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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015


EVENTS 6.6 – 10am HALF PINT PRINTS Education studio Free with museum admission

6.6 – 6pm PITTSBURGH YOUTH PRIDE PROM: THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE CANDYLAND Co-hosted with the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN Pittsburgh) Tickets $10 advance / $15 at the door

6.8-6.12 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Andy Warhol: Pop Portraits and Selfies – Ages 8-10

6.12 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

6.15-6.19 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Vertical Silkscreen Printing with Stefan Hoffmann – Ages 8-10

Get the real story. Only at The Warhol. PEARLSTEIN I WARHOL I CANTOR

Opening Celebration Friday, May 29, 7pm

From Pittsburgh to New York • May 30–Sept 6, 2015

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015


{EDITORIAL}

05.27/06.03.2015 {COVER PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 21

[NEWS]

to go to college, 06 “Ifwhatwearecan’tweafford going to do, just sit on the corner selling drugs?” — Obama Academy senior Donald Lewis on the number of black males who don’t receive the Pittsburgh Promise

[VIEWS]

change doesn’t know from 16 “Climate baselines. It cares how fast we’re reducing our energy use.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the 2030 District plan to reduce water and energy use in the city

[TASTE]

jam-packed pages of everything 20 “Three you can imagine rolled in rice, and it

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

Kenny y e n s e h C e r o h S h Nort t s o P d n a Pre s r e t r a u Headq

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

doesn’t stop at seafood.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review sushi restaurant The Slippery Mermaid

[MUSIC]

not a friend. I couldn’t care less if we 24 “No, hate each other.” — Patrick Waters of the T-Tops on finding the perfect drummer

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

[SCREEN]

Mighty Hammer of Obvious 36 “The Themes is wielded so often you may

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

choose to root for the bad guy out of spite.” — Al Hoff reviews Tomorrowland

Corona and Corona Light Specials and Giveaways.

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

38

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, JOSEPH PEISER, MIKE SCHWARZ, AARON WARNICK

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[LAST PAGE]

think that we just flip burgers. 55 “People We just take your orders and we mess up your orders. No, we’re human beings, too.” — McDonald’s worker Chris Ellis, one of the “Faces of $15” profiled in this week’s comics-journalism feature by Em DeMarco

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 42 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 50 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 51 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 53 N E W S

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STEEL CITY MEDIA

“While we direct our gaze toward these women, they avert theirs from each other.”— Lissa Brennan on the figures in Kelli Connell’s images in A World Imagined

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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• McFaddens • Atria’s • Soho • • Jerome Bettis Grille 36 • • Mullens Bar and Grill • • BZ’s Bar and Grill •

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THIS WEEK

“JUST BECAUSE WE HAVE FAILED TO EDUCATE DOESN’T MEAN THEY SHOULD MISS OUT.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Use an interactive map to see which high schools produce the highest numbers of Pittsburgh Promise-eligible students at www.pghcitypaper.com. Our special news feature on young black males and the Pittsburgh Promise begins to the right.

Do you know what your Pittsburgh City Councilor has been up to? Follow the latest updates on our new blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

UNFULFILLED

PROMISE

The Pittsburgh Promise was supposed to get more city youths into college. So why are so many black males left out of the equation? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

I

T’S LESS THAN one month before gradu-

This week: Warhol, vinyl junkies, ghosts n’at. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Do you have a weird or nontraditional pet? City Paper wants to hear from you. Email us your story at info@pghcitypaper.com. Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to see Taylor Swift at Heinz Field on June 6. Contest ends June 4, 2015.

ation, and Obama Academy student Donald Lewis can’t wait to begin college at Robert Morris University in the fall. It’s been a great senior year for the 17-year-old and, overall, he’s had a bright scholastic career. He was a member of both Obama’s swim team and wrestling team for three years, and during the summer he works as a lifeguard. This past February, he was named the school’s King of Mardi Gras. And right now, he’s preparing to meet with representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice to lend his voice to the national My Brother’s Keeper initiative, which serves to close the opportunity gap for young black men. Lewis has come a long way from earning a 1.8 grade-point average in 10th grade (the year his father died) to earning a 3.7 this past semester. There’s just one problem. Despite working hard to turn his academic career around, he recently found out he won’t be receiving the Pittsburgh Promise, a $40,000 post-secondary scholarship for students in the Pittsburgh Public School District. “I’m pretty upset because I was convinced that there was a good chance of me

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Obama Academy senior Donald Lewis plans to attend Robert Morris University in the fall.

getting the Promise,” Lewis says. Unfortunately, his predicament has become the norm for black male students in the Pittsburgh Public Schools. Lewis and his peers are half as likely to receive a Promise scholarship as every other major student group in the district. To date, AfricanAmerican males make up just 13 percent of Promise recipients, despite comprising 27 percent of the student population. But this disparity isn’t unique to the

Pittsburgh Promise. Across the country, African-American males lag behind other groups in a number of academic indicators, like test scores and graduation rates. Some say the effects of traumatic experiences and poverty have built barriers too high for black males to see beyond. Most experts agree that the inequity in Promise distribution is yet another way to measure how the district has failed this vulnerable population. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015


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UNFULFILLED PROMISE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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“We have a system of separate and says Saleem Ghubril, executive director unequal schools in Pittsburgh that pro- of the Pittsburgh Promise. “But it’s not the vide separate and unequal opportunities, only priority. It’s also to use the scholarand that naturally leads to separate and ship as a way to lean on the district to prounequal outcomes,” says Joseph Kennedy, mote school reform and measure that by head of the Fix the Promise campaign. college readiness.” There are some programs making Along these lines, the Promise has set headway in reducing these opportunity a goal of having 80 percent of Pittsburgh gaps. For example, the district’s We Prom- Public Schools students obtain a post-secise program, which connects black males ondary degree or certificate. In 2007, before to mentors, has been a lifeboat for a num- the Promise started, 15 percent of students ber of students, including Lewis. were meeting that goal. Nationally, the But activists argue that these programs rate of college graduation for black males is don’t go far enough, and that requirements 17.7 percent. for Promise eligibility maintain a system “It’s crazy ambitious,” says Ghubril. where the group perhaps most in “There’s a ton of work to be done, need of financial aid, is least but I’m delighted that since likely to attain it. the Promise was announced “If you’re not getting the we’ve seen high school More e on on th Promise, you’re clearly not graduation rates grow, informati H G getting the same opportuand the highest growth R U B PITTS ISE nities as someone who is has been among AfricanM O PR getting the Promise,” says American males. “ le at b a il a v a is y Lewis. “There are a lot of it As of February 2015, c h g .p www lower-income families out 686 black males have rem o c r. e p a p there who can’t afford to go ceived the core Promise to college and depend on the scholarship. For white males, Promise. That means a lot more the number is nearly double, at African Americans won’t be in college, and 1,190 recipients. (The school district’s curthat’s a big issue, because if we can’t afford rent student body is 53 percent black and to go to college, what are we going to do, 34 percent white.) just sit on the corner selling drugs?” To receive the Promise, students must have a 2.5 grade point average and a 90 THE PITTSBURGH Promise was launched percent attendance rate. in 2008 as a partnership between the These requirements are the reason that City of Pittsburgh, the city’s school dis- Kennedy, a local education activist, started trict and UPMC, which committed $ 100 Fix the Promise, a campaign that calls for million to seed the scholarship fund. the elimination of Promise requirements. It was originally meant to attract new Kennedy, who has worked with students residents to the city, but the Promise had at Manchester PreK-8, in the North Side, more lofty goals as well. and University Prep, in the Hill District, “Creating access for kids to pursue says that if students get accepted to a posthigher education is clearly our priority,” secondary institution, they should receive a Promise scholarship. “Pittsburgh Public Schools has been locking in disparities by rewarding white students and ignoring black students,” says Kennedy. “I am concerned that our students, black male students in particular, are being badgered about Promise readiness without getting the tools. When they have succeeded in leveling the playing field, we can talk.” A charming new e-boutique. Ghubril argues that the program’s requirements are data-driven. Research Offering trunk shows, online and testimony from presidents at colshopping & personal styling. leges and universities indicates that students who go into college with a 2.5 GPA and strong attendance do better in postsecondary institutions. “If you throw somebody in the deep end and say, ‘Swim,’ and they can’t, is that @fascinopgh really a fair thing to do to them?” says Ghubril. “The rule seems to be that high www.fascinopgh.com school-readiness is the best indicator for info@fascinopgh.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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UNFULFILLED PROMISE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

college readiness, and if that’s the case, the answer isn’t just to give someone a scholarship. It’s to fix the systems when the systems are broken.” To help students who don’t quite hit the mark at graduation, the Pittsburgh Promise created the Promise extension program. The program gives students with a GPA between 2.0 and 2.49 a scholarship to attend the Community College of Allegheny County for one year, and later transfer to another post-secondary institution if they maintain at least a 2.0. To date, 245 black males have received a Promise extension scholarship. But this program isn’t enough for Kennedy. He says black male students don’t have time to wait for the education system to meet their needs. Last year, in the 2014 graduating class, only 30 percent of African-American male students in the district were Promise-eligible. In comparison 73 percent of White males were eligible. “I’m deeply concerned with the level of wishful thinking here because it undermines the needs and the wants of the students that are here now,” Kennedy says. “I think these students deserve justice. Just because we have failed to educate doesn’t mean they should miss out. This is an opportunity gap that [the school district has] created.” HOW TO FIX the education system is a million-dollar question, but one of Lewis’ mentors, Michael Quigley, says administrators could start by looking at black males as “assets to be nurtured” instead of “problems to be fixed.” Quigley is the outgoing program director of the Black Male Leadership Development Institute, a partnership between the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh and Robert Morris University designed to increase educational and leadership opportunities for black males. “These students are growing up in communities where there is violence and pov-

{INFOGRAPH BY AARON WARNICK / SOURCE: PITTSBURGH PROMISE}

erty, and then going to a school where their experiences are largely that they are problems to be solved,” says Quigley. “So what else would you expect?” Over the life of the Pittsburgh Promise, just 106 African-American males have used the scholarship and then graduated from post-secondary institutions. For white males, the number is 271, more than double. “Anytime that a system consistently fails a particular population, that’s not systemic failure, that’s systemic success,” says Quigley. “That system was designed to do just that, so it takes courageous leaders and courageous people to turn that system on its head.” Despite his involvement in programs like We Promise and BMLDI, Quigley is an advocate for broader reforms in the Pittsburgh Public School District. “Often times we tinker around the edges and we focus in on a program here or

there, and we lose sight of the core changes that need to take place,” Quigley says. “The stakes are very high when black males fail in schools. The stakes are very high when they end up in the morgue or jail.” When the Promise was launched, only 18 percent of black males were taking advantage of the program. This disparity caught the attention of the Heinz Endowments, which supports the We Promise program. “There are some real issues with access and opportunity, in particular for African-American male students,” says Stanley Thompson, director of the Heinz Endowments’ education program. “When you look at the number of kids who are taking advantage of the Pittsburgh Promise, you see that the numbers are significantly lower for black males. That to me is a red flag.” Thompson agrees that Promise disparities are a result of what’s going on in Pitts-

“IF YOU’RE NOT GETTING THE PROMISE, YOU’RE CLEARLY NOT GETTING THE SAME OPPORTUNITIES AS SOMEONE WHO IS.”

burgh classrooms. But he says the problem is not unique to black males. “If you find yourself in a high school classroom that is engaging, you find yourself studying something that is relevant, you’re probably going to do fairly well,” Thompson says. “The unfortunate thing is, we often times see high school students sitting in class and they’re bored because teachers are not necessarily engaging them in the kind of active learning that could take place, so students disengage, and some might not come to school.” What is unique to black males is that many come from families living in poverty. Unlike their middle-class counterparts, Thompson says, these students don’t have access to out-of-school “enrichment experiences.” “If you have kids that are not privy to those things, and we provide a type of education that’s relegated to a classroom-like setting where we’re never really asking kids to think about what’s going on in their community, kids are not necessarily going to see school as being CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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relevant,â€? Thompson says. This is especially a problem as it relates to the Promise’s attendance requirement. In 2013, a district report found that 47 percent of high school students were chronically absent, meaning these students missed 10 percent or more of school. “Research has proven, when kids feel like they are valued by adults in their learning settings, then what you have is kids responding in a way that shows they care about their own learning, and where they’re going to wind up in their futures,â€? says Thompson. NATIONALLY AND locally, there are academics looking at how to more fully engage students in education. Among them is Daphna Oyserman, whose book Pathways to Success Through Identity-Based Motivation was the result of working with students in high-poverty schools in Detroit. “Part of the problem with poverty is that your life is in chaos. My theory going in was, the more chaotic your life is, the more you can only think about right now,â€? says Oyserman. “We looked to see what kids think about college. They assume their parents can’t afford it. They know it’s expensive.â€? For those living in poverty, and for a lot of inner-city black male students, Oyserman says, the idea of college is very abstract and out of reach. “If the future seems far, you start too late,â€? Oyserman says. “It’s often easy for us to stigmatize the vulnerable, that they’re somehow weaker. But if in your natural environment there’s a lot of people who failed, but they never got back up, then that’s your reality.â€? In Detroit, she worked with students over the course of 10 half-hour sessions in the ďŹ rst two weeks of 8th grade, which has been identiďŹ ed as a critical point in academic development. Oyserman had students envision the future they wanted, and helped them understand the many steps they would need to take to get there. “Boys are the vulnerable group; they’re not doing well,â€? says Oyserman. “But this worked equally for all. Everyone had the same size of effect.â€? Pittsburgh Public Schools’ We Promise program, which focused on AfricanAmerican male students with a 2.0 to 2.49 GPA, is attempting similar methods locally. The program connects students with successful African-Ameri-

can male mentors from the Pittsburgh community who offer them help academically, while also exposing them to experiences and opportunities that success in post-secondary education will afford them. “For the most part, our young men are in school, but they’re a shell,� says Jason Rivers, We Promise program director. “They’ve bought into the lie that education and college is not for them. We’re unpacking years of bad practices.� The program has served 517 students since 2013. It originally worked with only 11th- and 12th-graders, but this year it was expanded to grades 9-12. Out of 393 We Promise students in 10th-12th grades, 191 — 59 percent — have had GPA increases over the past year. While the program is showing results, it hasn’t led to every We Promise participant receiving the Promise. Like Lewis, there are several students in the program who have fallen short of the scholarship’s requirements. Of the 126 seniors in last year’s We Promise cohort, 24 received the core Promise scholarship and 53 received the Promise extension. Data was not yet available for the 2015 graduating class, but as of press time, Lewis says he will not be among the Promise recipients.

“BLACK MALE STUDENTS ARE BEING BADGERED ABOUT PROMISEREADINESS WITHOUT GETTING THE TOOLS.�

DESPITE HIS disappointment, Lewis re-

mains upbeat. But he was not always the smiling, successful, scholar his mentors describe today. He says he owes his change in attitude and outlook to the We Promise program. When Lewis entered 9th grade, he was like a lot of his peers — unaware of how his actions would impact his future. “Of course people always say school is important,â€? says Lewis. “But because it was 9th grade, I didn’t think school mattered at that point. So it really was a hard hit on my GPA.â€? The following year, things deteriorated even further for Lewis after his father passed away. “With the loss of my father I had to take on the responsibilities of being the man of the house because I’m the only boy, plus just the emotional stress it put on me, plus just watching my mom go through all of that. It was very difďŹ cult,â€? Lewis says. “It just made me not want to do anything at all.â€? But Lewis says his mentors in the We Promise program wouldn’t let him hold CONTINUES ON PG. 14


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Join us for an afternoon of making, music,& food in the Hill District.

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DIY WORKSHOP: NEW CONSTRUCTION, RENOVATIONS AND RESTORATION Whether you’re working on a house restoration project, building new, or simply interested in learning about how to go about the restoration/renovation of an older or historic house, join us for this open forum presented by one the leading practitioners in the business. This session will also include a hands-on demonstration on the basics of masonry like mixing mortar and how to build a wall. Bring your questions on specific and ongoing projects. About the presenter: Stephen Shelton has 40 years of experience working in the building trades. For 12 of those years, he was the president of one of the city’s premier masonry companies; known for its high level of craftsmanship and the mark it left on many of the beautiful and historic homes in Pittsburgh. He is the founder and executive director of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh, which is a non-profit training facility. The Institute’s goal is to give individuals, who have been incarcerated or had troubled pasts, an opportunity to learn a trade and secure a living-wage employment.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

UNFULFILLED PROMISE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

on to that mindset. Through his two years in the program, he says, they helped him change socially as much as academically, while steering him away from potentially dangerous distractions in Homewood, where he lives. “It’s difficult living in that area sometimes. I have quite a lot of friends who have gotten into trouble,” says Lewis. “My mom and my dad have always been a good influence on me. But once I lost my dad, I sort of had the attitude of, ‘Oh I don’t care anymore.’ So if I hadn’t met some of the mentors in the We Promise program, there’s a good chance I might have given into peer pressure. “I have a lot of friends that are going nowhere with their life, and I couldn’t let that distract me anymore.” Receiving the Promise would have signified how much he’s overcome. Because his school, Obama Academy has an international baccalaureate program, his courses are more challenging and weighted differently than courses at other schools. Lewis has a weighted GPA of above the 2.5 required to receive the Promise. But his unweighted GPA, the form of data the scholarship recognizes, is 2.4.

“Getting the Pittsburgh Promise would’ve meant like, ‘Yes, I did it,’” Lewis says. “Once I got in the We Promise Program, I began to strive for better grades. I got a 3.7 and I was like, ‘Yes, I’m definitely going to get the Promise,’ and then it was like, ‘No, your average is still too low,’ which made me feel like, ‘Why even try?’” Lewis has filed an appeal, but says losing the scholarship won’t keep him from attending Robert Morris to study psychology in the fall. “It would just open so many more doors, because your college would pretty much be paid for, so you don’t have to get a job while you’re in college, so you can perform better,” Lewis says. “But the We Promise program still improved my performance and my study habits, so I still know I’m going to do great.” RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Editor’s Note: Support for this story was provided by The Equity Reporting Project: Restoring the Promise of Education, which was developed by Renaissance Journalism with funding from the Ford Foundation. Rebecca Nuttall was a 2014 recipient of the Renaissance Journalism Fellowship.

