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RARE CUT: MARINA AND THE DIAMONDS ON SURVIVING THE ‘POP STAR’ EXPERIENCE 24

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015


EVENTS 6.6 – 10am HALF PINT PRINTS Education studio

6.6 – 6pm PITTSBURGH YOUTH PRIDE PROM: THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE CANDYLAND Co-hosted with the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN Pittsburgh) Tickets $10 advance / $15 at the door

6.8-6.12 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Andy Warhol: Pop Portraits and Selfies – Ages 8-10

6.12 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

6.15-6.19 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Vertical Silkscreen Printing with Stefan Hoffmann – Ages 8-10

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Leonard Kessler,, Andy Andy Wa Warhol, o Dorot othy h Cantor, and Philip Pearlstein on Carnegie Institute of Technologyy campus, ca. 1948, courtesy of the Arch ves of Archi of American American Art, Ar Smit S i hsonian Institution. =hkhmar<Zgmhk%Ngmbme^] ^ !Lmn] n rh_\Zmla^Z]Zg][Z\d"%*2. * .&.0\hnkm^lrh_ma^ _ Zkmblm'

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015


{EDITORIAL}

05.20/05.27.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE, MIKE SCHWARZ, AARON WARNICK

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 20

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY STRAWBERRYLUNA}

[PULLOUT]

{ART}

[NEWS]

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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Stay cool this season with City Paper’s Summer Guide.

are people in the community 06 “There who want to be involved in what’s

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

happening.” — Jerome Jackson, of Operation Better Block, on the benefits of cluster planning

[NEWS]

the hospital, if they know the 13 “For concentration is too high, they can take measures to protect their people.” — Chemist Richard Warburton on the importance of establishing safe exposure levels to OxyCide

[TASTE]

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“The overall flavor of the pickled mango pork was robust and meaty.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Royal Myanmar

[MUSIC]

was assumed that I wasn’t a creative 24 “Itperson, and that I didn’t create my own

music.” — Marina Diamandis, of Marina and the Diamonds, on playing a pop star

“The film illuminates its times, and the unpredictable, idiosyncratic ways that pop life so often gets made.” — Bill O’Driscoll reviews Lambert & Stamp, a new doc about The Who’s managers

“It makes it more of a community, a village play that people can be proud of.” — Braddock resident Sanford-Mark Barnes on the play Saints Tour

“Rockwell showed work by an avant-garde who’s-who, ranging from the famous — Picasso — to such thenobscure future icons as Jackson Pollock.” — Bill O’Driscoll on Betty Rockwell and her 1940’s modern art gallery Outlines

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 104 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 111 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 112 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 115 N E W S

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{ADMINISTRATION}

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{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“THEY’RE PREPARING HOMEWOOD FOR CHANGE.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Hear from the creators of the Saints Tour in Braddock, at www.pghcitypaper.com. Our feature on the production begins on page 99.

This week: Feel the presence of a saint or wish upon a star. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

{PHOTO BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Visit our Web Only page to find videos, audio and other multi-media presentations. www.pghcitypaper.com

An Operation Better Block cluster planning meeting

REINVENTING THE PLAN

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

O

N A PARTICULARLY chilly evening

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in February, about 14 residents are gathered in the basement of the Church of the Holy Cross in Homewood. It has all the usual trappings of a neighborhood meeting: plastic folding chairs, linoleum floors, drop ceilings and some sandwiches spread across a table in the corner — an incentive to show up despite the elements. But what’s going on at this meeting is hardly typical. After a several-minute crash course in urban planning, Operation Better Block (OBB) asks Homewood residents to put aside differences and rethink their neighborhood, one property at a time.

“There are people in the community who want to be involved in what’s happening,” explains OBB executive director Jerome Jackson. “But no one has really made it accessible to them.”

Community-oriented cluster planning looks to revitalize Homewood one block at a time {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} That’s changing, Jackson says. Over the past year-and-a-half, OBB has invested in an ambitious “cluster planning” process in which Homewood residents

are responsible not only for coming up with a detailed plan for revitalizing their neighborhood, but are also charged with making sure those plans don’t sit on a shelf collecting dust. Just outside the church on Kelly Street, it’s obvious change is needed: There are overgrown vacant lots next to boarded-up houses, and slabs of sidewalk that have gone unmaintained and have erupted into the air, like warring tectonic plates. A few blocks away next to a crumbling stoop, a sign reads: “STOP SHOOTING Live Love Respect.” These are symptoms of larger problems, but OBB isn’t looking to rehash the challenges everyone already knows CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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REINVENTING THE PLAN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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about. They’re asking people — who have been invited because they all live within a few blocks — to roll up their sleeves and try to reach consensus on everything from what property should be demolished to where a new playground might succeed. It’s a painstaking process. From January 2014 to summer’s end, OBB will have held roughly 30 community meetings, drawn up more than a dozen different land-use plans and knocked on every door in the neighborhood for input at least three times. They will have formed roughly 10 distinct “cluster associations,” each responsible for carrying out its section of the neighborhood’s consensus plan. The process, which cost roughly $63,000 not including OBB staff time, was largely funded through the Richard King Mellon foundation, while the Pittsburgh Foundation contributed funds for an original effort to survey each of the neighborhood’s properties, says Demi Kolke, who is leading the cluster-planning project. She notes that all of the cluster plans have been completed except one. But not everyone in the neighborhood is on board. OBB is facing some skepticism from other community groups and residents, some of whom feel like they never agreed to OBB’s approach and shouldn’t be bound by its “consensus.” And even among those who support the process, concerns linger about whether developers and property owners, including the city, will pay much attention to it. “The confusion comes with the residents when they hear they’re supporting something and all they know is that they participated and they signed an attendance sheet,” says Dina Blackwell, co-founder and CEO of the Homewood Renaissance Association. Just “because you’re in attendance, doesn’t mean you agreed.” Still, almost everyone acknowledges the neighborhood is going to change; the question is how much control residents will have over it. “The development is coming,” says Emmett Wilson, who has attended OBB’s cluster-planning meetings and points to its easy access to the busway and flat terrain. “They’re preparing Homewood for change … I’d just like to see the residents involved.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

BORN IN Homewood 46 years ago, Wil-

son is perched over a map of “cluster five” — a several-block quadrant in the middle of Homewood that contains the 13 apartment units he rents out. He has a green dot sticker in his hand and places it on a plot of land near Bennett Street marked “small apartments.” He explains that building new apartments could “bring in people from outside the community to live side by side.” This is essentially what the cluster-planning process looks like: residents gathered around hyperlocalized maps that each represent about one-tenth of the neighborhood. At each of three community meetings spread over a few weeks, they’re asked to mark up the maps with ideas about how to use the vacant land. The reason OBB divided the neighborhood into 10 distinct clusters, each with three set community meetings, is

“IT MAKES IT REALLY EASY FOR ME AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS IN HOMEWOOD TO GUIDE DEVELOPERS.”

to “include people who would probably not engage in the traditional planning model,” Jackson says. The typical process, he notes, is to invite people to one neighborhood-wide meeting — a practice that inevitably leaves people out who can’t make it. And since each cluster contains roughly 225 occupied parcels, it’s possible to knock on every single door and invite people to the meetings specific to their cluster. Residents are guided by planning consultants from Studio for Spatial Practice, who lend expertise on zoning rules and best practices in planning. In between meetings, the same consultants turn the recommendations into draft land-use plans. These plans are mailed to every resident in the cluster, who are invited in person by volunteers to attend the next meeting. Finally, the plan is resubmitted to residents for edits and approval. “[OBB’s Jackson] was explaining it to me and I was like, ‘Damn, man, that’s a lot of legwork,’” says Henry Pyatt, the City of Pittsburgh’s small-business and redevelopment manager, who says he has rarely seen so much effort devoted to CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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REINVENTING THE PLAN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

soliciting resident input. “It makes it really easy for me and other organizations in Homewood to guide developers. … We can say, ‘Here’s the plan; here’s what the community wants.’” OBB has drawn a higher-than-expected 615 unique participants to attend cluster meetings (about 10 percent of the neighborhood population) But the group acknowledges the neighborhood won’t change overnight. Jackson, for instance, notes that there hasn’t been a house built and sold in Homewood without a government subsidy since 1998. An interconnected web of disinvestment, vacancy issues and public-safety concerns all pose challenges, says OBB’s Kolke. Of the 5,160 parcels in Homewood, 61 percent are vacant, she says. And for the past 70 years, the neighborhood has experienced significant population loss. The neighborhood went from a population of 31,000 in 1940 to about 6,442 in 2010. But there have been bright spots in Homewood’s recent past. “Beginning in the mid-’80s to the very early ’90s … Homewood was becoming a very good example of revitalization,” says Mulu Birru, who served as the executive director of the city’s

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An image from Operation Better Block’s Homewood cluster planning report

Urban Redevelopment Authority from 1992 until 2004 and was a director of the Homewood Brushton Revitalization and Development Corporation, before it went defunct. The HBRDC successfully attracted development to Homewood Avenue, Birru says, drawing on revitalization that was happening in North Point Breeze. “It just went down after that,” he says. “The apartments were not maintained, the Dairy Queen shut down … I think crime was one [reason].” Another reason, he says, is that despite “great” community leaders, “you need a professional staff to carry that mission.” That’s a legacy OBB is well aware of. “The biggest challenge was just the lack of belief in OBB, community planning, in the revitalization of Homewood,” says Kolke. “People have been promised many things … their hopelessness is justified.” That’s one of the reasons for the creation of “cluster associations” — groups of interested residents facilitated by OBB who will do everything from notifying 311 problem properties to negotiating directly with developers. The idea is to make sure the focus isn’t just on lofty long-term goals, Kolke says, but shortterm projects residents can work on right away. “The low-hanging fruit will be to develop green space and initial cleanup,” says 44-year-old Bob Lee, a Homewood resident involved in his newly formed cluster association. He says his associa-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

tion has already started meeting with developers who have expressed interest in building apartments. Asked how optimistic he is about the process, he says: “I think it’s good to have something on paper, [but] I’m on the fence. I have no idea if what we say is actually going to happen. We don’t own any of this [land].” Carl Redwood, chairman of the Hill District Consensus Group, also cautions against holding a sanguine view of Homewood’s future. “The real issue is, how do you take the plan done by residents and force politicians Downtown to honor it and support it?” Redwood asks. “I’m not trying to throw shade on the OBB process. It’s one of the best processes you could use to move forward. I just don’t want to lose sight of what’s happened already: large displacement of black people.” One way to avoid that history, some argue, could be the city’s land bank — a quasi-government entity approved last year that is designed to serve as a clearinghouse for publicly owned blighted and vacant property. (Roughly one-third of Homewood’s vacant land is publicly owned as of 2010, Kolke says, and 93 percent of those parcels are held by the city or URA.) “We have what appears to be a model inclusive planning process,” says Helen

Gerhardt, who serves on the housing committee on the Pittsburgh Commission on Human Relations, but was not speaking on behalf of the organization. “Whether we have processes that give those plans teeth,” she said of the land bank’s yet-to-be-determined policies and procedures, “that’s going to be crucial.” So far, at least, the cluster-planning process appears to have government support. Cluster planning is “something we support at the URA,” says Karen Abrams, community- and diversity-affairs manager, who notes that OBB’s individual work with residents can also help link them to social services. “We definitely need to figure out better ways of engaging communities around planning.” For the city’s part, Pyatt says, cluster planning is a model he’ll “push” for in other neighborhoods when it’s appropriate. But he stresses the importance of being realistic about the pace — and consequences — of change. “I’m under no illusion we’re going to build every single building,” that was drawn in a cluster plan, he says. And because development is driven in part by private dollars, “we’re trying to match the market with community desires,” Pyatt says. “It’s about finding a compromise. … Our mantra is ‘development without displacement,’ [but] as prices rise, some folks are inevitably going to be displaced.” And while most people in communitydevelopment circles lauded OBB’s efforts, some expressed skepticism of its approach. The Homewood Renaissance Association’s Blackwell, for instance, says she’s heard residents wonder whether their mere attendance at a cluster meeting signals that they must agree with it. “Is this being considered the master plan? There’s just a lot of questions,” Blackwell says, noting that she doesn’t want to “[take] away from the hard work and booklets and outreach.” OBB’s Jackson has heard some of these concerns. “We’ve gotten some pushback from gatekeepers,” he says. “It really is about the old, traditional model. We have a group of people who sit around a table and make decisions, then convince the community of that decision.” “We don’t want to be the voice of residents,” he adds. “We want to give residents a voice.”

“IS THIS BEING CONSIDERED THE MASTER PLAN? THERE’S JUST A LOT OF QUESTIONS.”

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CHEMICAL REACTION OSHA closes complaint against UPMC over cleaning chemical, but expert says more testing may be needed {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} IN FEBRUARY, City Paper wrote about a fairly new hospital cleaner called OxyCide that was being used in more and more hospitals across the country, including facilities in Pittsburgh. The chemical, which contains peracetic acid, is touted as a useful tool in cutting down on hospital infections. And according to a report released last month by Persistence Market Research, the market for the chemical peracetic acid is rapidly growing. But there is one barrier to that growth. “Direct exposure to [p]eracetic acid can cause severe burns, allergy, and other hazardous health effects to the eyes, skin and respiratory organs,” the report says. “[T]ogether these factors are restricting its wide acceptance in household application …” However, it’s still being used in some hospitals. Earlier this year, employees from UPMC hospitals filed a complaint with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regarding the use of peracetic acid in their workplaces. (OxyCide is also being used in some local hospitals in the Allegheny Health Network.) The OSHA complaint was filed on behalf of 200 workers who said they’ve experienced negative health side effects when using OxyCide. (Workers have also claimed that the chemical irritated some hospital patients.) But in April, OSHA closed its investigation into UPMC’s use of the cleaning solution without issuing any violations. “OxyCide is giving us headaches, making us nauseous and making it hard to breathe,” says Justin Sheldon, the employee who filed the complaint. “We know it is making us sick and we will continue to demand that UPMC provide safe working conditions for employees like me.” And while the complaint might be closed, there’s evidence to suggest Sheldon and his fellow employees did not receive a thorough investigation into their complaint. According to chemical-exposure experts, there are flaws in the way OSHA investigates complaints involving peracetic acid. Before this past spring, there was no occupational-exposure limit for peracetic acid, and to this date,

OSHA has not set a limit on how much exposure to the chemical is permissible. “One of the difficulties is peracetic acid is a fairly new chemical,” says Richard Warbuton, whose company ChemDAQ manufactured the first peraceticacid gas monitor. “OSHA at this time doesn’t really have a good method to test for peracetic acid.” According to local OSHA spokesperson Joanna Hawkins, when investigating whether an employer violated OSHA safety and health standards, the agency collects samples from the workplace and then sends the samples to the agency’s lab in Salt Lake City for analysis. “As part of the investigation, OSHA reviewed the Safety Data Sheet for the cleaning chemical Oxy[C]ide and determined the appropriate sampling protocol would be to sample for [h]ydrogen [p] eroxide and [a]cetic [a]cid, which have established OSHA exposure limits,” Hawkins said in an email. “OSHA does not have a standard for peroxyacetic/peracetic acid, therefore it does not have a sampling method.” And that’s exactly the problem, says Warburton. Alone, the components hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid are not as harmful as when they are combined. “OSHA in the past has gone in looking just at hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid, even though in most of these cases, the primary irritating compound is the peracetic acid,” Warburton says. “Because they didn’t have an exposure limit for it, and they didn’t have a method to detect it, they sort of ignored it.” OSHA did not provide further comment on how it could determine whether its investigation was accurate. Now, ChemDAQ is interested in visiting UPMC facilities to test exposure limits for itself. “For the hospital, if they know the concentration is too high, they can take measures to protect their people,” Warburton says. “They can either increase ventilation; they can switch to a different product; they could give their people respirators.” Or decide not to use the chemical at all. After nurses at the University of Vermont Medical Center complained about negative side effects associated with

“OSHA AT THIS TIME DOESN’T REALLY HAVE A GOOD METHOD TO TEST FOR PERACETIC ACID.”

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OxyCide last year, hospital administrators discontinued use of the product. At Mayo Clinic, ChemDAQ recently tested exposure levels associated with using another brand of peracetic-acid cleaning wipes similar to those used at UPMC. The results of that testing have not yet been released. “Some of the exposures were really low; some were surprisingly high,” says Warburton. “In the Mayo Clinic, they had some complaints there and that’s why they invited us in to do testing, so they could find out what the concentrations were.” According to ChemDAQ, continued exposure to peracetic acid can result in pulmonary edema, liver and kidney problems, epigastric pain, circulatory collapse and other health problems, which might not be detected for months or even years. “It’s a very effective biocide and that’s why hospitals are using it,” says Warburton. “But if people get exposed to it, it’s irritating. It’s strong.”

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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Police were able to link Christopher Furay, 33, to six bank robberies in Pittsburgh, Pa., by his distinctive red beard. After media coverage of the first four robberies, he wore a fake red beard over his real one for the next two. He was arrested anyway after the sixth robbery when a detective recognized his getaway vehicle as the same one used for previous heists. (Pittsburgh’s WTAE-TV)

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Tyler Trammell, 27, was arrested as the “Average Joe Bandit” when he robbed a Phoenix, Ariz., bank he’d robbed only weeks earlier. This time, a detective standing “approximately 15-20 feet away” said he recognized Trammell as the suspect and saw him accepting money from the teller in a small blue bag. Trammell explained he robbed the bank a second time because he needed money “because the country is so fucked up.” (Phoenix’s KPHO-TV)

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After the Rubbin’ Buttz BBQ in Milliken, Colo., announced that the restaurant would celebrate White Appreciation Day on June 11 by offering white customers a 10 percent discount, co-owners Edgar Antillon and Miguel Jiminez began receiving threats, including one bomb scare. “It’s been phone calls, it’s been emails, it’s been on social media,” Antillon said. “Some are just, ‘Hey, you’re an idiot,’ and others have been legit threats.” He added, however, that the messages have been “overwhelmingly positive.” Antillon said the idea for White Appreciation Day was to “highlight a double standard,” where African Americans and Hispanic Americans have month-long celebrations of their heritage, but he emphasized that the discount would apply to all patrons. All they have to do is ask. (The Washington Times)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

Federal authorities were forced to drop criminal charges against a California man accused of starting a wildfire because two key witnesses died within months of his indictment. The 2013 blaze burned 400 square miles, including parts of Yosemite National Park, destroyed 11 homes and cost $125 million to fight. One of the witnesses died in a workplace accident, the other of a heart attack. Prosecutors said statements they made implicating Matthew Emerald, 33, can’t be used in court. (Associated Press)

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Utah authorities arrested Weston Frank Vetere, 25, after he told them he started a brush fire that burned 40 acres of old-growth cottonwood trees and threatened several buildings. The Grand County Sheriff’s Office said Vetere explained that he set the fire to signal for help after his car got stuck. (Reuters)

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Quebec police issued a $148 ticket to 91-year-old Yvette Vachon for making too much noise with her recliner rocking chair. Two officers responded after her downstairs neighbor complained about being irritated by the sound of her chair and her television and insisted that police take action. Lawyer Charles Cantin took on her case pro bono. After he reported the ticket to the media, prosecutors in Saguenay canceled the fine and said the officers should have issued her just a warning. (Canada’s National Post)

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The utility company on the Philippines island of Palawan asked residents to turn off refrigerators and other electrical appliances so there’d be enough power to broadcast the boxing match between local favorite Manny Pacquiao and American Floyd Mayweather. (Australia’s News.com.au)

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Hoping to overcome its junk-food image, McDonald’s began testing two breakfast bowls in Southern California. One includes kale. The chain is also introducing three salads in Canada that contain kale. The new menu items follow recent ads for the Big Mac that mocked trendy foods like kale, soy, quinoa and Greek yogurt. (Associated Press)

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A Michigan court sentenced Shaneka Torres, 30, to three to seven years in prison for opening fire at a McDonald’s restaurant that failed to put bacon on her burgers. She complained when the burger she ordered at the drive-through was missing bacon. She was offered a free replacement, but this one also lacked bacon, provoking her to shoot through the restaurant. (Associated Press)

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The Internal Revenue Service announced that it won’t even try collecting from delinquent taxpayers who owe less than $1 million. “Nobody’s ever going to knock on their door,” said Richard Christian, supervisory revenue officer for the Dallas area, who explained that five years of budget cuts by Congress have reduced staffing to where collection efforts are now focused on tax cheats who owe $1 million or more. Christian further noted that traditional collection methods don’t work against the people who owe between $100,000 and $999,000 because they generally don’t have regular jobs and wages that can be garnished. “If you just owe $700,000,” he said, “we’ll hope you get a job sometime so we can levy.” (The Washington Post)

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Norway’s Child Protection Service is seizing foreign children and fostering them to Norwegian parents to combat “the highest inbreeding in the world,” according to the Lithuanian talk show “An Hour With Ruta.” The program said that Lithuanian children living in Norway “are a sought-after commodity” to combat the high rate of Down syndrome and other birth defects among Norwegians. Dag Halvorsen, Norway’s ambassador to Lithuania, hired a Lithuanian public-relations firm to counteract the misconception that Norwegian authorities are working “to obtain fresh, foreign children, such as Lithuanian ones, to strengthen the genetic material.” (Norway’s The Local)

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More than a thousand military veterans a day contact the Veterans Administration’s Veterans Suicide Hotline, according to a Scripps news report that found that the calls often overload the system. The hotline was set up in 2007, with four operators receiving 60 calls a day. It now has 52 operators. Some calls are rerouted to other call centers, but many callers are placed on hold, some for as long as 36 minutes. (Tampa Bay’s WFTS-TV)

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S BY R O L AN D S WE E T. AUT HE N T I C AT I ON O N D E M AND.


Title Sponsors

SPIRIT. IT HAPPENS HERE.

NEXT AT HEINZ HALL BEETHOVENFEST THE IMMORTAL June 5-7

CONDUCTOR: MANFRED HONECK VIOLIN: CHRISTIAN TETZLAFF SOPRANO: SIMONA SATUROVA MEZZO-SOPRANO: JENNIFER JOHNSON CANO TENOR: NICHOLAS PHAN BASS: LIANG LI THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH: BETSY BURLEIGH, DIRECTOR Beethoven: Concerto in D major for Violin and Orchestra, Opus 61 Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Opus 125, “Choral,” Ode to Joy BNY Mellon Grand Classics

MAHLER’S “TITAN” SEASON FINALE June 12-14

CONDUCTOR: MANFRED HONECK PIANO: YEFIM BRONFMAN OBOE: CYNTHIA KOLEDO DEALMEIDA Fletcher: Concerto for Oboe and Orchestra (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Commission/World Premiere)

DANCE AND FLIGHT

Liszt: Concerto No. 2 in A major for Piano and Orchestra

May 29 & 31 HEINZ HALL

CONDUCTOR: Juanjo Mena

BASSOON: NANCY E. GOERES

Mahler: Symphony No. 1 in D major BNY Mellon Grand Classics

DISNEY IN CONCERT

Debussy: “Ibéria,” No. 2 from Images Ludwig: Pictures from the Floating World, for Bassoon and Orchestra Ginastera: Suite from Panambi Ginastera: Four Dances from Estancia Falla: Interlude and Dance from the opera La Vida Breve

June 19-21

CONDUCTOR: LAWRENCE LOH Tales of friendship and romance abound in this musical spectacular from the wonderful world of Disney. This new DISNEY IN CONCERT production features well-loved music and high definition film clips from some of Disney’s most treasured films. All brought to life by the Pittsburgh Symphony and four Broadway vocalists.

Experience a complete elevation of the senses, as the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra presents: Dance and Flight. Featuring a spirited and energetic repertoire led by Spanish conductor Juanjo Mena and gifted Principal Bassoon Nancy Goeres. Part of the BNY Mellon Grand Classics series, Dance and Flight is a ticket that’s sure to move you.

PNC Pops Media Sponsor: Trib Total Media

For tickets and times: 412.392.4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org N E W S

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THE OVERALL FLAVOR OF THE PICKLED MANGO PORK WAS ROBUST AND MEATY

NEW OLD WORLD {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} If Day One was any indication, Szmidt’s Old World Deli needn’t worry about drawing customers to its new Downtown location. On May 7, an hour into its first lunch since moving from Greenfield, the full-service restaurant’s nearly 100 seats were two-thirds full. Credit, in part, the reputation Darren Smith’s deli had built since it opened in a Greenfield storefront in 2011, including a loyal customer base and a 96 percent favorable Urbanspoon rating. And credit all that to the former Murrysville kid’s belief, on his return to Pittsburgh five years ago, that what this town needed was a top-shelf, from-scratch deli serving hearty but inventive fare. Airy and spacious, with wood floors, knick-knacked walls and friendly servers, Szmidt’s (pronounced “schmeed’s”) complements its burgers and smoked brisket with specialty pierogies — like spinach and feta with marinara sauce — and pierogi sandwiches like the GobbleRogi (turkey breast, gravy and cranberry vinaigrette). But its staples are pastrami and corned-beef offerings, the latter including the delicious Irene ($13.49), with Swiss cheese, slaw and Thousand Island dressing on grilled rye. A side of house-made pierogies was tasty, and a slice of carrot cake ended the meal richly. Szmidt’s is now open for lunch and dinner. Smith says he’ll fatten the somewhat slimmed-down menu as his staff gets more comfortable. He’s looking forward to realizing his vision Downtown: “It’s a lot more business down here.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

957 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-1128

the

FEED

Get buzzed about the science behind coffee at the Carnegie Science Center’s adults-only night. Learn about roasting, what factors affect bean taste, assorted brewing methods and what coffee “cupping” is. Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 night of the event. 6-10 p.m. Fri., May 29. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Nyat khaukswe kyaw noodles with shrimp; chicken noodle soup with coconut; and appetizer sampler: samosas, crispy tofu squares and chicken satay

SILK ROAD CUISINE {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

I

MAGINE A MAP of world cuisines, ani-

mated by when they arrived in and around Pittsburgh. Asia would be almost filled in by now. Whereas in the ’90s, the pan-Asian restaurant Silk Road on Atwood Street was one of the city’s most exotic dining spots, now most of the cuisines of that storied route are represented by their own establishments, each one a unique reflection of the different but related cultures connected by the real Silk Road. Most maps place Myanmar — formerly Burma — a bit south of the Silk Road, but its cuisine nonetheless stitches together Southeast Asian, Indian and Himalayan traditions. Our own first exposure to Burmese dining was at the erstwhile Burma Tokyo, which was located, coincidentally, in the former Silk Road space on Atwood Street and served sushi as well. That, too, is now Pittsburgh restaurant history, but

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

on the bright side, Royal Myanmar, in West View, now offers a similar combination of Burmese and Japanese delights. For those still unsure about Burmese cuisine, some of Royal Myanmar’s offerings are unapologetic loans from more familiar menus, such as pad Thai and miso

ROYAL MYANMAR

644 Center Ave., West View. 412-415-3380 HOURS: Mon. noon-9 p.m.; Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $4-15 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED soup. But this isn’t an ethnic menu padded with Americanized dishes. For evidence, we present crispy tofu, housemade with yellow chickpeas, also know as chana dal. The flavor was much richer than that of soy

tofu, and its fluffy interior was pleasantly reminiscent of mashed potatoes. Satay is skewered grilled meat the world around, but Royal Myanmar’s dipping sauce, instead of the typical sweetened peanut butter, was a stiff, intensely peanutty paste. To be honest, we didn’t love it, but it was different. Sweet chili sauce, on the other hand, was similar to Thai nam prik pla, but with cumin and vanilla adding intrigue to the flavor profile. The sauce paired especially tastily with the squash fritters, wedges of green squash fried in a tempura-like shell. The squash’s vegetal flavor came through, the coating was light and crisp, and we could have dipped these in chili sauce and eaten them all night. Except that would have kept us from pickled tea-leaf salad, a combination unlike anything we’ve ever tasted. Marinated


On the RoCKs

tea leaf, finely shredded cabbage and tomato were tossed with peanuts, broad beans, yellow peas, sesame seeds and dried-shrimp powder for a nutty, crunchy salad with a range of subtle yet distinctive flavors. Despite the pickling, the flavor wasn’t pungent, but rather an addictive mingling of earthy, astringent, briny and mildly bitter notes, unified by a fresh lime dressing. Samosa thoke was equally beguiling. Bite-size slices of deep-fried potato samosa were tossed with shredded curried chicken, onion, mint and lime for a hearty cold dish that brought to mind the mind the satisfaction of an Indian chaat.

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

TÄKŌ TIME A new street-fusion restaurant’s inventive bar

Could the entrees live up to these starters? Yes, they certainly could. Pickled mango pork seemed to use pickle in the Indian sense: not big slices of fruit so much as spiced relish melded into a thick, curry-like sauce. Big chunks of pork were tender and moist, if a bit lean, and some had unexpected bones. The overall flavor was robust and meaty, the mango notes more pungent than sweet. Curry chicken with paratha sounded Indian, but Burmese paratha is something else, its puffy, flaky, chewy character closer to a croissant than to Indian flatbread. Just one for a platter of curry wasn’t enough, but that was our only quibble with this excellent dish. Coarsely mashed potato gave the sauce body, while warm spices provided plenty of seasoning. The sushi menu was relatively brief, covering the standard nigiri and maki selections and adding two rolls made with real crab, one blue and the other snow. After sampling some nigiri, we can vouch for the quality of Royal Myanmar’s warm, tender-firm rice topped by cool slabs of fish. A journey to sample the Silk Road cuisine of Pittsburgh now must include a stop in West View for the deliciously prepared Burmese food — alongside perfectly respectable sushi — at Royal Myanmar. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Aloe & Elderflower, made by Maggie Meskey {PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS}

Royal Myanmar partners Myat Theingi and Aye Yee in their kitchen

No more waiting for Taco Tuesdays: Now it can be täkō time all the time, with the much-anticipated opening of Downtown’s täkō. Joining the ranks of Butcher and the Rye and Meat & Potatoes, täkō is the new Latin- and Asian-influenced street-fusion venture from partners Tolga Sevdik and chef Richard DeShantz. Maggie Meskey, a driving force of Pittsburgh’s cocktail renaissance, takes the helm as bar manager. The bar’s vibe is pirate ship meets dancehall. Bike-chain chandeliers throw rosy light on a mural of a giant octopus clutching a half-naked woman in one tentacle. A reproduction of Warhol’s “The Last Supper” oversees high-top booths lining the wall as bartenders flow around each other like they’ve worked together for years. About half the size of neighboring Butcher and the Rye, with which it shares an inside door, it’s a cozy, intimate party, with a DJ booth in the corner. The drink list is equally inviting. Some 300 tequilas, 60 mezcals and 50 rums, handpicked by Meskey and Sevdik, make the drinker’s possibilities endless. “The things we really enjoy are on the house drink list, and the menu is only going to grow,” says Meskey. The cocktail program is tailor-made for DeShantz’s food, carefully constructed to lend harmony to the flavors and to highlight the agave spirits at the heart of many of the drinks. Unique Mexican sodas, house-made syrups and a concise but varied wine and beer list fill out the libations. So, grab a beer with your taco, or for a herbaceous example of tequila’s potential, try an Aloe & Elderflower, a floral and cooling drink that’s sure to perk anyone up on a summer night. Hours are currently Tuesday through Saturday, beginning at 5 p.m. Check back for extended hours as the team gets into the groove. Make a reservation to ensure you get a seat, and introduce yourself to your bartender. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

214 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-471-8256

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

SAVOR AUTHENTIC FLAVORS FROM OAXACA & MEXICO CITY AT THE MEXICAN UNDERGROUND IN THE STRIP

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Serving Breakfast & Lunch 1844 RESTAURANT. 690 State Route 66, Leechburg. 724-845-1844. This restored 19th-century farmhouse offers a classic fine-dining menu with intriguing updates suited to 21st-century tastes. Thus, prime rib sits alongside tempura shrimp with orange cayenne, cucumbers and bleu cheese, and the stalwart shrimp cocktail is now dressed with sofrito lemon sauce. LE

AQUI HORA TANGO FELIZ! FRIDAY, MAY 22

Playing music from Argentina going back to the 20’s Plus food features and Drink specials before, during and after the show.

(HAPPY HOUR)

Every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM. • 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

now open 7 days a week!

Did d yo you know you kno k now n ow we off ow offer... offer ffer... Breakfast Br B reakfast kf t All All D Day • Vegetarian Options • Gluten-Free • Preservative Free • Sausage & Angus Beef • Locally Home-Grown Vegetables • And so much more 1718 Mt. Royal Blvd Mt. Royal Plaza | GLENSHAW Next to Shaler Middle School

www.colecafe.com (412) 486-5513

Takeout & Delivery Authentic Thai Food

Hours: Mon -Thurs : 3pm - 9pm Fri & Sat : 11am - 9pm Sun : 12pm - 9pm

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

1 12 Abbeyville Rd. (412) 833-1888 www.thaifoodsouthhills.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE BRGR. 5997 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-than-average fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pearand-bleu-cheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-anddumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for

Lucca {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial whitelinen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE

the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and handcrafted cocktails. LE THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF

Sausalido {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey St., North Side. 412-322-6535. A welcoming neighborhood bar with a menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers and mash”) But there is also the occasional Asian flourish or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an Irish-Cuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE

LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of

NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy CONTINUES ON PG. 20


OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Reservation R T Take-Out Free Delivery F Catering C

Ramen Bar

Coriander

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

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Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

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Oakland 414 South Craig St. AM PM Mon-Sat 11 -9 Sun 12PM-9PM

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Squirrel Hill 5874 1/2 Forbes Ave. AM PM Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

40 Craft Beers w

A Taste of the Caribbean

ontap w

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Curry & Jerk Chicken, C Fish or S Shrimp.

