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CONSTRUCTION CRITICISM: WHY ARE SO MANY OF THE CITY’S NEW BUILDINGS ARCHITECTURAL FAILURES? 36

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015


EVENTS 5.15 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

5.16 – 10am KID CITY DANCE PARTY WITH DJ KELLYMOM Warhol entrance space FREE

5.29 – 7pm OPENING CELEBRATION: PEARLSTEIN, WARHOL, CANTOR: FROM PITTSBURGH TO NEW YORK Free with museum admission

6.6 – 10am HALF PINT PRINTS Education studio Free with museum admission

Betty Douglas & Co.

6.8-6.12 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Andy Warhol: Pop Portraits and Selfies – Ages 8-10

6.19 – 8pm Warhol theater | Tickets $10 / $8 Members & students | visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes Betty Douglas & Co., for an evening of jazz, presented in connection with the exhibition Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Ms. Douglas is a Pittsburgh-based artist and musician, who studied in Carnegie Tech’s Department of Painting and Design, overlapping with Philip Pearlstein, Andy Warhol, and Dorothy Cantor, and she became the program’s first African-American graduate in 1951. She and her band have developed a set reflecting the era of the late 1940s and early 1950s, including classics by such iconic performers as Billie Holiday, Eartha Kitt, and Mabel Mercer. N E W S

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015


05.13/05.20.2015 {PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 19

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

this facility was located in 06 “Whether trendy Lawrenceville or somewhere not so trendy, GASP’s concerns would be the same.” — GASP Legal Director Joe Osbourne on emissions from Lawrenceville foundry, McConway & Torley

[VIEWS]

posthumous election to county 15 “A council would be the perfect tribute to a public official who wasn’t afraid to stand alone in the face of policies she believed to be wrong.” — Charlie Deitch on the death of Allegheny County Councilor Barbara Daly Danko

[TASTE]

spirit of the bottle shop is to do 19 “The for beer what we’ve done with food.” — Regina Koetters, on Marty’s Market’s new bottle shop

“I think that humans are romantically in love with the earth.” — Dendritic Arbor guitarist Max Beehner on the themes of the band’s new record

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER}

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{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

“It seems like a film designed in a lab for the laziest girls-night-out ever.” — Al Hoff reviews Hot Pursuit

STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS]

be better off if this 36 “We’d forgettable design were forgotten.” — Charles Rosenblum on the proposed U.S. Steel building

[LAST PAGE]

Latino community in Pittsburgh 55 “The needs visibility.” — Tara Sherry-Torres of Café Con Leche on programs highlighting Latino culture

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 49 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 52 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

“THEY’VE BEEN A GOOD NEIGHBOR EXCEPT FOR SMELLS AND AIR POLLUTION.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

View a photo slideshow of a steel foundry in Lawrenceville, including a panoramic view of the changing neighborhood and a timeline of events, at www.pghcitypaper.com. Our feature on the steel foundry debate begins to the right.

This week: Visit East Liberty, Transylvania or Spain. Your choice. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Tina Gaser, who lives near the foundry, says she doesn’t want the facility to close but expects that the Allegheny County Health Department will ensure residents healthy air to breathe.

GROWING DEBATE @yinzsterpgh’s photo from the South Side is our #CPReaderArt choice this week. Tag your Instagram spring photos as #CPReaderArt, and we may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to see Kenny Chesney, The Big Revival Tour at Heinz Field on May 30. Contest ends May 21.

CORRECTION

The election chart for Pittsburgh City Council District 9 in our May 6 issue omitted candidate Judith Ginyard’s endorsement by the Steel City Stonewall Democrats. The full, corrected chart can be found online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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ARKING IS SCARCE along Lawrenceville’s main artery, Butler Street, on a Friday night. Bars and restaurants are packed. Come Saturday morning, a line snakes out of a gourmet French bakery. Development in the neighborhood is booming. “We’re the only neighborhood I can think of that has a single-screen movie theater, a bowling alley and a pinball arcade within a block,” says Matthew Galluzzo, of the Lawrenceville Corp., a neighborhood development group active since the 1980s. The 2.5-square mile residential and commercial district boasts old and new, as illustrated in the corporation’s logo — a World War I soldier signifies legacy, and a green vine represents growth. “History in

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

the Remaking,” reads the tagline below the image. A look around the neighborhood reveals the new Children’s Hospital towering over the historic Allegheny Cemetery and

Is an emissions permit at an historic Lawrenceville foundry just about clean air — or is the neighborhood’s future growth at odds with its past? {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} shiny, new condos built just across from riverfront industry. A banner hanging on a chain-link fence advertises “luxury urban living” in planned dwellings with

rooftop decks. It is a neighborhood of contradictions. While most housing stock was built before the 1940s, rents now average $734 a month, according to census data, nearly double what they were 15 years ago. The number of affordable housing units built since 2012 can be counted on two hands. Yet 14 percent of families earn below the poverty line and most kids enrolled in neighborhood schools qualify for free or reduced lunch. “The neighborhood is still in need,” says Galluzzo. “That gets lost in gloss.” Cut through that gloss and head toward the river — down the street from the newly built condos — and you can see a huge remenant of what Lawrenceville once predominantly was: a riverfront CONTINUES ON PG. 08


Tracing Outlines Film Screening Thursday, May 21 5:30–9 p.m.: Cash Bar Open 6:30–8:30 p.m.: Screening and Q&A $15 ($10 Carnegie Museums Members) Includes one drink token The untold history of Pittsburgh's Outlines Gallery, one of the most cutting-edge art galleries of the 1940s. Join director Cayce Mell and producer Scott Sullivan for the first Pittsburgh screening of their groundbreaking documentary feature! Seating is limited. Buy tickets online at CMOA.org/tracing-outlines.

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McConway & Torley steel foundry in Lawrenceville

industrial neighborhood. At the end of 48th Street sits McConway & Torley, a 19th-century steel foundry, still operating today with hundreds of workers melting scrap metal and pouring steel castings. The hidden-away foundry supplies much of the U.S. rail industry with important parts that keep railcars safely connected. But the needs of the neighborhood, residents say, include less noise, less truck traffic and less air pollution, part of which they attribute to the foundry. “They’ve been a good neighbor except for smells and air pollution,” says Tina Gaser, a resident who bought her home 10 years ago and rents part of her building to a small boutique toy shop. Taking the company by surprise, the Allegheny County Health Department is just now investigating how much dust and particles from the steelmaker end up in the air and, presumably, in the lungs of Lawrenceville residents. The agency has proposed to drastically cut what the foundry is allowed to produce, which the company says could result in fewer jobs at the plant. M&T is at the heart of a debate in a changing neighborhood — a complex examination of health and air, abundant and stretched resources, and socioeconomics. And the question that everyone is trying to answer is whether this urban growth and successful industry can co-exist. “It’s our job to make sure there’s a community conversation around it,” Galluzzo says. LAWRENCEVILLE SITS along the Allegheny

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River, spanning from 34th to 62nd streets. It was named after a War of 1812 vet-

eran, and war catalyzed Lawrenceville’s birth and became a theme in its tragedies and industry. It was the site of a 30-acre government-owned arsenal, which tragically exploded during the Civil War, killing about 80 workers, mostly young girls. By mid-century, steel mills began to dot the riverfront, including McConway & Torley, established in 1868 by William McConway and John Torley. By the 1880s, Lawrenceville’s river bank was lined with mills. A couple held on through the 1980s, but today, only McConway & Torley survives. M&T’s website boasts that it’s “as old as the American Railroad industry.” The foundry makes steel products for the rail industry, including its signature railcar coupler. Today, its parent company, Trinity CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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Industries, which has owned it since 1998, line for issuing that permit in the late touts it as the leading producer of railroad 1990s. The health department disputes couplers in the U.S. that deadline. “The manufacturing of a freight“Because M&T was engaged in many car coupler is more sophisticated than signiďŹ cant modiďŹ cations/upgrades to the people realize,â€? says Russell Peterson, plant over the past several years, work on CEO of Carload Express, which owns and the operating permit was deferred,â€? Jim operates the railroad that runs through Thomspon, deputy director, said in an Lawrenceville and does business with email to City Paper. McConway & Torley. “Consider the enviIn 2010, the company applied to the ronment it is in. Some trains are pulling county for permits for new furnaces. And 18,000 tons. It must be an extraordinarily in a legal settlement with GASP, the comreliable device.â€? pany agreed to use ďŹ lters to offset emisToday, the foundry employs 420 non- sions from the new furnaces. In 2011, the union workers who start at $ 15/hour ACHD instituted the ďŹ rst-ever limit on plus beneďŹ ts but can average up to $ 20 how much steel M&T could melt: 92,500 — 88 percent of whom live in Allegheny tons per year. County, according to the company. Last fall, GASP — whose ofďŹ ces The company will not say how are located in GarďŹ eld, just up many live in Lawrenceville, the hill from Lawrenceville — E R nor would it grant City Paper wrote a letter to the health O M SEE AND an interview. department, pointing out PHOTOSINE OF L E Trinity is based in Dalthat the foundry had never IM T E A NCEVILLy las, incorporated in Delabeen issued an operating LAWREw it c gh at ww .p ware, and in North Amerpermit under current EPA m o c r. e pap ica runs 18 facilities that regulations, and followed manufacture tank barges, that up with a 60-day warning construction materials, conthat it would take legal action if tainers, wind towers and railroad ACHD didn’t. products. An April letter to investors put What the health department did next total revenues at $ 6.2 billion and net is now the source of controversy. In a Janincome at $678 million. uary review of McConway & Torley’s operBack at the steel foundry along the ations, the health department stated that Allegheny River, scrap metal continues it would no longer accept as an emissions to be melted and cast into railroad prod- control a condition the foundry had been ucts. However, M&T has been operating reporting for years — that the walls of its without a federal air-emissions permit building had been keeping 50 percent of since the 1990s. The Group Against Smog its dust and particles away from the comand Pollution (GASP), a local air-quality munity. “The Department no longer alwatchdog, says that the Allegheny Coun- lows for use of buildings as a control dety Health Department missed its dead- vice for particulate matter,â€? ACHD stated.


Start your weekend early at McConway & Torley’s entrance on 48th and Hatfield streets

“In the draft permit, we assumed no building efficiency,” says Jim Thompson, deputy director of the health department. “If more is leaking out, then they can’t operate as much.” Now, says the health department, if McConway & Torley wants to remain in its current permit category — as a minor source of synthetic pollution — its permitted production must drop from 92,500 tons of melted steel per year to just 21,250. Last year, the foundry melted twice that, according to a public statement by Harry Klodowski, the company’s environmental legal counsel, at the health department’s hearing on the foundry’s permit last month. Jumping into the major-pollution permit category would mean more fees and regulations for the foundry. As to actual emissions, however, the health department doesn’t know how much particulate matter is wafting out of McConway & Torley. It says it will take the next several months to monitor testing conducted by an independent company. The threat of production loss, along with the fresh scrutiny of an industrial facility operating without the proper permits has roused public debate. In an editorial last week, for instance, the Pittsubrgh Tribune Review called GASP a “rabble-rouser,” saying that “eco-wackos and hipsters” started this fight. “Some interest groups are throwing

out words like ‘benzene,’ ‘particulate matter’ and ‘manganese’ as a scare tactic,” Klodowski said in his public hearing testimony. McConway & Torley executives held their ground the entire night at the front of the room, lining the space behind the podium. “We agree that safeguards should be in place to protect those that live and work in the facility and the neighborhood.” “My understanding is that [the health department] changed the formula [to calculate emissions] without warning. That goes beyond rude,” said Carload Express’ Peterson in a phone interview. He also testified at April’s public hearing about the importance of McConway & Torley to the railroad industry. Workers and their family members expressed concern for the more than 400 jobs at the foundry. Though the foundry didn’t melt its full allowance last year, they said production cuts would cost jobs. “I want you to go and ask the people in Homestead and Duquesne if they would like the mills back,” said Russell Lange in his testimony. He identified himself as a Lawrenceville resident and foundry employee, who also had time under his belt at U.S. Steel. “I bet you they would trade the low-paying, dead-end jobs and high crime in a heartbeat for good days … knowing you had a good job.” Tina Gaser, the woman who lives near the foundry and rents her building’s

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A sign for new lofts being developed on Hatfield and 47th streets boasts rooftop decks.

storefront, painted a different picture at the meeting. “In October 2013, 911 received a call about a carbon-monoxide detector blaring. My husband made that call. He and I both felt nauseous and light-headed, and the Pittsburgh Fire Department arrived. They tested all sources in our home and found no internal leak … they determined that it came from outside, possibly from the plant down the street,” Gaser said in her testimony. In her testimony, she said that last summer her husband had a stroke caused by a heart rhythm that developed a blood clot, which traveled to his brain. “[It] was attributed directly to environmental causes,” she told the crowd. A monitor along the chain-link fence surrounding the facility has been measuring heavy-metal particulate matter since spring 2011. Results published on the health department’s website show manganese levels averaging 50 percent above U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limits. The EPA cites studies indicating a “consistent pattern” of neurotoxicity from exposure. The health department’s Thompson says the EPA told him that the measurement was no longer valid, and to use a different guideline developed by the Centers for Disease Control, which is more lax. The filter has recorded manganese levels above that CDC limit nine times over the last three years. “Given the proximity of the industry to the community … and ACHD’s established policy on sources of chemical-toxicity

information, the more protective [EPA] value is the one that ought to be used,” Rachel Filippini, executive director of GASP, said in an email to CP. The EPA did not respond to inquiries about why it switched directives. “Years of data from an upwind monitor indicating excessive levels of pollutants raises concerns of what is really coming off of the plant and into the neighborhood,” said Mark Dowiak, who lives in Beaver County but is remodeling a Lawrenceville house he recently purchased near the foundry. If steel production took a plunge at the foundry, it’s doubtful that Lawrenceville would follow the trajectory of places like Homestead. While some workers there might be relying on jobs, the local economy is not relying on the foundry. Just in the past two years, 36 new businesses have opened. The highest list price for a residential property on the market right now is $748,000. The crime rate has decreased significantly over the past decade, according to Lawrenceville United. “The challenge is figuring out if those things can co-exist and under what conditions,” Galluzzo says. “It’s really the charge of the ACHD to default to protecting community health.” Joel Haight, director of the University of Pittsburgh’s Safety Engineering program, says there are several things the health department needs to consider. One is whether the filters on the foundry’s furnaces are the right size and maintained properly.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015


The future of transit is now and we are working to improve your ride. Look for bus tracking technologies and other innovations to keep you better informed. Getting around town has never been so easy.

FUTURE OF TRANSIT IS NOW THE

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GROWING DEBATE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

“One of the things with heavy metals is that when you melt them, they actually will evaporate, but they condense really quickly to a very, very small particulate size,” Haight says. Small particles can be more dangerous because they can be inhaled deeply into the lungs. “There are a lot of questions that would need to be answered before major changes are made. I think the health department should be responsible enough to ask the correct questions.” Could M&T maintain current production levels but simply install better emission controls? “Certainly the technology exists,” says Anthony Deardo of Pitt’s Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science department. “It’s a pretty small operation. Usually we’re talking about millions of tons per year.” M&T has had residential neighbors since its inception. If air quality has been in the public’s consciousness since the 1970s, and permits for minor sources were due in the 1990s, why target the foundry now? “Permitted facilities in Allegheny County [are] competing for attention [and] … the ones classified as major

sources tend to get more attention,” said Joe Osbourne, legal director for GASP. “Ideally, we or ACHD would have become aware of the issue sooner, but hindsight is 20/20.” Asked why the ACHD didn’t address M&T’s missing permit sooner, Sandra Etzel, chief engineer at the ACHD, said that perhaps the department was shortstaffed. Seven people in the health department’s air-quality program are in charge of permitting 410 facilities in the county. Of those, 31 are classified as major sources. Meanwhile, among Lawrenceville residents who’ve spoken publicly about the issue, several say they don’t want the foundry to shut down. They just want to know they are safe. M&T’s closure “is certainly not my wish,” Gaser says. “But we do expect clean air to breathe.” GASP agrees. “This isn’t an issue of jobs versus the environment or old Pittsburgh versus new Pittsburgh,” Osbourne says. “Whether this facility was located in trendy Lawrenceville or somewhere not so trendy, GASP’s concerns would be the same.” A M U RRAY @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

LAST CAMPAIGN

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} IT WAS LATE in the afternoon on Nov. 6, 2013, and I was sitting in the Crazy Mocha on Fourth Street with Barbara Daly Danko. She was pissed and confused. “Charlie, it’s a park!” she told me, incredulous that anyone would think drilling under Deer Lakes Park was a good idea. But that was the plan then being put in motion by Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald. Even “people who are in favor of drilling generally, are still against the idea about drilling on or near our parks,” she said. It was just one of many issues that the progressive Democrat from Regent Square fought for — regardless of the opposition — during her nearly four years on council. Sadly, the 61-year-old Danko died May 6 after a 10-year battle with cancer. It goes without saying that her death is an immeasurable loss to her husband, George, and her children. But her passing is also a huge loss to the citizens of Allegheny County. A longtime fixture in 14th Ward politics, she was appointed to county council in 2011 to replace Fitzgerald, who was running for county executive. By all accounts, the two were longtime friends, but that didn’t make her a rubber stamp for his plans and policies. Nowhere was that more obvious than on drilling issues. She voted against his plan to drill at the Pittsburgh International Airport and was the most vocal critic of the proposal to drill under county parks. That’s what led us to meet for that pre-council-meeting coffee in November 2013. The previous September, she had introduced a three-year moratorium on drilling in county parks. But two months later, the bill languished in committee, unable to get a fair hearing. She suspected Fitzgerald had something, if not everything, to do with blocking the bill, and she was frustrated. But she refused to stop fighting. That spirit is the reason that, despite her health struggles, she decided to run for re-election. She faced a stiff challenge from Caroline Mitchell, a chemical engineer and lawyer from Squirrel Hill running with the support of Fitzgerald. Despite that, however, she received endorsements from the county Democratic committee and the 14th Ward Independent Democrats club. And despite her passing, her name will appear on the ballot for District 11 council representative on May 19. Vote for her. A posthumous election to

Barbara Daly Danko

county council would be the perfect tribute to a public official who wasn’t afraid to stand alone in the face of policies she believed to be wrong. Barbara Daly Danko was one of the few unapologetically independent voices on Allegheny County Council. Maybe the only independent Democratic voice who was seeking a new term, as county council has tended to follow Fitzgerald’s lead on, well, most everything. Her opponent could be that voice; I don’t know. Here’s what I do know: When no one else would stand up and fight, Barbara stood and fought. When dozens of anti-fracking activists and West Deer residents spent hours at every council meeting for months speaking straight about the folly of drilling under a public park, she stayed and listened to each one of them. When it came time to stand up for her principles even in the face of her friend, Fitzgerald, she did. In her final weeks, Daly Danko penned a letter to her constituents that included this request: “It was previously explained to me that my name will remain on the primary ballot later this month. If my nomination and/or election is vacated, it is my understanding that the Democratic Committee members from County Council District 11 will elect someone to fill the void. I hope that they will carefully consider all interested candidates and support someone who will study the issues and always vote based on the best interests of the citizens of Allegheny County.” That’s what Barbara Daly Danko did, and that’s why she still deserves support. The post-primary process to fill Danko’s seat could result in Mitchell getting the job anyway. But it will be Barbara’s term, and hopefully whoever is chosen to replace her will share her independent, fighting spirit and won’t be afraid to stand up for his or her beliefs regardless of the opposition.