JENSORENSEN


Opens May 30, 2015 Introducing the pioneering work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the very notion of representation with passion and power, questioning tradition and challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. #rawiya OPENING DAY EVENTS: SATURDAY, MAY 30 Galleries Open for Members Only! 10 a.m.–noon Image credits (top to bottom): Lalla Assia Essaydi, Bullet Revisited #3, Courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery, NY. Yezerski and Miller Gallery, Boston; Shirin Neshat, Untitled (detail), 1996, © Shirin Neshat. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels; Gohar Dashti, Untitled #5 (detail), Courtesy of Gohar Dashti.

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[GREEN LIGHT]

Would you like to Participate in a fertility study? Volunteering couples are needed to join a research study in Monroeville You may qualify if you and your partner are: • A monogamous, heterosexual couple • Between the ages of 20-45 years old • Sexually active • Trying to conceive or using a non-vaginal form of birth control You will receive compensation for your time and participation. The device is for home use, and has been cleared for OTC use by the FDA. You will be asked to use the device in the privacy of your home. It requires two physician examinations for female participants.

Call 412-200-7996 to see if you qualify.

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WALK OF SHAME June 11: WOLVES IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING June 4:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

HALF OFF BY 2030 {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} THE PITTSBURGH 2030 District is among the city’s more ambitious green initiatives. This Green Building Alliance project has a quantifiable goal: getting participating buildings to reduce their energy and water usage by 50 percent by 2030. As importantly, the goal actually acknowledges the scope of larger environmental challenges. Scientists say that preventing the worst effects of climate change, for instance, requires cutting greenhouse-gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Unlike the many less-rigorous green initiatives, the 2030 District’s conservation goals, if achieved, would actually put at least some of us on track to do that. Recently, Pittsburgh’s District — one of 10 in North America — announced that it was indeed on track: Through 2014, energy use in 436 participating buildings Downtown and in Oakland was 6.3 percent below national baseline numbers for similar buildings. That bodes well for meeting the interim goal of 10 percent by 2015, said District Director Anna Siefken. And water usage is already down 10 percent from the District’s locally compiled baseline. What’s working? Siefken says the threeyear-old District combines appeals to pragmatism with awareness-building and peer networking. Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. energy use. But while some of the 85 participating building owners (who include some of the city’s largest landlords) are motivated by environmental concerns, she says, the District makes its case solely on the bottom line: conserving energy and water saves money. However, she says, “Most building owners don’t know how their buildings are performing”: They assume utility costs are fixed. So simply informing them about new techniques, technologies and resources to phase in over time (as old boilers wear out, say) helps a lot. And the District holds monthly meetings where building owners share their challenges and success stories with one another. One such story: The Wyndham Pittsburgh University Center recently replaced its kitchen ventilation system — which previously ran full-blast 24/7 — with one that automatically runs only as needed. The electricity savings is projected to be $ 15,000 a year, says hotel general manger Coleman Hughes. He adds, “If you do a lot of little things right, you can see the efficiencies begin to pay off.” Another participating structure mak-

ing incremental changes is Downtown’s City-County Building. City of Pittsburgh Sustainability Manager Grant Ervin says the CCB has been doing things like improving its HVAC system, upgrading its lights to LEDs and replacing employees’ energysucking individual hard-drives with a virtual network. The building, which the city co-owns with Allegheny County, also now has sensor-equipped “smart-jacket” insulators on its basement steam-valve traps, which county sustainability manager Cathy Hrabovsky says is expected to save $106,000 a year. And the county has a green-behavior program that urges employees to turn off unneeded lights, use communal rather than personal printers and adopt other energy-saving habits. Perhaps surprisingly, given its age, the City-County Building is among the highest-performing large buildings in the 2030 District, with energy use 47 percent below the national baseline for office buildings. But environmentally, there’s an asterisk. When the CCB joined the 2030 District, its energy usage was already well below average. That’s largely, says Ervin, because the building’s thick stone walls retain heat well, and its wealth of working windows provide ventilation and natural light. (Many newer buildings suck energy because they are poorly insulated and their windows don’t open; as Ervin says, “design matters.”) Climate change, however, doesn’t know from baselines. It cares how fast we’re reducing our energy use. By that standard, the CCB still did quite well, cutting usage 7.7 percent from 2013. Can the CCB — and other 2030 District structures — keep improving? The example of Conservation Consultants, Inc. says yes. CCI’s South Side office building recently came in second (out of 5,500 commercial buildings) in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Battle of the Buildings competition. CCI cut its energy use by a mindboggling 61 percent from 2013. Granted, this energy-auditing nonprofit’s building was renovated with conservation in mind. But not recently. That means that most of that 61 percent happened because occupants behaved differently, keeping the A/C off, the thermostat down, the lights doused when daylight would do. Says building manager Indigo Raffel, “People are really surprised at the little bit of energy we use.”

“MOST BUILDING OWNERS DON’T KNOW HOW THEIR BUILDINGS ARE PERFORMING.”

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Connect and Save with Port Authority andthe Pittsburgh Pirates Use your Port Authority ConnectCard and save up to $10 per ticket on all Sunday-Thursday Pittsburgh Pirates home games from April 14-October 4. Go to Pirates.com\connectcard or show your ConnectCard at the PNC Park ticket window to receive your discount. Connect and Save with this special offer today!

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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Moments after robbing a tourist of her gold chain on a street in Miami Beach, Fla., the gunman returned to the scene in his Mercedes and confronted the victim about the poor quality of the jewelry, complaining it was fake. The victim flagged down police and pointed out Daniel Sion Palmer, 26. “That was a brazen move,” Det. Ernesto Rodriguez said, “and because of that, he was able to be apprehended.” (Miami’s WTVJ-TV)

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The suspect fled after fatally shooting a man outside a convenience store in Fairfield, Ala., but his car broke down. He abandoned the vehicle, which police found and towed to the impound lot. The next day, Willie Lee Brown, 29, showed up at the police station to retrieve his car. Police Chief Leon Davis said that Brown, who was wearing the same clothes as the suspect in surveillance photos, was immediately recognized and arrested. (AL.com)

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Claiming racial bias in undergraduate admissions, a coalition of Asian-American groups filed a federal discrimination complaint against Harvard University. They pointed out that Asian Americans represent 5.6 percent of the U.S. population but constitute only 21 percent of Harvard’s incoming freshman class (up from 17.7 in 2006). (Bloomberg News)

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After Marsha Yumi Perry, 36, struck a 5-year-old boy with her pickup truck in Washougal, Ore., she left the injured victim at the scene and then hid from police by crawling into a shallow hole and covering herself with dirt. A police dog tracking her scent indicated her location, and the handler warned that he was about to unleash the dog. “The ground moved, and she sat up,” police Sgt. Geoff Reijonen said. (Portland’s The Oregonian)

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Authorities charged John Connolly, 52, with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon at a medical clinic in Englewood, Fla., after they said he disputed a pain-medication prescription and began choking a physician’s assistant with a stethoscope. (Sarasota’s WWSB-TV)

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Muslims may now use toilet paper, according to a new Islamic fatwa by Turkey’s Directorate of Religious Affairs. It noted that although toilet paper is acceptable for hygiene, water remains preferable. Men and women still aren’t supposed to stand while relieving themselves but should squat or sit. (Britain’s Daily Mail)

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A sex shop that caters to Muslims is opening in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Abdelaziz Aouragh, owner of the Halal Sex Shop, said the store targets married couples looking to enhance their sex lives. Aouragh pointed out that its 18 halal-observant sex toys do “not include inflatable dolls.” (International Business Times)

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Vermont Hard Cider Company, LLC, Middlebury, VT 05753

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

Having failed to stop intruders from climbing the fence surrounding the White House, the Secret Service is adding a second layer of steel spikes to the existing iron picketfence tops. The spikes will measure 7.25 inches tall, with a half-inch steel pencil point at the top, protruding outward multiple inches, to create

an acute angle. The measure is only temporary, according to National Parks Service official Jenny Anzelmo-Sarles, who said the goal is to have a completely new fence built by fall 2016. (CNN)

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Female lifeguards at China’s most dangerous rapids, in Henan province, have been fitted with cameras to discourage men from deliberately throwing themselves into the water so that they can grope their rescuers. Intended to identify sex-pest swimmers, the waterproof cameras are attached to the women’s helmets and legs, waists and chests, and decoratively covered by leaves and flowers. (Britain’s Daily Mail)

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An Australian man, seeking to reduce the amount owed his wife in divorce proceedings, disputed her claim that their marriage ended in 2011. He insisted instead that it ended in 1999 but, for the purposes of dividing their joint assets, that his affection for her ended in 1974, when he discovered she had “deformed” nipples. That was two years after their wedding, the man told Federal Circuit Court, but it took that long before he saw her undressed. “If I had seen them before, I would not have married her,” he said. Even though he wanted out of the marriage at that point, they subsequently had three children and stayed together for decades. Judge Warwick Neville chided the husband for his “very cavalier, if not a misleading and remarkably nonchalant, bordering on an immaturely irresponsible, approach … to the marital relationship,” and said the man was “nit-picking” to suit his own case. He ruled that the marriage ended in 2011. (Australia’s Canberra Times)

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The conservative group ForAmerica invited key contributors to donate $50,000 to spend a “historic weekend” at an exclusive resort in Jackson Hole, Wyo., and shoot machine guns with Robert O’Neill, billed as the Navy SEAL “who shot Osama bin Laden.” When critics condemned the promotion’s portrayal of O’Neill, ForAmerica’s founder, Brent Bozell, apologized, explaining that his team “got a little ahead of itself” in issuing the invitation. He regretted describing O’Neill “in a way that is inconsistent with the high standards he applies when he characterizes the service of Navy SEALS” and added, “There will be no machine guns involved; this is strictly a sport shooting event.” (The Washington Post)

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A British immigration court overturned a deportation order for a foreign criminal because he is an alcoholic. The 53-year-old man, who came to Britain from Libya in 1981 and has been convicted of 78 assorted offenses, appealed on the grounds that deporting him would violate his human rights because he would face physical punishment and imprisonment in his homeland for his uncontrollable drinking. The court noted that his many, unspecified offenses were committed “largely and possibly exclusively as a consequence of his alcoholism.” But Upper Tribunal Judge Jonathan Perkins said deportation would deprive him of his “right to family life” in Britain, enabling him to continue his alcohol-fueled criminal behavior. (Britain’s The Telegraph)

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S BY R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE NT I C AT I ON ON D E M AN D.


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THE SLIPPERY MERMAID MAKES SUSHI FUN AND EXCITING

TOP-SHELF BAR FARE {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Pittsburgh bars that also offer light fare tend to stick to the usual script: wings, burgers and deep-fried vegetables. But the menu at The Summit, a Mount Washington establishment on the corner of West Sycamore and Shiloh streets, seeks to break away from the pack. The Summit, which opened nearly two years ago, offers a local beer list and specializes in craft cocktails made with fresh ingredients. Its new menu hopes to mirror the drink menu, continuing the commitment to local, fresh and well-crafted items. “None of us had any experience putting together a menu that wasn’t your typical bar fare,” says Shane Witt, one of the Summit’s four co-owners. “But we all knew we didn’t want typical bar fare.” So Witt and his co-owners brought in Brandon Davis to serve as executive chef. Davis previously worked at Lola Bistro, in the North Side, and with chef Kevin Sousa at Bigelow Grille. “We chose him for his experience working in high-end, from-scratch kitchens,” says Witt. “We wanted someone who had worked with raw ingredients.” Items on the menu change every two weeks, but offerings have included: steamed duck dumplings, goat-cheese fritters, charcuterie, herbed popcorn and a variety of tacos. One of Witt’s favorites is the mushroom-and-goat-cheese ravioli; the pasta is made in house. “I think that’s just how food is supposed to be,” says Witt. “Technology had gotten us away from that.” RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

200 Shiloh St., Mount Washington. 412-918-1647

the

FEED

It’s Rhubarb Time! You already know that the early-summer fruit makes a great pie or crumble, but consider these other uses: Use chopped rhubarb in coffee cakes. Boil down with sugar and use the syrup in seltzers and cocktails. Search out savory recipes, like an Indian-style lentil-andrhubarb soup. Or just chop it up and freezer-bag it: Rhubarb pairs well with fruits yet to come, like berries and apples.

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FISHING {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

EWICKLEY MAY be a riverside town,

but it doesn’t quite offer an oceanfront vibe. Nonetheless, the owners of The Slippery Mermaid sushi house on the Florida panhandle chose this Pittsburgh suburb to open a second location. This explains the decor, which couldn’t be farther from the reserved, lacquerand-calligraphy clichés of most Japanese restaurants. Deep turquoise walls, paintings of mermaids and dolphins in tropical tones, and a mosaic of weathered wooden louvers, stained in oceanic hues, evoke an atmosphere more Caribbean than Pacific Rim. Boppy ’80s tunes convey a carefree, vacation vibe in a way that the enigmatic pluckings of the shamisen just can’t. The restaurant’s tongue-in-cheek motto — “Let’s roll a fat one!” — confirmed that if traditional Japanese restaurants are kimonos and geta sandals, The Slippery Mermaid is shorts and flip-flops. In fact, even though the menu consists almost entirely of sushi, we would stop short of calling The Slippery Mermaid a Japanese restaurant. The website puts it

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

Triton Triple Tuna Roll

best: “We are not settling for authentic,” it proclaims. “We are striving for inventive!” While a handful of strictly traditional maki, nigiri and sashimi are offered, by far the bulk of the lengthy menu is dedicated to creative rolls.

THE SLIPPERY MERMAID 613 Beaver St., Sewickley 412-741-2459 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: $5-15 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED And when we say lengthy, we mean three jam-packed pages of just about everything you can imagine rolled in rice, and it doesn’t stop at seafood. Cream cheese and avocado are by now familiar in American sushi rolls, but this was the first time we’d seen bacon, steak or chicken. Sushi skeptics take note: Non-sushi selections are extremely limited (think miso soup, seaweed salad), and there are no hot entrees. The choices and combinations are myr-

iad and have names like Psycho Mermaid, Crabby Sailor and Triton’s Triple Tuna. Frankly, the menu could be better organized. Local Favorites, which consist largely of relatively straightforward maki, are listed after the Extra Ordinary Rolls, consisting of jazzed-up Local Favorites. So many were the variations that we could have used an app to, for instance, show us all the rolls with salmon and tempura crunch. Tempura crunch is what it sounds like — tiny nuggets of deep-fried batter — serving a role not dissimilar to tobiko, the roe that provide salty pop in many classic sushi preparations. Too much of this good thing could have been an affront to the fish, but it was applied with a judicious hand which carried through to the other ingredients, as well. We appreciated that even the roll called Whale of a Roll wasn’t one of those massive maki that seem to demand knife and fork over chopsticks. This despite it containing yellowfin, housemade surimi (imitation crab) and avocado, and being topped with more yellowfin (seared), tempura crunch, scallions and sweet chili sauce. The


flavors and textures were balanced in each miraculously bite-sized slice of roll. Such rolls often seem like stunts designed to impress with a striking presentation, not flavor. But the Mermaid’s sushi chefs manage to get creative without losing espect for their ingredients. The Dixie roll, in which yellowfin was paired with items more commonly found on a bagel — bacon and cream cheese — offered the same sort of balanced and complementary flavors and textures as a salmon-skin roll. The bacon was smoky and crunchy, the cream cheese rich and slightly tangy, while the yellowfin provided the meaty backbone, so to speak. A spicy octopus roll with scallions and cucumber was, likewise, a successful variant of the popular spicy tuna roll. The cooked tentacles were tender, and the spice mixture suited them well.

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

SIMPLICITY SCORES

A fledgling brewery’s blond ale is a hit at Beers of the Burgh I often marvel at beer. Not just because it tastes great or because it can enliven a dull evening (though I do appreciate those qualities), but because four humble ingredients come together to create a bottomless well of possibilities. Tweak the malts, hops, yeast or water even slightly, and the end product is a completely different beast. At the recent Beers of the Burgh festival, local brewers proved they’ve got a whole lot more ideas for America’s favorite beverage.

THE ELEGANCE OF ABJURATION’S CRISP, SESSIONABLE ALES MADE A MARK.

Reece Duncan prepares a sashimi plate.

A small sashimi plate allowed us to sample the fish, and only the fish, one at a time. Broad, butterflied slices of sea scallop were perfect, sweet and buttery. Thin, cross-cut slices of octopus tentacle had tender centers with pleasant chew at the edges. Tuna is the fish that most distinguishes between ordinary and better sushi places, and the Mermaid’s was on the better side — deep red and full-flavored, not pink and watery. Poke — Hawaiian fish salad — made with this tuna, however, lacked enough seasoning or dressing; as a result, it was monotonous and bland. The Slippery Mermaid also serves escolar, also known as walu walu, which some restaurants avoid because large portions can cause some eaters gastric issues. A safely small morsel of sashimi, however, had a silken texture and subtle, buttery flavor with none of the fishiness of other oily fish. We have always thought that sushi is delicious. The Slippery Mermaid also makes it fun and exciting — without going overboard.

On a rainy Saturday in May, more than 40 of the region’s brewers — darn near all of the region’s brewers, in fact — flocked to the massive Lawrenceville warehouse that hosted Art All Night a few weeks before. And in their wake came throngs of craft-beer lovers itching to sample everything from classic American lagers to hopped passionfruit mead. These beer festivals are tricky to navigate. It’s easy to get lost in the foamy sea of possibilities, or lose track of what new brew has made its way into your tiny glass. But amidst the maze of homebrewers, cider-makers and local brewing celebrities in attendance, one newcomer stood out in a delightfully nerdy way. Abjuration Brewing was one of several breweries making their public debuts at the festival. Along with offerings like a Belgian strong ale and a juicy IPA, Abjuration brought four versions of a low-alcohol blond ale. Each was dry-hopped with a unique hop variety, and the resulting brews testified to the power of raw ingredients and the value of experimentation. Amidst a warehouse full of staggering ABVs and fiery chili beers (of which there were a surprising number), the elegance of Abjuration’s crisp, sessionable ales made a mark. Abjuration Brewing (started by four local friends) is currently looking for a location to open a nano-brewery in the area. And even though Pittsburgh’s craft-beer scene has boomed in recent years, I’m convinced there’s room for plenty more folks at the bar.

