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MUSIC CLASS: DOOMSDAY STUDENT TEACHES AUDIENCES ITS GENTLE-CHAOS THEORY 22

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015


EVENTS 3.14 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JACE CLAYTON – THE JULIUS EASTMAN MEMORIAL DINNER Carnegie Museum of Art Theater (Oakland) Co-presented with the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets $20 / $15 Members & students

3.21 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: ART & SOCIAL CHANGE: MOVEMENT-MAKERS IN THE ARTS WITH DEANNA CUMMINGS, JASIRI X AND DR. JOYCE BELL Warhol theater Free with museum admission

3.24 – 5pm TEACHER WORKSHOP This teacher workshop coincides with the exhibition Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent. FREE parking in The Warhol lot Ticket $34 / 3 ACT 48 credit hours are available for teachers.

3.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN WITH SPECIAL GUEST LOSCIL Warhol theater FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students

SOMEDAY IS NOW:

3.28 – 8pm CYNTHIA HOPKINS: A LIVING DOCUMENTARY Warhol theater Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students

THE ART OF CORITA KENT

THROUGH APR 19 • 2015

Image: Immaculate Heart College Art Department, Los Angeles, c. 1955, courtesy of Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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Our region will go where public transit takes it. At Port Authority, the nearly quarter-million people who ride our buses and light rail system every weekday are commuters, shoppers, students and senior citizens. It's not just about convenience. It's about this region's economic future. Over half the people who work in Downtown Pittsburgh take public transit. And Port Authority connects our growing population of seniors to the outside world. We all want this region to continue to grow and prosper. And it can…with a strong, viable public transportation system to get us there.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015


03.11/03.18.2015 VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 10

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER PHOTO BY J.R. BLACKWELL}

[NEWS]

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“For me, this isn’t about the party, it’s about the people.” — Democrat Joe Sestak,explaining why he is running again for U.S. Senate, and walking across Pennsylvania

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

vegetable-seafood pancake was 17 “A a delicious riot of texture and flavor.”

— Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Nak Kwon Garden

[MUSIC]

like gentle chaos.” — Eric Paul, 22 “We of Doomsday Students, appreciating

[SCREEN]

“The flatness of the 2-D animation is belied by the swirling colors, the evocative backgrounds and the intricate line drawings.” — Al Hoff reviews Song of the Sea

[ARTS]

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“The speaker in the book is really a persona that comes out of my experience but is not completely verbatim of my life.”— Film-industry vet Celeste Gainey on her debut poetry collection

[LAST PAGE]

Eating Food on the Steps!” 55 “No — From our photo essay “The Art of No”

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 49 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 52 N E W S

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WINGHARTS - GREENSBURG Sam Stout + Angry Orchard SMOKIN’ JOE’S - SOUTH SIDE Sam Stout + Blue Moon

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

TONIDALE - ROBINSON Sam Stout + Angry Orchard

{ADMINISTRATION}

the intense audience reaction the band generates

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

MCFADDEN’S - NORTH SHORE Sam Stout + Angry Orchard

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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THIS WEEK

“FOR ME, THIS ISN’T ABOUT THE PARTY, IT’S ABOUT THE PEOPLE.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Democratic candidates vie for the Allegheny County Democratic Committee endorsement. Some wonder whether the process should be changed. www.pghcitypaper.com

Democrat Joe Sestak is making another run for U.S. Senate. We take a look back at his last campaign and how one ad put him over Sen. Arlen Specter in the primary. www.pghcitypaper.com

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

{PHOTO BY J.R. BLACKWELL}

Joe Sestak kicked off his walking tour of the state in Philadelphia on March 4.

Follow our #CPPiratesPreview hashtag on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get our photos and updates from Spring Training. And, look for our Pirates issue on April 1!

BOLD STEPS [ON THE RECORD WITH JOE SESTAK]

The former congressman is making a second run at the U.S. Senate, whether the Democratic Party likes it or not {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Check out our #Blogh for the latest news. Also get est #Election2015 news our #Election2015 updates by following @PghCityPaper on Twitter. Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to Rosanne Cash at the Byham Theater! Contest ends March 19, 2015.

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IS OFFICIAL campaign for U.S.

Senate was barely two days old, and already Joe Sestak was working on a big bipartisan project. On March 6, he was walking west through Bucks County as part of a 422mile trek across the state to “walk a mile in the shoes of Pennsylvanians.”

“I came across a car that got stuck in the snow while trying to get out of the driveway and I had a tracker with the [Republican U.S. Sen. Pat] Toomey campaign following me and I said, ‘Come on, we’re going to get them out,’” Sestak told City Paper minutes after the event. “It took us 25 minutes, but we did it. I high-fived

him and yelled, ‘Bi-partisanship!’” Sestak doesn’t just want to practice this spirit of cooperation on a snowcovered highway; he wants to take his act to Washington, D.C. In 2010, after defeating 30-year incumbent Arlen Specter in the Democratic primary, Sestak came within two points CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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BOLD STEPS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

keeping women strong

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of beating Toomey, the fiscally conservative Republican favored by the tea party, that November. Now Sestak wants to take another run at Toomey, but the path to November’s general election might not be an easy one. Last month, National Journal ran an article detailing the state Democratic Party’s efforts to find a different candidate. “If Joe Sestak is the nominee in 2016 for U.S. Senate, we will once again lose to Pat Toomey,” former state party chairman T.J. Rooney told the Journal. But running without the support of his party is nothing new for Sestak, t h e p r o g r e s s ive D e m , former Navy admiral and U.S. Congressman. The party was firmly opposed to him running against Specter in 2010, after the 30-year incumbent switched his party affiliation from Republican to Democrat to avoid a primary battle with Toomey. Specter was miles ahead of Sestak just a month before the election. But Sestak ran a solid grassroots campaign, closed the gap and defeated Specter. It’s still unclear whether Sestak will have a primary challenger in May 2016. But right now, he’s not concerned about that. Right now, he’s walking across the state to meet voters, hear their concerns and rebuild that grassroots support that served him in 2010. Sestak talked with City Paper about his campaign, Toomey’s record and his relationship with the state party while walking through Bucks County on March 6.

“THE PARTY CAN BECOME TOO INTERESTED IN THEMSELVES RATHER THAN THOSE THEY SERVE.”

WHAT GAVE YOU THE IDEA TO KICK OFF YOUR CAMPAIGN WITH A CROSS-STATE WALK? As I’ve traveled across Pennsylvania in

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To register call 412-345-7300 x501 or email garroyo@animalrescue.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

YOU’RE AWARE OF THE NATIONAL JOURNAL ARTICLE AND THE STATE

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IS THAT WHY YOU DECIDED TO TAKE ANOTHER RUN AT TOOMEY? I’ve done more than 400 events in the past two years, and the one question that kept coming up was, “Who can you really believe anymore? Who can you trust?” So remembering how close I came with the biggest funding gap of any Senate race ... that year and knowing that we came that close because of the grassroots support, we thought, “Heck, winning this race is about getting out there and gaining trust,” like the captain of a ship. You get out there and you gain trust, and hopefully respect, and then you complete the mission together. That made the difference in 2010. I didn’t and won’t shy away from who I am and what I stand for. And that’s what this race is going to be about.

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

at Animal Rescue League

June 22-26 & July 6-10 (6-8 year olds) August 3-7 (9-10 year olds)

recent years and talked to people, I realized that the biggest deficit that we have is a trust deficit. I thought, “How can I demonstrate that Pennsylvanians can trust me in terms of my accountability; trust me for my deeds, not for my words? Years ago, my daughter drew a picture that I had hanging in my office and it said, “Joe Sestak is walking in your shoes.” … So when I started this, I thought, “I can do this literally.” It started [March 5] walking in veterans’ shoes. Today I walked figuratively in the shoes of victims of domestic violence and human trafficking. I’m walking 26 miles today because people don’t trust their leaders anymore. They say one thing in Pennsylvania and do another when they get to D.C. And that’s what this is about.

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SATURDAY MARCH 21 7:30PM

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It’s Pittsburgh’s largest annual trivia competition. Cheer on your favorite teams as they battle for the 6-foot Trivia Bowl trophy. Or grab some friends and show off your smarts, as a team, and compete in this family-friendly event that supports education programs for Pittsburgh families.

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For tickets, please call 412.393.7632 or visit www.gplc.org/trivia | Adults $20 | Children (2-12) $5 TA S T E

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BOLD STEPS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

PARTY’S EFFORTS TO RECRUIT SOMEONE ELSE TO RUN AGAINST TOOMEY. SOME INSIDERS SAY IT’S BECAUSE YOU’RE RUNNING THIS CAMPAIGN YOUR WAY AND NOT THE PARTY’S. IS THAT, AT LEAST IN PART, WHERE THIS RIFT COMES FROM? I don’t pay much attention to it, to be honest. I spend a lot of time, even with the state party, sponsoring all of these events for Democrats. When [Democratic State Chair] Jim Burn asked me to speak to the state committee, I was humbled that I got a standing ovation from 350 committeemen and -women before I even said a word. I had earned, I felt, their support. So I haven’t paid much attention to all of this stuff going around by all the party establishment. I like the party establishment. I sat down with members of the party a year ago and let them know that I was going to run. I do have respect for them. But for me at the end of the day, this isn’t about the party, it’s about the people. I’m here to take care of them.

DO YOU THINK THAT PEOPLE SOMETIMES CONFUSE THE WISHES OF THE PARTY LEADERSHIP WITH THE WISHES OF THE ACTUAL PARTY? John F. Kennedy once said, “Sometimes the party asks too much.” And I also believe that sometimes the party — Democrats and Republicans can lose their way. They forget the party is about the people. I think when people become more concerned with whether it’s his turn or her turn [to run for a seat], the party is lost. I am an independent Democrat and I like being in the party, but that comes second to serving “We the People.”

“I WON’T SHY AWAY FROM WHO I AM AND WHAT I STAND FOR.”

THAT WAS THE CASE IN 2010, RIGHT? THE PARTY LEADERSHIP WANTED ARLEN SPECTER AND THE PARTY MEMBERS WENT ANOTHER WAY, AND YOU WON WITH 54 PERCENT OF THE VOTE OVER A 30-YEAR INCUMBENT. I couldn’t agree more. The party can become too interested in themselves rather than those they serve. But look, when

JENSORENSEN

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015


or conservative — I believe in people. I judge people by what they say and then by what they do. So let’s walk through his record. OK, he did something on a single background check [for firearm purchases]. Afterward, he said, “We’ve had our vote and this is over.” But [forYOU’VE LONG CHAMPIONED mer Democratic U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin of SOCIAL ISSUES, USUALLY FROM A West Virginia] said, “It’s not over, we’re PROGRESSIVE POSTURE. WHAT ARE going to continue.” But Sen. Toomey was THE MAIN SOCIAL ISSUES THAT done. What kind of fair-weather friend YOU INTEND TO HIGHLIGHT IN is that? Well, he’s refused to give up his THIS CAMPAIGN? We need to focus on issues facing wom- fight on the Affordable Care Act, and he’s en. First, women will be the largest por- voted against that more than 30 times. tion of our workforce by 2018, yet they OK, so why is it over on gun control, but not the ACA? Is it because earn on average 77 cents to 92 the NRA put up a bunch of cents on the dollar of what money against Manchin? a man makes. We have to Where’s the political courget the Paycheck Fairness k o We lo ak’s age? Do you want a guy Act approved, a measure t s e S back at n for who’s in for one shot that Pat Toomey filibuslast ru ww. and who has said, “My tered three times, sayw t idea of gun control is ing it’s an unfair burden. senate a paper pghcity . steady aim?” Secondly, the Pregnancy .com He has voted to shut Discrimination Act needs down the government to be fixed. The law has a twice. Pat Toomey says he loophole that employers can supports veterans, but has voted bypass. In the minimum-wage area … there are so many jobs that if you’re against 12 straight Senate appropriapregnant you can’t get leave, and you tions bills for the Veterans Administracan lose your job. That has to be taken tion. … He was opposed three times to [raising] the minimum wage after saying care of. that we need to lift people up. He has said we need to help the poor … but he MANY FEEL THAT PAT TOOMEY has voted against the SNAP program, he WENT INTO OFFICE AS A TEA-PARTY voted against the HUD housing transiFAVORITE, AS AN ULTRAtion bill and blocked unemploymentCONSERVATIVE. SINCE THEN HE HAS relief efforts. So it’s hard for me to find DONE SOME WORK WITH DEMOCRATS an instance that doesn’t cast him in the ON A GUN-CONTROL MEASURE, AND SOME PEOPLE SAY HE’S BECOMING MORE light that: “I’ll say one thing in Pennsylvania and vote a totally different way in OF A MODERATE. DO YOU SEE THAT? I don’t believe in types — moderate Washington, D.C.” you go home at night, is it more important that you rose up in the party, or that you were a public servant who actually worked to improve the lives of the people you represent?

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CLEAN CONSTRUCTION

City’s decision to use clean-diesel legislation on Greenfield Bridge project hinges on the state {BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

presents

PET of the WEEK

Photo credit: Jeff Geissler

Shamrock Check out that mane! Shamrockk ddefifinitely it l knows how to rock a ‘do! This little lassie is gentle and sweet, but she’s also rather shy. While she likes to be pet and snuggled, she has to get to know you first. If your family has older, respectful kids, then Shamrock may be a good fit for you. We know that Shamrock likes to be around other bunnies and an outgoing bun might help her come out of her shell. If you have a quiet, patient home, please consider meeting Shamrock. She has a lot of love to give to the right family.

A FEW TIMES a week, Stephanie Schott attends a “New Moms Coffee” group connected to her 13-month-old son’s pediatrician’s office. “It’s a moms’ group where moms with babies 1 year old and younger can go,” Schott says. “There’s even prenatal classes, yoga classes. It’s basically a meet-up place for families and moms.” KidsPlus Pediatrics and The Well meeting place are located in Greenfield, just under a tenth of a mile from the Beechwood Boulevard Bridge (commonly referred to as the Greenfield Bridge), and just down the street from Schott’s home. The bridge is slated for demolition next winter. The parkway beneath will close for five days between Christmas and New Year’s. Construction of a new bridge is set to last until winter 2017. “I’m not really knowledgeable on the subject [of bridge construction]. I just know that I heard other moms talking about pollution and greener machinery,” says the former reading specialist turned stay-athome mom. And now she’s worried. What Schott’s referring to is the use of cleaner heavy-construction equipment, which is being ushered in by stricter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. Though the standards on off-road diesel equipment, like construction machinery, have been getting more stringent for several years, older models can be grandfathered in. “I’m concerned about [my son] breathing in all the chemicals from the machinery running all day,” Schott says.

412-847-7000 blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry. www.dayauto.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

Though the law has been in place for more than three years — its provisions incrementally phased in — it hasn’t been applied. Ervin says that’s because there hasn’t been a project under the new administration’s watch that has fit the criteria. And, he adds, the law needs to be modernized. He says amending the law is a three-part strategy that requires: better identifying which department will enforce the law; modernizing the city’s own fleet, like street-sweepers and salt trucks; and restructuring some of the ordinance’s language. “The goal isn’t to confuse people or to be punitive, but to create compliances and apply cleaner equipment to the construction process,” Ervin says. “That helps everybody, helps workers on site, people adjacent to the project, helps the city address air quality. We’re not trying to create a difficult, cumbersome process; everybody should win.” The Group Against Smog and Pollution (GASP), a key local advocate for the law, says it is following the amendment process closely. “I think they’re making a sincere effort to figure out the best way to make it clearer,” says Rachel Filippini, executive director of GASP. “While the Greenfield Bridge project would be a project this would make sense for, there’s been quite a few projects in the last few years that would have also benefitted from this.” Filippini’s disappointment reaches back to the previous administration’s failure to enforce the law. The story was the same then: The law needs to be rewritten. Ervin said on March 6 that over the next several weeks, the city will work hard to complete analysis of the ordinance and begin preparing reforms to present to city council. “What we’re looking at are projects going forward as being a priority,” Ervin says. “Whether or not we’re able to apply the ordinance to the Greenfield Bridge remains to be seen, and we’re going to have to talk to PennDOT about it. The answer to the question is simply maybe.” Meanwhile, Stephanie Schott is hoping for the best. “I just hope that whatever the greener machinery is, it will be used. I just hope that whoever is in charge will make that decision,” she says.

“I JUST HOPE THAT WHATEVER THE GREENER MACHINERY IS, IT WILL BE USED.”

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With good reason. Construction and demolition can create particulate matter as well as the gasses that these particles form in the atmosphere, like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. According to the American Lung Association and the EPA, such pollutants cause early death (even from short-term exposure), cardiovascular and respiratory harm, cancer, and reproductive and development issues. Among the most vulnerable populations are infants, children and teens. New maps measuring air quality from Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies show that proximity to diesel vehicles is a huge factor in exposure to air pollutants. A law passed by Pittsburgh City Council in 2011 has the potential to make construction sites on big projects cleaner. But whether it will be enforced for the Greenfield Bridge project — a $ 16 million venture jointly funded by the federal and state governments, for which the city is kicking in $800,000 — is still unanswered. “We’re putting this into action here, and it takes time,” says Grant Ervin, the city’s sustainability manager. The legislation, called the Clean Air Act 2010, requires city-hired contractors to use ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel and retrofit technology on projects costing more than $ 2.5 million — up from $ 1 million in an earlier version of the bill — when the city subsidizes $250,000 or more of the project.

