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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 01.28/02.04.2015

JOINING VOICES: ANTIBALAS AND ZAP MAMA FIND THEIR GROOVE TOGETHER ON TOUR 21


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015


EVENTS 1.30 – 5-10pm FREE GOOD FRIDAYS PRESENTED BY UPMC HEALTH PLAN Each Good Friday in January Cash bar and Pittsburgh’s own DJ Huck Finn. FREE admission

1.31 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JESSICA MEYER AND SETH JOSEL Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

2.6 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

2.7 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BATTLE TRANCE Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

SOMEDAY IS NOW: THE ART OF CORITA KENT

JAN 31 - APR 19 • 2015

EXHIBITION OPENING EVENT | 1.30 - 7–10 PM | FREE PRESENTED BY

Image: Mary’s Day Parade, Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles, 1964, courtesy of Corita Art Center, Los Angeles

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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It’s True.

You can now track your bus in real-time.*

Go to PortAuthority.org to learn more about TRUETIME, the routes currently available and which real-time apps use Port Authority information for mobile access on your smart phone. *If you don’t see your route, don’t worry. More routes will be rolling out soon.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015


01.28/02.04.2015 VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 04

DON’T BE A STUPID CUPID

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, DANIELLE FOX, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE

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[NEWS] lot of the changes we’ve done 06 “A go to the core of the city’s culture.” — Mayor Bill Peduto on his first year in office

[NEWS]

important.” — State ACLU chief Vic Walczak, on the transparency of the Peduto administration

[TASTE]

slightly medicinal tang, balanced 17 “A by a creamy, malty nose and a lingering, root-beer-like finish.” — Celine Roberts on Wigle’s Sassafras Whiskey

[MUSIC] have the horns section, drums, 21 “To bass, a whole Afrobeat band, it’s fantastic! It’s a plus.” — Marie Daulne of Zap Mama on touring with Antibalas

[SCREEN]

[ARTS] think part of the reason he died 30 “Iis that he overworked himself.” — Novelist Stewart O’Nan on F. Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 34 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 42 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 43 STUFF WE LIKE 45 +

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

“Your eye takes in the odd moments of contrast between the Tibetans in their traditional dress and elements of modernity.” — Al Hoff reviews “Butter Lamp,” among the Oscarnominated Short Films

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transparency to be meaningful, 12 “For it has to apply to matters that are

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Duane Michals, Take One and See Mt Fujiyama, 1975. Carnegie Museum of Art

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Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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| one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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“A LOT OF THE CHANGES WE’VE DONE GO TO THE CORE OF THE CITY’S CULTURE.”

INCOMING District Attorney Zappala withdraws charges against Leon Ford (Jan. 23, online only) “It’s horrifying that the DA’s language clearly treats Ford as a second-class citizen, and doesn’t take even the smallest bit of responsibility for the egregious errors that the officer made. Maybe it’s time for Pittsburgh Police to go back under federal oversight again.” — Web comment from “Up Ere N’At”

PEDUTO: YEAR 1

ANNUAL REVIEW Despite some concerns, Peduto gets high marks for freshman year {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

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Despite sexual-assault allegations, Bill Cosby’s Pittsburgh show will go on (Jan. 21)

“And when due process fails you and you can’t prove your story other than through corroboration of other women sticking their necks out, where do we get those facts? Do you really think you live in a fantasy world where every misdeed has an overwhelming amount of physical evidence that substantiates it? Or are you just being childishly short-sighted on this issue? What about Bill Cosby’s refusal to go on record to at least try to provide an alibi for at least one of the instances of alleged rape. You’re seriously going to diminish the testimony of 32 women by comparing them to supernatural ape men? Is that the best insight you can provide on this very real problem? I’m not even saying you’re not right, but trivializing and dismissing 32 rape allegations is downright insulting.” — Web comment from “Jake Zigler” “Rape culture: when people believe a mass conspiracy of unrelated women creating false accusations with coincidentally similar stories, even with the extreme shame and negative attention it garners them, is more likely than a famous rich dude drugging and raping women and hiding it. Heinz Hall, National Artists Corporation, and anyone else promoting this should be ashamed of themselves.” — Web comment from “Corvus”

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

“There have been thousands upon thousands of Loch Ness Monster and Bigfoot sightings. History teaches us that people making unproven assertions isn’t synonymous with fact.” — Web comment from “Juggling for a Cure”

Bill Peduto’s first-year initiatives have been generally well received.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

T’S THE WEEK before Christmas and Mayor Bill Peduto is at a senior highrise in the Hill District. After some gentle prodding, a room of senior citizens talks him into singing “Jingle Bells.” Moments later, he goes into the room next door, where more residents of the K. Leroy Irvis Towers are waiting. Once they get wind that he’s sung give for the first group, he’s pressured Residents ts n e essm their assPeduto’s for an encore. He concedes. l il of B r in a e “This is the good part of the y t rs fi www. job,” Peduto says afterward. “I office at paper pghcity need it to balance out the other .com side, which is dealing with negativity. I have an all-access pass to the city. To be able to walk into a room of people, whether it’s wealthy or poor, black or white, hipsters or orthodox Jews, and be welcomed is the single best thing about being mayor.” The positive has seemed to outweigh the negative during Peduto’s first year in office. Even his critics — those who say his actions haven’t quite lived up to the ideals he campaigned on — are willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. But critical voices during these first 12 months have been few. Much louder are the accolades Pittsburgh has received during Peduto’s tenure in office. He campaigned on the idea of a new Pittsburgh, different from the city run by former Mayor Luke Raventshal. And in many ways, his initiatives have moved the city’s renaissance forward. “When someone can appeal both to the hipsters and the people living in blighted neighborhoods by talking about what we can do together, that’s a unified message,” says Barney Oursler, executive director of activist group Pittsburgh United. “He’s talking about a renaissance in the city, but every time he’s talked about that, he’s also very carefully said it’s going to be done differently, so parts of the community aren’t left out of that movement.” To that end, Peduto describes his freshman-year accomplishments as culture CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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ANNUAL REVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

[clockwise from left] From the time of his election night victory in November 2013, Bill Peduto has officiated weddings, done media interviews and attended countless community events.

changes. He’s doubled down on efforts to improve the city’s basic functions like snow removal and pothole repair. But he’s also made more drastic changes, like creating protected bike lanes and selecting a police chief who didn’t come up through the city’s ranks. “A lot of the changes we’ve done go to the core of the city’s culture,” Peduto says. “Eliminating a lane of [Penn Avenue] Downtown to put in a bike lane, that’s a culture change. Bringing in a police chief from outside of the city, that’s a culture change.” Bike lanes are perhaps the most visible impact the mayor’s already had in Pittsburgh. To date, there are three protected bike lanes in the city, and funding earmarked for cycling improvements in the 2015 capital budget promises more to come. “He ran on the idea of making Pittsburgh biking- and walking-friendly,” says Scott Bricker, executive director of Bike