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Takeout & Delivery Authentic Thai Food

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

A Taste of the Caribbean

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

40 Craft Beers w

BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-431-9313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfastand-lunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J

The Pub Chip Shop {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Strip is noted for its innovative, contemporary American cuisine. Dishes are prepared with fresh, local ingredients and served in a classy modern space, to be complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken” (skewered pork). KE

EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE EL BURRO COMEDOR. 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412-904-3451.A casual Southern California-style taqueria offers a variety of tacos, burritos and Cal-Mex specialties, such as carne asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles (a homey casserole). Tacos are come with a variety of fillings, including mahi mahi and shrimp, and burrito fillings run from standard to breakfast and French fries and steak. JF ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656. This multi-leveled venue (with balcony) perched on the edge of The

Verde {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-and-true breakfast-and-lunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such

as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE OFF THE HOOK. 98 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale. 724-719-2877. This fine-dining fish restaurant features a menu almost exclusively from the sea; even the pastas are seafood-centric. The fresh-fish section has a variety of suggested preparations, from classic (almondine) to modern (finished with chimichurri). Off the Hook also offers a fresh-oyster bar, expertly curated wine selection and impeccable service. LE PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-7586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo


blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Rumfish Grille {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} mein, seafood hot pot, Thai curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-935-9870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a well-curated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-and-cheese, made with Buffalo hot sauce. Well-prepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-369-5380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

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Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

• 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

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Sangria $2.95 ____________________

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(Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

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TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” THE PUB CHIP SHOP. entree featured sliders 1830 E. Carson St., made with chicken, . www per South Side. 412-381pulled BBQ pork and a p ty pghci m 2447. This storefront steak fillet, .co venue offers British-style on a potato roll with quick fare, from fish and red pepper and goat chips and meat pies, to doner cheese. The fried calamari kebabs and pasties. Pastry pies include traditional (meat, Stilton) THAI COTTAGE. 1109 S. but also more modern fillings Braddock Ave., Regent Square. like chicken curry and vegan 412-241-8424. This Regent Square vindaloo. Beer-battered haddock restaurant distinguishes itself with pairs well with housemade sauces its appealing ambience, excellent and thick fresh-cut fries. JF service and superb renditions of classic Thai cuisine: complexly RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 textured, with flavors balanced Washington Pike, Bridgeville. gloriously among sweet, salty and 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers brightly tangy notes. A good stop a modern yet comfortable take for the popular appetizers, soups, on seafood, offering distinctive curries and stir-fried entrees. KF appetizers and a few signature entrées. There is also a build-yourTOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East own entrée option, in which a Ingomar Road, Allison Park. 412dozen fish and shellfish (plus 364-6622. Located on the verdant a few meat options) can be edge of North Park, Tomato Pie combined with interesting sauces, is more than a pizzeria. It offers starches and vegetables to create other simple Italian specialties a custom dinner, whether your including pasta and sandwiches, tastes run to truffle jus or macand the chef uses plenty of fresh n-cheese. LE herbs grown on the premises. FJ SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA. 22 Market Square, Downtown. 412-281-6888. This fine-dining spot brings an elegantly casual, European vibe to the renovated Market Square, leaning toward small plates and starters without conceding an inch to American pub-grub conventions. Starters include grilled octopus, beans and greens, and flatbreads, while the entrees (meat, pasta, fish) offer more sophisticated presentations. KE

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LOCAL

“IT SUCKS TO HAVE TO WAIT. I’M ANXIOUS TO MOVE ON.”

BEAT

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

WARM SOUNDS Wooly Woman, a project of pro-BMXbiker-turned-musician Gregory Smee, will release its official debut by the middle of this summer. And if the two tracks that appear on the 7” that Smee is currently handing out for free is any indication of his talent and creativity, Wooly Woman will hit the ground running. Backed by some of the city’s most prolific musicians (Nate Campisi of Shaky Shrines, Chris McCune of Locks and Dams/ Bear Skull/Dendritic Arbor, Greg Decarolis of Harlan Twins, Matt Fiorillo and Nick Charters of Andre Costello and the Cool Minors/Ghost Guts), Smee has found a sound that will complement the coming summer heat. The release’s A and B sides — “Strange Eyes” and “Selling Sunshine,” respectively — contain poppy hooks that hover over jangly rhythm guitar with plenty of reverb recalling the psychedelic ‘60s. While Wooly Woman directly cites ‘60s bands like the Kinks and Beatles as influences, there is also an early-’90s nod to the Brian Jonestown Massacre, and contemporary pop/psychedelic Aussies, Tame Impala. The chain of influence is intentional. “I enjoy borrowing from bands who are borrowing from bands that I enjoy,” says Smee. Wooley Woman’s loose and warm recordings give the band its charm. This vibe was attained by recording the songs live as much as possible, and then running overdubs through an Ampex reel to reel. With many modern listeners acquiring the bulk of their music for free, some bands are skipping the part where they try to convince you to give them money. Wooly Woman’s free 7” is Smee’s contribution to that movement. “It’s hard to say plainly whether free music is a good or bad thing,” admits Smee. “As a music consumer, it’s a mistake to devalue music. At the same time, if you’re blowing through writing and recording without much thought, and then saying, ‘Here it is, now give me twenty bucks,’ you’re not going to get a positive response.” So far, Wooly Woman has been a rotating cast of characters, but Smee thinks he’s found a permanent line-up that contributes and helps achieve his vision. “I do chase a specific sound,” he admits, “but I never want to be the maestro.”

SMEE HAS FOUND A SOUND THAT WILL COMPLEMENT THE COMING SUMMER HEAT.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Visit Wooly Woman at www.soundcloud. com/woolywoman or email woolywooly woman@gmail.com for more information.

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{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

T-Tops: Jason Orr (left), Jason Jouver and Patrick Waters

LONG DRIVE {BY MARGARET WELSH}

T

HE OFFICIAL release of T-Tops’ self-

titled debut record has been a long time coming. Long enough that, bassist Jason Orr says, “We already have another one ready to go.” That, singer/guitarist Patrick Waters interjects, is an exaggeration, but — with six new songs already recorded — not by much. T-Tops started jamming in 2011. Previously, Waters fronted the well-regarded spastic-rock group The Fitt. When that dissolved, he struggled to form something else that he was happy with. “I’m constantly looking for more people to play with,” Waters says. While he’d played with Orr in other bands (including, most notably, the far-out, semi-experimental Wormrigg), “I’ve always had trouble finding drummers. I kind of gave up. I thought, forget it, I’m not going to play for awhile. And I tried not to, for a while.” Then he saw a post on a local message board by Jason Jouver, saying he was looking for an opportunity to play drums. “I had heard his name floating around,”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

Waters says — Jouver is a recording engineer at +/- Studios in the South Side and has played other instruments in bands including Don Caballero, Teddy Duchamp’s Army and German Shepherd. “I didn’t know he was a drummer —and he doesn’t even really call himself a drummer. He was maybe the five-millionth person I’d contacted, so we set up a practice.”

T-TOPS/NIGHT VAPOR RECORD RELEASE SHOW WITH GANGWISH

9 p.m. Sat., May 30. Gooski’s, 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $5. 412-681-1658

When asked what, exactly, they were looking for in a drummer, Waters responds “someone who hits hard” while Orr simultaneously says, “a friend.” Waters shakes off Orr’s answer with a touch of exasperation. “No, not a friend. I couldn’t care less if we hate each other,”

he says. Fortunately, Waters, Jouver and Orr hit it off immediately. By early 2013, the record was basically finished. The band approached the folks at Virginia-based label Big Neck Records to see if they had any interest in releasing the record (and, more importantly, to see if they would pay to put it out). “[They] ended up being interested, but it just took forever,” Waters says. The band is extremely grateful for the label help but, Waters admits, “It sucks to have to wait. I’m anxious to move on. We have a bunch of new ideas.” Despite the long lag time, there’s nothing stale about T-Tops. From start to finish, the record is pure sludgy, hooky heaviness. Attach as many sub-genres as you’d like, but in the end you’ll probably throw up your hands and call it rock ’n’ roll. Waters does most of the songwriting, and the influence of his favorite band, the Melvins, is obvious. Nirvana, beloved by Waters as a teen, also comes into play. (As Orr puts it, “if you don’t hear THAT on the album, you’re just thick, right?”) Not that the band is going for anyCONTINUES ON PG. 26


participating bars and restaurants include รปฤƒรพฤล—0,(ล—ฤŠล—#ล—ฤŠล—(3-ล—ฤŠล—/.",ล—ฤ‹ล—"ล—3ล—ฤŠล—,'&&ฤ“-ล—&.-ล—ฤ‹ล—#(.-ล—ฤŠล—,,#%ล— #.ล—&/ล—ฤŠล—-" #,)&)ล—))รฐ,ฤžฤ‚ฤ‚ล— )/(!ล—#()ล—,ฤž ล—#!,ล—,ล—ฤŠล—&,%ล—,ล—ฤ‹ล—,#&&ล—ฤŠล—/,ล—-./,(.ล—ฤŠล—#-"ล—ฤŠล—#-"ล—-.,#ล—ฤ‹ล—,ล—ฤŠล—&0(ล—ฤŠล—,(%./,3 ,#.ล—(ล—,ล—ฤŠล—,,#-ล—,#&&ล—ฤŠล—'#(!13ฤ“-ล— ล—ฤŠล— &ล—#44#)&)ล—ฤŠล— (*((.ล—,1#(!ล—)'*(3ล—ฤŠล— (/-.,3ล—/&#ล—)/-ล—ฤŠล—ล— 3ล—ฤŠล— &&3ฤ“-ล—,ล—ฤ‹ล— )/(!

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Stiltwalkers, Fire Performers, Aerial Acts, Jugglers, Magic + More!

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LONG DRIVE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

thing in particular. “There’s not really a theme,” Waters says. “It’s just what comes out. We’re just trying to write catchy, loud, heavy songs.” Orr waxes more philosophical on the topic: “It’s music from people from isolated worlds. Rock music as an area of musical artistic expression is just, you know, disgusting people [teasing] their imaginations to the public a little bit. “If we didn’t get together and be grumpy most of the time and happy a couple of times, it just wouldn’t work,” he continues, adding with a chuckle, “If you love life, I just don’t see where your place is in rock music.” T-Tops will share its release show with Night Vapor, which is also celebrating the release of its first full-length. The combined show was born somewhat out of convenience —T-Tops had planned its release for earlier this spring, but couldn’t find a time or lineup that felt right —but it’s also an appropriate pairing of two bands with similar sensibilities. “There’s some shared sonic territory there,” says Night Vapor drummer John Roman, who, for a time, played with Jouver in the band Microwaves. “They’re both punk bands, but not in the obvious way that people would think of a punk band.” Night Vapor, with its dark, angular grooves and Albert C. Hall’s guttural, Birthday Party-esque vocals, sounds a little like a lounge band in a nightmare. But what members are really aiming for is something closer to old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll. “We wanted to do something that had heavy elements but wasn’t completely bludgeoning,” Roman says. Coming from the harsher, noisier Brown Angel, Roman and bassist Mike Rensland wanted to make music that incorporated classic rock roots, like Zeppelin, “without being totally obvious about it.” (Roman later polled fellow members for their take on the sound: Rensland called it “music for the mentally ill”; guitarist Aaron Brooks simply described it as “gross.”) Waters agrees that the bands have a similar vibe, though, he says, “[Night Vapor] has a little bit more of a noisy edge. I would try to go in that direction, if I knew how.” But, it seems the real common ground lies more in general attitude. While it would be a mistake (or at least an overstatement) to categorize these as “dark” bands, they share a pervasive, though not unpleasant, sense of cynicism and gloom. “Pat is a pessimistic fuck sometimes,” Orr says, as he laughingly gets up from his chair to give Waters a conciliatory hug. “But he has the most optimistic outcomes.” MWE L SH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

NEW RELEASES

ESSENTIAL MACHINE THE CEILING AND THE FLOOR [SELF-RELEASED] WWW.ESSENTIALMACHINE.COM

Vocal harmonies are, arguably, the highlight of this Greensburgbased band’s new release — and the band seems to know it. The fact that singer/songwriter/guitarist RJ Dietrich found a passion for such harmonies after meeting his wife, drummer/singer Karen Dietrich, is a focal point of the band’s online bio. But there’s more here than pretty voices, and this record becomes more rewarding with each listen. In the age of Avett and Mumford, too much indie folk is blandly slick. Here, the slightly gritty production sticks to the ears: Think My Bloody Valentine trying its hand at rootsy folk-punk. BY MARGARET WELSH

ESSENTIAL MACHINE. 1:30 p.m., Sun., June 7. Dollar Bank Stage, Three Rivers Arts Festival, Downtown. Free. www.3riversartsfest.org

BLOOD PRESSURE PROMO TAPE 2015 [SELF-RELEASED] BLOODPRESSUREPGH.BANDCAMP.COM

This promo from locals Blood Pressure is five minutes of fast, traditional, no-nonsense U.S. hardcore. No solos. No breakdowns. No mosh parts (sorry, bro). No bullshit. Simple riffs are played at a breakneck pace and backed by pummeling drums and ultra-gruff vocals, creating fully formed songs that — while taking influence from classic ’80s hardcore — don’t ape anyone. The stand-out track is “Drone War,” where the guitar backs off and lets the bass and drums take the focus for a few measures. Then it kicks back in, sounding twice as sick, as the singer shouts “judge ... jury … and executioner” like a madman. Songs are tighter and more focused than the demo/EP that came out last year. I’m looking forward to hearing what these guys do next. BY DAN MORGAN


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Thu Jun 18 8PM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SPENCER WADDELL}

Rotten Sound: Noisem

ORIGINAL NOISE {BY SHAWN COOKE} TWO THINGS TO keep in mind if you’re

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talking to Noisem: Don’t discuss how young they are and, more importantly, don’t compare them to Slayer. They get that a lot. “I feel like it’s more of a cop-out for people who can’t compare the music to anything else ... without actually analyzing what’s going on in the music,” says Tyler Carnes, the band’s lead screamer. While some of the band’s detractors lazily reduce it to a Slayer knock-off, Carnes pointed out in a recent Facebook comment that his band “only listened to The Cure and Thin Lizzy” when writing Blossoming Decay, Noisem’s firecracker of a second album. Not to mention that his dad brought Carnes up on a healthy musical diet that ranged from Black Sabbath to Funkadelic to Motown. It’s less condescending, though no less annoying, when critics marvel at the band’s youth: the current lineup ranges from ages 17 to 23. The members of the Baltimore band were even younger when they released their first album, Agony Defined, in 2013. And given the major leap forward they’ve taken on Decay, the maturing shows. The first LP was a crushing 24-minute blitzkrieg of metal, blending thrash, death and grindcore. While Noisem hasn’t shifted away from brevity, it’s using the time wisely. Blossoming Decay is a more measured and varied outing than its predecessor, both lyrically and sonically. Agony Defined never took its foot off the pedal, but Decay turns out to be a far more dynamic effort. It even leaves room for ambient cello sections, which were scored by Carnes’ brother (and Noisem bassist), Billy, and performed on

the record by Tyler’s neighbor. On Blossoming Decay, Carnes internalizes the agony and bottled-up emotion from his past for a startlingly personal record, full of anxiety and grisly imagery. Carnes’ mother abandoned the family at a young age — which he won’t get into specifics about — but he indicates that fingerprints of his difficult upbringing are all over the album. “Blossoming Decay has a metaphorical and literal meaning — metaphorical blossoming from the birth of a broken home, which is a personal reflection,” Carnes said. “But the literal meaning is the decay of the urban landscape that is constantly surrounding us.”

NOISEM

WITH IRON REAGAN, ANGEL DU$T, KNIFE 8 p.m. Sun., May 31. Gooski’s, 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $13. 412-681-1658 or www.winterforgepromotions.bigcartel.com

Carnes talks about seeing this decay every day in Baltimore, but cites recent protests after the death of Freddie Gray — which he participated in every day they were happening — as positive change blossoming from the decay. Although many in the media dubbed the protests as “riots,” Carnes prefers the term “uprising.” But Blossoming Decay works best on the micro level, with unnerving scars, burns and lacerations brutalizing the songs’ protagonist. It’s painful description, but it’s the sound of Carnes finally coming to grips with his childhood, all through a lens he couldn’t access before. “Most of the lyrics are personal reflection and seeing the light with new eyes,” Carnes says. “Trying to figure out what happened in the past — putting it down on paper.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Pittsburgh’s #1 Video Game Shop V

CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF EREZ AVISSAR}

Penn Hills e g n a h c x E e m Ga

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Sinkane

431 Rodi Road • Penn Hills • 41 412.371.0386 12.371.0386 0386 6 Ahmed Gallab is a chameleonic musician: he’s surrounded himself with so many different collaborators and types of music, it can be impossible to predict where a track might be headed. When he’s recording as Sinkane, one song can channel free jazz, funk or even some country-flavored steel guitar — but most of it occurs under the umbrella of synth-driven pop. The Sudanese DFA Records signee has played in-studio with a handful of big-ticket indie acts, including Caribou, Yeasayer and Of Montreal, but his work as Sinkane takes these artists’ experimental sensibilities a few steps further. He Tame Impala performs tonight at Cattivo with Diamond Shapes and Different Places in SPACE. Shawn Cooke 7 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 21 and over. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

[RECORDS] + SAT., MAY 30 By now, serious and casual record collectors alike know that, when it comes around twice a year, the Pittsburgh Record Fest is the place to be. The event had become a staple at Belvedere’s, which hosted the first 12 rounds. But, while that bar recovers from the fire that closed its doors last December, the record swap takes up residence at a new Lawrenceville venue, Spirit. There will be plenty of opportunities to buy, sell and trade records with collectors from all over the city; the night also offers live DJ’s, drink specials and — with the backdrop of Spirit’s hip retro décor and wood-paneled walls — a little trip back in time. Margaret Welsh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

7 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $3. Email omnimax7@yahoo.com for information.