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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In collaboration with

Gregory Dike, 38, received 11 years in jail for robbing 10 banks across England. Police arrested him after he booked a taxi for his getaway, but the driver realized what was happening and refused to wait. “He was undoubtedly a beginner,” Detective Constable Darren Brown said.” (BBC News)

the event guide Time Out London that encouraged London to follow Japan, where at least five owl cafes have opened. Tokyo’s Fukuro no Miso (“Shop of Owls”) cautions customers that its birds are tame but “can’t be potty trained.” (CNBC and Associated Press)

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Andrew McMenamin opened what he claims is the world’s first potato-chipsandwich café in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Simply Crispy (“crisps” are what the British call chips, which is their word for fries) offers 35 flavors. The sandwiches are served with soup (topped with crisps croutons) and fries. McMenamin got the idea from a spoof website article by Billy McWilliams and Seamus O’Shea, who observed, “Not only did people believe it, but people wanted to believe it, and the story went viral.” (Britain’s Daily Mail)

Randy Gillen Jr., 28, pulled up to a bank drive-through window in Clearfield, Pa., intending to pass a fraudulent check, police said. When he found $500 that a previous customer had left in the carrier, he took it and drove off. When the customer returned for the money, police identified Gillen from the bank’s surveillance video and traced him to his girlfriend’s house, where officers found him hiding in a closet. (Johnstown’s WJAC-TV)

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

DIY WORKSHOP:

INTRODUCTION TO HOME IMPROVEMENT Every house owner knows that there comes a point when a house, regardless of it condition, will need repairs and other improvements. The ability to complete even the smallest home improvement begins with a basic foundation of skills with hand tools and power tools. In this workshop, you will learn how to use the most common hand tools and power tools of the trade to complete basic home improvements and repairs. ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Michael R. Wetmiller is a Pennsylvania Registered Home Improvement Contractor specializing in interior renovation. He grew up in a family of tradesmen and attended a four-year carpenter’s apprenticeship training program. He became a Journeyman Carpenter in 1999. Michael has worked in both commercial and residential construction in all phases from foundations to finish carpentry. This workshop is FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. Click here for more information about PHLF membership and please join! NON-MEMBERS: $5

THURSDAY, MARCH 12 • 6 - 8PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

The Internal Revenue Service rehired hundreds of employees “with known conduct and performance issues,” including 141 who had misfiled their own returns and five known to have intentionally failed to file returns, according to an audit by the agency’s inspector general. The report noted that nearly 20 percent of the workers with prior problems continued having problems paying their taxes after they were rehired. (The Washington Times)

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A court in Northern Ireland convicted Morrison Wilson, 58, of assaulting a neighbor with his belly. Wilson, described as “heavy-set,” told Belfast Magistrate’s Court he was trying to get the retired woman off his lawn when he “bounced her back” with his “big belly.” (Northern Ireland’s Belfast Telegraph)

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America’s best-selling cars and trucks rely on fake engine noise to simulate power and performance because today’s fuel-efficient engines lack their once-distinctive roar. Ford’s 2015 Mustang EcoBoost, for example, amplifies the engine’s purr through the car speakers to produce a sound the automaker calls “a low-frequency sense of powerfulness.” Porsche’s “sound symposer” uses noise-boosting tubes, and BMW plays a recording of its motors through car stereos. Without the artificial noise, proponents say, drivers would hear an unsettling silence or ordinary road noise. Critics, including Kelly Blue Book senior analyst Karl Brauer, want automakers to level with buyers. “Own it,” he urged. “You’re fabricating the car’s sexiness. You’re fabricating performance elements of the car that don’t actually exist.” (The Washington Post)

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More than 35,000 people entered a lottery for tickets to sip cocktails at London’s Annie the Owl pop-up bar while owls fly around and perch on their shoulders. Professional falconers join the patrons, who pay $30 for two cocktails and two hours of “unique owl indulgence,” according to Sebastian Lyall, CEO of start-up app company Locappy, which sponsors the weeklong event. He said a maximum of 12 patrons will be allowed to sit around each owl, and that background music will be kept to a moderate level so as not to upset the birds. Annie the Owl, which pledged to donate proceeds to a U.K.based owl charity, resulted from a blog post by

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Hjortur Smarason, 28, bought the last McDonald’s hamburger and fries to be sold in Iceland before the chain closed there in 2009. “I realized it was a historic occasion,” Smarason said. He stored it in a plastic bag in his garage for three years before donating it to the National Museum of Iceland. After a year, the museum returned the “hamborgarinn” to him, following complaints calling it an inappropriate exhibit. “I regard it as a historical item now,” he said. “I think it’s incredible that it seems to show no signs of decomposition.” (Britain’s Daily Mail)

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Michael Bain, the principal of a New Zealand elementary school, was serving as the starter for a swim meet in Havelock North when his shorts burst into flames. “I was just standing there having a sandwich, and then ‘boom,’” he recounted. “Basically, the starting-gun caps self-ignited, which set fire to my shorts.” Fortunately, Bain was standing next to the pool and jumped in. He was treated at the hospital for “a large burnt patch” on his leg. Fire official Jamie Nichol said that in his 24 years in the Fire Service, “I’ve never come across anything like this.” (The New Zealand Herald)

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Ontario authorities reported that Adam Robert Brunt, 30, died while undergoing training for ice-and-water rescue at the Saugeen River, in Hanover after he became trapped under ice in the “frigid and fast-flowing” water for 15 minutes. (The Toronto Star)

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After a Swedish educational video aimed at explaining private parts to children became a YouTube hit, Peter Bargee, programming director at public broadcaster SVT, said the clip also drew “unexpected” criticism. Some people complained that portraying the penis with a mustache and the vagina with long eyelashes reinforced gender stereotypes. Bargee responded that the video was meant to be fun and not a “statement on gender politics.” (Associated Press)

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British police reported that a Manchester bar accepted a 20-pound note that was “just two paper photocopies of banknotes stapled together.” Inspector Phil Spurgeon called it “probably the worst forgery we have ever seen.” (Britain’s Manchester Evening News)

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S BY R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE NT I C AT I ON ON D E M AN D.

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Friday, March 13

Explore our newest exhibit, H2Oh!: Why Our Rivers Matter โ€“ without the kids!

6 โ€“ 10 pm

Live music, NO KIDS, cash bars, snacks DYDLODEOHIRUSXUFKDVHDQGIRXUรงRRUVRI exhibits. Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for details and to register. Cost: $10 in advance / $15 day of the event

DANCE * SNAP * SHARE

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART & VIA PRESENT:

#NOWSEETHIS TICKETS

ON SALE

FRIDAY, MARCH 13 AT 10 A.M. LIVE PERFORMANCES BY:

LOCATION:

KELELA

Carnegie Museum of Art 4400 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

$15 online $20 at the door (Students: $10 with ID) 18+ event TICKETS:

JULIANA HUXTABLE

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A VEGETABLE-SEAFOOD PANCAKE WAS A DELICIOUS RIOT OF TEXTURE AND FLAVOR

AFTER FISH, FUEL {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} On Saturday mornings during Lent, when the latest weekly fish fry is history, several churches are letting their used oil cool down. Not to pitch it, but to donate it. “We try not to waste anything, that’s our big philosophy this year,” says Amy Goetzman, who coordinates the fish fry at St. Rosalia Parish, in Greenfield. “We even give our leftover food to the homeless. We just try to use everything we have to benefit the most people.” That’s a good thing for small local energy companies who use the cooking oil as fuel for vehicles. “It’s like liquid gold to us,” says Steven Kovacik of Zero Fossil, an alternative-energy company in Munhall. The company provides solar- and wind-powered generators for events, including such large, high-profile ones as the Three Rivers Regatta and the Three Rivers Arts Festival. In keeping with its off-the-grid philosophy, the vehicles it uses to haul equipment to and from events are powered on vegetable oil. “We just pull out the French fries and bread crumbs and use it,” Kovacik says. With almost 10 Catholic parishes in nearby Greenfield, Swissvale and Homestead donating to his company, Kovacik says he’s receiving 10 times more oil than he can use. In the spirit of wasting nothing, he’s collaborating with another local company, Fossil Free Fuel, of Braddock, which uses the oil in its biodiesel blend. “We want to show that we do it all without fossil fuels,” Kovacik says. AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FEED

March arch 14 used to just ust be a day to prep for the Ides of March, but now you gotta ta get your knife fe out early. Because it’s

Pi(e) Day y, in which everyone’s favorite infinite number (3.14 etc.) is celebrated with certain circle-shaped baked goods, whose diameter-circumference ratio is defined by π (pi).

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Seafood soondubu (center) and side dishes

KOREAN DELIGHT {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

J

UST BECAUSE Pittsburgh currently lacks

a large immigrant population doesn’t mean we don’t have authentic foreign cuisine. We do still have immigrants, after all — if in smaller numbers, then arguably from a more diverse geography than ever before. And opening a restaurant is a time-honored way for new arrivals to find a foothold in the local economy by plying an undisputed specialty. But there is a difference, we think, in the way that smaller, tighter communities like ours adopt foreign cuisines. Instead of becoming fluent in them through full immersion, we tend to hold dear one or two iconic, gateway dishes, like Mexican tacos, Japanese sushi and Vietnamese pho. Once these have become established, often after several years, we are primed to explore and embrace a broader, more authentic menu. If this theory holds, then the opening

of Nak Won Garden marks the full-fledged arrival of Korean cuisine in Pittsburgh after a decade or more of enthusiasm for Korean barbecue. Open since November on busy Centre Avenue, at the seam of Shadyside and Bloomfield, Nak Won Garden is Pittsburgh’s most ambitious Korean restaurant to date.

NAK KWON GARDEN 5504 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-904-4635 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $6-15; individual entrees $11-17; casseroles, family-style and other shared dishes $26-36 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Polished marble tabletops lend gravity to the deep, narrow storefront (a former flower shop), but the real draw is an ex-

tensive menu consisting mostly of dishes not on offer anywhere else in town. Even the inevitable Korean barbecue section was full of novel cuts and meats, such as duck sirloin and pork neck. We liked seeing many of our fellow guests chatting in Korean with co-owner Yang-Suk Beondy as she stopped by each table in turn. Beondy, who is Korean by way of Los Angeles, opened the restaurant with her brother, ChungChu Yi, and daughter, Christina Beondy. We dove in with an order each of steamed and pan-fried mandoo (dumplings). The dumpling wrappers were wonderful. They were tender and translucent, the steamed ones offering just a hint of chew, the fried ones lightly crispy without a hint of toughness. The filling of minced beef and pork was combined with a bit of fluffy tofu and lightly seasoned with garlic, scallions and ginger. The flavor was CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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KOREAN DELIGHT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

PAIRING CHERRY HEERING Little-heralded red liquor adds depth to drinks

The Reef Dweller {PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS}

subtle but straightforward and true, and the dipping sauce, chock-full of sesame seeds and more scallions, added plenty of extra punch. A vegetable-seafood pancake was easily 12 inches in diameter and arrived sliced into wedges on an elevated platter, not unlike a pizza. But its structure was neither flatbread nor pancake-like, in the Western sense. It was more of a dense mass of justcooked vegetables, shrimp and squid held together by a batter matrix that was fried until crisp and browned outside, while remaining soft and pliant within. It was a delicious riot of texture and flavor. Nak Won has a lengthy list of individual entrees, but we were intrigued by the “casseroles,” one-pot meals to share. Being unfamiliar with this genre of Korean cooking, we relied on our server, Christina Beondy, for guidance. She steered us toward the budae jigae, which she called the most popular. Like all of the four casseroles on offer, it’s essentially a soup, prepared in the kitchen but finished at the table on a portable gas burner. What set this one apart was its ingredients, both listed — kimchi, ramen noodles, spicy bean broth — and unlisted: sliced hot dogs, Spam and American cheese. After the Korean War, Beondy explained, American GIs left their surplus rations behind, and resourceful Koreans figured out how to incorporate them into traditional dishes. The result was gloriously delicious. The broth, spicy and bold, surrounded all the ingredients with its big, complex flavor, so that the unconventional meats — augmented with actual sliced pork — acted as part of a broad textural mélange. There were also watercress; enoki mushrooms, which, like the cheese, practically melted into the bubbling broth; and rice cakes, their chewy white cylinders epitomizing the texture-centric East Asian approach to dish construction. “L.A. galbi” were marinated beef short ribs, sliced across the bone and served with sautéed onions over rice. Though their flavor, infused with soy, garlic and a little sugar, was excellent, their texture was a bit tough. Also on our table were banchan, the many small dishes which are not so much side dishes as central components of any Korean meal. Ours included acorn jelly, burdock root, sprouted mung beans, steamed vegetables and, of course, kimchi. Each offered its own distinctive flavor, from earthy to fiery to sweet, to fully round the panoply of tastes and textures. With its extensive, authentic menu, Nak Won Garden is a top contender for the ultimate, authentic Korean dining experience in Pittsburgh.

Flipping through a classic-cocktail book can be an adventure into a world of unrecognizable ingredients and strange measurements. One such perusal led me to a liquor store and a bottle of ruby-colored Heering: The Original Cherry Liqueur. Rye, lemon, cherry Heering, ice, shake, glass and a sip later (an imprecise High Hat recipe), I realized that I was about 200 years late to a really awesome party I hadn’t even known was happening. First produced in 1818 by Peter Heering, cherry Heering is a Danish liqueur, made by soaking slightly crushed Danish cherries in neutral grain spirits with herbs and spices. This natural mixture is aged for at least three years, while sugar, the only additive, is gradually introduced. The result is pure, slightly sweet cherry, as though you left some out in the sun and are eating them warm. It’s perfect for adding depth and a bit of temper to a stiff cocktail, without the syrupy mouthfeel of other cherry liqueurs. A robust and versatile ingredient should be tested. So with the help of Tender Bar, in Lawrenceville, I set out to drink two radically different cherry Heering-imbued cocktails. The bartenders opened with a Blood and Sand, a classic that inspires polarizing feelings among drinkers. Scotch, cherry Heering, vermouth and orange juice, while sounding like a clash in flavors, actually make for a balanced, clean-feeling drink, perfect for sipping before dinner. The bite of the scotch was tamed by the fruit but not extinguished, leaving a little woodiness behind. After conferring secretly about a good foil, Craig Mrusek offered up his Reef Dweller, a tiki cocktail with spiced rum, passion fruit, lime, Campari and, of course, cherry Heering. Served partially aflame, over a mountain of shaved ice, inside half a pineapple and garnished to the nines, the Reef Dweller couldn’t have been a better contrast. This caramelized, amaretto-reminiscent colossus had me finishing it with a spoon after my straw proved unfit for the task. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

SAVOR AUTHENTIC FLAVORS FROM OAXACA & MEXICO CITY AT THE MEXICAN UNDERGROUND IN THE STRIP

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

1844 RESTAURANT. 690 State Route 66, Leechburg. 724-845-1844. This restored 19th-century farmhouse offers a classic fine-dining menu with intriguing updates suited to 21st-century tastes. Thus, prime rib sits alongside tempura shrimp with orange cayenne, cucumbers and bleu cheese, and the stalwart shrimp cocktail is now dressed with sofrito lemon sauce. LE BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-4319313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red currypeanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE BRGR. 5997 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-than-average fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pear-and-bleu-cheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

ACOUSTIC SOUNDS!

Tuesday

We are proud to feature This FRIDAY, MARCH 13 from 7pm-11pm

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

a Spanish Solo by

Friday

Monterey Pub {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-anddumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE

Naya {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfastand-lunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato

pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday

HORA FELIZ! (HAPPY HOUR)

10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________

SATURDAY, MARCH 14

7pm to 11pm Mexican/American Menu and Drink Specials Live entertainment with with

SCHEER ELEMENT

Every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM. • 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242

900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

now open 7 days a week!

@casareynamex

BenjaminsPgh.com

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

40 Craft Beers w

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

ontap w

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

ALL LUNCHES

$

8-$10

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

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1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM +

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www.RentTheChicken.com

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Proper Brick Oven and Tap Room {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and handcrafted cocktails. LE

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PITTSBURGH WINERY

NorthSide Sandwich ars Running! Winner 3 Ye

LIVE IN THE CELLAR

Songs and good aul Irish Craic 9PM Friday 1PM Sat & 9PM Sat

Mar. 19 Mouths of Babes w/ Julia Weldon Mar. 20 Kuf Knotz Mar. 21 Good Brother Earl with Joshua Powell Mar. 23 Branches with Isaac Merz Mar. 26 Matthew Perryman Jones w/ Molly Pardon Mar. 27 Kevin Garrett with Nathan Zoob Mar. 28 Balloon Ride Fantasy w/ Wicked Chief Record Release Apr. 1 American Opera Apr. 2 The DuPont Brothers Apr. 3 The Red Western w/ Paul Luc Apr. 4 10 String Symphony

Apr. 7 The Last Bison - 7PM Show w/ Gypsy and his Band of Ghosts and Neulore

Apr. 10 “Songwriters in the Cellar” Hosted by Jimbo Jackson w/ Clinton Clegg, Nathan Zoob, Kyle Lawson, and Ben Shannon.

Apr. 12 Joy Ike with Timbre Cierpke - 7PM Show Apr. 17 Nameless in August w/ Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing Apr. 18 Buzz Poets SOLD OUT Apr. 19 Buzz Poets SHOW ADDED! Apr. 21 Kristeen Young - 7 PM Show Apr. 24 theSHIFT - EP Release Apr. 26 Mark Rose (of Spitalfield), Shane Henderson (of Valencia) & Mike Cali Apr. 30 “Songwriters in the Cellar” May 2 Grape Stomp! - 12 Noon w/ Juan Vasquez May 5 Lowland Hum w/ The Weathered Road

Doors at 8PM show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+ 2815 PENN AVE. | PITTSBURGH PA 15222

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THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. casual eatery successfully taps 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. the multicultural cuisines of 412-247-4848. A neighborhood India’s eastern coast, with pizza place and more, Salvatore’s dishes such as gongura chicken offers something even rarer than and mutton biryani. Other good pizza: fast food of the regions are also represented finest quality. “Fresh” is with dosas, curries and the watchword, and the tandoori specialties. large, full-color takeout For an appetizer, try menu has dozens of Chicken 555, dressed dishes in a score of with peanuts, www. per categories. Shellfish are curry leaves and a a p pghcitym prominently featured, traditional pickle. KF .co and worth trying. K MONTEREY PUB. 1227 SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Monterey St., North Side. Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. 412-322-6535. A welcoming Casual elegance is the byword neighborhood bar with a menu at this neighborhood venue, of classic pub grub and Irish where the fare is inspired by standards (such as “bangers and Northern California cuisine, mash”) But there is also the with seasonal ingredients occasional Asian flourish or combined into New American unexpected ingredient mashand Continental dishes. The up, such as Thai red curry wings, preparations vary widely, from fried green beans, an Irishultra-traditional offerings like Cuban sandwich and a BLT crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant with salmon. JE updates like duck with orangeapricot balsamic glaze. LF NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 this storefront restaurant, diners Bryant St., Highland Park. can explore the depths of Syrian 412-441-1610. This Japanese cuisine as well as a few Middle restaurant offers fare drawn from Eastern favorites, such baba the menus of lunch counters, ghanoush. Among the entrees: train stations and family kitchens. samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian From salads containing burdock fish”), shawarma served with rice root and rice balls to cabbage pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this diner-style venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams elegant restaurant and lounge Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724offers a maturation of 591-5688. This suburban eatery contemporary American cuisine, offers honest, straightforward effortlessly shifting from refined Japanese cooking without hibachi Continental to Asian fusion to theatrics or other culinary ingredient-focused invention. influences. Besides the wide sushi Instead of showy creations, the selection and tempura offerings, kitchen produces dishes that try squid salad or entrees instantly seem right, such as miso incorporating udon, Japan’s cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE buckwheat noodles. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

live music, great wine

Mar. 12 The Mulligan Brothers Mar. 13 - 14 Big Jim and The Ravens

PROPER BRICK OVEN AND TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-281-5700. This cozy Downtown spot offers a menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can be. Some cheeses and pasta are housemade, and many starters are closer to tapas or antipasti than to pub grub. More than 30 beers are on tap, as well. KE

HAPPY HOUR

1/2 /2 OFF ALL DRAFTS & $2 OFF MUNCHIES Mon-Thurs 5-7 Fri & Sat 4:30-7:30

OPEN DAILY • 11AM - 1:30AM

862 WESTERN AVE. 412-321-4550 themoderncafe.com


Kegs & Eggs On the High Road Shiloh GreeN 123 Shiloh St

Parade Day Specials Saturday, 3.14 -- open at 8:00am Yeah, Eight O’Freakin’ Clock

Pre-Parade Provisions:

Delicious Breakfast Buffet $10 All Ya Can Eat

Green Eggs!

And Ham!

Plus Free Shellelagh Waxing for the first 69 Guests

Shirt-Staining Green Beers!

