is [when] kids have to do physical therapy and they want them just to get out of bed and stand up or walk the hall or something,” Marci says. “What an inspiration to see a dog like Lulu. ‘Oh, she can do it. I can try it.’”

“WHAT AN INSPIRATION TO SEE A DOG LIKE LULU.” When the Andersons brought her inside, though, chaos reigned as Lulu began screaming, which sent their other six dogs into attack mode. Greyhounds usually have an extremely docile temperament, but the ear-piercing screeches triggered the instinct to kill the vulnerable member of the pack. David and Marci found themselves trying to protect Lulu — and themselves. In the frenzy, one of their dogs bit David’s face. As owner of The Golden Bone Pet Resort, in Homewood, David had both the knowledge and the resources to help Lulu. He administered a sedative and wrapped her leg. Then, he and Marci whisked Lulu to the emergency vet, where the remainder of her leg was amputated. David said that dogs will try to walk on a stump, so it was necessary to take her leg off at the shoulder. After three days, Lulu was released from the hospital. She spent 10 days at the Andersons’ cabin with David, where he allowed her to recover at her own pace. For the first three days, Lulu “screamed bloody murder” whenever David approached her. “She was crazed,” he recalls. After a week, she was hopping around. In two weeks, she had healed,

The Andersons give the children postcards of their dogs when they visit. Lulu’s postcard has a picture of her with her cast after her leg was amputated, “to show the kids that she had to heal,” says Marci. “There’s a little bit of a connection if they’re in a cast.” The Andersons felt that connection during Lulu’s very first visit, with a child who had lost a foot. They put Lulu in bed with the child, who was only 3 or 4 years old. “The whole family’s there, and I mean, everybody’s there, and he starts rubbing her where her limb’s gone,” David recalls. “He’s like, ‘That doesn’t hurt her … I guess I’m going to be OK, too.’” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

June 10, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 23

June 10, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 23