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

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24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

823 East Warrington W Ave | Pittsburgh TAKEOUT AVAILABLE | 412-431-5366

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

San Lorenzo Ristorante {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE

where the fare is inspired by Northern California cuisine, with seasonal ingredients combined into New American and Continental dishes. The preparations vary widely, from ultra-traditional offerings like crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant updates like duck with orangeapricot balsamic glaze. LF

SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412-741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian www. per pa porterhouse. LE pghcitym .co

PROPER BRICK OVEN AND TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-281-5700. This cozy Downtown spot offers a menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can be. Some cheeses and pasta are housemade, and many starters are closer to tapas or antipasti than to pub grub. More than 30 beers are on tap, as well. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-247-4848. A neighborhood pizza place and more, Salvatore’s offers something even rarer than good pizza: fast food of the finest quality. “Fresh” is the watchword, and the large, full-color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. Shellfish are prominently featured, and worth trying. K SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE. 4407 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-235-7696. The menu here straddles traditional and updated approaches to Italian food. Thus, a caprese tomato salad might contain poached peaches, endive appears in the beans and greens, and rigatoni is spiced up with jalapenos. Diners can also expect meatballs, gnocchi and chicken Milanese. LF SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. Casual elegance is the byword at this neighborhood venue,

STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this diner-style venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF


LOCAL

BEAT

“THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC THAT I’M ASSOCIATED WITH IS STILL UNDERGROUND.”

{BY ALEX GORDON}

Last October, Jon Bindley gave Norah Jones a book. The Pittsburgh-born singer-songwriter was back in his hometown, driving a limousine to make ends meet after two years living in Nashville, when he was sent to pick up Jones from the airport. Some musicians might carry demo CDs for this reason (run-ins with nine-time Grammy-winners), but Bindley opted to hand over his copy of John Steinbeck’s The Winter of Our Discontent. He’d already read it three times. “It feels so much better to give something than to get something,” Bindley recalls. Jones put him on the list for her show. These days, Bindley — who also performs under the name Bindley Hardware Co. — is still connecting with people through art, though not with multi-platinum recording artists. He’s a full-time staff educator at Saturday Light Brigade Radio Productions, a local publicradio program founded in 1978 that partners with schools and nonprofits to “encourage and amplify self-expression by youth.” According to its website, SLB serves about 8,000 local students per year. For a working musician and former substitute teacher, it’s a perfect fit. “There’s a lot of different approaches to this project,” says Bindley, 25. “I chose to pursue rallying the artist community around Wilkinsburg students because they naturally gravitate to creative things.” When you ask Bindley about his work with SLB, he launches into proud-parent mode: sharing videos of his students singing around a piano, showing off prints they made at The Andy Warhol Museum, reciting a Goethe quote he had them memorize (“I have come to the frightening conclusion ...”). Ask him about his music career and the answers are shorter. A handful of shows this summer, some studio time booked for August. Style-wise, he takes a page from early Bob Dylan: colorful characters cast in lyrical, literary, country-fied folk. Maybe it’s the time in Music City, though to Bindley, Nashville was less about a taste for fiddles and more about learning life as a professional musician. He knew didn’t want it. “What does success look like? Does it look like money?” says Bindley. “To me, it looks like people. Being able to rally people.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JON BINDLEY 5:30 p.m. Fri., May 22. Mullaney’s Harp and Fiddle, 2329 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-642-6622 or www.harpandfiddle.com N E W S

Jon Bindley {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE REINHART}

MUSICAL CONNECTIONS

ADVENTUROUS

PATHS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WES ORSHOSKI}

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

A

Cinematic vision: David Torn

PRIL WOUND UP being a busy

month for fans of improvised music. Instead of getting passed over by national artists, Pittsburgh’s dance card was filled virtually every week, with venues of different sizes and formats hosting adventurous performers. While May looks a little lighter by comparison, two shows at the end of this month present long-standing names in modern jazzinspired music. It’s no show-biz line to call bassist William Parker the hardest-working man in music. His name is synonymous with New York’s adventurous jazz scene, having played with pianist Cecil Taylor and saxophonist David S. Ware, in addition to leading his own quartets and the large Little Huey Orchestra. Prior to his appearance this month with a co-operative quartet, he embarked on a tour of Canada with tenor saxophonist Peter Brötzmann. This follows two other trips up north and a couple to New Orleans earlier this year, with international trips planned each month through August.

One of Parker’s crowning achievements will be the 20th anniversary of the Vision Festival in July. Each year, the bassist and his wife, Patricia Nicholson Parker, organize the festival in New York City, which presents avant-garde jazz, dance and film. Parker is slated to perform with three different groups during the five-day event.

WILLIAM PARKER / DANIEL CARTER QUARTET 8 p.m. Thu., May 28. Thunderbird Cafe, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $16-20 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

DAVID TORN 8 p.m. Sun., May 31. Club Café, 56-58 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

The festival has maintained a grassroots level of organization throughout its run, with money being a little tight. But as he talks on the phone, the bassist clearly has other things keeping him motivated. “I think the main thing about playing music is you reach people, and there’s a possibili-

ty that you change lives through what you do,” he says. Parker recalls being stopped on the subway by someone who, at age 19, saw the bassist perform at his college and still felt the impact — 25 years later. That kind of rare connection is “the only solid and continuous thing that you really rely on.” The quartet coming to Pittsburgh includes saxophonist Daniel Carter, whom Parker has known since the early 1970s, when the bassist first immersed himself in New York’s jazz scene. Their music is completely improvised, which Parker describes as a liberating approach to music. “The definition of free music is you’re free to choose the language you want to speak, and you’re free to make up the images and the shapes of the words of that language, the sounds of that language. There are no restrictions. If you hear blues, you play blues. If you hear a bossa nova beat, you play that. If you hear a beat [you might think], ‘I don’t even know what that was, but we played it and it sounded good.’” People new to music might find it CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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ADVENTUROUS PATHS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

intense or dark, but Parker — who, at 63 has the enthusiasm of someone half his age — puts it in an accessible context: “The school of music that I’m associated with is still underground and still considered out. We’ve been doing it for 30 to 40 years, and I guess you could say, yeah, we’re still trying new formulas and new combinations of sounds, but then that’s what you’re supposed to do with music coming out of jazz. You’re supposed to create and explore.” “I take every opportunity whether there’s two people in the audience or thousands,” he says. “It’s a great opportunity to play, to meet people, to talk to people, to get a chance to learn to communicate.” Guitarist David Torn’s career has taken a much different trajectory. He has worked as a band leader, playing with people like drummer Bill Bruford and saxophonist Jan Garbarek. He’s also garnered a reputation for his work in the studio, appearing on albums by David Bowie and David Sylvian, and producing both jazz musicians and singer-songwriters. Additionally Torn has scored numerous films, including Lars and the Real Girl, Everything Must Go and Friday Night Lights. His studio skills have played a big role on recent albums under his name. His 2007 release prezens featured improvisations by a full band that included saxophonist Tim Berne. Torn took the performances and edited them into shorter pieces that came across more like compact compositions. The new solo album, only sky, features Torn left to his own devices, improvising freely. The idea was to present a portrait of the guitarist, never really landing in a progressive-rock or jazz camp. “One of the reasons I got into films in the first place was that, back in the ’80s, people would say, ‘I don’t know what to call your sound,’” Torn explains. “Eventually somebody would say, ‘cinematic.’ I still get that. This was the record in which I wanted to just do it and expose it. Just say, ‘Here’s one version of what I’ve been doing with the guitar for the last 40-odd years.’” The results sound visually evocative, with spaghetti Western-style themes creeping up in some tracks, while looped melodies organically create structures in others. The current tour is Torn’s first in nearly two decades, and the New York native is looking forward to reconnecting with our city. “I spent two summers in Pittsburgh when I was a kid with my grandparents, because my mom was a native,” he says. “I’ve always enjoyed playing there. It’s one of those cities where you go and feel like the people who come out really love to hear music.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES

WHITE LIKE FIRE WAIT THE NIGHT OUT [SELF-RELEASED] WWW.WHITELIKEFIRE.COM

Many music critics have tossed bands like Kings of Leon and Mumford & Sons to the curb — but Pittsburgh indie-rockers White Like Fire really don’t seem to care. On the band’s latest EP, Wait the Night Out, it mixes tiny doses of twang into dancy rock songs, reel in Mumford-esque crescendos and even try on some soul revival. Lead vocalist Tyler Clawson has a thick, full-bodied, arena-ready voice that finds the middle ground between Kings of Leon’s Caleb Followill and Phosphorescent’s Matthew Houck. Although Wait the Night Out seems to lack real cohesion or identity, cruising through multiple styles of big-ticket indie, it provides enough reminders of why everyone liked White Like Fire’s alt-rock forefathers in the first place. BY SHAWN COOKE

WINGS FOR ARMOR CHASING AND BEING CHASED [SELF-RELEASED] WWW.WINGS FORARMOR.COM

This debut release from the local duo is nothing if not ambitious. Comprised of guitarist/bassist/keyboardist Murph and drummer Christy (they take a minimalist approach to selfidentification), Wings For Armor is all about the drama, from its sweeping, synth-and-guitar-driven surges to the raw, angst-filled lyrics. Musically, the record evokes Lacuna Coil, Thirty Seconds to Mars and Taylor Swift in equal measure. It’s way too long, but this band has a lot to get out there, and — quite frankly — it feels good to listen to something so unabashedly sincere. BY MARGARET WELSH


{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE RUTHERFORD}

Just another diamond day: Marina & the Diamonds

RARE GEM {BY MARGARET WELSH} WELSH POP SINGER Marina Diamandis —

who performs under the name Marina & the Diamonds — isn’t afraid to go for it. For her 2012 concept album, Electra Heart, she fully adopted the larger-thanlife, pop-star alter ego of Electra, blonde wigs and all. On her new record, Diamandis — who spoke to City Paper back in March — is as smart and sexy as ever, but takes a less-extreme approach. It feels, she says, “closer to the sound that I’ve always imagined for myself.” YOUR NEW RECORD, FROOT, HAS A MUCH DIFFERENT VIBE THAN ELECTRA HEART. WHAT WERE YOU GOING FOR? The last one was very electronic, it has much more of a commercial sound. The mindset with this one was quite different. It’s very calm and was done quite slowly, and by myself, completed with one guy. It’s completely black-and-white from Electra Heart, actually. In terms of sound, I made the decision early on that I wanted to have a live drummer and live guitar and bass. I’VE HEARD THAT WHEN YOU TOOK ON THE ELECTRA PERSONA PEOPLE REALLY TREATED YOU DIFFERENTLY. It was more in terms of meeting [press] who perhaps hadn’t heard about me or my first album. They kind of took me as I was. Which I found kind of hilarious. I mean, the whole point was to masquerade as kind a generic pop star, but they actually thought I was that. My general feeling was that it was assumed that I wasn’t a creative person, and that I

didn’t create my own music, because I was singing a certain type of music. It’s actually enjoyable doing interviews [now] because I’m discussing things that are relevant and appropriate as opposed to just bullshit. [As a pop star], the general level of intellect in the questions is completely lowered. DID THAT AFFECT THE WAY THAT YOU FELT ABOUT YOURSELF, OR WERE YOU ABLE TO SEPARATE YOURSELF FROM THE CHARACTER? No, I wasn’t able to separate that. I think it was really quite hard, looking back. But at the time you just try and get through it because you’ve created this thing, and you almost have to try and keep up appearances. So it was completely my own doing [laughs]. But it makes me appreciate things much more now, and the ease and effortless feel of Froot is definitely not taken for granted.

MARINA & THE DIAMONDS 7 p.m. Tue., May 26. Stage AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25-30. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

SO THIS HAS BEEN A MORE SATISFYING EXPERIENCE? Yeah, I think it’s more satisfying. With Electra Heart, the reason that I indulged so much in visuals and creating this external story was because I felt like, through the production, I wasn’t getting as much say. I was working with producers who were, obviously, extremely talented but who had that sound already. So they kind of put their sound on you when really, it should have been the other way around. M W E L S H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Doctor’s Memory Breakthrough

New Discovery for People with Failing Memory World’s Leading Brain Expert and Winner of the Prestigious Kennedy Award, Unveils Exciting News For the Scattered, Unfocused and Forgetful By Steven Wuzubia Health Correspondent; Clearwater, Florida: Dr. Meir Shinitzky, Ph.D., is a former visiting professor at Duke University, recipient of the prestigious J.F. Kennedy Prize and author of more than 200 international scientific papers on human body cells. But now he’s come up with what the medical world considers his greatest accomplishment — A vital compound. so powerful, it’s reported to repair… even regrow damaged brain cells. In layman’s terms — Bring back your memory power. And leave you feeling more focused and clear-headed than you have in years! Dr. Shinitsky explains this phenomenon in simple terms; “Science has shown when your brain nutrient levels drop, you can start to experience memory problems and overall mental fatigue. Your ability to concentrate and stay focused becomes compromised. And gradually, a “mental fog” sets in. It can damage every aspect of your life”. Not only do brain cells die but they become dysfunctional as if they begin to fade away as we age. This affects our ability to have mental clarity and focus and impacts our ability to remember things that were easy for us to do in our 20’s and 30’s. Scientists think the biggest cause of brain deterioration in older people is the decreased functioning of membranes and molecules that surround the brain cells. These really are the transmitters that connect the tissues or the brain cells to one another that help us with our sharp memory, clear thinking and mental focus, even our powers to reason well. “When we are in our 20’s” according to Dr. Shinitzky “our body produces key substances like phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid”…unfortunately they are believed to be critical essential nutrients that just fade away with age, much like our memories often do leading to further mental deterioration. As we get older it becomes more frustrating as there is little comfort when you forget names… misplace your keys…or just feel “a little confused”. And even though your foggy memory gets laughed off as just another “senior moment,” it’s not very funny when it keeps happening to you.

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vital nutrient phosphatidylserine (PS) can really make a huge difference in our mental wellness. 17 different double blind studies with placebo controlled groups have been involved in the clinical research of PS with patients between the ages of 55-80 years of age. Periodically the researchers gave these patients memory and cognitive tests and the results were simply amazing: 1) PS patients outperformed placebo patients in All 5 Tests - 100% Success Rate 2) After only 45 days there was a measurable improvement in mental function 3) After 90 days, there was an impressive and amazing improvement in mental function The group taking phosphatidylserine, not only enjoyed sharper memory, but listen to this… they were also more upbeat and remarkably more happy. In contrast, the moods of the individuals who took the placebo (starch pill), remained unaffected….no mental or mood improvement at all.

My Memory Started to Scare Me. I would forget all kinds of things and something that I just said earlier in the day would have completely slipped my mind. I almost forgot my granddaughter’s birthday and that would have been horrible. I had forgotten lots of other little things along the way. I was worried about it. Over the last several months I’ve noticed my memory seemed to be getting pretty unreliable and so I thought I’d better do something about it now. So when I read about this amazing PS nutrient and how much it would help me with my memory I wanted to try it. It’s great! I have actual recall now, which is super. After about 6 weeks of taking it on a daily basis is when I began to notice that I wasn’t forgetting things anymore. Thanks to PS for giving me my memory back. It’s given me a lot more self-confidence and self-esteem. I would not trust my memory without it. - Ethel Macagnoney

Dr. Meir Shinitzky, Ph.D. a former visiting professor at Duke University and a recipient of the prestigious J.F. Kennedy Prize

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CRITICS’ PICKS

BLUE

[ROCK] + THU., MAY 21

[JAZZ] + SUN., MAY 24

“Buzz” can be a figurative four-letter word — at least for many British rock startups trying to bring the band to America. The London pub-rockers of Palma Violets are experiencing this firsthand, playing much earlier in the afternoon at Coachella and Shaky Knees Festival than they will at Reading and Leeds. Tonight at Brillobox, the band brings its live show to a much smaller stage than it will occupy after returning home to Britain later this summer. Even though the Violets’ anthemic new album, Danger in the Club, is still catching on in the States, British fans should envy our opportunity to see the group in such intimate, raucous quarters. Public Access T.V. kicks things off tonight. Shawn Cooke 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $12-15. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

It’s rare that you find an exceptional jazz guitarist who’s equally indebted to Django Reinhardt and Woody Allen. Reinhardt provided Stephane Wrembel with a highly sophisticated Gypsy modus to build upon, and Allen provided him the opportunity to reach a larger audience than ever before: Wrembel scored the theme to Midnight in Paris and later performed at the Oscars. Although Wrembel has fully entrenched himself in the Gypsy culture and musical style — he studied extensively in Gypsy camps before moving to New York — his later records, including last year’s Dreamers of Dreams, have coalesced into a fusion of jazz, flamenco and rock. Tonight, he plays from that record at the Thunderbird Café. SC 6:30 p.m. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $20. 412-682-0177 or www. thunderbirdcafe.net

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITEHORSE}

DO

THE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL ANDRADE}

Chain and the Gang

[ROCK] + SAT. MAY 23

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Ian Svenonius — who stops by Brillobox Whitehorse tonight with his band, Chain and the Gang — first rose to notoriety in the late ’80s as the dapper frontman of Washington, D.C.-based Nation of Ulysses. In 1990, Sassy magazine crowned him “the Sassiest Boy in America.” Twenty-five years, dozens of records and a bunch of non-music side projects later, the title still fits. Last year, Chain and the Gang released its fourth record, Minimum Rock n Roll; it perfectly showcases the distinct (and distinctly snotty) punk-tinged ’60s garage rock that Svenonius has made his trademark. Brooklyn’s !!! and Sex Tide from Columbus also appear. Margaret Welsh 10 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $12-15. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[FOLK] + TUE., MAY 26 Like many duos, Whitehorse wasn’t content to just sound like a duo. Canada’s folksy answer to The Kills brought in some more studio hands to produce this year’s Leave No Bridge Unburned than on its Polaris Music Prize-shortlisted predecessor. The adjustment resulted in a brasher, more confident record than we’re used to from the band, and it’s sure to net it an even bigger following. Rolling Stone recently ran a story on Whitehorse in its “RS Country” section, but that discounts the band’s versatility — some of these are punchy enough to rock. Fellow Canadian songwriter Lindy Vopnfjörd opens the show tonight at Club Café. SC 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10-12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 21 BRILLOBOX. Palma Violets w/ Public Access T.V. Bloomfield. 866-468-3401. LAVA LOUNGE. Kevin Finn, Robin Vote, Wayside Exchange. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE SHOP. Crooked Cobras, World War IX, The Sablowskis, Dead Batteries. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Bad Marmot, Different Places in Space, Aris Paul & the Night Owls. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. All Time Low, Issues, Tonight Alive, State Champs. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Raised by Wolves, Love Letters & Murder for Girls. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 22 31ST STREET PUB. Facility Men, Danger Signs, The Spectres. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CATTIVO. Don Strange, Chet Vincent & Big Bend, Paddy the

REX THEATER. The Weight. Wanderer. Album release party. South Side. 412-381-6811. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. SMILING MOOSE. Jawless HAMBONE’S. Old Game, The Fish, Fondate Paure. South Side. Park Plan, Donny. Lawrenceville. 412-431-4668. 412-681-4318. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. AM Faces, HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sterling Waltz, Middle Children. Mickey & The SnakeOil Boys, Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Dick Whiskey, Bill Jasper, Bryan McQuaid. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. BRILLOBOX. Chain & the LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Gang, !!!, Sex Tide. Bloomfield. Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-621-4900. MEADOWS CASINO. CLUB CAFE. Akrasia, Tres Lads. Washington. & the #’s, The Mighty 724-503-1200. Flying Squirrel. South MOONDOG’S. Side. 412-431-4950. Norman Nardini. www. per DOWNEY’S HOUSE. pa Blawnox. 412-828-2040. pghcitym The Delaneys. .co THE MR. ROBOTO Robinson. 412-489-5631. PROJECT. Pedestrian HOWLERS COYOTE Deposit, Sunken Cheek, CAFE. Solarburn w/ Javier & Godofgaps, Alex York, Satyr/ Los Dishdogs, Vertigo Go. Elfheim, Thumbscrew. Bloomfield. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. 412-345-1059. JOSE & TONY’S. King’s Ransom. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Beauty Mt. Lebanon. 412-561-2025. Slap, Eastend Mile, Rachel B, Rich LEMON TREE LOUNGE. Dave Robbins, Ian Mellencamp. Millvale. Iglar Band. Oakdale. 412-487-8326. 412-821-4447. MEADOWS CASINO. Dancing THE R BAR. Randall Troy Band. Queen. Washington. 724-503-1200. Dormont. 412-942-0882. PARK HOUSE. Ghost Guts. North Side. 412-224-2273. PENNSYLVANIA COIN OPERATED GAMING HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM. Ron Keel. Beaver. 412-423-8532. SMILING MOOSE. Ambiance of Chaos, Clover, Mutalist, Old Lords. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Universal Beat Union, John Bindley Hardware Co., Xylen Roberts. CD release. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

10PM-2AM With DJ T$

SAT 23

FULL LIST ONLINE

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEN RUSIECKI}

STRANGER CONVENTION

SUN 24 CITY GROWS. War On Women, Human Petting Zoo, Chattel Tail, Huntress Thompson. Lawrenceville. 412-781-2082. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Velocopter, The Lopez, Telavision & KMFD. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Change Is, The Florals, Curse Words, False Accusations, Down They Fall, Witch Rider. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. THE SLIT. Young & Heartless, KOJI, Run Forever, Petal. North Side. TUGBOAT’S. Distractions. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Stranger Convention; stream or download

2 Coors Light $ .00 3 . 00 Fireball

$ .50 . 50

140 S. 18TH STREET | 412-488-0777 WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/JEKYLHYDESOUTHSIDE

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MON 25 THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Howl, In Exile, Sup, Muscles?, Came From Earth, The Monsters. Bloomfield. 412-407-7082. REX THEATER. Rubblebucket w/ Vacationer. South Side. 412-381-6811.

“Treat Yo Self” for free on FF>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

5514 Penn Ave.

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AUGU


Eden Hall Campus Summer Series Richland, PA

The Eden Hall Campus Summer Series features activities ranging from live theatre and music performances to farm-to-table and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events. At the center of it all is the Hilda M. Willis outdoor amphitheater, a one-of-a-kind outdoor performance space carved directly into the surrounding landscape. The series kicks off with a free performance by the Pittsburgh Opera on June 5 and events run through September. Visit chatham.edu/ summerseries for more details and a full listing of events.

Eden Hall Campus, 6035 Ridge Road, Gibsonia, PA 15044

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

Pittsburgh Opera Friday, June 5, 7:30 p.m. KidsCan Festival Sunday, June 14, 1:00-5:00 p.m. Bluegrass Jam with The Allegheny Drifters and Shelf Life String Band Saturday, June 27, 7:30 p.m. Pies and Pints (of Ice Cream) Sunday, July 12, 4:00 p.m. An Evening with Joy Ike, featuring Velvet Heat Friday, July 24, 7:30 p.m.


SUNDAYS

5.31.15 6.28.15 7.26.15

RUN WALK SKATE

BIKE SHOP

SALSA Presented by:

Penn Ave. and Butler St. are opening to pedestrians. From 8 a.m. to noon, for three Sundays this summer, a three-and-a-half-mile route through Downtown, the Strip and Lawrenceville will be car-free. You and a few thousand new friends can run, bike, skate, shop, salsa and do almost anything else that doesn’t involve a motorized vehicle. It’s bound to be hot, but it will definitely be the coolest thing happening in Pittsburgh this summer.

Complete route, programs and more info available at openstreetspgh.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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All concerts are free and begin at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Food trucks at all concerts starting at 6:00 p.m. June 5 Feelin’ Groovy with Donna Groom of The Skyliners

(Hits of the ‘60s & ‘70s)

June 12 Field Report with Special Guest Andre Costello & The Cool Minors June 19 Stella James with Special Guest Sydney Hutchko

(Indie Rock)

(Country)

June 26 Eve 6 with Special Guest Meeting of Important People (Rock/Punk) July 3 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra July 10 Blue Oyster Cult with Special Guest Gene the Werewolf (Hard Rock) July 17 Chris Smither with Special Guest Rusty Belle

(Blues)

July 24 Joe Lagnese Swingtet 8 with Featured Guests Johnny Angel & Debbie Zugates July 31 Red Baraat with Special Guest Rachel B August 7 Paul Luc and The Commonheart

(Funk/R&B)

(Rock/Soul)

August 14 Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes with Special Guest Joe Grushecky August 21 BNY Mellon Jazz presents Dirty Dozen Brass Band August 28 Duquesne University Tamburitzans September 4 Dancing Queen

(Swing/Oldies/Big Band)

(Jersey Sound/Soul)

(New Orleans Jazz)

(Eastern European Music & Dance)

(Disco)

June 7 Pittsburgh Opera June 14 Randall Baumann’s Hartwood Ramble featuring Scott Blasey, Rob James, Casey Hanner & Many More! (Roots Rock) June 21 Father’s Day Car Cruise & Billy Price Band Concert (Blue-Eyed Soul) Cruise 2-7 p.m. Concert at 7:30 p.m. June 28 Bastard Bearded Irishmen with Special Guest The Hawkeyes

(Rock/Irish)

July 5 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra July 12 Mat Kearney with Special Guest Judah & The Lion

(Pop/Rock)

July 19 BNY Mellon Jazz presents Spanish Harlem Orchestra featuring a special tribute to the Latin side of Billy Strayhorn in honor of his 100th birthday (Jazz) July 24-26 21st Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival August 2 Bootsy’s Rubber Band

(Get tickets, times & lineup at pghblues.com)

(Funk/Soul)

August 9 Eileen Ivers with Special Guest Heather Kropf

(Celtic/Folk)

August 16 Pittsburgh Ballet Theater August 23 Howard Jones

(Pop)

August 30 River City Brass Band

(Classical/Pops/Jazz)

September 6 Allegheny County Music Festival featuring Rusted Root with Special Guests Beauty Slap, J.D. Eicher & The Goodnights, and Donora (World Beat/Rock/Pop) $20 per vehicle donation benefits Allegheny County Human Services. Opening acts at 5:00 p.m., Rusted Root at 7:30 p.m. 4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


COVER ILLUSTRATIONS BY STRAWBERRYLUNA

SUMMER MUSIC

SUMMER FILM

••• PAGE 06

SUMMER ARTS+EXHIBITS ••• PAGE 26

•• PAGE 20

SUMMER STAGE •• PAGE 40

SUMMER FAIRS, FESTIVALS+SPECIAL EVENTS ••• PAGE 56

SUMMER KIDS ••• PAGE 60

SUMMER OUTDOORS •• PAGE 58

Its’ Summer Tune-up Time!

Emily Hawkins 412-407-4266

Check out the Dark Side of the Moon @ the North Shore. McFADDENS, Nitro Stout, and Blue Moon RICKS SPORTS BAR in Murrysville Featured draft: Smooth Nitro draft. Or mix with any of our 77 drafts! www.rickssportsbar.com BADO’S PIZZA GRILL & ALE HOUSE in Mount Lebanon, featuring Sam Adams Nitro Stout. www.badospizzagrill.com BEERMUDA in New Kensington has Sam Stout on draft or mix it up with Angry Orchard

heennttiicc AAuutthTACOS

The Piano Hawk PIANO TUNING & REPAIR

PITTSBURGH-MIX IT UP

BLUE DUST, Homestead Now featuring Sam Stout Nitro Stout. www.bluedustpgh.com

BURRITOS ENCHILADAS CHIMICHANGAS 633 SMITHFIELD STREET | PITTSBURGH, PA 15222 5222

412-471-8361 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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MAKE IT A COOL SUMMER: OUR 2015 SUMMER GUIDE OFFERS PLENTY TO DO, SEE AND HEAR THIS SEASON. {ILLUSTRATIONS BY STRAWBERRYLUNA}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


MUSIC VENUES Bebel Gilberto. Performing June 21, part of the Pittsburgh International JazzLive Festival, June 19-21

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DARYAN DORNELLES}

31ST STREET PUB. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-391-8334 565 LIVE. 565 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue. 412-522-7556 ALTAR BAR. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-206-9719 THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 BACH, BEETHOVEN AND BRUNCH. Mellon Park. Fifth Avenue at Shady Avenue, Shadyside. 412-255-2493

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. www.bayardstown.com

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. 4412 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-8611 BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 421-621-4900 BYHAM THEATER. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

SUMMER

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL OF HOMESTEAD. 510 E. 10th St.,

MUSIC ••• MAY 20 En Esch. 31 Street Pub

••• MAY 24 Zac Brown Band. First Niagara Pavilion

World Party. Club Café Abstract Artimus. Howlers Shari Richards. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille All Time Low. Stage AE

The Red Paintings. Hard Rock Café Granati Brothers School of Rock.

st

•• MAY 21 Veil of Maya. Altar Bar Palma Violets. Brillobox Heather Maloney. Club Café Torn & Frayed. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Exotic Tribal Fusion Dancers. The Mr. Roboto Project Joe Stevens. Pittsburgh Winery Rebecca Kaufman Duo. Rivers Casino All Time Low. Stage AE

••• MAY 22 Modern Baseball. Altar Bar Union Rye. Bayardstown Social Club The Early Mays. Club Café Joe Grushecky & the Houserockers. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Norman Nardini. Moondog’s Pedestrian Deposit. The Mr. Roboto Project Beauty Slap. Mr. Small’s Theatre Trio Plus. Pittsburgh Winery The Weight. Rex Theater Nieds Hotel Combo. Rivers Casino

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Change Is. The Mr. Roboto Project Stephane Wrembel. Thunderbird Café

Munhall. 412-368-5225 CATTIVO. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 CITY GROWS. 5208 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-2082 CLUB CAFE. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. 412-642-1800 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. 724-947-7400 FLAGSTAFF HILL. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-422-6426

THE FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. 7227 Reynolds St.,

•• MAY 25 Jacquees. Altar Bar The Howl. The Mr. Roboto Project

••• MAY 26 Sinister Haze. 31 Street Pub st

Whitehorse. Club Café Bike Night w/ Tres Lads. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille As Ladders. The Mr. Roboto Project Ensiferum, Korpiklaani. Mr. Small’s Theatre Cory Henry. Rex Theater Marina and the Diamonds. Stage AE Mark Strickland. Theater Square

•• MAY 27 Bass Nation. Altar Bar Black Pussy. Club Café Norm Nardini. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Caulfield Cult. The Mr. Roboto Project The Early November. Mr. Small’s Theatre Barefoot Movement. Thunderbird Café

•• MAY 23 Bobby Hawkins Blues Band. 565 Live

••• MAY 28 Brooke Annibale. Club Café

Caleb Johnson. Altar Bar Jayna Lininger. Club Café (early show) AKRASIA. Club Café. (late show) Velveeta. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Acoustic Assault. Moondog’s Supervana (Nirvana tribute). Rex Theater John Sarkis Trio. Rivers Casino

Will Hoge. Hard Rock Café Benefit for Animal Friends feat. Wrecked Lexus. The Mr. Roboto Project The Benny Benack Big Band. Phipps Conservatory

William Parker/Daniel Carter Quartet.

Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-361-2262 HAMBONE’S. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318 HARD ROCK CAFE. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. 412-481-7625 HARTWOOD ACRES. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. 412-351-2528 HEINZ FIELD. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. 412-322-9662 HEINZ HALL. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-392-4900 HIGHMARK STADIUM. 510 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. 412-224-4900 HOWLERS. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-0320 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. 724-799-8333 MELLON SQUARE. Smithfield Street at Sixth Avenue, Downtown MOONDOG’S. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. 412-828-2040

MOST WANTED FINE ART. 5015 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-328-4737 THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.org MR. SMALL’S THEATRE. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 412-821-4447 PALACE THEATRE. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. 724-836-8000 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-622-6914 PITTSBURGH WINERY. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 REX THEATER. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6811 RIVERS CASINO. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. 412-231-7777 RIVERPLEX AT SANDCASTLE. 1000 Sandcastle Drive, Homestead. 412-461-3694 RIVERVIEW PARK. Perry North. 412-255-2539 SHADYSIDE NURSERY. 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5845 THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668 SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATRE. South Park. 412-835-4810 SPIRIT LODGE. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com STAGE AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483 ST. CLAIR PARK. 135 N. Maple Ave., Greensburg. 724-838-4323 THEATER SQUARE. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-6769 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-6070 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177

Thunderbird Café CONTINUES ON PG. 08

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

Ozric Tentacles. Rex Theater Field Report. South Park Amphitheater Flogging Molly. Stage AE The Suffers. St. Clair Park Richard Thompson. Three Rivers Arts Festival David Liebe Hart. Thunderbird Café

•• MAY 29 Bethany James. 565 Live Unknown String Band. Bayardstown Social Club

Sinkane. Cattivo The Billy Price Band. Club Café (early show) Daily Grind. Club Café (late show) Jonah Parzen-Johnson.