On the Low Road Harris GreeN

: s y a s addy

Don’t go out a-boozin’ P 5747 Ellsworth Ave without a ‘tater in your tummy

$5 Foreign Car Bombs limited time only 412.362.5273 412.431.4000

! h a r r Bego

HarrisGrill.com theShilohGrill.com

harrisgrill follow us shilohgrill

We’d like to thank the Irish for chemistry, literature, Guinness, and U2. No Leprechauns were harmed for this event. N E W S

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LOCAL

“IT WAS ACTUALLY MORE UNCOMFORTABLE FOR ME TO TRY TO DO STUFF THAT WAS MORE ACCESSIBLE.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

Pittsburgh hip hop has a storied history, but aside from a few standout exports in the last decade, it’s a story that mostly goes untold. Pittsburgh State of Mind, a new documentary premiering at SouthSide Works on March 15, aims to bring those stories to light. “The documentary basically focuses on inner-city artists, their struggle with everyday life, and the ways they’re trying to make it out of the situations they’re in, through music,” says director Jay “Ruff Bone” White, a Beltzhoover-born filmmaker and founder of the South Side-based production company Plug Media. Last year, White returned to Pittsburgh after living in North Carolina for 10 years, and began interviewing local artists for Pittsburgh State of Mind. His previous documentary series, Bloccs, Projects and Entertainment, put a spotlight on Pittsburgh’s often-overlooked neighborhoods like Wilkinsburg, Homewood and the Hill District. For State of Mind, White wanted to focus specifically on the city’s musical subcultures and their working musicians. He shot, conducted and edited the interviews over the last year. The documentary mines the city’s distinct neighborhoods and slang to create a roadmap of Pittsburgh’s varied hip-hop styles, such as trap, house and street. White says he wants his film to spread that message: “I’m trying to bridge the gap between black, white, hip-hop rappers, backpack rappers, whoever the case may be.” Along with the documentary, White is releasing an original soundtrack to the film with a hip-hop showcase at Rex Theater this Friday. After the local premiere and showcase — billed as Pittsburgh State Of Mind Weekend — White plans to submit Pittsburgh State Of Mind to film festivals across the country. “I want their story to get out there and to show how they’re living and what their struggle is on an everyday basis,” says White. “I just basically want to get it across the globe and let people see Pittsburgh, see the artists, see the city.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CD-RELEASE PARTY with YOUNG JUNNE, ASCO, OWEY, more: 7 p.m. Fri., March 13. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. Ages 17+. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com. DOCUMENTARY SCREENING: 4 p.m. Sun., March 15. SouthSide Works, South Side. $10. 412381-7335 or www.clevelandcinemas.com

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Still from Pittsburgh State of Mind {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY “RUFF BONE” WHITE}

HIP-HOP STATE

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

D

S O A H C E L T N E G

OOMSDAY STUDENT has a way of

getting to audiences. And while that particular band has only existed for a few years, its members have a tradition of musical agitation that goes back much further. In the mid-’90s, singer Eric Paul — along with guitarist Steve Mattos, drummer Craig Kureck and others — formed the Providence, R.I.-based noise band Arab on Radar. While a sophomoric sense of humor always shone through (song titles from its 2001 record Yahweh or the Highway included “God Is Dad” and “Semen on the Mount”), the music itself was chaotic, dissonant and nihilistic. Live performances where unhinged, and occasionally featured nudity. Sometimes, things got a little out of hand. “Inevitably, there’d be a couple altercations on tour, mostly while playing,” Paul recalls. “We’ve been attacked on stage and after shows. For whatever rea-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NATALJA KENT}

Classroom Management: Doomsday Student

son, what we were doing elicited a lot of raw feeling in a lot of people, and we got into a lot of fistfights.” The goal was not necessarily to antagonize audiences, at least not to that degree. “It’s not that I think it’s a positive thing,” Paul says of these moments of aggression. “It’s really scary, and I never re-

DOOMSDAY STUDENT WITH NIGHT VAPOR, NATURAL BOTTOM, ENNEY

8 p.m. Mon., March 16. The Shop, 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. 412-951-0622

ally felt that great after. But I think that what it did do was prove that whatever we were doing onstage was getting at people in a really visceral way. You don’t really leave a Coldplay show with that.” In 2002, Arab on Radar disbanded, and Paul formed The Chinese Stars with

Kureck. While many audiences found The Chinese Stars confusing (particularly when it opened for more traditional rock acts), it was a considerably more accessible band, playing something much more recognizable as rock ’n’ roll. For Paul, however, the transition from Arab on Radar to Chinese Stars spurred a minor identity crisis. Mostly, he found that he missed drawing from his old influences, like The Birthday Party, Captain Beefheart and Chrome, among others. “More or less, I was 19 when I started playing with Steve, and the beginnings of Arab on Radar started coming together,” he says. “That was my upbringing, all of those records that inspired that band. It was actually more uncomfortable for me to try to do stuff that was more accessible. I felt very lost doing it.” Then, in 2010, Arab on Radar got back together for some reunion shows. “I got to play with Steve again, and playing


with him brought back a lot of great feelings of our early days playing music that we felt most connected to,” Paul says. Those reunion shows led to more collaboration between Mattos, Kureck and Chinese Stars guitarist Paul Vieira. “It kind of clicked, and we migrated back to the influences of our earlier days. It was kind of getting back to a place that we felt most comfortable with.” Arab on Radar could hardly be described as soothing, but Doomsday Student pushes things to the next level. Paul’s vocals are crazier and the riffs are more jagged; the lyrics, while still steeped in humor, are darker, harsher and filled with dread. Paul doesn’t shy away from shock value: “They told us we were a mistake / so let’s fuck away all our accidents / let’s fuck away all our bad parenting,” he yowls on “Disappearing,” the opening track of 2014’s A Walk Through Hysteria Park. But he’s ultimately dealing with the mundane horrors and anxieties of everyday life. A poet as well as a musician — Paul has published several collections of poetry, and last year went on his first full book tour — he isn’t just trying to make listeners uncomfortable. “My lyrics are really thought out — they’ve always been very personal, and they’ve always been directly related to issues in my life,” he says. The song “Hunting for a Headshrinker,” for example, deals with having to find a new therapist after the one he’d been seeing for many years became seriously ill. “I didn’t think that making a lyric about her being sick would be all that entertaining, so I skewed it as this really ridiculous story where she fell off a cruise ship.” Not everyone gets it, but he says, “I’ve actually talked to a lot of people that have been like, ‘Hey, I know what you’re talking about.’ It’s like a code: If you’ve been there, then you know.” Doomsday Student puts on an intense live performance — Paul spastically hurls himself around the stage, doubling over as though he might puke at any moment. And as with Arab on Radar, that physicality, mixed with the anxiety of the music, tends to bring out the feral side in some of their fans. Paul is quick to note that the band does not endorse violence (“We like gentle chaos,” he says), but there is an undeniable thrill in igniting that kind of intense audience reaction. Paul recalls one recent festival in Boston, where an audience member got up on stage and started a fight, before getting hauled out by security. “And my first reaction was like, ‘Alright, this is still real.’ It was just that raw emotion that I think is lacking in so much fucking music now.” M WE LS H@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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ON THE RECORD

with Will Butler {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WILL BUTLER}

Will Butler

Will Butler first came to prominence as a multi-instrumentalist in Arcade Fire. He’s also recorded soundtracks, and this week, he releases his solo debut, Policy, on Merge Records. Before hitting the road, Butler spent a week writing a song a day, based on articles in the British newspaper The Guardian, which were posted on the paper’s website. The results have been a lot catchier than one might expect. HOW DID THE ALBUM HAPPEN? Part of it was I got nominated for an Oscar for the Her soundtrack with Owen Pallett. My name was out there attached to something I was really proud of. So I thought, “If my name’s out there, I might as well do something that’s just Will Butler.” HOW HARD WAS IT COMING UP WITH SONGS FOR THE GUARDIAN EVERY DAY? Hard! (Laughs) Everything needs more than a day to be worked on. My goal was to have it be medium-serious. The element of surprise … I think I cherish surprise more than most artistic values. First be surprising, then be memorable, then be good. WHAT’S THE PROCESS LIKE? It’s on U.K. time, so I wake around 7 [a.m.]. They like to post it at 9 p.m., which is 4 p.m. Eastern time. So I have from about 9 [a.m.] to 3 [p.m.] to work on it. A couple times I’ve seen an article at midnight — 5 a.m. U.K. time — and I’ll sleep on it. It’s been fortuitous a couple of times. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WILL BUTLER with TEEN. 9:30 p.m. Thu., March 12. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $11. 421-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net +

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

DIY WORKSHOP:

HOW TO FRAME A WALL Wood framing is the structural skeleton of your house. If you are planning a remodeling project that includes opening walls or adding on, this workshop will help you tackle the job in a safe and structurally sound manner. Students will learn safe use of hand and power tools, layout, measuring, cutting, and ultimately how to frame a wall with a window and a door. ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Michael R. Wetmiller is a Pennsylvania-Registered Home Improvement Contractor specializing in interior renovation. He grew up in a family of tradesmen and attended a four-year carpenter’s apprenticeship training program. He became a Journeyman Carpenter in 1999. Michael has worked in both commercial and residential construction in all phases from foundations to finish carpentry. This workshop is FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. Click here for more information about PHLF membership and please join! NON-MEMBERS: $5

TUESDAY, MARCH 17 • 6 - 8PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LACE CURTAINS/FEMALE FANTASY RECORDS}

Ready for a closeup: Lace Curtains

L.A. CONFIDENTIAL {BY IAN THOMAS}

Featuring choreography by Mark Morris, Lar Lubovitch, Emery LeCrone and Bennyroyce Royon

MARCH 20–22 RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES PRODUCING DIRECTOR

WWW.PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM

(412) 392-8000

AS A SONGWRITER, Michael Coomer, who records as Lace Curtains, is interested in seeing all the angles. Lately, he’s had his eye trained on Los Angeles. The title of Lace Curtains’ second album, A Signed Piece of Paper, is an allusion to the bogus paperwork given to naive starlets by predatory talent scouts to lure them to the Hollywood of yesteryear. But the album’s smartly poppy content is not so lurid, not entirely. That’s because Coomer, who splits his time between Tucson, L.A. and New York, is as interested in upholding the Los Angeles mythos as he is in upending it. Coomer’s Los Angeles is not a monolith. It is nuanced and widely sampled. His read on the city is cynical at turns, but also goofy. Call it the midpoint between James Ellroy’s L.A. and Larry David’s. A Signed Piece of Paper is an album full of characters. The least likable among them are Hollywood wannabes, sliding demo CDs to anyone who might offer them a leg up. The best of them find virtue in the endless stretches between gigs because they know that true character is revealed in the banal, not in the depths of failure or the heights of success. On “Boardwalk to the Alps,” Coomer’s raucous Sly Stone character study, he sings “You know a prophet is worshipped in every town but his own / I find it peaceful living piecemeal / here on my own.” “If someone was going to try and rip on [the record], they’d probably say I was just doing clichés or stereotypes of peo-

ples’ lives. But I’m not really trying to tell anyone else’s story, I’m trying to tell my own story through other people,” Coomer explains. He isn’t interested in speaking for the city’s denizens, but through them. “I can’t possibly say I understand what Los Angeles is like [as] a whole, but I can find little snapshots that create a bigger thing. As the sum of its parts, it can make more sense,” he says.

LACE CURTAINS

WITH GHOST GUTS, ANELLO 8 p.m. Thu., March 12. The Shop, 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $5. 412-951-0622

A Signed Piece of Paper hovers across the pop spectrum, buoyant and jangly. C o o m e r ’s e nj oy m e n t o f s p e a k i n g through his characters is apparent, especially when it allows him to sneak in lines that wouldn’t otherwise pass the litmus test of good taste. “Play solitaire alone / Cause that’s how it’s played / Just wish a queen would come over and lay on top of me,” he sings. He’s quick to point out the line that separates the work and its creator is a hair’s breadth. “There’s no way to be an artist and be a human being and make stuff that’s not from your own perspective,” he says. Coomer is largely successful in finding the city’s seams, and tucking into the folds of its heavy cloak. In piling on perspectives, Coomer hopes to capture the energy and vitality in the cacophony of urban sprawl. “It isn’t cohesive unless you can get the schizophrenia of what a Los Angeles traffic jam really feels like,” he says. “Anywhere that is that massive is going to make you rethink what you’re up to, you know?” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

! P U N E LIST

Cold War Kids

You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days. Tune in while you read, and judge for yourself whether that indie band’s guitar work is really angular, or if that singer actually sounds like Sandy Denny. [ROCK] + FRI., MARCH 13

The members of Beech Creeps are only kidding around — they swear. Hell, they even sport Animal Collective-like aliases (PP Colada, Yka Mofongo and Ron Llave) to prove it. But none of this changes that their self-titled, debut LP sounds straight-up mean. It’s an aggressive, noisy collection of feedbacklaced rock songs. Vocalist Mofongo (né Mark Shue, of Pterodactyl) won’t get less intense than a howl, but can max out at uncontrollable freak-outs. Dirty Faces, Stillborn Identity and Advaeta also perform tonight at Gooski’s. Shawn Cooke 10 p.m. 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $5. 412-681-1658

[POP] + FRI., MARCH 13 {PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE + THE MECHANICS

The Mechanics may be different, but the machine’s all the same — Mike Rutherford’s hugely successful Genesis spinoff Mike + The Mechanics still performs the old hits with a new pair of vocalists. After Paul Young’s death in 2000 and Paul Carrack’s departure in 2004, Rutherford put the band on hiatus for a few years, before a 2010 comeback with Andrew Roachford and Tim Howar. The band doesn’t have any new music in the pipeline, but Mike + The Mechanics will likely celebrate the chart-toppers on its first North American tour in 25 years. Fellow Genesis alum Daryl Stuermer opens for the band tonight at Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. SC 7:30 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $45-80. 412-462-3444 or www.librarymusichall.com

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Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

[HIP-HOP] + SAT., MARCH 14

EarthGang is very conscious of what it means to be an “Atlanta hip-hop act.” The duo of Johnny Venus and Doctor Dot recognize the boxes in which rap fans might place them — the twangy, cerebral interplay of Outkast; the gloriously loud, dumb trap anthems of Migos. EarthGang intelligently navigates these disparate influences to the point where its hometown doesn’t have to be a talking point. Even Mac Miller has taken notice, guesting on “Monday,” from the gang’s recent Torba mixtape — which might be further evidence that our local hero is headed in a promising direction. EarthGang performs at Club Mike + the Café tonight with Mechanics Fashawn, DJ Exile and SonReal. SC 9 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or clubcafelive.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., MARCH 17 Sometimes it only takes one song. “Hang Me Up to Dry” put Cold War Kids and its debut album, Robbers & Cowards, on the map in a way that the band hasn’t quite been able to match. Great early singles cast large shadows, but Cold War Kids have emerged over the years with a consistent career of soul-infused indie rock. Even if the group has softened and streamlined over time — especially on last year’s hand-clap-happy, Imagine Dragons-type “First” off Hold My Home — the Kids remain a reliable fixture on alt-rock radio. Cold War Kids play Stage AE tonight with Nevada Color. SC 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $22.50. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

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LIVE MUSIC

LOOKING FOR

GOOD PEOPLE WITH

BAD CREDIT! WE WANT TO

FRIDAY, MARCH 13 & 20 4 BANDS EACH WEEK COME VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE 9:00PM • FREE • AGES 21+

SATURDAY MARCH 14 9:00 AM • FREE GET SHAM-ROCKED

FREE BREAKFAST w/ KEY OF X 11:00 AM • FREE

HELP YOU! CALL MR. “CAPPY” 724-327-0900 x 267

JAY WILEY Irish Rockers CRAIC

THE GINGERBEARDS

ROUTE 286 I MONROEVILLE I 724.327.0900

THE BASTARD SUNS and

Memorial Dinner. Oakland. 412-237-8300. FAIRWAYS LOUNGE. E Z Action. Braddock. 412-271-0506. BRILLOBOX. Will Butler, Teen. HACKETT SLOVENIAN CLUB. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. Gone South. Venetia. 724-348-5503. CLUB CAFE. Dave Alvin & Phil HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Grand Alvin, The Guilty Ones, The Far Piano, Those Manic Seas, Ghost West. South Side. 866-468-3401. Guts. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. GUS’S CAFE. Deathjazz, I’m with THE KICKSTAND. The Dave Iglar Joo Won, Richard M, Reggie Band. 412-384-3080. Rivka, Quincunx. Lawrenceville. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. King’s Ransom. 412-315-7271. Cheswick. 724-265-9950. PALACE THEATRE. Abba Mania. MOONDOG’S. G13. Blawnox. Celebrating the music & 412-828-2040. style of Abba. Greensburg. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 724-836-8000. 10 Years, Otherwise, The SMILING MOOSE. Glorious Sons, Luminoth. Northern Faces, Millvale. 412-821-4447. Idlehands, Vinyl NIED’S HOTEL. Slim www. per a p Thief. South Side. Forsythe’s Annual Saint pghcitym o .c 412-431-4668. Patrick Parade Day. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. RAMADA INN HOTEL & 31ST STREET PUB. Lich King, Gran CONFERENCE CENTER. 13 Stories. Gila, The Judas Bull. Strip District. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. 412-391-8334. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Beagle BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Brothers w/ Mickey & The Snake Oil Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. Boys. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Ploughshare Poets. RSVP required. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ALTAR BAR. Andy Grammer, Alex CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF & Sierra w/ Paradise Fears. Strip HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Mike District. 412-263-2877. & The Mechanics. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Yarn, Woodz Rising. CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. South Side. 866-468-3401. Maroon 5 w/ Magic!, Rozzi Crane. Uptown. 412-642-1800. FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES. Daniels & McClain. New Kensington. 724-335-7811. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Chris Vipond & the Stanley Street Band, Tracksploitation, Misaligned Mind, Gypsy & His Band Of Ghosts, Sean Howard. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KENDREW’S. The Grid. 724-375-5959. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Unlucky Revival ft. Beauty Slap, Eastend Mile, Nameless In August, Big Gypsy & Round Black Ghosts. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE R BAR. Norman Nardini. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Dancing Queen. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Capsized. Allison Park. 412-487-6259. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Fight {MON., MARCH 23} The Fade, Sink In. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

ROCK/POP THU 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 15

BUMPIN UGLIES with special guest 8:00PM • $10 / $12 Dos • AGES 21+

ALSO COMING Tribute SAY AHH! 3/ 21 Poison Crue Tribute STEEL CITY CRUE 3/ 22 AWAKE AT LAST 3/ 24 OPEN MIC NIGHT FOR TICKETS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

HARDROCK.COM/CAFES/PITTSBURGH OR CALL +1-412-481-7625 ARTISTS, SHOWTIMES, PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE. VALID ID REQUIRED FOR ENTRY.

Have a great Pittsburgh photo to share? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions! Here’s one that Instagramer @loriallofus took at the Sewickley Bridge. She calls it “Waiting for Spring.”