“HER PASSING IS A HUGE LOSS TO THE CITIZENS OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY.”

CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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A funeral procession thwarted a man’s attempt to rob a 79-year-old woman in San Antonio, Texas. “We were going really, really slow, so as we passed this bus stop, there was this elderly lady, [and] a gentleman was knocking her around and was pulling on her purse,” witness Robert Garcia said. “Before I turned around, about eight of the mourners were all around him, getting him down, and then we flagged the police officer that was guiding the procession.” Joe Carpenter, 41, was charged with aggravated robbery. (San Antonio’s KSAT-TV)

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Tony Jerome Torbert Jr., 20, attracted the attention of authorities in Brevard County, Fla., after he posted an ad on Craigslist offering “Legit Counterfeit $$.” Sheriff’s deputies executed a search warrant and seized a printer, a computer and counterfeit currency. (Florida Today)

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German police were summoned at 9:40 a.m. after a woman reported that an intoxicated 37-year-old man attacked her and other passersby at a Munich market with a mouse. Police confiscated the mouse, but returned two hours later after a complaint that the same man was throwing a different white mouse at pedestrians. (Germany’s The Local)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

CODE: AJ44

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As mobile devices hog telephone numbers, new area codes created to meet mathematical demand are causing old ones to become status symbols, for which some people are willing to pay. And others are selling. Ed Mance, who operates PhoneNumberGuy.com, buys numbers in bulk from companies that no longer need them. He sells them for between $299 and $799, although his biggest sale was a “nine-of-a-kind” number for $95,000. Mance notes that the area code most in demand is Los Angeles’s 310, whose numbers are the hardest to secure. Many of Mance’s customers are less interested in the area code than the numbers around them, including ones that spell out words. “HURT and PAIN are the two most in-demand numbers,” Mance said, because they’re coveted by personal-injury lawyers. (The Washington Post)

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A 29-year-old California man was diagnosed with a torn tendon in his thumb caused by playing Candy Crush Saga on his smartphone “all day for 6 to 8 weeks” with his left hand, according to a study reported in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. One of the authors, San Diego orthopedic surgeon Dr. Dori Cage, cautioned that the rise in the number of people with smartphones who spend lots of time texting or tapping on their cellphones or tablets has the potential to lead to a “texting thumb,” a repetitive stress injury that affects the thumb and wrist. She said that people experiencing pain from texting might instead use voice control, such as Siri on an iPhone, or “actually pick up the phone and call somebody” to communicate. (U-T San Diego)

Just months after the Sandy Hook massacre, the school district in Halfway, Ore., decided to stage a surprise “active-shooter drill” at its elementary school on a day when only teachers were there. Linda McLean, 56, said a man dressed in a black hoodie and goggles burst into her classroom, aimed a pistol at her face and fired. “You’re dead,” he said and left. Panic ensued as the gunman went from room to room, firing what turned out to be blanks. One teacher wet her pants. Teachers later learned the gunman was the district’s safety officer and that officials had alerted law enforcement so they wouldn’t respond to emergency calls from distressed teachers. Insisting that the incident caused her to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder, McLean in April filed suit against Pine Eagle School District, the safety officer and others. (Portland’s The Oregonian)

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law’s mobile home, through a recliner she was sitting in and into her back. The 74-year-old victim wasn’t seriously hurt. Authorities do recommend shooting armadillos as an effective way of getting rid of them but suggest using a shotgun, which, investigator Bill Smith said, has “a spread pattern with a lot less range.” (Albany’s WALB-TV)

Radio station KREL-AM in Colorado Springs, Colo., abandoned its unprofitable sports-talk format to become the nation’s first radio station dedicated to marijuana programming. Its new call letters are KHIG. KHIG-AM airs three local shows: “Wake and Bake” from 7 to 9 a.m., “High Noon” from noon to 1 p.m. and “High Drive” from 5 to 7 p.m. It also broadcasts three hour-long newscasts from Los Angeles-based National Marijuana News Service and programming from Chicagobased RadioMD. Six local medical-marijuana dispensaries signed up as advertisers. “I just saw a business opportunity,” general manager Mike Knar said, noting that public response has been “amazing.” (Colorado Springs’ The Gazette)

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Larry McElroy, 54, fired his 9 mm pistol at an armadillo outside his home, but wound up shooting his mother-in-law. Sheriff’s investigators in Lee County, Ga., determined the bullet ricocheted off the animal, hit a fence, went through the back door of his mother-in-

Hoping to relieve traffic congestion in Washington’s Puget Sound area, state Rep. Jesse Young proposed using decommissioned Navy aircraft carriers to form a 3,700-foot-long bridge linking Bremerton and Port Orchard. “I know that people from around the world would come to drive across the deck of an aircraft-carrier bridge, number one,” Young explained. “Number two, it’s the right thing to do from my standpoint because this is giving testimony and a legacy memorial to our greatest generation.” (Britain’s Daily Mail)

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As Americans write fewer checks (down 50 percent since 2000, according to the Federal Reserve), Google reported that searches for “how to write a check” are five times more prevalent than 10 years ago. Pennsylvania leads the nation in such searches, followed by Delaware, New York and Hawaii. Even with the decline of checks in favor of electronic and card payments, which have tripled since 2000, the Federal Reserve said Americans are writing 18.3 billion checks per year. (The Washington Post)

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S BY R O L AN D S WE E T. AUT HE NT I C AT I ON ON D E M AN D.


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THE FIRM SHRIMP, WITH A LIGHT, CRISP COATING, WERE BRINY AND JUICY

FRESH PIZZA {BY AL HOFF} There is no shortage of pizza joints in Pittsburgh, and yet a new spot can still entice. Pizza Taglio has taken over the old AVA spot in East Liberty, and on a warm night, the open-to-the-street, wellpolished space looked — and smelled — quite inviting. Taglio has a simple menu: a dozen pizzas (split evenly between white and red), an antipasto plate and fruit sorbets. The pizzas are “Roman style,” meaning they have a thinner and crispier crust. Let others debate crusts; there will be plenty of discussion which of pizzas to order. One pizza would just about feed two, but leftovers heated up deliciously; get a couple of flavors. Among the whites: carbonara (with an egg), “The Jackie” (with prosciutto and truffle cream), or the more virtuous-sounding cauliflower. I doubled down on dairy with the ricotta pie (fresh mozzarella, dollops of ricotta, blistered cherry tomatoes and arugula). It was luxurious, without being greasy, and the half-clove of garlic I uncovered thankfully didn’t translate to a toogarlicky white base. On the red side, I regretfully passed by the Margherita and the “Bob Malnati” (with smoked mozzarella and Calabrian chilis), and picked “The Greenpointer”: mozzarella, spicy sopressata and Mike’s Hot Honey. Honey on pizza? No way! But the gamble paid off: The chili-infused honey played well with the light tomato base, giving it a deep fruity brightness. Both pizzas were almost too thin in the middle — the toppings soaked through and folding was necessary. So don’t wear your white linen suit, but when in Rome … or the East End, do stop by Pizza Taglio. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

126 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-7410

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FEED

The snow is gone, and the fruits and vegetables are back! Well, some of the early bloomers, like greens, at least. Several Citiparks farmers markets open this week, where shoppers can find produce, plants, baked goods and assorted canned foodstuffs. See www.citiparks.net for the market schedules and locations.

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{PHOTO BY BRIAN KALDORF}

The “Mess Beni”: chorizo, roasted pepper, onions, stewed tomatoes and poached eggs

ATTENTION TO DETAILS {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

E

VEN IN A CITY increasingly accustomed to high-profile restaurant openings, The Commoner stands out. This is partly due to its location within the Kimpton Hotel Monaco in the former Reed Smith building Downtown; the first of a wave of boutique hotels to open in Pittsbugh, it is a potent symbol of both upscale style and economic rebirth. But the advance buzz on The Commoner is also partly attributable to its executive chef Dennis Marron, brought in from well-regarded restaurants in the Washington, D.C., area. In any case, it’s the first time we can remember being unable to reserve a table for a Thursday. When we finally did get in, the interior — an homage to industrial Pittsburgh — struck us as one of the city’s most stunning, despite being well below street level. But big, high windows admit daylight and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

frame unusual views of the Downtown skyline, while leaving plenty of wall space for old maps of the city’s riverfronts, blown up and printed onto antiqued mirrors. The Commoner manages to recall Pittsburgh’s

THE COMMONER 458 Strawberry Way, Downtown. 412-230-4800 HOURS: Breakfast Mon.-Fri. 6:30-10:30 a.m.; Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; dinner Sun.-Wed. 4 p.m.-midnight.; Thu.-Sat. 4 p.m.-1 a.m.; Bruch Sat.-Sun. 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $6-16; entrees $14-30 LIQUOR: Full bar

(suddenly glorified) industrial grit while somehow still appearing shiny and new — a neat trick. The name refers to William Pitt, a.k.a.

The Great Commoner, but also hints at the restaurant’s concept, which is essentially updated tavern and comfort food. Hearty favorites like burgers, steak frites, seafood chowder and flatbread share the menu with slightly more adventurous items, like steak tartare and bone marrow, along with a healthy assortment of notyour-grandma’s-vegetables, including (of course) brown-butter Brussels sprouts, but also charred cauliflower with sage-walnut pesto and a medley of roots and tubers. Emblematic of The Commoner’s new approach to the old were scampi and chips. Put buttery garlic sauce out of mind and picture several large shrimp stacked on a vertical skewer alongside a comparable skewer of waffle fries, also impaled. The firm shrimp were briny and juicy, their light, crisp coating providing contrast


and crunch — when it didn’t slip off. The waffle fries, also light and crisp, benefited from a modern dusting of malt vinegar powder, which provided welcome tang without sogginess. The Scotch deviled egg, served halved, was a more traditional success. The addition of a puff of deviled yolk atop the boiled one helped the egg stand up to the strong, salty savor of the sausage coating, which was just the right thickness. The menu offers two burgers: the PA burger — a mix of ground beef and lamb, with white cheddar, watercress and smoked-yellow-tomato ketchup — and the intriguing onion-soup burger, an all-beef patty topped with onion soup, Gruyere and aioli on an onion bun. We ordered the former. It was very tender, and so finely ground that its texture was almost smooth. Jason found it overly salted, but Angelique wasn’t bothered, and liked the almost-pungent sharpness of the substantial slab of melted cheddar. The ketchup bore about as much resemblance to Heinz as grape juice to Bordeaux; its astringent tang was a welcome counterpoint to the hearty meat. Overall, this was a thoughtfully constructed burger, if the patty itself was unexceptional. Steak-and-ale pie with a suet (beef-fat shortening) crust, a pub classic from The Great Commoner’s homeland, was charming enough with a little ceramic penguin as a steam chimney and a substantial cap that was a lovely golden brown. But beneath the crust were such big chunks of meat and root vegetables that the pie had to be almost completely dismantled in order to prepare bite-sized pieces. The beerbased gravy was thin and bland, and while the short rib was tender and the vegetables suitably cooked, the crust deserved better. Then there was the strip steak, a favorite cut for its tender, fine-grained texture paired with big beef flavor. But even when we sliced The Commoner’s strip thinly, bites were tough, even stringy, and the beef flavor was obscured by a smokiness in the crust that would enhance a richer, bolder cut like ribeye, but here seemed out of place. Fries on the side were fantastic, and the house steak sauce — adorably served from a cow pitcher — was tasty, distinct from the default A-1 style, yet offering the same complex blend of sweet, tangy and savory flavors. But the point of a good steak is never, ever, the sides. Traditional cooking relies on painstaking recipes and foolproof technique to wrest satisfying meals out of challenging ingredients. But the modern American style relies on impeccable ingredients and chefdriven reinvention. This leaves but a thin margin for a mediocre steak or a stew that doesn’t quite come together. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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{BY DREW CRANISKY}

EVERY SUNDAY

SIX-PACKS AND SAUSAGES

Farm Fresh All Summer Long Starting May 10th 10am to 2pm

Marty’s Market adds a bottle shop

I often hear people griping about having to go to three (or 10 or 12, if they’re dramatic) different places to get everything they need for the weekend. “Here for the meat, there for the beer, a whole other store to get the wine!” What a nightmare. But there is hope, and its name is Marty’s Market. Already a destination for local meat and produce, craft coffee and more, Marty’s recently upped its one-stop appeal by adding a bottle shop. “The spirit of the bottle shop is to do for beer what we’ve done with food,” explains Regina Koetters, owner and founder of the Strip District destination. That means creating an atmosphere that celebrates the producer and educates the consumer. Marty’s bottle selection, curated by beverage guru Will Groves, highlights local brewers, and Koetters extends those farm-focused sourcing values to beer and other libations. “The most important people aren’t in the store,” she added. “They’re out in the fields.”

1014 Fifth Avenue • 412-281-2583 (BLUE) www.pghuptown.com • www.facebook.com/UptownPgh

“THE SPIRIT OF THE BOTTLE SHOP IS TO DO FOR BEER WHAT WE’VE DONE WITH FOOD.” The bottle shop, which occupies a small but prominent section in the middle of the store, currently carries about 225 varieties in bottles and cans. Marty’s plans to increase that number and will rotate the selection frequently as seasonal beers come and go. And though the emphasis is on craft brews, Koetters stresses the desire to “remove the pretension” from beerbuying. In other words, you can also get PBR pounders to pair with your artisanal meats and cheeses. The bottle shop is just one way Marty’s Market is using its newly acquired liquor license. The store already offers a handful of cocktails during lunch and brunch, which features a Bloody Mary made with Boyd & Blair vodka and Clarion River’s organic mix, garnished with a house-made beef stick. It will soon add wine sourced through Lawrenceville’s Dreadnought Wines. And when Marty’s starts serving dinner, at the end of this month, you can bet it’ll have some killer drinks to go with it. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

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1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

ALLA FAMIGLIA. 804 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown. 412-488-1440. The Italian restaurant is an elder statesman of Pittsburgh fine dining, but hardly stuck in the past. The frequently changing menu is anchored by classics like beans and greens and a meatball appetizer, plus its signature item: a doublecut veal chop, available in three refined preparations. LE

Curry & Jerk Chicken, Fish or Shrimp.

Daily Specials!

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Coriander India Bar & Grill

2201 Murray Ave, Squirrel HIll | CORIANDERPA.COM 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

APSARA CAFÉ. 1703 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-251-0664. This storefront restaurant offers primarily Cambodian food alongside Thai and a limited Chinese selection, with a menu balanced between unfamiliar and familiar dishes. For less common fare, try Cambodian puffed rice squares, or saramann, cubes of chuck slow-simmered in a thick, warmly spiced coconutmilk sauce. KF BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE

Alla Famiglia {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF

THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. 1701 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6199. Having made the jump from street truck to modest sit-down venue, the owners retained their menu, so popular with the late-night crowd, of fresh-cooked Cambodian cuisine. Kabobs, fried wontons, chicken, shrimp cakes, curried vegetable bowls and fried noodles are among the restaurant’s staples, as is its distinctive in-house “moon sauce” and fresh limeade. JF THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412-338-9100. This dark, clubby restaurant excels at VIP service, and offers a menu highlighted by steaks, chops and seafood, with sophisticated but straightforward preparations such as crab cakes with added lobster, or steak encrusted in Kona coffee beans. Also, the Grille employs its own butcher (for cutting and dry-aging), and desserts are made on site. LE THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412-828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for

cachet of Pamela’s, but the portions are large and the quarters are close. On weekends, it’s one of Pittsburgh’s great gathering places. Try the “Super Bowl” omelet. J DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. 2339 E. Carson St., South Side (412-390-1111) and 100 Adams Shoppes, Route 288, Mars (724-553-5212). You may cringe at the “white trash” theme, or feel bemused at ordering sautéed shrimp and woodgrilled portabella on a faux TV-dinner tray. But there’s plenty of good vegan fare, beer and a fun filling-station-turnedrestaurant ambience. KE D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-241-4666. This established venue is known for its revered pub fries and the classic wiener with kraut (plus plenty of beer to wash it down). But don’t miss the pizza, with a top-notch crust. D’s continues to raise the preparation of salty, cheesy, fatty comfort food to an art. JE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Istanbul Sofra

DAPHNE. 5811 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-1130. Outside seating is a plus here, but the well-prepared Turkish food is a year-round asset. The menu is familiar — hummus, falafel, gyros, shish kebab — but the execution is notable and the flavors rich. Lamb features as sausages, chops and a burger, and grilled chicken breast doesn’t get much better than Daphne’s shish kebab. KF DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195. DeLuca’s doesn’t have the White House

HIMALAYAS. 20445 Route 19, Excel Center Plaza, Cranberry. 724-779-4454. This restaurant features the cuisine of Nepal, fare influenced by neighboring India and China. Thus, expect chow mein to be flavored with subcontinental spices, and to find tweaked version of familiar Indian items such as samosas. Be sure to try the signature dish — momos, or large fried or steamed dumplings, filled with meats or vegetables. KF ISTANBUL SOFRA. 7600 Forbes Ave., Regent Square. 412-727-6693. This restaurant offers a variety of Turkish specialties, from appetizers (falafel, mucver zucchini cakes) and bean salads to grilled meats (lamb, chicken). Try the Adana


Takeout & Delivery Authentic Thai Food SAVOR AUTHENTIC FLAVORS FROM OAXACA & MEXICO CITY AT THE MEXICAN UNDERGROUND IN THE STRIP

40 Craft Beers w

ontap w

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Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

Open Bottle Bistro {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} kebab, made of spiced ground meat, smoked Turkish peppers and sumac, or the small but worthy vegetarian section of falafel, grilled vegetables and manti dumplings. KF LA PALAPA. 1925 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-7015 or 412-586-4943. Among the basic offerings at this bright, colorful storefront Mexican restaurant — tamales, nachos, tacos, enchiladas — there is other less familiar fare, such as a squid and shrimp salad. And the staple dishes excel with the inclusion of expertly cooked meats, which are moist and flavorful. KF

PITTSBURGH THAI RESTAURANT BY BORIS. 321 South Ave., Verona. 412-828-0339. Expect to find with the standard array of Thai curries, noodle dishes and stir fries, with more unusual offerings tucked away under “Specialties” and “Chef’s Specials.” Appetizers include corn fritters and steamed dumplings, and among the less-common entrees are tropical bird’s nest . w ww per (with a shredded a p ty ci pgh m potato base) and .co tamarind tofu. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

LULA. 515 Broad St., Sewickley. 412-7491200. Seating at this informal tapas bar is lounge-style indoors, and in warm weather, along the sidewalk at café tables. The menu, which also offers a few entrees, is eclectic, and suggestive of Mediterranean cafés, with plenty of seafood, cured meats, cheeses and seasonal produce. Portions are adequate for sharing, if you can bear to part with, say, asparagus spears wrapped in ham. KE

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straight-up, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE OISHII BENTO. 119 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-687-3335. Bamboo walls and a low counter with colorful cloth cubes for seating denote a place for moderately priced Japanese food, including sushi. Oishii also adds a few Korean dishes for variety and spice; those seeking a little heat might consider bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF OPEN BOTTLE BISTRO. 5884 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-450-8217. Small plates and Mediterranean entrees pair well

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with wine in this charming spot. It’s a menu that is refreshingly light on clichés: Only a few of its offerings are standard tapas, and many of the familiar-seeming dishes offer intriguing variations, such as “pinchos,” or short skewers of tasty trios. KE

THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. Yogi Berra groused about the restaurant nobody went to — because it was always too crowded. Taste of India is the opposite: Everyone goes there partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF

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from 7pm-11pm Mexican/American Menu and Drink Specials. Live entertainment with

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LOCAL

“WE’RE REALLY NICE GUYS DESPITE HOW FUCKING ANGRY OUR MUSIC IS.”