[ROCK] + WED., JUNE 03 Kevin Parker’s an introverted studio wizard, so fronting one of the world’s soon-to-be biggest rock bands might seem outside of his comfort zone. As he put it in a recent Reddit AMA, “I record music under the name Tame Impala. When you add 4 of my friends we’re a band that tours the world together.” Parker does it all in the studio — playing every instrument — and based on what we’ve heard from the forthcoming Currents, he’s adding some welcome electropop and R&B wrinkles to the mix. If 2012’s Lonerism put Tame Impala on the map in a big way, then Currents might make Parker a reluctant star. Tonight, the band takes Stage AE with Kuroma. SC 7 p.m. 400 N Shore Drive, North Shore. $25. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT SAV}

[INDIE POP] + FRI., MAY 29

[ROCK] + WED., JUNE 03 Unlikely indie-rock mainstay Sebadoh has been the rare band to turn a series of reunion tours into new music. 2013’s Defend Yourself, the band’s first LP in 14 years, proved that Lou Barlow’s Dinosaur Jr. escape hatch still had some life in it. J Mascis and Barlow eventually settled their differences for a remarkable late-career run, so it only made sense for Barlow to recapture some of that spark for himself while Dinosaur Jr. takes a brief pause. Sebadoh plays Brillobox tonight with support from Total Babes. SC 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. $16-18. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net


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ROCK/POP THU 28 CLUB CAFE. Brooke Annibale, Heather Kropf, Judith Avers. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Shot O’ Soul. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Bryan William Kinney, Caleb Pogyor & The Talkers, Casuals. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Wrecked Lexus, Trash Bag, Preppers, Reign Check, Teen Death. Benefit Show for Animal Friends. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059.

FRI 29

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

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BRILLOBOX. The Red Western, Andre Costello & the Cool Minors, Seafair. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CITY GROWS. Worriers, Caves, Playoff Beard, Small Fish Great Lake. Lawrenceville. 412-781-2082. CLUB CAFE. The Billy Price Band Daily Grind w/ Red Room Effect. South Side. 412-431-4950. LINDEN GROVE. Street Level. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. THE MCKEESPORT PALISADES. Time Squared w/ A Roll Of The Dice. McKeesport. 412-400-9977. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Jonah Parzen-Johnson, Ryan Emmett, Satyr/Elfheim, Nevhar Anhar, Ken Kaminski. Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. SMILING MOOSE. Prime 8, Curseborn, Skippy Ickum, Demo Demon, God Hates Unicorns. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Donora w/ Dream Phone & Nox Boys. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DURING PIRATES GAMES

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

31ST STREET PUB. Aurelio Voltaire, Ego Likeness, Qiet. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 565 LIVE. The Mani Stokes Group. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. BILLY’S ROADHOUSE. Still Not Sober. Wexford. 724-930-1177. BRILLOBOX. Delicious Pastries, City Steps, Balloon Ride Fantasy. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Backyard Kings w/ Steve Lauer. CD Release. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Submachine, The Filthy Lowdown, Aurora, False Profit , Worst Kept Secret. McKees Rocks. 412-452-6749. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARVEY WILNER’S. AlterEgo. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Proper People w/ Big Gypsy,

Nic C & The Blue Tops. EP release. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Ross. 412-366-7468. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. Washington. 724-225-5221. MEADOWS CASINO. Jukebox. Washington. 724-503-1200. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain w/ Soulville Horns. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Electric Army, Histrionic, By the Process of Elimination. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Clap Your Hands Say Yeah w/ Teen Men. Millvale. 412-229-5483. OAKMONT TAVERN. LSD w/ Father Grimm. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. PALMIERI’S RESTAURANT. EZ Action & Deliverance. Plum. 724-387-2444. THE R BAR. Chrome Moses. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERTOWNE BREWING COMPANY. Frankie Catazano.

North Side. 412-322-5000. SMILING MOOSE. Milly, Nightbeast, Paper States, Come Summer (early show). Commonwealth Family, Joel Kellum, Narue Pearson. (late show). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Davis Rogan. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Moose Tracks. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 31 CLUB CAFE. David Torn. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Iron Reagan, Angel Dust, Noisem. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. PALACE THEATRE. “Weird Al” Yankovic. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PARADISE ISLAND. Gone South. Neville Island. 412-264-6570.

MON 01 THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Marine Corpse, Soothsayer, Wealth. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059.

MP 3 MONDAY

BENT SQUARES

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH LANDERMAN}

SSALON-ATMOSPHERE.COM A L O N -AAT M O S P H E R E C O M

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Bent Squares, the new solo project from local musician Marcus Meston. Stream or download

“Hook, Line and Sinker” for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.


THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Singer Songwriter Contest. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 02 PALACE THEATRE. Steven Wilson. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

WED 03 BRILLOBOX. Sebadoh w/ Total Babes. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Northern Gold w/ Jon Bindley. South Side. 412-431-4950. STAGE AE. Tame Impala w/ Kuroma. North Side. 412-229-5483.

DJS THU 28 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. REMEDY. Telephone Plastic Baby. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. TWELVE ON CARSON. Digital Dave. South Side. 412-742-4024.

SAT 30 ELWOOD’S PUB. Ms. Freddye’s Home Cookin’ Trio. 724-265-1181. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Satin Hearts Strange Brew. Downtown. 412-471-9100. VERONA MOOSE. Shot O’ Soul. Verona. 412-828-3119. WESTWOOD GOLF CLUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. West Mifflin. 412-462-9555.

SUN 31 LATITUDE 360. Sweaty Betty, Shot O’ Soul, Pittsburgh Women of the Blues, Tony Janflone, Jr., Vince Agwada, The Bo’ Hog Brothers. Sweaty Betty’s Blues Jam. All proceeds benefit Greater Pittsburgh Food Bank. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

THU 28

FRI 29

FRI 29

SAT 30

WED 03

SAT 30 GROWN & SEXY II. Yolanda Barber. Strip District. 412-728-4155.

BLUES FRI 29 NIED’S HOTEL. Ms. Freddye. Lawrenceville. 412 781-9853. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dr. Zoot. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE R BAR. Felix & The Hurricanes. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir w/ Tania Grubbs & Daniel May. East Liberty. 412-345-1722. SAHARA TEMPLE. Tony Campbell & Smooth Jazzsurgery. Braddock. 412-271-0502.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Bronwyn Wyatt Higgins. Downtown. 412-773-8884. PHIPPS paper pghcitym .co CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Jazz in the Garden. Oakland. 412-622-6914. ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Downtown. 412-773-8884. Paul Cosentino. Lawrenceville. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, 412-402-9522. DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. William REMEDY. Already Sweaty. Parker/Daniel Carter Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 565 LIVE. Bethany James. South Side. 412-431-2825. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ ANDYS WINE BAR. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. SPIRIT. In Bed By Ten Dance Party. 412-773-8884. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. HOLLYWOOD LANES. 412-431-8800. Guaracha Latin Dance Band. REMEDY. Leg Drop. Dormont. 412-583-8815. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. HYEHOLDE. Ron Wilson & RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. Bob Insko. Moon. 412-264-3116. North Side. 412-231-7777. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker South Side. 412-431-2825. Jazz Band. Ballroom. Glenn S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Zeleski. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-481-7227. 412-904-3335. SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk KOLLAR CLUB. The Jazzed Owls. Night. South Side. 412-431-4668. South Side. 412-431-2002. SPIRIT. Tracksploitation & DJ Kelly. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff & Max Leake. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. THE SPOT, ETC. Etta Cox Band. 412-362-6001. Penn Hills. 412-727-2141.

HIP HOP/R&B

SUN 31

MON 01

JAZZ FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

Zeleski. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Two Marks & A Pearl feat. Andrea Pearl. Downtown. 412-392-2217. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

SAT 30 ANDYS WINE BAR. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Flying Dutchmen. Downtown. 412-456-6666. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir w/ Tania Grubbs & Daniel May. East Liberty. 412-345-1722. FRESCO’S. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ Eric Susoeff. Wexford. 724-935-7550. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Glenn

WED 03 RIVERS CLUB. Lyndsey Smith. Downtown. 412-391-5227. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. David Thockmorton, Chris Parker Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ACOUSTIC THU 28 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall Duo. Downtown. 412-697-3120. CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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33


Our First Shipment of Trees & Shrubs Have Arrived!

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

EARLY WARNINGS

Cavacini Garden Center

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Unknown String Band. Strip District. 412-362-0201. CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Laney Jones & The Spirits. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

Spring Has Sprung!

SAT 30

All Annual Flowers Have Arrived PETUNIAS • BEGONIAS • GERANIUMS You Must See Our Variety of Hanging Baskets, Perennials & Vegetable Plants

SUN 31

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE 100 51st st STREET • L AWRENCE VILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Bill Couch. West End. 412-458-0417.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BERTA PFIRSICH}

FRI 29

GIANT EAGLE MARKET DISTRICT. Brad Yoder. Shadyside. 412-831-1480. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. The Hills & The Rivers, Slim Forsythe & His Payday Loners. Weather Permitting Opening Party w/ live music, food trucks, brews & games for all ages. Shadyside. 412-363-5845.

MOURN

[TUE., JULY 21]

MOURN

Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville

WED 03

[FRI., JULY 24]

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Danny Whitecotton. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5992. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Waka Flocka Flame Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District [THU., SEPT. 17]

Echo and the Bunnymen Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

REGGAE THU 28 CHURCH BREW WORKS. The Flow Band. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200.

FRI 29 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. The Flow Band. Beaver. 724-724-0222.

CLASSICAL

OTHER MUSIC

FRI 29

THU 28

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Ludwig’s Pictures from the Floating World, & Debussy’s “Iberia” from Images, plus works by Ginastera & De Falla. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

RIVERS CASINO. Harry & Hermie. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 30

DAVE WICKERHAM. Keystone Oaks High School, Dormont. BAJA BAR AND 412-214-8108. GRILL. The Flow LARA LYNN www. per Band Reggae Jam pa COTTRILL. Singing pghcitym .co Rockers. Fox Chapel. excerpts from 412-963-0640. “A New Kind of Fallout,” Opera Theater’s new eco-opera to celebrate Rachel OAKS THEATER. The Wailers. Carson’s birthday. Rachel Oakmont. 412-828-6311. Carson Homestead, Springdale. 724-274-5459. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performances of Cowboy Overture, Grand ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Canyon Suite & melodies from Rooster. Rural Ridge. Pirates of the Caribbean. Heinz 724-265-1181. Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 31

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 03

COUNTRY Take advantage of our self-service dog wash at these locations: BRIDGEVILLE, CRANBERRY, EDGEWOOD, HAMPTON, IRWIN and MONROEVILLE.

TOTA LP ETSTO TO R E S.C S COM LO CALLY OWN E D & O P E RATE D F O R 22 YEAR S! 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

THU 28

FRI 29

MEADOWS CASINO. Christian Beck. Washington. 724-503-1200.

TUE 02 CLUB CAFE. Slim Cessna’s Auto Club w/ Jayke Orvis. South Side. 412-431-4950.

SUN 31 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Ludwig’s Pictures from the Floating World, & Debussy’s “Iberia” from Images, plus works by Ginastera & De Falla. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FRI 29 LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100 x1. NEW CITY CHURCH. Wayfaring Brothers, Sofia Lange, Ben Cadenhead, Janine Jones. Downtown. 412-726-4217. RIVERS CASINO. Sputzy. North Side. 412-231-7777. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Emmet Cahill. An Irish tenor, formerly of Celtic Thunder. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 30 MONROEVILLE CONVENTION CENTER. Pennsylvania Polka & Ethnic Food Festival. Live bands w/ headliner, Jimmy Sturr & his orchestra, food, Polish Mass, more. Monroeville. 412-373-7300. RIVERS CASINO. Shelley Duff Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 31 HIGHLAND PARK. Eclectic Laboratory Chamber Orchestra. Highland Park. 412-608-6120. MONROEVILLE CONVENTION CENTER. Pennsylvania Polka & Ethnic Food Festival. Live bands w/ headliner, Jimmy Sturr & his orchestra, food, Polish Mass, more. Monroeville. 412-373-7300.


What to do

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

May 27 - June 2

Clap Your Hands And Say Yeah

WEDNESDAY 27 Girls Only - The Secret Comedy of Women

Dance and Flight

MAY 30 MR. SMALLS THEATRE

Nelsonville Music Festival

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through May 31.

NELSONVILLE, OHIO. Tickets: nelsonvillefest.org or 740-753-1924. Through May 31.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.com. Through Aug. 16.

SATURDAY 30 The Shadyside Art & Craft Festival

Brooke Annibale / Heather Kropf / Judith Avers

The Early November / Lydia / Restorations MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

WALNUT STREET, SHADYSIDE. Free event. Through May 31.

Sinkane

Will Hoge

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Comedian Ricky Reyes (As Seen on Comedy Central)

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

and Enation

Milly

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

ANTONIAN THEATER AT CARLOW UNIVERSITY Oakland. Tickets: undercroftopera.org. Through May 31.

Gringo Star / Hollis Brown

SUNDAY 31

FRIDAY 29

Madama Butterfly

HEINZ FIELD North Side. With special guest Eric Church and Brantley Gilbert. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 5p.m.

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. Clap Your Hands And Tickets: ticketfly.com Say Yeah MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m. Jonathan Jackson

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

THURSDAY 28

Kenny Chesney The Big Revival Tour

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m. NOW LEASING

Where to live

TUESDAY 2 Kyle Kinane

Backyard Kings

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through May 30.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m. NOW LEASING

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35


STOP YELLING AT ME TO CARE AND DREAM AND INVENT THINGS!

MUSIC HISTORY {BY AL HOFF} The first two-thirds of John Pirozzi’s documentary Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten: Cambodia’s Lost Rock and Roll are a delight. The last part is devastating, but no filmmaker can re-write the country’s tragic history. In the early 1960s, Cambodia was shaking off French colonialism and beginning to fashion itself into a new country. Part of its education was popular music, which streamed into Cambodia in various forms: French lounge music, Afro-Cuban rhythms, American surf

NOT SO

DREAMY

Cambodian crooner Sinn Sisamouth

CP APPROVED

instrumentals. And young Cambodian singers and musicians created kicky hybrid bands, incorporating regional instruments and the national penchant for weepie ballads. (Nobody recorded more haunting love songs than Sinn Sisamouth and Ros Sereysothea.) Old films show a fantastic scene in the capital of Phnom Penh, of nattily dressed bands performing in lounges for dancing couples. Pirozzi uses archival footage and interviews with former band members, influential Cambodians and assorted historians to tell both the story of the music and the increasingly tumultuous times, as the war in neighboring Vietnam begins to encroach. (One positive of the rising tensions: More sources of American popular music, leading to hits like the Khmer version of Santana’s “Oye Como Va.”) Politically, there are twists and turns, and then horror, when in 1975, Phnom Penh falls to the Khmer Rouge. Artists, musicians and other free spirits are banished, Western music is branded counter-revolutionary, and Cambodia’s quirky, lively popular-music scene vanishes overnight. The recounting of these dark years by survivors is heartbreaking. But the two seemingly disparate parts of this film do form a cohesive whole — a tough but uplifting reminder that no matter what awful things humans do to each other, art survives. The singers can be killed, the records smashed, but always, the spirit remembers. And recordings that escape the wrecking ball live on, entertaining and inspiring anew. One elderly woman cries, recalling her sister, a popular balladeer who “disappeared forever.” But as she thumbs re-issued CDs, she notes: “I am happy her voice is still here.” AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In English, and Khmer and French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., May 29. Hollywood

36

Field of dreams: Britt Robertson looks for the future.

{BY AL HOFF}

O

H, TOMORROWLAND. Like the future, I wanted you to be good. Who doesn’t enjoy a fanciful journey into times unknown, and director Brad Bird has delivered some excellent, smartfun family sci-fi adventures before (The Iron Giant, The Incredibles). But Tomorrowland, an original story co-penned by Bird and Damon Lindelof (Lost), is a bust. It begins in the past, at the 1964 World’s Fair, where a judge at the Hall of Invention is dismissing a boy’s not-quitefunctional jetpack. Then, poof! The young inventor is spirited away to the future (I think), where everything is silvery and gleaming and, yes, there are jetpacks. Meanwhile in the now, the spaceshuttle launch pad is being dismantled, because NO FUTURE. A plucky young woman named Casey (Britt Robertson), who dreams of visiting the stars, is addressing this lack of opportunity by sabotaging the work site. When she gets caught, it’s no SuperMax for her, but rather a magical trip to that same silvery city, where, of course, she is invited onto

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

a rocket ship because FUTURE. The visit expires, and Casey is back in Florida, condemned to a series of frantic, unfunny and confusing adventures engineered so that she might: meet a weird girl from the future (Raffey Cassidy); dodge some robots; and join up with America’s only other dreamer, the jetpack kid from the World’s Fair, now a cranky, paranoid man (George Clooney).

TOMORROWLAND DIRECTED BY: Brad Bird STARRING: George Clooney, Britt Robertson, Raffey Cassidy

If only Tomorrowland were entertaining: It’s too silly for adults and too complicated for little kids; the pacing is a mess; and some scenes feel grafted from other movies (Men in Black cuttingroom floor; the never-produced Edison and Tesla’s Steampunk Nights in Paris). The dialogue is preachy, and the actors mostly squabble. (Even Clooney —

Clooney! — is grating.) But for a film about dreaming up a better future, it fails to entrance or inspire, chiefly because it doesn’t trust its audience to discover and assemble its pieces. There isn’t much nuance in Tomorrowland: The Mighty Hammer of Obvious Themes is wielded so often you may choose to root for the bad guy and his shitty future out of spite. Stop yelling at me to care and dream and invent things! There’s a rich irony that all this dareto-be-a-creative-outlier blather is being shoveled out by Disney, a global entertainment mega-entity that exists to wring money out of us by reproducing endless amounts of formulaic product. And I hope you see the same Disney ad I saw before this film: the one where the two suburban dads are mocked for dreaming and daring to build a backyard rocket — before being course-corrected and whisked away to a Disney theme resort to hang out with a guy in a Buzz Lightyear costume. Because BUY SOMETHING. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


also with Chaney and Earles. That film was the versatile silent star’s only speaking role (though he tackles five voices here); Chaney died soon after. 1925 silent version, with live musical accompaniment: 2 p.m.; 1930 “talkie” remake: 4 p.m. Sun., May 31. Hollywood (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS. Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron star in Vincente Minnelli’s Technicolor musical comedy about an American painter who attracts the attention of an heiress. Singing, dancing and romance abound! The 1951 film concludes this month’s Sunday-night series of highly quotable films. 8 p.m. Sun., May 31. Regent Square

ALOHA. Bradley Cooper stars in this romantic dramedy about a military contractor who reconnects with a long-lost love and falls for his Air Force minder. Emma Stone and Rachel McAdams also star; Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire) writes and directs. Starts Fri., May 29 BIGFOOT THE MOVIE. In this new, locally produced comedy-horror film from Jared Show, three guys from Ellwood City have to sort things out when Bigfoot comes to town. The film features plenty of well-known Western Pennsylvanians including: Curt Wootton (“Pittsburgh Dad”), comedian Jim Krenn, WDVE’s Mike Wysocki and former news anchor Darieth Chisolm. 7 p.m. Thu., May 28 (AMC Loews); 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 29 (Oaks); 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 30 (Strand, Zelienople); 2 p.m. Sun., May 31 (Strand); 8 p.m. Sun., May 31 (Dependable Drive-In); and 8:45 p.m. Thu., June 4 (Riverside Drive-In). See www.bigfootthemovie. com for event details, meet-and-greets and ticket information. CAN’T STAND LOSING YOU: SURVIVING THE POLICE. Andy Grieve and Lauren Lazin’s recent musical bio-pic focusing on the career of Andy Summers, from his days in 1960s psychedelic bands through the formation of The Police in the mid-1970s and that megahuge band’s dissolution in the 1980s. 7 p.m. Thu., May 28; 6 p.m. Sat., May 30; and 4 and 5:30 p.m. Sun., May 31. Parkway, McKees Rocks ENTOURAGE. The gang from the HBO comedy series are now in a movie, about how they’re making a movie. The boys are back: Adrian Grenier, Kevin Dillon, Jerry Ferrara and Jeremy Piven, plus cameos from Andrew Dice Clay, Tom Brady and Warren Buffet, among others. Doug Ellin directs. Starts Wed., June 3

THE GOONIES. A treasure map! A spooky cave! A group of kids embark on an adventure in this 1985 comedy from Richard Donner. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 3. AMC Loews. $5

Bigfoot the Movie household objects (and one tree) to lash out against and terrify the family. The rules don’t make a whole lot of sense, but Kenan and producer Sam Raimi keep the affair lighthearted. Leaning heavily on the charm of Sam Rockwell and Rosemarie DeWitt as the parents, the story is shallow but brief, more startling than scary and, overall, a pretty harmless way to spend 90 minutes. (Alex Gordon) SAN ANDREAS. California gets split in half by The Big One, along the San Andreas fault. But no earthquake will stop one man (Dwayne Johnson) from saving his family. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., May 29.