PITTSBURGH | STATION SQUARE #THISISHARDROCK

JOIN HARDROCKREWARDS .COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

pghcitypaper

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Courage To Do What’s Right III. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. moe.. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PALACE THEATRE. Michael Bolton. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

MON 16 ALTAR BAR. Doyle, Joey Zampella. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

TUE 17

ALTAR BAR. Sundy Best. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Lincoln Durham w/ Todd Christian. South Side. 866-468-3401. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lazer Wulf w/ Landbury & Television. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Gin Blossoms w/ Jocelyn Arndt. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. REX THEATER. Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, The ChopShop. South Side. (412) 381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Have Mercy, Weatherbox, You Me And Everyone We Know, Head North. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Cold War Kids, Nevada Color. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Town Pants w/ The Barleycorn Bards. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

BALTIMORE

YOB

SAT 14

©2015 Hard Rock International (USA), Inc. All rights reserved.

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412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

FRI 13

THE CLINTONES

9:00PM • $5 • AGES 21+

TUESDAY APRIL 7

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Ploughshare Poets. RSVP required. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Jace Clayton. The Julius Eastman

Baltimore Soundstage

AKRON {SUN., MARCH 22}

Gordon Lightfoot

Akron Civic Theatre

CLEVELAND {THU., APRIL 16}

Sufjan Stevens

Cleveland Masonic Auditorium


WED 18

ALTAR BAR. I Prevail. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Kelly Zullo, Gary Antol, David Dickinson. South Side. 866-468-3401. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Heartwarmer, Ephen, Cole Meyers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Urban Pioneers, The Armadillos. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 12 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 13 ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 14 BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

422 FORELAND STREET, NORTH SIDE FOLLOW US ON

412-904-3335 www.jamesstreetgastropub.com

LIKE US ON

WED 18

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 14 CLUB CAFE. Fashawn, DJ Exile, EarthGang, SonReal. South Side. 866-468-3401.

BLUES THU 12 MOONDOG’S. Jeff Jenson. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

ST. PADDY’S DAY HEADQUARTERS Live music by

FRI 13 565 LIVE. The Blues Orphans. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. MOONDOG’S. Nicole Belli Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NIED’S HOTEL. Jimmy Adler w/ Charlie Barath. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

HARMONY HOUSE

SAT 14

Green Beer | Irish Stew | Sheppard’s Pie Corn Beef & Cabbage | Guinness

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Hawthorne Project. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. COOL SPRINGS GOLD & FAMILY RECREATION CENTER. The Witchdoctors w/ Johnny Smoothe. Bethel Park. 412-831-5080. HOG’S HEAD BAR & GRILL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Spring Garden. 412-251-0439. THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 15 THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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Get your official t-shirt - $15 Open at 10am • 949 LIBERTY AVE. +

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Log on to www.pghcitypaper.com/yuenglingspecials

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015


to check out Madness in March Yuengling Specials.

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Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

MP 3 MONDAY

TUE 17 ST. SIMON NIGHTCLUB. Tinsley Ellis. 724-544-4052.

BACKYARD KINDS

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dr. Zoot. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ FRI 13 Tickets at www.jergels.com

SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & THE ASBURY JUKES

THU 3.19 8PM

LEON RUSSELL

WED 3.25 8PM

BELLA SERA BY GRECO’S. Jessica Lee. Canonsburg. 724-745-5575. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Benny Benack. Downtown. 412-471-9100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-281-7100.

CARNEGIE COFFEE COMPANY. Redhouse Trio. Carnegie. 412-316-7483. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Etta Cox & Al Dowe. Homewood. 412-731-3080. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Sue Leslie. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dan Bubien. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

LATITUDE 360. Marcus Anderson. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-281-7100.

MON 16 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412251-0097.

WED 18 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834.

WORLD FRI 13 CLUB CAFE. Mark Dignam & Friends. A Night of Irish Traditional Music & Song. South Side. 866-468-3401.

REGGAE FRI 13 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

FULL LIST ONLINE

www. per pa pghcitym .co

WED 18 DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. The Music of the ‘70s Horn Bands. Jazz Ensemble w/ director Mike Tomaro. Duquesne Union Ballroom. Uptown. 412-396-6083.

ACOUSTIC THU 12

SAT 14

Orchestra Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 14

RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Great American Songbook era classics, standards & showtunes. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN. Film screening w/ live orchestral accompaniment by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “Beethovens Eroica” showcasing Andrés Cárdenes. WSO invites attendees to bring non-perishable food donations & help with the “Orchestras Feeding America” Program. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SUN 15

HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Great American Songbook era classics, standards & showtunes. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN. Film screening w/ live orchestral accompaniment by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 14

MON 16

MEADOWS CASINO. Stampede. Washington. 724-503-1200.

ZUILL BAILEY & AWADAGIN PRATT. Cello & piano together on Stravinsky: Suite Italienne, Brahms: Sonata in D major, Op. 78 & Franck: Sonata in A major, more. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

FAN CLUB SPORTS BAR. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Monroeville. 412-829-3966.

COUNTRY FRI 13

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Acoustic Night w/ John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

CLASSICAL

SAT 14

RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Great American Songbook era classics, standards & showtunes. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN. Film screening w/ live orchestral accompaniment by the Pittsburgh Symphony

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike Flaherty & Jack Puskar. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Tim & John. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from indie poppers Backyard Kinds. Stream or download “Teenagers,” the first single from the band’s forthcoming album, The Weekend, out later this spring.

SAT 14

SUN 15

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRITTANY SOSSONG}

WED 18

FRI 13

OTHER MUSIC THU 12 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Fizzle & Pop. Soul Oldies Night, open turn tables & record swap. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.


PAI PAID PA AID D ADVERTORIAL ADVE ADVERTO RTORIAL R ORIALL SPONSORED SPONSORED BY

What to do March

IN PITTSBURGH

11 - 17

WEDNESDAY 11 Pete Rock & Slum Village

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 18 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 12 125 Katt Williams Born Again…Again Tour SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL Oakland. All ages show. Tickets: showclix.com. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 13 136

Brit Floyd

Marcus Miller MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN'S GUILD North Side. Tickets: mcgjazz.org. 9:30p.m.

An Evening with Moe MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All Ages Show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Brit Floyd - 2015 World Tour BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m. Through March 14.

MONDAY 16 Doyle

Singin' in the Rain

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org/pops. Through March 15.

Northern Faces / Idlehands

Glen Gerard (As Seen on AMC's Freak Show)

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through March 14.

Mike + The Mechanics

SATURDAY 14 147

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

MARCH 13 BENEDUM CENTER

SOUND SERIES: Jace Clayton - The Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner

TUESDAY 17 179 CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART THEATER Oakland. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

The Clintones HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

10 Years MR. SMALLS THEATRE

Millvale. 412-821-4447. Yo Soy Latina All Ages Show. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone East Liberty. Tickets: or 866-468-3401. 7:30p.m. womenofcolorherstory.org. 7p.m.

Bastard Bearded Irishmen's St Pat's Parade Party

SUNDAY 15 158

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 7p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877.

Andy Grammer / Alex & Sierra

Have Mercy

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Cold War Kids STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Station Square

$3.50 GREEN MILLER LITE 20 OZ. DRAFTS AND $7 PITCHERS W/LIVE BAND N E W S

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TEAM PLAYERS {BY AL HOFF} One benefit of the dissolution of the Soviet Union has been the revelation of all the history previously hidden behind the Iron Curtain. Now unfolding in Gabe Polsky’s documentary Red Army is a recounting of Russia’s fabled and feared national hockey team.

SONG IS A GORGEOUS HAND-DRAWN VISUAL EXPLORATION COMBINING STORY, SYMBOLS AND WHIMSY

SEA FAIRY {BY AL HOFF}

F

Tough on ice: Red Army players celebrate another win.

CP APPROVED

Polsky’s film is less about the playing of the sport than it is about hockey’s role in the ever-present Cold War tensions between the West and the Soviets, and what playing hockey meant for these young men who were groomed to play for patriotic glory, not money or personal fame. (The players were technically soldiers, and conscription included living in a training camp 11 months of the year.) The system offered good (the on-ice teamwork) and bad (having a former KGB official for a coach). And as history would have it, when the U.S.S.R. began to fall apart, these same men found themselves pawns in the chaotic political times that followed. Much of the story is told through contemporary interviews with former team captain Slava Fetisov, who makes a prickly if intriguing study of a man who has negotiated both communism and capitalism, the collective and the individual. The film is a must for hockey fans, especially those old enough to have railed against these men (one of the Red Army’s rare defeats was the 1980 Olympic “Miracle on Ice”). But it’s also a fascinating Cold War document with much general appeal. In English, and Russian, with subtitles. Starts Fri., March 13. Hollywood and Manor

OLK TALES ARE meant to entertain, but also to convey necessary mores about family, life and death, living the best one can, and so on. Tomm Moore’s new animated family film, Song of the Sea, an original contemporary fairy tale rooted in traditional Irish folklore, is no exception. It’s a simple enough story for children, with plenty of colorful visuals to hold them, but one that is engrossing enough for adults. The story concerns a fractured family, who live in a lighthouse near the sea. They are shut off from one another by grief, jealousy and pettiness: Widowed dad is sad, and young Ben resents having to look after his mute baby sister, Saoirse, who is weirdly drawn to the water. Then, a forced move to the city changes everything.

SONG OF THE SEA DIRECTED BY: Tomm Moore FEATURING THE VOICES OF: Brendan Gleeson, Fionnula Flanagan, David Rawle and Lucy O’Connell Starts Fri., March 13. Regent Square

CP APPROVED

Saoirse, you see, is a selkie, a mythological creature that can shift between human and seal forms. As befitting her dual citizenship, she is deeply in tune with both the natural order and the more shadowy world of fairies, witches and other non-humans, including an odd fellow who lives under the sea and stores his memories in impossibly long strands of silver hair.

All fa Al airy y ta tales le lles es ne need e a ques ed uesst, and nd Be Ben n and Saoirse set ett out on o n the theirs th rss — to o find fin ind the the lair lai air of of the e Owl w Wi Witch and her jarred col col co ollec le ecti ec t on of em tio mot mo otion io ons, whi o hich hich h she e ha as suck suc uck ck ked fro f m various magic ma mag agica al creatur rea ea atur t es, tu es, lle eav aviing g the hem he m sston t e-l ton to e-like ike an a d llif ifeles ife lesss. les s. If I you ou th ou hink in nk th nk the e stor to tory’s o y’s ’ss h hu uman mans need ee e to ge gett in bett etter er tou touch ch h witth th the heirr em moti otions otions onss, you’ you’ ou’d ou db be e righ igh ght. t. Be Ben B en mu must st rel r y not onl re onlyy o on n his hi own n pl p uck u ,b uc but ut dra r w from om m th t e see eem min inglyy sil ing i lyy son illy il so o gs and le legen ge dss gen h la his ate e mot mothe h on her ncce e sha sh red wi sh w th t him him. m.

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“Pardon me, boy — is this the Transylvania station?” Leave it to Mel Brooks to turn ror story Mary Shelley’s cautionary hor gags al visu of run p -sto non a into edy com 4 197 the and puns. Catch

tein Young Frankens a, on at Row House Cinem 9. March 13-15 and March 17-1

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

Moore’s earlier work was The Secret of the Kells, and like that 2009 film, Song is a gorgeous hand-drawn visual exploration of this world and others, combining story, symbols and whimsy. The flatness of the 2-D animation is belied by the swirling colors, the evocative backgrounds and the intricate line drawings, which frequently incorporate folk art. It’s a journey worth taking, especially when a singing seal is leading the way. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM CAPSULES CP

of grief or madness or both, is visited by a talking raven — a black bird that ominously repeats the worrisome “Nevermore.” Now, local filmmakers Thad Ciechanowski, Joe Serkoch and Frank Tirio Jr. have created a faithful and handsomely produced short film of this nocturnal encounter between man and bird. The team won an Emmy for its previous Poe adaptation, “The Cask of Amontillado,” and as result received funding for this new work from The Heinz Endowments. 7 p.m. Mon., March 16. Melwood. $5 suggested donation (proceeds benefit The Open Door Youth Outreach)

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK CINDERELLA. Kenneth Branagh directs this adaptation of the classic fairy tale about the over-worked girl granted a magical night at the ball. Lily James, Richard Madden and Cate Blanchett star. Starts Fri., March 13. DELI MAN. Erik Greenberg Anjou’s entertaining new documentary recounts the history and current state of Jewish delis in the United States. Eastern Europe is the ancestral home of some of the deli’s staples, but it’s not that simple. As Jewish immigrants assimilated into a new country, the “traditional” deli was born of melting-pot cities, exposure to new cuisines and changing lifestyles. Where they did have roots was in family, with many delis run by successive generations, and loyal patronage from customers. (And there’s Henny Youngman, who at the Carnegie Deli reputedly only ever “paid” with jokes.) In the 1930s, there were more than 1,500 Jewish delis in New York City alone; today, there are approximately 150 nationwide. Anjou checks in with a handful, from wellknown eateries in New York to new venues in San Francisco and Toronto. For a hands-on spiritual guide, Anjou taps Ziggy Gruber, a thirdgeneration New York deli man committed to keep the culinary and cultural traditions of the deli alive — in Houston, Texas. Gruber is a lively host, and Anjou supplements his tales with deli remembrances from such noted connoisseurs as Jerry Stiller, Fyvush Finkel and Larry King. There’s some filler on this platter, to be sure, but it’s not hard to stomach the extras. Starts Fri., March 13. Manor (Al Hoff)

LABYRINTH. This cultish 1986 film from Muppetmaster Jim Henson spins a fairy-tale-ish yarn about a teenage girl (Jennifer Connelly) who must navigate a strange world in order to rescue her baby brother from a goblin king (David Bowie). Featuring one of the Thin White Duke’s worst hair-dos ever. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 18. AMC Loews. $5

Deli Man THE SALVATION. Mads Mikkelsen stars in Kristian Levring’s new Western, in which punishment and revenge tear apart an American frontier town in the 1870s. The 7 p.m. March 19 screening is part of the Spaghetti Western series, and includes movie and spaghetti dinner; reservations required at 412766-1668. Starts Thu., March 19, through March 29. Parkway, McKees Rocks. www. parkwaytheater.org UNFINISHED BUSINESS. Lately I’ve been thinking: If only there were an international-business comedy that also incorporated anti-bullying messages and gloryholes. Ken Scott has delivered, but alas, it’s an unfunny venture to which nobody seems committed. In the wafer-thin plot, three stereotypes — solid dude (Vince Vaughn), maudlin old guy (Tom

Nancy Spungen), March 10-12. Almost Famous (semiautobiographical 2000 tale about a teenage journalist traveling with the band), March 11-12. This Is Spinal Tap (classic mockumentary from 1984), March 12. Mel Brooks Retrospective. Blazing Saddles (1974 Western spoof starring Cleavon Little and beans), March 13-16 and March 18-19. Young Frankenstein (Gene Wilder stars in this hilarious but deeply respectful 1974 Frankenstein re-boot), March 13-15 and March 17-19. Spaceballs (Stars Wars and other sci-fi sagas get sent up in this 1987 comedy), March 13-17 and March 19. The Producers (the 1967 show-biz comedy about staging a Broadway flop), March 13-18. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com

A MASTER BUILDER. In the twilight of his life, a well-regarded architect (Wallace Shawn) continues to peevishly grumble to his colleagues and wife (Julie Hagerty). But he comes alive at the unexpected arrival of a young female houseguest (Lisa Joyce), whom he last encountered as a child. Together they recall — somewhat differently — a notable project from a decade earlier. Jonathan Demme’s new film is an adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s 1892 play, in a translation by Shawn. Demme will attend the screening, which opens CMU’s Faces of Work International Film Festival. The film will be followed by a reception. 7:15 p.m. Thu., March 19. Regent Square. $20 ($10 seniors/ students). www.cmu.edu/faces NIGHT TRAIN. A mysterious man boards a night train for the Baltic coast, and finds himself sharing a compartment with an equally mysterious woman, in Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s 1959 thriller. The film continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 19, and 5:30 p.m. Sat., March 21. Harris. $5

BILL & TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE. In Stephen Herek’s 1989 comedy, two student doofuses (Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter) show how to ace history class — by building a time machine and checking out the past in person. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 11. AMC Loews. $5

GOODFELLAS. Spend more time with The Family in Martin Scorsese’s 1990 drama, a searing, profanely funny account of real-life mobster (and FBI informant) Henry Hill. Starring Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci and Robert DeNiro. 8 p.m. Thu., March 19. Oaks

EROICA. Andrzej Munk’s 1958 film looks back at World War II through two characters: one a drunk who becomes a soldier during the Warsaw uprising, the other a soldier who tries to escape a POW camp. The film opens a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 12, and 5:30 p.m. Sat., March 14. Harris

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org

FRIDAY THE 13TH. A group of teenagers working to re-open a rundown lake camp are killed off one by one. Sean S. Cunningham’s 1980 horror flick launched a zillion sequels. 8 p.m. Fri., March 13. Oaks

Unfinished Business LIKE SUNDAY, LIKE RAIN. Frank Whaley directs this new drama about a musically inclined au pair and the shy 12-year-old cello prodigy she cares for. Leighton Meester, Debra Messing and Billie Joe Armstrong star. 7 and 9 p.m. Fri., March 13; 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., March 14; 5 and 7 p.m. Sun., March 15. Parkway, McKees Rocks RUN ALL NIGHT. Yet again, somebody is trying to kill a morally compromised Liam Neeson. This time it’s Ed Harris, so Neeson better watch his back. Jaume Collet-Serra (Unknown, NonStop) directs this action thriller. Starts Fri., March 13.

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Wilkinson) and possibly brain-damaged naif (Dave Franco) — need to seal a business deal. In Berlin — home of topless women, hotels-as-installation-art and the aforementioned gay watering hole. It’s a lifeless, laughless affair that will slowly drain away any residual affection you may have held for these actors. (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Movies That Rock. The Blues Brothers (1980 musical comedy, adapted from Dan Aykroyd-John Belushi SNL skit), March 10-11. Sid & Nancy (1986 docudrama recounts the destructive relationship of Sex Pistol Sid Vicious and his girlfriend,

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THE KID. In this 1921 Charlie Chaplin feature, Chaplin portrays his “Little Tramp” character, who takes charge of an abandoned child (Jackie Coogan). Also screening: Chaplin’s “A Dog’s Life” (1918), in which the Tramp takes charge of an abandoned dog. Bring enough hankies for both films. With live musical accompaniment on the organ by Jay Spencer. 3 p.m. Sun., March 15. Hollywood MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN. Gary Cooper stars in this 1936 Frank Capra comedy about a small-town fella who moves to the big city after inheriting a fortune. The film continues a month-long Sundaynight series of digitally restored Capra films. 8 p.m. Sun., March 15. Regent Square THE RAVEN. “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary …” So begins both Edgar Allan Poe’s 1845 poem “The Raven,” a certifiably creepy work in which a young man, in the throes

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What We Do in the Shadows (2015)

3/11 @ 7:30pm, 3/12 @ 7:30pm From the creators of “Flight of the Conchords” comes this new must-see vampire comedy. Final screenings!

-Red- - -Army ---------------------------------(2014)

3/13 @ 7:30pm & 10pm, 3/14 @ 10pm, 3/15 @ 7pm & 9:15pm, 3/16 @ 7pm & 9:15pm, 3/17 @ 7pm & 9:15pm, 3/18 @ 7pm & 9:15pm The story of the Soviet Union’s famed Red Army hockey team through the eyes of its players.