BEAT

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

30 ROCK A lot has happened since 1985, the year local garage/post-punk outfit A.T.S. first started calling itself a band. From the beginning, the group had been difficult to classify. Several years ago, original drummer Steve Heineman told the Pittsburgh PostGazette that A.T.S. was “a country band trying to play jazz.” Today, guitarist/vocalist Evan Knaeur and bassist Mike Marcinko have given up on classifications. “Now I just say we are a rock band,” admits Knaeur. “It’s hard for me to be objective when it comes to classifying our music,” says Marcinko, “I guess I’m just too close to it.” On Saturday, A.T.S — currently rounded out by Kip Ruefle on drums — will grace the stage at Howlers, in Bloomfield, celebrating three decades together. It will be a show befitting such a milestone, as A.T.S plays first as a trio, and then closes out the night with Meet the Beatless, a seven-piece super-group of past and present A.T.S. members, including its original bass player, Josh Arnson of Asylum Street Spankers. Opening the celebration will be newly formed band The Full Counts, which features members of The Cynics, Legendary Hucklebucks, White Wreckage, and the Steel Miners. Both Knauer and Marcinko recognize that 30 years is a long time, especially in band years. For Knauer, it’s all about effort. “Thirty years making music, for me, just means we tried harder.” In other words, just because a band hits the five-, 10- or 15-year mark doesn’t necessarily give it more staying power than any other band. Hard work is still the foundation. For Marcinko, 30 years is more about the relationships forged: “I’ve had the privilege to work with my best friends at doing what I like best.” Recognizing that such longevity ultimately inspires others, A.T.S. maintains its humility. “I hope we’ve influenced other bands,” Knaeur reflects, “but we’re still being influenced, too. Our songwriting is influenced by The Working Poor, our continuity by The Cynics, and our musicality by Ben Opie.” “Hopefully, we’ve been able to influence younger musicians in a positive way,” Marcinko says. “Most of them have probably never heard of us, though!”

“NOW I JUST SAY WE ARE A ROCK BAND.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A.T.S. ANNIVERSARY SHOW with THE FULL COUNTS, MEET THE BEATLESS. 10 p.m. Sat., May 16. Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sincerely yours: Chris McCune (left), Tom Bittner Jr., Adam Henderson and Max Beehner

TRUE ROMANCE {BY MARGARET WELSH}

W

HEN MUSIC journalist and noted

metalhead Kim Kelly wrote a glowing review of Romantic Love, the newest release from local metal band Dendritic Arbor, she described the title as “sardonic.” When this comes up in conversation, the band — seated around a back table in its favorite South Side haunt, Ruggers Pub — heaves a kind of collective sigh at the idea that it’s being sarcastic. But the members do understand why a listener would make such an assessment. Even to the ears of many hard-boiled metal fans, Romantic Love is harsh, beguiling and almost defiantly unmelodic: not exactly something most people would play over a candlelit dinner. But as bassist Tom

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

Bittner Jr. puts it, with a grin, “We’re really nice guys despite how fucking angry our music is.” The band formed in 2012, with the goal of playing black metal. Guitarist Max Beehner befriended drummer Chris Mc-

DENDRITIC ARBOR

ALBUM-RELEASE SHOW WITH THANTIFAXATH, IMPERIAL TRIUMPHANT

8 p.m. Sat., May 16. House of the Low Voice, 228 39th St., Lawrenceville. $7. dendriticarborpa@gmail.com

Cune while hanging out at Ruggers, where McCune works. McCune is, in fact, on duty tonight, gamely providing thoughtful an-

swers to interview questions between running to the kitchen to fill food orders. Beehner introduced McCune to guitarist Adam Henderson, who had played with Beehner in another metal band, Colossus. The three of them practiced once, wrote a song and, realizing they might be on to something, enlisted Beehner’s new roommate, Bittner, who, conveniently, happened to play bass. “We practiced and recorded our first record [2013’s Sylvan Matriarch] before we played a show,” says Beehner. “That was the whole point, at first — we were just going to write that first record and not do anything else. It wasn’t supposed to be serious at the time — and I don’t know if it necessarily is serious now. We’ve done a lot more than I CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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TRUE ROMANCE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

think we ever thought we were going to do.” Their current list of accomplishments includes a couple of extensive tours — including a financially successful trip to this year’s South By Southwest festival, where the band played a Worshiper Cabs showcase — and getting scooped up by Baltimore’s Grimoire Records label, also home to locals Wrought Iron. Grimoire cofounder Noel Mueller came to Pittsburgh and recorded Romantic Love himself, with mobile equipment, at Beehner’s house in Lawrenceville. They knocked the whole thing out in one day, starting at noon and finishing at 3 a.m. “Noel came at us thinking that we were a pretty straightforward black-metal band, because Sylvan Matriarch has that kind of sound to it,” Beehner says. “But with the new stuff … even though we didn’t know what it was going to sound like, we knew it wasn’t that.” But in the end, Bittner says, “He was pretty stoked on it.” Given the cohesive, stream-of-consciousness feel of Romantic Love, it’s not surprising that it was recorded so quickly. While Sylvan Matriarch wasn’t straightforward, exactly, the new record delves further into experimental and extreme metal, making Dendritic Arbor more difficult to classify.

! P U EN

LIST

overage ? c c i s u aper’s m listen to it too P y t i C You read k, but why not ee every w

Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days. Tune in while you read, and judge for yourself whether that indie band’s guitar work is really angular, or if that singer actually sounds like Sandy Denny.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

The group has drawn comparisons to the progressive technical death-metal band Gorguts, and avant-garde-ish black metalers Deathspell Omega; it also brings to mind the rusty edges and precisely executed chaos of a band like Krallice, though Dendritic Arbor is a little more freeform and ambient than any of the above. Despite its black-metal roots, members agree that that term has become a miscategorization. “Picking a genre to play in isn’t really what happens,” McCune says. “It’s more what we allow ourselves to do or not do when writing the songs. We tend to not go anywhere in the mid-paced; we don’t allow ourselves to do a d-beat. The guitar parts aren’t chuggy rock ’n’ roll bluesbased riffs.” And, with a band that is somewhat difficult to categorize —“We’ve been called everything from doom to noise” Beehner says — a title like Romantic Love only adds to the confusion. “People don’t really listen to the music,” Henderson theorizes with a half shrug. Or if they do, they aren’t open to hearing what’s really happening. “People are going to say that we’re black metal because black metal is popular, but they can’t really stomach the idea that [we’re] not going to be dark or evil or spooky or whatever.” Like Sylvan Matriarch, Romantic Love deals with the natural world. But where Sylvan Matriarch bordered on (as Beehner half-jokingly puts it) eco-terrorism, this record explores themes of a more erotic variety. “The songs have a very sexual nature to them,” Beehner says. “We all write lyrics, we all have our ideas, but mine come from a relationship with the earth.” Citing the predominantly Western attitudes of material entitlement and privilege, he continues: “Love is love and sex is romance, and I think that humans are romantically in love with the earth, verses being actually in love with the earth.” McCune adds, “The overall theme of the band is the urban colliding with the natural, and what it does to a person’s mind.” Is there a little bit of stoner logic at work here? Maybe: Stoner logic is, stereotypically speaking, par for the course in the wide world of heavy music. But in the chaotic, visceral context of Romantic Love, the sentiment makes sense. And ultimately, Dendritic Arbor is more about vibes rather than words. “Lyrically, it’s significant what we’re saying, but it’s also more imagery than it is us trying to get a point across,” McCune explains. “We don’t really need to get a point across lyrically; it’s just there to serve the song. That’s why song titles are usually a big deal with bands where you can’t understand the vocals.” MWE L SH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

ON THE RECORD

with Interpol’s Daniel Kessler {BY CARALYN GREEN}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ELIOT LEE HAZEL}

Interpol (Daniel Kessler, front)

It’s been more than a decade since Interpol emerged as the New York City post-punk band adored by college co-eds who preferred smart suits over the Strokes’ tattered Chuck Taylors. Last year’s El Pintor was the group’s first release as a trio, having lost its founding bassist, the iconic Carlos D. City Paper caught up with guitarist Daniel Kessler for a few minutes of niceties, and lots of good-natured vagueness about Interpol’s future. AFTER CARLOS LEFT, LEAD SINGER PAUL BANKS STEPPED IN ON BASS. WHAT’S IT LIKE FORMING THAT NEW DYNAMIC? Carlos is big part of my life and will always be. He’s an incredible individual and what he contributed to the band … in general, and way beyond that. HOW DID YOU GET TO BE THE GUY IN THE “EVERYTHING IS WRONG” VIDEO WHO HELPS OLD LADIES CROSS THE STREET AND EATS AN ICE-CREAM CONE? My bandmate wanted me to do [those] things [in the video], … but I would definitely do both those things any given day. YOU OPENED A RESTAURANT, BERGEN HILL, IN BROOKLYN, A FEW YEARS AGO. LET’S TALK FOOD. I’m a big food dude. I don’t know what happened, but you have a great opportunity [when you’re in a band] — you get to travel. And after awhile it gets boring if you’re just drinking every single night. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INTERPOL with ALGIERS. 7 p.m. Sat., May 16. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $28-30. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com


VOICING PROTEST {BY BRIAN CONWAY} THIS SATURDAY, Pittsburgh performers will donate their time to raise awareness of the dangers of hydraulic fracturing at the Freedom From Fracking: Clean Air, Water, and Energy Festival, at Mr. Small’s Theatre. Among those attending will be: Rusted Root, Mike Stout, Jasiri X, Kellee Maize and nine other local musical acts. “Fracking affects everybody,” says Stout, a local singer-songwriter and longtime social activist. “All people, all ages, all generations, all nationalities. So the idea was to bring everybody together that we could, from all different musical genres. We have just about every genre there is [performing at] the concert here.” Stout honed his chops in Greenwich Village in the late ’60s and made headlines organizing benefits for his unemployed steelworker colleagues in the early ’80s. Today, he says he was inspired to organize a protest festival after meeting people whose lives were negatively affected by fracking for oil and natural gas, and whose exposure to unknown chemicals reminded him of what happened to Vietnam veterans with Agent Orange. “I said we needed a concert that not only makes people aware of what’s going on, but raises money for these people,” Stout explains. “I think when people find out what they’re breathing — what they’re sucking in — [and] what kind of chemicals these frackers are putting in our water and our air and our land, I think people are going to be outraged.” Victims of hydraulic-fracking pollution will be in attendance to discuss their experiences firsthand. Representatives from renewable-energy groups will provide information about wind- and solar-power

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Jasiri X

says, “but the ultimate goal is to pull people together into a unified force.” Stout’s desires for solidarity are echoed by local hip-hop artist and social activist Jasiri X, who will also perform at the benefit. “I feel like I’ve always been somebody who has lent my voice to other struggles,” Jasiri says, “whether it’s immigration issues, environmental issues or union issues, because I hope for a day when we have a global justice movement. I feel like that is when we can really accomplish what we need to.” “My mentor is one of the greatest artist-activists of our generation, Harry Belafonte,” he continues, “and his mentor was Paul Robeson, who basically said that artists are the gatekeepers of truth. So I feel like as artists, we play a very pivotal role in pushing the conversation forward around issues of social justice.”

“FRACKING AFFECTS EVERYBODY. ALL PEOPLE, ALL AGES, ALL GENERATIONS, ALL NATIONALITIES.”

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

FREEDOM FROM FRACKING:

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

CLEAN AIR, WATER AND ENERGY FESTIVAL 6 p.m. Sat., May 16. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $30-35. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

alternatives, and volunteers from antifracking groups like Marcellus Protest and Friends of the Harmed (a beneficiary of the event) will be on hand as well. For Stout, it’s more than just a fundraiser and teach-in. “I want to raise awareness about renewables and the alternatives to fracking,” he

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CRITICS’ PICKS UltraMantis Black

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMIE HEIM}

[JAZZ] + THU., MAY 14

[ROCK] + SAT., MAY 16

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ADRENALINE PR}

Although the Sacramento jazzman has been at it for more than 10 years, Ross Hammond had never gotten around to releasing a solo acoustic album — that is, until last month’s Flight. Hammond’s guitar-playing remains as intricate as ever, but for this go-round, he channels his Kentucky roots for a record that’s more Americana than jazz. Much like a book-reading in a bookstore, tonight’s show with Daryl Shawn and David Bielewicz is at Squirrel Hill’s music store, Acoustic Music Works. Shawn Cooke 8 p.m. 2142 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. $8. 412422-0710 or acoustic musicworks.com

What began as a Metallica tribute band has since become one of the world’s premier orchestral rock acts. Apocalyptica, a group of Finnish cellist metalheads, just released its eighth studio album. Shadowmaker doesn’t break much from the formula, aside from the fact that it’s the band’s first album to feature just one vocalist, Franky Perez. Tonight, the band returns to the home of its former tour manager, Tom Furey, who now works as a live-sound engineer for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Heinz Hall. Apocalyptica takes The McKeesport Palisades stage with Art of Dying. SC 8 p.m. 100 Fifth Ave., McKeesport. $22. 412-400-9977 or www.themckeesportpalisades.com

[PUNK] + SAT., MAY 16 For one day only, the whole world might mosh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

as one — at least in a few dozen major cities. Tonight, Dock 5 joins together with a handful of other tight, sweaty rooms across the globe to participate in Maximum Rocknroll’s “A Day of Punk and Hardcore Gigs Worldwide.” The international event, with hubs in Philadelphia, Columbus and Helsinki (among others), serves as a benefit concert for the nonprofit punk zine. For the Pittsburgh show, organizers have rounded up UltraMantis Black — a pro wrestler from Philly who plays hardcore with members of Pissed Jeans — Bad Noids, Bi Marks, Eel, Mower, S.L.I.P and Swingers Club. SC 6 p.m. 234 Ninth St., Braddock. $7. vegthesystem@ gmail.com

Tech N9ne

[RAP] + MON., MAY 18

Tech N9ne cranks out new music at the same machinegun-pace as his rhymes; hardly a year passes where N9ne doesn’t release either a solo or collaboration album on his Strange Music label. It seems like ages since we could classify Tech N9ne as a quaint “underground” rapper — especially since he has A-listers like B.o.B, Kendrick Lamar and Wiz Khalifa on speed dial. Most recently, he brought in Eminem and Slipknot’s Corey Taylor for some genre-hopping on this month’s Special Effects. And this is partly what makes Tech N9ne an anomaly in mainstream rap — he doesn’t care whether or not it’s cool to fuse rap, rock and metal in 2015. Chris Webby, King 810, Murs and Zuse open tonight at Stage AE. SC 6 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive., North Side. $25. 412-229-5483 or www.thestageae.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Darius Rucker w/ Brett Eldredge, 31ST STREET PUB. The Brothers Osbourne & A Independents, Black Cat Attack, Thousand Horses. Burgettstown. Children of October, Boiled Denim. 724-947-7400. Strip District. 412-391-8334. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. BENEDUM CENTER. Rain: A West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. Tribute to the Beatles. Downtown. LINDEN GROVE. Good Guys. 412-456-6666. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. BULL PEN RUSTIC INN. The THE MR. ROBOTO Dave Iglar Band. Avella. PROJECT. Fertile the 724-356-3000. Drip, Magnelli/Meyers/ CLUB CAFE. Southside Mihalko, Worn Colors, American, Demos LAACK. Bloomfield. Papadimas & His 412-853-0518. . www per Band. South Side. a p MR. SMALLS ty pghci m 412-431-4950. .co THEATER. Streetlight DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Manifesto w/ Kevin Game Face. Robinson. Seconds, Sycamore Smith. 412-489-5631. Millvale. 412-821-4447. ELLIOTT’S BBQ & STEAKHOUSE. PARK HOUSE. Walk Of Shame. Shotgun Jack & Coldhearts. North Side. 412-224-2273. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-6440. REX THEATER. Tauk w/ Aqueous. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Larry Belli South Side. 412-381-6811. Trio. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & HOUSE OF LOW VOICES. Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. Thantifaxath, Imperial Triumphant, 724-319-7938. Ramlord & Dendritic Arbor. SMILING MOOSE. Houdini’s Lawrenceville. Psychic Theatre, Eye on Attraction. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The South Side. 412-431-4668. Full Counts, Steve Heineman & SPIRIT. Enney, Strep Torso, Josh Arnson & Meet the Beatless. Thousandzz of Beezz, Wiretappers. A.T.S. 30th anniversary show. Lawrenceville. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

SAT 16

ROCK/POP THU 14 CLUB CAFE. The Baseball Project. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Orleans & Friends w/ Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. The Bessemers. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Primal Scream w/ Shade, Flash & Finn. Millvale. 412-821-4447. SMILING MOOSE. Ghost Town. South Side. 412-431- 4668. STAGE AE. In Flames w/ All That Remains, Periphery. North Side. 800-745-3000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Turbo Suit. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 15 31ST STREET PUB. Invisible Things, Derider, Blod Maud. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Peter Mulvey w/ T. Mitchell Bell. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Sathanas, Disobey, Necrotherion. Aliquippa. 740-424-0302.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MP 3 MONDAY {PHOTO COURTESY OF AMBROSIA LYNN}

DERIDER

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Derider; stream or download

LA CASA NARCISI. Austin Drive. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. MEADOWS CASINO. Velveeta. Washington. 724-503-1200. NEW CASTLE PLAYHOUSE. Pop Goes Ingrid! A song & dance tribute from the 1950s to today. New Castle. 724-654-3437. THE NIGHT GALLERY. Lycosa, Postmortal Possession, Ambiance of Chaos, WolfBlanket. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. THE PARKWAY THEATER. Shiva Stone, Black Souled Pope, Last Will, Sound Servent. McKees Rocks. 412-758-7926. REYNA RESTAURANTE MEXICANO. Scheer Element. Strip District. 412-969-7197. RIVERS CASINO. Abacus Jones Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. Spencer Patrick, GLitCH, Nice Nate, EvoniX, & Jaekae. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Interpol w/ Algiers. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. theCAUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VALLEY HOTEL. King’s Ransom. Clairton. 412-233-9800.

SUN 17 CLUB CAFE. Rhett Miller w/ Salim Nourallah. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Drunken Logic, Bad Custer &

“Rusty Nail” for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

Ferdinand The Bull. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. SuperHeaven, Diamond Youth, Rozwell Kid. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 18 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions w/ Working Breed. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 19 31ST STREET PUB. The Erotics, Prophets of Addiction, Torn Apart Hearts. Strip District. 412-391-8334. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Psychedelic Furs w/ Black English. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

WED 20 31ST STREET PUB. En Esch, Ghostfeeder, Venus in Furs, Molecule Party. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. World Party w/ Gabriel Kelley. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Abstract Artimus, Amoeba Knievel, Sneaky Mike. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

DJS THU 14 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. REMEDY. Telephone Plastic Baby. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771.