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Alfred Hitchcock series. The Birds (birds go mad, attack humans, in this 1963 thriller), May 27. Rear Window (in which busybody Jimmy Stewart spies a murder in a neighbor’s apartment), May 27-28. The 39 Steps (1935 romantic spy thriller from Hitchcock’s U.K. years), May 27-28. N orth by N orthwest (Cary Grant stars in this classic mistaken-identity thriller from 1959), May 28.

Poltergeist THE HUMAN CENTIPEDE III (FINAL SEQUENCE). A prison warden, inspired by the previous Human Centipede films and seeking a solution to overcrowding, decides to create a 500-inmate-long chain. Written and directed by Tom Six. Starts Fri., May 29. Parkway, McKees Rocks POLTERGEIST. In 1982’s Poltergeist, a little girl sits before a snowy TV set, hands on the screen patty-cake style, looking like she might be somehow pulled into it. (She is.) In Gil Kenan’s 2015 remake, the image is upgraded with fancier apparitions and a much thinner television. But the story is generally the same: handsome three-kid family moves to a new house built on a cemetery (what is it about cemeteries and suburban real estate?); displaced spirits inhabit

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Graduation series (Fri., May 29, through Thu., June 4). Adventureland (2009 comedy about working at an amusement park; shot at Kennywood). The Perks of Being Wallflower (2012 adaptation of Stephen Chbosky’s popular young-adult novel). The Graduate (in Mike Nichols’ 1967 dramedy, a young man faces uncertainty). Boyz N the Hood (John Singleton’s 1991 coming-of-age drama set in a tough Los Angeles neighborhood). Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com STRIPES. Bill Murray and Harold Ramis star in Ivan Reitman’s 1981 comedy about two bored guys who enlist in the army. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 27. AMC Loews. $5 HIGH AND LOW. Akira Kurosawa’s 1963 adaptation of Ed McBain’s detective novel King’s Ransom

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pits a wealthy industrialist (Toshiro Mifune) against a kidnapper, and places him in the moral gray area between saving his company or saving the life of an employee’s child. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., May 27. Melwood. $2 THE LAST DAY OF SUMMER. While vacationing on a deserted beach, a woman meets a man who declares his love for her, and they Roar spend the afternoon together. Tadeusz Konwicki’s 1958 film concludes a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 Thu., May 28, and 5:30 Sat., May 30. Harris ROAR. In this cult 1981 film — now in re-release — dozens of big cats (lions, tigers, cheetahs) live with a naturalist (director Noel Marshall), and get testy when his wife (then real-life wife Tippi Hedren) and children come to visit. A glorious mess filmed over 11 years at the couple’s California ranch, with their own kids and more than 100 of their own animals. There’s virtually no plot and the acting is abysmal, but you cannot look away from scene after scene of actors being attacked (somewhat playfully, but there’s blood) by lions, tigers and elephants. To top it off, the film, with its deluded lions-are-pets premise, is supposed to foster world-wide animal conservation. Um, that lion just ripped that guy’s shirt off. This film is bat-shit crazy, even if bats are about the only wild animal not in it. Fri., May 29, through Sun., May 31. Melwood (AH)

GLEN CAMPBELL: I’LL BE ME. James Keach’s 2014 documentary profiles the singer and songwriter (“Rhinstone Cowboy”) on his farewell tour after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This Pittsburgh-premiere screening is presented by the Jewish Association on Aging. 6:30 p.m. Thu., June 4. SouthSide Works Cinemas ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! THE DEATH OF JONNY GAMMAGE. The starting point of local filmmaker Billy Jackson’s 2005 documentary is a re-enactment of the death of black businessman Jonny Gammage at the hands of Brentwood police during a 1995 traffic stop. The hour-long documentary also recalls the large-scale street protests that followed, and explores the investigation into Gammage’s death, along with allegations of police misconduct in that case and in other recent fatal encounters between black men and law enforcement, and prospects for reform. The screening continues a monthly series of films about labor and social justice presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation, and director Jackson will be on hand to discuss the film. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 4. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomesteadfoundation.org (BO)

JINNAH. Christopher Lee stars as Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of modern Pakistan, in this 1998 bio-pic directed by Jamil Dehlavi. The screening is a fundraiser for The Citizens Foundation, which builds schools in Pakistan, and the ticket price includes a lunch. 12:30 p.m. Sat., May 30. Hollywood. $30. www.facebook.com/jinnahscreeningpittsburgh THE UNHOLY THREE. Lon Chaney Sr. made a number of films in the 1920s that even by today’s standards are still deliciously weird or grotesque. Among them is this one, in which Chaney’s character, a ventriloquist known as Dr. Echo, leads a trio of former side-show performers who have turned to a life of crime. Chaney spends much of the film in drag as “Grandma O’Grady,” with midget Harry Earles dressed up as her “grandchild.” The 1925 silent version was directed by Tod Browning (Freaks). In 1930, Jack Conway directed an early “talkie” remake of it,

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IThis Amheartwarming Big Bird (2014) - 5/27 @ 7:30pm doc chronicles the life of Caroll Spinney,

the man who has been Sesame Street’s Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch since 1969. _____________________________________________________

Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten

(2014) - 5/29 @ 8:00pm, 5/30 @ 7:00pm & 9:30pm, 5/31 @ 7:0pm, 6/1 @ 7:30pm, 6/2 @ 7:30pm, 6/3 @ 7:30pm, 6/4 @ 7:30pm This documentary tracks the twists and turns of Cambodian music as it morphs into rock and roll, blossoms, and is nearly destroyed along with the rest of the country. _____________________________________________________

Two Thousand Maniacs!

(1964) - 5/29 @ 10:30pm In this darkly-comic slaughterfest, six vacationing Yanksfall victim to the cheerfully violent Southern hospitality of Pleasant Valley. A classic! Directed by Herschell Gordon Lewis. _____________________________________________________

Jinnah

(1998) - 5/30 @ 13:30pm - Biographical film which follows the life of the founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali Jinnah. Starring Christopher Lee. A benefit for The Citizens Foundation, tickets $30 and includes lunch. _____________________________________________________

Silents, Please! The Unholy Three

(1925 & 1930) 5/31 @ 2pm & 4:00pm - Screening both the silent version with live theater organ, and the “talkie”, Lon Chaney’s only speaking role and his last film. Chaney in drag!

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[COMEDY]

BOTH ARTISTS PRESENT THEIR SUBJECTS WITH EMPATHY BUT NOT SENTIMENT

LUCKY HIM {BY IAN THOMAS}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KYLE KINANE with Ryan Thompson and Shannon Norman 7 p.m. Tue., June 2. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

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[ART REVIEW]

Kyle Kinane {PHOTO COURTESY OF MOSES ROBINSON}

“All a miracle is, is the world letting you know it can still surprise you,” comedian Kyle Kinane says on the opening track of his latest album, I Liked His Old Stuff Better. The record captures a raucous performance at the 40 Watt Club, the legendary rock venue in Athens, Ga. The line sets up tales of debasement and personal disaster, but it also sums up Kinane’s comedic perspective, which mines disappointment as a source of wonderment and redefines success as the absence of utter failure. “Maybe it’s a Midwestern belief, but just hope for average. If it goes above that, lucky you,” Kinane says by phone, as he prepares for his U.S. tour. “I wasn’t raised materialistic or anything, so it was kind of like, ‘You got your imagination, go have fun, go with your friends.’ You make the best out of everything; we didn’t need toys, just go out and sit in the dirt, have fun. And that’s kind of what I did with the rest of my life.” Kinane, 38, has found success in comedy, but it’s taken a while. He moved from Chicago to Los Angeles in 2003. His first Comedy Central special aired in 2011. “If you think you’re going to be a superstar because of standup comedy, you’re going to be disappointed. I’m still mystified that I made it this far,” Kinane says. “All I can say is, ‘Wow, thank you, Universe, for giving me this brief amount of time to tell jokes for a living.’” Kinane also provides the gravelly voiceovers for Comedy Central’s promotional spots. Kinane’s world-weary pragmatism is hard-won. His dry, detached observations are a levy against the flood of desperation and absurdity in the world. Kinane’s narratives offer a funhouse-worth of skewed selfreflection. Each inner monologue seems to beget another darker, deeper inner monologue. “To explain where I’m at on the social spectrum, I recently said ‘God bless you’ to a cat,” he says on his previous album. “Not my room, not my cat, but I was fine with this arrangement.” Is Kinane’s perspective a mark of maturity? “I’d like to say that, but it still goes one way or another,” he says. “Still, one of the funniest things is when someone just flies off the handle.”

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

S

OLITUDE, ISOLATION, loneliness, pur-

pose, connection, intimacy and the relationship with the self are explored with respectful tenderness and delicate reverence in A World Imagined. The show at Silver Eye Center for Photography, organized by Leo Hsu and David Oresick, is comprised of simultaneous solo exhibitions by Sara Macel and Kelli Connell. Macel’s contribution, “May The Road Rise To Meet You,” presents a life of work and drive straightforwardly, while Connell’s “A Double Life” imagines and invents through manipulated media. Both artists offer large, vibrant images presenting their subjects with empathy but not sentiment, in fleeting glimpses that fill in pieces of each separate puzzle while permitting viewers ample room to envision the big picture for themselves. Connell, who’s based in Chicago, be-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

LIES

Sara Macel’s “Dennis Anthony Macel, Hitchcock, Texas” (2010)

gan the “Double Life” project with a series of images in 2002. She created subsequent installments in 2005-2006 and 2008-2010; the works shown here, their first public exhibition, were created in 2013-2015. A single model (who is not Connell herself) appears in all of them. She is pictured twice

A WORLD IMAGINED continues through June 13. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereyecenter.org

and cast not as multiple characters but as multiple incarnations of one, in this examination of perceptions of sexuality, gender roles and status in relationships. Connell’s lens is an autobiographical one, and the tableaux she manufactures are rooted

in personal experience and thought. But the duality (and beyond) of the individual isn’t a subject that can be understood only through Connell’s own context. The matters of our place, our purpose and our struggle to understand ourselves are universal. Perusing these large-scale, dynamic photographs, it doesn’t take long — it can even happen with the initial portrait — for the viewer’s eye to begin to register two different women rather than the same woman digitally reproduced. Their clothes contrast, their stances and carriages — which communicate volumes about each woman and her relation to the other — are distinct. Their personalities and attitudes, throbbing off the wall, are particular and owned. After a moment, we honestly don’t even think they look alike. After several moments, and several images, we begin to notice what all these pictures, with one


[BOOKS]

WORK FORCES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Illah Nourbakhsh

notable exception, share. Whether they’re drying off in bathing suits alongside a lake, huddled against wind squinting at choppy water, smoking at a state fair with a muzzy Ferris wheel in the background, or touching in seduction or comfort, while we direct our gaze toward these women, they avert theirs from each other. They focus on the same unseen object nearby, stare together toward the far horizon, cast down their eyes or squeeze them shut. But save for one gentle embrace in the front seat of a car, they’re not connected with each other. This disconnect heightens the distance between the parts which ultimately should join into a whole. While Connell’s works emphasize the struggle of the individual within herself, Brooklyn-based Macel focuses on the isolation that a man can experience when the need to work detaches him from the very family for whom his work enables him to provide for. Her own work honors the efforts of her father, a salesman of telephone poles, who traveled across the country. Photos depict the man himself — serving as his own model — recreating situations during his absence as she pictured them, sight unseen: the ennui of travel not undertaken for pleasure, the well-organized details of a regimented plan of attack, supplemented in the gallery by an installation including her father’s actual desk, complete with pens and papers, agenda and name plate. Images of airport runways, company cars, unfolded maps, Post-its, vintage luggage and portraits come together to tell a story without imposing a narrative. We’re left with a clear impression of a man doing what was needed, dedicated to his task, even when it meant absenting himself from the people for whom he cared enough to do it. If the loneliness is evident, so are pushing past loneliness, and the refusal to let it take over. Both artists in A World Imagined offer their subjects with palpable love and in the highest esteem, yet remarkably manage to steer completely clear of the precious or romantic. Connell’s women reading in the bathroom together (one in the tub, one out) are almost anthropological in their stylization, and Macel’s father’s notes on Marriott stationery, like her strip-motel doors under blazing sunlight, are fully objective — or at least their presentation is. While emotion or sentiment might have been behind the creation of these essentially fictional works, in execution they’re offered without obvious sentiment, free of commentary by their creators. That gives viewers permission to draw their own conclusions, rather than being manipulated into seconding the artists’. And what we’re given is stunning in its truth and compelling in its directness.

In his 2013 book Robot Futures, Carnegie Mellon University roboticist Illah Nourbakhsh explored the dark side of high tech. He raised alarms about how increasingly powerful and ubiquitous robots and virtual realities might compromise our privacy, our safety and even our psychological well-being. But he says the biggest question the book generated came from parents: What will a roboticized future mean for my kids’ job prospects? Nourbakhsh doesn’t have a comforting answer. “There is no safe job. Everything is always at risk,” he says. But he does sketch out some suggestions in his new book (part one of a planned two-parter), Parenting for Technology Futures. Broadly, the selfpublished, 60-page book ($5 on Amazon) advises that assuring that your kids are technologically “literate” — able to use apps, say — isn’t enough. Instead of mere consumers of technology, Nourbakhsh recommends that you help your kids become technology fluent: producers of technology, not just consumers. That means, in part, turning technology to problem-solving. At CMU, for instance, Nourbakhsh — who heads the school’s robotics master’s program — also directs the Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment (CREATE) lab, which helps individuals and communities create tech to do things like monitor air and water pollution. He also cites the example of school kids in Maryland who used a 3D printer not to fabricate toys from a downloadable design, but to design and manufacture an adaptive pencil-holder for classmates with muscular dystrophy. “Are you making for the sake of making, or are you making for a real reason?” he says. Perhaps surprisingly, Nourbakhsh critiques current buzz concept STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Nourbakhsh — who has two young children himself — cautions that STEM is no educational cure-all, even for kids’ employment prospects. He notes that basic engineering jobs are among the most easily automated. But problem-solvers, he argues, will always be valued. And the best problemsolvers, he says, are people who can think across disciplines — language, history, the arts — not those who simply hunker down in a STEM silo. He’d like to see people with such cross-disciplinary training pursue “maker culture” (admittedly, another buzzword) to tackle real problems on the local level, helping people make choices about their lives, and using technology in ways that no one’s thought of yet. “I think that’s where a lot of the promise of technology lies in the future,” he says.

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SUMMER CAMPS GRADES 1 - 3

GRADES 4 - 9

June 15 - 26 or Aug 3 - 14

Gr. 4 - 6: July 20 - Aug 7 Gr. 7 - 9: June 29 - July 17

GRADES 2 - 12

Have a great Pittsburgh photo to share? June 8 - 12 or July 27 - 31

Gr. 4 - 6: June 29 - July 17 Gr. 7 - 9: July 20 - Aug 7

Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

AGES 3-5 Pre-School Camp: June 8 - 12 or July 27 - 31 GRADES 6 - 12 June 22 - July 3

Here’s one of our favorites from last week’s submissions by Instagramer @meesha31!

Private Voice & Piano Ages 12 - 18: June 15 - August 7 ½ Hour and Full Hour spaces available

412-281-2234 pittsburghCLO.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TAMI DIXON}

Bria Walker in Saints Tour, at Bricolage

[PLAY REVIEWS]

HALLOWED {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

pghcitypaper

“FAMILY FRIENDLY” usually does not appear in the same sentence with “Bricolage Productions.” The real question is why Saints Tour, produced in association with Real/Time Interventions, is not marketed as such. The site-specific play, conceived and written by playwright Molly Rice, has all the earmarks of classic children’s theater: immersion into a land of wonderment, frequent calls for participation, exuberance and joy. And, oh yes, a treat at the end.

SAINTS TOUR

continues through June 13. Bricolage Production Co. in association with Real/Time Interventions in Braddock. $60 (free for residents of 15104 zip code). 412-471-0999 or www.bricolagepgh.org

an imagination in real life. It’s not difficult to perceive ghosts, if not saints, still inhabiting the area. The very idea of organizing this triborough trek with so many private and public parties involved is mind-boggling, even more challenging than Bricolage’s immersive STRATA in 2012. A tip of the hat to Real/Time cofounders Rice and Rusty Thelin, and Bricolage “team members” Jeffrey Carpenter, Tami Dixon, Jackie Baker, Maureen White Ciampaglia, Alicia DiGiori and Emily Willson. So much of the magic is created by local visual artists, including David Pohl and Lenka Clayton (“saint signs”), James Simon (violin-maker), and Vanessa German (the bridge). Bria Walker, as the Tour Guide, shoulders her monumental task with ease. The Tour sweeps through Monongahela Cemetery, with spectacular views of the Mon Valley, and the silent history of its residents, as Scots-Irish names are succeeded by Eastern European ones on the gravestones. The Tour-ists also walk up and down hills, steps, paved and unpaved places. Wear sturdy walking shoes that you don’t mind getting wet or muddy, and be careful. Don’t lose your footing, just capture the magic.