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Pittsburgh. “He’s made investments in safe, promise to relocate the park to a different comfortable bike infrastructure, and we’re location nearby. working with his administration to build “It divided a neighborhood in half. It off of those projects in 2015 and beyond.” wasn’t about a dog park anymore,” Peduto In addition to addressing issues on a says. “Mount Washington is a neighborgrand scale, Peduto has also waded into hood in transition. You have a lot of famismaller, neighborhood-specific lies that are generational and a lot controversies — the type of of young people. I was involved scuffles that one wouldn’t in Mount Washington because G ordinarily think a mayor it was about more than a CHECKINENCY AR would step in to. dog park.” TRANSP UTO’S IN PED RGH “The term [for it] in the ofHe was also vocal about PITTSBU fice is ‘in the weeds,’” Peduto the sale of the August Wilson 2 1 e g Pa says. “They want me to stay Center for African American out of the weeds, but after years Culture. Through the Urban Reof doing this on council, somedevelopment Authority, Peduto times I have to get back into it.” helped ensure that a group of local founIn July, for example, Peduto served as dations were able to purchase the center a mediator in an unlikely neighborhood after it was foreclosed on and nearly sold battle: the dog park in Mount Washing- to out-of-state developers. ton. Residents were divided about wheth“With all the great things being said er the off-leash area should stay in one of about Pittsburgh, losing a cultural center the neighborhood’s parks. After meeting that was built by the African-American with residents, the mayor reached a com- community would have been devastating,”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Peduto says. But if you ask Peduto what his greatest accomplishment in his first year in office was, it’s not flashy new initiatives, national recognition or mediating local controversies. Instead, it’s the city’s finances, particularly the community process for creating the 2015 capital budget. “Even though most people don’t think about it, it’s the foundation that will affect the next five years,” says Peduto. “It’s not the sexiest, but it’s important.” In other ways he’s worked behind the scenes during his first term to get legislation passed on city council. Among his successes was land-banking legislation that will give local communities a say over vacant and abandoned properties. “His leadership in the creation of the city’s land-bank legislation was really indicative,” says Oursler. “When city council had some struggle with it, because it changes control of the land, it takes it out of the hands of individual council people, the


mayor stepped in and brought everyone to the table. It ended with almost unanimous support on council.” And there are other issues where the public says it was beneficial for the mayor to insert himself. These include negotiations between UPMC and a group of organizers attempting to unionize workers at one of the city’s largest employers. “In March of 2014, 2,000 people went to the streets to tell UPMC to act right toward workers, patients and the people of Pittsburgh,” says UPMC employee Christoria Hughes, who has been an outspoken critic of her hospital. “The mayor cut short a trip in D.C. to come tell us that he had our back and would start talking to UPMC about changing their behavior. It was a great day for UPMC workers. Not that UPMC has started treating its employees right. … So in 2015, we’ll be fighting for good jobs and a voice at work. We’re counting on the mayor to do the same.”

February 15th is the last day to enroll in peace of mind.

I’M WILLING TO GIVE HIM THE OPPORTUNITY TO REALIZE THE VISION HE RAN ON.” By and large, his Pittsburgh City Council counterparts have nothing but high praise for the mayor. Toward the end of the year, Peduto attended a city council budget hearing. Although the focus was supposed to be a meeting where councilors talked with the mayor about budgetary concerns, it quickly evolved into an evaluation of Peduto’s performance thus far. “I tell people that I supported you because of your managerial skills,” said Councilor Bruce Kraus. “The level of professionalism that is the mayor’s office is unlike anything I’ve seen in my six years in office.” Even Peduto’s former foes on council say that they have a good relationship with the mayor, and that he has been receptive to their needs. “I think that he and I have reached a really good working relationship, and I look forward to working more effectively with him over the next few years,” says Councilor Ricky Burgess. “There are times when we definitely had our disagreements,” says Councilor Daniel Lavelle. “But I think he’s been open and fair-minded and we’ve had a positive working relationship.” While Peduto is not without his critics, they can be difficult to find. For them, some of the projects touted by the Peduto administration aren’t successes at all. Among these projects is the development of the former Civic Arena site in the lower Hill District. Although the

Time is running out to enroll in health insurance on the Marketplace. You must sign up by February 15 to have coverage for 2015 and the peace of mind that comes with it. Even if you were re-enrolled in the plan you had last year, you can still change your plan. And that’s a good idea. Because UPMC Health Plan has the lowest cost Marketplace plans in Pittsburgh* – and they all give you full access to UPMC doctors and hospitals. So you can pay less, get the care you want, and avoid a potential tax penalty for not having health coverage. Don’t wait. Enroll today.

Open enrollment ends February 15th. Find the plan that’s best for you today at UPMCHealthPlan.com, or call 1-855-417-8762.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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ANNUAL REVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

Peduto attending the premiere of his Undercover Boss at Cappy’s Café, in Shadyside

administration secured a deal between the Pittsburgh Penguins — the site’s developers — and U.S. Steel to build the company’s new headquarters on part of the 28-acres, critics say the mixed-use development doesn’t include enough affordable housing. “He said as one of his policy issues that he supported mixed-income communities that would provide housing for lowincome folks, and he hasn’t done anything toward that,” says Carl Redwood, of the Hill District Consensus Group. “It seems like they’re trying to get rid of poor people in the search for this new Pittsburgh.” City officials still see the Penguins development as a victory because the taxes yielded from the site will go back into a fund for the Hill District. “The essence of getting to a deal is that not everyone is going to be happy,” says Kevin Acklin, Peduto’s chief of staff. “We think we have a plan with the Hill District, with the Penguins … that is not only great for this development but great for the [Hill District].” But this is an example, some say, of Peduto’s words not matching his actions. “The talk [centers] around changing politics as usual, and it’s not going to be the same old-boys network; look at what happened in the Hill District,” says state Rep. Jake Wheatley, who ran against the mayor in the 2013 Democratic primary. “You had the Hill community basically battling by themselves. When Mayor Peduto campaigned he was against the Penguins, but in negotiations, he was more working with the Penguins.” Another example, says City Controller Michael Lamb, involves the city’s ethics board. Throughout his time on council and

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

his campaign, Peduto criticized the ethics board’s inaction. But so far in his tenure, no one has been appointed to the board. “In many ways, he’s set the right tone in his administration in changing the culture in the city,” says Lamb. “But I think far too often the administration’s actions fell short of that message.”

Peduto at a Menorah lighting in the City-County Building in December

“I’ve heard him verbalize that the neighborhoods that have been left behind and left out should be the focus of the city and its resources,” says Wheatley. “I’ve heard him talk about trying to connect historically underemployed and unemployed communities of folks to work and jobs, but I can’t say I’ve seen the evidence of that transformation happening.” While Peduto has seen a number of


victories on issues he’s taken on, Lamb says some of the things he’s tackled, such as the mayor’s education task force, are a waste of city resources. “As the city, we don’t really have a role in public schools,” Lamb says. “Education is important to the city, but the mayor’s task force was not the best use of the city’s resources.” Lamb says the task force used manpower resources that could have been spent elsewhere. “My concern about resources is, there has been a dramatic increase in spending and a lot of that spending has gone to things that don’t support the city’s core mission,” says Lamb. “The city’s core mission is to keep the city clean and its people safe. “ Despite overwhelming support for the mayor, most people say it’s too soon to tell what kind of impact Peduto will have on the city because a mayor’s first year in office is usually one of transition. “The downside is, not just for this mayor but every mayor, whenever a

new administration comes in it takes some time for all the new folks to understand how the machinery of government works,” says Mark Fatla, of the Northside Leadership Conference. “There’s always this transition time where the mechanics of government don’t move as smoothly as they used to do. Stuff that should move more quickly, contracts and approvals and the like. It’s a cycle that’s repeated.” Because of the limitations in a mayoral administration’s first year, even those who have been critical of Peduto say they won’t be writing off the mayor anytime soon. Instead, they’re hopeful that come next year, more of the ideas he campaigned on will be a reality. “I’m willing to give him the opportunity to realize the vision he ran on,” Wheatley says. “After a year, I’m still willing to work with the man to continue to grow his vision, and hopefully that vision will include underserved and left-out neighborhoods.”