FRI 15

JAZZ

ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Desus. ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Ross Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. Hammond w/ David Bielewicz, Daryl ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Shawn. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0710. Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. ANDYS WINE BAR. 412-874-4582. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. REMEDY. BBYMAMA. 412-773-8884. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777. ANDYS WINE BAR. Jessica ROWDY BUCK. Zamiska. Downtown. Top 40 Dance. South 412-773-8884. Side. 412-431-2825. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. RUGGER’S PUB. Roger Barbour Jazz 80s Night w/ Trio. Lawrenceville. DJ Connor. South 412-251-0097. www. per a p Side. 412-381-1330. JAMES STREET pghcitym .co GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Reggie DIESEL. DJ CK. Watkins Quartet. North Side. South Side. 412-431-8800. 412-904-3335. REMEDY. Push It! NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. Gresh. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. RIVERS CASINO. Kenny Blake North Side. 412-231-7777. Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. SYRIA SHRINERS PAVILION. South Side. 412-431-2825. Swing Time Nights. Cheswick. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-398-1158. 412-481-7227. VIVO KITCHEN. Don Aliquo & Jeremy Fisher. Sewickley. 412-259-8945. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. New Show Band IVY. 3D Na’Tee. Strip District. & the Jazz Workshop Ensemble. Homewood. 412-731-3080. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB GREATER PITTSBURGH & SPEAKEASY. The Horn Guys. COLISEUM. Big Daddy Kane, Speakeasy. Max Leake, Roger Kool G Rap, Brand Nubian, Das Humphries, Dwayne Dolphin & EFX. Homewood. 412-218-1584. George Jones. Steeltown Jazz Storytellers celebrates the music of Pittsburgh’s great jazz pianists 565 LIVE. Groove Academy Mary Lou Williams, Errol Garner, & Cadillac Club. Bellevue. Ahmad Jamal, more. Ballroom. 412-301-8623. North Side. 412-904-3335. GROWN & SEXY II. Confluence. LITTLE E’S. Eddie Brookshire Strip District. 412-728-4155. Quintet. Downtown. 412-392-2217. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. STAGE AE. Tech N9ne, Chris West End. 412-458-0417. Webby, MURS, Krizz Kaliko, King 810, Zuse. North Side. 412-229-5483. LATITUDE 360. Marcus Anderson. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SAHARA TEMPLE. Tony Campbell & Smooth Jazzsurgery. Braddock. 412-271-0502. MEADOWS CASINO. Tony STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. Janflone Jr. Band. Washington. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters w/ 724-503-1200. Eric Susoeff & Eric DeFade. Acme. MOONDOG’S. Nicole Belli Band. 724-423-5604. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz 412-682-0177. Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

THU 14

FRI 15

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 16

WED 20

SAT 16

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SAT 16

Live Music

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MON 18

SUN 17

BLUES FRI 15

MON 18

SAT 16

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

MOONDOG’S. Billy Price. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Billy the Kid & the Regulators. Downtown. 412-471-9100. OBEY HOUSE. Ron & The RumpShakers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. THE R BAR. Vince Agwada. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

TUE 19 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Palindromes. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 20 ANDYS WINE BAR. Paul Cosentino. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-471-9100.


{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID STEWERT}

EARLY WARNINGS

Kate Tempest

{WED., JUNE 10}

Kate Tempest Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield {TUE., JULY 07}

Pink Martini Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown {FRI., AUG. 07}

Eleanor Friedberger Frick Art & Historical Center, 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze

WED 20

ACOUSTIC THU 14 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. RIVERS CASINO. Jason Kendall Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. John Marcinizyn. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 15 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. ELWOOD’S PUB. Unknown String Band. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181. HAMBONE’S. Jeremy Caywood, Morgan Erina & Zach Weiss. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dorthia Cottrell, Nate Hall, Devil’s Holler & Union Rye. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

SAT 16

FRI 15

NIED’S HOTEL. The Rizdales, The Beagle Brothers w/ Slim Forsythe, Molly Alphabet, Rick Malis, Charlie McVay. Lawrenceville. 412 781-9853.

TUE 19 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Guy Russo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

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LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100 x1. SYRIA SHRINERS PAVILION. Syria Shriners Stage Band. 412-833-2405.

CLASSICAL

SAT 16

FRI 15

LIVEBURGHSTUDIO. Jeff Powers, Dan Tedesco, Natalie Sorce. Glenshaw. 414-726-2563.

SAT 16

MR. SMALLS THEATER. William Fitzsimmons w/ Denison Witmer. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

THU 14

COUNTRY

CLUB AE. PigPen Theatre Co., Goodnight Texas. North Side.

MON 18

THE BELL’ART ENSEMBLE. Music by Falla, Piazzolla, Marcinizyn & others performed by Raquel Winnica Young, Ashley Freeburn, & John Marcinizyn. Old St. Luke’s, Scott. 412-969-7072. KATY WILLIAMS. The yearly recital of her favorite pieces that she has performed over the past year including the aria, “Vorrei spiegarvi, O Dio” & “Porgi Amor” from, The Marriage of Figaro. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153. THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. “Voices Reunited” w/ music from Charles Villiers Stanford, William Billings, John Tavener, Stephen Paulis & “Miserere” by Gregorio Allegri. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-421-5884. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “The Sound of the Modern Symphony” featuring Mason Bates’ Alternative Energy & Jake Heggie’s The Work at Hand. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. THE PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Performing Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations”, Pytor Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s “Romeo & Juliet Fantasy Overture” & Sergei Prokofiev’s 1st movement from “Piano Concerto No. 3”. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Fizzle & Pop Soul Oldies Night. Vinyl social record swap. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

SUN 17

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 17

OTHER MUSIC

FRI 15

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “The Sound of the Modern Symphony” featuring Mason Bates’ Alternative Energy & Jake Heggie’s The Work at Hand. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 16

Jake Heggie’s The Work at Hand. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & JEANS ‘N CLASICS. Performing the music of Michael Jackson, w/ rock musicians & vocalist Gavin Hope. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. Downton Abbey concert featuring Colleen Gray, soprano, & concertmaster Jennifer Sternick on violin. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-279-4030. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “The Sound of the Modern Symphony” featuring Mason Bates’ Alternative Energy &

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SUN 17 EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. The Brass Roots & Dr. Edward Moore. East Liberty. 412-441-3800 ext. 24. HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. REX THEATER. Laibach. South Side. 412-381-6811.

TUE 19 PITTSBURGH WINERY. CAPA House Band, Laitta, Tucker, Thompson, Elevations. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do IN PITTSBURGH

WEDNESDAY 13

show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 18 show. TIckets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

EQT Children's Theater Festival

Kill Paris

Breaking Benjamin STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

THURSDAY 14

In Flames Charming America Tour STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Primal Scream / Shade / Flash & Finn MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

The Baseball Project CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. For more info & tickets visit pghkids.org. Through May 17.

FRIDAY 15 Midsummer

CITY THEATER MAINSTAGE South Side. 412-431-2489. Limited ages show. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through May 31.

Pianos Become the Teeth

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. Various times. For more info visit carnegiesciencecenter.org.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. TIckets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org. Through May 17.

SATURDAY 16

America Loves Bacon Pennsylvania Bacon Festival Tour STATION SQUARE. Tickets: americalovesbacon.com/pa. 1p.m.

Crown The Empire ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. TIckets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Freedom From Fracking: A Benefit For The Friends of The Harmed

Comedian John Evans (As Heard on the Bob and Tom Show & Seen on Comedy Central) LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through May 16.

Laser MGMT

The Sound of a Modern Symphony PHOTO CREDIT: OLE WESTERMANN

May 13 - 19

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Rusted Root. Over 21 event. Tickets: ticketfly.com/ purchase/event/779201. 6p.m.

William Fitzsimmons MR. SMALLS THEATRE MONDAY, MAY 18

Where to live

The Story So Far ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 18 show. TIckets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

MONDAY 18

William Fitzsimmons MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

TECH N9NE STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

TUESDAY 19 Ghoul

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. TIckets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

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Upscale urban rentals • 412.683.3810 • walnut capital.com Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, East Side & South Side

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


WHO WOULD NAME A CAT AFTER AN EXPLOSIVE DEVICE?

COLD CASE {BY AL HOFF} I sort of felt sorry for Reese Witherspoon and Sofia Vergara, shrieking and flailing about in the unfunny mismatched-buddy comedy Hot Pursuit. But these are a couple of pros, and this mess must have looked just as dumb on the page. Now you gotta own it, ladies, while we suffer through it.

Sofia Vergara and Reese Witherspoon yell some jokes.

Directed with little verve by Anne Fletcher, we get a by-the-book cop (Witherspoon), who’s defined by not knowing what “calling shotgun” means, and her charge, a witness for a drug-cartel case (Vergara). Or, to put it another way: a humor-challenged woman repeatedly described as “looking like a boy” for wearing a uniform escorting an ay-yiyi-ing hourglass-shaped plot device comprised of huge hair, skintight dress and teetering high heels. In any case, the two wacky gals drive around Texas, exhibiting such high-larious hi-jinks as: driving badly; getting accidentally jacked up on 42 kilos of cocaine; making out for the benefit of some yokel; hijacking a bus full of old people; and crashing a tacky quinceanera and killing some people there. From the test-marketed jokes about granny panties, menstrual periods and impractical shoes, Hot Pursuit seems like a film designed in a lab for the laziest girls-night-out ever. It should come with recommended wine pairings — perhaps something in the $10 range with a pink label? AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NO NO: A DOCKUMENTARY If you missed this illuminating, hilarious, ous, heartbreaking and inspiring doc last ast year about Pirates ates great Dock ck Ellis, catch itt now on Netflix. Ellis claimed med to have pitched ched a no-hitter while on LSD, D, but that’s just ust one great story tory out off dozens recounted unted here.

LIFE GOES BOOM {BY AL HOFF}

Riding the rails: Allan (Robert Gustafsson) and Julius (Iwar Wiklander) transport some recently deceased human cargo

“N

OBODY HAS meant more to me in my life than my cat, Molotov,” says Allan, a very old Swedish man, in the opening scene of The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared. Who would name a sweet-looking orange-and-white cat after an explosive device? Perhaps a man, like Allan, whose eventful life has been shaped at all turns by his love of blowing things up. And sure enough, after exploding the fox that killed his cat, Allan finds himself sent to a nursing home. But on his 100th sen birthday — while nurses struggled to birt stick that many candles in a cake — Alstic lan simply climbs out of the window and buys a bus ticket. buy Felix Herngren’s comedy is adapted from the best-selling novel by Jonas Jonasson, and the film was a blockbuster hit sso in its native Sweden. It’s a hybrid piece, combining an absurd fabulism with farce, com a ccrime caper and a darkly comic reflection on the importance of enjoying life to the fullest. At its center is Allan (Robert

Gustafsson), a man of some intelligence and brio, who nonetheless remains rather child-like and oblivious to the drama and destruction around him.

THE 100-YEAR-OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT A WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED DIRECTED BY: Felix Herngren STARRING: Robert Gustafsson, Iwar Wiklander In English, and various language, with subtitles Starts Fri., May 15. Regent Square

CP APPROVED The contemporary scenes are intercut with flashbacks depicting how Allan’s love of blowing things up led him to be present at significant 20th-century events that required explosives, including the Spanish Civil War and the Manhattan Project. (On seeing the Berlin Wall dismantled, Allan expresses regret that it couldn’t have been blown up.) Allan hobnobs with leaders as disparate as Franco and Ronald Reagan, and develops

a sideline in espionage. Meanwhile, back at the bus station, a thuggish biker barks at him to watch his suitcase. But when Allan’s bus arrives, he gets on, suitcase and all. Disembarking in a backwater, Allan is taken in by another older fellow, Julius (Iwar Wiklander). After a night of boozy camaraderie, during which they fend off an attack by the biker pursuing his suitcase, the pair opens the luggage; it’s packed with cash. Thus, the pair begins a new adventure, which includes dodging gangsters, disposing of bodies and finding a new home for an elephant. The guileless-man-ambling-throughhistory will recall an earlier hit, 1994’s Forrest Gump, but Herngren’s film is less sentimental, and the humor is much darker. (Prepare for blithely considered decapitations.) There’s also some subtle commentary about the cost of remaining neutral about the chaos one causes, even as one benefits from it — whether one is an old man or a nation. Sweden, you may recall, is the ancestral home of dynamite, Allan’s favorite explosive. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Opens May 15 on Pittsburgh’s biggest screen!

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK

On May 16, Armed Forces Day, active military and veterans get free admission to the movie (ID required).

Film sponsored locally by:

HEAVEN ADORES YOU. “I’m not the sort of person to be really, really famous.” So said singer-songwriter Elliott Smith in an interview, and it’s one of the main themes of Nickolas Dylan Rossi’s profile of the troubled artist, who died in 2003. Even his death at age 34 was flagged as “media-ready,” a still-unresolved knifing that might — or might not — have been self-inflicted. The documentary takes the viewer through Smith’s musical life, beginning with a high school band in Texas, through his notable time in Portland’s 1980s post-punk scene in bands like Heatmiser. In the early 1990s, Smith adopted his signature solo style — quiet, spare, introspective songs that held audiences rapt. Rossi taps many of Smith’s friends and colleagues of this time, who paint a portrait of an iconoclastic, but talented, artist coming into his own, seemingly on the cusp of a modest, workable career. Then in 1998, the aging punk, a shy and reserved oddball, was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song, “Miss Misery,” from Good Will Hunting. And perhaps, the film posits, this was not an individual suited for widespread fame. It’s here that the film’s narrative takes a downbeat tone, with recountings of Smith’s substance abuse, erratic behavior and general unhappiness. Clips of Smith’s music are accompanied by gloomy wallpaper: shots of the less scenic and emptier parts of Portland, Los Angeles and Brooklyn — the three cities where Smith found Pitch creative inspiration. Perfect 2 The film remains hagiographic, with even the most candid interviewee relating some rosy wistfulness of the “good” Elliott, or what musical genius was snuffed out untimely. The film is a bit insular for general audiences, but certainly fans of Smith and those intrigued by troubled contemporary musicians will find the work of interest. Starts Fri., May 15. Hollywood (Al Hoff) MAD MAX: FURY ROAD. Return to the apocalyptic wasteland, and join two rebels fighting to maybe restore some order. Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron star in this dystopic actioner; George Miller, who helmed the original 1979 Mad Max, directs. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., May 15.

#filter412 original iPhone art by City Paper photographer Heather Mull, published every Tuesday

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

PITCH PERFECT 2. The Bellas singing group, last seen in 2012’s Pitch Perfect, enter an international competition. Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson and Hailee Steinfeld star; Elizabeth Banks directs. Starts Fri., May 15.

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Adventure Kids Series. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (things get more complicated for the boy wizard in this second installment), May 13. The Goonies (misfit kids search for treasure in the 1985 adventure comedy), May 13-14. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (kid wins trip to super-weird candy factory in this 1971 favorite), May 13-14. Labyrinth (1986 fantasy film featuring Jim

Heaven Adores You Henson creatures and David Bowie), May 14. Girl Power series. A League of Their Own (Geena Davis fronts this 1992 comedy about professional women’s baseball leagues set up during World War II), May 15, May 17-18 and May 20-21. Bridesmaids (Kristen Wiig heads ensemble cast of funny ladies, who nearly ruin the wedding, in this 2011 comedy), May 15-16 and May 18-20. The Craft (witchcraft rules the school in this 1996 camp classic), May 15-19 and May 21. Troop Beverly Hills (Shelley Long plays a housewife who takes charge of a Wilderness Group troop, in this 1989 comedy), May 15-17 and May 19-21. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com THE BREAKFAST CLUB. A little sad, a little happy is one way to sum up this 1985 dramedy about high school from John Hughes. You don’t need me to re-tell the plot (five kids from different cliques discover they have plenty in common). So, whether you’re a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess or a criminal — just be there when the bell rings. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 13. AMC Loews. $5 THE HEALTHCARE MOVIE. This 2013 documentary from Canadian filmmakers Laurie Simons and Terry Sterrenberg charts the divergent histories of health care in Canada and the U.S., particularly the fight for a single-payer system. The screening continues a monthly series of films about labor and social justice presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 14. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Dr., Munhall. Free. www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org FIVE BROKEN CAMERAS. Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi’s 2011 documentary depicts a Palestinian farmer in the occupied West Bank who, through a series of cameras, records his village’s resistance to various Israeli policies and actions. In 2005, Burnat acquires his first camera in order to record the birth of his fourth son, but that event coincides with the encroachment of Israeli settlements, the construction of a security wall and the frequent presence of the Israeli army. Burnat, his children and neighbors attend many protests — some of which turn violent, and even deadly — and one by one, his cameras break. But for his losses — whether the land, or watching his small son internalize the ongoing animosity — Burnat makes gains. His project provides an on-the-fly


Five Broken Cameras record of daily life on this contentious border, and in a broader sense, the knowledge that a commitment to non-violent resistance can be productive. Screens as part of the Pittsburgh Palestinian Film Festival. In Arabic and Hebrew, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Thu., May 14. Regent Square. $10 (AH) DIVINE INTERVENTION. In Elia Sulieman’s deadpan 2002 dramedy, a number of vignettes illustrate the absurd geopolitical obstacles a couple must overcome to meet. He lives in Nazareth, she lives in Ramallah, so they meet at an Israeli checkpoint. Screens as part of the Pittsburgh Palestinian Film Festival. In Arabic and Hebrew, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Fri., May 15. Melwood. $10 WHEN I SAW YOU. Annemarie Jacir’s 2014 film is set in 1967 Jordan, as thousands of refugees from Palestine are coming over the border. When one of them, an 11-year-old boy, loses his father in chaos, he sets off on a journey to find him. Screens as part of the Pittsburgh Palestinian Film Festival. In Arabic, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Sat., May 16. Schenley Plaza (in tent), Oakland. Free BENVENUTO CELLINI. Would you be more inclined to see an opera if it were directed by former Terry Gilliam? Now’s your chance as the former Monty Pythoner and English National Opera director Edward Gardner take on Berlioz’s rarely performed 19th-century opera about the titular 16th-century goldsmith and sculptor. 2 p.m. Sun., May 17. Hollywood

movies, shop class and falling in love again with that perky Australian girl. Directed by Randal Kleiser, the film stars John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John at their dreamiest. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 20. AMC Loews. $5 BLIND CHANCE. A young man runs to catch a train, and in this film’s three stories, he either catches it, misses it when detained by a security guard, or misses it but meets a girl. Krzysztof Kieslowski directs this 1987 film. Continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 21, and 5:30 p.m. Fri., May 23. Harris

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THE SHINING. It seemed like a great opportunity for writer Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) and his family: a care-taking gig at an isolated mountain hotel. But the place is wicked haunted, and soon the little family, including wife (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd), are in grave peril of losing their minds — and lives. Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel drops some of King’s supernatural elements in favor of omnipresent dread and a meditation about the collapsing family unit, but it’s still a freaky, hair-raising ride. The film continues a year-long look at the films of Kubrick. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 21; 10 p.m. Fri., May 22; 9 p.m. Sat., May 23; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 24. Hollywood (AH)

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DR. STRANGELOVE, OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB. The Cold War was never funnier than in Stanley Kubrick’s pitch-black 1964 satire. From the brilliant Peter Sellers’ three roles (including the titular doctor with a problematic artificial arm) to Sterling Hayden’s muttering about “precious bodily fluids” to Slim Pickens’ greatest ride, this mad rush to annihilation manages to be a sharply defined time capsule of early’60s paranoia while remaining a hilarious all-purpose general indictment of military madness. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of highly quotable films. 8 p.m. Sun., May 17. Regent Square (AH) THE PROMISED LAND. Andrzej Wajda’s 1975 drama tells the story of three men — a Pole, a German and a Jew — who start a textile factory together, in 19th-century Lodz. But their success undermines their relationship. Continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles.7 p.m. nightly, Mon., May 18; Tue., May 19; and Wed., May 20. Harris GREASE. The 1978 hit movie musical (itself adapted from a Broadway show) is a color-saturated 1950s fantasy, where high school is for sock-hops, drive-in

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Welcome To Me

(2015) 5/13 @ 7:30pm, 5/14 @ 7:30pm When Alice Klieg wins the Mega-Millions lottery, she immediately quits her psychiatric meds and buys her own talk show. Starring Kristen Wiig. _______________________________________________

Heaven Adores You

(2014) 5/15 @ 7:30pm, 5/16 @ 9:30pm, 5/18 @ 7:00pm, 5/19 @ 9:30pm, 5/20 @ 7:00pm - An intimate, meditative inquiry into the life and music of Elliott Smith. _______________________________________________

Ex Machina

(2015) 5/15 @ 10:00pm, 5/16 @ 7:00pm, 5/17 @ 7:00pm, 5/18 @ 9:30pm, 5/19 @ 7:00pm, 5/20 @ 9:30pm A young programmer is selected to participate in a breakthrough experiment in artificial intelligence by evaluating the human qualities of a breathtaking female A.I. _______________________________________________

Benvenuto Cellini

(2015) - 5/17 @ 2:00pm Director Terry Gilliam’s inexhaustible imagination is unleashed on the outrageous autobiography of celebrated 16-century goldsmith and sculptor Benvenuto Cellini. _______________________________________________

Rocky Horror Picture Show - 5/16 @ Midnight with live shadowcast by the JCCP!