••• JUNE 13

Uke Hunt. 31st Street Pub Sleeping With Sirens. Altar Bar Robin Vote & Red Western.

The Mr. Roboto Project

Laney Jones and the Spirit & Sarah Blacker. Pittsburgh Winery No Bad Ju Ju. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Sputzy. Rivers Casino The Garment District, Butterbirds.

Bayardstown Social Club

Someone and Somethings. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern

Smokin’ Section. Club Café (early show) The Semi-Supervillens.

Theater Square

Club Café (late show)

••• MAY 30 Aurelio Voltaire. 31 Street Pub

Christian Beck Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Soul Asylum, Meat Puppets.

st

Mani Stokes Group. 565 Live Gringo Star. Cattivo Backyard Kings. Club Café (early show) Kenny Chesney. Heinz Field School of Rock Wexford.

Mr. Small’s Theater

Max Leake. Riverview Park The Clarks. Stage AE Neko Case. Three Rivers Arts Festival

Carpe Diem Quartet, July 3

•• JUNE 14 NKOTB, TLC. CONSOL Energy Center

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Electric Army. The Mr. Roboto Project Clap Your Hands Say Yeah.

Randall Baumann’s Hartwood Ramble.

Mr. Small’s Theatre River Whyless. Pittsburgh Winery Shelly Duff Duo. Rivers Casino Milly. The Smiling Moose Tracksploitation. Spirit Lodge

•• MAY 31 Judi Figel. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille David Torn. Club Café Jonathan Jackson, Enation. Hard Rock Café Beauty Slap. Pittsburgh Winery Mastaflex. Rex Theater Slim Forsythe & His New Payday Loners. Shadyside Nursery

••• JUNE 01 Balcony Big Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Beta Play. Pittsburgh Winery

Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater {PHO CARPTO COUR T E DIE M QUESY OF ARTE T}

Jessica Hernandez. Club Café Old Man Luedecke. Frick Art & Historical Center Rig1. Hambones Phase IV. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Brimstone Coven. Mr. Small’s Theatre Beatlemania Now! St. Clair Park Donna Groom of the Skyliners. South Park Amphitheater Jenny Lewis. Three Rivers Arts Festival

•• JUNE 02 Kyle Kinane. Altar Bar Rhythm Grille

••• JUNE 03 Sebadoh. Brillobox

Altar Bar SY RTE N} OU MA O C LD OT GO {PH VID DA OF

Slim Cessna’s Auto Club. Club Café The Ray Lanich Band. Jergel’s

••TheJUNE 06 Opiuo Band. Benjamin Booker, June 14, at Three Rivers Arts Festival

Father John Misty. Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead

Hop Along. Cattivo

Jesse Mader & the Urban Rock Project. Club Café Dave Matthews Band. First

Northern Gold. Club Café

Tame Impala. Stage AE

Niagara Pavilion Taylor Swift. Heinz Field

•• JUNE 04 Murder Junkies.

Wanted (Bon Jovi Tribute).

31st Street Pub Twiztid. Altar Bar

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts. Cattivo Joe Firstman. Club Café Skinny Tie Club. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Walk of Shame. Mellon Square World/Inferno Friendship Society.

Lil Dicky. Mr. Small’s Theatre Omniverse. Pittsburgh Winery Poogie Bell Band. Riverview Park Railroad Earth + Elephant Revival.

Rex Theater

••• JUNE 07 The Movement. Club Café

••• JUNE 05 Beagle Brothers & Armadillos. Bayardstown Social Club Chase Huglin. City Grows

Three Rivers Arts Festival

Pittsburgh Opera. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater

Benny Benack. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Andrew W.K. The Mr. Roboto Project Wire. Mr. Small’s Theatre Alvvays. Three Rivers Arts Festival

•• JUNE 08 Andrew W.K. The Mr. Roboto Project Clean Bandit. Mr. Small’s Theatre Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra w/ Pittsburgh Opera. Three Rivers Arts Festival

••• JUNE 09 Nothing More. Altar Bar The Dovewires. Club Café Sumpin’ Fierce. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Felice Brothers & Hurray for the Riff Raff. Three Rivers Arts Festival

•• JUNE 10 Betty Who. Altar Bar

Steve Miller Band. Highmark Stadium Keely Singer. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Coronado, Grand Piano. Shadyside Nursery Daisyhead. Smiling Moose Benjamin Booker. Three Rivers Arts Festival Velvet Acid Christ, Cyanotic, Mindless Faith. Thunderbird Café

••• JUNE 15 Balcony Big Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille •• JUNE 16 Chappo. Cattivo Lloyd Cole. Club Café Tim Kinsella. Howlers Moscow Mule. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Rob Zombie. Stage AE

••• JUNE 17 Twin Peaks. Brillobox The Iguanas. Club Café Ferla-Marcinizyn Guitar Duo. Flagstaff Hill The Real McKenzies. Hard Rock Café Time Tested. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Mitski, Elvis Depressedly.

Kate Tempest. Brillobox Leni Stern African Trio. Club Café Shinizyn. Flagstaff Hill Michael Allman Band.

The Smiling Moose T

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Sundials. The Mr. Roboto Project Yellow Claw. Rex Theater Milo Greene. Three Rivers Arts Festival

The Suffers. Club Café Shooter Jennings.

••• JUNE 11 Elizabeth Cook. Club Café Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing ng. Mellon Square

Rhiannon Giddens. Three Rivers Arts Festival

•• JUNE 12 Rhyme Cal Summer Slam. Altar Bar Kalob Griffin Band. Club Café Rik Emmett. Hard Rock Café Dancing Queen. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Red Wanting Blue. Mr. Small’s Theatre

•• JUNE 18 Lynch Mob. Altar Bar Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Scheer Element. Mellon Square Heartless Bastards. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Damien Rice. Stage AE Howlin Brothers. Thunderbird Café

••• JUNE 19

Stinking Lizaveta. 31st Street Pub TAAKE. Altar Bar Betty Douglas & Co. Andy Warhol Museum Meridian Brothers Dance Band. Bayardstown Social Club Man Man. Club Café Imagine Dragons. CONSOL Energy Center Fathertime. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Paul Weller. Mr. Small’s Theatre CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

{PHOTO COURTESY OF POONEH GHANA}

SALON-ATMOSPHERE.COM HOURS: Tuesday – Thursday: 11am – 8pm, Friday – Saturday: 9am – 4pm

3000 W. LIBERTY AVE | DORMONT | 412-343-5490

Twin Peaks, June 17

Steel City Folk School Classes to both grow the mind and create with the hands.

Inaugural Pop-Up Day of Learning June 20th, 2015 8:30am – 5:00pm Waldorf School of Pittsburgh www.steelcityfolkschool.org

Who’s Your Daddy Benefit Show feat. The Mia Z Band. Pittsburgh Winery Todd Snider. Rex Theater Stella James. South Park Amphitheater The Last Bison. St. Clair Park Everclear. Stage AE Clear Water. Thunderbird Café

Celeste. The Mr. Roboto Project Third Eye Blind, Dashboard Confessional. Stage AE

•• JUNE 23 Against Me. Altar Bar

•• JUNE 19-21 Pittsburgh JazzLive International

Girl Band. Brillobox Olivia Chaney. Club Café Tony MacAlpine. Hard Rock Café Neutral Loss. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Barenaked Ladies. Stage AE

Downtown. (www.pittsburghjazzlive.com)

••• JUNE 24 Hugh Cornwell of the Stranglers,

Festival. Aaron Abernathy & Nat Turner Band and many more. Multiple venues

••• JUNE 20 Angelspit, The Gothsicles. 31 Street Pub st

The Adolescents. Altar Bar Amoeba Knievel. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern Beth Hart. Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead A Place to Bury Strangers. Cattivo Nathan Angelo. Club Café (early show) Road Runner. Club Café (late show) Dierks Bentley. First Niagara Pavilion Walk of Shame. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille M.O.P. Mr. Small’s Theatre OnCue. Rex Theater Yoko Suzuki. Riverview Park

•• JUNE 21 Los Lonely Boys. Altar Bar Billy Price Band. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater Benny Benack. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Steel City Harmonizers. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Truth, Rites, The Working Poor. Shadyside Nursery Widespread Panic. Stage AE

Continental. 31st Street Pub Jon Bellion. Altar Bar Coliseum. Club Café Bobby Short Band. Flagstaff Hill Carl Palmer, the Emerson, Lake & Palmer Legacy Show. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Mowgli’s. Mr. Small’s Theatre Merle Haggard. Palace Theatre Dear Rouge. The Smiling Moose

•• JUNE 25

Great Lake Swimmers. Club Café Billy the Kid & the Regulators. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Mia Z. Mellon Square Blue Moon Soup. Rex Theater JP Soars & the Red Hots. Thunderbird Café

••• JUNE 26 Tim Barry. 31st Street Pub Arlo Aldo. Bayardstown Social Club Semi-Super Villains.

••• JUNE 22 P.O.D. Altar Bar

Bloomfield Bridge Tavern

Melissa Etheridge. Carnegie Music Hall

Brad Paisley. First Niagara Pavilion New Wave Nation. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Tanlines. Mr. Small’s Theatre Eve 6. South Park Amphitheater Gedeon Luke & The People. St. Clair Park

of Homestead

Mates of State. Club Café Jessica Lee’s Rhythm & Jazz Blues. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Houdini’s Psychic Theatre. Club Café (early show)

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

11


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

•• JUNE 27 Banned From Hell. 31 Street Pub

••• JULY 07 Pink Martini. Byham Theater

From Autumn to Ashes. Altar Bar Lofi Delphi. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern The Deceptions. Club Café Bon Journey Revival. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Havoc Theory. The Mr. Roboto Project DMX. Mr. Small’s Theatre Crystal Bright and the Silver Hands.

The Glorious Sons. Hard Rock Café

st

Pittsburgh Winery

••• JUNE 28 Quinta Voce Wind Quintet. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch David Crosby. Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead

•• JULY 08 L’Lamint. Flagstaff Hill Mudhoney. Mr. Small’s Theatre ARSTIDIR. Pittsburgh Winery

••• JULY 09 Powerman 5000. Altar Bar Sol Cat. Club Café Vans Warped Tour. First Niagara Pavilion Fabulous Thunderbirds. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Lions in America.

Sugar & the Hi-Lows. Club Café Kid Rock. First

Mellon Square

Cross Town Train. The Mr.

Niagara Pavilion

Roboto Project

Bastard Bearded Irishmen. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater Beauty Slap. Shadyside Nursery

Three Days Grace. Stage AE Waxahatchee , July 15

•• JULY 10 Unknown

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHA RUBENSTEEL IN}

String Band. Bayardstown Social Club

•• JUNE 29 The Dead

Shania Twain.

Woods. Howlers Balcony Big Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

••• JUNE 30 Goatwhore. Altar Bar The Grahams. Club Café Train. First Niagara Pavilion Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros. Stage AE

•• JULY 01 Sleep On It. City Grows Gypsy Jazz Trio. Flagstaff Hill Old Wounds. The Mr. Roboto Project The Ataris. Mr. Small’s Theatre Purple. Smiling Moose

••• JULY 02 Drusky Unity Concert 2. Altar Bar

CONSOL Energy Center

Blue Oyster Cult. South Park Amphitheater Willie Nile. St. Clair Park Jane’s Addiction. Stage AE

••• JULY 11 Deutschtown Music Festival. Many

local bands at various venues. North Side. (www.deutschtownmusicfestival.org)

Robert Fireball Mitchell. 31st Street Pub Hinder. Altar Bar Hard Money. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern Smokey Robinson. Heinz Hall Joe Fletcher. Howlers Trophy Scars. The Mr. Roboto Project The Appleseed Collective. Pittsburgh Winery

••Aeolian JULY 12 Winds. Bach,

Los Straitjackets. Club Café Fall Out Boy. First Niagara Pavilion Dave Mason’s Traffic Jam.

Beethoven and Brunch Mr Twin Sister. Club Café Mat Kearney. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater A

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

•• JULY 03 Sebastian Bach. Altar Bar

Ma Machete Kisumontao, She Life String Band. Shelf Shadyside Nursery Shad

Butch Hancock. Club Café Carpe Diem Quartet. Frick Art & Historical Center

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. South Park Amphitheater

The Underhill Family Orchestra. St. Clair Park

Chri Christina Perri, Colbie Caillat. Stage AE

••• JULY 13 Jill Scott. Heinz Hall Emily Danger. Howlers The Family Crest. Pittsburgh Winery

••• JULY 04 •• JULY 14 Insubordation. Howlers Liturgy. Brillobox Stephen Lee. Howlers •• JULY 05 Electric Citizen. Mr. Small’s Theatre River City Brass. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. ••• JULY 15 Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater Waxahatchee. Cattivo Union Rye, Chet Vincent & Big Bend.

Muddy Kreek Blues Band.

Shadyside Nursery

Flagstaff Hill CONTINUES ON PG. 14

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

13


{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Tracksploitation, May 30

•• JULY 16 The Nied’s Hotel Band. Mellon Square ••• JULY 17 Karma to Burn. 31 Street Pub st

W E S T M O R E L AN D C O U N T Y

Fun, FREE events for the whole family!

Sunday, May 31

Sunday, August 9

Mammoth Park, Mt. Pleasant

Cedar Creek Park, Belle Vernon

September 6 & 7 Northmoreland Park, Apollo

st

Steve Forbert. Club Café Rascal Flatts. First Niagara Pavilion Joe Lagnese Swingtet 8. South

Dark Side of the Moon: A Pink Floyd Experience. Altar Bar Paul Luc Full Band. Pittsburgh Winery Bulletboys. Rex Theater Chris Smither. South Park Amphitheater Joe Caro & The Met Band. St. Clair Park

Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater

•• JULY 18 Sage Francis. Altar Bar

•• JULY 25 No Control. Hard Rock Café

Eilen Jewell. Club Café Mayhem Festival. First Niagara Pavilion Lucky Tubb. Howlers Lazyeyes, The Teen Age.

JD McPherson. Mr. Small’s Theatre Paul Pfau with Connor Pledger.

Most Wanted Fine Art

••• JULY 26 Trillium Ensemble. Bach, Beethoven

The Ting Tings. Mr. Small’s Theatre White Like Fire. The Smiling Moose

Park Amphitheater

Glenn Miller Orchestra. St. Clair Park

••• JULY 24-26 Pittsburgh Blues Festival.

Pittsburgh Winery

X-Fest I feat. Rise Against. Stage AE

••• JULY 19 Jake Miller. Altar Bar

and Brunch

West Hills Symphonic Band.

Blueprint. Thunderbird Café

Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Kelly Clarkson. First Niagara Pavilion Spanish Harlem Orchestra. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater The Gaslight Anthem. Stage AE

•• JULY 27 Iron & Wine. Carnegie Music Hall

•• JULY 20 R5. Stage AE ••• JULY 21 Rocky Votolato. Club Café Paisley Fields. Howlers

•• JULY 22 Joy. 31 Street Pub st

Beverly. Brillobox The Weather Station. Club Café Center Stage Band. Flagstaff Hill Anthony Raneri. Smiling Moose

www.co.westmoreland.pa.us/parks

•• JULY 24 Repaid in Blood, In Death. 31 Street Pub

••• JULY 23 The Appleseed Cast. Cattivo Diana Krall. Heinz Hall

Robin Vote, Dream Phone, Turpentiners. Shadyside Nursery

of Homestead

Brandon Flowers. Mr. Small’s Theatre Brandi Carlile. Stage AE

••• JULY 28 Van Halen. First Niagara Pavilion Hozier. Stage AE

•• JULY 29 Justin Fabus Band. Flagstaff Hill The Arisocrats. Hard Rock Cafe Old Crow Medicine Show. Stage AE

••• JULY 30 J. Cole. First Niagara Pavilion Randy Newman. Heinz Hall Who’s Bad (Michael Jackson tribute). Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Skinny Tie Club. Mellon Square Dean Ween Group. Mr. Small’s Theatre CONTINUES ON PG. 16

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

15


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

Purple, July 1

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENN FIVE}

•• JULY 31 Luke Bryan. First Niagara Pavilion

ROCK YOUR TASTEBUDS

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Blues Traveler. Stage AE (outdoors) Red Baraat. South Park Amphitheater The Deslondes. St. Clair Park

Mellon Square

••• AUG. 01 The Crain Wives. Pittsburgh Winery

Vixen. Altar Bar. Eleanor Friedberger.

Bombino. Rex Theater

•• AUG. 02 Tom Roberts. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch

Frick Art & Historical Center KMFDM. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Paul Luc, The Commonheart. South Park Amphitheater

Between the Buried and Me. Stage AE Bumper Jacksons. St. Clair Park

Hartwood Acres Amphitheater One Direction. Heinz Field Arlo Aldo. Shadyside Nursery

•• AUG. 08 Nicki Minaj. First Niagara Pavilion

••• AUG. 03 Death From Above 1979. Altar Bar •• AUG. 04 Delta Spirit. Mr. Small’s Theatre

The Happy Together Tour feat. The Turtles. Palace Theatre

Klezlectic. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Eileen Ivers. Hartwood Acres

Graham Nash. Palace Theatre

Park Amphitheater Dick Dale. Rex Theater

Bridgette Perdue. Flagstaff Hill #THISISHARDROCK

••• AUG. 07

Bootsy’s Rubber Band.

••• AUG. 05 Kottonmouth Kings. Altar Bar PITTSBURGH | 230 W STATION SQUARE DR. | +1-412-481-7625

Slipknot. First Niagara Pavilion The Annajames Band.

•• AUG. 06 Buke and Gase. Club Café

••• AUG. 09

Sugar Ray, Better Than Ezra. Stage AE

•• AUG. 11 Down. Altar Bar Psychostick. Mr. Small’s Theatre CONTINUES ON PG. 18

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


WEEKENDS vs

JUNE 12-14

vs

JUNE 26-28

FRIDAY, JUNE 12 Free Shirt Friday

FRIDAY, JUNE 26 Free Shirt Friday

courtesy of Central Blood Bank

courtesy of AAA Auto Insurance

SATURDAY, JUNE 13 FanJam with Big & Rich in Concert

SATURDAY, JUNE 27 Starling Marte Bobblehead courtesy of PPG

courtesy of Highmark

SUNDAY, JUNE 14 Kids Day/ Kids Andrew McCutchen Compression Sleeve

SUNDAY, JUNE 28 Kids Day/Kids Pirate Parrot Gnome courtesy of Trib Total Media

courtesy of Mrs. T’s Pierogies

INTERLEAGUE PLAY

vs

JUNE 15-16

NL CENTRAL DIVISION MATCH-UPS vs

JUNE 8-10

vs

JUNE 23-25

MONDAY, JUNE 8

TUESDAY, JUNE 23

TUESDAY, JUNE 9

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24 Zambelli Fireworks

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10

courtesy of ServiceLink

THURSDAY, JUNE 25 Pirates Replica Camo Cap courtesy of PNC Bank

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

17


{PHOTO COURTESY OF SANDRINE LEE}

SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

Leni Stern African Trio, June 10

•• AUG. 12 Authority Zero. Altar Bar Nickelback. First Niagara Pavilion Maria Wilson. Flagstaff Hill Die Antwoord. Stage AE

••• AUG. 25 Foo Fighters. First Niagara Pavilion

Michael Sweet. Hard Rock Café Kid Icarus. Mellon Square

Gwar. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Howlers

Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes w/ Joe Grushecky. South Park Amphitheater

Chatham County Line. St. Clair Park

••• AUG. 15 RANT Lawrenceville.

Many local bands at various venues in Lawrenceville. (www.rantlawrenceville.com)

Insomnium. Altar Bar Anime’BOP! Ensemble. Andy Warhol Museum

Florida Georgia Line. First Niagara Pavilion

•• AUG. 16 East Winds Symphonic Band. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Wreckids. Shadyside Nursery Counting Crows. Stage AE

••• AUG. 19 The Grid. Flagstaff Hill •• AUG. 20 Amber Alexis. Mellon Square ••• AUG. 21 Nicholas David. Club Café Dirty Dozen Brass Band. South Park Amphitheater

The Revelers. St. Clair Park X-Fest II feat. Social Distortion. Stage AE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

Park Amphitheater

••• AUG. 13 Jimmy Buffett. First Niagara Pavilion •• AUG. 14 Jaguar Club, Incredible Change.

18

•• AUG. 23

5 Seconds of Summer. First Niagara Pavilion Armadillos. Shadyside Nursery Howard Jones. Hartwood Acres

•• AUG. 26 GumBand. Flagstaff Hill Lake Street Dive. Mr. Small’s Theatre

••• AUG. 27 The House Band. Mellon Square T •• AUG. 28 Duquesne University Tamburitzans. South Park Amphitheater The Stickers. St. Clair Park Brit Floyd. Stage AE

••• AUG. 30

Tim McGraw. First Niagara Pavilion River City Brass Band. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater

John Hiatt & the Combo. Palace Theater Red Western. Shadyside Nursery

•• SEPT. 04 Opek Plays Strayhorn. Frick Art & Historical Center Evergrey. Mr. Small’s Theatre Dancing Queen. South Park Amphitheater

••• SEPT. 06 Allegheny County Music Festival. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater Matthew Tembo. Shadyside Nursery

•• SEPT. 11 The Wombats. Mr. Small’s Theatre ••• SEPT. 11-13 Pittsburgh Irish Festival feat. Red Hot Chilli Pipers, Gaelic Storm, more. Riverplex at Sandcastle


Pittsburgh

BUD & BURGERS CONTEST

Who has the Best Burger? Locations: 1) Big Jim’s

201 Saline Street Greenfield, PA 12517 412-421-0532

www.bigjimsrestaurant.com Every Tuesday Gourmet Burger’s for $6.89 and Budweiser 16oz aluminum bottles for $3.00

2) Zano’s Pub House 3806 Acorn Street Greenfield, PA 15217 412-521-9939

Every Thursday 7:00-9:00 pm Cheeseburger and 16oz Budweiser draught for $7.50

3) Carl’s Tavern

3386 William Penn Highway Monroeville, PA 15146 412-823-4050

www.carlstavern.com Double “B” Burger and $2.50 Budweiser aluminum bottles

4) Dukes Upper Deck 122 West 8th Ave Homestead, PA 15120 412-461-9595

www.dukesupperdeck.com Big Duke Burger or the Pitts Burger and 16oz Budweiser aluminum bottles for $13.95

5) Pleasant Bar 32 Pld Clairton Road Pleasant Hills, PA 15236 412-655-4551

VOTE NOW for a chance to win a Budweiser BBQ Prize Pack!

www.thePBAR.com Every Thursday $2.00 Budweiser 16oz draughts and $1.00 off burgers

6) Bigham Tavern 321 Bigham Street Mt. Washington, PA 15010 412-523-1623 www.bighamtavern.com Every Monday $2.50 Budweiser 16oz aluminum bottles and $1.00 Off Burgers

7) Billy’s Roadhouse 10150 Old Perry Highway Wexford, PA 15090 724-934-1177

www.billysroadhouse.com Every Wednesday 5:00-9:00 pm the already famous Pittsburger w/fries and Budweiser 16oz aluminum bottles for $9.99

8) Rochester Inn 505 Rochester Road North Hills, PA 15237 412-364-8166

www.therochesterinn.com Every Tuesday 5:00-10:00 pm Bacon Cheeseburger & fries & Budweiser 16oz aluminum bottles for $9.00

9) Carnivores

215 Allegheny Avenue Oakmont, PA 15139 412-820-7427

www.carnivores-oakmont.com Featuring the Carlburger for $8.95 and Budweiser 16oz aluminum bottles for $3.00

10) Papa Rock

4512 Broadway Blvd Monroeville, PA 15146 412-856-6441

www.paparocks.com Featuring the Haystacker Burger for $6.99 and $3.00 Budweiser 20oz draughts

11) Hop House

2749 Noblestown Road Greentree, PA 15220 412-922-9560

www.thehophouse.com Enjoy any of our Gourmet Burgers and $3.25 Budweiser 16oz aluminum bottles

12) Mt Lebanon Saloon

622 Washington Road Mt Lebanon, PA 15228 412-531-5666

www.saloonofmtlebanon.com $2.75 Budweiser and Southwest burger

budburgercontest.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

19


GARDEN CENTER

A charming new e-boutique. Offering trunk shows, online shopping & personal styling.

• Just 30 minutes from Downtown! • Large Selection of Evergreens, Shade Trees, Ornamental and Flowering Trees and Shrubs • Hanging Baskets, Bedding and Vegetable plants • Landscape Supplies - Screened Topsoil, Mushroom Manure, Bulk Mulch, and 10 varieties of decorative rock weighed on site • Full Landscape Service - Design, Installation, Maintenance • Fresh Produce Picked Daily July-November

Inside Out, June 19

FILMS

728 Steubenville Pike Burgettstown, PA 15021 724-729-3500

@fascinopgh www.fascinopgh.com info@fascinopgh.com

SUMMER

Outdoor Dining in the Beer Garden Fresh and Local Homemade Food ‘til Midnight 16 American Craft Beers on Tap Rotation Over 400 Bottle Choices Beer Tastings Weekly Saturday Afternoon Acoustic Showcase (Monaca)

Monaca

Next to Macy’s 724-728-7200 bocktown.com

Penn Hills e g n a h c x E e m a G

Robinson

Across from Target 412-788-2333 @bocktown

Pittsburgh’s #1 Video Game Shop V

y. mes. Be Happ a G o e id V y la P We W e specialize in Japanese imports and other hard-to-find gaming items! Sega, Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft & more! Atari to XBox Box One, we’ve got it all! Plus, HUGE Xbox SALE check out our awesome Going on NOW! game room full of arcade Get a $50 Gift & pinball games! Card when you facebook.com/pennhillsgames

buy an Xbox On e Kinect bundle !

431 Rodi Road • Penn Hills • 41 412.371.0386 12.371.0386 0386 6 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

THIS SUMMER is going to seem very familiar, with more than a dozen sequels and remakes packed into three months. And maybe you are pumped for Insidious: Chapter 3 (June 5), but take heart: There are some fresh films, too. Here’s the round-up of repeat offenders, sequels and sequel-like features. The Human Centipede III (May 29), now longer and made of prisoners; Entourage (June 3), a big-screen debut for the HBO show; dinos redux in Jurassic World (June 12); and the potty-mouth toy is back in Ted 2 (June 26). The male strippers return in Spy, June 5 Magic Mike XXL, and so do those bad metal guys in Terminator Genisys, both on July 1. On July 31, Tom Cruise gets busy in Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation, and the grown-up kids from the 1980s Vacation movies take their own Vacation. Sinster 2 goes “Boo!” on Aug. 21. 2 Getting remakes or o reboots are: the Victorian sleuth Mr. Holmes, on July 17; V the comic-book heroes Fantastic Four (Aug. 7); and the ’60s spy franchise The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (Aug. 14). For fresher action: Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson tries to fix an earthquake in San

Andreas (May 29). In a change of pace from muscle-bound he-men, Paul Rudd is the shrinky-dinky Marvel hero in AntMan (July 17). And one for the grown-up kids, Pixels (July 24), finds Earth under attack from ’80s arcade-game characters. The ladies are making a strong run for summer comedies this season. Melissa McCarthy stars as an unleashed CIA agent in Spy (June 5). Then, Amy Schumer headlines (and writes) Trainwreck (July 17), about a men’s-magazine writer. Kristen Wiig is half of a 1970s armored-c a r - h e i s t crew in Masterminds, opening Aug. 7. Va r i o u s e n t e r taining types get their biographical due. The troubles of Beach Boy Brian Wilson are re-told in Love and Mercy (June 5). Also in June, the documentary Live From New York! looks at the early days of Saturday Night Live. Straight Outta Compton (Aug. 14) recounts the birth and rise of Los Angeles gangsta rappers N.W.A. And in August, Jason Segel suits up as writer David Foster Wallace in The End of the Tour. For the younger set, there’s a new animated film from Pixar, Inside Out (June 19), in which a little girl’s emotions come


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Convenient 9 or 18 Holes Public Play Event Packages for small to large groups 19th Hole Bar & Grille CLOSE TO HOME AND IN YOUR BUDGET!

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to life. And here’s a shameless cash-grab, Despicable Me spin-off the kids will insist on seeing: Minions starts July 10. On July 24, it’s the kiddie action adventure Pan, a backstory of sorts to Peter Pan. Other films to keep an eye out for: Ricki and the Flash, a rock ’n’ roll story starring Meryl Streep and her daughter Mamie Gummer, and Dark Places (Aug. 7), more twisted doJurassic World, June 12 mestic drama adapted from a Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl) novel; both Aug. 7. Paper Towns (July 24), from the pen of John Green (The Fault in Our Stars), and Self/Less (July 10), a drama about a rich, dying man shifting his consciousness into a young man. Adolescence in 1976 gets a look in Diary of a Teenage Girl (Aug. 21), adapted from Phoebe Gloeckner’s novel. And finally, two films shot locally: the weepie Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (June 12) and Southpaw (July 24), a boxing drama starring Jake Gyllenhaal. In early June, Pittsburgh Filmmakers host UNSEEN/UNHEARD, a series of five free locally produced films, including Homemakers, Progression and Tracing Outlines. Also booked for Filmmakers, in June: The Wolfpack, a documentary about locked-

up kids who re-create the world at home, and the Studio Ghibli anime, When Marnie Was There. In July, look for the Los Angeles indie dramedy Tangerine, shot on an iPhone. The Hollywood in Dormont is bringing the doc Dark Star: H.R. Giger’s World (June 5), A Poem Is a Naked Person (July 10) and two new adaptations: Mike Le igh ’s Pirat e s of Penzance (June 14) and Julie Taymor’s Midsummer Night’s Dream. Lawrenceville’s Row House Cinema celebrates its first birthday in June; weekly themed series that month include: School Graduation, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Forbidden Love and Westerns. The Silk Screen Film Festival returns, now relocated to mid-summer (July 10-19), with films focusing on Asian and AsianAmerican experiences. The warmer weather means area drive-ins are open, and Pittsburghers can even walk to several city parks for outdoor films: The Cinema in the Park series returns on June 7, with recent films including Interstellar and The Boxtrolls; concerts at Wednesday-night Schenley Park screenings; S and the Pittsburgh prea mieres of Cantinflas and Cesar Chavez.

1401 E. Carson St. • South Side

1

412-481-3203

$

32oz Yuengling drafts Thursday’s starting at 9pm

B Y AL H O F F

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

21


22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


Outdoor DINING

open

Tonic

Asiago’s

Patio OPEN DAILY AT FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH

Lunch served

TUESDAY-FRIDAY

BBQ EVERY FRIDAY through g the summer

Drinks SERVED DAILY

CORNER OF FIF TH & MARKET | DOWNTOWN

andyswinebar.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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DECK OPEN

Outdoor

971 LIBERTY AVE. FRESH SQUEEZED COCKTAILS

Sunny Jim’s Tavern

Andy’s

KITCHEN OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT PRIVATE PARTY SPACE AVAILABLE NO ROOM RENTAL FEE 412.456.0460 TONICPITTSBURGH.COM

(412) 235-7752 | 381 North Shore Drive | Pittsburgh Located on the North Shore in-between Heinz Field & PNC Park.

asiagostuscanitalian.com 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


Dining Walnut Grill

N E P O O I T A P

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255 Camp Horne Road • 1 Mile West of 279 412-761-6700 • www.sunnyjimstavern.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

25


Art by Mary Mazziotti Group show at be Galleries, June 20-July 25

SUMMER

ARTS ••• CURRENT Assemble Artspace. AmeriKKKa: A

SUMMER CAMPS GRADES 1 - 3

GRADES 4 - 9

June 15 - 26 or Aug 3 - 14

Gr. 4 - 6: July 20 - Aug 7 Gr. 7 - 9: June 29 - July 17

GRADES 2 - 12

June 8 - 12 or July 27 - 31

Gr. 4 - 6: June 29 - July 17 Gr. 7 - 9: July 20 - Aug 7

AGES 3-5 Pre-School Camp: June 8 - 12 or July 27 - 31 GRADES 6 - 12 June 22 - July 3

Private Voice & Piano Ages 12 - 18: June 15 - August 7 ½ Hour and Full Hour spaces available

412-281-2234 pittsburghCLO.org

Post Racial Society (interactive installation by Alaric X), through Sat., May 23. 937 Liberty. Temporary States (art exploring climate change and “a common household substance,” by Lori Hepner and Christine Lorenz), through Mon., May 25. Christine Fréchard Gallery. Two Italian Masters (contemporary painters Pier Luigi Slis and Laura D’Andrea), through May 29. Filmmakers Galleries. 2015 Intensive and Thesis Show (work by Filmmakers students), through May 29. ModernFormations Gallery. Black Room: Color Room — Work by Ross Hardy (works on paper), through May 29. Spinning Plate Gallery. Following the Visual Path: Retrospectives by Teacher and Student (work by Paul Ben-Zvi and Richard Claraval), through May 29. BOOM Concepts. Pgh POC Zine Distro, through May 30. Boulevard Gallery. Visions (oils and watercolors by Bill Perry), through May 30. The Gallery 4. 100 Flowers Bloomed (new and old works by illustrator Brian Gonnella), through May 30. Most Wanted Fine Art. Projeto Madre Latina (photographs of Latina mothers by Lila Rodrigues) and Earth Portals and the Bizarre! Bazaar! (installation by Nick Noir and Macabre Noir), both through May 30. UnSmoke Artspace. Brain, Self, Objects (art by Jay Grassel) continues through May 30. Future Tenant. David Calfo: Daydreaming Through a Child’s Eyes (toys from vintage and found objects), through May 31.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Pop-Up Exhibition Featuring Scott Hunter (abstract painting), through May 31. Pop-Up exhibitions featuring John Flatz, Sarika Goulatia and Patricia Kelly continue June 3-July 12. Mattress Factory. Artists in Residence (installations), through May 31. Factory Installed (installations by artists-in-residence Jacob Douenias + Ethan Frier, Anne Lindberg, John Morris and Julie Schenkelberg), through spring 2016. Plus Trace of Memory (house-sized installation by Chiharu Shiota), ongoing, and permanent exhibits. The Mine Factory. No Vacancy (works by tenants of 201 N. Braddock Ave.), through May. Panza Gallery. The House Collection (group show), through May. Clay Place at Standard. Independent Pittsburgh Area High School Students, nts, s through May.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. The Art of Healing: Reflections 2015 (works by patients of Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center), through June 5. Pittsburgh Glass Center. ABC@PGC (Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert’s alphabet-themed glass sculptures with interactive component), through June 7. Summer Lecture Series, Wednesdays May 20-July 8 and July 22-Aug. 12. Artspace 616. Hereafter (joint show by Ryan Lammie and Alisha Wormsley), through June 13.

Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Shaping New Worlds (national exhibit of constructed photography), through June 13. Also: Selections From the Elgin Park Series (photographs by Michael Paul Smith). Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. teapots! (ninth teapot-themed invitational), continues through June 13. Gallerie Chiz. Looking Forward Looking Back (20th-anniversary show with work by Leonard Leibowitz and Dennis Bergevin), through June 13. B Silver Eye Center for Photography. A World Imagined: Kelli Connell and Sara Macel, through June 13. Revision Space. Scratching the Itch (paintings and drawings by Travis K. Schwab), through June 14. Gallery on 43rd. Recent Work (pastel paintings by Diane Grguras), through June 20. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. The Big Little Show: Art in Miniature (group show), through June 20 (June 5 closing reception). 707 Penn Gallery. Vascular Caverns (abstract papercut sculpture by Gianna Paniagua), through June 21. 709 Penn Gallery. Out of Many, One People (paintings by Tamara Natalie Madden exploring the cultural heritage of Jamaica), through June 21. Wood Street Galleries. HC Gilje: The World Revolves Around You (video installations), through June 21. Greensburg Art Center. Pennsylvania and Arizona: Worlds Apart (paintings by H.K. Miller), through June 26. CONTINUES ON PG. 28

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


MUSEUMS+GALLERIES 707 PENN GALLERY. Downtown,

MATTRESS FACTORY. North Side,

412-325-7017

412-231-3169

709 PENN GALLERY. Downtown,

MENDELSON GALLERY. Shadyside,

412-281-8723

412-361-8664

937 LIBERTY. Downtown, 412-456-6666 AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM.

www.minefactory.com

Squirrel Hill, 412-521-8010

MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY.

THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. North Side, 412-237-8300 ARTSPACE 616. Sewickley, 412-259-8214 ASSEMBLE ARTSPACE. Garfield, www.assemblepgh.org ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF BUTLER COUNTY. Butler, 724-283-6922 BE GALLERIES. Lawrenceville, 412-687-2606

BOOM CONCEPTS. Garfield, www.facebook.com/boomconcepts BOULEVARD GALLERY. Verona, 412-721-0943 BOX HEART GALLERY. Bloomfield, 412-687-8858 CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Oakland, 412-622-3131

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-322-5058 CHRISTINE FRÉCHARD GALLERY. Squirrel Hill, 412-421-8888.

CLAY PLACE AT STANDARD. Carnegie, 412-489-5240

DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Greensburg, 724-219-0804.

FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. North Oakland, 412-681-5449

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Point Breeze, 412-371-0600 FUTURE TENANT. Downtown, 412-325-7037 GALERIE WERNER. Shadyside, 412-716-1390 GALLERIE CHIZ. Shadyside, 412-441-6005 THE GALLERY 4. Shadyside, 412-363-5050

GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Lawrenceville, 412-683-6488

GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Greensburg, 724-837-6791

HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS. New Castle, 724-652-2882

HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Oakland, 412-268-2434

THE MINE FACTORY. Point Breeze,

Garfield, 412-362-0274

July 2,3,4,& 5,2015 FREE ADMISSION Thursday - Saturday 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Twin Lakes Park, near Greensburg Shuttle bus service available from St. Vincent College and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS. Shadyside, 412-441-5200

MOST WANTED FINE ART. Garfield, 412-328-4737

NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Ross Township, 412-364-3622 PANZA GALLERY. Millvale, 412-821-0959 PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. North Side, 412-231-7881 PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Shadyside, 412-361-0873 PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Friendship, 412-365-2145 REVISION SPACE. Lawrenceville, www.revisionspace.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. South Side, 412-431-1810

SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Strip District, 412-261-7003 SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Downtown, 412-261-7003

SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT JOHNSTOWN. 814-269-7234 SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT LIGONIER VALLEY. 724-238-6015

SPACE GALLERY. Downtown, 412-325-7723

SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Friendship, rclaraval@gmail.com SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sewickley, 412-741-4405 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Downtown, www.3riversartsfest.org TOONSEUM. Downtown, 412-232-0199

UNSMOKE ARTSPACE. Braddock, www. unsmokeartspace.com

WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Greensburg, 724-837-1500

WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Downtown, 412-471-5605

Make some me time with a book I love.

ayy too redu reduc Read for 6 minutes a dda day reduce stress. Explore Finish threethe bookss during d rin in ngg Summer n the summer. sum su Reading possibilities of

Read with thee famil family family.

Read a book from thee year ear ar I was wa bborn. Adults, teens, kids…

Tackle classic. new genre ge g . Readabooks • Win Try prizes a • Enjoy programs

Finish that book next to my bed. Summer is for everyone! Impress my Reading boss with that book about work.

Cook through a cookbook. Join us for Summer Reading Extravaganza Outdoor Family Festival Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh – Main, Oakland Sunday, June 7, 2015 [ 12 – 5 pm

TRY POETRY. Read a book my best friend loves. Pick a book by its cover. Read a bestseller. Read that book I bought but haven’t started.

IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Bloomfield, 412-924-0634

JAMES GALLERY. West End, 412-922-9800

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

27


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

The Andy Warhol Museum. Exposures series, featuring Pittsburgh-based Cecilia Ebitz’ Good Intentions (inspired by the work of Corita Kent), through June 28. SPACE. Repetition, Rhythm and Pattern (group show exploring pattern and abstraction), through June 28. ToonSeum. Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream (contemporary cartoonists’ tribute to Winsor McCay), through June 28. Avengers Assemble! Celebrating Marvel’s Mightiest Heroes, through Aug. 23.

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Elements (drawings and watercolors of bird nests incorporating natural and man-made materials), through June 30. Photo Antiquities. Photographs in Gold (vintage photographic images printed on glass plates, some gold-leafed by hand), through June 30. BoxHeart. California Crude (paintings by Kuzana Ogg), through July 3 (June 6 reception). Carnegie Museum of Art. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples, through July 6. Sketch to Structure (exhibit about the architectural process), through Aug. 17 (closed May 25-June 6). Teenie Harris Photographs: Cars, through Oct. 31. James Gallery. All Terrain Vehicle (group show exploring the contemporary landscape through painting and photography) and Bound (woven fiber forms by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze), through July 11. be Galleries. Around the Body: Photography by Rebeka Alviani and Brenda Roger, through July 14. American Jewish Museum. The Israelite Samarians and the Festival of Unleavened Bread: Photographs by Dale Lazar, through July 24. Hoyt Center for the Arts. Earth Sky Galaxy (work by Joseph Orffeo) and Ceramic Expression (work by Tom Hubert), both through July 31. Frick Art & Historical Center. Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape, through Aug. 2. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods (paintings by Ron Donoughe), through Aug. 9. Other solo shows: Let It Do What It Does (art by Danny Bracken); Creep (Haylee Ebersole); Ground Clearance (B.A. Harrington with Chele Isaac); SPORTSNATION (Brett Kashmere); Calamity (Derek Reese); Universe (Mark Schatz); and Look Closer (Steven Sherrill), all through Aug. 9. Society for Contemporary Craft. Bridge 13: Keith Lo Bue, Elisabeth Higgins O’Connor &

Jason Walker (three solo exhibitions, in mixed media, ceramics and metal), through Aug. 22. SCC Satellite Gallery. Her Turn (work by 12 women woodturning artists), through Aug. 22.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley. Pastel Expressions (works by 29 members of the Central Pennsylvania Pastel Society and the Pittsburgh Pastel Artists League), through Aug. 23. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery. Gallery/ Studio/Lab (evolving, immersive summer-long installation by Mark Barrill incorporating earth-science and paleontological imagery and objects in a “theatrical nonlinear narrative), through September. Mendelson Gallery. BOYS, BOYS, BOYS (erotic objects and images by Don Joint, and new work by Masha “Mousebones” Vereshchenko).

•• MAY Galerie Werner. upStage — An Exploratory of Dance (work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire and Christine Swann), Wed., May 27-Aug. 31 (May 27 opening).

Associated Artists of Butler County.

Art by Kuzana Ogg California Crude continues through July 3 at BoxHeart Gallery.

Wheels (art with wheels), May 29-June 19 (May 29 reception).

North Hills Art Center. Regional Show (juried show for local pros and amateurs), May 30-July 4 (May 30 reception).

The Andy Warhol Museum. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York (work by Philip Pearlstein, Dorothy Cantor and Andy Warhol from their time at Carnegie Tech and early days in New York City), May 30-Sept. 6. Carnegie Museum of Art. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World (from fine art to photojournalism, by 12 leading photographers), May 30-Sept. 28.

••• JUNE The Mine Factory. Atticus Adams — Mesh Lab: The Experiments, June 4-27 (June 6 reception).

Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. Annual showcase of local visual and performing arts, plus craft vendors. Various indoor and outdoor venues, June 5-14. BOOM Concepts. Microresident Wine & Words Pittsburgh Celebrates 2 Years & Growing, June 5-27 (June 5 opening, plus events June 11, 17, 20 and 27). Future Tenant. Bedtime Stories (group show), June 5-28. Assemble. Environmental Charter School Youth Showcase, June 5-30. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


Hosted by the Mattress Factory,

Lisa Cibik and Bernie Kobosky

91.3 WYEP + 90.5 WESA A-1 Realty, Inc. AIO - Associates in Ophthalmology All in Good Taste Productions Allegheny General Hospital / Allegheny Health Network Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff Allegheny Health Network Amcom Office Systems Anonymous AudioCARE Systems, Inc.

Vivian + Bill Benter Lisa Cibik + Bernie Kobosky CGI Technologies and Solutions Inc. CrawfordEllenbogen LLC First National Bank Giant Eagle Jones Day Susan + Scott Lammie Maher Duessel CPAs McGuire Woods, LLP NEXTPittsburgh Nancy + Woody Ostrow

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

29


{IMAGE COURTESY OF ROSE ISSA PROJECTS, LONDON}

SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

Art by Nermine Hammam She Who Tells a Story, May 30-Sept. 28 at the Carnegie Museum of Art

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The Gallery 4. Thoughts & Feelings: New and Collected Works by Ben Patterson (chalk art and paintings), June 5-30 (June 6 reception). Most Wanted Fine Art. Visiting artists from St. Louis (work by Dail Chambers and Darnell Chambers) opens June 5 (June 5 reception). Art City USA (gallery hosts a community group show in Century III mall), June 14-Sept. 12 (June 21 opening, Sept. 12 closing). Boulevard Gallery. All American Art (tattoo artists Greg Davenport & Heather Scherrah), June 6-27. UnSmoke Systems. The Project Person Project: Brought to You by the #ENDOFNOW (art by Max C Lee) June 6-28 (June 6 reception). Clay Place at Standard. Breaking New Ground: Three Western Pennsylvania Potters (Donn Hedman, Dale Huffman, Dan Vito) opens June 12. Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. Projections on Paper: Abstract Prints and Drawings from the Permanent Collection (works by Albers, Calder, Helen Frankenthaler and others), June 12-Aug. 21. Filmmakers Galleries. PhAb Now! (group show of abstract work), June 12-Sept. 4. Society for Contemporary Craft. Daniel Baxter — Summer Artist in Residence (Pittsburgh-based creator of the Kreepy Doll Factory), June 16-Sept. 19. Revision Space. Immediate Realities (international group exhibition of urban contemporary artists, with Los Angeles-based C.A.V.E. Gallery), June 19-July 19. Artspace 616. TRACE ELEMENTS (work by William Earl Kofmehl III and Stephanie Armbruster), June 20-July 18 (June 20 reception). Mattress Factory. Urban Garden Party, June 19. Annual Community Day, June 21. Gallerie Chiz. High Voltage (mixed-media sculpture by Ron Nigro, works on paper by Aaron Regal and mixed-media sculpture

by Bruce Senchesen), June 19-July 25 (June 19 reception). Pittsburgh Glass Center. Out of the Archives and Into the Gallery (group show of work inspired by ancient glass from the Carnegie Museum of Natural History), June 19-Sept. 13.

Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. glassweekend ’15 (international group sculpture show), June 19-Sept. 26 (June 19 reception). be Galleries. Gallery artists group show (with Mary Mazziotti, Elizabeth Castonguay, Robert Qualters, Atticus Adams and more), June 20-July 25 (June 20 opening).

Associated Artists of Butler County. Art by Stan Walchesky and Lisa Sten, June 24-July 24 (June 26 reception). Silver Eye Center. London/ Pittsburgh: Mark Neville (photographer’s first solo exhibition in the region explores wealth disparities and racial segregation), June 26rac Sept. 12 (June 16 opening). Sept

•• JJULY 709 Penn. Grit to Glass 7 (Pittsburgh Glass Center show spotlighting local glass artists), July 1-Aug. 23. Photo Antiquities. The Camera That Captures the 1960 World Series at Forbes Field (vintage camera, and more), July 1-Aug. 31. ToonSeum. Slinging Satire: Master of Political Cartoons (work by leading U.S. editorial cartoonists), July 2-Sept. 20. Most Wanted Fine Art. International doll show and Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland art show, both opening July 3. BOOM Concepts. Julie Mallis Feature, July 3-Aug. 1. Irma Freeman Center. Side Wall Project (12 murals co-curated by Brick), July 3-Aug. 21. Assemble. Café con Leche (exhibit by local Latino group Café con Leche), July 4-31. CONTINUES ON PG. 34

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

31


Think outside the Bach.

2015 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Summer Concert Series 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


CONCERT IN THE PARK:

CONCERT IN THE

PARK

Hartwood Acres July 5, 8:15 p.m.

C Classical BBQ: S Summer Spectacular! S Sponsored by BNY Mellon A August 2, 6:30 p.m.

(Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.) THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

BNY Mellon Presents Smokey Robinson July 9, 7:30 p.m.

Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival Monday, June 8, 7 p.m. Point State Park, downtown

Pittsburgh Jazz Celebration June 16, 8 p.m.

FUSE@PSO: Brahms + Radiohead June 24, 6:30 p.m.

Celebrate Pittsburgh: Sensory Friendly Concert June 27, 2:30 p.m.

Classical BBQ C S Sponsored by BNY Mellon J July 11, 6:30 p.m.

(Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.) (C

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

Johnny Mathis July 16, 7:30 p.m.

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

Diana Krall July 23, 7:30 p.m. A Night of Symphonic Rock July 25, 8 p.m.

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

M Music for the Spirit JJuly 1, 1 and 7:30 p.m. CONCERT IN THE PARK:

South Park PARK July 3, 8 p.m. CONCERT IN THE

Randy Newman July 30, 7:30 p.m.

NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: A Salute to Veterans August 31, 7 p.m.

NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: Brass N’at September 1, 7 p.m. NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: Play N’at at the Rex Theater September 2, 7 p.m. NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: N M Music Squared S September 3, noon N NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: S Sounds of Summer S September 3, 7 p.m. N NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: C Classical Standards S September 4, 8 p.m.

Distant Worlds: music from FINAL FANTASY August 1, 8 p.m.

For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/summer PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

33


#CrawlPGH

GALLERY

SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

CRAWL in the Cultural District

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Art by Helga Winter Her Turn at SCC Satellite Gallery through Aug. 22

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES KLOSE}

TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawlt FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENTS Presented by THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST Department of Education and Community Engagement

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UnSmoke Systems. Bee Side: BBQ in the Unsmoke Courtyard Beside Ryder Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Mural (debut event), July 4; Other Books, Other Worlds (group show with David Newbury, Brad and Stephanie Towell, Lena Loshonkohl, and Co Bappe, July 11-31 (receptions July 11 and July 31). The Gallery 4. New paintings by Marlana Adele Vassar opens July 4 (July 11 reception). Associated Artists of Butler County. Annual Invitational Show (at Cranberry Township Municipal Building), July 8-24 (July 8 reception). Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Gallery Crawl. Downtown, July 10. Clay Place at Standard. Work by Bob Anderson, Due Miecznikowski and Jerry Wagner opens July 10. Future Tenant. Sidney Mullis: Inti.Mate (â&#x20AC;&#x153;a fictive kingdom of invented animals performing their mating ritualsâ&#x20AC;?), July 10-Aug. 9. 707 Penn. Travis Mitzel: As Best I Can Remember (photographic exploration of memory), July 10-Aug. 30. SPACE. Wall Paintings (group show with local artists given one day to each create a large painting on the gallery walls), July 10-Aug. 30. Wood Street Galleries. D-Fuse: UNTITLED (multi-sensory, y, multimedia work by the transdisciplinary London-based collective), July 10-Sept. 6. Greensburg Art Center. Present and Past Perfect (open-juried group show of emerging and established artists), July 11-21. BoxHeart. Dismantled and Reclaimed (paint and paper assemblages by Erin Treacy) and You Only Live Twice (paintings by Jim Studeny, influenced by Japanese woodblock prints), July 14-Aug. 21 (July 18 reception). be Galleries. Smaller Than a Breadbox (small-works show by gallery artists), July 18-Sept. 5

Revision Space. Great Waves II (annual summer rotating exhibition of local artists), July 24-Sept. 7. Carnegie Museum of Art. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper (first exhibit of the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complete Hopper collection), July 25-Oct. 26. Gallerie Chiz. Conversations from the Backseat (mixed-media works by Luon St. Pierre), July 31-Aug. 29 (July 31 reception).

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUGUST The Gallery 4. New works by Brian Holderman and Jeremy Beightol opens Aug. 1. BOOM Concepts. Jenesis Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Agendaâ&#x20AC;? Month series, Aug. 1, 7, 8, 22 and 29.

Hoyt Center for the Arts. Monumental (work by M James Rosati), Aug. 4- Oct. 23 (Aug. 7 reception). Assemble. Welcome to Moonbabyland (artist moonbabyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pop-up interactive department store exploring â&#x20AC;&#x153;self-mythologizing spaces and bodiesâ&#x20AC;?), Aug. 8-31. Future Tenant. Jake Marsico: Trespass: Traffic Lights (light and sound installation on the patterns created by traffic cameras), Aug. 14-Sept. 13. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. P Artist of the Year: Dennis Marsico; Emerging Artist of the Year: Seth Clark; and Pittsburgh Print Group, all Aug. 21-Nov. 1.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. Allied Artists of Johnstown 83rd Annual Juried Art Exhibit, Aug. 28-Dec. 11.

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ SEPTEMBER Photo Antiquities. The Oldest Known Photo of Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point Taken From Mount Washington (1896 exposure, and other old images of the city), Sept. 1-Oct. 31. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


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SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

BoxHeart. Between Worlds (abstract found-object art by Brenda Stumpf) and Journal of Repetitive Learning (multi-media works by Daria Sandburg) Sept. 1-Oct. 30 (Sept. 5 reception). Irma Freeman Center. Lithographs and Artwork by Benjamin Crème opens Sept. 4 (Sept. 4 reception). Gallerie Chiz. Memories of Home (glass sculpture by Elizabeth Fortunato and oil pigment on paper and collage by Susan Middleman), Sept. 4-Oct. 10 (Sept. 4 reception). North Hills Art Center. Member Show (annual exhibit of pottery, sculpture, painting and photography), Sept. 5-26 (Sept. 5 reception). Assemble. Dashian (kites by local artist Katy DeMent celebrating this Nepalese holiday), Sept. 5-30. Greensburg Art Center. Water Authority (watercolorists Frank Webb, Ron Thurston and Bill Vrsack), Sept. 12-Oct. 23.

OTHER EXHIBITS

Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Permanent exhibits including Dinosaurs in Their Time. Also Animal Secrets (hidden habits of forest animals), through Jan. 10. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age (touring show of outer-spacethemed wearable decorative arts dating to the 19th century), June 27-Jan. 4. Carnegie Science Center. Permanent exhibits including Highmark SportsWorks, roboworld and Rangos Omnimax Theater. Also: H2Oh! Why Our Rivers Matter and Blue (hands-on building exhibit with large-scale foam blocks).

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Permanent exhibits plus

$10 Lite Buckets ALL DAY EVERY DAY

attractions and activities including: Rainbow Jumpy (Missing Links) (inflatable rainbow-striped tunnel), through May 24. Kid City Rockers Dance Parties, May 24 and June 28. May Day Marching Band, May 30. Very Eric Carle (exhibit based on books by The Very Hungry Caterpillar author) opens June 13. Fort Pitt Museum. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th-Century Frontier opens Fri., May 22. History Inspires … Again! (contemporary-art show), opens June 5. Also, Living History programs: Fife and Drum (demo on 18th-century military music), June 6 and Aug. 1; Artillery, June 13 and 14; Cooking, June 20; Buckskins & Powderhorns, June 2; Fourth of July, July 4; Artillery, July 11 and Aug. 8; Cooking, July 18; and Blacksmithing, July 25; and Women’s History Seminar, Aug. 15.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Permanent exhibit

Lite $ $2.50 Lite 2 Drafts Bottles DURING PIRATES GAMES

36

DURING PIRATES GAMES

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

includes archaeological site with 16,000 years of human habitation and recreations of a Native American village and a 19th-century settlers’ village. Also: Walk Through Prehistory (guided nature hike), June 6; Vintage Baseball with the Pittsburgh Franklins (game with 1860s rules), June 13; 18th Annual Meadowcroft

OTHER VENUES CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Oakland, 412-622-3131

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. North Side, 412-237-3400

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-322-5058

FORT PITT MUSEUM. Downtown, 412-281-9284

MEADOWCROFT ROCKSHELTER AND HISTORIC VILLAGE. Avella, Pa., 724-587-3412 NATIONAL AVIARY. North Side, 412-323-7235

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS. Oakland, 412-622-6914

RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Swissvale, 412-464-4020

SEN. JOHN HEINZ PITTSBURGH REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER. Strip District, 412-454-6000

Atlatl Competition (stone-age spearthrowing implement), June 20; Inside Tour of Meadowcroft Rockshelter, June 27 and Sept. 5; and Independence Day Celebration, July 3 and 4. National Aviary. Masters of the Sky (special programs with eagles, condors, falcons and more), through July. Plus Penguin Point, Tropical Rainforest, Wetlands and other permanent exhibits.

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Butterfly Forest continues through Sept. 7. Summer Flower Show continues through Oct. 4. Tropical Forest Congo, ongoing.

Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area. Saturday tours of historic Carrie Blast Furnace continue weekly through October; Friday tours of historic Carrie Blast Furnace start June 6 and ccontinue weekly through August. Babushkas and Hard Hats Aug Tour (about immigrants and industry; includes lunch) start indus May 30 and continue June 13, July 25, Aug. 22 and Sept. 19. Happy Hour with Carrie tours of the historic Carrie Blast Furnace (on site and at a different local brewery or pub) continue on each of the following dates: June 3, July 1, Aug. 5, Sept. 2 and Oct. 7. Sen. John Heinz History Center. We Can Do It! WWII (region’s role in World War II), through Jan. 4. Also: Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood (original items from the TV series), Heinz (history of the H.J. Heinz Company), From Slavery to Freedom (African-American history) and other ongoing exhibits. Also houses the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum (the region’s heritage of pro and amateur sports).


Whether it’s your everyday commute or a weekend ride, we’re ready to help you get your bike on. All Port Authority buses are now equipped with bike racks. Bikes can also be taken on Port Authority's Light Rail System (T) seven days a week and on the Monongahela Incline at any time with no restrictions. More great ways to ride out the summer. There are no bike racks on the T or Incline. Bikes must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces on the T and Incline. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bicycles.

we like bikes

Summer’s here and the time is right for bikin’ in the street.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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THEATER COMPANIES +VENUES

The Last Five Years, at Front Porch Theatricals, May 22-31

APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Delmont, 724-468-5050

BAREBONES PRODUCTIONS. Braddock, www.barebones productions.com BRICOLAGE THEATRE. Downtown, 412-394-3353 BYHAM THEATER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 CITY OF ASYLUM/PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-323-0278 CITY THEATRE. South Side, 412-431-2489 CLO CABARET. Downtown, 412-281-3973 FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS. North Side, www.frontporchpgh.com THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Brookline, 412-254-4633

JOHNNY APPLESEED CHILDREN’S THEATER. Delmont, 724-468-5050 KINETIC THEATRE CO. North Side, www.kinetictheatre.org LITTLE LAKE THEATRE. Canonsburg, 724-745-6300 LOOKING GLASS THEATRE. Canonsburg, 412-561-4402 NEW HAZLETT THEATER. North Side, 412-320-4610

SUMMER

NEW HORIZON THEATER. Homewood,

STAGE ••• NOW PLAYING Our Town. The Thornton Wilder classic, through Sat., May 23 (Little Lake).

Detroit. Lisa D’Amour’s drama about two couples from vastly different backgrounds in contemporary suburban Detroit, through May 30 (12 Peers Theater). Fences. August Wilson’s Pulitzerwinner, through Sat., May 30 (Pittsburgh Playwrights). American Falls. Miki Johnson’s new drama about life in a small Idaho town, through May 31 (barebones productions). Midsummer Song. A play with songs about a wild weekend, by David Greig (The Monster in the Hall), with songs by Gordon McIntyre, through May 31 (City Theatre).

•• MAY Knickers. Sarah Quick’s comedy about a custom underwear business, Thu., May 21-June 6 (South Park). Saints Tour. Immersive theater work by Molly Rice about everyday saints that incorporates a guided tour of Braddock, Thu., May 21-June 13 (Bricolage).

www.newhorizontheater.org

NO NAME PLAYERS. Oakland, www.nonameplayers.org OPERA THEATER OF PITTSBURGH.

Eve Apart. Operatically trained vocalists star in the Pittsburgh premiere of Tim Hinck’s multimedia musical-theatrical work reimagining the Garden of Eden, Fri., May 22-Sun., May 24 (Alia Musica at the Hillman Auditorium, Hill District; www.aliamusicapittsburgh.org). The Last Five Years. Jason Th Robert Brown’s hit musical R about two people falling in love, one of whom tells the story backward, Fri., May 22-31 (Front Porch Theatricals). To Kill a Mockingbird. Adaptation of the Harper Lee novel, May 22-31 (The Heritage Players). Girls Only: The Secret Comedy of Women. A reprise of this crowdpleaser, which combines sketches, improv and songs, about two women discovering their childhood diaries, Wed., May 27-Aug. 16 (CLO Cabaret). In the Mood. Staged tribute to 1940s big bands, with a 13-piece group and six singerdancers, May 28 (Byham). Butterflies Are Free. Leonard Gershe’s 1969 Broadway hit about a blind man, his controlling mother and his free-spirited female neighbor, May 28-June 6 (Apple Hill). CONTINUES ON PG. 42

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

Oakland, 412-621-1499 PICT CLASSIC. Oakland, 412-561-6000 PITTSBURGH CLO. Downtown, 412-325-1582

PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATER CO. Downtown, www.pghplaywrights.com

PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER. Downtown, 412-316-1600 PLAYHOUSE JR. Oakland, 412-621-4445

RAGE OF THE STAGE PLAYERS. McKeesport, www.rageofthestage.com SOUTH PARK THEATRE. South Park, 412-831-8552 STAGE 62. Carnegie, 412-429-6262 THE THEATRE FACTORY. Trafford, 412-374-9200

THROUGHLINE THEATRE COMPANY. Lawrenceville, www.throughlinetheatre.org

TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 TWELVE PEERS. Lawrenceville, www.12peerstheater.org UNSEAM’D SHAKESPEARE. Oakland, 412-621-0244


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW MURPHY}

Billy Porter in Kinky Boots, Aug. 4-9 at the Pittsburgh CLO

Dance on Widow’s Row. Samm-Art Williams’ comedy about four Nashville widows looking for new husbands, May 28-June 14 (New Horizon). The Best of Everything. Julie Kramer’s adaptation of the Rona Jaffe novel about ambitious secretaries in the big city in 1958, May 28-June 13 (Little Lake). How the Other Half Loves. Two dinner parties on different nights occur onstage at once in Alan Ayckbourn’s farce, May 28-June 13 (PICT Classic). Buyer & Cellar. Tom Lenk (from TV’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer) stars in playwright Jonathan Tolins’ one-man show centering on the (fictive) clerk who staffs the “street of shops” in Barbra Streisand’s (real-life) basement, May 28-June 28 (Pittsburgh Public Theater).

••• JUNE Out of This Furnace. A reprise of Andy Wolk’s stage adaptation of the classic Thomas Bell 1941 novel about generations of steelworkers in Braddock, June 4-21 (Unseam’d Shakespeare).

A (Micro) History of World Economics, Danced. Pittsburgh premiere for French playwright and director Pascal Rambert’s internationally performed dance-theater work exploring economics’ impact on people’s lives,

June 5 and 6 (City of Asylum/Pittsburgh). The Ruling Class. The 14th Earl of Gurney, who believes he is God, joins the House of Lords in Peter Barnes’ classic 1968 satire, June 5-13 (Throughline Theater Co.). Mary Poppins. Stage-musical adaptation of the Disney move, itself a Broadway hit, June 9-21 (CLO). Making God Laugh. Sean Grennan’s play follows “a typical American family over the course of 30 years’ worth of holidays,” June 11-27 (South Park). Molly’s Hammer. A staged reading of Tammy Ryan’s new play about the life of peace activist Molly Rush, co-founder of the Thomas Merton Center, June 15 (Unseam’d). Funny Money. Ray Cooney farce about a CPA who tries to keep a briefcase full of suspicious cash, br June 18-27 (Apple Hill). Lucky Guy. Pittsburgh premiere Luck Nora Ephron’s 2013 Broadway of No play about the rise, fall and rise pl of real-life Pulitzer-winning newspaper reporter Mike McAlary, June 18-July 3 (Little Lake). Man of La Mancha. Dale Wasserman, Mitch Leigh and Joe Darion’s classic musical about “The Impossible Dream,” June 23-28 (CLO). Brewed. Scott T. Barsotti’s dark, fabulistic family drama about six adult sisters condemned to spend their days stirring a cauldron, June 26-July 11 (No Name Players). CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

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a USO canteen during World War II, by William Repicci, Linda Thorsen Bond and Charles Busch, July 2-18 (South Park). The World Goes Round. Musical salute to the writing team of Kander & Ebb, with “All That Jazz,” “Cabaret” and more, July 9-18 (Apple Hill). Last Gas. Romantic comedy about a small-town guy and his old flame from John Cariani (Almost, Maine), July 9-25 (Little Lake). Sherlock’s Last Case. Charles Marowitz’s 1987 comedy about famous detective Holmes, sidekick Watson and their old pal Moriarity, July 9-26 (Kinetic Theatre Co). Gypsy. The classic musical about a stage mother, by Jules Styne, Arthur Laurents and Stephen Sondheim, July 10-19 (CLO). Bloody Hell. New show based on characters

from Bram Stoker’s Dracula, set in a dystopian future London, July 10-25 (Rage of the Stage). The Marriage of Figaro. Mozart’s classic, produced for SummerFest, July 10 and 19 and Aug. 1 (Opera Theater). Stoop Is a Verb. Premiere of a multi-genre performance work that grew from visiting musician Oliver Lake’s residency at City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, in which input from community members inspired a portrait of Pittsburgh’s North Side in music, poetry, dance and art, July 11 (City of Asylum).

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. Musical spoof of the fairy tale that’s the family offering at SummerFest, July 11, 18 and 25 and Aug. 1 (Opera Theater). Damn Yankees. The Adler & Ross musical, produced for SummerFest, July 11-Aug. 1 (Opera Theater). CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

••• MAY Jungalbook. Contemporary

with June 27 tea party (Looking Glass Theatre).

adaptation of the classic Kipling Story about a boy raised by wolves, through Sun., May 24 (Playhouse Jr.). A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Shakespeare’s fantastical comedy, adapted for young audiences, through Sun., May 24 (Playhouse Jr.). Luna. A contemporary play, by Ramon Esquivel, about a daughter of migrant workers who always finds herself the new girl at school, Sat., May 23-June 7 (Playhouse Jr.).

A musical, June 29-July 8 (South Park).