Grown-ups who can leave their apprehensions at the door of the magical mystery tour bus will have a lot of fun, especially if they bring kids. The dark, adult themes will fly over the little ones’ heads and not bother them, while giving the “serious” people something to think about. The Tour, by bus and on foot, explores I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM real history given mythical interpretations with miracles, saints, ethereal music and apparitions throughout the Greater Braddock area. True, it’s not exactly ev- {BY TED HOOVER} eryone’s idea of “a land of wonderment,” but the history of this hollowed-out UP UNTIL NOW, Front Porch Theatricals mastodon of a town has captured many has produced just three musicals (and

VOICES CARRY

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015


two were co-productions.) This is its first year as a stand-alone troupe with an announced season. Given such a minimal production history, I was in no way prepared for the unbelievably professional, absolutely top-drawer standard of Front Porch’s first 2015 outing, Jason Robert Brown’s musical The Last Five Years. In almost every way that matters, this is a flawless evening. A newish company could be excused a less-thanperfect physical production; but Andrew David Ostrowski’s lighting, Kim Brown’s costumes and Scott P. Calhoon’s set rival, if not surpass, any local show, and most tours, that I see. The Last Five Years is Brown’s fictionalized account of the breakup of his marriage. Its score is pop-rock-influenced and power-ballad-flavored, and its boymeets-girl, boy-gets-girl, boy-loses-girl plot is, um, unremarkable. But while I don’t like the plot, I do love Brown’s plotting of it. The story of Jamie (the Boy) is told chronologically straightforward, while Cathy’s runs in reverse; his first scene is after their first date, her first scene is her walking out of the marriage. They never appear together except when their stories meet in the middle —

their wedding. It’s a rather remarkable bit of playwriting and adds a considerable interest to the well-worn plot. But even that plot seems exciting when Erin Lindsey Krom and David Toole are up on stage blasting this show into the sky. Quite simply, they are Cathy and Jamie, and it’s amazing how deeply they make us care. And you haven’t heard voices like this sing with such power and depth since … well, since I don’t know when.

THE LAST FIVE YEARS continues through Sun., May 31. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $24-30. www.frontporchpgh.com

Calhoon’s direction is specific and deliberate, providing Krom and Toole with excellent support from start to finish. And if I haven’t used up all my adjectives, let me shower what’s left on musical director Deana Muro and her six-piece “orchestra” — the color, mood and emotional heft of this evening is due, in large part, to the talent of these musicians. With this show, Front Porch Theatricals has leapt to the head of Pittsburgh’s theatrical class. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

CONGRATULATIONS Pittsburgh City Paper writers captured six first-place finishes and the Ray Sprigle Memorial Award for best-in-show at the 51st Annual Golden Quill Awards hosted May 22 by the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania. The total makes CP the most-honored non-daily newspaper in Southwest Pennsylvania. Staff writer Rebecca Nuttall won the top prize for Education Reporting and the Sprigle Award for her August 2014 cover story, “Classroom Experiment,” which highlighted failures at Pittsburgh Public Schools’ highly touted University Prep High School.

City Paper Writers won Golden Quill Awards in the following categories: RAY SPRIGLE MEMORIAL AWARD NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Rebecca Nuttall, “Classroom Experiment”

EDUCATION NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Rebecca Nuttall, “Classroom Experiment”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ARTICLE OR SERIES OR CRITICISM NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Margaret Welsh, “The Gotobeds Reap Success”

COLUMNS NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Bill O’Driscoll, “Green Light”

HEALTH/SCIENCE/ENVIRONMENT ARTICLE OR SERIES NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Andy Mulkerin, “UPMC Musicians’ Hearing Center Helps Local Musicians Protect Their Ears”

HISTORY/CULTURE ARTICLE OR SERIES NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Charlie Deitch, “In New Exhibit of After-Hours Gay Clubs, Local Historian Unearths the City’s LGBT Legacy”

SPORTS NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Charlie Deitch, “After Iraq, the Ring Holds Few Terrors for Sammy Vasquez Jr.”

City Paper Writers were also finalists in the following categories: HEALTH/SCIENCE/ENVIRONMENT ARTICLE OR SERIES NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Alex Zimmerman, “The Other End of the Spectrum”

COLUMNS NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

Hal B. Klein, On The Rocks

SPOT NEWS, ONLINE Ashley Murray and Rebecca Nuttall, “Protestors Take to Pittsburgh Streets in Wake of Police Violence”

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.2806.04.15

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

Live Music MAY 29

Admission

FRIDAY | MAY 29 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

the satin hearts

SATURDAY | MAY 30 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

rick matt

WEDNESDAY | JUNE 3 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

john gresh

FRIDAY | JUNE 5 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

lyndsey smith

SATURDAY | JUNE 6 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VINCE AGWADA

WEDNESDAY | JUNE 10 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

benny benack

FRIDAY | JUNE 12 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

dan bubien

SATURDAY | JUNE 13 | 8PM

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

{STAGE} It was news to us that Barbra Streisand’s Malibu estate includes a “street of shops” built in the basement. And it was such news to Jonathan Tolins that he wrote a play about it. Buyer & Cellar is Tolins’ well-reviewed one-man 2013 comedy about the lone clerk who serves the superstar lone customer in her subterranean mall. Pittsburgh Public Theater stages the show’s Pittsburgh premiere, directed by Don Stephenson. It stars Tom Lenk (of TV’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer) as Alex More, Streisand and other characters. The first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through June 28. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-56. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 31. 3333 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $5-35. www.undercroftopera.org

+ FRI., MAY 29

happy-hour dance party at Lawrenceville’s brand-new Spirit Lodge is for people who have kids or who work early, or something. BO 6-9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. Free. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

{PARTY} When the recent Commonwealth Press Beer Barge dance party ended, as scheduled, at 9 p.m., and everyone went home happy, Kelly Beall and Matt Buchholz decided they were on to something. Tired (literally) of dance parties that didn’t get cranking till midnight, blogger and designer Beall and artist Buchholz tonight premiere In Bed by Ten. The no-cover

{DANCE} As one of Pittsburgh’s newer dance troupes, FireWALL Dance Theater has earned critical acclaim. But plaudits are not the same as equality, as women know all too well. FireWALL’s new show, Admission, is billed as “a celebration of female empowerment” in which six dancers depict women

{OPERA} Undercroft Opera is a community-based company that since 2006 has staged the classics and more with local talent and thrifty budgets. But for its new production of Madama Butterfly, the troupe is touting not just its singers’ chops, but also the lighting and costumes. The production of Puccini’s classic tragedy double-casts sopranos Anna Singer and Katie Manukyan as Cio-Cio San. Tonight is the first of four performances this weekend at Carlow University’s Antonian Theatre, all sung in Italian with English supertitles.

McCay

dr zoot

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Art by Winsor

VINCE AGWADA

WEDNESDAY | MAY 27 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MAY 30

: Dream Little NemroDream e Anoth


FreeEvent

drawings from their Carnegie Tech classwork, is the first to examine these formative years. The show also includes period photos of the three, as well as a sampling of Pearlstein’s most recent paintings. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York, co-curated by the Warhol’s Jessica Beck and Matt Wrbican, opens to the public today. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 6. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. www.warhol.org

struggling for their due “in a world full of all-boys’ clubs, glass ceilings and disproportionate salaries.” The choreography is by Elisa-Marie Alaio, with original music by Ryan McMasters. The first of six performances at Off the Wall Performing Arts Center is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through June 6. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-25. 888-718-4253 or www.insideoffthewall.org

+ SAT., MAY 30

MAY 30

She Who Tells a Story

{ART}

{ART} Whatever your ideas about Middle Eastern identity — or about women artists from the Middle East — they’ll likely be challenged by She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. This touring exhibition, organized for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, features more than 70 works by 12 photographers. The “visual stories” depicting contemporary life range in style from documentarian to expressionistic to surreal. Artists include Jananne Al-Ani, Gohar Dashti, Tanya Habjouqu and Rania Matar. The show opens today. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 28. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-19.95 (free for kids under 3). 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Cartoonist and animator Winsor McCay was ahead of his time. His most influential strip, “Little Nemo in Slumberland,” debuted in the New York Herald in 1905; it depicted a young boy’s adventuresome dreams with technical mastery, formal invention, surreal wit and unreasonable beauty. In the acclaimed recent book Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream (Locust Moon Press), dozens of contemporary comics artists honored McCay’s work with original art. An eponymous exhibit, which tonight opens at The Toonseum, features contributors including David Mack, Carla Speed McNeil, Peter Bagge, Yuko Shimizu and Pittsburghbased Jim Rugg (Street Angel, Afrodisiac), who also designed the book. The opening reception is tonight. BO 7 p.m. (Reception: $20). Exhibit continues through June 28. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

Before they got famous, Andy Warhol, Philip Pearlstein and Dorothy Cantor were schoolmates studying art at Carnegie Tech, in the late 1940s; Warhol and Pearlstein later pursued their careers as roomies in Manhattan (and Pearlstein and Cantor later married). A new exhibit at The Andy Warhol Museum, including paintings and

{BURLESQUE} Smokin’ Betties Burlesque calls its Burly-Q Summer Kickoff “Sweet Tease & Lemonade.” That’s kind of two names for one event — but hey, women

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with names like DemDare Eyes, Luna La Crème and Violet Courbeau have a lot to offer. The saucy troupe ranges from classic vaudeville style to modern approaches. Their guests tonight at Club Café include local ’lesque lights Lita

running a marathon would typically mean last place, but the annual City Spree can’t be won without an explorer’s heart. Participants create their own paths through a series of checkpoints spread across Downtown, Lawrenceville and the Strip District. Seeing as the whole point is to connect with Pittsburgh, winners are chosen based on how many places they visit within the allotted time. The event is presented by City of Play, in partnership with OpenStreetsPgh (see Free Event, above), and benefits the Community Lawns project. Joseph Peiser 8 a.m. Market Square. Pre-registration required. $25 (free with registration code “OPENSTREETSPGH”). info@cityofplay.org or www.cityspreerace.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN DAY PHOTOGRAPHY}

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Sweet Tease & Lemonade

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{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BIKE PITTSBURGH}

One Sunday last July, the inaugural OpenStreetsPGH closed Market Square, Sixth Street and the Clemente Bridge to cars for four hours. Offering yoga classes and dance lessons along with liberated blacktop, it drew 4,000 visitors. This year’s reprise will surely beat that number: On May 31, the free Bike Pittsburgh initiative will close 3.5 miles of streets from Market Square to Lawrenceville, along the route offering activities and the chance to walk, run, bike and skate streets usually dominated by cars. (Motorists: The route will be crossable by car at 11 intersections.) In Market Square, Pittsburgh’s take on the open-streets concept embraced by 100 U.S. cities includes: the long-awaited launch of the Healthy Ride Bike Share; tai chi and yoga classes; and the City Spree race (see separate Short List entry). At 8th and Penn, there’ll be zumba classes, ballroom dance and more. At 23rd and Penn, in the Strip: more yoga, and dancing. And Lawrenceville’s Leslie Park hosts still more yoga, an historical bike tour, fitness classes and hula-hooping. Beyond pure fun, says Bike Pittsburgh’s Mike Carroll, the idea is to make public space people-friendlier, highlight neighborhood amenities and connect neighborhoods. “It’s about featuring what’s already here in Pittsburgh,” he says. Two more Open Streets are planned this summer, on June 28 and July 26. Bill O’Driscoll 8 a.m.-noon, Sun., May 31 (rain or shine). Free. www.openstreetspgh.org

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Celeste Ng

D’Vargas (pictured), Penny De La Poison and Viva Valezz. BO 10:30 p.m. 56 12th St., South Side. $10. www.clubcafelive.com

{WORDS} It’s got time travel. It’s got witches, vampires, an enchanted book and a quest. But novelist Deborah Harkness’ All Souls Trilogy also boasts a moatful of reviews hailing the books as smart, witty pageturners that delve into history

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and science as well as fantasy. With final installment The Book of Life in paperback, the best-selling University of Southern California history professor is on a national reading-and-signing tour that tonight hits Shadyside Academy’s Hillman Center. BO 7 p.m. 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel. $5-20. 412-968-3040 or www. shadysideacademy.org

+ WED., JUNE 03 {WORDS} Released last summer, Celeste Ng’s debut novel, Everything I Never Told You, was named a New York Times Notable Book for 2014. Set in 1970s Ohio, it follows the mixed-race Lee family unraveling after the mysterious death of daughter Lydia exposes a tangled web of lies and secrets. Ng, who grew up in the South Hills and Shaker Heights, Ohio, reads at the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall as part of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures and Carnegie Library’s Authors on Tour series. JP 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5. 412-6228866 or pittsburghlectures.org

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310 Allegheny River Blvd.

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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THEATER AMERICAN FALLS. A kind of CALL FOR INFORMATION ON PRIVATE PARTIES.

FULL BAR and KITCHEN

theoakstheater.com

FRIDAY MAY 29 Bigfoot the Movie WORLD PREMIERE

Q&A WITH CAST INCLUDING CURT CU URTT W WOOTON O TO OO TON N (P ((PITTSBURGH PITT ITTSBU SBURGH SBU RG DA RGH DAD) D)

SPECIAL BEER TASTING WITH HOP FARM BREWING

The

SATURDAY SATU SAT U MAY 30 8PM

Room The

Tommy Wiseau’s Master work

WEDNESDAY JUNE 3

modern day “Our Town”, American Falls is the story of the lives of six living people & two dead ones in American Falls, Idaho. Presented by barebones productions. Fri, Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 31. barebones black box theater, Braddock. www.barebonesproductions.com BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE. A blind man moves into his own apartment against the wishes of his overprotective mother, & befriends the freethinking young woman next door. Thu, Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 5 & 8:30 p.m. and Sun., May 31, 2 p.m. Thru June 7. Apple Hill Playhouse, Delmont. 724-468-5050. BUYER & CELLAR. A one-man comedy about Barbara Streisand & the stuff she collects. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Wed-Fri, 8 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m.

Thru June 28. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. DETROIT. In a first-ring suburb just outside a city that might be Detroit, a couple makes friends w/ the mysterious neighbors who’ve just moved in next door. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 31. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-496-2194. FENCES. August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play presented by Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 30. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-687-4686. KNICKERS! Elliston Falls has been spiraling into an economic depression after the closing of its paper mill. When a tourism officer arrives to lend a hand, she discovers an unlikely business partnership in the three brassy friends that make up the local chapter of Weight Watchers. Could the ladies’ plan for a custom underwear business really be the town’s salvation? Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru

Warhol, vinyl junkies, ghosts n’at Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

June 7. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. MADAMA BUTTERFLY! Giacomo Puccini’s opera presented by Undercroft Opera. Thu-Sat, 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 31. Antonian Theatre, Carlow University, Oakland. 412-422-7919. MIDSUMMER (A PLAY WITH MUSIC). Midsummer in Edinburgh turns into a weekend of wild abandon when divorce lawyer Helena meets small-time crook Bob in a basement wine bar. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 31. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. O’SULLIVAN STEW. When the king steals the wild red stallion, it’s Katie O’Sullivan & her family to the rescue! During the rescue attempt, they get kidnapped & Katie has to enchant the king w/ stories of her family in order to set them all free. Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri., June 5, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 7. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200.

[FOOD]

Wailers

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

SAINTS TOUR. Molly Rice’s site-specific play built for the neighborhood it occupies, taking the form of a bus & walking tour during which magical things happen. Co-presented by Bricolage & Real/Time Interventions. Wed-Sun, 7 p.m. Thru June 13. 722 Braddock Ave., Braddock. 412-471-0999. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Presented by The Heritage Players. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 31. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633.

COMEDY THU 28

DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. EVAN DEAN, MIKE WYSOCKI & G3. Benefit for family of Eric Crouse. 8 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 29 COMEDY & VARIETY FESTIVAL. Feat. acts from Mark Hayward, world champion yo-yoer, Nick DiSanto, one man band, The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus, comedian, Chip Chantry & contortionist, Jonathan Burns. 8-10 p.m. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

FRI 29 - SAT 30

RICKY REYES. 8 p.m. and Sat., May 30, 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 30 LAURENCE MULLANEY, MATT LIGHT. 8 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. MAY FLOWERS. A night of all-female comedy. BYOB. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRIDAY JUNE 5TH

Featuring Rick Sebak, Rob Rogers & The Pittsburgh Taco Truck Guy

FRIDAY JUNE 12 Chris Denem’s

SUN 31

Neil NNe eill DDiamond iiamo amoonndd TTrib Tribute ribbutee Chris Plays all your favorite Neil Diamond Hits. Live Band!

SATURDAY JUNE 13 Bo Wagner presents

Frank & Sammy Rent The Oaks Theater for BIRTHDAY RTHDAY DA PA PARTIES! S TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

Citiparks commences its season of farmers’ markets, with the last location opening in the second week of June. From Sunday through Friday, from Beechview to East Liberty, seven locations will offer seasonal and farm-fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheeses, eggs and other locally grown or made items. All Citiparks farmers’ markets accept payment in cash, ACCESS +, Fresh Access Food Bucks, credit, debit, WIC and senior vouchers. All of the markets run through the end of October (some continue into November), so there’s plenty of time to get some shopping done. Sun.–Fri., May–November. Various locations. www.pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/farmers-market

DAVID KAYE, LAURENCE MULLANEY, MIKE WYSOCKI. 7 p.m. Beth El Congregation, Green Tree. 412-561-1168. FIVE MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC. A melting pot of poets, singers, comedians, dancers, musicians & entertainers. Presented by Chicksburgh. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Gus’s Cafe, Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271.