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[DANCE]

“CREATING A BIG BOX IS NOT ALWAYS AN EASY THING.”

MUCH DESIRE

For the second time in three years, local dance audiences will be treated to a ballet production of Tennessee Williams’ classic play A Streetcar Named Desire. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performed choreographer John Neumeier’s version in 2012. Now Glasgow’s Scottish Ballet performs the Pittsburgh premiere of its own 2012 British Critics’ Circle awardwinning ballet, for one performance, May 19 at the Byham Theater, presented by Pittsburgh Dance Council. The two-hour narrative ballet, directed by U.K.based theater/film director Nancy Meckler, with choreography by Colombo-Belgian choreographer Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, depicts a clash of cultures, and lives gone astray. It’s told from Southern belle Blanche DuBois’ point of view and begins with backstory. “I told [Meckler] there is no past tense in dance movement, so it would be better to do a linear narrative,” says Ochoa, by phone from Cali, Colombia. Set to a filmic original score by British TV/film composer Peter Salem, the ballet’s first six scenes tell of Blanche’s ill-fated marriage and the deaths of loved ones. Thereafter, the ballet follows the familiar play/movie storyline after she arrives at her sister Stella’s New Orleans apartment and first encounters Stella’s brutish husband, Stanley. “Tennessee Williams decides what you have to do,” says Ochoa about her approach to the ballet’s choreography. Ochoa, who has created works for Dutch National Ballet, Ballet Nacional de Cuba and Washington Ballet, says she had to rein in her creative urges in order to streamline her theatrical choreography and serve the story. Another challenge was adapting a play with only seven characters for a cast of 26. The solution was to work in group scenes that the play merely references, such as Stella at the bowling alley and Blanche at the train station. The production has an abstract, contemporary-theater look, using 200 beer crates to create its furniture and scenery. It is also dense with metaphor. A wall of those crates crumbles to represent Blanche’s crumbling life, for instance, and she’s drawn to a lightbulb, referencing her moth-like desire for light and one of the play’s alternate titles, The Moth. “Blanche is a broken soul,” says Ochoa. “She is a person who gets caught up in her own web of lies trying to leave her troubled past behind and survive.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Scottish Ballet performs A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE 8 p.m. Tue., May 19. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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Eve Mutso in Nancy Meckler and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa’s A Streetcar Named Desire {PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY ROSS}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

[ARCHITECTURE]

BUILDING

BUSTS {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

P

ITTSBURGH IS ABOUT to get a very

nice mixed-use building for multiunit housing and retail on Baum Boulevard, in Friendship. The Vitmore (whose developer is Vitmore LLC) is a seven-story, 103-unit project, designed by Workshop/ APD architects of New York. Its combination of community support, sustainable amenities and high-quality architectural design is making it an exception among Pittsburgh real-estate developments, many of which have lacked some or all of these attributes. Please, everybody, try to act normal. For its part, the city’s Planning Commission reacted effusively, full of praise and unexpected pleasure. Commission head Christine Mondor commented, “The architects laid out very clearly both private amenities and public benefits. It went beyond what was laid out in the criteria” of the Baum Centre Overlay District Guidelines, which provide minimum standards for the area. Such overachieving designs should appear all the time — not leave us thinking that the commission had never really seen

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

{ARTIST’S RENDERINGS COURTESY OF WORKSHOP/APD}

One done right: The Vitmore, on Baum Boulevard, in Friendship

a decent building design before. Maybe they haven’t. Pittsburgh is experiencing a building boom, but so much of it is bad. The Yards, in the Strip, by Oxford Development, is all cheap materials and grudgingly small fenestration in an underdeveloped façade. Whatever the landscape amenities might be, the architecture is just awful. Likewise, the apartments called Skyvue 3333 Forbes, in Oakland, are some of the worst architecture the city has seen in recent memory. This frantic agglomeration of hackneyed and mishandled motifs is a desperate but failed effort to make this beast look somehow less monstrous than it really is. For this we lost the Allegheny County Health

Department, a building whose admirable restraint and dignity clearly made no impression on the architects of Skyvue. How this thing passed the Planning Commission is a mystery. Meanwhile, the housing at Bakery Square is by turns too large, too cheap and too unimaginative. If Pittsburgh is going to engage best practices and international standards, then architectural design needs to be part of the equation. It’s as easy as keeping up with quality design journals, domestic and foreign, then holding our favorite local developers to such standards, instead of letting them fall short time after time. But Pittsburgh seems to be too busy patting itself on the back to realize that good architecture


does not stop with a few environmentally sustainable features here or some community involvement there. Those things are necessary but not sufficient. We have zeroenergy buildings, which are admirable, but you couldn’t pick them out of a lineup. And we are too busy having Sally Field-esque “You really like me” moments with inconsequential hipster blogs instead of getting serious about good design (among our other our perennial needs for critique and improvement). So it was actually a great and necessary pleasure a few months ago when Mondor called out U.S. Steel for the anonymous and undercooked suburban-office-park design that they unveiled with such fanfare for the old Civic Arena site. Suddenly, a public figure, with actual credentials and responsibilities to pass judgment on architecture, was doing so. In the ensuing flurry of activity, a few design changes on the order of rearranged deck chairs were proposed, but were neither convincingly posted, published or debated. Now, U.S. Steel is announcing layoffs by the thousands. Frankly, we’d be better off if this forgettable design were forgotten. In this context, the Vitmore seems rather miraculous, when it is in fact simply good. Make your bloated floorplate as huge as possible in the lamentable but common local practice? No. The architects carved a portion of the center of the building out for light and air. “We felt we’d get a good public amenity from [that],” says architect Andrew Kotchen, in a phone interview. Complain about how hard it is to make money with decent design in the Pittsburgh market? No. “The numbers are completely different than New York, but we had a desire and interest in achieving a high level of design while being mindful of the budget.” Take your unfinished, context-free construction documents and present them to the planning commission? No. “The planning commission seemed to like the quality of our presentation.” Throw two colors of Dry-vit, add a few balconies and call it a day? No. “I think we did well with the overall design of the project and the skin of the project. Creating a big box is not always an easy thing.” Indeed, among the building’s many features, this compositional sense is especially balanced — fresh and rhythmic while maintaining neighborliness. Kotchen is quick to credit a team starting with the developer and including Moshier Architects locally. “I don’t think we are doing anything that novel,” he says. “Study the site, study the conditions, look at the program.” They seem like they do this all the time. Why the hell don’t we?

SMALL MOMENTS

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Charley’s Aunt

- a comedy written by Brandon Thomas

MAY 15, 16, 17, 2015

{BY FRED SHAW}

From a neighbor’s lost turtle to sparrows in Bahrain to prom night on the Gateway Clipper, small moments loom large in Richard St. John’s newest poetry collection, Each Perfected Name (Truman State University Press). These brief instances often add up to something more insightful. In the elegiac title poem, St. John focuses on the passing of neighborhood fixtures — like a woman and her dogs, described as “disappearing quietly, like griefs.” It’s a poem that well exemplifies a meditative style unfolding easily over 87 solidly written pages. St. John lives in Pittsburgh and is active in the poetry community, giving regular readings. Given his education at schools like Princeton, Harvard and University of Virginia, a reader might wrongly expect scholarly opacity. But while poems on Aristotle and Kant have an expected philosophical bent, they remain accessible. What makes the collection a success is the honest empathy of St. John’s speakers. In “Second Birth,” a reader is dropped into the home shared by the speaker’s elderly mother and a sister with Down syndrome, revealing their quirky relationship and ways of communicating. “Twenty minutes, it’s been — / no, really fifty years, their shared laboring / converges, as our mom grows young again. / ‘This may seem a litto’ strange,’ my sister told me / on the phone. ‘Sometimes we make animo’ sounds.’” St. John’s language reveals a keen ear and a tender heart for off-beat familial experience. He also displays a firm grasp of domesticity in “Penelope in Firelight (I),” re-imagining the difficult rapprochement of mythical Odysseus and Penelope after he’s returned from many years of war and travel. “That’s why he’d come home. / That’s why he studies her so closely now. That’s why / the slender, silvery needle, on which she lavishes / her easy, whole-hearted attention, terrifies him / as nothing on the fields of Illium had ever done.” St. John also displays a sharp imagistic eye, offering keen observation and clarity. In “Prom Night,” the dinner fare is described as “pallid, heart-sized slabs / of rare prime rib under their orange lamp.” In “Pluto 3,” a walking tour of the speaker’s neighborhood includes a rental’s yard, detailed here as a “dimming galaxy of dandelion puffs / floating at its unmowed front.” Through precise rendering of familiar images, St. John sets a compassionate tone found throughout the thoughtful Each Perfected Name.

Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m.

TICKETS ARE $15.00 FOR ADULTS, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

SCOTTISH BALLET TUESDAY, MAY 19TH 2015 • 8PM • BYHAM THEATER WATCH: TrustArts.org/Streetcar

crackles with Southern heat and sexual tension – The Independent TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

[BOOK REVIEW]

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SALON-ATMOSPHERE.COM 3000 W. LIBERTY AVE | DORMONT | 412-343-5490 Stiltwalkers, Fire Performers, Aerial Acts, Jugglers, Magic + More!

Ent rtainment i lity Ente Above & Beyond Specialit

Book Us Now 614.432.1968 theamazinggiants.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES ORR}

From left: Lily Lauver, Art DeConciliis and James Curry in Our Town, at Little Lake

Front Porch Theatricals presents

The Last Five Years May 22nd-31st NEW HAZLETT THEATER TICKET PRICES: $30 ON-LINE, $35 AT THE DOOR, $24 STUDENTS & GROUPS

Tickets: www.frontporchpgh.com frontporch.showclix.com

1-888-718-4253 Written & composed by Tony Award Winner JASON ROBERT BROWN Originally Produced for the New York Stage by Arielle Tepper and Marty Bell. Originally Produced by Northlight Theatre, Chicago, IL. “The Last Five Years” is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI) . All authorized Performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, 10019 P: 212-541-4684 F: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

“You’ll LAUGH and s” friend bond with your t-Gazette - Pittsburgh Pos

MAY 27 - AUG 16

Barbara Gehring & Linda Klein | Photo: Terry Shapiro

412-456-6666

CLOCabaret.com THE CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE IS A PROJECT OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

Groups 412-325-1582

[PLAY REVIEWS]

LIFE, ON STAGE {BY TED HOOVER}

OPENING ITS 67th season, Little Lake The-

atre presents the classic American drama Our Town, Thorton Wilder’s look at a small New Hampshire town 100 years ago. The trick of the 1938 Pulitzer-winning Our Town is that by focusing so intensely on small day-to-day matters and the ordinary rituals and commonplace cycles of life, Wilder’s play becomes nothing less than a testament to existence.

OUR TOWN

continues through May 23. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelaketheatre.org

In a number of ways, it’s fitting that Little Lake is producing this show. The company has always been a “people’s theater”; out of necessity and vision, the Lake eschews spectacle and theatrical fashion, instead focusing on telling the story in the most direct, sincere way possible. That is exactly Wilder’s goal as well. Art DeConciliis plays the Stage Manager, fittingly, having been a cornerstone of the company. DeConciliis unfurls a piercing intelligence and can be, at the same time, both remote and intimate. James Curry and Lily Lauver are moving as George and Emily, given terrific support by Mary Liz Meyer, Allison Morgan Cahill, Bob Rak and Kevin Bass as their parents. And a large ensemble provides solid color and shading to the production. It’s fitting, too, that Sunny Disney-

Fitchett serves as the director of this, her favorite American play. She resolutely avoids Our Town’s trap; this is not a sentimental or nostalgic play — as many productions I’ve seen seem to think — and hers is an unvarnished look at the material. I could wish for more of a sense of time and place in the playing style: These are laconic, stolid New Englanders in 1905 after all. But that might grow as the run progresses. Our Town is also fitting because it’s the final play Disney-Fitchett will direct as artistic director: After 22 years, she and her husband (and managing director) Rob Fitchett have turned the company over to a new team and are heading out west. It would be impossible to sum up in the small space I have the brilliant work Sunny and Rob have done and the thriving, vital cultural institution they leave behind. To them (and the incoming crew) I can only say … break a leg! I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

GOING YARD {BY TYLER PLOSIA}

THERE’S SOMETHING fatalistic about August Wilson’s writing. So many of his plays — like all true stories — end in death, and some begin that way. Fences, now at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company, is no exception. And the artists behind this production defer to the words, respecting the fatalism with a steady, inevitable pace. The magic of August Wilson is that even when we can feel where the story is leading us, we want to stick around to delight in the details. But writing can only carry this weighty play so far, and Pitts-


burgh Playwrights has pieced together an acting showcase. Anthony Chisholm is the early standout as the brain-damaged Gabe — his cadence and varied register recalls a pitchy Ossie Davis. Sandra Dowe plays Rose Maxson, the matriarchal rock: reliable in her presence, though ever-shifting in her relationship with her husband, Troy.

FENCES

continues through May 30. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $27.50-35. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com

And former baseball player Troy Maxson is the most challenging character. In the role, Kevin Brown does very little to sand the rougher sides of the man, and this production emphasizes the question: Is there enough here to empathize with? To his credit, director Mark Clayton Southers seems more interested in molding a complex central character than an empathetic one. Troy has had a difficult life — far more difficult than most. But do anecdotes about a violent childhood justify an adulthood of negligence and arrogance? What are these stories worth when recited by a dishonest man? Ultimately, Troy’s insistence on doing “what his heart tells him is right”

leaves him isolated. We’re left wondering whether this isolation is tragic or cathartic (or both). But if Wilson’s writing is often fatalistic, his characters’ fates are not predetermined. Instead, there’s the reminder that familiar conditions will yield predictable results. Over the course of Fences, Troy gradually assembles a fence for his small yard. He’s ostensibly creating it for the family that it ends up shutting out. Scenic designer Tony Ferrieri embraces the symbolism by creating fence-like trees, windows — nearly the whole set resembles a fence. Troy Maxson is villainous, but it’s helpful to keep in mind that the conditions he lives in are real fences: the conditions that contribute to the trapped urban existences Wilson was so fascinated with.

rendingly dark undertone to some genuinely funny material. With tone-setting help from music composed by Tom Kitt, writer and lyricist Brian Yorkey conceived Next to Normal as a problem play in the non-Shakespearean sense. The 2008 work’s focus is psychiatry, so if you have strong feelings about how we treat people with mental illness, you will either get a lot out of it or depart ready to tweet dirty words at the writers. It won multiple Tonys and a gosh-darned Pulitzer, though — meaning that, technically, the play outranks me. In Stage 62’s new production, directed by Stephen Santa, Cynthia Dougherty takes the lead as Diana, the matriarch of an overfunded white suburban family, who can never quite find the right psychiatric care to function as well as she’d like. Every number Dougherty gets is a highlight, including one with her son Gabe, played by Nick Black, that had me bawling in my seat. In an interesting twist — trying not to reveal too much here, as the show plays with hallucinations and perception —

THE MUSICAL BRINGS A HEARTRENDINGLY DARK UNDERTONE TO SOME GENUINELY FUNNY MATERIAL.

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

GETTING WELL {BY COLETTE NEWBY}

NEXT TO NORMAL is a rock-styled musical

about a dysfunctional family, with a heart-

Diana’s mental illness is manifested as a character with its own songs and interactions with other characters. I, a relative alien to the psychiatric world, found this somewhere between cheesy and unrealistic. A friend in the next seat, having experienced the rigmarole of experimenting with medication and so on, thought it was among the show’s most resonant devices. I think that says a lot about this play’s sincerity, not to discard the irony that each of us saw a hallucination differently.

NEXT TO NORMAL

continues through Sat., May 16. Stage 62 at Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-18. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.com

The music is live, conducted glitteringly by Lena Gabrielle. I note this because the musicians were hidden behind the stage and struggled against a sound system that seemed to hate them. (I had assumed the score was canned.) At times, the performance I saw turned into a fracas between the musicians, the singers and technology. It got hard to understand only in the more bombastic numbers where the whole family is singing; you might want to read some lyrics online after the show.