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PEDUTO: YEAR 1 For Peduto administration, transparency is still a work in progress {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} NINE MONTHS after Bill Peduto took office,

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he stood in council chambers and touted one of his young administration’s chief accomplishments. “Our proudest moments this year may have been in promoting government transparency, and proving our ability to listen,” he said, echoing a consistent refrain of government openness. But while some observers laud his firstyear efforts at improving transparency, others say he’s fallen short. “I think you have to go give kudos to [Peduto for] being more open than his predecessor,” says Vic Walczak, legal director of the state American Civil Liberties Union. “But that was a pretty low bar.” Ask Peduto administration officials about how they have opened city government and they’ll tell you about the “Mayor’s Night Out” town-hall meetings, where top city officials gathered from Carrick to Homewood to listen to residents’ concerns. “We have the administration out in the community with no agenda,” says Kevin Acklin, Peduto’s chief of staff. They’ll also tout the “Talent City” program, an independent process to keep nepotism at bay when selecting top city employees, and “Open Data” legislation that promises to provide easy access to everything from pothole locations to building-permit data. Then there’s the mayor’s online public schedule, a clear divergence from former mayor Luke Ravenstahl, who was notoriously absent from city hall. And while virtually everyone agrees these are worthwhile initiatives, experts argue the real test is how open the administration is in releasing information that might make the city — or the mayor — look bad. Transparency isn’t about “whether his calendar is posted on the website,” Walczak says. “For transparency to be meaningful, it has to apply to matters that are important and potentially embarrassing to his administration.” And by that standard, observers say, the Peduto administration’s record is decidedly mixed. Last June, for instance, a Pittsburgh police officer punched and arrested a teenage girl who wound up in a confrontation with a group of protesters at PrideFest.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Bill Peduto talks to reporters on election night in November 2013

Peduto promised a swift, 30-day investigation and hired an outside firm to review the incident. Eighty-one days later, the city issued a statement exonerating the officer. City officials refused to release video evidence that helped clear him, or even to name the outside agency hired to help city investigators reach their conclusion. To Don Friedman, a Democratic political strategist, that was “an absolute mistake. The city hires a firm and we taxpayers aren’t allowed to know who it is? That’s not transparency even at a rudimentary level.” Friedman also criticized a recent decision to require all city police officers to sign a document stating that information “confided in me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret, unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.” “You can’t be a progressive leader by taking away the First Amendment rights of anyone,” Friedman wrote in an email. Walczak noted his own concerns, saying the requirement could chill whistleblowing activity that can bring to light fraud and abuse. “It’s pretty clearly unconstitutional,” he adds. Acklin, Peduto’s chief of staff, defended the decision, saying that it merely reaffirms existing policy. “The intention is to maintain the integrity of the crime-investigation process.” Officers, he adds, “are always free to make complaints to [the Office of Municipal Investigations],” the city’s internalaffairs unit. Even more recently, the administration has taken heat for failing to disclose donors for the mayor’s December appearance on CBS’ Undercover Boss — where Peduto doled out roughly $ 150,000 to financially struggling city employees, saying he couldn’t use “taxpayer dollars.” Though the donors were

“FOR TRANSPARENCY TO BE MEANINGFUL, IT HAS TO APPLY TO MATTERS THAT ARE IMPORTANT.”

revealed about a month after the show aired, public dollars were, in fact, solicited. As much as $50,000 could come from VisitPittsburgh, a taxpayer-supported entity. “It’s kind of hard to give him a very positive reading” on transparency, says Gerald Shuster, a communications professor at the University of Pittsburgh, citing the Undercover Boss flap. “He’s done things that give him all the appearances of ‘I desire and am attempting to provide transparency,’ […] but in reality that’s not what’s happening.” Still, the Peduto administration has earned praise from the open-governmentpromoting Sunlight Foundation, specifically for its passage of an “open data” bill. The measure is designed to “[set] the city’s default to open” and give the public access to city information from crime statistics to building-code violations in a flexible, electronic format that can spark app development and promote rigorous examination of public information. Though some data is available, City Controller Michael Lamb says it will take additional resources to form the data into a releasable format. Lamb thinks more publicly available data is good for the city. But, he says, “it’s one thing to have a bill. The real question is, ‘Are you going to put the resources behind making the data available?’” Acklin acknowledges that one of the hardest elements of promising complete transparency is the sometimes-frustrating pace of government. “We inherited a city government that is siloed,” Acklin says, “It’s government, it takes time.” And for all the criticism, Friedman still gives the administration a positive assessment. “[Peduto] has set himself up by raising expectations and then not being able to deliver as consistently as he had expected,” Friedman says. “The good news is that he learns from his mistakes and will self-correct.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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Police charged Kahlif Aleem Buggs, 32, with fraudulent use of debit cards after Tamara Thomas noticed a family “shopping like it was Christmas” at a Family Dollar store in DeKalb, Ga. She got behind them at the register and saw Buggs pay with her missing card, which she recognized because it had been customized with a picture of her, her daughter and their puppy. When she confronted Buggs, he forgot his $200 purchase and told his family to start running. Thomas followed, leading police to their location. Besides Thomas’ card, police found another missing debit card, which Buggs had used to buy $80 in merchandise. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

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Chacarion Avant, 19, tried to enter a bakery in Groveland, Fla., through the ceiling, but his plan was thwarted when he fell through the ceiling tiles and landed on top of a rack of potato chips. Police said Avant was badly hurt and took him to the hospital before charging him with armed burglary. (Orlando’s WKMG-TV)

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A company called Hyperloop has teamed with graduate students at the University of California Los Angeles to develop a solarpowered “speed tube” that will let pasengers in a hovering capsule inside a low-pressurized tube make the trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 35 minutes for about $30. The tube technology could be used to link other cities less than 300 miles apart, Hyperloop CEO Dirk Ahlborn said, noting, “It could be very easily put together. It’s more about figuring out how to make it a good business.” (Los Angeles’ KCAL-TV)

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During her trial for defrauding landlords, Toronto resident Nina Willis, 50, pleaded “the fifth,” only to have prosecutor Craig Power point out the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution doesn’t apply in Canada. (Toronto Star)

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Evidence cited against accused murderer Faramarz Bakhshi, 23, at his bail hearing in Cook County, Ill., included his Facebook post: “It’s only murder if they find the body; otherwise, it’s a missing person.” (Chicago Tribune)

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Researchers linked the decline of marriage in the United States to the rise of free Internet pornography. One of the study’s authors, Michael Malcolm, a professor at Pennsylvania’s University of West Chester, explained that the reason is tied to the relationship between marriage and sexual gratification. If pornography is seen as a alternate means to sexual gratification, Malcom said, then it could be undercutting the need for marriage to serve this function. (The Washington Post)