•• JUNE The Spell of Sleeping Beauty. June 15-24 (South Park Children’s Theatre). The Invisible Dragon. An unhappy princess, an unhappy prince and an imaginary serpent, June 16-26 (Johnny Appleseed). The Adventures of a Bear Called Paddington. Adaptation of Michael Bond’s beloved stories, June 24-July 11,

Rats: The Story of the Pied Piper.

••• JULY Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. A musical adaptation, July 7-17 (Johnny Appleseed). Cinderella. July 13-22 (South Park). Goodnight, Moon. Musical adaptation of the book by Margaret Wise Brown and Clement Hurd, July 15-Aug. 1, with July 18 tea party (Looking Glass Theatre). A Pirate Christmas. July 28-Aug. 6 (South Park). The Emperor’s New Clothes. A comic take on the cautionary fable, July 28-Aug. 7 (Johnny Appleseed).

•• AUGUST Alexander Who’s Not Not Not Not Not Not Going to Move. A musical, with book and lyrics by Judith Viorst, Aug. 2-22, with Aug. 15 tea party (Looking Glass).


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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

Monomyth: The Hero’s Journey, by OvreArts and The Pillow Project, May 30

{PHOTO COURTESY OF REMINGTON BROOKS}

Rhinestone Steel 2015. A queer music and

with songs including “All That Jazz,” July 16-26 (Theatre Factory). The Drowsy Chaperone. The 1998 Broadway about a die-hard theater fan whose favorite cast album comes to life, with music and lyrics by Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison, July 16-25 (Stage 62). Sharon’s Grave. John B. Keane’s 1960 “folk play,” set in 1920s Ireland, that weaves a family feud with a Celtic myth, July 16-Aug. 8 (PICT Classic). Medea. Euripides’ drama of revenge, July 17-25 (Throughline). A New Kind of Fall-Out. New opera based on the life of Rachel Carson, by playwright Tammy Ryan and composer Gilda Lyons, July 18, 24 and 26 (Opera Theater). Pine. A dead man still living in his house is Texture confronted with his Contemporary ex-fiancée’s new Ballet performs boyfriend in this Strength & Grace, July 16-19 comedy by Eugenie Carabatsos, July 23-Aug. 8 (South Park).

arts festival, July 26 at Garfield’s BOOM Concepts gallery (www.facebook.com/boomconcepts). It Could Be Any of Us. Alan Ayckbourn’s comedic murder mystery set amidst a family of failures fighting over a will, July 30-Aug. 8 (Apple Hill). Outside Mullingar. John Patrick Shanley (Moonstruck) wrote this play about two misfits, a budding romance and a family feud, July 30-Aug. 16 (Little Lake). Peter Pan. J.M. Barrie’s tale as a musical, July 31-Aug. 9 (Heritage Players).

The Wedding Singer. Musical based on the Adam Sandler romantic comedy, from Matthew Sklar, Chad Beguelin and Tim Herlihy, July 24Aug. 2 (CLO).

Live & Direct 3: Music, Performance Art & Interactive Visuals. An evening at Garfield’s BOOM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

Concepts gallery, July 25 (www.facebook.com/ boomconcepts). Capricio. The Strauss opera, produced for SummerFest, July 25 and 31 and Aug. 2 (Opera Theater).

••• AUGUST Kinky Boots. Pittsburgh native Billy Porter reprises his starring role as Lola in the touring version of this hit Broadway musical by Harvey Fierstein and Cyndi Lauper, about a struggling British shoe factory that starts making shoes for drag queens, Aug. 4-9 (CLO). {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

WE HOST FIELD TRIPS, TIES FUNDRAISERS, BIRTHDAY PA!R & CORPORATE EVENTS

Chicago. The classic Kander & Ebb musical,

Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella.

The Broadway incarnation, from the creators of South Pacific and The Sound of Music, Aug. 11-16 (CLO). Exit Laughing. Paul Elliot’s comedy about three bridge partners coping with the death of the fourth, Aug. 13-29 (South Park). The Light in the Piazza. The Broadway musical by Adam Guettel and Craig Lucas, a romantic musical set in 1953 Italy, Aug. 21Aug. 30 (Front Porch). CONTINUES ON PG. 48


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47


{PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN DAY PHOTOGRAPHY}

SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

Celeste Ng, at Authors on Tour, June 1

Be My Baby. Ken Ludwig’s comedy about a mismatched couple, a Scot and a Briton, thrown together on a road trip to retrieve an infant, Aug. 20-29 (Apple Hill). A Little Hotel on the Side. Adaptation of the classic Feydeau/Désvallières farce set in a hotel, Aug. 20-Sept. 5 (Little Lake).

Visionary Performing Arts Academy. Students ages 2-18 perform a program titled Living Out of the Box in styles including tap, jazz, modern and lyrical, June 13 (Byham).

•• SEPTEMBER Bell, Book & Candle. John Van Druten’s

Arcade Comedy Theater. Troop Grown-Up,

romantic-comedy chestnut about a guy who falls for a witch, Sept. 3-19 (South Park). Saint Joan. George Bernard Shaw’s historical “tragedy without villains” about Joan of Arc, Sept. 3-19 (PICT).

DANCE

Artcity: Reed Dance Intensive. Showcase for students ages 8-12, July 6 (Trust Arts Education Center). Bodiography Center for Movement. The dance school’s spring performance, including classical and contemporary works, June 6 (Byham Theater).

Carnegie Performing Arts Center. Starburst (year-end student recital), May 30 and 31. Carnegie, 412-279-8887. The Pillow Project. Monomyth: The Hero’s Journey (collaboration with OvreArts), May 30. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze, www.pillowproject.org

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. The spring dance performance including classical and contemporary works performed by students from both student and pre-professional divisions (Byham). Texture Contemporary Ballet. Strength & Grace (new and old work by dancers/ choreographers Alan Obuzor and Kelsey Bartman), July 16-19 (New Hazlett). www.textureballet.org

COMEDY

Fri., May 22, and Sat., May 23. The Sisters Sorella (“live sitcom” by No Name Players), Fri., May 22, Sat., May 23 and June 19-20. Marta on the Move: Live, May 29. Comic Wars, May 29. May Flowers, May 30. Knights of the Arcade (comedy Dungeons & Dragons), May 30, June 27, and July 25. Your Life: The Musical, June 5. Hotel Nowhere & Well Known Strangers, June 5. Dinner With the Nolens, St June 6. Blue Light Special, June 6. Hi-Fi Music Improv Mix, June 12. Arcade Pride, June 12-13. Penny A Arcade: Kids Comedy Show, A June 13, July 11 and Aug. 8. Comedy Royale, June 19 and July 17. All Made Up, June 20. Blue Light Special, July 3. Matt & Improv Show, July11. Hootenanny!, July 11. Hustlebot: The Show, July 17. Downtown, 412-339-0608 Club Café. Davon Magwood with Jordan Weeks, Brandon Mickey and Stoph Edison, Fri., May 22. South Side, 412-431-4950 David Feherty. The sportcaster known for D his comedy visits, June 5 (Byham) DVE Comedy Festival. DVE’s Randy Baumann hosts an evening featuring Jim Norton, Michael Che, Tom Segura, Christina Pazsitzky and Bill Crawford, June 26 (Byham). Latitude 360. Bryan Cork, Fri., May 22 and Sat., May 23. Ricky Reyes, May 29 and 30. Chris Gorges, June 5 and 6. Chuck Krieger, June 12 and 13. Adam Ace, June 19 and 20. Robinson, 412-693-5555 The Maker Theater. The Draft; Atomic Jane; and Play, Date (all improv), June 5. The Duo Show (improv) and Keystone Comedy Show, CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

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June 6. LGBTQ*Bert (improv), June 12. Father’s Day Show and open mic, June 19. Shadyside, 412-404-2695 Pittsburgh Comedy Showcase. For pros and amateurs, hosted by Tom Kupiec. Corner Café, South Side, 412-488-2995 Pittsburgh Improv. Reno Collier, Thu., May 21-Sun., May 24. Gary Owen, May 28-31. Aries Spears, June 4-7. Justin Willman, June 11-14. Michael Blackson, June 17. Pablo Francisco, June 18-21. Stand-Up Pittsburgh Open Mic, hosted by T-Robe, June 24. Ralphie May, June 25-28. Pittsburgh All-Star Comedy Showcase, July 2 and 3. Colin Kane, July 9-12. Doug Benson, July 11 and 12. Pete Davidson, July 16-18. Bert Kreischer, July 24-26. Loni Love, July 31-Aug. 2. Rodman, Aug. 7-9. Corey and Chad (The Smash Brothers), Aug. 20-23. Sommore, Aug. 28-30. Steve Trevino, Sept. 3-6. West Homestead, 412-462-5233 Pittsburgh Improv Jam. Thursdays at Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown, 412-281-3973 Pittsburgh Public Theater. Famed Chicago-based sketch and improv troupe The Second City visits for three performances of a new show, Fully Loaded, including new and classic material, Aug. 28 and 29. Slapsticks Comedy Club. David Kaye, Lawrence Mullaney and Matt Light, May 30 (Rose Bar & Grille, White Oak). www.slapsticksproductions.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

Extravaganza, June 7 (free family activities and entertainment). Oakland, 412-622-3151 Cave Canem Poets. Annual reading series by the collective for African-American poets and City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, this year featuring Toi Dericotte, Cornelius Eady, Amber Flora Thomas and Willie Perdomo. June 18, North Side. East End Book Exchange. Creative Nonfiction Reading with Jill Kandel (So Many Africas) and Lori Jakiela (The Bridge to Take When Things Get Serious), Thu., May 21. Lori Jakiela and Sarah Einstein: New Creative Nonfiction, Fri., May 22. Bloomfield, 412-224-2847

Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series. Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange readers, Tue., May 26. Squirrel Hill Poetry Workshop, June 2. Margaret Bashaar, Craig Bernier, Romella Kitchens, Leslie Anne Mcilroy and Sheila Squillante, June 9. Tess Barry, Jan Beatty, Celeste Gainey and Rachel Mennies, June 16. Ace Boggess, Barbara Edelman, Mike Schneider, Michael Simms and Ellen McGrath Smith, June 23. Deborah Bogen, Robin Clarke and TBA, June 30. Jimmy Cvetic, Ed Ochester, Terrance Hayes, Judith Vollmer and Michael Wurster, July 7. David Ades, Sheila Carter Jones, Gene Hirsch, Moon Soon Lee, Joan E. Bauer and Joseph Karasek, July 14. Tameka Cage Conley, Frank Montesonti, John Repp, Marianne Trale, Bob Walicki and Carolyne Whelan, July 21. The

Author Deborah Harkness at the Hillman Center for Performing Arts, May 31

Grand Finale, with Jason Baldinger, Stephanie Brea, Kristofer Collins, Angele Ellis, John Korn, Adam Matcho, Bob Pajich and Scott Silsbe, July 28. Hemingway’s Café, Oakland, jbauer103w@aol.com Joseph Finder. Thriller author visits, June 15 (Barnes & Noble Homestead, 412-462-5743). The Living Room Chronicles. Prominent local people tell stories about their lives: Playwright, producer and director Mark Clayton Southers, Wed., May 27 (Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District, 412-392-4400). The Moth StorySLAM. Themed storytelling nights: Delusions, June 2. Rex Theater, South Side, www.themoth.org Penguin Bookshop. Literary fantasy author Deborah Harkness, May 31 (at the Hillman Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel). Cookbook author Jessica Merchant, au June Ju 25. Novelist Sharon Huss Hu Roat, June 27. Illustrator Mark Brewer, Illu July 8. Jonathan Auxier, July 23. Sewickley, www.penguinbookshop.com Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Authors on Tour series: Chuck Palahniuk, Thu., May 21 (sold out), and Celeste Ng, June 1 (Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland). WritersLIVE (locally based authors): novelist Robert Yune (Eighty Days of Sunlight), June 17; novelist Philip Beard (Swing), July 14; poet Terrance Hayes (How to Be Drawn), July 28; and Mary Jo Sonntag (Write, If You Live to Get There: Tracing Westward Expansion through 120 Years of Family Letters), Aug. 11 (Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Oakland). 412-622-8866 TEDX PITTSBURGH. Ten local speakers discuss the “ideas and innovations that are redefining the Steel City,” Sat., May 23 (Byham). WordPlay. Quarterly series blending true stories with live DJ, hosted by comic Alan Olifson, Aug. 14 (Bricolage).


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Pittsburgh’s favorite apartment and town home community located in the heart of the city. Oak Hill is steps away from most colleges, universities and hospitals with entertainment, shopping and public transportation right at your door. Oak Hill also offers free parking and complete access to our fitness facility, swimming pools, and tennis/basketball courts! With several floor plans available, we have the right apartment to fit your lifestyle! Apartments start at $995/mo. Call now and ask about our limited time discounted floor plan special!! COMMUNITY AMENITIES

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faros properties Faros Properties is currently the largest single owner of residential property in greater downtown Pittsburgh. Faros is enhancing the community with dog parks, rooftop lounges and state of the art fitness centers to embrace active lifestyles in the heart of an urban city. Each unique property conveys a united commitment to provide tenants with comfort, convenience and affordability. PARK VIEW APARTMENTS Located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s North Shore, Park View offers residents convenient access to a number of the city’s most popular cultural and athletic attractions, including: PNC Park, Heinz Field, The Benedum Center, Carnegie Science Center, Andy Warhol Museum, Convention Center, Children’s Museum and Three Rivers Casino. With property features designed to complement an active lifestyle, including a state-of-the-art fitness center, rooftop sun deck and balconies, Park View facilitates the ultimate Pittsburgh experience – providing stylized apartment living in an atmosphere as contemporary as it is historic. CITY VIEW APARTMENTS Designed by world renowned architect I.M. Pei, City View offers residents exclusive access to unparalleled views of the Pittsburgh skyline and an elite range of amenities, including: 24-hour concierge and valet service, complimentary shuttle transportation, an Olympic-size swimming pool, tennis courts, landscaped walking trails, BBQ picnic areas, a sand volleyball court, and 24-hour fitness center. Conveniently located next to the Consol Energy Center – within walking distance of fine dining, shopping, and entertainment – City View allows residents to experience resort-style living without ever leaving the city. CARSON STREET COMMONS Nestled behind the neighborhood’s most popular attractions, yet conveniently hidden from traffic, Carson Street Commons offers residents a unique opportunity to enjoy Pittsburgh’s South Side, while still maintaining a sense of comfort, space and privacy. Balancing design and affordability, all apartments feature spacious closets, over-sized bathtubs, washers and dryers, and open kitchens – each reasonably priced and customized to facilitate a relaxing, yet invigorating, residential experience.

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Exciting city living in the South Side with a suburban feel.

Downtown sophisticated, resort-style living without ever leaving the city.

412-231-3400 www.parkviewapts.com

412-431-1183 www.carsonstreetcommons.com

412-391-9833 www.cityviewapts.com

Pet Friendly with private dog park 24-Hour Concierge & Maintenance Beautiful rooftop sundecks Fitness Center Lounge, game room & outdoor patios with BBQ grills Laundry facilities Parking

Pet Friendly 24-Hour Maintenance Fitness Center Laundry in each unit Biking and walking trails Steps away from shopping, dining and nightlife Parking

Pet Friendly Outdoor heated Olympic-size pool 24-Hour Concierge & Maintenance Fitness Center Lounge, game room & outdoor patios with BBQ grills Laundry facilities Parking PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

53


CITY LIVING

YOUR GUIDE TO PITTSBURGH’S HOTTEST PLACES TO LIVE!

Luxury lives at

cranberry woods Located in the heart of Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania, THE HAVEN AT CRANBERRY WOODS is a brand new apartment community that boasts spacious one, two, and three bedroom contemporary residences designed for your ultimate comfort and convenience. Residents can indulge in community features like the resort-style saline pool, gastro pub, and state-of-the-art fitness center. Apartment interiors feature impressive 9-foot ceilings, stainless steel appliances, relaxing garden tubs, and other ultramodern amenities. All of this, including close proximity to a multitude of entertainment, recreation, and shopping options, make Cranberry Woods the most desirable digs in town. Call (724) 778-4000 to schedule a private tour of luxury living at its finest.

CITY VISTA City Vista is located just one exit from Downtown Pittsburgh and boasts brandy-new luxury 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments. Enjoy the resort-style swimming pool, 24/7 health & wellness center, Starbucks Cyber Café, car-care center, grilling/picnic space, and cozy fire pit area. Take advantage of the convenient dry-cleaning service, package receiving, and concierge option. We welcome your furry friends at our pet-friendly property. Take in the beauty of our ample green space as you stroll through CITY VISTA. Enjoy the financial benefits of a 1% wage tax by living in Greentree Borough and our affordable parking policy. Enjoy the quick tunnel-free commute to Downtown Pittsburgh, The North Shore, Southside and Airport areas! Come meet the friendly staff of City Vista and take a personal tour of our amazing property!

walnut capital Walnut Capital’s properties are located in Pittsburgh’s most desirable neighborhoods, close to popular shopping, dining and entertainment destinations. But a Walnut Capital apartment or townhome is so much more than just an address. It’s an expression of your lifestyle, and that’s why our properties offer unique amenities and features. They’re also backed by round the clock service and our commitment to an exceptional customer experience.

HWY-28 HWY-65

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HOT METAL FLATS – It’s Cool To Live Hot – www.hotmetalapartments.com

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Hot Metal Flats is the most commuter-friendly luxury apartment building in the SouthSide Works neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Designed to LEED (Registered) Silver standards, Hot Metal Flats amenities support sustainable living and encourage your active lifestyle. A professional-grade fitness center, over-sized gathering spaces and exterior lighting displays combine to create a vibrant atmosphere.  Residents can enjoy the private lounge and bar area, and the outdoor lounge with grills and a sundeck, heated for year-round use!  EV charging stations, car sharing, bicycle storage and a bike repair shop on-site inspire greener living. Restaurants, shops, a movie theater, grocery store and more are within walking distance. Hot Metal Flats welcomes pets and offers a mudroom with pet wash stations and outdoor green space. Integral parking provides convenience, protection from the elements, and enhances building security. Hot Metal Flats will feature studio, 1-bedroom, and 2-bedroom urban-style apartments ranging from 550 square feet to 1280 square feet.

BAKERY LIVING – Rethink Home – www.bakeryliving.com

Think beyond walls. And think past the front door. Because at Bakery Living, home doesn’t end there. It’s also the uber-comfy lounge where you unwind with a latte after work. It’s the bike trail that winds through grassy bioswales. Home is the grilling deck where you and your friends concoct the ultimate dry rub. And it’s the vibrant urban neighborhood just footsteps away. Here, home is a community. Your place to connect with life.

Complimentary shuttle to CMU and Pitt exclusively for our tenants at select properties. Our clients value the responsive, reliable services of Walnut Capital for worry-free living. With Walnut Capital, you’ve found your Happy Place!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

Carrick Cornfest, Aug. 22

Meet. Eat. Repeat.

SUMMER OPENING SOON! 335 E. MAIN STREET CARNEGIE, PA 412.275.3637

$PPM $PPMFS $PPMFTU $PNFTFF GPSZPVSTFMG

FAIRS, FESTIVALS+ SPECIAL EVENTS â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ ONGOING â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 14 Pittsburgh Neighborhood Festivals. Held Pride Awareness March and PrideFest.

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 03-04 Independence Day Celebration.

throughout the city through fall. 412-422-6405 or www.citiparks.net for complete list

Meadowcroft, Avella. Games, food and demonstrations of 19th-century rural celebrations. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 20 â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ MAY 22-23 Atlatl Competition. Meadowcroft, Pyrofest. Fireworks festival, Hartwood Acres. www.pyrofest.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ MAY 25 Memorial Day Celebration. Soldiers & Sailors Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ MAY 31 Open Streets. Recreate on more than 4 miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 05-14 Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown. Visual-art exhibitions, public art installations, music and dance performances, and arts-and-crafts market. 412-456-6666 or www.3riversartsfest.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 07 Animal Friends Mutt Strut. South Park. Games, activities and pooches. 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 13 Riverview Park Heritage Day. Free family BerkeleySprings.com 56

Downtown. www.pittsburghpride.org

fun includes games, crafts, refreshments and more. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 Harmony Herb and Garden Fair. Harmony Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

Avella. Try your hand at the ancient spear-throwing implement. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 27 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 28 Classic Car Show.

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘BigJULY 03-11 Butler Fair. Butler County Fairgrounds. B Head for the biggest fair H â&#x20AC;&#x2122;round these parts. 724-865-2400 or www.bigbutlerfair.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 10-19

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Various locations.

Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Washington. 877-728-7655 or www.pa-trolley.org Open Streets. Recreate on more than 4 miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 11 Doo Dah Days: Stephen

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 02-04 Three Rivers Regatta. North Side and

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 13 Vintage Grand Prix Car Show.

Downtown. Boat races, fireworks, food, fishing. www.threeriversregatta.net

Walnut Street, Shadyside. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 02-05 Westmoreland Arts and Heritage

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 17-18 Picklesburgh. Food, demos,

Festival. Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg. 724-834-7474 or www.artsandheritage.com

live music. Rachel Carson Bridge, Downtown. www.picklesburgh.com.

Vintage car races and shows. www.pittsburghvintagegrandprix.com

Foster Music and Heritage Festival. Allegheny Cemetery, Lawrenceville. www.doodahdays.com


•• JULY 18-19 Harambee Ujima Black Arts and

••• AUG. 15-22 Washington County Agricultural

Culture Festival. Kelly Street, Homewood. 412-255-8983 or www.citiparks.net

Fair. Washington. 724-225-7718 or www.washingtonfair.org

••• JULY 18-19 •• AUG. 17-22 Polish Hill Civic Weekend. Brereton Street, Lawrence County Fair. Lawrence Polish Hill. 412-255-8983 or www.citiparks.net

•• JULY 25 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside.

County Fairgrounds, New Castle. 724-654-7745 or www.lawrencecountyfair.com

••• AUG. 20-23 Bloomfield Little Italy Days.

Live bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

412-255-8983 or www.citiparks.net

••• JULY 26 Open Streets. Recreate on more

•• AUG. 21-29 Westmoreland County Fair.

than 4 miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

Greensburg. 724-423-5005 or www.westmorelandfair.com

•• JULY 26-

AUG. 01

Shadyside. Live bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.think shadyside.com

••• JULY 29 141 Annual st

Rain Day.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL}

Bedford County Fair. Bedford County Fairgrounds, Bedford. 814-623-9011 or www. bedford-fair.com

•••Jam AUG. 22 on Walnut.

Waynesburg, Greene County. 724-627-8111 or www.rainday festival.com

••JULY 30-

AUG. 02

Fort Armstrong Folk Festival. Riverfront Park, Kittanning. Arts and crafts, food, music and other entertainment. www.armstrongfestival.com

••• JULY 30-AUG. 08 Fayette County Fair. Fayette County

•• AUG. Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival, Aug. 22Sept. 27

22-29

Somerset County Fair. Meyersdale. 814-634-5619 or www. somerset countyfairpa.com

••• AUG. 22SEPT. 27 Greater Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival. West Newton. Open Saturdays, Sundays and Labor Day. 724-872-1670 or www.pittsburghrenfest.com

•• AUG. 25-29 Hookstown Fair. Hookstown, Beaver County. 724-573-4512 or www.hookstownfair.com

Fairgrounds, Dunbar. 724-628-3360 or www.fayettefair.com

••• AUG. 29-30 The Arts Festival on Walnut.

•• AUG. 01-02 Regatta at Lake Arthur.

Shadyside. National, regional and local artists. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

South Shore, Moraine State Park. www.lakearthurregatta.org

•• AUG. 30-SEPT. 05 Indiana County Fair. Indiana.

••• AUG. 07-09 Black Family Reunion. Schenley Park Oval. 412-255-8983 or www.citiparks.net

•• AUG. 08 Annual Antique Gun Show. Harmony Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

••• SEPT. 01-05 Big Knob Grange Fair. Rochester, Beaver County. 724-752-5973 or www.bigknobgrangefair.org

•• SEPT. 04-07 Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Labor Day Festival. Westmoreland

724-627-4752 or www.greenecountyfair.org

••• SEPT. 11-13 Pittsburgh Irish Festival. Riverplex

www.butlerfarmshow.com

Cavacini Garden Center

Spring Has Sprung! All Annual Flowers Have Arrived PETUNIAS • BEGONIAS • GERANIUMS You Must See Our Variety of Hanging Baskets, Perennials & Vegetable Plants OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE 100 51st st STREET • L AWRENCE VILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

PITTSBURGH TATTOO COMPANY 103 SMITHFIELD STREET D O W N T O W N PITTSBURGH, PA 15222 PHONE: 412.201.9075

Walk-ins Welcome! Please join us for our very first group art show on

Friday, June 5th, 2015 at 7pm

www.indianacountyfair.com

••• AUG. 09-15 Greene County Fair. Waynesburg. •• AUG. 10-15 Butler Farm Show. Butler.

Our First Shipment of Trees & Shrubs Have Arrived!

County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. 724-863-4577 or www.familyfestivals.com

at Sandcastle, West Homestead. www.pghirishfest.org

Take advantage of our self-service dog wash at these locations: BRIDGEVILLE, CRANBERRY, EDGEWOOD, HAMPTON, IRWIN and MONROEVILLE.

TOTA LP ETSTO TO R E S.C S COM LO CALLY OWN E D & O P E RATE D F O R 22 YEAR S! PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

57


Slide the City, June 6-7

SUMMER

OUTDOORS •• ONGOING City Pools. Citiparks pools are open June 9 through Labor Day. Programs include swimming lessons and swim teams. Purchase seasonal pool tags or pay a daily entrance fee. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

area parks, including family fun walks, plus beginner-to-advanced sessions in hiking, backpacking, mountain-biking, rock-climbing, horseback-riding, canoeing, kayaking, yoga and much more. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

Spray Parks. From May 23 until early fall, enjoy getting splashed as movement sensors cause sprayers to turn on and off. Parks in Hazelwood, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Beechview. 412-323-7928

Dek Hockey. Available at outdoor rinks in Banksville Park; Marmaduke Playground, Brighton Heights; Lewis Playground, Hazelwood; Ormsby Playground, South Side; Bloomfield Park; and Brookline Memorial Park.

Summer Soul Line Dancing. Exercise to R&B tunes at area parks. 412-225-9190 or www.citiparks.net Tennis. Regional tennis courts are open in Allegheny Commons, Arsenal, Frick, Highland, Moore, Schenley, and Washington’s Landing. Summer programs include camps and lessons. 412-244-4188 Lawn Bowling. Open lawn bowling and league play, plus free lessons. Frick Park, Regent Square. 412-782-0848 or www. lawnbowlingpittsburgh.org

Skateboarding. Go boarding at these city-run skate parks: McKinley, West Penn and Sheraden. 412-255-2539

BIG League Sports. Organized programs for kids include baseball, softball, soccer and hockey. Co-sponsored by Citiparks, Pirates Charities and Pittsburgh Penguins. 412-488-8585 Inline Skating. Weekly through September. Offers beginner, intermediate and advanced skates throughout the week around the city and on the Eliza Furnace Trail. www.skatepittsburgh.com

••• MAY 22

Two-Player Scramble. South Park

lets you play on the water. Rentals and launch points in North Park and the North Side. Other rentals include stand-up paddleboards, rowboats, pedal boats and canoes. www.kayakpittsburgh.org

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

Venture Outdoors. Venture Outdoors sponsors hundreds of outdoor events at PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

ssmorgasbord of games ffrom cards to Circle Rules Football, a team sport using a fitness ball and a circular field. Various locations around the city. Full schedule at www.cityofplay.org

Kayak Pittsburgh. Kayak Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Sports League. Year-round adult co-ed sports, including basketball, kickball, volleyball, softball. Various city locations. 412-338-2133 or www.pump.org

58

City of Play. Try a

•• MAY 30 Walk to Cure Arthritis. Allegheny Commons East Park, Cedar Avenue. arthritiswalkpittsburgh.kintera.org

••• MAY 31

City Spree. A city-wide 5K race without a course. Runners and walkers create their own course throughout the city, traveling between checkpoints to discover connections between neighborhoods. www.cityspreerace.com


â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 05-26 Market Square Area Downtown Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet at PNC Triangle Park in front of the Fairmont Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 06 Riverview 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 or www.riverview5k.com Rollercoaster Race. 10K race or 5K run/walk at Kennywood Park. 412-951-8572 or rollercoasterrace.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 06-07 Slide the City. A 1,000-foot water slide will brighten city streets this weekend. www.slidethecity.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 07

Greenfield Glide. 5K run and walk over a cross-country course. Schenley Park Overlook. 412-255-2493 or www. greenfieldglide.com

and celebration. North Shore Riverfront Park. www.nightnationrun.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 25 Pittsburgh Pirates Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy. 5K course. PNC Park. www.efwp.org

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUG. 07-28 Bridges & River Shores Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet in front of Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUG. 07-09 Pittsburgh Triathlon and Adventure Race. Compete in an international- or sprint-distance triathlon, or the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adventureâ&#x20AC;? tri featuring a two-mile paddle, 20K bike ride and 5K run. www.piranha-sports.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUG. 08 Brookline Breeze 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Plus non-competitive one-mile â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mini-Breezeâ&#x20AC;? fun run. Brookline Memorial Recreational Center. 412-571-3222

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 13-21 Bob Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUG. 15 Habitat for

Summer Tennis Classic. Tennis Summer Soul Line Dancing, Ongoing

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 14 Annual Pittsburgh Walk NOW for Autism. Schenley Park. www.walknowforautismspeaks.org

Humanity Kids Triathlon. Ages

{P C H CI OU OTO TI RT PA E RK SY S} OF

tournament open to all ages and abilities. Schenley Park Tennis Center and Highland Park courts. 412-244-4188

Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet in Katz Plaza at Seventh Street and Penn Avenue, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 06-19 Paul G. Sullivan Championship. Tennis tournament open to players 16 and older. Frick Park Red Clay Courts. 412-244-4188

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 18 Habitat for Humanity Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-12. Wave Pool, South Park. 412-351-0512 Night Nation Run. A running-and-music festival complete with lights, lasers, beats

Experience all the fun and excitement that awaits you in wild, wonderful West Virginia. The adventure begins here.

celebration of life on two wheels in Pittsburgh. Various events and locations. www.bike-pgh.org

Henrietta Street and Milton Avenue, Regent Square 412-246-9506 or www.runaroundthesquare.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JULY 03-31 Penn-Liberty Cultural District Walking

Reconnect with family and friends.

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUG. 21-30

Challenge. A 34-mile endurance hike

tournament open to boys and girls 16 and younger. Frick Park. 412-244-4188

Nature. History. Culture. Adventure.

Bikefest. A

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ AUG. 22 Run Around the Square 5K Run/Walk.