Images: Lorcan O'Herlihy, Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects, Formosa1140, 2010. Gift of Lorcan O'Herlihy, 2014.67.7 © 2007 Lorcan O'Herlihy. Bottom Photo: © Lawrence Anderson/Esto

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

CLOSES MAY 25 ABRIDGED REOPENING JUNE 6

Building curiosity. Sketches, plans, blueprints, renderings, models. Architectural design is anything but straightforward. An in-depth look at the process, featuring work from CMOA's collection.

the heinz architectural center cmoa.org N E W S

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| one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.1405.21.15

Live Music

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE MATTRESS FACTORY}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

MAY 15

Factory Installed

Brent Sullivan Santry and Alyssa Herron. The first performance at The Maker Theater is tonight. ZM 8 p.m. Continues through May 30. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $15-20. 412-496-2194 or www. 12peerstheater.org

+ FRI., MAY 15 {EVENT}

DAN BUBIEN

WEDNESDAY | MAY 13 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Art by Jacob Douenias + Ethan Frier

JOHN GRESH

FRIDAY | MAY 15 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BILLY THE KID & the regulators

SATURDAY | MAY 16 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RML JAZZ

WEDNESDAY | MAY 20 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BILLY PRICE

FRIDAY | MAY 22 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OLGA WATKINS

SATURDAY | MAY 23 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VINCE AGWADA

WEDNESDAY | MAY 27 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

dr zoot

FRIDAY | MAY 29 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

the satin hearts

SATURDAY | MAY 30 | 8PM

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

+ THU., MAY 14 {FESTIVAL} The EQT Children’s Theater Festival marks its 29th season with four days of programming. Free events like public-art installations, craft-making, a scavenger hunt and movies take over Downtown venues like Wood Street Galleries and the Harris Theater. Food trucks and a pop-up park are the visual centerpiece, with Penn Avenue closed from Seventh to Ninth streets. Meanwhile, theater troupes from overseas — Denmark, Scotland, the Netherlands — perform shows including Hansel and Gretel, The Adventures of Robin Hood and Manxmouse: The Mouse Who Knew No Fear. Daytime and evening performances of these ticketed events will be held at the Byham Theater, the Trust Arts Education Center and Cabaret at Theater Square. Children can also enjoy an interactive art installation by Australia’s Polyglot Theater, tangling elastic through tall golden poles. Zacchiaus McKee 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 17. Various

venues, Downtown. Some events free; ticketed events: $5-18. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{STAGE} Described by The New York Times as “a sharp X-ray of the embattled American psyche,”

Starting tonight, the Frick Art & Historical Center has a brand-new attraction. For Summer Fridays at the Frick, the center’s entire site will remain open until 9 p.m. on Fridays, offering visitors a chance to tour the historic Clayton mansion, picnic on the grounds, view exhibits and eat at the café, as well as experience special events. Food trucks, art socials and lawn games are included on selected dates, along with the long-running first-Fridays concert series, starting in June. ZM 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Aug. 7. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Free admission to grounds; $5-15 for exhibits. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrick pittsburgh.org

MAY 15

Tonight at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, it’s not just the artists who are local; much of the subject matter is, too. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods is Lawrenceville-based painter Ron Donoughe’s project to paint each city neighborhood over the course of a year. The exhibit, organized by Laura Domencic, is complemented by a book, available for signing at tonight’s opening reception. The PCA also opens seven solo exhibits curated by Adam Welch, by artists including Danny Bracken, Haylee Ebersole, Brett Kashmere and Steven Sherrill. BO 5:30-9 p.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $5. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

The Sound of a Modern Symphony

Lisa D’Amour’s Detroit is a dark comedy portraying the economic uncertainty of the middle class. Focusing on two neighboring couples at a barbeque with vastly different life stories, the play was a 2011 Pulitzer finalist. The Pittsburgh premiere, staged by Twelve Peers Theater, is directed by Vince Ventura and stars John Feightner, Sara Fisher,

{ART}


sp otlight {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Like many artists, Patrick Jordan has found himself drawn to Braddock. Now, the barebones productions founder will be spending even more time in the struggling mill town: barebones black box theater, the company’s permanent theater space, debuts with the Pittsburgh premiere of Miki Johnson’s play American Falls, May 14-31. The acclaimed 2012 drama (which some have called a latter-day Our Town) depicts eight people in a small Idaho town — six alive, two dead — telling stories about their lives: suicide, love, childhood, nightmares, meth, Bud, magic shoes. Pitt grad Johnson is a former Pittsburgh-based actor now working as a writer in Los Angeles. Jordan, in his directorial debut, guides a cast including Leandro Cano, Connor McCanlus, Cary Anne Spear and Dave Mansueto. The stillraw barebones space is located across from U.S. Steel’s Edgar Thomson Works, in the Superior Motors building set to house noted chef Kevin Sousa’s new restaurant. The theater, which seats just 50, is quite a change from barebones’ recent shows at the much larger New Hazlett Theater. But Jordan, a friend of both Sousa and Braddock Mayor John Fetterman, has the space rent-free from Fetterman’s nonprofit, Braddock Redux. He says he wants it to house not just a stepped-up slate of smaller barebones shows, but other arts events and even classes, too. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. May 14-31. 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. $30-35. www.barebonesproduction.com

{ART} Some 500 artists from 27 countries and across the U.S. applied for the Mattress Factory’s Factory Installed; eight were accepted to create new room-sized installations. Four have work in part one of this two-part show, which opens tonight. New Yorkbased Anne Lindberg, who has international exhibition credits, makes room-sized drawings in space with colored thread. Brooklyn’s

the orchestral world premiere of Jake Heggie’s “The Work at Hand.” This PSO co-commission by the composer known for his Dead Man Walking opera features PSO principal cellist Anne Martindale Williams (pictured) and guest mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton. All three days, the Heinz Hall program, conducted by British conductor Michael Francis, includes the PSO premiere of Composer of the Year Mason

MAY 15

Flamenco y Tango

Julie Schenkelberg combines vintage domestic items with discarded industrial materials. Pittsburgh’s John Morris makes installations with found objects, and Pittsburghbased team Jacob Douenias + Ethan Frier works with beneficial microbes. BO 6-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through next winter. 1414 Monterey St., North Side. $15. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

{MUSIC} The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra highlights new symphonic music. Tonight and Sunday, BNY Mellon Grand Classics: The Sound of a Modern Symphony includes

N E W S

Bates’ “Alternative Energy” and Bartok’s “Concerto for Orchestra.” BO 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 16, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., May 17. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25.75-105.75. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

{ART} SPACE gallery opens the exhibit Repetition, Rhythm, and Pattern, a new version of a group show previously staged in San Diego and Brooklyn that features works in many media exploring the possibilities of abstraction. Says organizer Lindsey Landfried, “Each of the artists works with characteristic elements of abstraction such as geometry,

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monochromatic or limited color, plainspoken materials, seriality and precise craftsmanship.” Artists Kim Beck, Alex Paik and Lilly Zuckerman unveil site-specific works at an opening reception tonight. ZM 6:30-8:30 p.m.. Exhibit continues through June 28. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

MAY 16

Animal Secrets

{MUSIC} Referred to as a “sono-mosaic” in that it blends vocal and musical talent, Flamenco y Tango combines Spanish and Argentine music and dance in a performance-art piece. Presented at CAPA Theater by Pittsburgh-based Resonance Works, the show features songs not commonly sung together, but which complement both each other and the dancing to appeal to lovers of both concert music and opera. Flamenco dancer Fanny Ara, mezzo-soprano Maria Dominique Lopez, tenor Carlos Feliciano and violinist Greta Mutlu collaborate with the CAPA High School Concert Choir. ZM 8 p.m. Also 3 p.m. Sun., May 17. 111 Ninth St., Downtown. $15-50. 412-501-3330 or www.resonanceworks.org

Palace. The first of two shows is tonight. ZM 10 p.m. Also 10 p.m. Sat., May 16. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

chipmunks, raccoons and more in Animal Secrets, a new interactive exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. The exhibit, which opens today, includes hands-on simulations like gathering food for winter with a chipmunk family, protecting baby raccoons from a fox, and matching tracks to their animals using puzzle pieces. How do mother bats find

+ SAT., MAY 16 {EXHIBIT} Kids can learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats,

MAY 15

{COMEDY}

Repetition, Rhythm, and Pattern

Pittsburgh-native comedian Zach Miller has a tattoo on his right forearm that says “Steel City Jew,” even though according to him, it’s the least Jewish thing you could do. Appearing for two nights at Arcade Comedy Theater, Miller delivers standup that is both cheeky and cynical, incorporating impressions, conspiracy theories and dick jokes. Miller has appeared on The Best Comedy Show Ever, Amp Network’s 5 Spot and at The Improv and The Comedy

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their babies in a cave? Here’s your chance to find out. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Jan. 10. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-19.95 (free for children under 3). 412-621-3112 or www.carnegiemnh.org

+ SUN., MAY 17 {ART} A hulking former factory in Point Breeze has in recent years become a hive of artistic activity, housing a cross-section of local visualart and performance talent. It also shelters The MINE Factory, and starting tonight the gallery showcases its fellow occupants in No Vacancy: Works by Tenants of 201 N. Braddock Ave. The two dozen or so artists in the group show include Stephanie Armbruster, Kim Beck, Dave Bernabo, Corey Escoto and Blaine Seigel. BO Reception: 5-8 p.m. Point Breeze. Free. www.facebook.com (search “No Vacancy”).

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FRIDAY MAY 15 A CELEBRATION OF THE CHEAPEST, CHEESIEST & MOST UNINTENTIONALLY HILARIOUS MOVIES EVER MADE HI

FRIDAY MAY 22 8PM | DOORS OPEN 7PM

2 ACT BROADWAY STYLE MUSICAL

EVERY SHOW’S A WORLD PREMIERE!

2 ACT BROADWAY STYLE MUSICAL COMEDY

Visible Fictions presents a silly & unexpected take on Robin Hood. May 14-15, 10:15 p.m., Sat., May 16, 4 & 7 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 11 a.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. AMERICAN FALLS. A kind of modern day “Our Town”, American Falls is the lives of six living people & two dead ones in American Falls, Idaho. Presented by barebones productions. Fri, Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 31. barebones black box theater, Braddock. BINGO! THE WINNING MUSICAL. A musical comedy about a group of die-hard bingo players & their friends.Their lives are thrown into a tizzy when a young stranger blows through their bingo hall & makes them confront their past. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 3 p.m. Old Schoolhouse Players, Hickory. 724-344-7467.

Visit East Liberty, Transylvania or Spain. Your choice. Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

Squirrel Hill. 412-250-7688. BROADWAY ROCKS! The DETROIT. In a first-ring suburb music from favorite Broadway just outside a city that might Shows based on rock operas be Detroit, a couple makes friends from some of rock & pop w/ the mysterious neighbors music’s icons. May 15-16, who’ve just moved in next door. 8 p.m. Strand Theater, Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Zelienople. 724-742-0400. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Mon., CHARLEY’S AUNT. When May 18, 8 p.m. Thru Charley’s aunt’s visit is May 31. The Maker delayed, Charley & Jack Theater, Shadyside. persuade their friend 412-496-2194. Lord Fancourt Babberly DEVELOPMENTAL to impersonate her. www. per WORKSHOPS Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, pa pghcitym .co FOR OPERA THEATER. 2 p.m. Thru May 18. Development, McKeesport Little Theater, performance & discussion McKeesport. 412-673-1100. of scenes from Opera Theater’s CIAO, BAMBINO! An almost new eco-opera, “A New Kind musical comedy about middle of Fallout”. Thu., May 14, 6 p.m. aged ladies man who tries to The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden & annul his “accidental” marriage Campbell Memorial Chapel. Sun., to his 25-year life companion. May 17, 2 p.m. Chatham University, Adaptation of Italian play by by Shadyside. 412-326-9687. Eduardo De Filippo. Presented DON’T DRESS FOR DINNER. A by Pittsburgh Russian Theater. farce by Marc Camoletti. Thu-Sat, In Russian w/ English subtitles. 8 p.m. Thru May 23. Beaver Area Katz Hall. Sun., May 17, 4 p.m. High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. Jewish Community Center,

FULL LIST ONLINE

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FRIDAY MAY 29

BBigfoot the Movie WORLD PREMIERE

Q&A WITH CAST INCLUDING CURT WOOTON W WOOT OOTON ON N (P ((PITTSBURGH PITT ITTSBU SBURGH RGH DA DAD) D))

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Frank & Sammy Rent The Oaks Theater for BIRTHDAYPARTIES BIRTHDAY PARTIES! TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

A showcase of performance and art in its seventh year, Morose & Macabre’s

Atrocity Exhibition brings together artists from Pittsburgh to Nashville for a night from the shadowy side of cabaret and burlesque. The Witching Hour is a “360-degree living art installation” that transports you to Transylvania and into the dark legend of the Hoia Baciu Witch. With local performers including Macabre Noir and Penny De La Poison, The Witching Hour is sure to haunt and inspire. 9 p.m. Sat., May 15. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-17. www.rextheater.com

FENCES. August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play presented by Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 & 8 p.m. Thru May 30. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-687-4686. FRECKLEFACE STRAWBERRY THE MUSICAL. Freckleface Strawberry will do anything to get rid of her freckles – from scrubbing them w/ soap, to caking on makeup or wearing a ski mask to school! Will her schoolmates realize it’s her under the mask? Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 16. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. HELLO DOLLY! Jerry Herman’s classic musical presented by Mon River Arts. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 17. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-405-8425. MIDSUMMER (A PLAY WITH MUSIC). Midsummer in Edinburgh turns into a weekend of wild abandon when divorce lawyer Helena meets small-time crook Bob in a basement wine bar. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 31. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. MOROSE & MACABRE’S 7TH ANNUAL ATROCITY EXHIBITION. An array of performances from some of the leading fetish, sideshow, & cabaret artists in the country, Sat., May 16, 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. THE MOUSETRAP. Prime Stage presents Agatha Christie’s murder mystery classic. Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 17. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. www.primestage.com. NEXT TO NORMAL. A musical exploring how one suburban household copes w/ crisis & mental illness. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. NOISES OFF. A manic menagerie as a cast of itinerant actors rehearsing a flop called Nothing’s On. Presented by Valley Players of Ligonier. Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 17. Ligonier Theater, Ligonier. 724-532-1240. OTHELLO. William Shakespeare’s classic drama. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 7 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. SOMETHING’S AFOOT. A musical that takes a satirical CONTINUES ON PG. 44


FEATURING

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ART

146 Three Degree Rd

Ross Twsp., PA

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Happy Hour Mon. - Fri. ŕś˜ŕś•ŕś˜ŕś•

$3.00 Bottle +ŕś‰ŕś”ŕśŽ

“Regression Session 35 B.C.� (photograph, 2014), by Alisha Wormsley. From the exhibition Hereafter, at Art Space 616, Sewickley.

ART SPACE 616. Hereafter. Work by Ryan Lammie & Alisha Wormsley. Opening reception May 15, 6-9pm. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. JAMES GALLERY. All Terrain Vehicle. Exploring the contemporary landscape through painting & photography. Bound. Woven fiber forms by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze. Both opening May 15. West End. 412-922-9800. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Grain Of Salt. Works by Lizzee Solomon. Opening May 15, 8 pm. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Opening reception May 15, 6pm. Featuring all new installations created in-residence by Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Anne Lindberg, John Morris & Julie Schenkelberg. North Side. 412-231-3169. THE NIGHT GALLERY. The Many Faces of The Joker. Opening May 17, 4 pm. Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197. SPACE. Repetition, Rhythm & Pattern. Work by Kim Beck, Corey Escoto, Lilly Zuckerman, Megan Cotts, Brian Giniewski, Kate McGraw, Crystal Gregory, Alex Paik, Anna Mikolay, Helen O’leary, Lindsey Landfried & David Prince. Opening May 15. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Vascular

Caverns. Papercut sculpture depicting abstracted, anatomical imagery by Gianna Paniagua. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. One Out of Many, One People. Works by Tamara Natalie Madden. An exploration of the vast cultural heritage of Jamaica. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Temporary States. Work by Lori Hepner & Christine Lorenz. Downtown. ALLEGHENY COUNTY COURTHOUSE. Ceramic Tile Quilt Exhibit. Raising awareness of domestic violence. Downtown. 855-222-8211. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. Works from Pittsburgh based artist, Cecilia Ebitz’s “Good Intentions�, inspired by the work & teachings of Corita Kent. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Vixens from the Vault. Pin-Up Photography by Laura Petrilla. Downtown. 412-325-6766. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Only Perfect Quiet. Painting by Tony Cavalline. Barco Law Library Gallery. Oakland. 412-648-1376.

BOULEVARD GALLERY. Visions. Work in oils & watercolors by Bill Perry. Work by Dorothy DeGroat in the Different Strokes Gallery. Verona. 412-828-1031. BUTLER ART CENTER. 2015 Spring Art Show. Works by many artists in the mediums of painting, drawing, photography & digital art, mixed media, sculpture, fiber art, ceramics & printmaking. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples. Van Gogh’s “Still Life, Basket of Apples� (1887),�Le Moulin de la Galette� (1886–1887), “Wheat Fields after the Rain� (1890), & Paul Signac’s “Place des Lices, St. Tropez�, visiting from the Saint Louis Art Museum. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Will close temporarily on May 25 & reopen on June 6. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Two Italian Masters. Works by Pier Luigi & Laura D’Andrea. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The CONTINUES ON PG. 45

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT DAYAK}

*Stuff We Like

poke at Agatha Christie mysteries & musical styles of the English music hall of the ‘30’s. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 16. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE WEDDING FROM HELL! A comic murder mystery about whether a couple will be together until “death do they part?” Sat., May 16, 7-9:30 p.m. Hartwood Acres Mansion, Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

COMEDY Dear Pittsburgh, I Love You

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Local artist Amy Garbark screenprints adorable typewritten love letters to the city on tea towels, T-shirts, lapel pins and more. Another favorite from her shop: “P is for Pierogi” baby bibs. www.garbelladesign.com

THU 14 DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 15 TIM ROSS, JOHN PRIDMORE, JAMES J. HAMILTON, SHANNON NORMAN. Hosted by John Dick Winters. 10 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

FRI 15 - SAT 16

The Amtrak Pennsylvanian It’s neither the cheapest way to cross the state, nor the fastest. But try finding another conveyance that cuts through people’s backyards, doesn’t get slowed by storms and lets you read or sleep the whole trip. Also, no onerous security checks, and as much legroom as your favorite diner booth. www.amtrak.com

Ta-Nehisi Coates Speech at Johns Hopkins

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK FRENIE}

In the aftermath of protests against the police killing of Freddie Gray, Baltimore native and Atlantic correspondent Coates serves up some wisdom about the deep roots of unrest there. www.ustream.tv/recorded/61723764

DODGE INTREPID RADIO ADVENTURE. Original radio adventure about a time traveling librarian & his plucky intern. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. GREG MORTON, JOHN KNIGHT, MIKE STANKIEWICZ, MIKE WYSOCKI, DAVID KAYE. Dinner & show. 6:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden, Belle Vernon. 724-379-7100. MATT WOHLFARTH, DERRICK KNOPSNYDER, MOLLY SHARROW, DAY BRACEY, TOM MUSIAL, JOHN DICK WINTERS & RAY ZAWODNI. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

SUN 17 FIVE MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC. A melting pot of poets, singers, comedians, dancers, musicians & entertainers. Presented by Chicksburgh. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Gus’s Cafe, Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271.