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Fast food might be making people stupid as well as fat, according to researchers at Ohio State University who compared fast-food consumption and test results among children in grades 5 through 8. “Our results show clear and consistent association between children’s fast-food consumption in fifth grade and academic growth bewteen fifth and

eighth grade,” the researchers reported. (The Washington Post)

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Sheriff’s deputies in Traill County, N.D., said Brian Cutshall, 40, threatened to kill his 9-year-old son if the boy didn’t call 911 while the parents argued over a game of Yahtzee. The boy told deputies that his mother was beating up his father when the dad made the threat. (Fargo’s The Forum)

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A New Zealand couple spent nearly 13 hours trapped in their new “keyless” car in their garage. Brain and Mollieanne Smith had left the car’s instruction manual in their Alexandra home and the transponder outside the car when they realized that without the transponder, they couldn’t start the engine to unlock the power doors. They tried to attract attention by honking the horn and then tried smashing a window with a car jack. Neighbors found them the next morning with only enough air left to survive for less than an hour, emergency workers told Mollieanne Smith, 65, who was hospitalized for three days. After their rescue, Brian Smith, 68, learned that the door could have been unlocked manually. “Once I found out how simple it was to unlock it, I kicked myself that I did not find the way out,” he said. (New Zealand’s Otago Daily Times)

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Michigan lawmakers introduced a ban on using drones to hunt deer and other game animals. “This came from hunters and outdoor enthusiasts” who felt the use of drones “takes away from the spirit and tradition of what hunting is supposed to be about,” chief sponsor Sen. Phil Pavlov said. Concerned that anti-hunting groups might also use drones to interfere with hunting, lawmakers are considering companion legislation to ban the use of drones to harass or interfere with hunters. (Detroit News)

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The brewer of Bud Light introduced an e-commerce app that lets drinkers in Washington, D.C., order 12-packs or 24-packs for delivery within an hour. The move by AnheuserBusch InBev SA follows that by MillerCoors to provide free delivery of Miller Lite in Boston, New York, Seattle and Washington. The companies view e-commerce as a way to market their products to young consumers who have become accustomed to clicking an app to have food and other products delivered. (The Wall Street Journal)

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Pizza Hut and Domino’s are developing ways to order pizza faster. Claiming to have “the world’s first subsconscious menu,” Pizza Hut incorporated retina-scanning technology and “psychological research” to create a special eye-tracking tablet at its 300 locations across the United Kingdom. The digital menu shows 20 toppings and computes orders based on which ones the customer looks at the longest. “Finally, the indecisive orderer and the prolonged menu peruser can cut time and always get it right, so that the focus of dining can be the most important part: the enjoyment of eating,” a Pizza Hut official said, noting that the menus feature a “restart” button to ensure accuracy.

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S BY R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE NT I C AT I ON ON D E M AN D.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015


TITLE SPONSOR SPONSOR

SWOON THE NIGHT AWAY.

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Chris Botti, trumpet

Love is in the air this February as trumpet phenomenon and the nation’s best selling jazz instrumental artist, Chris Botti, shares his love for romantic melodies. Botti— and his trumpet—hold multiple Grammys, Gold and Platinum records and have captured the hearts of millions of music lovers. Will yours be next?

For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/pops.

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MOMOS ARE THE SUBSTANTIAL DUMPLINGS AT THE CORE OF THE NEPALESE CUISINE

WINGIN’ IT

{BY AL HOFF}

When you’re craving two of the major food groups — chicken wings and bubble tea — make tracks for Chick’n Bubbly, the amusingly named tiny eatery in Oakland. Chicken is available in its convenient snack size, as wings or drumsticks. It is prepared in KFC-style (Korean Fried Chicken): battered, deep-fried, then drenched in one of two sauces, “sweet and spicy” or soy garlic. (Sauce also available on the side.) The night I stopped by, chicken was cooked to order, which took time — I was lucky to have one of the few seats, and watched the bubble teamaking — but it also meant my order arrived crackling hot from the fryer. These may be the crispiest wings in town, with some pieces doubling in size from the fried batter accumulating. Both sauces were on the sweet side, and next time, I’d go with the “more spice” option. To help with the heat and the messy sauce of the wings, a dispensary of plastic finger-tip shields is available on the counter. If you wish to add another food group, the menu has a couple of options, including French fries, sweet-potato fries, takoyaki (Japanese octopus snack) and sweet pickled radishes. And what goes better with fried food than a fruit-flavored tea, slushy or smoothie? There are a variety of flavors, including the more exotic options such as taro, lychee and passion fruit, plus add-ins of tapioca or jelly. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

117 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-863-7741 or www.chicknbubbly.com

the

FEED

Citrus are abundant this time of year. Save their deliciousness by making easy marmalade (chop up entire fruit, add sugar and water, and simmer down to jam).

Experiment with different varieties of oranges, as well as the less-sweet fruits such as lime, lemon and grapefruit.

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NEPALESE

ON THE NORTH SIDE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Nepali chicken, with daal, saag, rice, pickles and salad

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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EO SUBBA, proprietor of an epon-

ymous Asian restaurant on the North Side, is Nepalese, and thus part of one of Pittsburgh’s newest and fastest-growing immigrant communities. Naturally, the arrival of Nepalese culture has meant the introduction of Nepalese cuisine. Subba Asian Restaurant casts a broader net, with a menu that includes Chinese and Indian dishes as well. Since Nepal itself is tucked between China and India, this makes sense. A sign in the window promises sushi, too, but there’s no hint of it on the menu, which may be for the best: China, India and Nepal is already a lot of ground for one kitchen to cover. And if the Chinese offerings were predominantly Chinese-American tropes along the lines of kung pao chicken, Hunan beef and shrimp lo mein — and if the Indian was no more than an abbreviated list of generic curries and biryanis — well, we took that as a sign to start where our interest already lay, which was in Subba’s

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Nepalese fare. But by the time we finished, we held Subba’s entire menu in esteem. In Nepalese cooking, too, the menu is brief, allowing us to sample each of three types of dishes on offer: momos, the substantial dumplings at the core of the cuisine; sadako, a sort of sauceless stir-fry; and curries.

SUBBA ASIAN RESTAURANT 700 Cedar Ave. (second floor), North Side. 412-586-5764 or 412-853-1070 HOURS: Daily 11 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $3-12 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Subba’s momos are available steamed or pan-fried, and with meat or vegetable filling. The meat momos were shaped like crescents with crimped edges, while the vegetable ones resembled the dim sum

dumplings often called purses, round with gathered dough at the top. The wrappers, which should have been almost translucently thin, were thick and doughy, but what was inside was delicious. In the meat momos, minced — not ground — morsels, heated inside the close quarters of the dumpling, formed a savory steam that settled as flavorful broth. A similar effect in the vegetable momos rendered this filling tender and juicy. Both fillings were spicy and could be enhanced by dipping into an even spicier sesame-chili chutney. A plate of sadako almost put us in mind of a salad, with its barely sautéed, still fresh-tasting and crunchy vegetables, including peppers, onions and cabbage. Instead of a sauce, a light, lemony dressing united the ingredients in a bright flavor profile. Only the meat (we ordered pork) was disappointing, not in its robust, spicy seasoning, but in its tough texture. Despite this, the flavoring of this dish was so addictive, we polished off the plate.