-SILENTS, - - - - - - -PLEASE! -----------------------------Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid/It’s A Dog’s Life

3/15 @ 3pm Chaplin’s first full-length feature, with Jay Spencer playing live on our theater organ, introduction by noted Chaplin expert Dan Kamin!

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[ART REVIEW]

PERCEPTIONS

“WHY DON’T YOU TRY TO BE AN ACTRESS?”

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FELLOWSHIP 15 continues through March 21. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

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FROM

LIGHTING TO

WRITING {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

[BOOKS] Matthew Conboy’s “Michael”

The recent Internet frenzy over the color of a dress was compelling not just because it shows that each of us sees things differently, but also because it illustrates our relationship to digital media. Silver Eye Center’s Fellowship 15 includes two solo exhibitions juried by Allison Grant, assistant curator at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Photography. Both exhibitions — one by Christopher Meerdo, the other by Matthew Conboy — feature works that challenge our notions of objective perception. Chicago-based Meerdo’s video “Cipher II (wlinsurance20130815-A.aes256),” in particular, resonates given the intensity of the dress debate: Bright colors flash on screen in rapid succession, with a score of staticsounding clicks by Elise Macmillan. The colors and sounds are hypnotic, but you are keenly aware that your eyes and mind cannot keep up with the visual and aural information. This conundrum is complicated by the fact that the piece is itself an interpretation, using RGB color values, of an encrypted Wikileaks file. By visualizing seemingly inaccessible material, Meerdo exposes digital media’s fallibility while conceding our cultural dependence on it. In the series “Anthology,” Meerdo recovers deleted photo files from used memory cards purchased online. By restoring data that has been erased and recorded over, Meerdo resurrects the fragments left behind. He excavates our collective visual memory in order to understand and upend the authority and authenticity of the photographic medium. Conboy’s images are more narrative, although hardly straightforward. A tense beauty pervades his subjects and draws the viewer into a drama that vacillates between truth and fiction. His series, titled “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear,” captures Skatopia, a skate park in southeastern Ohio. Echoing Nan Goldin and Larry Clark, Conboy offers a glimpse of youthful angst, although he never achieves the intimacy that comes from being an insider. A lone gas can in daylight or a towering bonfire at night suggests the exuberance and exasperation of ardent emotion. While the two shows are unrelated, Conboy’s “Mob at the Bonfire” reflects the same anarchic energy that Meerdo explores in his video “Untitled (Redactions),” in which he has spliced together the moments during nighttime protest videos from YouTube when a flash from someone’s camera washes out the image. Light heightens the drama in each and reminds us that seeing and perceiving depend on your point of view.

A

BOUT 40 years ago, Celeste Gainey

graduated from New York Univer .sity’s film school. Though she’d studied lighting, as she was preparing to find work, her cinematography teacher suddenly suggested, “Why don’t you try to be an actress?” Back then, you see, women didn’t often get jobs like gaffer, the head electrician on a film crew, responsible for executing or even designing a production’s lighting scheme. But Gainey did. In short order, she was serving as an electrician on now-classic films like Taxi Driver and Dog Day Afternoon. In 1974 — after struggling in a maledominated industry — she became the first woman admitted as a gaffer to the industry’s top craft union, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). Gainey spent a decade in the industry — also lighting documentaries and television news programs including 60 Minutes — before starting to transition into a career as an architectural lighting designer. She was based first in New York and then in Los Angeles, with commissions including Manhattan’s iconic Gramercy

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NOEL SCHERMAIER}

Celeste Gainey

Tavern and Union Square Café. So how’d Gainey become a poet — one whose first collection, the GAFFER, is new this month (see accompanying review)? Around 2007, she’d simply had enough of lighting, and found herself writing instead. She admired the work of poet Jan Beatty enough to enroll in Carlow University’s graduate creativewriting program, where Beatty teaches. Gainey and her partner, novelist and screenwriter Elise D’Haene, liked Pittsburgh so much that they moved here, in 2011. After decades in collaborative fields like film and architecture, Gainey appreciates the solitude of poetry. “You always were

fulfilling someone else’s vision,” she says today. “Here it’s my vision.” The poems in the GAFFER mine her reallife experiences, including life on set with the likes of Martin Scorcese and Lucille Ball. But don’t take the GAFFER for autobiography: “The speaker in the book is really a persona that comes out of my experience but is not completely verbatim of my life,” Gainey says.

THE GAFFER BOOK LAUNCH 5-7 p.m. Sat., March 14. Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. RSVP to thegaffer.book@gmail.com.

Nor is poetry a complete break from her lighting work. “They’re extremely similar because I’m a visual person,” she says. “When I’m writing, … a visual is


created in my brain that I’m translating onto the page, and I’m creating a world, really. So it’s a similar thought process for me.” In any case, things are looking bright: After Gainey’s Pittsburgh book launch, on March 14, look for the GAFFER to be featured in the April issue of O, The Oprah Magazine.

[DANCE]

NEW DIRECTION {BY STEVE SUCATO}

D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

[BOOK REVIEW]

BRIGHT SIDE A gaffer is the person in charge of the lights used when making films and TV shows. In Celeste Gainey’s highly anticipated debut poetry collection, the GAFFER (Arktoi Books, $18.95), illumination, both personal and professional, makes a powerful running theme. From movie sets to ’70s fashion, lesbian sex and family memories, it’s 100 pages that rightly tries to cover some ground. Gainey, who now lives in Pittsburgh, spent more than 35 years working in architectural lighting design and on seminal films like Taxi Driver and Dog Day Afternoon. A groundbreaker, she was the first woman electrician admitted to the stagehands union; more recently, she earned a master’s-of-fine-arts degree at Carlow University. the GAFFER’s effectiveness lies in its frequent use of specialized language, grounding the book in authenticity. A nice example is “best boy” (the term for an electrician’s apprentice), in which the speaker struggles with identity: “In high school I meet a boy / I either love or want to be.” The poem moves toward inclusion in this “band of brothers,” where she’ll “trim their brute arcs, / run their stingers, scrim their broads, / wrap their 9-light fays; / let them make me a man.” The on-set idiom inspires deft wordplay, a Gainey strength. While some might be drawn to the sexually provocative “a field guide to muff diving,” equally educational moments of experience and sharp-eyed expertise abound, most concerning the nature of lighting. “in the lobby of the five star hotel” shows a meditative side where the speaker notices shoddy work: “they … / didn’t overlap the lamps six inches, so the line / appears even, harmonious, uninterrupted. / How we like our light to be.” Poems like “the seventh avenue line” and “the gaffer’s invocation” cement the speaker’s authority by noticing what laypeople don’t. This eye for detail and willingness to examine memory are well-rendered in “woodland 7-2257,” where comforting recollections of a long-dead mother and childhood home are described with precise imagery: “the Peace roses are in bloom. / Beyond, the Pacific blankets out, / sun staccatos through the white shutters / of the breakfast room. / You are seated at the round Saarinen table / in that bright 60’s print dress / working a double-crostic.” With Gainey’s ability to capture emotion through small moments played big, the GAFFER burns bright.

Point Park dancers perform Mark Morris’ “Grand Duo.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

{BY FRED SHAW}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Audiences most often get a feel for a new dance-company director from his or her choices in repertory. In the case of Point Park University’s new dance-department chair, Rubén Graciani, an indication of the direction he’ll take the student dance company can be seen in the Conservatory Dance Company’s annual At the Byham program, in four performances March 20-22. Graciani has said that he’ll seek repertory that pushes students outside their comfort zones. And this time around, the company’s marquee production — which for a decade has primarily showcased works by the likes of George Balanchine, Martha Graham and Ohad Naharin — offers a different take. Works by noted choreographers Mark Morris and Lar Lubovitch are supplemented by two from up-andcoming New York-based choreographers Bennyroyce Royon and Emery LeCrone. For the world premiere of his “Body Electric,” Royon says via email, “The idea started as a solo to deeply explore my own body and movement.” That 2014 solo became the basis for his new work for 11 dancers, set to music by Ravi Shankar and Viennese acoustic folk-rock band Dawa. The work, Royon says, “synthesizes dance styles ranging from contemporary ballet to urban dance forms” and takes its inspiration from both Walt Whitman’s 1855 poem “I Sing the Body Electric” and the seven chakra points. Morris’ “Grand Duo” (1993) is a 25minute masterwork for 14 dancers in four movements, set to Lou Harrison’s “Grand Duo for Violin and Piano.” “The four movements are a study in contrasts musically,” says répétiteur David Leventhal by phone from New York. “Mark’s movement motifs for them make viewing the piece a rich experience for both firsttime and 20th-time audience members.” Originally choreographed using a large triangular set piece, LeCrone’s 16-minute “Divergence” (2010), about different sides of a relationship, will have a different look sans that piece. It’s a difference LeCrone says will shed new light on the contemporary ballet for five couples, set to music by English composer Joby Talbot. Rounding out the program, Lubovitch’s “The Legend of Ten” (2010), with music by Johannes Brahms, is a glorious ballet the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company performed at the Byham in 2012. Says Lubovitch: “It is kind of the big gorgeous dance people have come to expect from me.”

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

UNION TANGUERA SAT, MAR 28 TH 2015 • 8 PM BYHAM THEATER

extremely seductive and ravishing – The Oregonian

Sensational French Argentine tango ensemble accompanied by live music from one of Buenos Aires’ finest quartets.

WATCH: WATCH T : TrustArts.org/Tango TrustArts org/Tango

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Conservatory Dance Company presents AT THE BYHAM Fri., March 20-Sun., March 22. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com +

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TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX JONES}

Robin Abramson (left) and Kimberly Parker Green in Elemeno Pea, at City Theatre

[PLAY REVIEWS]

CLASS CLOWNS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

CITY THEATRE’S Pittsburgh-premiere production of Elemeno Pea is a lovely show about largely unpleasant people. Molly Smith Metzler’s 2011 one-act is high drama played as low comedy, as differently monied people clash about class. Well, it’s not really about class issues, but it’s mostly fun.

ELEMENO PEA

continues through March 22. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-61. 412-431-2489 or citytheatrecompany.org

No plot spoilers here (not that there’s much of a plot). At the center of the action is the least unpleasant character, Simone, who positively exudes cheer and care at all the needy people around her. Her elder sister, Devon, needs her for family comfort. Simone’s employer, Michaela, pays her big bucks as a personal assistant, and really, really needs her. And then there’s Simone’s unlikely swain, Ethan, unabashedly superficial and selfish as the rich brother of Michaela’s billionaire husband, stashed offstage. Not needing Simone as much as a compass in life is the caretaker, personifying the cliché servant in two modes: sycophantic and surly. There are any number of story possibilities here. Three working-class girls from upstate New York go to college and rise to various parts of the middle class, then take

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

on the old-money 1 percent. Michaela marries into it. Simone gets “perks and bennies” working for it. Devon openly disdains it, boorishly bad-mouthing her hostess (i.e., her sister’s boss) sight unseen. And there are various themes about family, siblings drifting apart, reasons to marry, setting one’s own goals, etc. Once again, City artistic director Tracy Brigden has combined a talented cast and design/tech team. Robin Abramson is prettily and perfectly perky as the one-time Buffalo gal Simone, plugging into preppie culture (bless the lime greens and “salmon” of Robert C.T. Steele’s costumes). Kimberly Parker Green beautifully chomps scenery as the trophy wife watching her life fall apart — and what gorgeous scenery it is, a coolly modern luxury guesthouse by City resident scenic designer Tony Ferrieri. Ariel Woodiwiss grows from snarly to sympathetic as sister Devon. While the ladies do dominate Elemeno Pea, the gentlemen also deserve a hand: Anthony Comis as a darling dolt, and Tony Chiroldes as the put-upon caretaker. The situations comprising Elemeno Pea’s comedy may be muddled, but there are laughs as various ends are satisfyingly tied. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

RE-CREATIONS {BY TED HOOVER}

WHEN MEL BROOKS opened the musical

version of The Producers, in 2001, the theater world went wild. The show won


12 Tonys, ran for six years and ushered in $400 and $500 seats. So Broadway had high hopes when, in 2007, Brooks opened the musical version of Young Frankenstein, his tribute to the 1930s movie adaptations of Mary Shelley’s novel about a scientist creating new life from old corpses. Perhaps the hopes were a little too high. The show opened to mixed reviews and closed after a mere 500 performances. Now, Pittsburgh Musical Theater presents the first local production, giving us the chance to make up our own minds. Just as I don’t think The Producers is as great as everyone says, I don’t think Young Frankenstein is the substandard work rumor claims. It’s exactly what you think it’s going to be: a Mel Brooks gag-fest of familiar comedy tropes and punchlines, peppered with innocuous tunes. To expect more is silly. As the show’s director, PMT’s Colleen Petrucci has gathered an impressive array of solid comedy performers. On physicality alone, no one in Pittsburgh but Tim Hartman could have been cast as the Monster; that he brings a delightful sense of anarchy only adds to his amusing performance. Andrea Weinzlierl and Lara Hayhurst, as the competing love inter-

ests, are really one-note characters, but play their notes with lots of humor. Frau Blucher is driven by an inner demon of warped lust that Tammy Townsend milks for every laugh possible. Quinn Patrick Shannon’s Igor is manic and controlled, both feral and sophisticated. Playing Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, Trey Compton’s stand-out performance is an homage to Gene Wilder (star and co-writer of the film); it’s not a copy, but the neurotic impulses informing Wilder’s performance also inform Compton’s.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN continues through Sun., March 15. Pittsburgh Musical Theater at the Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $12.75-49.95. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghmusicals.com

I will say there needs to be a rethink of the set. I salute PMT’s goal of bringing affordable theater to local audiences, and of course there’s only so much money. But there’s also a law of diminishing returns, and it’s hard to imagine a more diminished physical production than this one. And that’s a shame, because there’s a lot of high-quality entertainment happening on it.

BIPEDS

{BY COLETTE NEWBY} PRIME STAGE Theater’s production of Ani-

mal Farm, adapted from George Orwell’s novel by Andrew Periale, has my admiration for one simple reason: All through the show, the human actors portray pigs and horses and so forth, walking on two legs because, you know, they’re humans. Toward the end of the story, in the context of the narrative, pigs begin to walk on two legs, and somehow Stefan Ligenfelter, as the pig Napoleon, who has been walking on two legs for the whole show, manages to make his “first steps on two legs” genuinely chilling. It’s quite an accomplishment. Employing just eight actors, director Melissa Hill Grande must represent all the inhabitants of Animal Farm, who were used as a parable for all of Russia, whom Orwell saw as a synecdochic case study of victims of totalitarianism. (Got all that?) Grande accomplishes this using an arsenal of techniques, from puppets to shadows to good old-fashioned noise. An actor might play many different roles in a scene, sometimes even swapping out a single role. As with any experimentation, there are hits and misses — for example, occa-

sionally the cast spreads out and each addresses a different section of the audience. The one-eighth of these scenes provided by John Michnya, as Boxer the old workhorse, at least, are very charming, and it certainly produces confusion and ruckus. But one is left feeling like one missed something from the other seven actors. The New Hazlett Theater is probably my favorite theater in the city simply for its layout, all balconies and catwalks. It seems ideal for a setpiece in one of those self-aware action movies people keep making these days. The venue’s thrust stage is something of which this production takes full advantage.

ANIMAL FARM

continues through Sun., March 15. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 724-773-0700 or www.primestage.com

Unfortunately, spreading out the audience makes it harder to get laughs or a standing ovation. And when theatergoers are exhorted to sing along with a song they’ve never heard before — as happens in Animal Farm — the crowd is silent, the actors keep singing and encouraging people to sing along, and the discomfort thickens faster than bacon grease.

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Two years in Paris changed everything.

An intimate study of color featuring four masterpieces by Vincent van Gogh and Paul Signac. March 14–July 6 Sponsored by

Vincent van Gogh, Still Life, Basket of Apples, 1887; Saint Louis Art Museum, Gift of Sydney M. Shoenberg Sr. 43:1972

cmoa.org

A special behind-the-scenes CMOA presentation March 9–May 8

| one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

03.1203.19.15

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

Parade Day Fun starts Here...

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {PHOTO COURTESY OF UNCUMBER THEATRICS}

MARCH 13 Professor Eldritch’s Asylum for Uncanny and Extraordinary Women

+ THU., MARCH 12 {STAGE}

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24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

For the first show of its inaugural season, demaskus Theater Collective stages Wine in the Wilderness, a 1969 play by iconic African-American playwright Alice Childress. The play, set during the Harlem race riots, explores how black men and women view each other. Demaskus strives to use theater to “make known the messages of the marginalized.” Wine in the Wilderness, directed by demaskus founder and CEO Shaunda Miles, gets four performances this weekend at the Peirce Studio, in Downtown’s Trust Arts Education Center. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. Continues through Sun., March 15. 805807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-30. www.demaskus.com

Zacchiaus McKee 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. Sat., March 14, and 3 p.m. Sun., March 15. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, 116 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. $10-40. 412-345-1722 or www.rccpittsburgh.com

{STAGE}

Professor Eldritch’s Asylum for Uncanny and Extraordinary Women is a new immersivetheater work that, at close quarters, introduces participants to what codirector Ayne Terceira calls “the cons and murderesses of history.” Seven characters ranging from obscure to

better-known, dating from ancient times to contemporary, roam a private home in Swissvale where they are mysteriously trapped, enacting “strange scenes and private moments.” Only six participants at a time can experience the asylum, which is the brainchild of Uncumber Theatrics’ Terceira (known for the interactive “estate sale” Her Things) and Abby Lis-Perlis, of newly minted Devious Maid Productions. The first of about 25 performances is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through April 4. Swissvale (address revealed with ticket

+ FRI., MARCH 13 {MUSIC}

The Renaissance City Choir celebrates the LGBT community through song. In Cabaret: Let’s Duet Together, 17 choir members will sing from the Great American Songbook, highlighting artists like Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra and Michael Bublé. In three shows this weekend, expect fully choreographed performances of “Tuxedo Junction,” “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” and “The Joint Is Jumpin’,” among others. A ukulele band will also play classics like “Tip Toe Through the Tulips” and “Blue Moon.”