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

Pittsburgh’s LGBTQA choir has its home base at the East Liberty Presbyterian Church and performs several times a year. Its next show promises jazz, blues, spirituals and African music, and is set for May 30-31 in the church’s courtyard. www.rccpittsburgh.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

EVENT: Hedwig and the Angry Inch at Pittsburgh Fringe, The New Bohemian, North Side CRITIC: Emily O’Donnell, 29, a photographer and writer from Bloomfield WHEN: Fri.,

May 08

I saw it when John Cameron Mitchell did it on Broadway in March, so I really wanted to come out and see what a smaller production was like. This was a good production. It was interesting because every production of Hedwig is kind of different. It was interesting to see how closely they followed the movie as opposed to the original stage production. [The actor playing Hedwig] did well ad-libbing some of the lines, because he’s supposed to do that to some extent. It’s kind of like a cabaret show, half standup comedy and half music. There’s a lot of elements and it has a lot of layers to it. I really liked the staging of this production; the venue was great. I would have liked more wigs, but that’s a production cost. I didn’t see any of the other Fringe festival productions but I can imagine this would be a big draw. I’d definitely want to see more of them. B Y Z AC C HI AU S M C K E E

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JOHN EVANS. 8 p.m. and Sat., May 16, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. ZACH MILLER. 10 p.m. and Sat., May 16, 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

WED 20 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

EXHIBITS ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE

Children’s Museum, in San LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Diego CA. North Side. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The 412-322-5058. Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 FALLINGWATER. Tour the of the Grand Army of the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Republic served local Civil War 724-329-8501. veterans for over 54 years & FORT PITT MUSEUM. is the best preserved & most intact Reconstructed fort houses GAR post in the United States. museum of Pittsburgh history Carnegie. 412-276-3456. circa French & Indian War & CARNEGIE MUSEUM American Revolution. Downtown. OF ART. Distant Feel. Work 412-281-9285. by Antoine Catala that FRICK ART & HISTORICAL re-brands empathy. Oakland. CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic 412-622-3131. Mills: The British Passion for CARNEGIE SCIENCE Landscape. This exhibit explores CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl landscape painting in Britain Digital Dome (planetarium), form the Industrial Revolution Miniature Railroad & Village, to the eras of Romanticism. USS Requin submarine & Ongoing: tours of Clayton, more. H2Oh! Experience the Frick estate, w/ kinetic water-driven classes & programs for motion & discover all ages. Point Breeze. the relations between 412-371-0600. water, land & habitat. www. per pa HARTWOOD ACRES. How do everyday pghcitym .co Tour this Tudor mansion decisions impact & stable complex. Enjoy water supply & the hikes & outdoor activities environment? North Side. in the surrounding park. 412-237-3400. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare 724-329-8501. examples of pre World War II MCGINLEY HOUSE & iron-making technology. Rankin. MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. 412-464-4020 x 21. Historic homes open for tours, CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF lectures & more. Monroeville. PITTSBURGH. Missing Links 412-373-7794. (The Rainbow Jumpy). Bounce, NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to jump, roll, run & walk through more than 600 birds from over a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art piece created by Felipe Dulzaides & 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. Masters of the on loan from The New

FULL LIST ONLINE

Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Orotones. A display of glass plate images which have been enhanced w/ real gold-laced lacquers to bring a gilded-tone to the people & places depicted. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570.


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Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Student Photography Exhibit. A photography exhibit featuring work by six students in The Photography Intensive program. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Daydreaming Through a Child’s Eyes. An installation exhibition by Dave Calfo alongside Pittsburgh Children’s Festival. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Fabrizio Gerbino. New paintings by artist. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Looking Forward, Looking Back. Work by Dennis Bergevin & Leonard Leibowitz. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. 100 Flowers Bloomed. Work by Brian Gonnella. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Diane Grguras. New pastel paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Elements. Drawings & watercolors of bird nests w/ a focus on the natural & man-made materials incorporated into these architectural structures. The featured artists are Sue Abramson, Wendy Brockman,

FESTIVALS THU 14 - WED 20 PITTSBURGH FRINGE FESTIVAL. Presenting theater on the fringe of the main stream. Various locations. Thru June 10.

FRI 15 - SAT 16 PITTSBURGH FOLK FESTIVAL. Annual festival celebrating international cultures. Food, sales & performances by local world

David Morrison & Kate Nessler. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. The Big Little Show. An exhibition curated by Sheila D. Ali w/ local & international artists: Abira Ali, Alberto Almarza, Bill Shannon, Dougie Duerring, Eliza Henderson, Etta Cetera, Katy Dement, Laverne Kemp, Lisa Demagall, Nino Balistrieri (ACBIII), Michael “Fig” Magniafico, Merrily Mossman McAllister, Ryder Henry, Sandra Streiff, Sheila Ali & Waylon Richmond. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Landscape & Abstraction. Work by Patrick Ruane. South Side. 412-431-3337. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! A mixed media show exploring the common teapot in uncommon ways. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. ABC@PGC. A colorful exhibition feat. glass sculptures combined w/ an interactive illuminated word building piece that visitors can touch, rearrange & wear like apparel. Created by Jen Elek & Jeremy Bert. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Scratching the Itch. Work by Travis K. Schwab. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SHAW GALLERIES. Light from the Furnace.

Industrial themed artworks by Lyudmila Devlysh, Dawn Tekler, Mark Muse, Dave Kelsch, Sasha Williams & a mystery guest artist. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. A World Imagined: Kelli Connell & Sara Macel. Photography that reflects on authorship, on photographic construction & on the ways in which we define relationships through our subjective experiences of them. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Interior open for special occasions. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Following the Visual Path. Sculpture by Paul Ben-Zvi & works on paper by Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-877-7394. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Selections From The Elgin Park Series. Photographs by Michael Paul Smith. Shaping New Worlds. A national exhibition of constructed photography. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Shadyside. 412-913.4966. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. The World Revolves Around You. Work by HC Gilje. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

musicians. 4-10 p.m. and Sat., May 16, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-278-1267.

Dominique Lopez. Resonance Works. 8 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 3 p.m. CAPA Theater, Downtown. 412-501-3330.

DANCE

FRI 15 - SUN 17

FRI 15 FLAMENCO Y TANGO. A sono-mosiac project of dance & music from Spain & Argentina feat. flamenco dancer Fanny Ara & mezzo-soprano Maria

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE PRE-PROFESSIONAL SHOWCASE. A debut of original works by PBT company dancers as well as Arthur Saint-Léon’s classic “Coppélia” & Lew Christensen’s “Beauty CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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& the Beast” & “Sinfonia,” set to Luigi Boccherini’s “Sinfonia” in A Major, opus 37. Lawrence Hall, Rowland White Performance Studio. 7 p.m., Sat., May 16, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 2 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-281-0360.

SAT 16 AMETHYST’S PITTSBURGH BELLYDANCE SHOW. 10 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668.

SUN 17 FLAMENCO Y TANGO. A sono-mosiac project of dance & music from Spain & Argentina feat. flamenco dancer Fanny Ara & mezzo-soprano Maria Dominique Lopez. Resonance Works. 8 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 3 p.m. CAPA Theater, Downtown. 412-501-3330.

TUE 19 SCOTTISH BALLET. Scotland’s national dance company presents an interpretation of the Tennessee Williams’s masterpiece, “A Streetcar Named Desire”. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 15 COCKTAILS & CUISINE. Live music, various food &

drink vendors, & a silent & live auction. The event benefits victims of domestic violence. 6 p.m. The Woodlands, Wexford. 412-364-6728. HEART OF THE ARTS GALA. Honoring the patrons of Stage Right! Rizzo’s Malabar Inn, Greensburg. 724-832-7464.

SAT 16 ANIMAL FRIENDS CAT CRAWL. Crawl through Lawrenceville to visit Animal Friends’ adoptable kittens who will be spending their day at the unique shops & eateries on Butler. 10 a.m. 4300 Block, Butler Street, Lawrenceville. 412-847-7095. CLOTHES ON BODIES. Fashion & performance art exhibition to promote sustainability & benefit fair labor w/in the fashion industry through donations & local designers’ use of upcycled materials. 8:30 p.m. The Shop, Bloomfield. 724-797-7897. A FLAVOR OF THE EAST END. Sample fare from local restaurants, raffle table, auction & mystery boxes to benefit East End Cooperative Ministry. 7-10 p.m. East End Cooperative Ministry Community House, East Liberty. 412-345-7121. “LOVERS NOT FIGHTERS” GALA. Hello Bully’s gala to raise funds for Pit Bull rescue,

spaying & education. Silent & live auction, Adopt-a-Bulls & hors d’oeuvres. 7-11 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-212-6474. MAKERDATE. Benefits Assemble’s educational Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math (STEAM) programs. 6:30-10 p.m. Teamster Temple, Lawrenceville. 412-254-4230.

SUN 17 EASTER SEALS WALK WITH ME. National fundraising event to raise awareness & support for families living w/ disabilities. 8:30 a.m. Kennywood Park, West Mifflin. 412-281-7244.

MON 18 NATIONAL KINDEY FOUNDATION GOLF CLASSIC. 10:30 p.m. Valley

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

TUE 19

Brook Country Club, McMurray. 412-261-4115 ext. 15.

TUE 19 BIZARRE DRAG QUEEN BOWLING. W/ Brooklyn & VyVyan, benefiting Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. 7:30 p.m. Crafton-Ingram Lanes, Crafton. 724-678-0834.

WED 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. RICHARD H. WEISBERG. Reading & discussion of his novel, “In Praise of Intransigence: the Perils of Flexibility”. 7-9 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill.

WORDS @ WIGLE: CAMERON BARNETT & RACHEL MENNIES. A portion of the drink proceeds going to the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. 5 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

The Girl Scouts of Western Pennsylvania is seeking volunteer mentors for its programs. Help lead outings, plan activities and develop the skills of Pennsylvania’s young women. Take this opportunity to make a difference in your community. An online application and a background check are required. For more information, visit www.gswpa.org.

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

SAT 16

MON 18

THE GIRL SCOUTS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

UNTUCKED. Family carnival & concert featuring Danielle Bradbery of The Voice. All proceeds benefit the PACE School. 3 p.m. Shady Side Academy, Fox Chapel. 724-814-0064.

Exchange. 7:30-9 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118.

PA WOMEN WORK’S CASINO NIGHT. Music, games, prizes & drinks to benefit Pennsylvania Women Work. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Static, Strip District. 412-315-7330.

POLITICS THU 14 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of a group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 20 WILLIAM GUY & HOMER’S ILIAD. Reading & discussion of William Guy’s new translation of Homer’s “Iliad”. 7 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill.

KIDSTUFF THU 14 - SUN 17 SPOT. Go along with Spot & Theater Terra from the Netherlands, to the farm where all of the animals are lost. May 14-15, 12:15 & 7 p.m., Sat., May 16, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 3 & 5:45 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

THU 14 - WED 20

ALLEGHENY COUNTY MARBLES PROGRAM. Free games & lessons for children 14 & under. Tournaments. Various locations. . www per Thru May 27 a p ty ci pgh m 412-821-5779. .co BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY more. Ongoing Children’s HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Museum of Pittsburgh, Young writers & recent North Side. 412-322-5058. graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. ARTLAB. Hands-on, drop-in, com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, interactive activity designed Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. for visitors of all ages. Explore, play & experiment w/ projects STUART SHEPPARD, designed inspired by current ZIGGY EDWARDS & BARRY exhibitions, artists & ideas. 1 p.m. GOVENOR. Coffee house in Mattress Factory, North Side. partnership w/ Pittsburgh Poetry 412-231-3169.

FULL LIST ONLINE

LITERARY THU 14

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FRI 15

MARS AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY DAY. Model trains, story time, petting zoo, face painting & telescope time w/ the Kiski Astronomers. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mars Area Public Library, Mars. 724-625-9048.

SUN 17 THE JOSH & GAB SHOW. A high-energy musical-comedy duo. 1-1:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SHEEP TO SHAWL & 18TH CENTURY FASHIONS. Sheep shearing, spinning, an 18th Century fashion show & children’s story time. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Oliver Miller Homestead, South Park. 412-835-1554.

OUTSIDE SUN 17 ALLDERDICE DRAGON RUN 5K. Meet at Oval Sportsplex. Proceeds benefit “Allderdice Runners” & the Allderdice Athletic department. 10 a.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4254. COLOR ME RAD 5K RUN. Proceeds benefiting local charities. Parking lot. 8 a.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-656-7193. WALK W/ ME. 1 mile family fun walk. 8:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-281-7244.

WED 20 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 14 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. OPEN CRITIQUE. Discuss your work, your process, ask questions & get feedback. All mediums & artistic practices are welcome. For more info, visit http://neukirche.org/event/ open-critique-2/. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant


Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515.

THU 14 - SAT 16 PITTSBURGH PALESTINIAN FILM FESTIVAL. Recent, independent Palestinian films exploring the diversity of the Palestinian experience through documentary, fiction & experimental cinematic storytelling. May 14-16, 8 p.m. Regent Square Theater, Regent Square. 412-802-8417.

FRI 15 FATHER-DAUGHTER/ MOTHER-SON DANCE. Music, dancing for youth ages 6-12 & their parents or guardians. 7-11 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-723-2414. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: EAST LIBERTY. Walking tour of several artworks in the East Liberty neighborhood, including Leslie Ansley’s Convergence, Virgil Cantini’s Joy of LIfe, & Sheila Klein’s Shady Liberty. Artist Leslie Ansley will be present to talk about her work. 7 p.m. East Liberty Place South, East Liberty. 412-391-2060.

SUMMER FRIDAYS AT THE FRICK. Picnicking, tours, wine bar, yard games, music & different food trucks every week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE W/ MARY EPWORTH. a live performance of Welcome to Night Vale - the serial podcast that brings its listeners stories from the strange desert town of Night Vale in the form of community radio. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 1-877-4-FLY-TIX.

SAT 16 ART OF SELF-DEFENSE. An interactive workshop & learn how to safely defend yourself in any situation. 2:30-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. BEES, BEES, BEES! THE PLIGHT OF HONEYBEES. Learn all about bees, the hardships they face in today’s environment & the ways that you can help them through gardening & becoming a beekeeper. Registration required. Presented by Burgh’s Bees. 1 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. FOLK FESTIVAL REUNION PARTY. Celebrating 59 years of the Pittsburgh Folk Festival

w/ live music provided by the BMNECC Otets Paissii Band, the Srpski Sinovi Folk Orchestra & more. 8 p.m. Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-831-5101. HOW PROHIBITION EXPLAINS MODERN CRIMINAL PROCEDURE. A lecture presented by Associate Law Professor Wes Oliver. Rm. 203, School of Law. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6300. SPRING FROLIC– USO DANCE. This year’s theme is WWII USO canteen. Live music w/ Murphy’s Music Center Jazz Orchestra. Stage Right presents a performance by the Andrews Sisters & a one-act play, “Dreams Before Breakfast.” 6-9 p.m. Westmoreland County Courthouse, Greensburg. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Join WPMC Mycologist La Monte Yarroll & the Allegheny Land Trust for a species survey of Sycamore Island. The Allegheny Cleanways pontoon boat will be shuttling participants from the Verona Public Dock (located at 101 Arch Street) to the island, starting at 10:00 a.m. 10 a.m.2 p.m. 412-741-2750 x 207. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

[MUSIC]

PigPen Theatre Co., which formed when its members were students at Carnegie Mellon University, is both a folk-rock band and a theater group that stages original, music-driven plays, some of which have turned up Off-Broadway. Its current tour focuses on music, specifically songs from the band’s forthcoming album, Whole Sun. PigPen plays the Club at Stage AE this Sunday. 6 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $21.10. www.ticketmaster.com N E W S

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actress & a singer/guitarist for a production of “Woody & INAUGURAL PORCH Marjorie: Hard Traveling”. PARTY. Food, music & Please be familiar w/ the songs participation from local of Woody Guthrie. If you are companies like P&W BMW interested, email outreach@ & Wigle Whiskey. Some of alcstudies.org with “audition” the proceeds will go to Nepal in the subject line for more info. earthquake victims. 1-4 p.m. Thru June 1. 412-353-3756. Frick Park, Regent Square. COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions THE ORIGINS OF THE IRISH for “Cats”. A prepared song RACE. Lecture w/ Alan Boal. is not nessessary. Dress Presented by The Gaelic comfortably in clothing & Arts Society of Pittsburgh. footwear convenient for 2 p.m. Epiphany Catholic dancing. A children’s chorus Church, Uptown. 412-761-1844. is being added for young PFLAG GREENSBURG. performers ages 6 to 11. Support, education & advocacy June 6, 12-2:30pm & June 7, for the LGBTQ community, 3:30-6:30pm. Open audition family & friends. Third Sun for “Two by Two”, to showcase of every month, 2 p.m. vocal range w/ movement Trinity United Church & cold readings. June 13, of Christ, Greensburg. 12-2:30pm & June 14th, 412-518-1515. 3:30pm - 6:00pm. Cranberry. PRIDE BOWLING 724-773-9896. LEAGUE. Seeking bowlers THE JUNIOR of all levels. Every other MENDELSSOHN Sunday. Every other CHOIR OF Sun, 6:30 p.m. Forward PITTSBURGH. Lanes, Squirrel Hill. Seeking young 412-337-0701. www. per singers from 8th pa SUNDAY MARKET. pghcitym through 12th grades. .co A gathering of local Prepared solo of your crafters & dealers choice, preferably a selling unique items, from classical selection (art song, home made foodstuffs aria, etc.) Carefully selected to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. works from musical theater The Night Gallery, may be performed, but these Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223. should demonstrate a classical singing technique rather than belting. To schedule ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. an audition call Emily Meet w/ the Roboto board of Stewart at 412-926-2488. directors to find out what’s Auditions will be conducted happening at the space & help on August 27, after 3:30pm. guide its future. Third Mon of Third Presbyterian every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Church, Oakland. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. THE MENDELSSOHN 412-853-0518. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Spring auditions for all voice parts for the 2015/2016 GEO DUNCAN & JOHN season. Volunteer singers ERNEST MILLER: A GLASS will be heard on May 11, JOURNEY. Discussion w/ 12 & 13. Professional Core Tom Cooper of the Duncan singers will be heard & Miller Glass Museum. May 17, 18 & 19. For audition 7 p.m. Mount Pleasant criteria & to make an appt, Glass Museum. go to www.themendelssohn. org. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE, THE PITTSBURGH THE COURTS & YOU. Get SAVOYARDS. Stage & the tools to inform & impact vocal auditions for “Iolanthe”, our reproductive justice & June 22, 7:30-9pm & June 24, judicial systems. Featuring 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song panelists from The Women’s from either Gilbert & Sullivan Law Project, New Voices (preferred), standard Pittsburgh & Pittsburgh Pro musical theater or classical. Choice Escorts. 6 p.m. Rodef Accompanist provided. Shalom Congregation, Oakland. Bring resume & headshot. 412-421-6118. No appt. necessary. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. THE 34RD ANNUAL 412-734-8476. COUNTRY SHOWDOWN. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Seeking contestants for Seeking men & women America’s largest country music 18 + for a production of talent search. Open to vocal “Chicago”. Prepare 32 bars and/or instrumental performers, of Musical theater, rep-jazz individuals, or groups of up or swing & one 2 minute to seven members. Deadline monologue. There will be for entry forms is May 15. a group choreography audition. www.countryshowdown.com. Bring picture & resume. ADVANCED LABOR & Audition dates are May 15, CULTURAL STUDIES. Seeking an

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6-9pm & May 16, 1-4pm. Call 724-374-9200 or email tfauditions@gmail.com for an audition slot. WEXFORD ACTING STUDIO & INGOMAR CHURCH. Seeking actors, singers & dancers. All ages (must be entering 1st grade by Fall 2015.) May 29, 4-8pm & May 30, 2-7pm. Ingomar United Methodist Church, Wexford. 412-364-3613.