Nepali curries were served in the style of Indian thali, on a large platter filled with many components: steamed rice; a bowl of curried meat; a dollop of soupy dal; a tiny cup of savory mustard greens, and another of beautifully cooked mixed vegetables; an even tinier bowl of shredded, pickled veggies; and a further portion of the spicy chutney from the momos. Each component was marvelous: The vegetables seemed to have been pan-steamed, such that they were browned at the edges yet remained tender and moist, while the greens were cooked just enough to lose their harsh rawness and gain flavor from the dressing-like sauce. We prefer a thicker dal, but this one’s thin texture did not translate to a thin flavor, and the simple earthiness of the lentils filled a gap in a platter that seemed to cover the full range of possible flavors. The curry itself was peppery and straightforward with tender, boneless chicken. An Indian lamb curry bloomed with warm spices: cumin, cinnamon, coriander and more. Its unmistakably northern Indian flavor reminded us that, after all, Nepal borders that part of India.

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

INTO THE WOOD Wigle gets sassy with sassafras Sometimes our friends know what’s best for us. That’s how I found myself, to my bedraggled and bleary-eyed surprise, cheerfully labeling bottles of Wigle’s soon-to-be released Sassafras Whiskey on an early Sunday morning. This whiskey is part of Wigle’s experimental wood-finishes line, a monthly endeavor reflecting the distillery’s penchant for innovation. Inspired by its adventurous customer base, co-owner Meredith Grelli says Wigle “devotes an enormous amount of resources to experimentation, innovation and events to bring people through our doors. We want to help form an educated spirit population.”

“WE WANT TO HELP FORM AN EDUCATED SPIRIT POPULATION.”

Chicken momo

Our first taste of Subba’s Chinese cooking was a bowl of hot-and-sour soup. Button mushrooms were a pale substitute for standard/authentic wood ears, but the soup was otherwise first-rate, without the weirdly gloppy texture that this soup sometimes exhibits. Chicken lo mein was better yet. All too many restaurants fail to get this seemingly simple noodle dish right, whether because of excess greasiness, disharmonious flavorings or indifferent ingredients. Not only did Subba avoid all these pitfalls, but the added thin slices of chicken were some of the tastiest we’ve had in any context. Clearly cooked whole and then sliced and tossed with the noodles, the chicken breast was neither bland, tough nor marred by twice-cooked flavor, but instead deeply flavored from its first, impeccable cooking. Subba’s location, on the second floor of a nondescript building off East Ohio Street, may be discreet, and its decor may be humble. But the flavors of its Chinese, Indian, and — best of all — Nepalese cooking are big and bold. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

All of this begins with an educated and passionate staff. Ben Taylor, a home brewer turned distiller, adds the “art to the distillation,” says Grelli. After exploring 12 different kinds of wood finishes, from applewood to maple, he and the rest of the staff felt that the Sassafras Whiskey was so different that it was worthy of its own event and release. Every bottle begins its life as Wigle’s Wheat Whiskey. It’s aged for 16 months in a new American white oak barrels. The signature flavor is introduced during the last six weeks of aging, when honey-combed sassafras wood staves are added to the barrel. In keeping with Wigle’s tradition of using local plants, sassafras is native to the eastern United States. I grew up with some in my backyard, so my first golden amber pour of this spirit brought a lot of history with it. A first taste hits the palate with a slightly medicinal tang, balanced by a creamy, malty nose and a lingering, root-beer-like finish. A revisitation reveals hints of mint woven throughout. Although it’s more than smooth enough to drink straight, it would make a lovely Manhattan. The spirit’s coming-out party is set for Jan. 30. Be there for a shot at — and a shot of — this very limited release. A portion of the proceeds will benefit The Animal Rescue League and the Wildlife Center. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections have included piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweetpotato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-266-6362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many

Ramen Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE BUTCHER AND THE RYE. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-3912752. Amid the twee décor, diners can find outstanding food (and house-recipe cocktails). Starters might be a remade Caesar salad with baby kale, roasted Brussels

40 Craft Beers w

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Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

$8 Bud Light

Saturday & Sunday Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

140 Federal Street (next to PNC Park) 412-323-BZBG(2924) • bzbarandgrill.com

2328 E. Carson St.

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________

facebook: www.facebook.com/bzbarandgrill Twitter: @BZsPGH

412.481.0852

STARTS AT 9PM HOSTED BY MIAA GLOW

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Pitchers

SOUTHSIDE

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

2STEP TUESDAYS

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Catering &

Party Room Rental

game here! >>>>>>>>>> Win a 37” TV <<<<<<<<<<

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Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________ 10:30am-3pm

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

sprouts or rich mac-and-cheese. Game dishes, such as quail and rabbit, are available as entrees, as are popular standbys such as burgers, with fries and pickles. KE THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tuna-and-avocado spring rolls. LE HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the CONTINUES ON PG. 20


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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

D

NNING SAND W WI S! HE IC

AWA R

Dine In/Take Out/Delivery

NorthSide Sandwich ars Running! n i W ner 3 Ye

APPETIZER Edamame OR Chicken Gyoza (6)

SOUP Chicken Corn Soup

ENTRÉE (Choose one per person)

(One week only! From Feb. 9 to Feb. 15)

VALENTINE’S DINNER for TWO $49.95

Spicy Roll Combo (Tuna Avocado, Salmon Avocado and Shrimp Tempura) Triple Delight Imperial Beef Tangerine Scallop & Shrimp General Tso’s Chicken & Shrimp Chicken and Shrimp with Eggplant in Garlic Sauce Chinese baby Pak Choy and Chicken in White sauce

Sushi Tomo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE

HAPPY HOUR 1/2 11/ /2 O OFF FF F FA ALL LL DRAFTS & $2 OFF MUNCHIES Mon-Thurs 5-7 • Fri & Sat 4:30-7:30

All served with vegetable fried rice, white rice OR brown rice except Sushi, Sashimi and Spicy Roll Combo. *INCLUDES A GLASS OF HOUSE WINE FOR EACH PERSON*

OPEN DAILY • 11AM - 11:30AM 30AM

2101 Greentree Rd. (next to Applebee’s in Scott Towne Center)

862 WESTERN AVE. 412-321-4550

412-279-8811 • WWW.OSAKAPGH.COM

themoderncafe.com

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE

ALL LUNCHES

$

8-$10

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242 @casareynamex 20

now open 7 days a week!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

SMILING BANANA LEAF. 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-362-3200. At this absolute jewel-box of a restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai dishes rather than Thai-inflected Chinese food. Grilled meat appetizers are beautifully seasoned, and the pad Thai offers a lively balance of ingredients. The assertively spicy pumpkin curry features a special variety of Thai gourd. JF

PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. 2208 Penn Ave., Strip District (412-434-7200) and 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown (412-562-1710). These two fish restaurants fill the gap between humble lunch counter www. per pa and snooty steakhouse pghcitym .co — modern, funky

FULL LIST ONLINE

and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s menu is casual fare such as sandwiches, sushi and tacos, with a rotating selection of higher-end dishes, particularly at the Downtown location. KF RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF

MON TUE-THU FRI-SAT SUN

late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young professionals alike. The seasonal menu offers lively updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised short ribs. Gourmet burgers and pizzas make for quick meals. Linger for homemade desserts, or stop by after the show. KE

SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style tapas restaurant specializes in citrus-cured fish, while also offering a small selection of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open

SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. This North Hills restaurant offers a full range of Japanese cuisine beyond sushi that is more representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and rice bowls. But, as the name suggests, there is also plenty of well-prepared sushi, including specialty maki. KE THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-8881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring rolls, such as whole quail with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF


LOCAL

BEAT

“IT’S EASY TO COMBINE THAT ENERGY.”