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 22-28 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis

New River Gorge

7-15. Pool area, North Park. 412-351-0512

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ JUNE 20 Annual Rachel Carson Trail from North Park to Harrison Hills County Park. Two shorter events â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the 18-mile Homestead Challenge and a 7-mile Friends and Family Challenge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also take place that day. www.rachelcarsontrails.org

Discover West Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ SEPT. 04-25 Fourth Avenue & PPG Place Downtown Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet at the parklet next to Dollar Bank, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ SEPT. 12 Alphabet Trail. A free early elementary interactive literacy event incorporating childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books. Blue Slide Playground. Frick Park, Squirrel Hill. 412-655-3665

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ SEPT. 19 Dollar Bank Junior Great Race. One-mile fun run for kids under 12. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ SEPT. 27 Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race. The annual 10K foot race grows every year, so register early. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a 5K run/fitness walk. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

Â&#x2021;UDIWLQJLQIRFRP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

59


{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

Art Cart

SUMMER

KIDS •• ONGOING Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

Branches of the library citywide offer kids’ and teens’ programs — from story time and puppet shows to gaming and literature discussions — throughout the summer. www.carnegielibrary.org

Carnegie Science Center. Lots of youth-friendly ongoing science exhibits, including roboworld, the Highmark SportsWorks and the traditional Miniature Railroad & Village. New this year is the H2OH! exhibit, an interactive display that teaches why our rivers, and water, are so important. North Side. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

new this year — Beltzhoover. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

Heinz History Center. In addition to ongoing kid-friendly exhibits in the lobby, and the third floor’s Discovery Place exhibit, the center offers monthly “Hop Into History” events (the next is June 10), in which kids ages 2-5 can engage in hands-on exploration of history. Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

Pittsburgh Toy Lending Library. Kids up to age 6 can hone their social and motor skills in this indoor art-and-play space, which also features a toy-lending program for members. Call for hours. Shadyside. 412-682-4430 or www.pghtoys.org

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. This season’s exhibit, beginning June 13, is Very Eric Carle, an interactive tour of the author’s popular stories, including The Very Hungry Caterpillar. There are also plenty of interactive programs. North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

Pittsburgh Pirates Kids Days. Sundays are

Citiparks Dek Hockey. Full-size dek hockey

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. In addition to the hands-on Kids Kingdom area, the zoo offers family-friendly events all summer long. Specially themed programs take place during Eat’n Park Family Week (June 13-20), the UPMC Summer Kids’ Zoofari (Aug. 15-28) and on “Wild Wednesdays” from June 10Aug. 12. Highland Park. 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

rinks are open at Banksville Park, Brookline Memorial Park, Marmaduke Playground in Brighton Heights, Hazelwood’s Lewis Playground and South Side’s Ormsby Playground. www.citiparks.net

Citiparks Recreation Centers. Ten rec centers all over town offer sports and outdoor programs; beginning June 16, Summer Food Service programs provides breakfast, lunch and snacks to children up to age 18. Most centers are open 1-9 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. 412-422-6542 or www.citiparks.net Citiparks Swimming Pools and Spray Parks. The city offers 18 outdoor swimming pools from June 9 through Labor Day; swim lessons and swim-team events are available at each. Spray parks, where you can get soaked without opening a fire hydrant, open May 23 in Beechview, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill and —

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

all about kids at PNC Park. There are special ticket and concession prices. There’s always a great freebie like jerseys and, on June 28, a Pirates Parrot lawn gnome. North Side. www.pittsburghpirates.com

Tyke Hikes. Venture Outdoors presents relaxed, inexpensive weekday-morning nature hikes in city and county parks, for parents with children up to 5 years old. www.ventureoutdoors.org

SUMMER CAMPS The Andy Warhol Museum. From June 8-July 31, kids ages 8-10 will learn to create like the artist and Pittsburgh icon. Classes include lessons in screenprinting and


pop art, and there’s even an after-camp auction where students take field trips to explore the city. 412-237-8314 or www.warhol.org

Assemble.This Garfield “community space for arts and technology” offers weekday camps from June 22-Aug.14, utilizing STEAM curriculum (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) for kids in grades 3-8. www.assemblepgh.org

Carnegie Museums. From June 8 through Aug. 21, the museums of art and natural history hold camps for kids ages 4-13, with activities ranging from hands-on “dino digs” to art classes to a film camp. Kids 5-12 can also spend full-day sessions at the Carnegie’s Powdermill Nature Reserve in Rector, Pa. Oakland. 412-622-3288 or www.artandnaturalhistory.org/camps/

plus high school immersion camps that teach a wide array of subjects, from photography and ceramics to cosplay costume design and an anime workshop. Shadyside. 412-361-0455 or www.pittsburgharts.org/summerartcamps

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. Kids ages 2-13 can attend half-day and full-day Animal Adventures summer zoo camps that run from June to August and range from story time for little ones to animal study and interaction. Highland Park. www.pittsburghzoo.org Saltworks Theatre Company. From June 15-July 21, aspiring actors ages 4-16 can learn role-playing, movement, improv and other stage techniques at day camps held in Sewickley, the North Hills and Oakland. 412-621-6150 x201 or www.saltworks.org

Steel City Rowing Club Camp. Summer Carnegie Science Center. From June 8Aug. 21, kids ages 4-14 can participate in half- or full-day sessions on a variety of themes, from engineering and robotics to the science in the popular video game Minecraft. North Side. 412-237-1637 or www.carnegiesciencecenter. org/programs/summer-camps/ Frick Art and Historical Center. Starting June 22, the Frick offers a week-long day camp for kids ages 4-6 that looks at art and local history. Beginning Aug. 17, a full-day program for kids entering grades 2-5 offers drawing, painting and sculpting. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

Girls Rock! Pittsburgh. This camp, in which girls ages 8-18 learn to play in a rock band, is held from Aug. 3-7 at Winchester Thurston School. Girls will form bands that perform in a showcase on Aug. 8. Shadyside. www.girlsrockpittsburgh.org Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Four week-long, half-day classes run four consecutive weeks beginning June 15. Classes, including circus camp, creative writing, dance and more, expose kids to creativity. For ages 4-12. Bloomfield. www.irmafreeman.org

Monologues and Movement. Kids from grades 6-8 learn voice, movement, acting and improvisational skills at this camp, presented by Prime Stage Theater. June 15-19. 840 Saw Mill Run Blvd., Beechview. www.primestage.com

National Aviary. Camps run from June 22-Aug.7 for ages 4-18, where kids can interact with birds and go on birdingphotography hikes. North Side. 412-258-9439 or www.aviary.org/summer-camps

Phipps Conservatory. Kids ages 2-13 learn about conservation, ecology and healthy living in a series of camps throughout the summer. Oakland. 412-441-4442 x3925 or phipps. conservatory.org

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Camps from June 8-Aug. 21 in a range of disciplines are offered all summer long for kids ages 4-13,

camps in rowing and other aquatic activities are offered to kids ages 8-18 in half- and full-day sessions from June 15-Aug. 7. Verona. steelcityrowing.org/adventure-camps/

OTHER EVENTS ••• MAY 28-30 Allegheny County Marbles Tournament. Since 2004, eight National Marbles Champions have come from Allegheny County. The County Courthouse Courtyard hosts the finals for the county’s marbles competition. Winners head to the national competition, June 21-26 in New Jersey. Downtown. 412-260-7278 or www.alleghenycounty.us/parks

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•• JUNE 02 Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank presents Kids Cook. Kids will learn to chop, measure, taste and prepare nutritious and delicious foods at this event at the Carnegie Library Sheraden branch beginning at 3:30 p.m. Sheraden. www.carnegielibrary.org

••• •• JUNE 16-AUG. 07 Citiparks Roving Art Cart. Citip The Art A Cart provides free art-creation projects from around the world — like Amazon rain sticks and Chinese dragons — for kids at different city parks each Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Opening celebration at Highland Park Super Playground June 17. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net

•• JUNE 22-27 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Kids ages 16 and under can compete in this annual tennis tournament. There are three divisions — 16 and under, 14 and under and 12 and under. Point Breeze. www.clayfricktennis.org

••• SEPT. 12 Alphabet Trails and Tales. Take a walk through Frick Park and learn 26 awesome things to do on its Alphabet Trail. The interactive, free event promotes early elementary literacy through a day of nature and reading. 412-665-3665 or www.cityparks.net

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1000 Sandcastle Drive | Pittsburgh, PA 15120 412.462.6666 | sandcastlewaterpark.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2015

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The Lakehouse Inn

5653 Lake Rd. East, Geneva-on-the-Lake, OH B&B, Cottages, Full Service Spa, Crosswinds Grille Restaurant & Winery on the Southern Shore of Lake Erie within Northeast Ohio’s Wine Country. Make your Summer vacation reservations now before we’re booked! Packages available. TheLakehouseInn.com • 440/466-8668

Discover

ASHTABULA County

Grand River Cellars

5750 S. Madison Rd., Madison, OH A picturesque & secluded winery. Extensive Lunch & Dinner Menu. Outdoor Patio Seating. Live Entertainment Thursday thru Sunday. Private party room available. 440/298-9838 •grandrivercellars.com

Summer’s Short...Make the Most of It!

Debonné Vineyards

7840 Doty Rd., Madison, OH Ohio’s Largest Estate Winery. Internationally Award-winning wine. Live Entertainment, Private Party Room Sandwiches, Panini’s & appetizers. On-site brewery. 440/466-3485 • www.debonne.com

Geneva-on-the-Lake Amusements, Restaurants, Live Music Shops, Wineries and famous mile long Entertainment Strip. Stay with us in the heart of Ohio Wine Country. NEW! Walk the “Summer Fun Heritage Trail” and enjoy the story of Ohio’s First Summer Resort! 800/862-9948 • www.VisitGenevaontheLake.com

Old Firehouse Winery

5499 Lake Rd. East, Geneva-on-the-Lake OH Award winning wines & full service restaurant overlooking Lake Erie! Live Music 7 days in Summer. Open Daily Year-round. 1.800-UnCork-1 www.OldFirehouseWinery.com

Summer Break Charters Geneva-on-the-Lake, OH June-Sept. out of Geneva-on-the-Lake. 10% Military Discount. www.summerbreakcharters.com Capt. Jeff Spesia • 815/545-3095

Conneaut Board of Tourism Enjoy the Conneaut Beaches, Fun & Sun! We have Marinas, Public Boat Launches, Great Fishing, Wineries, Covered Bridges and more! July 1-4, 4th of July Festival, July 25 Dockfest, August 21-22 D-Day, Sept. 11-13 Rib Burn-off VisitConneautOhio.com

Adventure Zone

5600 Lake Rd. East, Geneva-on-the-Lake OH Open 7 days. Memorial Day thru Labor Day. Weekends May & Sept. Go Carts ~ The Rock ~ Bungee Tramp ~ Batting Cages Adventure Golf ~ Blaster Bumper Boats Arcade and more! 440/466-3555 • AdventureZoneFun.com

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FRIDAY, JULY 31 & SATURDAY, AUGUST 1

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions, Northern Gold. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Barefoot Movement, Well Strung. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 26

DJS

31ST STREET PUB. Sinister Haze, Bison Machine, BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ Geezer, Old Dream. Strip District. hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-391-8334. 412-687-2555. CLUB CAFE. Whitehorse, CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Lindy Vopnfjord. South Side. Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. 412-431-4950. REMEDY. Telephone Plastic Baby. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. As Ladders, DRU, Justin Giancola, Todd Teacher. Bloomfield. ANDYS WINE BAR. 412-345-1059. DJ Malls. Downtown. MR. SMALLS 412-773-8884. THEATER. Ensiferum . w w w ONE 10 LOUNGE. & Korpiklaani w/ typaper ci h g p DJ Goodnight, Trollfest. All ages. .com DJ Rojo. Downtown. Millvale. 412-821-4447. 412-874-4582. REX THEATER. Cory RIVERS CASINO. DJ Nugget. Henry & the Funk Apostles w/ Nth North Side. 412-231-7777. Power. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. STAGE AE. Marina & South Side. 412-431-2825. the Diamonds. North Side. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ 800-745-3000. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

THU 21

FRI 22 FULL T LIS ONLINE

WED 27

CLUB CAFE. Black Pussy w/ Supervoid, Spacefish. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Caulfield Cult, Things Fall Apart, Curse Words, Tiger$ Eyes, Kid Kawaii. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Early November w/ Lydia, Restorations. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

SAT 23

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Dance Crush. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Maria Romano. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk Night. South Side. 412-431-4668.

McQuaid, Evad & The Ominous Squad. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

WED 27

SUN 24

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Stephane Wrembel. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 21 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Apex, Shad Ali, Vaig, Hawk Junya, Yung Brody, Truth Be Told. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

{MON., JUNE 08}

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Forumla412. Balllroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

House of Blues

BLUES THU 21 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 22 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Billy Price. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PALACE INN. Strange Brew. New Brighton. 412-491-9356. SHELBY’S STATION. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. 412-319-7938. WOOLEY BULLY’S. Sweaty Betty. New Brighton. 724-843-2110.

565 LIVE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bellevue. 412-415-3992. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Olga Watkins. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PARADISE ISLAND. Ron & The RumpShakers. Neville Island. 412-264-6570. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Strange Brew. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

Live Music

Swing Dance Every Friday to a Live Band

WED 27 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ THU 21 ANDYS WINE BAR. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Don Aliquo Jr. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 22

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

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CLEVELAND

SAT 23

SAT 23

EVERY THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher w/ Daniel May & Paul Thompson. Downtown. 412-325-6769. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Street Swing All Stars. Ballroom. Skylights. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark & Donna Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 23 ANDYS WINE BAR. Christine Laitta. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

Juicy J

WED 27 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 22 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

SAT 23

BALTIMORE {FRI., JUNE 12}

Chastity Belt The Metro Gallery

LYNCH FIELD. The Flow Band Reggae Jam Rockers. Greensburg. 724-838-4324.

SUN 24 SOUTH SIDE RIVERFRONT PARK. The Flow Band Reggae Jam Rockers. South Side. 412-913-8078.

PHILADELPHIA

COUNTRY

{WED., AUG. 19}

THU 21

High on Fire Theatre of the Living Arts

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers & Midnight Rooster. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

SAT 23 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. IRMC PARK. Westsylvania Jazz & Blues Festival. The New Mastersounds, Elevations w/ Warren Wolf, Terry Gordon Quintet, Black Cat Moan, Eugene & The Junkman, more. Indiana. 724-465-2787. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Tom Wendt Quartet. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Just Ahead Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 24 SAHARA TEMPLE. Tony Campbell & Smooth Jazzsurgery. Braddock. 412-271-0502.

MON 25 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT SAND HILL. RML Jazz. Mt. Pleasant. 412-370-9621. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Ron Wilson & Charlie Sanders. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

TUE 26 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Wilson, Barnes, Throckmorton. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BREW ON BROADWAY. Reggie Watkins & Friends. Beechview. 412-437-8676.

CLUB CAFE. Jayna Lininger w/ Tim & Kori. South Side. 412-431-4950. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe & The New Payday Loners. Lawrenceville. 412 781-9853. RIVERTOWNE BREWING COMPANY. Ricki Lee. North Side. 412-322-5000.

ACOUSTIC

SUN 24

WED 27

THU 21 CLUB CAFE. Heather Maloney w/ Will Dailey, Posterchild. CD release. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Bottom Floor. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Cousin Boneless, The Stolen Stitches, Ricky Steece, Matt ‘Broke’ Boland, Texas Plant, Three Rivers Sisters Belly Dancing Trio. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Joe Stevens w/ River Glen, June Benedict & The Last Drop. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

FRI 22 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. CLUB CAFE. The Early Mays w/ David Manchester. South Side. 866-468-3401. ELWOOD’S PUB. Marshall Street ‘Rents. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. The Vagrants. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 23 MOONDOG’S. Bill Jasper Acoustics, Swiss Army, Bryan

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Zac Brown Band. Burgettstown. 888-223-6000.

CLASSICAL FRI 22

FRANCESCO ATTESTI. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

OTHER MUSIC THU 21 RIVERS CASINO. Rebecca Kaufman & the Groove Doctors. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 22 RIVERS CASINO. Nieds Hotel Combo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 23 RIVERS CASINO. John Sarkis Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777.

WED 27 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny. A showtunes sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Daikaiju w/ Vertigo Go. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.


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PAID PAI D ADVERTORIAL ADVE ADVERTO RT RIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do May 20 - 26 WEDNESDAY 20 World Party

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 21 Fences

PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE Downtown. 412-687-4686. Tickets: pghplaywrights.com. Through May 30.

Our Town

LITTLE LAKE THEATRE Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. Tickets: littlelaketheatre.org. Through May 23.

All Time Low

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 5p.m.

DelFest

CUMBERLAND, MARYLAND. For more info & tickets visit delfest.com. Through May 24.

IN PITTSBURGH Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Rubblebucket

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

MONDAY 25 Jacquees

Veil of Maya

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Saints Tour

TUESDAY 26

BRICOLAGE PRODUCTION COMPANY Downtown. Tickets: bricolagepgh.org. Through June 13.

Cory Henry Modern Baseball

Heather Maloney

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 22

Modern Baseball

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

The Last Five Years NEW HAZLETT THEATER

MAY 22 ALTAR BAR

North Side. 412-320-4610. Tickets: frontporchpgh.com or frontporch.showclix.com. Through May 31.

PyroFest

The Weight

(As heard on Sirius FM and Fox)

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX 8p.m.

COOPER'S LAKE Butler County. Tickets: pyrofest.com. Through May 23.

Comedian Bryan Cork

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Township. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through May 23.

Where to live

SATURDAY 23 Jayna Lininger

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 24

Stephane Wrembel

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Whitehorse

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Marina & the Diamonds STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

NOW LEASING

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REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

KICK OFF

MAY 22 Studio, 1 And 2 Bedroom Urban Apartments

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96

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


IT’S COMPLICATED

“THEY COMPLETELY AND UTTERLY, TOTALLY CHANGED MY LIFE.”

{BY HARRY KLOMAN} In Far from the Madding Crowd, the 19th-century British novelist Thomas Hardy tells too much story for director Thomas Vinterberg’s new two-hour adaptation. But Vinterberg does all he can to focus strongly on character, and he turns out an exceptionally acted and enjoyable period piece. Very long story short, young Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan) inherits her uncle’s sheep farm and

WHO WERE THEY?

Out and about: Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan)

CP APPROVED

fields three comely suitors, each of different character and station: a stoic shepherd (Matthias Schoenaerts), a wealthy older neighbor (Michael Sheen) and a raffish soldier (Tom Sturridge). Determined to be strong and independent (“it’s my intention to astonish you all”), she takes a while to learn that you can be in charge and also be in love. David Nicholls’ faithful script makes a few narrative tweaks to further the notion that this story has no villains, just full-bodied people wrestling with life’s choices. Fate drives too many of Hardy’s twists, but given that restraint, the company ably renders the humanity of the tale. “It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs,” Bathsheba says. This sounds very 21stcentury, but in fact, Hardy wrote it in 1874. So this Miss Everdene is a more astute role model than her malnourished contemporary action-heroine namesake. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Starts Fri., May 22. Manor and Galleria 6

D-Day: Normandy 1944 A new IMAX feature that uses animation, live-action and computergenerated imagery to recount the critical World War II military operation. Now playing at the Rangos Omnimax Theater, Carnegie Science Center

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

En route to success: Chris Stamp and Kit Lambert

T

HE TYPICAL rock doc spotlights front-

men, songwriters, lead guitarists. But just as The Who’s musical mainspring was its madly innovative drummer, so does James D. Cooper’s Lambert & Stamp view the iconic band from a novel perspective: through the sometimes-literal lens of its first managers. “They completely and utterly, totally changed my life,” says Pete Townshend. The managers were themselves an odd pair: Kit Lambert, the gay, aristo son of a classical musician, and Chris Stamp, the skirt-chasing offspring of a tugboat captain. In early-1960s London, the two budding filmmakers in their 20s bonded over French New Wave and planned to realize their cinematic ambitions by finding a wild rock ’n’ roll band to manage until it was successful enough to make a film about. The first part, anyway, worked. Lambert and Stamp (brother of actor Terence) nurtured guitarist Townshend, singer Roger Daltrey, bassist John Entwistle and drum-

mer Keith Moon from fiery but obscure mod outfit to the rock gods who played Tommy at Woodstock. The group’s long, painful split from its management began, ironically enough, with rancor over how and when to put Tommy on film.

LAMBERT & STAMP DIRECTED BY: James D. Cooper Starts Fri., May 22. Harris

CP APPROVED Lambert died in 1981. Cooper builds his two-hour film around copious blackand-white archival footage — including very early concert footage of The Who and its fans — and fresh interviews with key figures: the loquacious Townshend, a reflective Daltrey, long-time band associate Richard Barnes and a stillraffish Stamp. (Stamp died in 2012, during the film’s production.) What comes through loud as a power chord is the scope of Lambert and Stamp’s

influence, and not just as groundbreaking businessmen and promoters. Musically, it was Stamp, for example, who suggested the signature vocal stutter in “My Generation” (because pilled-up mods stammered like mad). And Lambert, as Townshend’s mentor and one-time flatmate, expanded the budding songwriter’s musical palette and helped structure the album that became Tommy. The managers also kept relative peace in the infamously fractious band — for instance, getting Daltrey to stop arguing with his fists. Cooper sets all this amid ’60s England’s generational and class antagonism — and indeed, alongside sweeping cultural changes as heralded by the likes of Lambert’s own early independent label Track Records, which signed an unknown named Jimi Hendrix. More than a Who fan’s complement to classic doc The Kids Are All Right, Lambert & Stamp illuminates its times, and the unpredictable, idiosyncratic ways that pop life so often gets made. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Art Theater, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15 (includes drink token). www.cmoa.org

FILM CAPSULES CP

BLIND CHANCE. A young man runs to catch a train, and in this film’s three stories, he either catches it, misses it when detained by a security guard, or misses it but meets a girl. Krzysztof Kieslowski directs this 1987 film. Continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 21, and 5:30 p.m. Fri., May 23. Harris

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK AN HONEST LIAR. Tyler Measom and Justin Weinstein’s documentary looks at the life, times and numerous debunking projects of James “the Amazing” Randi, a magician turned professional skeptic. 7 and 9 p.m. Fri., May 22; 6 and 8 p.m. Sat., May 23; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 24. Parkway, McKees Rocks I AM BIG BIRD: THE CAROLL SPINNEY STORY. Dave LaMattina and Chad Walker’s warm doc looks beneath the yellow feathers of Sesame Street’s iconic Big Bird, and finds Caroll Spinney, the puppeteer who has brought the beloved character to life for 45 years. Equal parts a profile of Spinney, a history of Sesame Street and an assessment of Big Bird’s global impact, the film bounces around amiably, while occasionally drifting into shadows: Spinney’s periods of unhappiness, the work-life balance of being an in-demand icon and on-set difficulties. But overall, the mission of Spinney/Big Bird is to be accessible and caring through it all. And nowhere is this better typified than during Jim Henson’s memorial service, where Big Bird sings “It’s Not Easy being Green.” When an awkward pile of feathers can make everybody happy and sad, that’s a puppet that has transcended its humble origins. Starts Fri., May 22. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

CP

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD. Likely to be the best action pic of the summer. Makes those bloated comic-book movies just look silly. Literally starts off running, and doesn’t let up. Basic plot: Max (Tom Hardy) and a truck-driver (Charlize Theron) need to get themselves and their precious human cargo from Point A to Point B while being chased by bad guys. Bonus pondering material includes: state of post-apocalyptic humanity, options for emotional survival, the exploitive nature of religion and a “radical feminist agenda” that has contemporary men’s-rights groups annoyed. Or just goggle at: the excellent car chases, the horrifyingly gorgeous desert of Namibia (standing in for dystopic wasteland) and the crazy stunts. And sure, some 1s and 0s were employed, but a lot in Mad Max got made — freaky hybrid vehicles, outlandish costumes, weapons — and I sure dug that a lot more than

Heaven Adores You

(2014) - 5/20 @ 7:00pm An intimate, meditative inquiry into the life and music of Elliott Smith. _____________________________________________________

Ex Machina

(2015) - 5/20 @ 9:30pm A young programmer is selected to participate in a breakthrough experiment in artificial intelligence by evaluating the human qualities of a breathtaking female A.I. _____________________________________________________

I Am Big Bird

(2014) - 5/22 @ 7:30pm, 5/23 @ 4:00pm & 7:00pm, 5/24 @ 4:00pm, 5/25 @ 7:30pm, 5/26 @ 7:30pm, 5/27 @ 7:30pm This heartwarming doc chronicles the life of Caroll Spinney, the man who has been Sesame Street’s Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch since 1969. _____________________________________________________

The Shining

(1980) - 5/21 @ 7:30pm, 5/22 @ 10:00pm, 5/23 @ 9:00pm, 5/24 @ 7:00pm Stanley Kubrick’s epic nightmare of horror, starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duval. _____________________________________________________

Rocky Horror Picture Show - 5/23 @ Midnight

with live shadowcast by the JCCP!

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THE SHINING. It seemed like a great opportunity for writer Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) and his family: a care-taking gig at an isolated mountain hotel. But the place is wicked haunted, and soon the little family, including wife (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd), are in grave peril of losing their minds — and lives. Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel drops some of King’s supernatural elements in favor of omnipresent dread and a meditation about the collapsing family unit, but it’s still a freaky, hair-raising ride. The film continues a year-long look at the films of Kubrick. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 21; 10 p.m. Fri., May 22; 9 p.m. Sat., May 23; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 24. Hollywood (AH) {PHOTO COURTESY OF DEBRA SPINNEY}

I Am Big Bird: The Caroll Spinney Story green-screen effects. This fourth Max was directed by George Miller, who helmed the original Mad Max way back in 1979, and it’s worth the wait. In 3-D in select theaters. (AH)

identity thriller from 1959), May 22-26 and May 28. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com

PITCH PERFECT 2. Elizabeth Banks’ sequel to 2012’s Pitch Perfect is pretty much the exact same film. This time, the female college a capella group The Barden Bellas vie for an international title. Same actors, same awkward mix of rom-com, singing and snark. New this round: More cameos by assorted stars and newscasters, and the “a capella” numbers are a lot more like pumped-up, bass-heavy cheerleading routines. (If this is the new sound, then the German villains, Das Sound Machine, have my vote over the kinda sappy Bellas.) For a film that is generally chick-positive, and hits the rare trifecta of female director, writer and stars, it sure starts with an awkward premise: that an accidentally unveiling of a performer’s vagina during a physically rigorous stage act would cause an international fury of disgust. But if you’re OK with that, and you loved the first film, you should enjoy Part 2. (AH)

THE PROMISED LAND. Andrzej Wajda’s 1975 drama tells the story of three men — a Pole, a German and a Jew — who start a textile factory together in 19th-century Lodz. But their success undermines their relationship. Continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., May 20. Harris

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THE WIZARD OF OZ. If your viewings of Victor Fleming’s 1939 musical film have been via TV only, you owe it to yourself (and any kiddies) to see this beloved family classic on the big screen. Join Dorothy (Judy Garland) and her little dog, too, on their unforgettable Technicolor journey to the Land of Oz — a wondrous place that, ultimately, isn’t quite as wonderful as Kansas. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of highly quotable films. 8 p.m. Sun., May 24. Regent Square STRIPES. Bill Murray and Harold Ramis star in Ivan Reitman’s 1981 comedy about two bored guys who enlist in the army. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 27. AMC Loews. $5

POLTERGEIST. Not sure we need a reboot of the 1982 horror film about a haunted little girl, but if we must, at least this one has a decent cast: Sam Rockwell, Jared Harris and Rosemarie DeWitt. Gil Kenan directs. Starts Fri., May 22. TOMORROWLAND. A teen with a scientific bent and former child genius work to sort out the secrets of “Tomorrowland,” a place in another space and time that exists in their collective memory. Britt Robertson and George Clooney star; Brad Bird (The Incredibles) directs. Starts Fri., May 22.

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Girl Power series. A League of Their Own (Geena Davis fronts this 1992 comedy about professional women’s baseball leagues set up during World War II), May 20-21. Bridesmaids (Kristen Wiig heads ensemble cast of funny ladies, who nearly ruin the wedding, in this 2011 comedy), May 20. Troop Beverly Hills (Shelley Long plays a housewife who takes charge of a Wilderness Group troop, in this 1989 comedy), May 20-21. The Craft (witchcraft rules the school in this 1996 camp classic), May 21. Alfred Hitchcock series. Rear Window (in which busybody Jimmy Stewart spies a murder in a neighbor’s apartment), May 22-25 and May 27-28. The 39 Steps (1935 romantic spy thriller from Hitchcock’s U.K. years), May 22-24 and May 26-28. The Birds (birds go mad, attack humans, in this 1963 thriller), May 22-27. N orth by Northwest (Cary Grant stars in this classic mistaken-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

Mad Max: Fury Road GREASE. The 1978 hit movie musical (itself adapted from a Broadway show) is a color-saturated 1950s fantasy, where high school is for sock-hops, drive-in movies, shop class and falling in love again with that perky Australian girl. Directed by Randal Kleiser, the film stars John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John at their dreamiest. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 20. AMC Loews. $5

HIGH AND LOW. Akira Kurosawa’s 1963 adaptation of Ed McBain’s detective novel King’s Ransom pits a wealthy industrialist (Toshiro Mifune) against a kidnapper, and places him in the moral gray area between saving his company or saving the life of an employee’s child. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., May 27. Melwood. $2

TRACING OUTLINES. It’s the first public screening for Cayce Mell’s feature-length documentary about Betty Rockwell, the 21-year-old society woman (and Mell’s grandmother) who in 1941 vaulted well ahead of her time by founding Pittsburgh’s first gallery of modern art. 6:30 p.m. Thu., May 21 (5:30 p.m. reception; filmmaker Q&A follows screening). Carnegie Museum of

THE LAST DAY OF SUMMER. While vacationing on a deserted beach, a woman meets a man who declares his love for her, and they spend the afternoon together. Tadeusz Konwicki’s 1958 film concludes a twomonth series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 Thu., May 28, and 5:30 Sat., May 30. Harris


[BOOKS]

STORY TIME

“SAINTS EMERGE IN DISPROPORTIONATE NUMBERS AT THIS VERY LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE.”

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DIGGING DEEP [STAGE]

Chuck Palahniuk {PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLAN AMATO}

Many of his readers, Chuck Palahniuk believes, discovered him in high school and college and stuck with him. But Palahniuk says his writing has changed a lot since Fight Club, his 1996 debut novel that achieved mass-cult status thanks to the 1999 film adaptation. The evolution is illustrated in Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread (Doubleday), his first collection of short fiction. It will be published May 26, simultaneously with Fight Club 2, a comicbook sequel to the novel. The stories in Make Something Up span 12 years, and many delve into the dark, disturbing subject matter his fans embrace. But while some are written in his familiar minimalist style, others employ a “very traditional modernism,” he says. And a few are experimental, “where I kind of … make the language do unlikely, awkward things, the things that proper language can’t do,” he says by phone from his home turf near Portland, Ore. “Eleanor,” for example, is a showcase of wordplay narrated in a kind of pidgin of misused verbiage: “Randy and the reality agent, they only stand and awe.” Says Palahniuk, “The context defines the word instead of the word actually being the correct word.” Four other stories are narratives of contemporary life told in the form of traditional animal tales, including “Why Coyote Never Had Money for Parking.” “What I like about that [technique] was that it allowed me to tell a very suburban, human story, but do it through this kind of mythical animal form that made it seem a little more detached but profound at the same time,” says Palahniuk. The collection also includes “Expedition,” a newer story that’s “kind of precursor story to the Fight Club story,” he says. Fight Club is further expanded in Fight Club 2, a Dark Horse Comics series featuring art by Cameron Stewart. “I thought it would be a fun way to tackle creating a larger mythology, expanding the whole Fight Club story into the past and the future,” says Palahniuk. “If I’m going to have to talk about it for the rest of my life, at least the story will be expanding.” Fans at Palahniuk’s sold-out Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures show can expect a wild, interactive evening, and are encouraged to wear pajamas for what the author calls a slumber-party vibe. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CHUCK PALAHNIUK 7 p.m. Thu., May 21. Carnegie Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Sold out. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org N E W S

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T

HE THREE LITTLE girls exit the house and march across the street. “Here they come,” says Tami Dixon. On a chilly May evening, she’s standing in a garden in North Braddock with TaeAjah Cannon as they rehearse for Saints Tour. The three girls, who’ve watched Dixon and Cannon rehearse here before, approach familiarly. They sit on lawn chairs as Cannon, 16, runs lines from the immersive, site-specfic play; when Dixon, pretending to be an audience member, responds to Cannon in a funny voice, they giggle. The scene reflects the community interaction you get when staging theater outdoors. But it’s also the kind of interaction that Saints Tour is both largely about and meant to nurture. Saints Tour is playwright Molly Rice’s work about finding the extraordinary in the everyday: saints in the front yard. The episodic, non-narrative show is produced by Bricolage Productions with Rice and partner Rusty Thelins’ Real/Time Interventions. It is structured as a 90-minute bus-and-walking

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

TaeAjah Cannon prepares for her role in Saints Tour.

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Sanford-Mark Barnes (left) and his son Seth

tour in and near Braddock — where, audiences are told by the Tour Guide, “Saints emerge in disproportionate numbers at this very latitude and longitude.” The Guide, herself a semi-mystical character, tells the stories of invented, nonsectarian figures like “migratory saint” St. James of the Open Hand; performers stationed along the way encourage audiences to participate in small rituals that emphasize the specialness of the place. Driven by Rice’s lyrical writing style, Saints Tour suggests a magical-realist Our Town. With audiences limited to 40 per performance, the show even concludes with a family-style community meal. Rice, a nationally produced playwright, has staged other Saints Tours. The first was in Louisville, Ky., in 2009, followed by sold-out versions in New York City’s West Village and Lower Manhattan. Each was tailored to its community, with a different cast and nods to local history and culture. But the Braddock iteration is the deepest plunge yet. Rice and Thelin, her husband, moved here from New York in 2013, to care for a sick friend, then stayed. They met with Bricolage about doing a Saints Tour here, and Bricolage’s Jeffrey Carpenter suggested Braddock, with its hard times and signs of

Bria Walker (center), who plays the Tour Guide, and Jeffrey Carpenter, at right

regrowth. Over some 18 months, the production partners (whose backers include the Sprout Fund) have logged hundreds of hours connecting with people and organizations in the struggling mill community, including neighboring North Braddock and Braddock Hills.

THE SAINTS TOUR BRADDOCK Thu., May 21-June 13. Braddock. $60. 412-471-0999 or www.bricolagepgh.org

For the first time, Rice has almost completely rewritten her original Saints script. This Saints Tour both incorporates more local culture than earlier tours — a story about Braddock’s famed Hungarian Gypsies, for instance — and involves more local residents. The production has even sown some long-term relationships. For instance, last year, Rice, Thelin and Bricolage’s Dixon and Carpenter befriended Braddock resident Sanford-Mark Barnes, a crossingguard, and three of his sons. Now Barnes, a former professional musician, and sons Nathan, 16, and Seth, 10, have notable non-speaking roles in the show. (Isaiah, 14, appears via audio recording.) While

Nathan Barnes prepares for his role.