SUBMISSIONS

THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, showcasing independent authors from Southwestern PA & beyond. Entrants must complete the online entry form (www.theauthorszone.com) & submit payment by August 1, 2015 for their work to be considered. 412-563-6712. GIRL GOV. Open to all girls entering 9th-12th grade in the Fall of 2015 who live in southwestern PA. Girls will travel to Harrisburgh to shadow gov. officials, learn about civics, advocacy, philanthropy, community involvement, youth organizing, women’s history & leadership. Apply online. http://wgfpa.org/ what-we-do/activities/girl-gov/ Deadline May 15. THE MT. LEBANON ARTISTS’ MARKET. Looking for artists for a T-Shirt Design Contest for the 2015 event. The winning design will be printed on T-Shirts to be sold at this year’s market. The contest is open to everyone. For details visit http://www.cwpress.com/ art-prep/. Deadline May 15. PRINTMAKING 2015. Work must be original, created within the last three years & not previously exhibited within a 150 radius of Pittsburgh. A printmaking process – relief, intaglio, silkscreen lithography, monotype – must be central to the execution of all entries. Photographs, offset reproductions, or reproductions of artwork originally produced in another medium will not be considered. Deadline June 2. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 304-723-0289. THE WRITERS’ PRESS POETRY CHAPBOOK COMPETITION. Open to new & emerging writers. No theme restrictions. Prizes include publication w/ Createspace & online distribution w/ Amazon & Barnes & Noble. thewriterspress@ gmail.com. Thru May 30.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My wife is one of those women who needs manual stimulation of her clit during sex to climax. Before meeting her, I had several long-term girlfriends, and not one needed to do this in order to climax. Before we got married, I explained that I wanted to explore and push the boundaries, and she promised me that would happen. But she has no fantasies, kinks or fetishes, and she’s not into any of the things I’ve proposed. Bringing this all together is that when we are having sex, she’s so fixated on stimulating her clit, it’s almost like we are in two different worlds. When she’s working toward an orgasm, her eyes are shut and she’s concentrating on the clit and I can’t help but wonder if the work it takes to get her to orgasm is part of the reason she’s not interested in exploring. I’ve talked to her several times about how I’m yearning to do more, but I haven’t brought up my thoughts on how the way she comes may be affecting things. COME AS YOU ARE

thing about online dating is that you can express preferences before going on a date, and I’d rather not unknowingly walk into these potentially awkward and painful situations. Is there something I could put on my profile expressing my preference for cisgender women that is not offensive to trans people? It’s important to me that I remain an ally. CAN I SAY?

You can put “not into trans women” in your online dating profile, CIS, but you’ll have to hand in your Trans Ally card. Occasionally having coffee with someone you’re not into — and having to tiptoe through the awkwardness — isn’t something you can avoid in online dating. You would have to do that even if only cis lesbians responded to your ads, as you’re presumably not attracted to all cis lesbians. Having a coffee now and then with a trans woman you most likely won’t find attractive — but you never know — is a small price to pay to make the online dating world a less shitty place for trans people. It’s what an ally would do.

“YOU CAN PUT ‘NOT INTO TRANS WOMEN’ IN YOUR ONLINE DATING PROFILE, CIS, BUT YOU’LL HAVE TO HAND IN YOUR TRANS ALLY CARD.”

My thoughts, in no particular order … 1. Three out of four women need direct, focused and sometimes intense stimulation of their clit in order to come, so either you lucked out and all of your previous girlfriends were 25 percenters or many/most/all of your previous girlfriends were faking it. 2. If your wife is picking up on your negativity, that could lessen her enthusiasm for sex in general and sex with you in particular. 3. Your wife is fantasizing about something when she closes her eyes and starts rubbing her clit. You might be able to have more productive conversations about your sex life — and your desire for a more adventurous one — if you drew her out about what’s going on in her head when she’s getting off. Once she opens up about whatever it is that’s unspooling in her head, you can suggest realizing her fantasies in real life — and a few of yours as well. 4. And … um … lastly … your wife might need to block you out — she may need to clamp her eyes shut — in order to climax because she might not be sexually attracted to you. I hope that’s not the case. But if marital sex for her is a joyless exercise — she gets you off then clamps her eyes shut and gets herself off — then this is a problem that can’t be fixed, and spending the next five decades trying to fix it will be both futile and frustrating. Here’s hoping your wife’s issue is something more common, and something that can be fixed: that she’s sexually repressed but can work through it, or that this clamp-eyes-and-rub-clit routine was her masturbatory go-to for years but you two can find new and exciting ways to get her off. Those new and exciting ways to get her off will most likely require her to fixate on stimulating her clit — and that’s OK.

I’m a lesbian who has been pretty successful at online dating. Lately, however, I’ve had a few women contact me who turn out not to be cisgender. I’ve tried to remain open, but I have never been attracted to a trans woman. I don’t rule out the possibility that it could happen. But one great

I’m a 29-year-old gay guy in a committed relationship. My boyfriend says he feels sexually inadequate, because I’m not the type of guy who needs to come in order to feel that I had great sex. Honestly, foreplay and receiving anal sex are much more pleasurable for me. If I want to come, I will, just not all the time. As long as there’s plenty of kissing, touching and licking — and all the other wonderful “ings” — I don’t feel like ejaculation is a big deal. He thinks it means I’m not attracted enough to him. He’s self-conscious, since his dick is a bit on the small side, and my not coming seems to make it worse. I’ve told him that I find him attractive, and I always try to make him have an orgasm. I’ve also tried to come more often for him, but sometimes I’m just not in the mood. I’ve also told him that he’s not doing anything wrong and this is just the way I’m wired. I don’t know what else to do or say. ORGASMS RELIABLY GREAT ALTHOUGH SOMETIMES MISSED

You’ve done the reassuring thing (about his size), you’ve done the explaining thing (this is just the way you’re wired), and you’ve done the meeting-him-halfway thing (coming more often to appease/mollify). Now it’s time for the exasperated-ultimatum thing. I’ve taken the liberty of scripting your ultimatum: “You have to stop obsessing about whether or not I come every time we fuck. I would never make you feel bad about your dick, but you’re making me feel bad about my dick. So here’s the deal: You’re going to drop this. You’re going to take ‘Yes, I’m attracted to you’ and ‘This is how my dick works’ for an answer. And you’re not going to bring this up anymore. Sometimes I’ll come, sometimes I won’t. Putting up with that is the price of admission to be with me. If you can’t pay that price, then we should break up.”

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Don’t miss Sherman Alexie on the Savage Lovecast: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.13-05.20

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): My astrological colleagues discourage me from talking to you Bulls about financial matters. “Most Tauruses know 10 times more about the mystery of money than you will ever know,” said one. “Their excellent instincts trump any tips you could offer.” Another astrologer concurred, noting, “The financial advice you give Tauruses will at best be redundant and at worst simplistic.” A third colleague summed it up: “Offering Tauruses guidance about money is like counseling Scorpios about sex.” So although I’m shy about providing recommendations, I will say this: The next five weeks will be a favorable time to set in motion the plans to GET RICHER QUICKER!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Endings to be useful must be inconclusive,” wrote science-fiction novelist Samuel R. Delany. I endorse that theory for your use in the coming weeks. Interweave it with this advice from playwright Sam Shepard: “The temptation toward resolution, toward wrapping up the package, seems to me a terrible trap. Why not be more honest with the moment? The most authentic endings are the ones which are already revolving toward another beginning.” In other words, Gemini, don’t be attached to neat finales and splashy climaxes. Consider the possibility that you can simply slip free of the complicated past and head toward the future without much fanfare.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In mythic terms, you should be headed for the winner’s circle, which is inside the pleasure dome. The parade in your honor should follow the award ceremony, and let’s hope you will be on the lead float wearing a gold crown and holding

a real magic wand while being sung to by a choir of people you love and who love you. If, for any reason, you are not experiencing some version of these metaphors, I urge you to find out why. Or better yet, get busy on planning a homecoming or graduation party or award ceremony for yourself. From an astrological perspective, you have a mandate to be recognized and appreciated for the gifts you offer the world.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): British Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley was a brilliant military commander. Renowned for his ability to beat larger armies, he also had great skill at minimizing loss of life among his own troops. His most famous triumph took place in 1815, when he led the forces that defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo. In the aftermath, the French tyrant lost his power and went into exile. What was the secret of Wellesley’s success? “Bonaparte’s plans were made in wire,” he said. “Mine were made in string.” In other words, Wellesley’s strategy was more flexible and adaptable. As circumstances

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

changed, it could be rearranged with greater ease. That’s the approach I recommend for you in the coming days.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You may not be strong enough to take a shot at a daunting challenge that’s five levels beyond your previous best. But I think you are at least ready to try a tricky challenge that’s one level higher than where you have been operating. And that, in my opinion, is a more practical use of your courage. I think it would be a waste of your energy to get wrapped up in grandiose fantasies about impossible perfections. As long as you don’t overreach, you can accomplish small miracles.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I suspect you are about to experience some prime contenders for The Most Unusual Adventures of 2015. Are you thoroughly prepared? Of course not. There’s no way you can be totally ready to adapt to unpredictable wrinkles and change your mind at a moment’s notice. But that’s exactly what will make these experiments so fun. That’s why they will be effective in building up your resilience and willpower. For best results, apply your nighttime thinking to daytime activities, and vice versa. Spend minimal time on responsibilities that don’t teach you noble truths about your fellow madmen and madwomen. Now here’s my big question: How can you tap into the extra power you will need during your rite of passage?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Many modern astronomers are allergic to astrology, but from my perspective there is no inherent conflict between the two fields. Four of history’s greatest astronomers were practicing astrologers, after all: Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, Tycho Brahe and Pierre Gassendi. One of my friends in college, a Scorpio woman named Martha Maiden, is a first-rate astrologer who got a degree in astronomy and became a top scientist at NASA. In the spirit of finding reconciliation between apparent opposites, I’m happy to say that you are now a virtual virtuoso in your ability to reconcile both apparent opposites and actual opposites. I invite you to use this aptitude with flair and daring.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian Matt Stutzman competes in the sport of archery. He’s the world’s record-holder for longest accurate shot, having hit a target 230 yards away. What makes his accomplishment so extraordinary is the fact that he was born without any arms. He holds each arrow in his mouth and grasps the bow with his right foot and the help of a chest harness. In the spirit of this armless archer, and in accordance with your current astrological omens, I invite you to initiate an attempt to triumph over one of your so-called disadvantages.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Long before Lou Reed recorded the song “Walk on the Wild Side,” Nelson Algren wrote a novel titled A Walk on the Wild Side. It depicts the luxuriant depravity of New Orleans’ French Quarter in the 1930s. One of Algren’s most enduring bits of spiritual advice goes as follows: “Never, ever, no matter what else you do in your whole life, never sleep with anyone whose troubles are worse than your own.” What do you think of that, Capricorn? Even if you don’t regard it as a universal rule that you should unfailingly obey, I suggest you observe it in the coming weeks. For the sake of your mental hygiene, be extra discerning about what influences you absorb — not just in bed, but everywhere.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The cosmos has authorized you to be hungrier than usual. You may also feel free to respond to your enhanced hunger with an extra-aggressive quest to be fed. Therefore: Be voracious! Risk being avid, ardent and even agog. Fill yourself up with pudding, pleasure, praise, peace, perks and privileges. Anything else you’d like to engorge? If some unenlightened person questions your right to claim the biggest piece and the sweetest taste and the best fuel, inform them that your astrologer says you have ultimate permission.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Is there an interesting ally whose path rarely crosses yours? Do you draw inspiration from a like-minded dynamo who is not fully available? Has fate kept you and a friend from getting as close as you would wish? According to my reading of the astrological omens, relationships like these could become more substantial in the coming weeks. The dream of a more robust connection could ripen into an opportunity to actually collaborate. So be alert for the openings, and be prepared to do what’s necessary to go deeper.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The danger of resisting a temptation too strenuously is that the temptation might depart. I suggest that you prevent that from happening. Without throwing yourself at the mercy of the temptation, see if you can coax it to stick around for a while longer. Why? In my view, it’s playing a useful role in your life. It’s motivating you to change some things that really do need to be changed. On the other hand, I’m not yet sure that it should become anything more than a temptation. It might serve you best that way, not as an object of your satisfied desire. Imagine that everything important you know is condensed into a single symbol or image. What is it? FreeWillAstrology.com.

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Clinical Research Opportunity for Women Do you suffer from uterine fibroids? DO YOU EXPERIENCE? • Heavy or abnormal periods • Abdominal pain and pressure • Increased need to urinate with your periods

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.13/05.20.2015

ACROSS

1. Basket from downtown 5. Author Ken 10. Scheduling problem 14. “Is this where it goes?” 15. One-up 16. “Julius Caesar” costume 17. Directly above 18. Optimistic business goal? 20. Prefix with state and lateral 21. Lionel Messi’s number 22. Jafar’s macaw in “Aladdin” 23. Gut reaction in a ship’s hospital? 29. Gulf of Masirah resident 30. “Milk me!” 31. Legendary drag Dame 32. “Mr. Blue Sky” band, for short 34. Risk-taking 37. Finale 38. Guided trip through state assistance? 41. “Road soda” crime, briefly 43. Mix things up 44. Oprah’s cable channel 45. Uncreative learning method 47. Loretta E. Lynch’s grp. 49. “Hungarian Rhapsodies” composer Franz

53. Any of nine characters underneath a picture of a leaping stag? 57. “Days Are Gone” sister band 58. Its gets laid down around the house 59. Line that points to infinity 60. Carbs eaten before a martial arts workout program? 64. Round caramel candy 65. “You ___ be assimilated” (“Star Trek” catchphrase) 66. Thick woolen fabric 67. Big name in cosmetics 68. Classic, in cheesy store names 69. Time (seemingly) in between checks, for a freelancer 70. Ballerina’s leap

DOWN

1. “... really?” 2. Make some adjustments to the topiary 3. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 4. “You betcha” 5. Land divided by the 38th parallel 6. Dr. Seymour Butz, the proctologist, e.g. 7. Rd. relatives 8. Name on a Slow Churned quart 9. Ashram visitors 10. Chintzy cigar

11. “Now, THAT explains it!” 12. Band’s rep. 13. Exasperated cry 19. Singer with a death wish? 21. Investments that mature in 52 weeks 24. ACL’s area 25. Warning from a bad drive? 26. Lymphatic mass 27. Cable channel pumped into airport lounges 28. Teensy smidgen 33. Habitually, to Hardy 35. Popular muscle car 36. Cried loudly 38. Kept back 39. President’s “body man,” e.g.

40. Section of a class 41. First player to slam dunk from the free throw line, familiarly 42. Make a pitch for 46. Authorize 48. Yorick’s job 50. Labored 51. Young Turk 52. Sampler’s message 54. God in Rome 55. Depleted 56. Laundry piles 60. A quarter of eight 61. Catch something 62. Astonishment 63. “In the Aeroplane over the ___” (Neutral Milk Hotel magnum opus) 64. British rule in Asia

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DANCING INTO THE LIGHT {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

THE SWIRLING COLORS are simply dazzling.

Wearing a full-length blue skirt, the drums up and hot behind her, Teanna Medina dances for Yemaya, a West African deity, or Orisha, also known as queen of the ocean. Moving like the sea itself, she recalls the deep African roots of Caribbean culture. The scene in Most Wanted Fine Art, on Penn Avenue in Garfield, is nothing short of raucous. Against the gallery interior de rigueur — red brick and soft white walls, tin ceiling, hardwood floors — 100 people crowd in for a celebration of Herencia Africana (African heritage). As the insistent music thickens, nearly three dozen dancers, toddlers to septuagenarians, move about the space, lofting babies, jouncing shoulders, swinging to and fro. “The Latino community in Pittsburgh needs visibility,” comments Tara Sherry-Torres, whose pop-up Café Con Leche created the event. “They need plug-ins, ways to express themselves and learn about each other.”

Once settled in, however, Sherry-Torres found she missed home and her locus of Latino culture — cultures, really, because they’re all very different. Guatemala, El Salvador, Panama, Puerto Rico, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico — they all have different dialects, diets, identities. “All those layers and complexities,” she says, “engender a larger question: How do we greet each other? Then, how do we normalize the greater Latino experience in Pittsburgh?” That was her inspiration for Café Con Leche. “It’s what’s offered in a Puerto Rican home, coffee and milk, offered in friendship and hospitality,” Sherry-Torres says. “Symbolically, it’s a mixture of black and white cultures. Figuratively, it came from my own experience of being a Latina in Pittsburgh, loving the city, but missing my own cultural connection — and growing tired of explaining to every person I met what it meant to be a Latina. Telling them there’s not one singular Latino experience. So I began developing events around multi-Latino concepts and customs. Food, art, music, dance.”

“PITTSBURGH IS CHANGING. BUT LATINOS NEED TO BENEFIT FROM THE CHANGE, TOO.” In a city where Latino culture is growing but still largely invisible, Sherry-Torres, a community organizer by training, “could see that work with the Latino community would be good,” she says. “It would be impactful. It would bear fruit.” That fruit has been a long time coming. While the highly diverse Latino culture hardly has the presence here that it has in other cities — consider Miami or New York — it has put down roots and is growing. By some estimates, Latinos make up as much as 3 percent of Pittsburgh’s metro population, and their number have risen by up to 200 percent since 2000. Fueled by jobs that run the gamut from food service and social service to highly paid lawyers, surgeons and the like, Latinos have discovered that Pittsburgh is highly affordable. And that many employers are actively seeking a diverse workforce. “Pittsburgh is changing,” Sherry-Torres says. “And that’s good. But Latinos need to benefit from the change, too.” Coming from New York City some seven years ago to get a master’s degree in social work, she connected with Pittsburgh immediately — its intimacy, low prices, easy access. She also liked being on the cusp of the long-awaited Third Renaissance, a city slowly shrugging off 30 years of local post-industrial recession and an iron curtain of racial divide.

Begat in January 2014, at a Bloomfield house party, the early version of Café Con Leche served beans and rice — and asked, “Is Pittsburgh ready to go beyond its past? Is Pittsburgh open to new people?” Popping up hither and yon since then, today’s event is heavy on sound and sense. A panel discussion over here delves into the African roots of Latino culture. Teens and pre-teens over there dance many cultures: Puerto Rican bomba — call and response, women in red skirts, men all in white; Venezuelan timbores — statue of John the Baptist, red flags, circling dancers; Brazilian Samba — waves of people like ocean breezes; Peruvian festejo — rhythm bouncing like the Andes in profile. “This is high-fun, high-energy,” Sherry-Torres gestures. “It’s the place to be.” But it’s not her place — not yet. She’d like her own venue — perhaps in Bloomfield, perhaps in Allentown, with its growing Latino community. Either way, she says, “I would like to see more normalization of these events. Make them less exotic.” A red-skirted dancer spins by. “My larger goal,” she adds, “is to inspire Pittsburgh to embrace change even more. To open itself to new people, new expressions. If I can do that, If I can leave that as a legacy, I’ve won.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

May 13, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 19

May 13, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 19