{BY MICHAEL CRANDLE}

In 2012, Latia Lee saw her dreams of being a well-known singer seemingly right at her fingertips: The Pittsburgher had wowed judges in the initial round of American Idol and had gotten the golden ticket to Hollywood and a spot in the top 25. Then the unforeseen death of her grandfather put a damper on the upand-coming artist. “He passed away the day I was supposed to perform and I was a wreck,” she explains; her overall demeanor, which reflected in the audition, led to her being eliminated. “When I came home, I was depressed,” she says, “because I knew I was there and I knew I had messed up.” In 2013, Lee began to stage a comeback of sorts, releasing her first official mixtape, Dear Diary, in March. It also featured her sister, Latasha Marie Lee. Just as that release started to get attention online, though, tragedy struck: Lee’s younger brother, Steven “Brub” Lee Jr., whom she called her “No. 1 fan,” was gunned down in what became known in the local news as the “party bus shooting.” There were several arrests made in relation to the murder; one suspect’s trial ended in a hung jury just last week. Latia took refuge and clung closely to her family after the tragedy, continuing what her brother wanted her to do: sing. “He told us that he needed us to do that,” she says. “It’s odd, but he said if he would ever go away, he wanted us to sing.” Using social media to keep her brother’s name alive, the singer came up with the phrase “Everything For Brub,” and the hashtag #EFB was released across Twitter, Instagram and Facebook “I just said it one day, and now we plan on expanding it to a victims-of-violence organization,” Lee says. With a new album, The Perfect Imperfection, set for release Feb. 2, Lee has gathered all the emotion she’s felt in the past year and funneled it into a strong 7-track EP. This album, unlike the first, hip-hop-centered mixtape, is more of a traditional R&B collection. “Since I did American Idol, I wanted people to see I can write and sing.”

Latia Lee {PHOTO COURTESY OF JORDAN BECKHAM}

FOR BRUB’S SAKE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARINA ABADJIEFF}

Top brass: Antibalas (Martin Perna, standing, second from right)

GROOVING TOGETHER

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

A

Mama and Antibalas are few: Africaninspired polyrhythms are just about it. Otherwise, the two ensembles are pretty disparate. Zap Mama, founded in the late ’80s, is the mostly-vocal project of Belgian artist Marie Daulne, who mixes polyphonics and the sounds of her native Democratic Republic of Congo. Antibalas, which got together in 1998, is a big instrumental group that’s as well known for serving as the band in Fela!, the Broadway musical, as for its own Afrobeat-inspired tunes.

ANTIBALAS AND ZAP MAMA 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 4. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $25-45. All ages. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LATIA LEE EP RELEASE. 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31. Father Ryan Arts Center, 420 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks. Free. www.twitter.com/Latia_EFB N E W S

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T A GLANCE, the similarities between Zap

But when a representative of concert-booker Columbia Artist Management Inc. came to Zap Mama’s Daulne with the idea of putting the two together on tour, it made sense to her.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF COLUMBIA ARTIST MANAGEMENT INC.}

Zap Mama’s Marie Daulne

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GROOVING TOGETHER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

“I asked him how come he thought that would sound good together,” she recalls. “But I liked the idea — especially because I saw Fela! on Broadway, and I was enjoying it so much, and it was Antibalas playing! “For me, to have Antibalas, with the horns section, drums, bass, a whole Afrobeat band, it’s fantastic! It’s a plus.” Both groups are no stranger to collaborating with others — to an extent, in fact, both have made it a big part of their missions. “Collaborating with other artists is rewarding musically, first and foremost, which is why we do it,” explains Martin Perna, Antibalas’ musical director, via email. “It’s a welcome challenge to work with other artists and figure out what our common musical ground is and to build relationships with them and help them present their work with a particular sound that they probably couldn’t get on their own.” Antibalas notably backed up David Byrne and St. Vincent on a track from their 2012 album Love This Giant, and appeared on TV on the Radio’s Dear Science in 2008. Guest spots like that, in addition to the Fela! gig, have made the ensemble more of a household name — though Perna is quick to note that fans of those

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

parts of the band’s work don’t necessarily become die-hard Antibalas fans. “When we went on tour with our last full-length album in 2012, we didn’t see much crossover from the Fela! musical audience, because the audience that goes to see an 8 p.m. show on Broadway is not the same audience that would go see us at a nightclub at 11 p.m. on a Tuesday,” Perna notes. “More importantly, though, what we do in its most undiluted form goes over most people’s heads. We don’t follow pop-music song structure, and [our tracks] tend to be two to four times longer than any song you hear on the radio. The styles of music that inform what we do, unlike soul, funk, R&B, rock or be-bop, [aren’t] in the cultural DNA of mainstream America, so it’s still very foreign, exotic and weird to most people.” With Zap Mama, Daulne has at times written and performed with instrumentalists, and at other times kept her arrangements purely vocal. (She’s also had everything from five voices in the group to just one.) Her ReCreation album, in 2009, was its own study in working together: It had featured guest spots from G. Love, Meshell Ndegeocello and Fela Kuti drummer Tony Allen, among others. In the past, she’s done tracks with The Roots, Common and Michael Franti. With that groundwork laid, when the double-bill tour was proposed, Daulne wanted to take it to the next level. “I asked [CAMI] and Martin [Perna], ‘Why don’t we merge the two?’” Daulne says. “Instead of just having one act go on after the other. You have to be creative today. We are four women and [Antibalas is] all men onstage; it’s easy to combine that energy.” Perna, for his part, agreed. “When they came to us with the idea of working with Zap Mama, it sounded great,” he explains. “The show will begin with the four Zap Mama vocalists doing their thing — tight harmonies, improvisation and vocal grooves. A few songs in, you’ll see members of Antibalas creeping on to back them up. Little by little, it will transition into our set, and we’ll be joined at the end by Marie and Zap Mama plugging into our material and Marie leading Antibalas.” Besides Antibalas, another notable collaborator in Zap Mama’s live show these days is … you. Daulne recently launched what she calls the “vocal flash mob.” On Zap Mama’s website, Daulne makes available separated studio tracks for certain songs. She encourages