TUE 02 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869. CONTINUES ON PG. 45


raccoons & more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY & the environment? Ongoing: HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), artifacts & exhibits on the Miniature Railroad & Village, Allegheny Valley’s industrial USS Requin submarine & more. heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. North Side. 412-237-3400. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Thomas Espy Room Tour. Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely The Capt. Thomas Espy Post rare examples of pre World 153 of the Grand Army of War II iron-making the Republic served local technology. Rankin. Civil War veterans for 412-464-4020 x 21. over 54 years & is the CHILDREN’S best preserved & most MUSEUM OF . w w w intact GAR post in the r PITTSBURGH. Missing citypape h g p United States. Carnegie. Links (The Rainbow .com 412-276-3456. Jumpy). Bounce, jump, BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. roll, run & walk through a Large collection of automatic 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art roll-played musical instruments & piece created by Felipe Dulzaides music boxes in a mansion setting. & on loan from The New Children’s Call for appointment. O’Hara. Museum, in San Diego CA. 412-782-4231. North Side. 412-322-5058. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ Preserved materials reflecting costumed guides feat. this restored the industrial heritage of stagecoach stop. North Versailles. Southwestern PA. Homestead. 724-238-4983. 412-464-4020. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF University of Pittsburgh Jazz NATURAL HISTORY. Animal Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards Secrets. Learn about the hidden from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. lives of ants, bats, chipmunks,

WED 03

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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“Moment” (oil on canvas) by Claire Hardy. From the exhibition UpStage: An Exploratory of Dance, at Galerie Werner, Shadyside.

VISUAL ART NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Work from Pearlstein, Cantor & Warhol from their time as students at Carnegie Tech to their early days in New York. Opening reception May 29, 7-10 p.m. North Side. 412-237-8300. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Opening reception & curator’s talk May 30, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mara Light. Paintings inspired by the neoclassical, Renaissance & romantic eras by Mara Light. Opening reception May 30, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. Cranberry Artists Network Member’s Show. Opening reception June 3, 6-8 p.m. Cranberry. www.cranberry artistsnetwork.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. 2015 Regional Show. More than 40 artworks are on display, submitted by local amateur &

professional artists. Mediums include oil, pastel, watercolor, fiber, stoneware & threedimensional pieces in metal. Opening reception May 30, 7-9 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Vascular Caverns. Papercut sculpture depicting abstracted, anatomical imagery by Gianna Paniagua. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. One Out of Many, One People. Works by Tamara Natalie Madden. An exploration of the vast cultural heritage of Jamaica. Downtown. 412-456-6666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. Works from Pittsburgh based artist, Cecilia Ebitz’s “Good Intentions”, inspired by the work & teachings of Corita Kent. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART SPACE 616. Hereafter. Work by Ryan Lammie & Alisha Wormsley. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Only Perfect Quiet. Painting by Tony Cavalline. Barco Law Library Gallery. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Visions. Work in oils & watercolors by Bill Perry. Work

by Dorothy DeGroat in the Different Strokes Gallery. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples. Van Gogh’s “Still Life, Basket of Apples” (1887),”Le Moulin de la Galette” (1886–1887), “Wheat Fields after the Rain” (1890), & Paul Signac’s “Place des Lices, St. Tropez”, visiting from the Saint Louis Art Museum. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Will close temporarily on May 25 & reopen on June 6. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Two Italian Masters. Works by Pier Luigi & Laura D’Andrea. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Student Photography Exhibit. A photography exhibit featuring work by six students in The Photography Intensive program. Oakland. 412-681-5449.

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

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SHOWCASE! 4pm - $10.00

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

AERIAL SHOWCASE! 6pm - $10.00

June 5th

DANCE & WINE TASTING. MEDITERRANEAN THEME! 6:30P WINE AND TAPAS 7:15P LATIN DANCE LESSON PERFORMANCE BY PITTSBURGH BELLY DANCE ACADEMY OPEN DANCE PARTY TILL 10:30PM. $15.00 CASH AT THE DOOR. BYO WINE.

4765 LIBERTY AVE. | BLOOMFIELD 412.681.0111

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DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape. This exhibit explores landscape painting in Britain form the Industrial Revolution to the eras

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{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

*Stuff We Like

The Andy Warhol Museum’s Parking-Attendant Booth The homage to Warhol’s art begins at the parking lot. 117 Sandusky St., North Side

Days of Rage: America’s Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

Bryan Burrough’s fascinating profile of several, now-sort-of-forgotten, homegrown terrorist groups of the 1970s, such as Weather Underground, the SLA, The Family and FALN.

Breakfast Magic These waffles from Waffles Incaffeinated have bacon, shredded cheddar cheese and green onion, with a fried egg on top. 2517 E. Carson St., South Side.

Lucky Peach

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Beautifully designed and executed food-and-writing quarterly, cultish-ly followed by people who like things to be delicious, beautiful and a little weird. www.luckypeach.com

Bargain Mondays at SouthSide Works Cinema All seats are $6 all day (3-D movies excepted). Catch the big summer movies just a day after the weekend.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

of Romanticism. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. The Bryce Family & the Mount Pleasant Factory. Telling the story of the Bryce family & their contributions. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Orotones. A display of glass plate images which have been enhanced w/ real gold-laced lacquers to bring a gilded-tone to the people & places depicted. North Side. 412-231-7881.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Viva Valezz. 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

SAT 30 - SUN 31 EVENT: Palma

Violets concert, Brillobox, Bloomfield CRITIC: Stewart Williams, 49, a

STARBURST. Ballet, modern, jazz, hip hop, lyrical & tap. 8 p.m. and Sun., May 31, 2 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-279-8887.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 30

graphic designer from Lawrenceville WHEN: Thu.,

May 21 The Palma Violets were great; I’ve heard them before and have been listening to them for a few months. Their sound was very distorted and pretty loud — I can’t hear very well right now — but also full and very satisfying for your rock ’n’ roll pleasure. The music was also slightly psychedelic in a way. The show was chaotic. There was generally a lot of activity on the front of the stage from the crowd and the band, so my friends and I tried to stay off to the side so we didn’t get run into. That helped make it fun though; kind of like being in a bar when someone has had too much to drink. B Y J OS E P H P E I S E R

RELAY FOR LIFE. 9 a.m. Mt. Lebanon High School, Mt. Lebanon. www.relayforlife.org. THE CITIZENS FOUNDATION. Screening of 1998 film Jinnah. Benefits The Citizens Foundation, which builds & operates schools for underprivileged children. 12:30 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368. THE MUSIC & MIND OF BEETHOVEN. Recital, lecture & dinner w/ Dr. Richard Kogan. exploring the psychological basis of Beethoven’s creative life. Benefit for Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center. 6 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-661-4224. THE WALK TO CURE ARTHRITIS. A 3 mile & 1 mile course w/ arthritis information & activities for the entire family. Pet owners are encouraged to bring their dogs. East Park. 8 a.m. Allegheny Commons, North Side. 412-250-3340.

SUN 31

PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection PRISONERS WORK PARTY. of military artifacts showcasing Read & code letters, pick books, photographs, uniforms, shells pack ‘em or database ‘em! & other related items. Military Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. museum dedicated to honoring Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. military service members since 412-361-3022. the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. PSO ROCKS. Proceeds from ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. this event benefit the PSO Features 5,000 relics of Catholic Musicians Care Fund. Music saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. includes traditional chamber ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN music, percussion chamber music, CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo & Orchestra de Nile. 7:30 p.m. Vanka Murals. Mid-20th Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. century murals depicting war, 412-983-3671. social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn ENGLISH LEARNERS’ about distilling & BOOK CLUB. For coke-making in this advanced ESL pre-Civil War industrial www. per a p students. Presented village. West Overton. pghcitym o .c in cooperation w/ the 724-887-7910. Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY SHADYSIDE ART & CRAFT HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. FESTIVAL. May 30 , 10 a.m.Young writers & recent 5 p.m. and Sun., May 31, 10 a.m.graduates looking for additional 5 p.m. Walnut Street, Shadyside. feedback on their work. 561-746-6615. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

TUE 02

LITERARY

THU 28 FULL LIST E ONLIN

FESTIVALS

SAT 30 - SUN 31

DANCE SAT 30

SWEET TEASE & LEMONADE. The Betties perform w/ guests Lita D Vargas, Penny De La Poison &

MON 01

TOM SWETERLITSCH. Discussion with the author of “Tomorrow &


VISUAL ART

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Daydreaming Through a Child’s Eyes. An installation exhibition by Dave Calfo alongside Pittsburgh Children’s Festival. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Fabrizio Gerbino. New paintings by artist. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Looking Forward, Looking Back. Work by Dennis Bergevin & Leonard Leibowitz. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. 100 Flowers Bloomed. Work by Brian Gonnella. Thoughts & Feelings. New & collected works by Ben Patterson, a chalk pastel artist & painter. Opening reception June 6, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Diane Grguras. New pastel paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Elements. Drawings & watercolors of bird nests w/ a focus on the natural & man-made materials incorporated into these architectural structures. The featured artists are Sue Abramson, Wendy Brockman, David Morrison & Kate Nessler. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. The Big Little Show. An exhibition curated by Sheila D. Ali w/ local & international artists: Abira Ali, Alberto Almarza, Bill Shannon, Dougie Duerring, Eliza Henderson, Etta Cetera, Katy Dement, Laverne Kemp, Lisa

Tomorrow.” 6:30 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220.

TUE 02 KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End

PITTSBURGH TATTOO COMPANY

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CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Demagall, Nino Balistrieri (ACBIII), Michael “Fig” Magniafico, Merrily Mossman McAllister, Ryder Henry, Sandra Streiff, Sheila Ali & Waylon Richmond. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. All Terrain Vehicle. Exploring the contemporary landscape through painting & photography. Bound. Woven fiber forms by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Lakevue. 724-316-9326. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Grain Of Salt. Works by Lizzee Solomon. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. MCG Invitational Arts Exhibition. Showcasing the winners of the Friedberg Family Arts Scholarships: Jameelah Platt, Breanna Stanton, & Sarah Hudson. North Side. 412-465-0140. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Landscape & Abstraction. Work by Patrick Ruane. South Side. 412-431-3337. MINE FACTORY. No Vacancy: Works by Tenants of 201 N. Braddock Ave. Works by the resident artists. Homewood. minefactory.tumblr.com. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! A mixed media show exploring the common teapot in uncommon ways. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods. Work by Ron Donoughe. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. ABC@PGC. A colorful exhibition feat. glass sculptures combined w/ an interactive illuminated word building piece that visitors can touch, rearrange & wear

Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

KIDSTUFF THU 28 - WED 03

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical

like apparel. Created by Jen Elek & Jeremy Bert. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Scratching the Itch. Work by Travis K. Schwab. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. A World Imagined: Kelli Connell & Sara Macel. Photography that reflects on authorship, on photographic construction & on the ways in which we define relationships through our subjective experiences of them. Closing reception, cocktails & a talk by curator, Leo Hsu June 13, 6 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Interior open for special occasions. Repetition, Rhythm & Pattern. Work by Kim Beck, Corey Escoto, Lilly Zuckerman, Megan Cotts, Brian Giniewski, Kate McGraw, Crystal Gregory, Alex Paik, Anna Mikolay, Helen O’leary, Lindsey Landfried & David Prince. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Following the Visual Path. Sculpture by Paul Ben-Zvi & works on paper by Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-877-7394. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Selections From The Elgin Park Series. Photographs by Michael Paul Smith. Shaping New Worlds. A national exhibition of constructed photography. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Currently showing, “Still” by Tony Cavalline. Shadyside. 412-913-4966. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. The World Revolves Around You. Work by HC Gilje. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 01

MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turnedTeaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s

TUE 02

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

WED 03 WRITING & ART W/ TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE SAT 30

103 SMITHFIELD STREET D O W N T O W N PITTSBURGH, PA 15222

THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Meet WPMC member Jim Wilson at the Mansion parking lot. 10 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

SUN 31

THE CITY SPREE. City-wide 5k race w/out a course. 8 a.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-467-9590.

PHONE: 412.201.9075

Walk-ins Welcome!

WED 03

Please join us for our very first group art show on

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

Friday, June 5th, 2015 at 7pm

OTHER STUFF THU 28 AMERICAN RED CROSS CLUB RED KICK-OFF. Learn about young professional opportunities with the American Red Cross. 6 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-302-8909. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HUMAN RESOURCES: MANAGING ISSUES AT WORK. Workshop led by Perity Timm. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Environment & Energy Community Outreach Center, Larimer. 412-904-4718. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. KNOW YOUR OPTIONS: DIFFERENT TYPES OF BUSINESSES. Learn about the various business models available including home-based, nonprofit, online, & franchises.

$1.15 12 oz. Draft Mon.-Fri. 5 - 7 pm

FIVE FOOLS

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, trucks every week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-7141. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point LISTEN, LUCY RE-LAUNCH Breeze. 412-371-0600. PARTY. A night of drinks & food, celebrating the online forum’s BABUSHKAS & HARD HATS work in anxiety & depression. TOUR. A presentation about the 6 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the rise & fall of steel in Pittsburgh Arts, Sewickley. 412-523-3074. & guided tour of the Carrie NEUROSCIENCE OF DATING Blast Furnaces, the Historic W/ DAWN MASLAR. Biology Pump House, site of the Professor Dawn Maslar 1892 Battle of Homestead. explores the neuroscience of Transportation will be provided love. 7 p.m. WYEP Community from Station Square. 10 a.m., Broadcast Center, South Side. Sat., June 13, 10 a.m., Sat., 412-638-5658. July 25, 10 a.m., Sat., Aug. 22, RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. 10 a.m. and Sat., Sept. 19, 10 a.m. Learn a variety of dances from Carrie Furnace, Rankin. the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting Mellon University, Oakland. House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. 412-567-7512. GHOST HUNT. Ghost N’at STATE MANDATES & Paranormal Adventures staff-guidTHEIR IMPACT ON LOCAL ed tour through Carrie Furnace. SCHOOLS. State Rep Dan 7 p.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. Miller sponsors this program 724-263-9603. that looks at how local PITTSBURGH RECORD school districts have lost FEST. Buy & Sell. 7 p.m. a lot of autonomy in Spirit, Lawrenceville. recent years & the THE PITTSBURGH concerns that state w. w w THUNDERBIRDS. mandates regarding er hcitypap g p Competing in the PA Core curriculum, .com American Ultimate standardized testing, Disc League. 7 p.m., Sat., Keystone Exams & June 6, 7 p.m., Sun., June 28, graduation requirements have 2 p.m., Fri., July 10, 7 p.m. and Sat., raised. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon July 18, 7 p.m. Cupples Stadium, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. South Side. 330-979-9347. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing Group acupuncture & guided follows. No partner needed. meditation for stress-relief. Thu Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-927-4768. 412-683-5670. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted SWING CITY. Learn & practice by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. swing dancing skills w/ the Jim and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. 412-965-9903. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. North Side. 412-224-2827. Second and Third Fri of every WOMEN’S SELF CARE month and Fourth and Last Fri SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce stress, of every month Irma Freeman tackle anxiety & strengthen Center for Imagination, Garfield. boundaries while building 412-924-0634. practical coping techniques & DREAMSCAPES tools in a confidential, healing CONTEMPLATIVE ART. Artist, & supportive environment. Sat, Sandra Gold Ford will present a 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Counseling hands-on program to develop Ministry, . 412-366-1300 ex. 129. new skills & encourage personal ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted insight into art. 2 p.m. Baldwin by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. Borough Public Library, Baldwin. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church 412-885-2255. of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA 412-965-9903. DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, OPENSTREETSPGH. 3.5 miles lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. of Penn Avenue & Butler Swisshelm Park Community Street from Market Square to Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. Lawrenceville will be closed to HEATHER MACDONALD. motor vehicles but open to Saint Vincent College Center walking, running, cycling, for Political & Economic dancing, jump-roping, more. Thought will present a lecture by Planned events will be set up the economist on the topic of along the way. 8 a.m.-12 p.m., “The Truth about Policing”. Sun., June 28, 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Make reservations by emailing: and Sun., July 26, 8 a.m.-12 p.m. marybeth.mcconahey@stvincent. PRIDE BOWLING LEAGUE. edu. 12 p.m. Duquesne Club, Seeking bowlers of all levels. Downtown. 412-391-1500. Every other Sunday. Every other SUMMER FRIDAYS AT THE Sun, 6:30 p.m. Forward Lanes, FRICK. Picnicking, tours, wine bar, yard games, music & different food Squirrel Hill. 412-337-0701.

SAT 30

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

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BY POPULAR DEMAND, NOW OPEN ON WEDNESDAYS! 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.27/06.03.2015

FRI 29

SUN 31

RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. THE REALITY OF OTHER DIMENSIONS. Lecture by Francesca Szarnicki. Presented by The Theosophical Society. F117 Falk Hall. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 01 SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. STEEL CITY ROLL. Group bicycle ride, ending in Bloomfield. 6:30 p.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-208-4892.

TUE 02

CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. FUNDAMENTALS OF DECORATING. Three-part Interior design course. Bring graph paper, pencils & erasers. First Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Thru June 17 Art Institute of Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-291-6614. HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? Resources & conversation about children’s nutritional needs, including tips about healthy & seasonal food selections, presented by Judy Dodd, MS. RD. LDN, University of Pittsburgh, Clinical Dietetics & Nutrition. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. REACHING CUSTOMERS THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA. Learn about the history of social networking, effective methods for audience engagement, & discover which online networks are the right fit for your goals. First Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Thru June 17. Art Institute of Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-291-6614.

WED 03 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session w/ literary conversation. First and Third Wed


of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

AUDITIONS ADVANCED LABOR & CULTURAL STUDIES. Seeking an actress & a singer/guitarist for a production of “Woody & Marjorie: Hard Traveling”. Please be familiar w/ the songs of Woody Guthrie. If you are interested, email outreach@ alcstudies.org with “audition” in the subject line for more info. Thru June 1. 412-353-3756.

THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Seeking young singers from 8th through 12th grades. Prepared solo of your choice, preferably a classical selection (art song, aria, etc.) Carefully selected works from musical theater may be performed, but these should demonstrate a classical singing technique rather than belting. To schedule an audition call Emily Stewart at 412-926-2488. Auditions will be conducted on August 27, after 3:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Stage & vocal auditions for “Iolanthe”, June 22, 7:30-9 p.m & June 24, 7:30-9 p.m. Prepare a song from either Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred), standard musical theater or classical. Accompanist provided. Bring resume & headshot. No appt. necessary. Our Lady of Victory Maronite

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

BIG BROTHERS, BIG SISTERS

A little quality time and friendship can broaden the horizons of a child. Big Brothers, Big Sisters is seeking volunteers who can commit to a year of service and fun with a Little. Volunteers are matched with a child, and are responsible for planning activities and keeping connected for at least one hour a week. For more information on the volunteering process, visit www.bbbspgh.org.