MARCH 15 Alchimie des Couleurs


sp otlight

Aaron Kleiber is in Philadelphia, prepping to portray an historical figure (he can’t divulge which one) in his latest Pennsylvania Lottery commercial. Kleiber also has a burgeoning career as a touring standup comic: After just six years in the game, the Munhall resident is working as far afield as Los Angeles. He’s even headlining in smaller cities (Youngstown, Harrisburg), and last year placed fifth against national competition at Montana’s Big Sky Comedy Festival. But Kleiber’s next career milestone is a home game: On March 12-15, he’ll become that rare Pittsburgh-based comedian to headline a full weekend, with six shows at the Pittsburgh Improv. “A lot of people don’t realize the path you have to take to be a headliner at a club two miles from your house,” he quips. The Steel Valley High grad, age 33, works hard in Pittsburgh’s burgeoning comedy scene, too, hosting two open mics and often guesting at Downtown’s Arcade Comedy Theater. And being a father (his third kid was born Feb. 12) is merely grist for the mill. “That’s all my comedy,” he says of family life. “I can only talk about what I know.” He adds, “It’s kind of unbelievable to be the guy on the marquee. … I’m sitting here telling diaper jokes and people give me a check. It’s crazy.” Bill O’Driscoll March 12-15. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, West Homestead. $15-17. 412-462-5333 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

{STAGE} American vocalist and “Queen of the Jukeboxes” Dinah Washington was known for her unique blues voice. In his new play Dinah, local playwright Ernest McCarty focuses on the life of the legendary singer that was tragically cut short after her seventh husband found her nearly lifeless body. Premiering at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Co., Dinah features more than 25 songs from the Great American Songbook. Pittsburgh-based vocalist Delana Flowers plays the title role in a production opening tonight. ZM 8 p.m. Show continues through April 5. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $22.50-35. 412-377-7803 or www.pghplaywrights.com

“April showers bring May flowers” to new heights during its annual Spring Flower Show. The exhibit, which opens today, celebrates rain and the cycle of nature. Each room intertwines a unique water display with a variety of flora; one room

{ART} Following a trip to Paris in 1886, Vincent van Gogh produced some of his most dynamically colorful works. One of these, “Still Life, Basket of Apples” is the focus of the new Carnegie Museum of Art exhibit, Visiting van

MARCH 14 SWAN Day Pittsburgh

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

purchase). $25 (18 and over). www.uncumbertheatrics.com

{COMEDY} Start your engines, and may the best comic win! Tonight, Arcade Comedy Theater presents the second round of its Comedy Royale: Improv Madness Tournament. The short-form improv contest pits four players against each other in a gauntlet of comedy. The audience is the judge in this show featuring improv games and scenes. The two comics with the highest scores will join last week’s winners in a final-four championship on March 20. Comedian Matt Hartman will serve as referee of this comedic version of March Madness. ZM 8 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

+ SAT., MARCH 14 {EXHIBIT}

Phipps Conservatory takes

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Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Kang, Lenny Young and Roger Zahab. BO 7 p.m. 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $10-15. www.ionsound.org

{STAGE} SWAN Day — the international day to Support Women Artists Now — was marked last spring by events in some 150 U.S. cities and in towns as far-flung as St. Petersburg, Russia, and Nairobi, Kenya. This week, SWAN Day Pittsburgh marks its seventh anniversary by packing Oakland’s landmark Twentieth Century Club with local women artists exploring the theme “Everyone has an untold story hidden behind closed doors.” Among the dozens of musicians, dance and theater artists, live painters and more performing tonight, hosted by No Name Players, are Brooke Annibale, Gayle Pazerski, Texture Contemporary Ballet (pictured) and Bria Walker. BO 8 p.m. 4201 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. $25-30. www.nonameplayers.org

{ART} French-born, French-trained artist Annette Poitau has exhibited her paintings in solo shows both in that country and throughout the U.S. Now based in Ohio, she continues to show regionally and nationally. Today’s art talk is a good

+ TUE., MARCH 17 {TALK} Art criticism is often considered a lower-risk activity than creating art itself. But criticism remains intrinsic to the art world. New York Times critic Roberta Smith is viewed as among the most forthright in the field. Focusing on contemporary art, Smith has written for a variety of publications since the 1980s.

MARCH 14 Spring i FFlower l S Sh Show h

+ SUN., MARCH 15 {MUSIC}

contains dozens of multicolored umbrellas while in another, storm clouds rain drops into the ponds below. Seasonal favorites like tulips, hyacinths, daffodils and lilies, as well as rarer breeds of orchids and poppies, will be on display. ZM 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 12. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $11-15. 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

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Gogh. On loan from the St. Louis Art Museum, the still life can be seen as an experiment with color palette. Joining it are two other paintings by van Gogh, and one by Paul Signac. Together these works showcase the evolution of van Gogh’s use of pigments and the neo-impressionist color that fascinated him. ZM 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues until July 6. 4400

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Tonight’s IonSound Project concert, Bridges and Byways, includes both classic new-music works and premieres by three Pittsburgh composers. The six-piece IonSound — flutist, clarinetist, violinist, cellist and two pianists — performs compositions including Steve Reich’s “New York Counterpoint” (1985), Max Bruch’s “Eight Pieces for Clarinet, Cello and Piano” (1925) and works by Lee Hyla and Erwin Schulhoff. Also on the program at Bellefield Hall Auditorium are specially commissioned works by locally based composers Jonghee

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL G. WIEGMAN}

chance to check out Alchimie des Couleurs, her current show at Christine Frechard Gallery. The talk is followed by a reception. BO 5 p.m. Exhibit continues through March 27. 5871 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free; RSVP at christinefrechard gallery@gmail.com.

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She has also contributed essays to museum catalogs on artists including Donald Judd and Cy Twombly. Tonight, Smith visits the Carnegie Mellon University School of Art’s lecture series. ZM 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. 412-268-2409 or www.cmu.edu/art

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Clubhouse

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

A big-time hip-hop artist visits the ’Burgh and filmmakers reminisce about the VHS days. Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

THE MIKADO. Gilbert & PROFESSOR ELDRITCH’S Sullivan’s comic opera presented ASYLUM FOR UNCANNY by the Pittsburgh Savoyards. AND EXTRAORDINARY overthrow their farmer masters, Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. WOMEN. The Asylum is a revolutionizing society. But is Thru March 15. Andrew Carnegie site-specific work taking up it for the better? Presented Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. residence at an undisclosed by Prime Stage Theater Co. 412-276-3456. location somewhere in Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Fri, MOTOWN THE Pittsburgh. Small, intimate Sat, 8 p.m. Thru MUSICAL. The story audiences will be invited to March 15. New Hazlett of Motown founder spend the evening observing Theater, North Side. Berry Gordy’s journey its occupants -- seven real-life 412-320-4610. from featherweight characters from history, women www. per BOEING BOEING. A pa boxer to the of a duplicitous nature who pghcitym 60s farce feat. Bernard, .co heavyweight music gambled against their society a wannabe-Casanova, w/ mogul. Thru Dec. 3, and lost. A joint project Italian, German & American 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, through Uncumber Theatrics fiancées, each a beautiful Downtown. 412-392-4900. & Devious Maid Productions. airline hostess w/ frequent NORM LEWIS. Dinner & Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Thu-Sat, “layovers”. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, showcase. Mon., March 16, 8 p.m. Thru April 4. 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater VEGAS IN SPACE. Interactive 7:30 p.m. Thru April 26. Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. performance, media mash-up Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE BOY FRIEND. A musical about being young, rich, lovely [EXHIBITS] & in love w/ the wrong man on the French Riviera in the {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE carefree Roaring Twenties. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY} March 12-13, 8 p.m., Sat., March 14, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., March 15, 2 p.m. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. ELEMENO PEA. A have & have-nots comedy by Molly Smith Metzler. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru March 22. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. GHOSTS. The classic by Henrik Ibsen. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru March 14. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. HOW I LEARNED WHAT I LEARNED. A one-man play about the power of art & the power of possibility by August Wilson. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru April 5. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. LOVECRAFT’S MONSTERS. A one-man show starring David Crawford about H.P. Lovecraft’s demons in his life and his art. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru March 22. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-496-2194. LUNCH LADY CABARET. It’s 10pm Friday night in the North Every Thursday in March, from 4-8 p.m., the Carnegie Hinterland High School cafeteria Museums of Art and Natural History & lunch ladies Gladys, Agnes, is offering free admission to all visitors. All exhibits Mavis & Doris are letting their will be open for viewing, from Dinosaurs in Their hairnets down for an evening of song, dance & irreverent Time to the three visiting van Gogh paintings entertainment served up hot. including his “Still Life, Basket of Apples.” The Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. free-admission offer is courtesy of the Jack Buncher Thru March 22. McKeesport Foundation. Continues through March 26. 4400 Forbes Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

THEATER ANIMAL FARM. Animals

FULL LIST ONLINE

& collaboration. Dress to express. Fri., March 13, 7:30 p.m. BUNKERprojects, Garfield. 412-368-2389. WINE IN THE WILDERNESS. In a tenement just above the chaos, an artist is creating a triptych about black womanhood. As he finds a muse to complete the final panel, his muse deconstructs his notions of the black woman in a discussion about race & women that ultimately changes his work. March 12-14, 7 p.m. and Sun., March 15, 3 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6070. YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN. Mel Brooks’ musical presented by Pittsburgh Musical Theater. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 15. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

COMEDY THU 12 PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

THU 12 - SUN 15

AARON KLEIBER. 8 p.m., Fri., March 13, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m., Sat., March 14, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., March 15, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 13 IMPROV MADNESS TOURNAMENT. A 3 part tournament of short form games & improv. BYOB. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru March 20. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Master Magician Michelangelo. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 13 -SAT 14

GLEN GERARD. 8 p.m. and Sat., March 14, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 14

AMISH MONKEYS. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. BRAD RYAN, GENE COLLIER, MIKE WYSOCKI, CHUCK KRIEGER. 7:30 p.m. Broughton Fire Hall, South Park. 412-655-4844. LISA DAPPRICH, CHRIS KEMP, AMANDA AVARELL & MOLLY SHARROW. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6311. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015


VISUAL

ART

“Rose Alexander’s Sister” (mixed media on paper, 2014), by Liz Goldberg (left), and “Are You Being Served?” (mixed media, 2014), by Patty Gallagher. From the exhibitions The Cigar Queens of Havana and Hot Tropics, both at Gallerie CHIZ, in Shadyside.

NEW THIS WEEK CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples. Van Gogh’s “Still Life, Basket of Apples” (1887),”Le Moulin de la Galette” (1886–1887), “Wheat Fields after the Rain” (1890), & Paul Signac’s “Place des Lices, St. Tropez”, visiting from the Saint Louis Art Museum. Oakland. 412-622-3131. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Urban Gurlz..overwintering... Mary Williams presents “Along the Road in Western Pennsylvania”, “ The Ancients”, & “Indoor Home Ocean” photography. Maryllyod Claytor presents “..Clean Your Closet..” Opening reception March 14, 11am-2pm. Ross. 412-364-3622.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Rebecca Lessner: Hunter Gatherer. A photography exhibition exploring living off the land. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Light & Landscape. A photography exhibition feat. a dozen printed canvases of urban landscapes & natural settings by artist Joey Kennedy. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. Works from Pittsburgh based artist, Cecilia Ebitz’s “Good Intentions”, inspired by the work & teachings of Corita Kent. Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent. A full-scale survey covering more than 30 years of work by American artist Corita Kent; a designer, teacher, feminist, activist for civil rights & anti-war causes. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the

famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Artwork by Bonnie Gloris. March 11 thru April 15. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Ed Rickus, Karen McKee, Claudia Salvatore. Multimedia, pottery & jewelry. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Art Inter/National. A celebration of artistic expression from all over the world, displaying how artists intend to use their art as a vehicle for change. 24 works by 20 artists from 10 countries. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Antoine Catala: Feel Images. A new body of work by Antonia Catala in sculpture, photography & video that addresses the way that images provoke emotion, especially as they travel virtual & physical distances via the internet. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Will close temporarily on May 25 & reopen on June 6. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Susan Winicour. An expressionist whose art expresses meaning or emotional experience rather

than physical reality. Squirrel Hill. 412- 421- 8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. John Eastman & Josh Hogan. By appt. only. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Photo Section. Exhibit celebrating the 130th Anniversary of the Pittsburgh Photo Section. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Impressionist to Modernist: Masterworks in Early Photography. Feat. photographs by major artists working in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz, capturing the international development of photography around turn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FRICK FINE ARTS BUILDING. Exhibition^3: Documenta 5, Harald Szeemann, The Artists. Szeemann’s artistic direction of Documenta 5, held in 1972 in Kassel Germany, is explored through 40 items and associated documents. Oakland. 412-648-2423. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Fabrizio Gerbino. New paintings by artist. Oakland. 412-716-1390.

TILTED KILT - NORTH SHORE Stout+Angry Orchard BUFFALO WILD WINGS - MONROEVILLE Stout+Cold Snap MEL’S PIZZERIA - KITTANNING Stout + Cold Snap HOUGH’S - GREENFIELD Stout + Angry Orchard

CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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TUE 17 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 18 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF. A weekly stand up show hosted by Dick Winters. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru April 29 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-904-1744.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh!. Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Missing Links (The Rainbow Jumpy). Bounce, jump, roll, run & walk through a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art piece created by Felipe Dulzaides & on loan from The New Children’s Museum, in San Diego CA. Opens March 14, 1-5pm. North Side. 412-322-5058.

COMPASS INN. Demos & picnic area & Trolley Theatre. tours w/ costumed guides feat. Washington. 724-228-9256. this restored stagecoach stop. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY 724-238-4983. & BOTANICAL GARDEN. CONNEY M. KIMBO Spring Flower Show. Tulips, GALLERY. University of daffodils, hyacinths & other Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: blooms are the stars of Spring Memorabilia & Awards from Flower Show, a celebration of the International Hall of Fame. sweet scents & colorful sights. Oakland. 412-648-7446. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor DEPRECIATION LANDS gardens feature exotic plants & MUSEUM. Small living floral displays from around the history museum celebrating world. Tropical Forest Congo. the settlement & history of An exhibit highlighting some the Depreciation Lands. of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. Oakland. 412-622-6914. FALLINGWATER. Tour the PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. famed Frank Lloyd Wright Photographs & Jewerly. house. 724-329-8501. A hundred years (1839-1939) FIRST PRESBYTERIAN of photographs that CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany incorporated jewelry. For stained-glass windows. guided tours, call 412- 231-7881. Downtown. 412-471-3436. North Side. FORT PITT MUSEUM. PINBALL PERFECTION. Reconstructed fort houses Pinball museum & players club. museum of Pittsburgh history West View. 412-931-4425. circa French & Indian War PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. & American Revolution. ABC@PGC. A colorful Downtown. 412-281-9285. exhibition feat. glass FRICK ART & sculptures combined HISTORICAL CENTER. w/ an interactive Ongoing: tours of illuminated word Clayton, the Frick building piece that visiww. r w estate, w/ classes tors can touch, pape pghcitym & programs for all rearrange & wear .co ages. Point Breeze. like apparel. Created 412-371-0600. by Jen Elek & Jeremy Bert. HARTWOOD ACRES. Friendship. 412-365-2145. Tour this Tudor mansion PITTSBURGH ZOO & & stable complex. Enjoy hikes PPG AQUARIUM. Home to & outdoor activities in the 4,000 animals, including many surrounding park. Allison Park. endangered species. Highland 412-767-9200. Park. 412-665-3639. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the RACHEL CARSON other Frank Lloyd Wright house. HOMESTEAD. A Reverence 724-329-8501. for Life. Photos & artifacts KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. of her life & work. Springdale. Tours of a restored 19th-century, 724-274-5459. middle-class home. Oakmont. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL 412-826-9295. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits MARIDON MUSEUM. on the Homestead Mill. Steel Collection includes jade & industry & community artifacts ivory statues from China & from 1881-1986. Homestead. Japan, as well as Meissen 412-464-4020. porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ MCGINLEY HOUSE & HISTORY CENTER. From MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Historic homes open for tours, Pittsburgh’s role in the antilectures & more. Monroeville. slavery movement. Ongoing: 412-373-7794. Western PA Sports Museum, NATIONAL AVIARY. Home Clash of Empires, & exhibits to more than 600 birds from on local history, more. over 200 species. W/ classes, Strip District. 412-454-6000. lectures, demos & more. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS North Side. 412-323-7235. HISTORY CENTER. Museum NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 commemorates Pittsburgh rooms helping to tell the story industrialists, local history. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant Sewickley. 412-741-4487. past. University of Pittsburgh. SOLDIERS & SAILORS Oakland. 412-624-6000. MEMORIAL HALL. War in OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. church features 1823 pipe a collection of military artifacts organ, Revolutionary War showcasing photographs, graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. uniforms, shells & other OLIVER MILLER related items. Military museum HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ dedicated to honoring military Whiskey Rebellion site service members since the features log house, blacksmith Civil War through artifacts & shop & gardens. South Park. personal mementos. Oakland. 412-835-1554. 412-621-4253. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. MUSEUM. Trolley rides & Features 5,000 relics of exhibits. Includes displays, Catholic saints. North Side. walking tours, gift shop, 412-323-9504.

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 44


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

GALLERIE CHIZ. Liz Goldberg & Patty Gallagher. Dual exhibtion w/ Goldberg’s painting & drawings for “Cigar Queens of Havana” & Gallagher’s wearable art, “Hot Tropics”. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Echoroad. New sequential art & comic book release by Leslie Minnis. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY 808. New work by 1st/2nd year MFA students at CMU in a month-long pop-up gallery “Gallery 808”. Artists: Daniel Allende, Kevin Brophy, Zhiwan Cheung, Brittany DeNigris, Jamie Dickerson, Nima Dehghani, Hannah Epstein, Ada-Scarlett Hopper, Jesse Kauppila, Tucker Marder, Adam Milner, Daniel Pillis & Moses Williams. Receptions every Thursday at 5pm. Shadyside. 412-268-2409. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Liza Brenner. “Plein Air Landscapes”. Oil on paper works by artist. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805.

GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILLMAN LIBRARY. Get to The Point!. An exhibition of early drawings, paintings, postcards, engravings, maps, & photographs from the University of Pittsburgh Library System Archives Service Center that document the history of the Point & Point State Park. Ground Floor. Oakland. 412-648-3330. HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ART. Crafts Faculty of Edinboro University. An exploration of ceramics, furniture & jewelry by Cappy Counard, Chuck Johnson, Lee Rexrode, Suzanne Amendolara, Karen Ernst & Linda Cordell. Gloria Stool Karn. Pulp Art Illustrations from the 1940s. New Castle. 724-652-2882. JAMES GALLERY. Headliners. New paintings, mixed media works, glass & ceramics. Feat. Christine Aaron, Eileen Braun, Claire Cotts, Jamie Harris, Ben Johnson, Micheal Madigan, Susan Morosky & Scott Turri.

West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Rhodes Revisited. Works by the acclaimed artist, author & educator, Daniel Rhodes. Reception March 12, 6-8pm. North Side. 412-322-1773. MARKET SQUARE. Jennifer Wen Ma: Installation. “A Winter Landscape Cradling Bits of Sparkle” 120 live trees, 200 kg of Chinese ink, wooden pathway & glass globes. Downtown. 412-471-1511. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169.

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. 3d@mgg. A exhibition of artists working in three dimensional media. Shadyside. 412-441-7258. PANZA GALLERY. Behind The Murals: Histories & Other Stories. Exploring the historic, social & artistic influences impacting each stage of the creation of Maxo Vanka’s murals in St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church. Presented by The Society to Preserve the Millvale Murals of MaxoVanka. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Nine Solo Exhibits. Feat. the work of Scott Andrew, Vlad Basarub, Terry Boyd, Oreen Cohen, Joy Christiansen Erb, Katie Ford, Joseph Lupo, Katie Murken & Hisham Youssef. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. REMEDY. RUBBERNECK. New work by Lizzee Solomon. Lawrenceville. 847-372-0958. REVISION SPACE. Nice But Mean. Paintings & woodblocks by Miss Dingo. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. THE SHOP. Jennifer Lee & Terry Young. New work by these artists. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622.