Bricolage and Real/Time worked with, the Tour Guide is played by professional actress Bria Walker, other community among others, Braddock Farms, the Bradmembers also perform or have behind- dock Carnegie Library, Unsmoke Systems gallery, work-readiness program the Bradthe-scenes roles. “I’m very blessed, very happy to be in dock Youth Project and Gardweeno, which this project,” says Barnes. The level of com- combines gardening and computer inmunity involvement “makes it more of a struction. Saints Tour producers reserved hometown play. It makes it more of a com- 40 percent of the run’s 800-some tickets munity, a village play that people can be for residents of the 15104 zip code, and mailed 4,000 copies of a letter inviting proud of.” The production incorporates original neighbors. Partly to subsidize the free artwork by several local artists, including tickets, full-price tickets are $60. Some dates are already sold out. sculptors James Simon and Vanessa A gardening theme runs German, and the painters at Bradthrough the script, and the play’s dock’s own New Guild Studios. tagline is “There’s something Saints Tour continues Pittsm Hear frors of in the dirt.” Rice hopes that burgh’s new wave of immerto a the cre ts Tour audiences, especially visitors sive, often site-specific and the Sainww. to Braddock, will develop new sometimes audience-interacat w paper connections that will aid in tive theater that began with pghcitym .co the town’s rebirth. Bricolage’s own 2012 producTaeAjah Cannon thinks tion, STRATA, which occupied that just might happen. The a whole Downtown building. But sophomore at Homestead’s Propel none of those shows involved such engagement with a community. Braddock, Andrew Street High School is a life-long once a bustling town, was devastated by Braddock resident. Saints Tour is her first Big Steel’s collapse; lately, it’s known for big acting role. “I think that people feel Mayor John Fetterman’s efforts to seed revi- Braddock is a run-down place — but in talization through initiatives like drawing reality, there’s a lot that happens here,” artists to the community, and starting an says Cannon. “I think it will give a new perspective on Braddock.” urban farm. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[ART REVIEW]

STATES OF MIND

Art by Pier Luigi Slis

{BY DAVID BERGER} A show at Christine Fréchard Gallery illustrates two very different approaches to contemporary art, two states of mind. One concerns the interpenetration of language and image, while the other contemplates both the destabilizing forces of civilization and the world as global village. Pier Luigi Slis and Laura D’Andrea’s work has come about through deep reflection, and an introspection into the origins of classical culture through genetic memory. While Slis’s work is mainly monochromatic, D’Andrea’s is rich in color. Slis is a master of perspective, of light and shadow, and the use of directional lines in white, brown and black. He delights in deconstructing cultural objects — piercing towers, curling bridges and compartmentalized blocks of habitations. It is a view of strained human expansion, sometimes meditative, always conscious of corrosive surface elements, clamorous, gas-filled air and the frenetic portrayal of movement. Slis relishes the plasticity of material, chiseling spray-paint with a knife, joining painted forms with string, incorporating a safety pin into canvas to symbolize a “concrete idea.” These are not just cityscapes but “relations between people,” Slis said in an interview. Slis often places his tag within the painting, figuratively fusing his ego with the object. By comparison, D’Andrea’s research into calligraphy and ancient scripture have evolved into a type of asemantic writing. In “Leoni Scripture,” cave-picture-like animals stained orange-red are filled with Arabic-type script. D’Andrea uses layering techniques and computer-aided photography. Our reward is works showcasing her lyrical gift and infatuation with color. “Red Moon,” with its swirling colors, red and black crescent moon and scattering of sand, suggests a dream; a charcoal drawing of two trees has a Leonardesque ebullience. D’Andrea demonstrates a facility with seriography, wood prints and serial imagery. One work contains antique representations of horses against a furious red parchment. Another silk-screen depicts 19th- and 20thcentury women who appear to evolve into the “future woman.” A Mediterranean sensuousness is integral to the work, as manifested by three large tapestries of the Venus of Morgantina. In this show, artists search for original paths — from the funny to the dramatic, from static and decaying to dynamic, from brute matter to the intuitive. It might be messy and imperfect but, as Slis says, “we are in a dramatic situation with good possibilities.”

Tracing Outlines Film Screening Thursday, May 21

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

cmoa.org

5:30–9 p.m.: Cash Bar Open 6:30–8:30 p.m.: Screening and Q&A $15 ($10 Carnegie Museums Members) Includes one drink token The untold history of Pittsburgh's Outlines Gallery, one of the most cutting-edge art galleries of the 1940s. Join director Cayce Mell and producer Scott Sullivan for the first Pittsburgh screening of their groundbreaking documentary feature! Seating is limited. Buy tickets online at CMOA.org/tracing-outlines.

Sponsored by

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TWO ITALIAN MASTERS continues through May 29. Fréchard Gallery, 5871 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888 or www.christinefrechardgallery.com N E W S

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The cast of American Falls, at barebones productions

[PLAY REVIEWS]

ALL FALL DOWN {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} ONE IS TEMPTED to read the title American

How The Other Half Loves

Falls as a sentence, with the second word a verb. In a sense, that’s the truth about barebones productions’ presentation of Miki Johnson’s 2012 play about a slice of Americans falling — in and out of love, through life, through tough decisions, through death.

AMERICAN FALLS continues through May 31. Barebones Black Box Theater, 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. $30-35. www.barebonesproductions.com

By Alan Ayckbourn

May 28 - June 13 Directed by Martin Giles

Mainstage Series The Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial

A little infidelity goes a long way. How the Other Half Loves is a hilarious play about three couples who have arrived a bit too late to the sexual revolution.

PICTTheatre.org/Love | 412.561.6000 | Discount CP5OFF* *For preview performances only. Some restrictions apply.

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Set in a Midwestern small town named American Falls, the Pitt grad’s first fulllength play is often described as an Our Town (Thornton Wilder’s 1938 masterwork) for the 21st century, though even kinkier. The stories meander across decades, but under the direction of barebones artistic director Patrick Jordan, the one-act whips through time and space with eight characters (two of them ghosts). At the center, much like OT’s Stage Manager, is Billy Mound of Clouds (heartily portrayed by Leandro Cano), shoe salesman and Native American seer, narrating and commenting on the action. The two ghosts are rather lively, especially Samantha (sweet and lusty, as only Cary Anne Spear can play) recalling an enthusiastic but ill-spent life of booze, sex and kids — of all of which she had way too much. As the wistful Lisa, Liz Hammond maintains a center of attention despite being perched over everyone’s head. The so-cute

Gunnar Bjornson’s Isaac could as well be a ghost, a child who barely comes to life for most of the play. Much of American Falls hinges on the transformation of a character related to both of the ghosts: Samuel. Once again Connor McCanlus, seemingly channeling both Steve Buscemi and Carrie, combines comedy and chills. If there is a “hero” or at least protagonist, it’s probably the decidedly non-heroic Eric (a sympathetic John Steffenauer). Completing the cast as hereand-now buddies are Dave Mansueto and Sarah Silk. Inaugurating the company’s new space, in Braddock, barebones founder Jordan has set the scene (literally, in this case) for intimate but polished productions. Try to take advantage of the Friday-Saturday pre-play receptions starring small plates by chef Kevin Sousa, coming attractions from his new restaurant Superior Motors, the theater’s upstairs neighbor. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

WEEKENDERS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THE FIRST SYLLABLE lays out the theme of

Midsummer, wrapping up the season for City Theatre. Subtitled “A Play With Songs,” the 2008 Scottish comedy/romance is set in Edinburgh on the weekend of the summer solstice, which more northerly types celebrate as Midsummer or St. John’s Day: the longest day/shortest night of the year. (Yes, Edinburgh is about as far north as Juneau, Alaska, and Moscow, Russia. Sunset is after 10 p.m., dawn before 5 a.m.) The play by David Grieg and Gordon McIntyre also pegs a pair of Edinburghers facing their respective mid-life crises — at


age 35. (Please. Thinking life is all downhill after 35 is more than a trifle jejune.) And continuing the “mid” meme, the nondescript hero is known as “Medium Bob” and the heroine, Helena, is at best a middlin’ lawyer. Unlikely to meet in the ordinary course of life, the unlikely couple plows through a wacky “lost weekend” collecting hangers-on, adventures and stories to be rehashed and embellished for the rest of their lives. (Actually, drunken parties with a lot of lights are standard St. John’s Day fare.)

MIDSUMMER (A PLAY WITH SONGS) continues through May 31. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-56. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

City artistic director Tracy Brigden handles a deft two-person cast and talented design/tech team with a light touch and humor. There are occasional chuckles and some real guffaws as Midsummer explores life and love. But, alas, at nearly two hours without an intermission, and so many references to Edinburgh geography and slang unfamiliar to most in the audience, Midsummer does not harbor rapt attention. The delicate pace cannot be rushed. The characters go forward, back. Further forward. Further back. The Firth of Forth. Carey Van Driest adds charm to the less-than-respectable Helena, and morphs into a delightful variety of supporting characters, especially the thugs. Opposite her as the bland rapscallion, Randy Redd moves through Bob’s changes and redds up (sorry) the rest of the multi-cast personae. Musically simple, the “songs with(in) the play” help to delineate the inner lives evolving within Helena and Bob. Midsummer provides a pleasant escape from a hotter Pittsburgh summer.

The play is set in the suburban backyard of an unnamed American city. (Detroit is never mentioned beyond the title; 12 Peers has implicitly reset the play somewhere in Pittsburgh, as evidenced by the Steelers merch on stage.) We’re introduced to two couples enjoying an outdoor meal. Mary and Ben have lived in the neighborhood for years. Their guests — a younger couple named Sharon and Ben — have just moved in next door. Since this is a play, you know that pretty soon, secrets will be unfurled, tempers will be unleashed and general mayhem will ensue. D’Amour doesn’t disappoint — at least as far as stage pyrotechnics go. But to what end, I couldn’t tell you. These aren’t really characters; they’re ideas of characters whose motivations (and even realities) change on the whim of the playwright. I found them tedious and implausible. On several occasions, for example, a character suddenly launches an emotionally extravagant shower of words — whether furious, yearning or nostalgic — that is disconnected from everything else and, once completed, has no effect on any of the other characters. D’Amour also strains for poetic allegory, which turns out to be slightly embarrassing. Nonetheless, 12 Peers throws body and soul into this production. Alyssa Herron, Brett Sullivan Santry, John Feightner and Sara Fisher, with direction by Vince Ventura, attack this work head on. To say they haven’t successfully landed the piece is misleading, because I’m not sure who could. This cast must leave the theater each night with throbbing migraines.

THESE AREN’T REALLY CHARACTERS; THEY’RE IDEAS OF CHARACTERS.

Stiltwalkers, Fire Performers, Aerial Acts, Jugglers, Magic + More!

Book Us Now 614.432.1968 theamazinggiants.com

Front Porch Theatricals presents

The Last Five Years May 22nd-31st NEW HAZLETT THEATER TICKET PRICES: $30 ON-LINE, $35 AT THE DOOR, $24 STUDENTS & GROUPS

Tickets: www.frontporchpgh.com frontporch.showclix.com

1-888-718-4253 Written & composed by Tony Award Winner JASON ROBERT BROWN Originally Produced for the New York Stage by Arielle Tepper and Marty Bell. Originally Produced by Northlight Theatre, Chicago, IL. “The Last Five Years” is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI) . All authorized Performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, 10019 P: 212-541-4684 F: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

DETROIT continues through May 30. 12 Peers Theater at The Maker Theater, 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $15-20. 412-496-2194 or www.12peerstheater.org

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

MUDDLE CITY {BY TED HOOVER} LISA D’AMOUR’S play Detroit (now receiving its local premiere at 12 Peers Theater) was a finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for drama. Detroit also won an Obie for Best New American play, in 2013. I’m giving D’Amour’s work an award as well: The Most Confounding Play I’ve Seen This Year.

James Jamison has designed a skillfully detailed set. It’s too big for the intimate Maker Theater space, but it is impressive. But here’s the really confounding part: While it would be easy to regard Detroit as mere twaddle, D’Amour again and again surprises with flashes of sharp writing and (too-) brief moments of interest. While these bits hardly make up for the surrounding muddle, this is a playwright you can’t easily dismiss. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.2105.28.15

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

this Summer Join Us On the Square

Market Square the Heart of Downtown Pittsburgh

MAY 28

Triple Divide

+ THU., MAY 21 {WORDS}

Live Jazz

Wednesday | Friday | Saturday

“I was nine years older than the country I had come to live in,” writes Jill Kandel of moving to Zambia as a newlywed in 1981. The North Dakota native has since lived and worked all over the world, but it was that initial overseas move that provided the material for her new memoir, So Many Africas: Six Years in a Zambian Village. The manuscript won publication via Pittsburgh’s Autumn House Press’ nonfiction contest. The widely published Kandel, who now lives in Minnesota, reads tonight at East End Book Exchange with Pittsburghbased poet and memoirist Lori Jakiela. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www. eastendbookexchange.com

{TALK}

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 104

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

Two local comics artists help close out the season for the TNY Presents reading series. One of them is Daniel McCloskey, known for founding the Cyberpunk Apocalypse writers’ residency, but a prolific artist and writer in his own right. He’ll present the fifth installment in his original series America’s Lesser Known Predators, each written specifically for a local reading event. McCloskey is

joined at ModernFormations Gallery by comics artist Nils Balls and writers Caitlin Bender and Adrienne Jouver. BO 8 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5 (free with potluck contribution). www.modernformations.com

+ FRI., MAY 22 {EXHIBIT} Life on the American frontier was complicated, and the

turbulent relationships between cultures remain difficult to convey. In its new exhibit, Captured by Indians: Warfare and Assimilation on the 18th-Century Frontier, the Fort Pitt Museum explores the practice of Native Americans capturing settlers. With dwindling numbers, Native Americans were forced to use other tactics to survive. The year-long exhibit, which opens today, uses life-cast vignettes of three captives with Western

Art by Benjamin West

MAY 22

Captured ap ptured d by by Indians In


sp otlight We, too, have whiled away 15 minutes at a pop watching TED talks on philanthropy or mushrooms that somebody passed around on Facebook. But Pittsburgh has its own, TED-sanctioned but independently organized and in-person version of the popular speaker series for “ideas worth spreading.” And the theme for this year’s TEDxPittsburgh, held Sat., May 23, at the Byham Theater, is Bridges: Ideas That Connect Us. The speakers, many locally based, include Dr. Jim Withers, the internationally known founder of Operation Safety Net, a street-medicine program for the homeless. Michelle King is a self-described “instigator of learning” whose interests include designing learning institutions to build connections. Gab Bonesso is a performer, comic and motivational speaker known for her antibullying work. At least two speakers speakers have environmental interests: Andrew Butcher, founder of Pittsburgh-based nonprofit GTECH, and Aislinn Slaugenhaupt, a high school student who’s a nationally known speaker. Dr. Josie Badger is a youth-empowerment expert. Lawrence Ian Reed studies facial expression, emotion and cooperation; Samantha Bushman wants to revolutionize sex ed; Michelle Franzo is a consultant and World Policy Institute fellow; and Diane Turnshek is a physicist and science-fiction writer interested in space colonization. TEDx runs all afternoon and concludes with an after-party. Bill O’Driscoll Noon, Sat., May 23. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $40. 5-7 p.m. (after-party at SPACE gallery, Downtown, ticketed separately). 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{PYRO} Some days this month, it might have already felt hot enough to be July, but tonight’s fireworks aren’t for Independence Day. Fireworks outfit Pyrofest makes a bigger bang in its fourth year with a venue change, from Hartwood Acres to Cooper’s Lake Campground, in Butler County. Pyrofest’s new location allows the festival to grow — including the addition of a second day. The festival includes bands, concessions and plenty of huge firework displays. Special events like a pyro-musical, phantom fireworks display and winners of the “Fantasy in the Sky” challenge will take place after dark. ZM 4 p.m. Also 4 p.m. Sat., May 23. 205 Currie Road, Slippery Rock. $20-110. 800854-4705 or www.pyrofest.com

foods. ZM 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 1 Schenley Park, Oakland. $11-15. 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

Garcia. Danielle Fox 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 23, and 2 p.m. Sun., May 24. 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. $15-25. 412-414-4649 or www.alia-musica.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF NO NAME PLAYERS}

Pennsylvania connections to explain the practice. Zacchiaus McKee 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 2016. 601 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. $3-6. 412-281-9284 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

{STAGE}

Front Porch Theatricals opens its 2015 season at the New Hazlett Theater with a show that puts an unconventional twist on romance. Jason Robert Brown’s off-Broadway favorite The Last Five Years follows two lovers as they tell the story of how they fell in and out of love over the course of five years. Jamie tells his story chronologically, while Cathy tells hers backward. The two meet once during the show, in the middle, at their wedding. Pittsburgh-born actors David Toole and Erin Lindsey Krom headline. ZM 8 p.m. Continues through May 31. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-24. 412-320-4610 or www.frontporchpgh.com

{STAGE} Dislike sit-coms, and think maybe one would be more fun live? Or do you like sit-coms,

MAY 22

The h Si Sisters i Sorella

and maybe just need to get out more? Either way, The Sisters Sorella might be for you. This original sit-com from theater troupe No Name Players, performed live monthly, rolls out its latest

after one separates from her husband. Join neurotic Cetta, narcissistic Raff and oddball Ernie for comedy, live music and even live commercial breaks. BO 10 p.m. Also 10 p.m. Sat., May 23. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. www.nonameplayers.org

episode tonight and again tomorrow at Arcade Comedy Theater. Series writers Tressa Glove, Julianne Avolio and Maggie Carr star as three Italian-American sisters reunited in a single apartment

{OPERA}

“Lillith, lies and paradise”: Alia Musica stages the Pittsburgh premiere of Eve Apart at Hillman Auditorium. The multimedia opera re-imagines the Genesis story while exploring primal feminine power and religion through video and characters like Lillith. In Jewish folklore, Lillith preceded Eve, but vanished after Adam attempted to assert his sexual dominance. Created by Tennessee-based composer Tim Hinick, with a libretto by Pittsburgh-based Kip Soteres, Eve Apart casts local favorites including soprano Desiree Soteres and tenor Donovan Smith, conducted by Federico

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+ SAT., MAY 23 {HANDS-ON} Gardens are a veritable smorgasbord of activity. Today, Phipps Conservatory offers Discovery Garden Day, a hands-on showcase. While the day is meant to be fun for the whole family, activities specifically for younger children include lawn games, potting plants, crafting and exploring the Nature Play Garden. In addition, learn more about topics including pollinators, the life-cycles of plants and the origins of certain

MAY 22

Pyrofest

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Video-production company In Media Res launches its series Cinema Exchange with a free screening and discussion of Triple Divide, a 2013 documentary about how state environmental regulators failed when it came to fracking for natural gas. The awardwinning film, produced by investigative-journalism nonprofit Public Herald, has had public screenings around the U.S. Tonight’s is presented in Uptown’s historic Paramount Film Exchange Building by the film’s co-directors, Joshua Pribanic and Melissa Troutman. Cinema Exchange is an initiative of In Media Res and community-development nonprofit StartUptown. BO 7 p.m. (6:30 p.m. reception). 544 Miltenberger St., Uptown. Free. www.startuptown.org

{OUTDOORS} Grab your helmets, bike locks and undies: The first Pittsburgh Underwear Bike Ride of 2015 is tonight. In an effort to promote positive body image and self-confidence — and build a stronger bike community — bikers will take to the streets of Lawrenceville to ride (mostly) naked along a route ending at Penn Brewery. The only rules are to have fun, be respectful and stay safe. A pedicab DJ will accompany the ride. Other underwear rides are scheduled for the final Thursday night of each month this summer. ZM 9 p.m. Route begins at 46th and Butler streets, Lawrenceville. Free. www.twitter.com/#!/ PghUndiesRide

C L A S S I F I E D S

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310 Allegheny River Blvd.

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

OAKMONT | 412-828-6322

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER AMERICAN FALLS. A kind CALL FOR INFORMATION ON PRIVATE PARTIES.

FULL BAR and KITCHEN

theoakstheater.com

FRIDAY MAY 22 8PM | DOORS OPEN 7PM

2 ACT BROADWAY STYLE MUSICAL COMEDY

5

$ White

Russians

EVERY SHOW’S A WORLD PREMIERE!

SATURDAY MAY 23 8PM

The Big Lebowski

FRIDAY MAY 29

Bigfoot the Movie WORLD PREMIERE

Q&A WITH CAST INCLUDING CURT W OT WOOTON WOOT WO OTON ON N

of modern day “Our Town”, American Falls is the story of the lives of six living people & two dead ones in American Falls, Idaho. Presented by barebones productions. Fri, Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 31. barebones black box theater, Braddock. www.barebonesproductions.com. DETROIT. In a first-ring suburb just outside a city that might be Detroit, a couple makes friends w/ the mysterious neighbors who’ve just moved in next door. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 31. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-496-2194. DON’T DRESS FOR DINNER. A farce by Marc Camoletti. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 23. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. EVE APART. A re-imagining of the Genesis story presented by Alia Musica. May 22-23, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 24, 2 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. 1-888-71-TICKETS. FENCES. August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play presented by Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 & 8 p.m. Thru May 30. Pittsburgh

Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-687-4686. HAWAII IN THE HIGHLANDS. Hawaiian drums, hula & traditional dance. Wed., May 27, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Ligonier Theater, Ligonier. 1-800-528-7429. JESSE B. SIMPLE ALIVE IN HARLEM. A show celebrating Langston Hughes’ legendary character, Jesse B. Simple. An artist talk will follow the performance w/ Dr. Anthony B. Mitchell. Wed., May 27, 7 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 347-259-9942. KNICKERS! Elliston Falls has been spiraling into an economic depression after the closing of its paper mill. When a tourism officer arrives to lend a hand, she discovers an unlikely business partnership in the three brassy friends that make up the local chapter of Weight Watchers. Could the ladies’ plan for a custom underwear business really be the town’s salvation? Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 7. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE LIVING ROOM CHRONICLES. A storytelling series created & hosted by Leslie “Ezra” Smith. This month feat. Mike Logan. Wed., May 27,

Feel the presence of a saint or wish upon a star Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

7-9:30 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. MIDSUMMER (A PLAY W/ MUSIC). Midsummer in Edinburgh turns into a weekend of wild abandon when divorce lawyer Helena meets small-time crook Bob in a basement wine bar. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 31. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. OUR TOWN. A look at core universal truths told through daily life in Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire, 1901. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 23. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. SAINTS TOUR. Molly Rice’s site-specific play built for the neighborhood it occupies, taking the form of a bus & walking tour during which magical things happen. Co-presented by Real/ Time Interventions. Wed-Sun, 7 p.m. Thru June 13. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. THIS GIRL LAUGHS, THIS GIRL CRIES, THIS GIRL DOES NOTHING. Contemporary fairy tale about 3 sisters, abandoned in the forest & forced to find their own way in the world.

SPECIAL BEER TASTING WITH HOP FARM BREWING

SATURDAY MAY 30 THE ROOM

[LECTURE]

Art by Tim Drier

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

John McIntire Show

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

DAVON MAGWOOD W/ JORDAN WEEKS, BRANDON MICKEY, STOPH EDISON. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 866-468-3401. PREMIERE: UNSCRIPTED MUSICAL COMEDY. A full two-act musical created from a few basic audience suggestions. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. UNSCRIPTED MUSICAL COMEDY. A full two-act musical from scratch at every show. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322.

FRI 22 - SAT 23

MAKE NICE BOOM. A team improv competition presented by Unplanned Comedy. Fourth Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Fourth Sat of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

MON 25

SATURDAY JUNE 13 RRentt Th The OOaks k Th Theater t ffor BIR BBIRTHDAY BIRTHD IRTHDDAY PARTIES! IR PARTIES RTIE TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253

FRI 22

FIVE MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC. A melting pot of poets, singers, comedians, dancers, musicians & entertainers. Presented by Chicksburgh. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Gus’s Cafe, Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271.

featuring Rick Sebak, Rob Rogers & The Pittsburgh Taco Truck Guy

Frank & Sammy

DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

SUN 24

FFRIDAY RRIDA IDAAY JJUNE UNNE 55TH TH

Bo Wagner presents

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SAT 23

WEDNESDAY JUNE 3

The

COMEDY

BRYAN CORK. 8 p.m. and Sat., May 23, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

Tommy Wiseau’s Master work back on the big 8PM screen. Don’t miss this night of Hilarity, random football, and ridiculous use of green screen.

The Wailers

May 23-24, 1, 4 & 7 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x11. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Presented by The Heritage Players. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 31. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633.

Pittsburgh Glass Center hosts free summer lectures every Wednesday from May 20 through August. Each session features a different internationally renowned glass artist who will share his or her craft through images, video and informal discussion. The series begins this week with Tim Drier, whose works focus on delicate forms, and Slate Grove, a tattoo and glass artist. A complete schedule is on the PGC website. 6 p.m. Wed., May 20. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. Steel City Improv house teams perform. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 26 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869. CONTINUES ON PG. 107


WED 27

famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY Assimilation on the 18th Century HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military Frontier. During the mid-18th artifacts & exhibits on the century, thousands of settlers of Allegheny Valley’s industrial European & African descent were heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. captured by Native Americans. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE Using documentary evidence from LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. 18th & early 19th century sources, Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. period imagery, & artifacts from The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of public & private collections in the Grand Army of the Republic the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit served local Civil War veterans examines the practice of captivity for over 54 years & is the best from its prehistoric roots to its preserved & most intact GAR post reverberations in modern in the United States. Carnegie. Native-, African- & Euro-American 412-276-3456. communities. Reconstructed fort BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. houses museum of Pittsburgh Large collection of automatic history circa French & Indian War & roll-played musical instruments & American Revolution. Downtown. music boxes in a mansion setting. 412-281-9285. Call for appointment. O’Hara. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL 412-782-4231. CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Mills: The British Passion for Preserved materials reflecting Landscape. This exhibit the industrial heritage explores landscape of Southwestern painting in Britain PA. Homestead. form the Industrial 412-464-4020. Revolution to the CARNEGIE eras of Romanticism. MUSEUM OF www. per a p Ongoing: tours of pghcitym NATURAL HISTORY. .co Clayton, the Frick Animal Secrets. Learn estate, w/ classes & about the hidden lives programs for all ages. Point of ants, bats, chipmunks, Breeze. 412-371-0600. raccoons & more. Oakland. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this 412-622-3131. Tudor mansion & stable complex. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome the surrounding park. Allison Park. (planetarium), Miniature Railroad 412-767-9200. & Village, USS Requin submarine KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the & more. H2Oh! Experience kinetic other Frank Lloyd Wright house. water-driven motion & discover 724-329-8501. the relations between water, KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. land & habitat. How do everyday Tours of a restored 19th-century, decisions impact water supply middle-class home. Oakmont. & the environment? North Side. 412-826-9295. 412-237-3400. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast includes jade & ivory statues from Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie China & Japan, as well as Meissen Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. examples of pre World War II MCGINLEY HOUSE & iron-making technology. Rankin. MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. 412-464-4020 x 21. Historic homes open for tours, CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF lectures & more. Monroeville. PITTSBURGH. Missing Links 412-373-7794. (The Rainbow Jumpy). Bounce, MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS jump, roll, run & walk through MUSEUM. The Bryce Family & a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art the Mount Pleasant Factory. piece created by Felipe Dulzaides Telling the story of the Bryce & on loan from The New Children’s family & their contributions. Museum, in San Diego CA. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to North Side. 412-322-5058. more than 600 birds from over COMPASS INN. Demos & tours 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, w/ costumed guides feat. this demos & more. Masters of the restored stagecoach stop. Sky. Explore the power & grace North Versailles. 724-238-4983. of the birds who rule the sky. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. Majestic eagles, impressive University of Pittsburgh Jazz condors, stealthy falcons and Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards their friends take center stage! from the International Hall of North Side. 412-323-7235. Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 DEPRECIATION LANDS rooms helping to tell the story MUSEUM. Small living of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. history museum celebrating University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. the settlement & history of the 412-624-6000. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church 412-486-0563. features 1823 pipe organ, FALLINGWATER. Tour the COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

EXHIBITS

VISUALART “Shoofly” (coil-woven pine needles, raffia and acrylic, 2007), by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze. From the exhibition Bound, at James Gallery, West End.

NEW THIS WEEK GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Opening reception May 27, 6-9pm w/ live music. Oakland. 412-716-1390.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Vascular Caverns. Papercut sculpture depicting abstracted, anatomical imagery by Gianna Paniagua. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. One Out of Many, One People. Works by Tamara Natalie Madden. An exploration of the vast cultural heritage of Jamaica. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Temporary States. Work by Lori Hepner & Christine Lorenz. Downtown. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. Works from Pittsburgh based artist, Cecilia Ebitz’s “Good Intentions”, inspired by the work & teachings of Corita Kent. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART SPACE 616. Hereafter. Work by Ryan Lammie & Alisha Wormsley. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Only Perfect Quiet. Painting by Tony Cavalline. Barco Law Library

Gallery. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Visions. Work in oils & watercolors by Bill Perry. Work by Dorothy DeGroat in the Different Strokes Gallery. Verona. 412-828-1031. BUTLER ART CENTER. 2015 Spring Art Show. Works by many artists in the mediums of painting, drawing, photography & digital art, mixed media, sculpture, fiber art, ceramics & printmaking. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples. Van Gogh’s “Still Life, Basket of Apples” (1887),”Le Moulin de la Galette” (1886–1887), “Wheat Fields after the Rain” (1890), & Paul Signac’s “Place des Lices, St. Tropez”, visiting from the Saint Louis Art Museum. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Will close temporarily on May 25 & reopen on June 6. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Two Italian Masters. Works by Pier Luigi & Laura D’Andrea. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition.

Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Student Photography Exhibit. A photography exhibit featuring work by six students in The Photography Intensive program. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Daydreaming Through a Child’s Eyes. An installation exhibition by Dave Calfo alongside Pittsburgh Children’s Festival. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Fabrizio Gerbino. New paintings by artist. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Looking Forward, Looking Back. Work by Dennis Bergevin & Leonard Leibowitz. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. 100 Flowers Bloomed. Work by Brian Gonnella. Thoughts & Feelings. New & collected works by Ben Patterson, a chalk pastel artist & painter. Opening reception June 6, 7-11pm. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Diane Grguras. New pastel paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent CONTINUES ON PG. 109

FULL LIST ONLINE

Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Orotones. A display of glass plate images which have been enhanced w/ real gold-laced lacquers to bring a gilded-tone to the people & places depicted. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War CONTINUES ON PG. 108

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*Stuff We Like SUMMER EDITION

Leinenkugel Summer Shandy

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

Crisp and refreshing. If beer and lemonade had an offspring, this is what it would taste like.

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 107

through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

It’s the Pittsburgh way to get ready for the future by revisiting the past. Let Rick Sebak help. The park is now open seven days a week. www.kennywood.com

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

Silver Star Natural Casing Hot Dogs Slap a couple of these dogs, made by a McKees Rocks company, on the grill and it’s instant summer.

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SPRING PERFORMANCE 2015. The training journey of a ballet dancer from preparatory to pre-professional in a work conceived by PBT School Faculty & set to Antonio Vivaldi’s lyrical “The Four Seasons.” 7 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SUN 24 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015

CAITLIN BENDER, ADRIENNE JOUVER, DANIEL MCCLOSKEY, & NILS BALLS. TNY Presents. BYOB encouraged. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. CHUCK PALAHNIUK. Author lecture. 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

TUE 26 PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

May 15

I just wanted to hear the symphony perform something modern and different. We come to the symphony fairly often, but this was more alternative music. I actually really loved it. I thought there was a lot of variety. I tend to be more of a traditionalist in regards to the symphony. When Manfred Honeck’s brother was here a few weeks ago, that was a wonderful evening. That’s more of what I like, but I can’t close my eyes off to the alternative music. I come about once a month, and other pieces by [Mason Bates], who wrote the first part of the symphony, have been played here before. This piece was very different and it just opened up your eyes. I think the symphony is trying to provide an alternative for people, to attract them. I also really loved the singer [Jamie Barton] in the middle. She had a beautiful voice with great voice control.

FUNDRAISERS

THU 21

Tis the season. Go Bucs. www.pirates.com

CRITIC: William Burgunder, 62, an

WHEN: Fri.,

LITERARY

Warm nights with baseball, beer and popcorn

the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Heinz Hall, Downtown

THU 21 - WED 27

FRI 22

Kennywood Memories

The Sound of a Modern Symphony, with

insurance agent from Mount Lebanon

DANCE

Gus & Yia Yia’s

EVENT: BNY Mellon Grand Classics’

FESTIVALS PITTSBURGH FRINGE FESTIVAL. Presenting theater on the fringe of the main stream. Various locations. Thru June 10. www.pittsburghfringe.org.

Few things say summer in Pittsburgh more than a bag of peanuts and an old-fashioned shaved-ice ball from this iconic North Side food cart. 638 W. Ohio St.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

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STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250. STORY NIGHT. Live, open mic storytelling w/ a different theme every month. Last Tue of every month, 8 p.m. Riley’s Pour House, Carnegie. 412-279-0770. STORYTELLING @ RILEY’S. Story telling on a theme every month. Last Tue of every month, 8 p.m. Riley’s Pour House, Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

WED 27 ALLEGHENY CITY: A HISTORY OF PITTSBURGH’S NORTH SIDE. Author talk w/ Dan Rooney & Carol Peterson. 6 p.m. Allegheny City Historic Gallery, North Side. 412-383-2493. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Book discussion hosted by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. This month’s meeting is about Tomas Transtromer’s “The Great Enigma”. Fourth Wed of every month, 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-7636.

KIDSTUFF THU 21 - WED 27 ALLEGHENY COUNTY MARBLES PROGRAM. Free games & lessons for children 14 & under. Tournaments. Various locations. Thru May 27 412-821-5779. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered

instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 23 DISCOVERY GARDEN DAY. Dig & plant seeds together as you learn about gardens & the critters who call them home. Games, hands-on crafts, storytelling, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. LITERACY DAY. Mini-Factory program, The Land of Nod Bookmobile w/ story time & bookmark crafts. Little Free Libraries featuring libraries available to “adopt.” 10 a.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. MUD ON THE MOUNTAIN KID’S EDITION. Three different runs & obstacle courses for three different age groups. 9 a.m. Seven Springs, . 814-352-7777.