AFTERSOUND: FREQUENCY, ATTACK, RETURN. Artists & practitioners will be considered for an extended on-line exhibition that pushes the envelope of how sound might be visualized. Send your most innovative examples in the form of a high res image, video or url link to miller-gallery@ andrew.cmu.edu. Deadline July 1. Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-3618. COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for “Cats”. A prepared song is not nessessary. Dress comfortably in clothing & footwear convenient for dancing. A children’s chorus is being added for young performers ages 6 to 11. June 6, 12-2:30 p.m & June 7, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Cranberry. Open audition for “Two by Two”, to showcase vocal range w/ movement & cold readings. June 13, 12-2:30 p.m & June 14th, 3:30 p.m - 6:00 p.m. Cranberry. Auditions for Seussical! the Musical. Shoes for a dance audition. Ability to play mulitple instruments a plus. Bring a headshot. No appt. necessary. June 23, 6:30-10 p.m & June 25, 6:30-10 p.m. Cranberry. 724-773-9896.

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Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS. Auditions for “King Lear” w/ Shakespeare in the Parks. Non-union actors only.Actors should arrive prepared for movement, interaction w/ other group members & a memorized Shakespearean monologue. Actors may also optionally prepare to perform any singing, musical instrument playing, juggling or tumbling skill. Auditions will be held June 6 at the Blue Slide Park, in Frick Park in three group sessions. By appt. only. To schedule an audition email Helen Meade at hmmeade@ yahoo.com. Frick Park, Regent Square. WEXFORD ACTING STUDIO & INGOMAR CHURCH. Seeking actors, singers & dancers. All ages (must be entering 1st grade by Fall 2015.) May 29, 4-8 p.m & May 30, 2-7 p.m. Ingomar United Methodist Church, Ingomar. 412-364-3613.

SUBMISSIONS THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, showcasing

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independent authors from Southwestern PA & beyond. Entrants must complete the online entry form (www. theauthorszone.com) & submit payment by August 1, 2015 for their work to be considered. 412-563-6712. BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@ hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com. Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com Ongoing. PRINTMAKING 2015. Work must be original, created within the last three years & not previously exhibited within a 150 radius of Pittsburgh. A printmaking process – relief, intaglio, silkscreen lithography, monotype – must be central to the execution of all entries. Photographs, offset reproductions, or reproductions of artwork originally produced in another medium will not be considered. Deadline June 2. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 304-723-0289. THE WRITERS’ PRESS POETRY CHAPBOOK COMPETITION. Open to new & emerging writers. No theme restrictions. Prizes include publication w/ Createspace & online distribution w/ Amazon & Barnes & Noble. thewriterspress@gmail.com Thru May 30.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

You often mention asexual people. I believe I may be one. I’m a 51-year-old woman. I’ve been separated from my opposite-sex partner for nearly nine years. I’ve been approached by a variety of men, each one interested in becoming “more than friends.” I haunt Craigslist’s “platonic m4w” section, but each time I reach out to someone, he turns out to want a FWB or NSA relationship. It’s frustrating! That part of my life — the sex part — is really and truly over! I had many sex partners for many years, I had a good run, and now I’m done. When I find someone attractive, I admire them in a nonsexual way. But I do masturbate. Not often. I can go two or three weeks without needing (or thinking about) release. When I do masturbate, it’s more of a “stretching activity” than a passionate requirement. Do true asexuals masturbate? Am I correct in identifying as asexual instead of heterosexual? Or am I a straight person who has simply retired from the field? NO NEED FOR SEX

“There’s some handy-dandy research on this topic,” said David Jay, founder of the Asexual Visibility and Education Network (AVEN). Jay is the world’s most prominent asexuality activist and widely acknowledged as the founder of the asexuality movement. Researchers at the University of British Columbia studied the masturbatory habits of asexual individuals and compared them to the masturbatory habits of people with low sexual desire (“Sexual Fantasy and Masturbation Among Asexual Individuals,” Morag A. Yule, Lori A. Brotto, and Boris B. Gorzalka, the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality). “[They found that] the majority of asexual people (about 56 percent) masturbate on at least a monthly basis,” said Jay, compared to 75 percent of individuals with low sexual desire. “For a sizable chunk of us, this is about a sense of physical release rather than about sexual fantasy. Masturbation and partnered sex are very different things, and desiring one doesn’t mean that we automatically desire the other.” So, NNFS, the fact that you masturbate occasionally — as a “stretching activity” (ouch?) — doesn’t disqualify you from identifying as asexual. And while the fact that you were sexually active for many years, presumably happily, and always with men could mean you’re a straight lady with low to no sexual desire, you’re nevertheless free to embrace the asexual label if it works for you. “If you’re not drawn to be sexual with anyone, then you have a lot in common with a lot of people in the asexual community,” said Jay. “That being said, there’s no such thing as a ‘true’ asexual. If the word seems useful, use it. At the end of the day, what matters is how well we understand ourselves, not how well we match some Platonic ideal of our sexual orientation, and words like ‘asexual’ are just tools to help us understand ourselves.”

All those crazy labels — bi, gay, lesbian, straight, pansexual, asexual, etc. — are there to help us communicate who we are and what we want. Once upon a time, NNFS, you wanted heterosexual sex, you had heterosexual sex, and you identified as heterosexual. That label was correct for you then. If the asexual label is a better fit for you now, if it more accurately communicates who you are (now) and what you want (now), you have none other than David Jay’s permission to use it. “I also feel NNFS’s pain about Craigslist ‘strictly platonic’ ads,” said Jay. “But I’ve found there are plenty of people out there who are interested in hanging out if I simultaneously say ‘no’ to sex and ‘yes’ to an emotional connection. I wish NNFS the best of luck in finding some.” Follow AVEN on Twitter at @asexuality. Jay recommends The Invisible Orientation, by Julie Decker, to people who want to learn more about asexuality. And Asexual Outreach is currently raising funds via Indiegogo to help finance the first North American Asexuality Conference in Toronto this June and other outreach programs: indiegogo.com/projects/ asexual-outreach. There’s this guy I stopped dating a few months ago, but we’ve remained friends. When we were still dating, he once wore a thong when we were having sex. He called it his “sexy underwear.” He said he wore it only if he really liked a woman. He also told me he tried using a vibrator and fingers in his ass and really enjoyed it. I wasn’t bothered, but I am curious to know if straight guys really wear thongs and enjoy having their asses played with. Could he be a gay?

“THERE ARE LOTS OF STRAIGHT GUYS OUT THERE WHO DIG SEXY UNDERWEAR — AND SOME MISTAKENLY BELIEVE THONGS QUALIFY.”

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WHAT’S HE ATTRACTED TO?

That guy could be a gay, WHAT, but any guy could be a gay. There are, however, lots of straight guys out there who dig sexy underwear — and some mistakenly believe thongs qualify. There are also lots of straight guys out there who like having their asses played with — and some are secure enough in their heterosexuality to share that fact with the women in their lives. And I hope you’re sitting down because this may come as a shock: Not all gay guys wear thongs and not all gay guys like having their asses played with. The boyfriends of these guys — gay guys with thong-averse/ass-play-averse boyfriends — never write to ask me if their boyfriend could be a straight. Instead, they take the gay sex they’re having with their gay boyfriends for an answer. I understand why a straight woman might have more cause for concern: Very few gay-identified guys are secretly straight, while a significant percentage of straight-identified guys are secretly gay or bi. (Google “antigay pastor Matthew Makela caught on Grindr” for a recent example.) But at some point, WHAT, a straight woman should relax and take all the straight sex she’s having with her thong-wearing, ass-playdigging boyfriend for an answer.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.27-06.03

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You have successfully made the transition from brooding caterpillar to social butterfly. Soon you will be in your full, fluttery glory, never lingering too long with one thought, one friend or one identity. Some heavy-duty, level-headed stalwarts might wish you would be more earthy and anchored, but I don’t share their concern. At least for now, having a long attention span is overrated. You have entered the fidgety, inquisitive part of your cycle, when flitting and flirting and flickering make perfect sense.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Only one fear is worthy of you. Only one fear is real enough and important enough to awaken and activate the numb part of your intelligence. So for now, I suggest that you retire all lesser fears. Stuff them in a garbage bag and hide them in a closet. Then put on your brave champion face, gather the allies and resources you need, and go forth into glorious battle. Wrestle with your one fear. Reason with it. If necessary, use guile and trickery to gain an advantage. Call on divine inspiration and be a wickedly good truthteller. And this is crucial: Use your fear to awaken and activate the numb part of your intelligence.

begin to wither away unless they evolve into bonds of affection. Connections that have been fed primarily on fun and games must acquire more ballast. In fact, I recommend that you reevaluate all your contracts and agreements. How are they working for you? Do they still serve the purpose you want them to? Is it time to acknowledge that they have transformed and need to be reconfigured? As you take inventory, be both tough-minded and compassionate.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In the coming nights, try to see your shadow as it’s cast on the ground by the moon. Not by the sun, mind you. Look for the shadow that’s made by the light of the moon. It might sound farfetched, but I suspect this experience will have a potent impact on your subconscious mind. It may jostle loose secrets that you have been hiding from yourself. I bet it will give you access to emotions and intuitions you have been repressing. It could also help you realize that some of the deep, dark stuff you wrestle with is not bad and scary, but rather fertile and fascinating.

Petrarch was an influential 14th-century Italian poet whose main work was Song Book. It’s a collection of 366 poems, most of which are dedicated to Laura, the woman he loved. For 40 years, he churned out testaments of longing and appreciation for her, despite the fact that he and she never spent time together. She was married to another man, and was wrapped up in raising her 11 children. Should we judge Petrarch harshly for choosing a muse who was so unavailable? I don’t. Muse-choosing is a mysterious and sacred process that transcends logic. I’m bringing the subject to your attention because you’re entering a new phase in your relationship with muses. It’s either time to choose a new one (or two?) or else adjust your bonds with your current muses.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

The ancient Greek statesman Demosthenes was regarded as a supremely skilled orator. His speeches were so powerful that he was compared to a “blazing thunderbolt.” And yet as a youngster he spoke awkwardly. His voice was weak and his enunciation weird. To transform himself, he took drastic measures. He put pebbles in his mouth to force himself to formulate his words with great care. He recited poems as he ran up and down hills. At the beach, he learned to outshout the pounding surf. Take inspiration from him, Virgo. Now would be an excellent time for you to plan and launch strenuous efforts that will enable you to eventually accomplish one of your long-range goals.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Long-distance flirtations may soon be just around the corner or across the street. Remote possibilities are taking shortcuts as they head your way. I swear the far horizon and the lucky stars seem closer than usual. Is it all a mirage? Some of it may be, but at least a part of it is very real. If you want to be ready to seize the surprising opportunities that show up in your vicinity, I suggest you make yourself as innocent and expansive as possible. Drop any jaded attitudes you may be harboring. Let the future know that you are prepared to receive a flood of beauty, truth and help.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I suspect that marriages of convenience will

“The soul moves in circles,” said the ancient Greek philosopher Plotinus. Modern psychologist James Hillmans agreed, and added this thought: “Hence our lives are not moving straight ahead; instead, hovering, wavering, returning, renewing, repeating.” I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because you’re now in an extra-intense phase of winding and rambling. This is a good thing! You are spiraling back to get another look at interesting teachings you didn’t master the first time around. You are building on past efforts that weren’t strong enough. Your words of power are crooked, gyrate, curvy, labyrinthine and corkscrew.

adopt that breezy, lazy attitude in the coming weeks. It’s high time for you to slip into a very comfortable, laid-back mood … to give yourself a lot of slack, explore the mysteries of dreamy indolence and quiet down the chirpy voices in your head. Even if you can’t literally call in sick to your job and spend a few days wandering free, do everything you can to claim as much lowpressure, unhurried spaciousness as possible.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Keith Moon played drums for the rock band The Who. He was once voted the second-greatest drummer in history. But his erratic behavior, often provoked by drugs or alcohol, sometimes interfered with his abilities. In 1973, The Who was doing a live concert near San Francisco when the horse tranquilizer that Moon had taken earlier caused him to pass out. The band appealed to the audience for help. “Can anybody play the drums?” asked guitarist Pete Townshend. “I mean somebody good?” A 19-year-old amateur drummer named Scot Halpin volunteered. He played well enough to finish the show. I suspect

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The weta is a very large insect whose habitat is New Zealand. It looks like a robotic grasshopper, with giant black eyes on a long red face, enlarged hind legs bearing spikes, and floppy, oversized antennae. The native Maori people call it “the god of the ugly things.” Please note that this is a term of respect. The weta’s title is not “the most monstrous of the ugly things,” or “the worst” or “the scariest” or “the most worthless of the ugly things.” Rather, the Maori say it’s the god — the highest, the best, the most glorious. I suspect that in the coming days, Taurus, you will have a close encounter with your own version of a “god of ugly things.” Doesn’t it deserve your love and welcome? Your Future Self comes to you and says, “You must get rid of two beliefs that are holding you back.” What are they? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s no coincidence that your libido and your mojo are booming at the same time. Your libido is in the midst of a deep, hearty awakening, which is generating a surplus of potent, super-fine mojo. And your surplus of potent, super-fine mojo is in turn inciting your libido’s even deeper, heartier awakening. There may be times in the coming week when you feel like you are living with a wild animal. As long as you keep the creature well fed and well stroked, it should provide you with lots of vigorous, even boisterous fun.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I always arrive late at the office, but I make up for it by leaving early,” quipped 19th-century English author Charles Lamb. I invite you to

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

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N E W S

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FACES of $ 15 “this campaign isn't just for fast-food workers. i t 's for low-wage employees ... the fact that we are the p e o p l e t h a t r u n t h e nation, we are still struggling. w e have to rely on government assistance.”

local voices i n v o lv e d in the ‘fight for $15,’ a national campaign among low-wage workers for $15 an hour and union rights.

“i'm a single father, so trust me, $7.25, that's not cutting i t ... i c an barely keep up on my bills. i 've got to do side work just to make ends meet.” “e very body deserves to be

“we can't afford to l i ve in this world.”

able to l i ve comfortably … i t ’s got to change.”

“right now the american

“minor i t i e s are dispropor-

taxpayer is paying for these

tionat ely affected by this.

families to make ends meet

so, as a minor i t y, i t 's my

while subsidizing the profits

job to fight for my people

of these corporations.”

when i can.”

“at the end of the day, i do

“i t seems l ike people think

think we're a nation in denial

that caring is going

about who's paying the price

beyond what you need to

for poverty in america.”

d o . w h e n i t 's r e a l l y j u s t

by em demarco may 27, 2015

“people with lower incomes are being run out of town, so they can build this ‘new pittsburgh ’ ... some people wil l end up l i ving way out, having to catch the bus into pittsburgh to work at mcdonald's ... or work at upmc for low wages.” “we need to recognize who

what you should do.”

the workers are that really are essential for the smooth operations of things.”

ASHONA OSBORNE, 23,

TERRANCE PICKENS, 33,

NATALIA RUDIAK, 35, pi t tsburgh

BEMMA PIE TERSON, 21,

CARL REDWOOD, 62, c hair per son,

worker at arby ’s

worker at mcdonald’s

c i t y councilor, dist r ict 4

act i vist

hil l dist r ict consensus group

“[ pol lution ] ends up in the

“i believe everybody is

“in l i f e, you kind of

“i t 's importan t to everyone

“when you go to college, you

poorer communities ... when we would talk to folks about the air qua l i t y there, some would say, ‘wel l i get

affected by workers making minimum wage. when

worried about how i'm going to feed my kids. how i'm going to get to work.’ ... we need

being done, a lot of i t comes down to people not having jobs. or , i f they do have jobs, people are not

to be part of a movement

making enough money to

that is building power in

the way it is.”

economy. the more money we

“but, i t 's not like the job i

to be able to buy things that

make, the more we're going

do i s n ’t important _ i t

we can't buy now.”

definitely is. i t 's a l ife-

on their homes ? i know i 'm

se r ious f a l l r i s k.”

supposed to do.” “you work al l these hours

homes. how do they pay taxes

is an o l d l ady, s h e is a

money because you did exactly what you were

and dedicate al l this time to

“a lot of these people own

and-death job ... my c l i e n t

feed their famil i e s.”

those communities.”

expect to be making al l this

because it boosts the

lot of money, that 's just

you talk about violence in the community and crimes

that, but today i'm real ly

in the city of pittsburgh

accept if you don't make a

your job, and you stil l don't have enough at the end of the day.”

having a hard time.”

THOMAS HOFFMAN, 67, conservation

LEON FORD JR., 22,

TYRONE HEATH, 40,

MARY ANN WILL IAMS,

CHRISTINE ANDERSON, 33,

program coordinator, sierra club

community acti vist

home care worker

65, worker at upmc

nursing home worker

“the l aw just isn 't the

“we're not taking i t anymore.

answer, at least not at this

we are speaking out. and i t is

“people think that we just

“you go to bat tle, you

f l ip burgers, we just take

need numbers. pol i tic ia ns,

your orders and we mess up

you need n umbers ... and

your orders. no, we're

the figh t for $15 move-

“as a minister in a church, i stand on a legacy of people that _ were they not _ we woul dn't have fighting

civil rights acts, we wouldn't have fair housing acts, we woul dn't have the dismantling of separate-but-equal. fighting means, in large part,

time. so that 's why the fight

time for the low-income

for $15 movement is impor-

families to start getting

tant, because for a lot of

paid. these ceos don't

low-wage workers _ a lot

realize that without us, they

of women in these horrible

woul dn't have a company.”

workplace situations _

_ every day, our

human beings, too. there's a

ment

lot of stuff we go through.

numbers are growing.”

we get burned. we don't even have health care. we're

“don't be afraid to

forced to go to work when

stand wi th us. you're not

tel l ing them to get a

“we deserve the respect and

l aw yer and go to court

the r a ises that we ask for.

just is not a solution.”

i t 's only f air.”

REVEREND RODNE Y ADAM LYDE, 45,

SUSAN FRIE TSCHE, 58, senior staff

MARIA CENTENO, 46,

CHRIS ELLIS, 26, worker

LENA GERMAN Y, 22,

baptist temple church of homewood

attorney, women's l aw project

secur i t y guar d

at mcdonald’s

worker at k f c

getting a glimpse of how you see the world ought to be. and then being i n ves ted in

we're sick.”

going to be, in no way shape or form, alone.”

making i t as suc h.”

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

May 27, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 21

May 27, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 21