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 15. Feat. work by Christopher Meerdo from his projects Iceland & Cataphote. Works also by Matthew Conboy, from his project “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear”. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. UNLOADED. A multimedia group show that explores historical & social issues surrounding the availability, use & impact of guns in our culture. Closing reception April 24. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Interior open for special occasions. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Time & Materiality. Work by Laura Tabakman, Camilla Brent Pearce & Michelle Browne. Friday March 20 & 27, potlucks 6pm. Please RSVP. Friendship. 412-441-0194.

SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. West Hills Art League Exhibition. A sampling of the wide array of West Hills Art League members’ artistic styles ranging from traditional watercolors & oil paintings to acrylics, pastels, clay, paper, & more. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TIP TYPE. Jason David LaCroix. Drawings, prints & paintings of landscapes & domestic scenes. Wilkinsburg. 412-501-3807. WAYNESBURG UNIVERSITY. Faculty Arts Exhibition. Selected sculptures, jewelry, drawings & paintings by Professors Andrew Heisey, Kathleen Rearick, Dr. Don Simson & Ron Jesiolowski. 724-852-3274. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Reconstructed Paintings. New works by Gary Jurysta. Greensburg. 412-559-8168. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. In the Absense of Self. Installations, video projections & ‘flicker’ objects ft. Ivana Franke, Lauri Astala, Bryndis Hronn Ragnarsdottir & Mirjana Vodopija. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

demaskus Theater Collective Presents

OUR SEASON OF STORIES ABOUT STRONG WOMEN Wine in the Wilderness

You Wouldn’t Expect

Written by Alice Childress

Written by Marilynn Barner Anselmi

March 12-15, 2015

September 17-20, 2015

Wine in the Wilderness image ©Joy Richardson www.joyrichardson.info

Written in 1969, Wine in the Wilderness is set amid a 1964 Harlem race riot. In a tenement above the chaos, an artist is creating a triptych of black womanhood. His muse leads him in a discussion about race and women that revolutionizes his work.

Based on true events surrounding the North Carolina eugenics program, which sterilized more than 7,000 women in the state between 1929 and 1976.

2015 SHE SAID performance produced in collaboration with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Community Engagement Department.

Performances in the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s PIERCE STUDIO – Pittsburgh’s Cultural District 805-807 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

2013 semi-finalist at Eugene O’Neill Playwrights Conference

TICKETS ON SALE NOW demaskus.showclix.com • 1-888-71-tickets 2015 Inaugural Season www.demaskus.com

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The Voice of Southside Karaoke Contest

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

Friday the 13th

$200 Cash Prize 2 Winners each week ADVANCE TOO FINALS! INAL NOW through March 19 th

OF THE

PARTY Sponsored by

Festive face painting for the daring!

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EVENT: Cannibal Ox and Crimson Godz concert, Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale CRITIC: Carl Treusch, 35, a

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SUN 15

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BENEFIT FOR CV STUDENT ART PROGRAM. Painting & potluck raising money to hold an art show at the end of the school year, showcasing the students’ works. Registration required. 2-5 p.m. Painting w/ a Twist, Robinson. 412-787-7928. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

This show was a hip-hop concert with some local performers and Cannibal Ox, which was a big duo in the early 2000s. My buddy actually told me about this event; I didn’t know much about it, but it was pretty cool. I go to concerts in Pittsburgh a lot — mostly here at Mr. Small’s because I live right up the street. I like all types of music: hip hop, R&B, jazz, country, just about everything. I liked the freestyles in this show a lot, especially the guys from Squirrel Hill that were rapping. It was sick as fuck. I also really liked the [DJ] mixing in between. I love having Mr. Small’s right here. I think it’s one of the most up-andcoming venues and having it around is great; it’s kind of revitalizing the neighborhood. That’s why I bought [in] Millvale, honestly, I knew that everyone coming from Lawrenceville is going to be coming right over here.

TUE 17

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A ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION OF FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE POLICIES IN PENNSYLVANIA. Hosted by the Pennsylvania Center For Women and Politcis. James McLaughlin Music Hall. 6 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1878.

LITERARY THU 12 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. THREE POEMS W/ GALWAY KINNELL. Reading & discussion. Classroom A of Main Library. 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 13

PRE SALE TICKETS: Brunch package with 2 complimentary Miller Lite green beers. Brunch 6am-11am. Giving away prizes every hour for best dressed/most Irish Spirit! 7am-11am GRAND PRIZE WINNER A pair of Pens tickets! (Winner overall- from every hour) For more information visit www.bighamtavern.com or follow us on Facebook.com/bighamtavern 412-431-9313 44

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ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

GAIL LANGSTROTH & SHEILA CARTER-JONES. MadFridays Reading Series. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030.

B Y Z AC C HI AU S M C K E E

all-day workshop that will inspire participants to recapture the past through memoir writing while using genealogy resources as a source of inspiration. 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Calvin E. Pollins Library, Greensburg. 724-836-1099. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

SUN 15 PRETTY OWL POETRY SPOTLIGHT SERIES. Mathias Svalina, Joshua Marie Wilkinson, Noah Eli Gordon & others will read their recent poetry. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 16

THE COFFEE www. per HOUSE READING a p ty ci h g p GENE HIRSCH & SERIES. Poetry & .com DON WENTWORTH. fiction discussions Poetry reading. 7 p.m. led by Erin Elizabeth East End Book Exchange, Smith & Jeffrey Condran. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. Barnes & Noble Cafe. 7 p.m. MARCH PARLOR TALK Duquesne University, Uptown. W/ CASSANDRA VIVIAN. 412-396-6000. 2 p.m. West Overton Museums. 724-887-7910. MEMOIR WRITING & KAREN RIGBY. Author talk. GENEALOGY WORKSHOP. Chambers Hall, Fireside Lounge. Ligonier Valley Writers & 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh Westmoreland County at Greensburg, Greensburg. Historical Society present an 724-836-7481.

SAT 14

TUE 17

PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ROBERTA SMITH. Lecture from art critic writing for New York Times since 1986, Village Voice, Artforum, Art in America, Arts Magazine, more. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-2409.

WED 18 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 12 - WED 18

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 14

BIRD’S EYE, BUG’S EYE. Discover your favorite point of view as we take a playful look at the photographs in our special exhibition. Learn about the many ways artists see the world & create a photo collage to take home. 11-11:45 a.m. Frick Art & Historical


*Stuff We Like {PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FABRIC STENCILING. Explore various techniques of decorating fabric. Such techniques include silkscreen, stamping, stencil, using paint, ink & markers. Register online. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. FAMILY PARTY NIGHTS. Hands-on dinosaur, nature & culture-related activities, shows in the Earth Theater, face painting, live animal encounters, take-home artifacts, snacks, more. Advance registration required. Registration closes one week before the event. 6-8:30 p.m. and Sat., May 9, 6-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE: KIDS COMEDY SHOW. Second Sat of every month, 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

Shamrock Shakes

An early harbinger of spring, McDonald’s guilty-pleasure green shake is celebrating its 45th year.

Irish Me, I’m KISS shirt Commonwealth Press has 13 St. Patrick’s Day T-shirts for sale on its site, but this one is by far the weirdest. compressmerch.com

REPTILE SHOW & SALE. Buy, sell, & learn about reptiles. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Harmar House. 724-516-0441.

MON 16

MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turnedTeaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

SUN 15

Biddle’s Escape

TUE 17

What a neighborhood coffeehouse should be: tea, coffee drinks and fresh pastries; a wall of tribal masks; literary readings, live music and people having earnest discussions. 401 Biddle Ave., Regent Square

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. REPTILE SHOW & SALE. Buy, sell, & learn about reptiles. Sun., March 15, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Harmar House. 724-516-0441.

The Critic

OUTSIDE

Created by golden-era Simpsons showrunners Al Jean and Mike Reiss, this shortlived cartoon — featuring the voice of Jon Lovitz as loser movie critic Jay Sherman — is worth revisiting.

TUE 17

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 12 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m.

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

WED 18

Weekends at the Carnegie Library Main Branch in Oakland In one place, you can take a foreign-language class, watch a movie and hear live music. Also, check out a book, get a coffee and admire the glass floors in the stacks.

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FREE KIDNEY SCREENING. Free screening for people at risk of kidney disease, from the National Kidney Foundation. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mt. Ararat Baptist Church, East Liberty. 412-261-4115. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LAST MINUTE FILING TIPS. Advice & guidance for late filing w/ IRS Tax Consultant Diana Smith. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MYBUSINESS GROWTH WORKSHOP. A five part workshop for or women business owners looking to strategically position their businesses for growth & expansion. Every other Thu, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru April 30

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Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. RIEDEL ME THIS THE IMPORTANCE OF GLASSWARE. A short history of glassware & how it effects wine. Preregistration required. 6 p.m. Dreadnought Wines, Lawrenceville. 412-391-8502. SHOW YOUR WORK. Meet 5 Pittsburghers who are using technology to develop exciting new projects. Each entrepreneur will have five minutes to describe their idea. They’ll field questions from the audience & receive a brief critique from our distinguished panel of experts from the local innovation

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

community. 6-8 p.m. FISH FRY FRIDAY TOURS. A shuttled tour & historical Carnegie Library, East Liberty, visit w/ your fish fry. Pick up is East Liberty. 412-363-8232. at Station Square across from WEEKLY WELLNESS the parking garage. This week CIRCLE. Group acupuncture we will visit Epiphany Catholic & guided meditation for Church in Uptown. 12:30 p.m. stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Station Square, Station Square. Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. 412-323-4709. WEST COAST SWING. THE FLAVOR OF Swing dance lessons for PITTSBURGH!. Visit iconic all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh ‘Burgh eateries featured in Dance Center, Bloomfield. Man vs. Food; Diners, Drive-Ins 412-681-0111. and Dives; Food & Wine ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted magazine; Huffington by City Dharma. Thu, Post & more. 10 a.m., 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, Fri., April 17, 10 a.m. 7-8:30 a.m. Church and Wed, Fri, 10 a.m. of the Redeemer, Thru May 8 Crazy Squirrel Hill. Mocha Coffee www. per 412-965-9903. pa Company, Downtown. pghcitym o .c 412-323-4709. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, PITTSBURGH HOME traditional American dance. & GARDEN SHOW. Offering No partner needed, beginners 1600 exhibits. Fri, Sat, 10 a.m.welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 10 p.m., Sun, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park and Mon-Thu, 4-10 p.m. Thru Community Center, Swissvale. March 15 David Lawrence 412-945-0554. Convention Center, Downtown. VIDEOS YOU WILL LIKE. 412-565-6000. Los Angeles based VHS label Viper Video has released a tape collection of Pittsburgh based AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. video artists. New work by Joshua Second and Third Fri of every Rievel, Rem Lezar, Gena Salorino, month and Fourth and Last Fri Kyle Van Noy & Pig Norovirus of every month Irma Freeman Bodine will be shown on videotape Center for Imagination, Garfield. the way they were intended. Curated by Everything Is 412-924-0634.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 12 SUN 15

FRI 13

Terrible!’s Scott Whiteman. 8 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-682-4111. WAGNER: HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Dr. Cleon Cornes returns to the library for this six-week class examining the life & music of Richard Wagner. Fri, 10 a.m. and Fri, 10 a.m. Thru April 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS MIXER. Guest speaker, Dr. Renee Galloway. 6-8 p.m. Encore Evernt Design, West End. 412-584-2105.

SAT 14 ALL ABOUT THE BURGH, THE CULTURE TO KETCHUP TOUR!. Step aboard a vintage 1920’s style Trolley & experience Pittsburgh w/ a guided 2-hour tour. Sat, 12:45-2:45 p.m. Thru April 25 Station Square, Station Square. 412-391-7433. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCING AFTERNOON TEA DANCE. Live music.Calling by Gaye Fifer & Jo Schlesinger. Beginners session 7:15pm. 1-3:30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-535-2078. FRENCH FOR BEGINNERS. French for Beginners is an introduction for those who

are new to French or consider themselves a little bit rusty. Second Sat of every month, 10:30 a.m.12 p.m. and Fourth Sat of every month, 10:30 a.m.12 p.m. Thru May 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAPLE SUGARING FESTIVAL. Registration required. Boyce Park Nature Center. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 724-733-4618. SATURDAY SILVER SCREEN FILM CLUB: BELLE. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194.


SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

SUN 15 ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Arabic for Beginners gives an introduction to the language & culture of Saudi Arabia. Second Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Thru April 19 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ART TALK ABOUT ANNETTE POITAU. Art discussion & reception. Please RSVP. 5 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CHINESE II. For those who already have a basic understanding

of the language & interested in increasing oral & written proficiency. First Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Third Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Thru April 19 Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ESOTERIC APPROACHES TO ADDICTION & OPPRESSION. Presented by the Theosophical Society. Speaker: Joe Turiano. Rm. 103, Woodland Hall. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 16 LANDSCAPE DESIGN COURSE. Phipps Conservatory & Botanic Gardens Master Gardener & landscape designer Claire Schuchman will teach this three-week course geared to the novice gardener. Topics include “right plant/right place,” shading out weeds w/ ground covers, use of hardy natives plants & installing rain barrels or permeable

pavement. Attendees should bring: graph paper, pencils, ruler, package of different colored pencils & some 18”- 24” tracing paper. Mon, 5:30 p.m. Thru March 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE MAKING OF A PLAYWRIGHT: AUGUST WILSON & BLACK HORIZON THEATRE. Panel discussion w/ original members of Black Horizon Theatre. 7 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-687-6943. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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Are You

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TUE 17

CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. COLD WAR SURVEILLANCE AND RECONNAISSANCE. Presented by David Assard, discussing his experience when his aircraft was shot down by Soviet MIGs in 1955. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x210. GLASS AND THE CITY OF JEANNETTE. Speakers John Howard & Cathie Means of the Jeannette Area Historical Society. 7 p.m. Mount Pleasant Glass Museum. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!. Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

WED 18 DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. DOCUMENTING ANARCHY: MATTHEW CONBOY & DYLAN VITONE. Join Fellowship 15 Keystone Award winner Matthew Conboy & artist Dylan Vitone for an in-depth conversation about their photo-based documentary projects on the notorious 88-acre

be a cold reading from the script. skate park & anarchist commune afterhappyhourreview.com Auditions March 21 & March 22, Skatopia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Silver Eye Ongoing. 1-4pm. Ligonier Theater. Center for Photography, South INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. 724-689-2581. Side. 412-431-1810. Submit your film, 10 minutes ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). THE VILLAGE HOTEL. The Village or less. Screenings held on the Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Hotel, part of the 2015 Pittsburgh second Thursday of every month. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Fringe Festival, seeks two actors. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & 412-531-1912. Both characters are male. One Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EVERY DROP COUNTS. Learn between the ages of 18 & 25. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking about the role rain gardens play The other is 40 to 60. All races original essays about literature, in controlling runoff, discuss & ethnicities. Send headshot music, TV or film, & also essays examples of plants common to & resume to thevillagehotel generally about Pittsburgh. To rain gardens in our region, see pittsburgh@gmail.com. Deadline see some examples, visit www. examples of rain barrels & learn March 15. The Maker Theater, newyinzer.com & view the current methods of water management Shadyside. 908-914-7778. issue. Email all pitches, submissions from StormWorks. property. & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. 6:30 p.m. Gemini Theater, com. Ongoing. Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. BLAST FURNACE VOLUME 5, PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!. ISSUE 1. Call for poems w/ ARTISTS. New Member Screening. Practice conversational the theme of mistakes, as Submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. well as original poetry that are exclusively created by the Carnegie Library, outside of this theme. applicant & made within the last Oakland, Oakland. No more than 3 poems two years. Drop- off March 29, 412-622-3151. per poet that may not 12:30-1:30pm. For further www. per a p THE PITTSBURGH exceed three pages guidelines: http://www.pittsburgh pghcitym o .c SHOW OFFS. A meeting in length individually. societyofartists.org/membr. of jugglers & spinners. For more guidelines, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, All levels welcome. Wed, see the website. Deadline Shadyside. 412-361-0873. 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Mar. 20, 12pm. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR Highland Park. 412-363-4550. BOULEVARD GALLERY & SOCIETY. New Member SPANISH II. Geared toward DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Screening. Water colorists age those who already have a basic Searching for glass artists, fiber 18+ invited to submit. Bring understanding of Spanish & artists, potters, etc. to compliment 3 paintings, framed & “exhibit are interested in increasing the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. ready”. No size limit. Register at proficiency. First and Third Wed Booking for both galleries for http://pittsburghwatercolorsociety. of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 com/event-1842889/Registration. Carnegie Library, Oakland, months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. March 22, 1:30-3pm. Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance Operation Save-A-Life is a street outreach group that lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, provides support, service referrals and resources to South Side. 916-287-1373.

SUBMISSIONS

FULL LIST ONLINE

OPERATION SAVE-A-LIFE

AUDITIONS BUNKER PROJECTS. Open call for performers & new media artists for interactive theater event. Thru March 12. www.bunkerprojects.com. KEYSTONE STATE MUSIC THEATER. Casting AEA, EMC & Non-Equity actors for productions of “Always...Patsy Cline”, “Pinkalicious, the Musical”, & “Broadway in the Park”. For more information, visit http://www. keystonestatemusictheater.org/. Auditions on March 18, 5-9pm. 724-480-1211. RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. The Renaissance City Choir celebrates LGBTQ identity through the unifying power of music.Professional training and/or experience are not required. Audition by appt. 412-345-1722. Thru April 2. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. SOUTH PARK THEATRE. Main Stage play auditions for 2015 Season.(Knickers, Making God Laugh, Pine, Exit Laughing, Bell, Book, & Candle). Cold readings from script. No appt. necessary. Headshot & resume. March 21, 12-5pm. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. VALLEY PLAYERS OF LIGONIER. Seeking 5 men & 4 women to fill the roles for “Noises Off” Please have a 1 minute comedic monologue prepared. There will

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

homeless individuals. Supported by Community Human Services, Operation Save-A-Life needs volunteers for outreach teams to go on rounds, giving out food, clothing, hygiene kits and other essentials. Rounds are performed every Tuesday evening. To find out more, visit www.chscorp.org or call Trevor Smith at 412-246-1615.

THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. THE GALLERY 4. A salon style competition. Send image files of up to 5 finished pieces to thegallery4@gmail.com or via the website. Include title, dimensions, medium(s) & write SALON APPLICANT 2015 in the subject line. Deadline Mar. 22. 412-363-5050. GIRL GOV. Open to all girls entering 9th-12th grade in the Fall of 2015 who live in southwestern PA. Girls will travel to Harrisburgh to shadow gov. officials, learn about civics, advocacy, philanthropy, community involvement, youth organizing, women’s history & leadership. Apply online. Deadline May 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop.

THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. SALON SHOW 2015. Submissions for a juried group exhibition. Send image files of up to 5 finished pieces to thegallery4@gmail.com. Please include title, dimensions & medium(s) & write SALON APPLICANT 2015 in the subject line. Deadline March 21. The Gallery 4, Shadyside. 412-363-5050. SIDEWALL: A MURAL PROJECT. Submissions requested for a space dedicated to showing works by artists both local & abroad, creative collaborations, etc., w/ murals rotating the first Friday of every month. Apply at https:// sidewallproject.wordpress.com. Thru May 1. sidewall, Bloomfield. THE WRITERS’ PRESS POETRY CHAPBOOK COMPETITION. Open to new & emerging writers. No theme restrictions. Prizes include publication w/ Createspace & online distribution w/ Amazon & Barnes & Noble. Thru May 30.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

When I was 15, I had a three-month-long sexual relationship with a 32-year-old woman. She was a friend of the family, and my parents were going through a divorce. I stayed with her for the summer, and she initiated a sexual relationship. Looking back, I can see that she had been grooming me. We used to have conversations online and via email that were very inappropriate considering our age difference. The relationship ended when I went home, but she remained flirty. As a 15-year-old, I had a hard time sorting out my feelings for her, but we remained in contact. Now we speak sporadically, and it’s usually just small talk. Soon after, I met a girl my own age and we started dating. Twenty years later, we are happily married and have two wonderful children. Our sex life is active and fulfilling. The only problem is my wife is very proud of the fact that we were each other’s “first and only” sex partners. When we first slept together at 16, I couldn’t admit that she wasn’t my first, and I didn’t want to get the older woman in trouble. I don’t want to hurt my wife by revealing the truth. Can I keep this secret to myself? THIS REVELATION UNDERMINES TOTAL HARMONY

I’m a 30-year-old gay man engaged to my partner of four years. During a conversation about faithfulness, I let slip to my dad that we are monogamish. He immediately went into a screed about the affair my mother had and how being open means I’m setting myself up for hurt. He suggested that he couldn’t support the marriage unless we were monogamous. He’s coming from a place of love, but I need advice on how to let him see that marriage doesn’t always equal monogamy. STRESSED ONTARIAN NOW

You could point out to your dad that monogamy didn’t protect him from hurt — Mom cheated on Dad, Dad got hurt — and then quickly add that being monogamish doesn’t make you immune to hurt. If your partner were to violate the terms of your monogamish relationship, then you could get hurt, SON, just like Dad got hurt when Mom violated the terms of their monogamous relationship. Or you could tell your dad what he wants to hear — you’ve decided to be monogamous — and run him on a needto-know basis. And unless you and your husband-tobe want to formally bring a boyfriend into your relationship at some point — including your boyfriend at the holidays, bringing him along on family trips, etc. — Dad doesn’t need to know that you’re having three-ways, joining sex clubs or tag-teaming twunks at the Folsom Street Fair.

PROTECTING YOUR SPOUSE FROM THE TRUTH IS OFTEN THE MORE LOVING CHOICE.

Like you, TRUTH, I lost my virginity to an older woman at age 15. My first was closer to me in age (20s, not 30s) than your first — the woman who preyed on you — and I never felt like she took advantage of me. If anything, I was taking advantage of her, as our sexual relationship helped me sort out my shit. (I could get through sex with a girl, yes, but I had to think about guys the whole time. I resolved to cut out the middlewoman and have sex with guys instead.) Over the years, well-meaning people have tried to convince me that I was damaged by this experience, but I never felt that way. Based on your letter, TRUTH, it doesn’t sound like you were damaged or traumatized by this relationship. You quickly figured out that what she had done to/with you was squicky and inappropriate; the fact that she didn’t leave you damaged or traumatized doesn’t make what she did OK. But it sounds like your only issue — it’s the only issue you raise — is whether you can continue to allow your wife to think she was your “first and only.” You can. Unless you need to unburden yourself to the wife for your own sanity, TRUTH, or you think there’s a chance she could discover the truth on her own, don’t let one marital ideal — you should be able to tell each other everything — obscure an equally important if less obviously virtuous marital ideal: You don’t have to tell each other everything. Protecting your spouse from the truth, allowing your spouse to have illusions, is often the more loving choice. While there are deceptions that aren’t OK — crushing student-loan debt, a second family hidden in another city, you are Dinesh D’Souza — some deceptions are harmless. Allowing your wife to continue to believe that she was your “first and only” falls squarely into the harmless camp.

My boyfriend and I have been together for three years. I grew up in Hawaii and currently reside on the mainland. My parents love my boyfriend, and we try to visit their home in Hawaii once a year. Until recently, they were caring for my uncle, but he died last year. I told my mom that we were coming to visit, and she was elated. However, when I asked if we could stay in the newly spare bedroom, she said “no” and cited her religious beliefs. We weren’t raised in a religious household, but my mom has become more “Christ-y” since I left. When I ask why she would treat me differently than her other two heterosexual kids, who ARE allowed to stay in the spare bedroom with their partners, she just says that those are “her rules.” I told her that as long as she discriminates against us based on our “chosen lifestyle” (her words), then she can’t expect a visit from us. Am I being unreasonable?

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

VEXED IN SEEKING ISLAND TIME

Nope. As an adult, your only leverage over your parents is your presence, VISIT. Tell your mom that if she can’t treat you with respect, then she has no one to blame but herself for your absence. On the Lovecast: He’s a “pervert.” She’s a “Christian.” Should he sneak off to see HUMP!? Listen at savagelovecast.com.

pghcitypaper

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.11-03.18

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the fairy tale “The Ugly Duckling,” the young hero suffers from a peculiar case of mistaken identity. He believes that he is a duck. All of his problems stem from this erroneous idea. By duck standards, he is a homely mess. He gets taunted and abused by other animals, goes into exile and endures terrible loneliness. In the end, though, his anguish dissolves when he finally realizes that he is in fact a swan. United with his true nature, he no longer compares himself to an inappropriate ideal. Fellow swans welcome him into their community, and he flies away with them. Is there anything in this story that resonates with you, Pisces? I’m guessing there is. It’s high time to free yourself from false notions about who you really are.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the old Superman comics, Mister Mxyztplk was a fiendish imp whose home was in the fifth dimension. He sometimes sneaked over into our world to bedevil the Man of Steel with pranks. There was one sure way he could be instantly banished back to his own realm for a long time: If Superman fooled him into saying his own name backwards. You might think it would be hard to trick a magic rascal into saying “Klptzyxm” when he knew very well what the consequences would be, but Superman usually succeeded. I’d like to suggest that you have a similar power to get rid of a bugaboo that has been bothering you, Aries. Don’t underestimate your ability to outsmart the pest.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1637, mathematician Pierre de Fermat declared that he had solved the “Last Theorem,” a particularly knotty mathematical problem. Unfortunately, he never actually provided the proof that he had done so. The mystery remained. Other math experts toiled for centuries looking for

the answer. It wasn’t until 1994, more than 350 years later, that anyone succeeded. I think you are on the verge of discovering a possible solution to one of your own long-running riddles, Taurus. It may take a few more weeks, but you’re almost there. Can you sense that twinkle in your third eye? Keep the faith.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your upcoming efforts might not be flawless in all respects, but I suspect you will triumph anyway. You may not even be completely sure of what you want, but I bet you’ll get a reward you didn’t know you were looking for. Cagey innocence and high expectations will be your secret weapons. Dumb luck and crazy coincidences will be your X-factors. Here’s one of your main tasks: As the unreasonable blessings flow in your direction, don’t disrupt or obstruct the flow.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): As soon as a baby loggerhead turtle leaves its nest on a Florida beach, it heads for the ocean.

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

It’s only two inches long. Although it can swim just one mile every two hours, it begins an 8,000-mile journey that takes 10 years. It travels east to Africa, then turns around and circles back to where it originated. Along the way it grows big and strong as it eats a wide variety of food, from corals to sea cucumbers to squid. Succeeding at such an epic journey requires a stellar sense of direction and a prodigious will to thrive. I nominate the loggerhead turtle to be your power animal for the coming weeks, Cancerian.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1961, 19-year-old Bob Dylan began doing solo performances of folk songs at New York clubs. To accompany his vocals, he played an acoustic guitar and harmonica. By 1963, his career had skyrocketed. Critics called him a creative genius. Pop stars were recording the songs he wrote, making him rich. But he still kept his instrumentation simple, relying entirely on his acoustic guitar and harmonica. That changed in 1965, when he made the leap to rock ’n’ roll. For the first time, his music featured a full drum set and electric guitar, bass and keyboards. Some of his fans were offended. How dare he renounce his folk roots? I wonder if it might be time for you to consider a comparable transition, Leo. Are you willing to risk disorienting or disturbing those who would prefer you to stay as you are?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Whoever travels without a guide needs 200 years for a two-day journey.” That’s an old Sufi saying sometimes attributed to the poet Rumi. I don’t think it’s accurate in all cases. Sometimes we are drawn to wander into frontiers that few people have visited and none have mastered. There are no guides! On other occasions, we can’t get the fullness of our learning experience unless we are free to stumble and bumble all by ourselves. A knowledgeable helper would only interfere with that odd magic. But right now, Virgo, I believe the Sufi saying holds true for you. Where you’re headed, you would benefit from an adviser, teacher or role model.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): There’s a meme rolling around Tumblr and Facebook that goes like this: “Everyone wants a magical solution for their problems, but they refuse to believe in magic.” Judging from the astrological omens, I think this Internet folk wisdom applies to your current situation. As I see it, you have two choices. If you intend to keep fantasizing about finding a magical solution, you will have to work harder to believe in magic. But if you can’t finagle your brain into actually believing in magic, you should stop fantasizing about a magical solution. Which will it be?

east liberty- new location! squirrel hill north hills

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I have taken a passage from a letter that Henry Miller wrote to Anais Nin, and I have chopped it up and rearranged it and added to it so as to create an oracle that’s perfect for you right now. Ready? “This is the wild dream: you with your chameleon’s soul being anchored always in no matter what storm, sensing you are at home wherever you are. You asserting yourself, getting the rich varied life you desire; and the more you assert yourself, the more you love going deeper, thicker, fuller. Resurrection after resurrection: That’s your gift, your promise. The insatiable delight of constant change.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): One of your important assignments in the coming week is to get high without the use of drugs and alcohol. Let me elaborate. In my oracular opinion, you simply must escape the numbing trance of the daily rhythm. Experiencing altered states of awareness will provide you with crucial benefits. At the same time, you can’t afford to risk hurting yourself, and it’s essential to avoid stupidly excessive behavior that has negative repercussions. So what do you think? Do you have any methods to get sozzled and squiffed or jiggled and jingled that will also keep you sane and healthy?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Singer Gloria Gaynor recorded the song “I Will Survive” in 1978. It sold over two million copies and ultimately became an iconic disco anthem. And yet it was originally the B-side of “Substitute,” the song that Gaynor’s record company released as her main offering. Luckily, radio DJs ignored “Substitute” and played the hell out of “I Will Survive,” making it a global hit. I foresee the possibility of a similar development for you, Capricorn. What you currently consider to be secondary should perhaps be primary. A gift or creation or skill you think is less important could turn out to be pre-eminent.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m tempted to furrow my brow and raise my voice as I tell you to please please please go out and do the dicey task you’ve been postponing. But that would just be a way to vent my frustration, and probably not helpful or constructive for you. So here’s my wiser advice: To prepare for that dicey task, lock yourself in your sanctuary until you figure out what you first need to change about yourself before you can accomplish the dicey task. I think that once you make the inner shift, doing the deed will be pretty easy. Homework: If you could be any other sign besides the one you actually are, what would it be, and why? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

GENERAL HELP Make $1000 a Week Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately www.themailinghub. com (AAN CAN)

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL HELP

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-9779537 (AAN CAN)

Start your humanitarian career! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 1,6,9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter. org 269-591-0518 info@ oneworldcenter.org

REAL ESTATE SERVICE

ROOMMATES

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412-316-3342 TODAY!

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

GENERAL HELP

AUTO SERVICES

Prestige Cuts & Hair Salon is looking for exp. barbers & stylists.

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

Please apply in person at

Puppets in Perfomance 21+ See our FB page.

434-221-3797

1507 Montier St. Pgh Pa 15221 or email resume to camillemcmillian4703@ yahoo.com

HELP WANTED

Downtown

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Apply In Person at 949 Libery Ave. between 2 and 4pm

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

GENERAL HELP Pass out flyers door to door for local business.

AUTO SERVICE

Rent -A- Bay

Frick Park Area

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

Contact Hartman1207@aol.com

412-403-6069

TEST SCORERS

Professional Line Cook Be a bigger fish in a smaller pond... Become a critical team member of rising star restaurant bringing city/cosmopolitan experience to downtown/small town venue. As we succeed, so will you. Experience with a wide variety of upscale foods primarily Italian, seafood, meats, sauté required. Contact us today!

724-264-4337 Nonni’s Corner Trattoria

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

CLASSES AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, NASA and others- start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

GENERAL HELP

is looking for experienced

mahoneysrestaurant.com

REHEARSAL

Rehearsal Space

Actors, Singers wanted for a local puppet company

HELP WANTED

WAIT STAFF

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Use your college degree to make the grade with Data Recognition Corporation. We are a national leader in educational testing and are preparing for our busy assessment season. We are now offering temporary FT day opportunities scoring tests at our Pittsburgh Scoring Center. Earn $13/ hour plus attendance bonuses that can increase your rate to $14.25/hour. We offer paid training, convenient schedules and an outstanding work environment!

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY the MILES GROUP

Now Hiring Agents & Managers!!! Make $500 A WEEK to start. Come work for the #1 agency within the #1 Final Expense Co. in the Nation! Call Now: Darrell Warden, Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com or teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

LOOK NO FURTHER! Interested in a job that can get you in shape while earing you money?

FEELING CONSTIPATED? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

-FT and PT available

- Drivers license a plus

- Great summer Job

apply online at careers.twomenandatruck.com

Come join our team at Schenley Gardens! We are currently hiring for the RESIDENT ASSISTANT position: All shifts - part/full time per diem Free covered parking Stop by and join the Schenley Gardens Team! 3890 Bigelow Blvd. Pgh, Pa 15213

To compete an application or visit, call 412-621-4200

WOMEN W/ LOW SEX DESIRE CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

Overactive Bladder? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Check out the job opportunities with

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. Evening Appointments Available For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

CTRS IS CONDUCTING CLINICAL TRIALS FOR: CONSTIPATION ALZHEIMER DISEASE Mild to Moderate

Positions SCORING HIGH SCHOOL MATH begin 6/4.

BIRTH CONTROL PATCH

A 4-year college degree is required. To learn more about our company, visit our web site at www.datarecognitioncorp.com Call 866-258-0375 for information!

POST-MENOPAUSAL HOT FLASHES VAGINAL DRYNESS GOUT

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STUDIES

Lincoln Heritage

STUDIES

WOMEN WITH LOW SEX DESIRE HIGH CHOLESTEROL With Heart Attack or Stroke

SMOKERS WANTED

HEAVY MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/ UTERINE FIBROIDS

for Paid Psychology Research

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to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old

WWW.CTRSLLC.COM

• In good health

- INVESTIGATORS DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN, DR. G. WALKER, DR. KASDAN, DR. SOFFRONOFF

• Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $50 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

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OUR STUDIES CHANGE REGULARLY. CALL US TO SEE IF WE HAVE A STUDY THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU.

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

HEAR YE, HEAR YE

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on March 17, 2015, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for: • Pittsburgh Peabody ECC Floor Replacement Asbestos and Generl Primes

• Pittsburgh Lincoln K-5 Masonry Restoration General Prime

• Pittsburgh Allderdice HS Corridor Ceilings and Lighting General and Elec. Primes

• Pittsburgh Lincoln K-5 Roof Replacement General Prime

• Pittsburgh Allegheny 6-8 Science Lab Renovations Asbestos, General, Plumbing, HVAC, and Electrical Primes

• Pittsburgh West Liberty K-5 Masonry Restoration General Prime

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on February 16, 2015 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 ~ www.pps.k12.pa.us

ACROSS OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on April 7, 2015, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for: • Pittsburgh Arsenal 6-8 Control System Modifications HVAC Prime

• Pittsburgh Morrow K-4 Ventilation Upgrades Mech. Primes

• Pittsburgh Milliones 6-12 Chiller Replacement Mech. and Elec. Primes

• Pittsburgh Phillips K-5 Boiler Replacement Asbestos and Mech. Primes

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on March 2, 2015 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 ~ www.pps.k12.pa.us

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

1. Tabula ___ 5. Total fraud 9. Sales team’s figure 14. Big burden 15. Turkish bazaar bread 16. Still single 17. Indie band with the 2007 hit “Kids” 18. “Is that so?” in IMs 19. Book that covers a lot of ground? 20. Woody’s wife getting off? 23. Cheer for a bicycle kick 24. Consume 25. “Drinks are on me” 29. Area for notes 31. A couple-three 33. Incur debts 34. ___ de mer 35. Oscar ___ (the Academy’s choice not to nominate a critically acclaimed work) 36. “Aha moment” sound effect 37. Battle royal between Kanye West and everybody? 40. Kind of blue 41. Truck stop wheels 42. Steve whom the Village Voice called the Douchiest Guitar Player of All Time 43. “Take me ___ am” 44. Seeks change 45. Figure in a kidnapping case 48. Its headquarters are in Langley, Virginia

50. Assistance 51. Burst into tears 52. Wait for a second before doing a cowboy’s shout? 56. Manning the deep fryer, e.g. 59. Value Meal beverage 60. Bill cancellation 61. Big jump in numbers 62. “Don’t be ___” (Google’s onetime motto) 63. Latin lover’s word 64. Minecraft nut 65. Gently touches 66. Stereotypical “xkcd” fan

DOWN

1. Date night flick 2. Its capital is Luanda 3. Blockbuster, often 4. Bubbly drink 5. Catchphrase 6. Artist Damien who puts dead animals in formaldehyde 7. “___ & Janis” 8. Sandwich spread that I prefer to dip French fries in 9. Bush’s successor and Gore’s predecessor 10. As far as 11. Horned hooter 12. Drink with crumpets 13. Screens between rounds of Words With Friends, e.g. 21. Director Blomkamp 22. Pejorative initialism said for those who

want wind farms, only nowhere near their homes 26. Fraudulent investment opportunity 27. Orange dot in Gchat’s status 28. “Dat’s right” 30. City on Lake Michigan 31. Snatches 32. Yours and mine 35. Big gulp 36. Napster founder Parker 37. Load of laundry 38. Bedtime story? 39. Avoid 40. Washington baseballer 44. First singer to have seven songs from a debut album

chart on Billboard 45. Saudi Arabian bucks 46. Elocutionist 47. “I say!” 49. Blow a best-ofseven series after being up three games, e.g. 50. Improvise on the fly 53. Did phefuckingnomenal on 54. Exploding star 55. Snapchat’s CEO Spiegel 56. Moo shu pork flavorer 57. Person hired around tax time: Abbr. 58. Actor O’Heir of “Parks and Recreation”

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy MASSAGE Grand Opening

Bodywork by Cindy Chinese Massage, Sauna & Table Shower 9:30am-10:30pm 7777 McKnight Road Pgh, PA 15237 412-366-7130

MASSAGE

Judy’s Oriental Massage FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

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4126 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

MASSAGE

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

Xin Sui Bodyworks

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330-373-0303

724-519-2950

Credit Cards Accepted

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work

Grandng Openi

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

412-335-6111

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JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

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NEW LOCATION OFF OF PERRY HIGHWAY

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20% off Glass with this Add 2

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• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency • Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

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Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.11/03.18.2015

Outpatient Program Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient 306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

South Side Outpatient 2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922 For more information, call 24 hours

1-888-694-9996

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com


THE ART OF NO

{PHOTOS BY AL HOFF}

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

March 11, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 10

March 11, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 10