MON 25

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turnedTeaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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HOMEWORK HELP. For grades

1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

OUTSIDE FRI 22 - SAT 23 MINGO CREEK STAR PARTY. Observe double-stars, planetary nebulae, star clusters, distant galaxies, Saturn & its rings, Jupiter & its Galilean moons as well as Venus at dusk. May 22-23, 7 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. Finleyville. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN OBSERVATORY STAR PARTY. A guided tour of the sky & portable telescopes presented by the Amateur Astronomer’s Association. May 22-23, 8:35 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

SAT 23 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Meet WPMC Identifier, Fluff Berger, to look for morels. 10 a.m. Sewickley Heights Park, Sewickley. 412-741-7536.

WED 27 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 21 AROMATHERAPY & ESSENTIAL OILS. Learn what oils are & how to use them for your benefit. Angora Gardens. 1-2:30 p.m. White Oak Park, White Oak. 412-675-8556. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. EARLY INTERVENTION FAMILIES WORKSHOP. Workshop Topics: Parenting a Child w/ Developmental Delays; Creating a Plan for your Child & Family; Advocating for your Child, The Parent Movement; Early Intervention Laws & Your Rights in the Early Intervention System; Promising Practices: Inclusion, Family Centered Principles, Parent/ Professional Partnerships; Finding Community Resources. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru May 22 Achieva, South Side. 412-323-3979. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LAW & ORDER. Magisterial District Judge Blaise Larotonda & Mt. Lebanon Police Corporal James Hughes will present this behind-the-scenes look at how the wheels of justice turn. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE OVERLAND CAMPAIGN OF THE CIVIL WAR: A NEW PERSPECTIVE. A lecture presented by Alfred C. Young &


VISUAL ART

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work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Elements. Drawings & watercolors of bird nests w/ a focus on the natural & man-made materials incorporated into these architectural structures. The featured artists are Sue Abramson, Wendy Brockman, David Morrison & Kate Nessler. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. The Big Little Show. An exhibition curated by Sheila D. Ali w/ local & international artists: Abira Ali, Alberto Almarza, Bill Shannon, Dougie Duerring, Eliza Henderson, Etta Cetera, Katy Dement, Laverne Kemp, Lisa Demagall, Nino Balistrieri (ACBIII), Michael “Fig” Magniafico, Merrily Mossman

McAllister, Ryder Henry, Sandra Streiff, Sheila Ali & Waylon Richmond. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. All Terrain Vehicle. Exploring the contemporary landscape through painting & photography. Bound. Woven fiber forms by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/ Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Lakevue. 724-316-9326. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Grain Of Salt. Works by Lizzee Solomon. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder

the Westmoreland County trucks every week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Historical Society. 7 p.m. Calvin Thru Aug. 7 Frick Art & Historical E. Pollins Library, Greensburg. Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. 724-532-1935 x 210. PA 2-1-1. Workshop led by PITTSBURGH FITNESS EXPO. Anne Fogoros , Dir. PA 2-1-1. Meet & greet celebrities, Call to register. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. professional athletes, Olympic Environment & Energy Community champions, & fitness icons. Outreach Center, Larimer. Presenting sports performance 412-904-4718. athletes, strength competitors, & RENAISSANCE DANCE fitness experts though a multitude GUILD. Learn a variety of dances of athletic skills competitions & from the 15-17th centuries. Porter world class sport championships. Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. 4-10 p.m. and Sat., May 23, 9 a.m.Carnegie Mellon University, 5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Oakland. 412-567-7512. Center, Monroeville. 412-310-7781. TRACING OUTLINES. Screening PYRO FEST. Fireworks festival of Tracing Outlines, a documentary w/ live music, food, & more. about Pittsburgh’s Outlines Gallery, 4-10:20 p.m. and Sat., May 23, a cutting-edge art gallery during 3-10:20 p.m. Cooper’s Lake the 1940s. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie Campground, Slippery Rock. Museum of Art, Oakland. 800-854-4705. 412-622-3131. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group BEGINNER TAI CHI acupuncture & CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. guided meditation Friends Meeting House, for stress-relief. Thu www. per pa Oakland. 412-683-2669. pghcitym DeMasi Wellness, o .c SCOTTISH COUNTRY Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. DANCING. Lessons ZEN MEDITATION. 7-8 p.m., social dancing Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, follows. No partner needed. 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Grace Episcopal Church, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SILVER SCREEN FILM CLUB. Screening of “American Sniper”. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Second and Third Fri of every Downtown. 412-281-7141. month and Fourth and Last Fri SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. of every month Irma Freeman Free Scrabble games, all levels. Center for Imagination, Garfield. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon 412-924-0634. Public Library. 412-531-1912. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA SWING CITY. Learn & practice DANCE. A social, traditional swing dancing skills w/ the American dance. No partner Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. needed, beginners welcome, Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. 412-759-1569. Swisshelm Park Community WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. SUMMER FRIDAYS AT THE Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, FRICK. Picnicking, tours, wine bar, yard games, music & different food North Side. 412-224-2827.

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Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Landscape & Abstraction. Work by Patrick Ruane. South Side. 412-431-3337. MINE FACTORY. No Vacancy: Works by Tenants of 201 N. Braddock Ave. Works by the resident artists. Homewood. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! A mixed media show exploring the common teapot in uncommon ways. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods. Work by Ron Donoughe. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. ABC@PGC. A colorful exhibition feat. glass sculptures combined w/ an interactive illuminated word building piece that visitors can touch, rearrange & wear like apparel. Created by Jen Elek & Jeremy Bert. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Scratching the Itch. Work by Travis K. Schwab. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SHAW GALLERIES. Light from the Furnace. Industrial themed artworks by Lyudmila Devlysh, Dawn Tekler, Mark Muse, Dave Kelsch, Sasha Williams & a mystery guest artist. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. A World Imagined: Kelli Connell & Sara Macel. Photography that reflects on authorship, on photographic construction

WOMEN’S SELF CARE SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce stress, tackle anxiety & strengthen boundaries while building practical coping techniques & tools in a confidential, healing & supportive environment. Sat, 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, . 412-366-1300 ex. 129. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634.

& on the ways in which we define relationships through our subjective experiences of them. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Interior open for special occasions. Repetition, Rhythm & Pattern. Work by Kim Beck, Corey Escoto, Lilly Zuckerman, Megan Cotts, Brian Giniewski, Kate McGraw, Crystal Gregory, Alex Paik, Anna Mikolay, Helen O’leary, Lindsey Landfried & David Prince. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the

WED 27 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed

SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Following the Visual Path. Sculpture by Paul Ben-Zvi & works on paper by Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-877-7394. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Selections From The Elgin Park Series. Photographs by Michael Paul Smith. Shaping New Worlds. A national exhibition of constructed photography. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Currently showing, “Still” by Tony Cavalline. Shadyside. 412-913-4966. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. The World Revolves Around You. Work by HC Gilje. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. CONTINUES ON PG. 110

SUN 24

RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 25

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, Ross Park. 412-366-1300. MEMORIAL DAY PARADE. Parade in honor of veterans w/ music, food trucks, a classic car show, living history re-enactors, prizes & face painting. From 40th & Bulter St to the Allegheny Cemetery. 10 a.m. 412-325-1817. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

TUE 26

BEGINNING UKULELE. Learn the basics of selecting & playing a uke. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912.

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TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WHO FREED WHOM?: EMANCIPATION, FREEDOM & SLAVERY IN 19TH CENTURY AMERICA. Historian Dr. Mike Naragon will discuss how anti-slavery evolved into a mass-based reform movement & discuss the ways in which Supreme Court’s Dred Scott [1857] decision shaped political debates over slavery & the meaning of freedom. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912.

AUDITIONS ADVANCED LABOR & CULTURAL

412-926-2488. Auditions will be conducted on August 27, after 3:30pm. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Spring auditions for all voice parts for the 2015/2016 season. Volunteer singers will be heard on May 11, 12 & 13. Professional Core singers will be heard May 17, 18 & 19. For audition criteria & to make an appt, go to www.themendelssohn. org. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Stage & vocal auditions for “Iolanthe”, June 22, 7:30-9pm & June 24, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song from either Gilbert & Sullivan

BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour

STUDIES. Seeking an actress & a singer/guitarist for a production of “Woody & Marjorie: Hard Traveling”. Please be familiar w/ [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] the songs of Woody Guthrie. If you are interested, email outreach@ alcstudies.org with “audition” in the subject line for more info. Thru June 1. 412-353-3756. AFTERSOUND: FREQUENCY, Just Harvest’s Fresh Access enables shoppers to use their ATTACK, RETURN. Artists & EBT, debit and credit cards at farmers’ markets across the practitioners will be considered city. The program is seeking volunteers who can commit to for an extended on-line exhibition 3–4 hours a week. Tasks include helping at the markets or that pushes the envelope of how in the office and conducting outreach in neighborhoods. sound might be visualized. Send your most innovative examples All volunteers will receive training with the program in the form of a high res image, coordinator. For more information, contact Ann Sanders video or url link to miller-gallery@ at anns@justharvest.org or 412-431-8960 x109. andrew.cmu.edu. Deadline July 1. Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-3618. (preferred), standard musical Writing Workshop. afterhappy COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions theater or classical. Accompanist hourreview.com Ongoing. for “Cats”. A prepared song is not provided. Bring resume & INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. nessessary. Dress comfortably in headshot. No appt. necessary. Our Submit your film, 10 minutes clothing & footwear convenient Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic or less. Screenings held on the for dancing. A children’s chorus is Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. second Thursday of every month. being added for young performers PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & ages 6 to 11. June 6, 12-2:30pm & IN THE PARKS. Auditions for Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. June 7, 3:30-6:30pm. Cranberry. “King Lear” w/ Shakespeare in THE NEW YINZER. Seeking Open audition for “Two by Two”, the Parks. Non-union actors only. original essays about literature, to showcase vocal range w/ music, TV or film, & also essays Actors should arrive prepared for movement & cold readings. generally about Pittsburgh. To movement, interaction w/ other June 13, 12-2:30pm & June 14th, see some examples, visit www. group members & a memorized 3:30pm - 6:00pm. Cranberry. newyinzer.com & view the Shakespearean monologue. Auditions for Seussical! the current issue. Email all pitches, Actors may also optionally Musical. Shoes for a dance submissions & inquiries to prepare to perform audition. Ability to play newyinzer@gmail.com. Ongoing. any singing, musical mulitple instruments a THE POET BAND COMPANY. instrument playing, plus. Bring a headshot. www. per Seeking various types of poetry. juggling or tumbling No appt. necessary. a p pghcitym Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. skill. Auditions will be June 23, 6:30-10pm .co com Ongoing. held June 6 at the Blue & June 25, 6:30-10pm. PRINTMAKING 2015. Work must Slide Park, in Frick Park in Cranberry. 724-773-9896. be original, created within the three group sessions. By appt. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. last three years & not previously only. To schedule an audition email Auditions for Disney’s “Peter Pan”. Helen Meade at hmmeade@yahoo. exhibited within a 150 radius Seeking actors age 7 to adult. of Pittsburgh. A printmaking com. Frick Park, Regent Square. Please prepare 16 bars of a song process – relief, intaglio, silkscreen WEXFORD ACTING STUDIO & of your choice. Cold readings lithography, monotype – must be INGOMAR CHURCH. Seeking from the script. Resumes & head central to the execution of all actors, singers & dancers. All ages shots optional. May 23, 2pm entries. Photographs, offset (must be entering 1st grade by Fall at Schoolhouse Art Center & reproductions, or reproductions 2015.) May 29, 4-8pm & May 30, May 24, 7pm at the Seton Center. of artwork originally produced 412-254-4633. 2-7pm. Ingomar United Methodist THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN in another medium will not be Church, Ingomar. 412-364-3613. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Seeking considered. Deadline June 2. young singers from 8th through Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 12th grades. Prepared solo of Shadyside. 304-723-0289. THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting your choice, preferably a classical THE WRITERS’ PRESS POETRY submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ selection (art song, aria, etc.) CHAPBOOK COMPETITION. Open Awards, showcasing independent Carefully selected works from to new & emerging writers. No authors from Southwestern PA & musical theater may be performed, beyond. Entrants must complete the theme restrictions. Prizes include but these should demonstrate a publication w/ Createspace & online entry form (www.theauthors classical singing technique rather online distribution w/ Amazon & zone.com) & submit payment by than belting. To schedule an Barnes & Noble. thewriterspress@ August 1, 2015 for their work to audition call Emily Stewart at gmail.com Thru May 30. be considered. 412-563-6712.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.20/05.27.2015


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Yesterday, I found my 5-year-old son putting things up his butt in the bath. This isn’t the first time — and it’s not just a “Hey! There’s a hole here! Let’s put things in there!” kind of thing. The little dude was rocking quite the stiffy while he did it. I’m well aware of how sexual kids can be (I freaking was!), although I wasn’t quite expecting to be catching him exploring anal at this young age. I want to avoid a trip to the emergency room to extract a toy car or whatever else from his rear end, and I don’t want to see him damage himself. So do you have any suggestions of what I can give him as a butt toy? Yes, I am serious, and no, I’m not molesting him. I know he’s going to do this on his own with or without my knowing, and I want him to be safe! Just today, he proudly showed me a toy car that he stuck up his butt. I told him that it wasn’t a good idea due to the sharp bits on it, and while he may have gotten this one out, one could get stuck and then we would have to go to the hospital. Help! HELPING INGENIOUS SON MAKE OTHER MOVES

“HISMOM has handled this really well so far, and I am impressed with her clarity and calm about this situation,” said Amy Lang, a childhoodsexuality expert and educator, public speaker and author of Birds + Bees + Your Kids (birdsandbeesandkids.com). “But NO BUTT TOYS for 5-year-olds! This is insane and will cause a host of problems — can you imagine if he says to his teacher, ‘Yesterday, I played with my butt plug!’ Instant CPS call!” I’m going to break in for a second: Do NOT buy a butt toy for your 5-year-old kid — if, indeed, you and your 5-year-old kid’s butt actually exist. I’m way more than half convinced that your letter is a fake, HISMOM, something sent in by a Christian conservative out to prove that I’m the sort of degenerate who would tell a mom to buy a butt toy for a 5-year-old. I’m some sort of degenerate, I’ll happily admit, but I’m not that sort. “This clearly isn’t a safe way for her boy to explore his body for a variety of reasons,” said Lang. “His butthole is tiny, it’s an adult-like behavior and it’s germy.” And while adults who are into butt play are proactive and conscientious about hygiene, grubby little 5-year-olds aren’t particularly proactive or conscientious about hygiene — or anything else. “It’s also on the outer edges of ‘typical’ sexual behavior in a young kid,” said Lang. “He may very well have discovered this sort of outlier behavior on his own, but there is a chance that someone showed him how to do this. HISMOM needs to calmly ask her son, ‘I’m curious — how did you figure out that it feels good to put things in your bum?’ Listen to what he has to say. Depending on his response, she may need to get him a professional evaluation to make sure that he’s OK and safe. She can find someone through rainn.org in her area to help.” Regardless of where he picked this trick up, HISMOM, you gotta tell him that it’s not OK to put stuff up his butt because he could seriously hurt himself. I know, I know: You are a progressive, sex-positive parent — if you exist — and you don’t wanna saddle your kid with a complex about butt stuff. But think of all the sexually active adults out there, gay and bi and straight, who have overcome standard-

issue butt-stuff complexes and now safely and responsibly enjoy their assholes and the assholes of others. If you give your son a minor complex by, say, taking his toy cars away until he stops putting them in his ass, he’ll be able to overcome that complex later in life. “She should tell him that she totally gets that it feels good,” said Lang, “but there other ways he can have those good feelings that are safer, like rubbing and touching his penis, and he is welcome to do that any time he wants — as long as he’s in private and alone. You can also tell him the safest thing to put up there is his own finger. But he MUST wash his hands if he does that. And did I mention NO BUTT TOY? Seriously.” Follow Amy Lang on Twitter @birdsandbees. I’m a longtime fan, but I disagree with your advice to CIS, the lesbian who wanted to add “not into trans women” to her online dating profile. I’m a straight guy, and if I met a woman online, I would want to be sure she had female genitalia under her clothes. It’s a requirement for me, and that doesn’t mean I’m not a trans ally. Should I go out on a coffee date with a trans woman just to make her feel better? NOT AN ASSHOLE

There’s nothing about preferring — even requiring — a particular set of genitalia that will result in your being stripped of your trans-ally status, NAA. The issue is adding a few words to your profile (“no trans women”) that might spare you from the horrors of having coffee with one or two trans women over the course of your dating life, but that will definitely make every trans woman who sees your profile feel like shit. The world is already an intensely hostile, unwelcoming place for trans people. Why would someone who considers himself (or herself, in the case of CIS) an ally want to make the world more hostile and unwelcoming? Awkwardness and “wasted” coffee dates are built into the online-dating experience. Trans women who haven’t had bottom surgery aren’t going to spring their dicks on you — they’ll almost always disclose before it gets to that point — and you’re not obligated to sleep with anyone you don’t find attractive. I’m a cis straight woman. I went on dates with a lot of guys from dating websites (200+) before I got married. Just writing to say that I agreed with your advice to the lesbian dating-site user. I agree that putting negative/exclusionary notes like “no trans women” or “no Asian guys” in a dating profile is a turnoff — and not just to the excluded group but to those who find those kinds of comments to be meanspirited and narrow-minded. And are there really so many trans people out there that such a comment is even necessary? Are there really that many trans people out there causing massive confusion on dating websites? And honestly, if someone is trans and you wind up meeting them for coffee, what would be the big deal anyway? It’s just coffee! I don’t understand why this would be such a huge problem.

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

STRAIGHT CHICK IN DC

My point exactly. Check out the Savage Lovecast every week at savagelovecast.com.

pghcitypaper

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.20-05.27

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Aha!” is your mantra for the coming weeks, Gemini. Keep it on the tip of your tongue, ready to unleash. This always-ready-tobe-surprised-by-inspiration attitude will train you to expect the arrival of wonders and marvels. And that will be an effective way to actually attract wonders and marvels! With “Aha!” as your talisman, all of your wake-up calls will be benevolent, and all of the chaos you encounter — or at least most of it — will be fertile.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Do you chronically indulge in feelings of guilt? Do you berate yourself for the wrong turns and sad mistakes you made in the past? These behaviors may be sneaky ways of avoiding change. How can you summon enough energy to transform your life if you’re wallowing in worries and regrets? In presenting the possibility that you might be caught in this trap, I want you to know that I’m not sitting in judgment of you. Not at all. Like you, I’m a Cancerian, and I have periodically gotten bogged down in the very morass I’m warning you against. The bad news is that right now you are especially susceptible to falling under this spell. The good news is that right now you have extra power to break this spell.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

In the TV comedy-drama Jane the Virgin, the fictional character known as Rogelio de la Vega is a vain but lovable actor who performs in telenovelas. “I’m very easy to dress,” he tells the wardrobe supervisor of a new show he’ll be working on. “Everything looks good on me. Ex-

cept for peach. I don’t pop in peach.” What he means is that his charisma doesn’t radiate vividly when he’s wearing peach-colored clothes. Now I want to ask you, Leo: What don’t you pop in? I’m not simply talking about the color of clothes that enable you to shine, but everything else, too. In the coming weeks, it’s crucial that you surround yourself with influences that make you pop.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Are you willing to entertain an outlandish possibility? Here’s my vision: You will soon be offered unexpected assistance, either through the machinations of a “guardian angel” or the messy blessings of a shape-shifting spirit. This divine intervention will make it possible for you to demolish a big, bad obstacle you’ve been trying to find a way around. Even if you have trouble believing in the literal factuality of my prophecy, here’s what I suspect: It will at least come true in a metaphorical sense — which is the truest kind of truth of all.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

“Glory” is the theme song of the film Selma. It’s

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

the 20th century. The narrative is both experimental and tightly structured. Its chaotic streamof-consciousness passages are painstakingly crafted. (Anyone who wonders how the astrological sign of Aquarius can be jointly ruled by the rebellious planet Uranus and the disciplinarian planet Saturn need only examine this book for evidence.) Joyce claimed he labored over Ulysses for 20,000 hours. That’s the equivalent of devoting eight hours a day, 350 days a year, for over seven years. Will you ever work that hard and long on a project, Aquarius? If so, now would be an auspicious time to start.

If you’re planning on breaking a taboo, sneaking into a forbidden zone or getting intimate with an edge-dweller, don’t tell boastful stories about what you’re doing. For now, secrecy is not only sexy; it’s a smart way to keep you safe and effective. Usually I’m fond of you telling the whole truth. I like it when you reveal the nuanced depths of your feelings. But right now I favor a more cautious approach to communication. Until your explorations have progressed further, I suggest that you only discuss them sparingly. As you put your experiments in motion, share the details on a need-to-know basis.

The English writer and caricaturist Max Beerbohm moved away from his native land when he was 37 years old. He settled in Rapallo, Italy, where he lived for much of the rest of his life. Here’s the twist: When he died at age 83, he had still not learned to speak Italian. For 40 years, he used his native tongue in his foreign home. This is a failing you can’t afford to have in the coming months, Pisces. The old proverb “When in Rome, do as the Romans,” has never been so important for you to observe.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

There are many possible ways to create and manage a close relationship. Here’s one of my favorite models: when two independent, selfresponsible souls pledge to help each other activate the best versions of themselves. If you don’t have a partnership like this, the near future will be a favorable time to find one. And if you already do have an intimate alliance in which the two of you synergize each other’s quest for individuation, the coming weeks could bring you breathtaking breakthroughs.

James McNeil Whistler was an influential painter in the latter half of the 19th century. He advocated the “art for art’s sake” credo, insisting that the best art doesn’t need to teach or moralize. As far as he was concerned, its most important purpose was to bring forth “glorious harmony” from chaos. But the immediate reason I’m nominating him to be your patron saint for the coming weeks is the stylized signature he created: an elegant butterfly with a long tail that was actually a stinger. I think you’ll thrive by embodying that dual spirit: being graceful, sensitive and harmonious, and yet also feisty, piquant and provocative. Can you manage that much paradox? I think you can.

an anthem about the ongoing struggle for equal rights by African Americans. I want to borrow one of its lines for your use in the coming weeks: “Freedom is like a religion to us.” I think those will be good words for you to live by. Are you part of a group that suffers oppression and injustice? Are you mixed up in a situation that squashes your self-expression? Are you being squelched by the conditioned habits of your own unconscious mind? It’s high time to rebel. The quest for liberation should be your spiritual calling.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s a challenge to drive a car through Canada’s far north. For example, if you want to get from Dawson in the Yukon Territory to Inuvik in the Northwest Territory, you take Dempster Highway. It’s gravel road for the entire 417-mile trip, so the ride is rough. Bring a spare tire and extra gasoline, since there’s just one service station along the way. On the plus side, the scenery is thrilling. The permafrost in the soil makes the trees grow in odd shapes, almost like they’re drunk. You can see caribou, wolverines, lynx, bears and countless birds. Right now, the sun is up 20 hours every day. And the tundra? You’ve never seen anything like it. Even if you don’t make a trip like this, Capricorn, I’m guessing you will soon embark on a metaphorically similar version. With the right attitude and preparation, you will have fun and grow more courageous.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Aquarian author James Joyce wrote Ulysses, one of the most celebrated and influential novels of

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Renowned author George Bernard Shaw was secure in his feeling that he did good work. He didn’t need the recognition of others to validate his self-worth. The British Prime Minister offered him a knighthood, but he refused it. When he found out he had been awarded a Nobel Prize for Literature, he wanted to turn it down, but his wife convinced him to accept it. The English government also sought to give him the prestigious Order of Merit, but he rejected it, saying, “I have already conferred this order upon myself.” He’s your role model for right now, Taurus. Congratulate yourself for your successes, whether or not anyone else does. Choose one area of your life where you will exceed your personal best in the coming week. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

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NEWS REPORTER

Drivers WANTED

Are you the type of reporter who is as comfortable writing long-form investigative stories as you are intriguing weekly news and feature stories?

Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

Are you as adept at writing breaking news for the web as you are developing more in-depth coverage on weekly deadlines?

If so, Pittsburgh City Paper may have the job for you. As the city's only alternative weekly, we provide a unique voice and perspective in a competitive news town that boasts two daily newspapers, three local news networks and a host of other online and print publications. Our award-winning staff works hard to provide the Pittsburgh region with top-notch news and entertainment coverage. The successful candidate has experience in news reporting and writing, and able to write for print as well online.

Must have a full-size truck/van.

To apply, please email a resume, cover letter and 6-8 writing samples that show the range of your work to Editor Charlie Deitch: cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com. No calls please.

CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 Jim for an application N E W S

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WE’RE HIRING! FULL-TIME CALL CENTER REPRESENTATIVES (LOAN COUNSELORS)

11 Parkway Center • Pittsburgh, PA 15220 • 12PM-9PM Shift • $12.50/Hour • Paid Training, 8AM- 5PM • Medical Benefits • Regular Pay Increases • Tuition Reimbursement Visit PHEAA.org/jobs to apply. PHEA A IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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SINGERS

Immunization...

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

the Power to Protect

May is Hepatitis can be caused by viruses that attack your liver. Hepatitis B virus can be spread by intimate contact. Each year in the U.S., viral hepatitis kills 5,000 people and sends many to the hospital. You can protect yourself from Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B infections with vaccines. ACROSS

1. Spicy applications 5. Texter’s totes closest pal 10. Onetime “S.N.L.”-type show 14. Thin pliable stems of a palm used to make furniture 15. Co-discoverer of radium 16. “The Time Machine” race 17. Sticky icky 18. Prepare, as for a slow pour 19. Basement problem 20. John Kerry was one in 2004 23. Texter’s “conversely” 24. Spoon’s drummer Jim 25. One of the Greek muses 26. Soft-serve selection 28. Somewhat rundown 30. Math class figures 32. Spectacular failure 33. Thanksgiving dessert 34. Brave judge? 35. Air force? 42. Revolutionary on many a t-shirt 43. Waves home? 44. “You’re the ___!” 45. Wipe out 48. Bank freebie 49. Do a DJ’s job

51. Mal de ___ 52. It’s home to roughly 15% of the world’s population: Abbr. 54. Move to a new house 55. Room service provider? 61. Baby shower gift 62. Put in a box 63. Mixer choice 64. “A few author names should do it”: Abbr. 65. 2002 hit for Cam’ron 66. Country singer Church 67. Breaks down 68. College application part 69. Assign places to

12. Put up with 13. YouTube selections 21. Lovebird’s sound 22. Cry from a crib 26. Prohibition repealer, briefly 27. Have second thoughts about 28. 9:30, e.g. 29. To the point 31. “Call of Duty: Black ___” 33. Talk foolishly about something 34. World Basketball powerhouse 36. Some notebooks 37. “People tell me ...” 38. Urge 39. 1970 movie about World War II

40. Check in the mail: Abbr. 41. “I’ve heard better” 45. “Fly ___” (Arsenal’s sponsorship message) 46. Provide an apartment for 47. Drawer’s location 48. Distributes 49. Quick instance 50. Saver? 53. Piece of microfilm 54. Settle a debt 56. Sushi ingredients 57. Both “Curious George” authors 58. Russian parliament 59. Ruler of Valhalla 60. Medieval torture device {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

DOWN

Talk to your health care provider about these immunizations that protect your liver, or contact the Allegheny County Health Department at 412-687-ACHD or www.achd.net.

Immunization strengthens what the body does naturally!

1. Like “American Sniper” or “Fifty Shades of Grey” 2. Magazine of alternative media 3. Period pieces? 4. Highfalutin’ 5. Sugar Ray lead singer Mark 6. Astronaut Gagarin 7. ___-a-brac 8. British actor Albert 9. Was nourished by 10. Penultimate contest 11. Made an exact copy of

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Smokers Wanted! The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health • Be willing to fill outquestionnaires • Not smoke before two sessions. Earn $150 for completing study. For more information call 412-624-8975

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Clinical Research Opportunity for Women Do you suffer from uterine fibroids? DO YOU EXPERIENCE? • Heavy or abnormal periods • Abdominal pain and pressure • Increased need to urinate with your periods

UTERINE FIBROIDS • Negatively impact your quality of life • Doctors in your area are looking for women to participate in a clinical research study. • All investigational medication and study-related care is provided at no cost. Compensation for time and travel may be available. To see if you qualify, visit

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FILLING IN

OUTLINES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

PITTSBURGH, WE’RE TOLD, didn’t much go for modern art until the 1950s. That was when the Carnegie Museum of Art’s Carnegie International, for example, really began to embrace abstraction, surrealism and other 20thcentury forms. But there’s a bit more to the story, as Cayce Mell began learning in 2009, after some typewritten sheets of paper slipped from a library book she had opened. The pages, rather eerily, had been typed a lifetime earlier by Mell’s own grandmother, Betty Rockwell. Nearly as shocking, the text documented the existence of a place most everyone alive had forgotten: Outlines, Pittsburgh’s first gallery of avant-garde art, founded Downtown by Rockwell in 1941, years before anyone would have thought such a thing possible. Nor — at a time when modern art was widely seen as morally suspect and politically subversive — was Outlines just any gallery. Over six years, Rockwell showed work by an avant-garde who’s-who, ranging from the famous (Picasso) to such then-obscure future icons as Jackson Pollock, Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell and Georgia O’Keefe. (Others on the list: Francis Bacon, Henry Moore, Ashile Gorky, Dali, Magritte, Mondrian, Klee.) Many of these artists weren’t even names in New York City yet. Moreover, well before it was fashionable, Rockwell exhibited fineart works of photography, furniture, industrial design — even commercial art. She screened experimental films by the likes of Maya Deren; hosted a lecture by Langston Hughes; and offered classes taught, early in their careers, by groundbreaking composer John Cage and dance pioneer Merce Cunningham.

TRACING OUTLINES 6:30 p.m. Thu., May 21 (5:30 p.m. reception; filmmaker Q&A follows screening). Carnegie Museum of Art Theater, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15 (includes drink token). www.cmoa.org THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL SCREENINGS: June 5, 7 and 10 (Harris Theater, Downtown). www.3riversartsfestival.org

“It’s mind-blowing, it’s jaw-dropping,” nationally known art critic Blake Gopnik has said of Rockwell’s achievement. Gopnik says that Outlines was, in its day, “one of the most important international galleries in North America” — and among the best in the world. Gopnik is one of the experts quoted in Tracing Outlines, the feature-length documentary that Cayce Mell began making shortly after finding those papers. The film, produced by Scott Sullivan, gets it first public screening on May 21, at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Mell’s project was aided immeasurably by her rediscovery of the “meticulous” scrapbook that Betty Rockwell kept on Outlines … but which had sat in a drawer at the Carnegie for more than a decade following Rockwell’s death, in 1998. Rockwell was the youngest child of the Pittsburgh-based industrialist who started the company that became aerospace giant Rockwell International. She founded Outlines at age 21, with $1,000 in college-graduation money. Rockwell closed Outlines in 1947, by which time it had moved twice: first from 341 Boulevard of the Allies to the second floor of Oakland’s Pittsburgh Playhouse, then back Downtown. But the six decades of

Betty Rockwell at Outlines in the 1940s

{IMAGE COURTESY OF CAYCE MELL}

oblivion to which the gallery was consigned in death might have stung Rockwell less than its reception while alive. For instance, though Rockwell sent 100 fancy invitations to Outlines’ inaugural press reception, “no one” came, she recalled. Her scrapbook proves that the local and regional press did cover Outlines. But many of the yellowing headlines today sound either condescending — “Art Gallery Opened by Girl” — or uncomprehending: “Weird French Film Shown at Outlines,” says a review of Jean Cocteau’s surrealist classic The Blood of a Poet. Rockwell herself estimated that “maybe a hundred” Pittsburghers frequented Outlines. After it closed, her busy life included raising three daughters and, in 1971, founding the Society for Contemporary Craft (which lives on in the Strip District). But Mell guesses that, even before she developed the brain tumor that incapacitated her, Rockwell “didn’t discuss [Outlines] because it was painful.” Ironically, Mell says, Outlines shut its doors just as post-war America was beginning to regard modern art not as a pariah, but as “part of everyday life,” its styles echoed in film, furniture and food packaging. As Robert Manley, of Christie’s Auction House, says in Tracing Outlines, Rockwell opened her gallery “just a little too soon.”

OVER SIX YEARS, BETTY ROCKWELL SHOWED WORK BY AN AVANT-GARDE WHO’S-WHO. But that’s not quite the whole story, either. That small band of Outlines devotees included artist Balcomb Greene, who taught at the Carnegie Institute of Technology and often took students to exhibits. Those students include famed painter Philip Pearlstein, who in Tracing Outlines recalls visiting the gallery with his classmate Andy Warhola. And in the film, critic Gopnik — who’s writing a biography of Andy Warhol — speculates that Rockwell’s venue was where Warhol got the idea to do silkscreen as painting. More than that, according to Gopnik’s educated guess, Warhol “learned how to be on the cutting edge at Outlines gallery.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

Summer Guide 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 20 May 20, 2015

Summer Guide 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 20 May 20, 2015