audience members to learn a specific part and join in on the song live. “I want to test [my new material], because it is a return to voices,” Daulne explains. “And I want the audience to be part of it, because I have a choir part — not choir like the classical way of Western reference, it’s more an ethnic choir, from the people. The only way is to ask the audience to do it, because I can’t tour with a full choir with me all the time.” “It’s an easy part,” she adds with an air of reassurance. If you’re worried about learning your part, don’t worry: Daulne is an experienced teacher. “I don’t like to use the word ‘educate,’” though, she says. “I say ‘opening doors of sounds and possibilities. ‘I do workshops for professional singers; I call that ‘vocal groove.’ It’s like if you want to take a class of yoga; I said, ‘Why don’t we start a class where we can groove together as vocalists?’” It resonates well with Antibalas’ Perna, who earned a Master’s of Education in 2011 and has worked as a music educator and curriculum developer. “Teaching electronic musicians in the classroom and online made me come full circle back to the fundamental idea that music is a social thing,” says Perna. “The music-making process is a growth process, and if you spend all of your time in front of a laptop, and never with other people, you’re not going to grow and the music is going to lack depth.” Zap Mama has two new albums in the hopper — one ready for release soon — and Daulne has other projects on the docket as well. Besides facilitating her vocal grooves, she’s featured in a French animated film, based on Roy Lewis’ book The Evolution Man, Or, How I Ate My Father, to be released internationally this year. Members of Antibalas are featured on the soundtrack of the new movie Mortdecai (“I don’t know if the film will be good, but the music is slammin’,” Perna notes), and Perna says the band is hoping to record this year, since this tour’s material is all unrecorded. If Daulne has her way, perhaps there will be a collaborative album coming out of all this, too. “Maybe with the fact that we’re out together with Antibalas, we can end with recording together, an album,” she says. “Nobody has really confirmed anything, but the energy’s so wonderful. I know it’s going to be fantastic. From there, maybe it can be a record.”

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

R. WEIS PARROT & PAPERBACK (SELF-RELEASED) WWW.RWEIS.COM

Weis, of the North Side, is a sound artist: He manipulates prerecorded ambient sounds using sequencing software, rendering them truly musical. The samples that provide the basis for this release are a parrot and a book being dropped — though you wouldn’t know it to listen. The highly manipulated sounds lie somewhere between industrial, noise and Steve Reich-style soundscape composition. Cool in concept, and generally a fun listen in its execution — two things that don’t always coincide in this field. Weis is an underappreciated local treasure, known more in the art world than the music scene; he’s worth a second look if you’re interested in exploring the outer reaches of what we call music.

THE LATEBLOOMER & MOEMAW NAEDON CIRCULAR SIGNALS (SURFACE LEVEL RECORDS) WWW.CIRCULARSIGNALS.BIGCARTEL.COM

Circular Signals is the product of a correspondence project between New Jersey producer The Latebloomer and local MC Moemaw Naedon (Fortified Phonetx). The Latebloomer deals largely in jazz and soul samples, laying boom-bap beats over wandering guitar noodling and organ lines to create tracks that feel relaxed but alert, verging on trip-hop. Naedon provides his signature flow of lyrics, smart but not nerdy (except for maybe that Bob Ross namecheck), confident but not overly cocky. More of the good stuff we’ve come to expect from the Surface Level crew; no reason this shouldn’t be huge on college radio. Guest spots include Brother Seamus and Connect.

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Donora

[ELECTRONIC] + THU., JAN. 29 Formerly the bassist for local experimental fusion outfit Smooth Tutors, Tim Vernon has spent the last year laboring under the alias Telavision. Tonight, he’ll release his hypnotic new mix tape, Privacy, on Preslav Lefterov’s Machine Age label. Drawing heavily from a personal obsession with ’90s hip hop and R&B, Vernon lets glitchy slow jams and hooky samples rise from sonic expanses. Stop by Brillobox to check out a full, live set — he’ll be joined by fellow Pittsburgh electro artists Chase Smith, Ivies and Ondo. Margaret Welsh 10 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[INDIE POP] + FRI., JAN. 30 For better or worse, concert-bookers work on a more advanced schedule than the NFL. Homegrown indie-poppers Donora were originally slated to play Brillobox on Jan. 3, but after the Steelers secured a first-round playoff game for that same night, the whole city canceled its plans. This Friday, the band will finally celebrate the release of its fourth LP, Ha Ha Heart. “Put on Your Neon” was just featured on ABC Family’s Switched at Birth, but you can hear it on a much more intimate scale tonight, along with opening sets from Kahli Abdu & VHS Safari and The Nox Boys. Shawn Cooke 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[BLUES] + SAT., JAN. 31 Few names are as revered in the blues world — or in American music period — as

Josh White Jr. and Rev. Robert B. Jones Sr. 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Lead Belly. The early-20th-century musician (born Huddie Ledbetter) was one of the pioneering voices in Delta blues, bridging the gap between Southern music (he grew up in Louisiana) and metropolitan folk (having moved to New York City later in life). Tonight, paying tribute to the legend at Carnegie Lecture Hall are: Josh White Jr. (whose father played with Lead Belly), Rev. Robert B. Jones Sr. and pianist Radoslav Lorković. It’s presented by Calliope. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $39. All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org

[DJS] + SAT., JAN. 31 The Red Bull Thre3style DJ battle has become an annual tradition in cities across the country. Tonight, it stops in Pittsburgh, where our local qualifying round takes place with contestants Petey C, Bamboo and Midas competing for a chance to move on to the U.S. final (and possible the world final). The eastern region only has events in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, so it’s no small deal — check out our local reps, plus DJ Bonics and Charlie White, tonight at the Rex Theater. AM 9 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. Free (with RSVP at win. gs/3stylepgh). www.rebullthre3style.com

[GRINDCORE] + SAT., JAN. 31 It’s hard to believe that Pig Destroyer’s latest EP, Mass and Volume, was really recorded during the Phantom Limb sessions — its 19-minute title track unfolds in a brutal, methodical dirge g for the band’s friend and Relapse Records staffer Pat Egan, who died in 2013. At A the time, Pig Destroyer couldn’t have anticipated the context of this release, but the EP’s two songs song are far more measured and somber than anything on Phantom anyth Limb. Lim Expect the band to mostly stick to its rapid-fire grindcore rap mode mo at Altar Bar, with wit Full of Hell, Cloud Rat and Purge Cl set se to open. SC p.m. 1620 Penn 8p Ave., Strip District. Av $18. 412-263-2877 or www.thealtarbar.com www.th


Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} Pearl & the Beard, James Tillman. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The South Side. 412-381-6811. Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. SMILING MOOSE. Dead CLUB CAFE. A.T.S., Paperback Batteries, Rebuilding Year, Katie (early) Caleb Pogyor & the Talkers, CLUB CAFE. Erin McKeown, Hate, Emergency Broadcast. Grand Piano, Gypsy & His Band MaryLeigh Roohan. South Side. South Side. 412-431-4668. of Ghosts (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bastard 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Bearded Irishmen, Andre GOOSKI’S. Six Speed Kill, Antz Marching DMB tribute. Costello,The Hawkeyes. Struttin Cocks, Thunder Vest, Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Elektro Moto-Men. Polish Hill. LAVA LOUNGE. Grand Bell, 412-681-1658. The Park Plan, Murder For Girls. HAMBONE’S. The Silver South Side. 412-431-5282. ALTAR BAR. Pig Destroyer, Thread, Amoeba Knievel, LEVELS. Darryl & Kim Askew. Ringworm, Full of Hell. Strip Hard Money. Lawrenceville. North Side. 412-231-7777. District. 412-263-2877. 412-681-4318. REX THEATER. Donna the THE BLIND PIG LEVELS. The Lava Buffalo, Ekoostic Hookah. SALOON. Dr. J’s Mojo Game Duo. North South Side. 412-381-6811. Hand. New Kensington. Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. Palisades, 724-337-7008. LINDEN GROVE. CARMELLA’S PINTS Who We Are, Camp Element. www. per Street Level. a p ty AND PLATES. pghci m South Side. 412-431-4668. Castle Shannon. .co Tracy Lee. South Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Devin PALACE THEATRE. Dave 412-937-1650 x227. Moses, Crystal Lee Morgan, Wreck Mason’s Traffic CLUB CAFE. The Love Letters, Loose. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Jam. Greensburg. Great Silence (Late). The Love 724-836-8000. Letters record release. Walker & RAMADA INN HOTEL & the Rebellion, The Redlines (Early). ALTAR BAR. Fungus (Grateful CONFERENCE CENTER. Skero, ‘Present Out of Balance’ CD Dead Tribute), Red Lion Reggae. Jingles. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. Release. South Side. 412-431-4950. REX THEATER. Wild Child, Strip District. 412-263-2877. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Verdict. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. The Hi-Frequencies, Th’ Royal Shakes, The Allegheny Rhythm Rangers. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. The Woo Hoo Band. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOSANNA HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band, Union Rye, DJ Selecta. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-3598. LEVELS. Sputzy. North Side. 412-231-7777. MOONDOG’S. All My Monsters. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Jayke Orvis, The Jakobs Ferry Stragglers, Shelf Life String Band, Lone Wolf Club. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Lovebettie. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMILING MOOSE. Muscle of Love, Motorpsychos. South Side. 412-431-4668. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. JJ Bickle. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bastard Bearded Irishmen, The Barons, The Beagle Brothers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Moose Tracks. West End. 412-458-0417. Each week, we bring you a new track from a THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & local artist. This week’s offering comes from McClain. Clairton.

ROCK/POP THU 29

Tickets at www.jergels.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5

SAT 31

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 30

proudly presents

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MASHA VERESHCHENKO}

DOUGLAS LOWELL BLEVINS

Douglas Lowell Blevins; stream or download “Hit the Lights,” from his new EP Cruel Variations, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

Be iimmersed d iin a li live las llaser li light ht show h th thatt ffeatures t animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects!

Check out Laser OutKast & Laser SkrillStep!

MON 02

SHOWS & TIMES:

CLUB CAFE. John Reilly & Friends feat. Becky Stark & Tom Brosseau. South Side. 412-431-4950.

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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An Evening of Music

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

SMILING MOOSE. Alex G, Teen Suicide. South Side. 412-431-4668.

VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Bill Couch. West End. 412-458-0417.

TUE 03

WED 04

SMILING MOOSE. Jonny Craig, Down With Webster. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

THU 29

APRIL 3 | 8PM THURSDAY JAN 29/10PM

THE PARK PLAN, MURDER FOR GIRLS, GRAND BELL THURSDAY FEB 12/10PM

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. DIESEL. Borgeous. South Side. 412-431-8800.

{WED., MARCH 18}

FRI 30

Jeff Campbell and Megan Slankard Presented By

EMO NIGHT abkmusic.com/coh-events $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

thecenterofharmony.com/

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY

Buy presale and save $$$

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

events/upcoming/

724-400-6044

Southern Theatre

CLEVELAND {TUE., JUNE 02}

Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds House of Blues

ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Smokin’ Section. 412-487-6259.

SUN 01

MOONDOG’S. Sewyn Birchwood. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Sweaty Betty. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Blues Open Mic w/ The Sharks feat. Tom Bielak. 724-433-1322.

THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

FULL LIST ONLINE

JAZZ THU 29

ANDYS. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8884. GIANNA VIA’S RESTAURANT & BAR. RML Jazz. Overbrook. 412-370-9621. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.

www. per pa pghcitym .co

SAT 31 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE. Still Not Sober. Wexford. 724-934-1177. INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. PLUM AMERICAN LEGION. Jill West & Blues Attack. Verona. 412-795-9112. THE R BAR. The Billy Price Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Ron & the Rumpshakers. 724-433-1322. TUGBOAT’S. Randall Troy

WED 04 BYHAM THEATER. Zap Mama, Antibalas. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

REGGAE FRI 30

SAT 31

Union Transfer

SAT 31

FRI 30

565 LIVE. Besame. Bellevue. 412-522-7556.

Father John Misty

& Friends. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992. WESTWOOD GOLF CLUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. West Mifflin. 412-462-9555. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

BLUES

FRI 30

{WED., APRIL 01}

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REX THEATER. Red Bull Thre3style. Regional DJ competition. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

HIP HOP/R&B

WORLD

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

PHILADELPHIA

SAT 31

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield

BRILLOBOX. Second Skin. 80s dance party. Bloomfield. 412-263-1679. THE CLOAKROOM. DJ SMI. East Liberty. 412-779-2624. DRUM BAR. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

WED 04

26

COLUMBUS

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834.

FRI 30 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band. 7 p.m dance lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. North Side. 412-904-3335.

SAT 31 ANDYS. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8 p.m. dance lesson, 9 p.m. music. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708.

MON 02 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 04 ANDYS. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC SAT 31 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TRAPUZZANO ITALIAN CHOPHOUSE. Jason Kendall / Jim Graff Duo. Shadyside. 412-515-5082.

STAY TUNED DISTILLERY. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. 412-461-4555.

COUNTRY THU 29 ELWOOD’S PUB. Marshall Street ‘Rents. 724-265-1181.

CLASSICAL FRI 30 A NIGHT IN RUSSIA: PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Krzysztof Urbański, now in his third season as music director of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, conducts the Pittsburgh premiere of Prokofiev’s Russian Overture. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 4139-24900.

SUN 01 A NIGHT IN RUSSIA: PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Krzysztof Urbański, now in his third season as music director of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, conducts the Pittsburgh premiere of Prokofiev’s Russian Overture. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 4139-24900.

TUE 03 PLAY N’AT TUESDAY CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES. Franktuary, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. THREE RIVERS YOUNG PEOPLE’S ORCHESTRA. Calvary United Methodist Church, North Side.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 30 TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Night Star. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do IN PITTSBURGH

Jan 28 - Feb 3 WEDNESDAY 28 Chris Jamison from The Voice

JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. All ages show. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moons CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 29 Palisades

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Donna the Bufffalo REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guests Ekoostik Hookah. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

WWW.REDBULLTHRE3STYLE.COM

Erin McKeown

A Night in Russia

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. All ages show. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org or 412-392-4900. Through Feb. 1.

FRIDAY 30

SATURDAY 31

Boulevard of the Allies and The Telephone Line PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. 412-566-1000. Over 21

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All Ages Show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: redbullthre3style.com. 10p.m.

TEMPLE OF COMEDY, QUANTUM’S POP-UP CLUB Garfield. All ages show. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412-362-1713. Through Feb. 22.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Jan. 31.

Jayke Orvis, The Jakobs Ferry Straggler, Shelf Life String Band, Lone Wolf Club

Red Bull Thre3Style

Brahman/i - A One-Hijra Stand-up Comedy Show

Comedian James Yon (Host of 'Viral Breakdown' on Dish Network)

412-206-9719. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 15

River Whyess PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. 412-566-1000. Over 21 show. Tickets: showclix.com. 9p.m.

Red Bull Thre3Style SATURDAY, JANUARY 31 REX THEATER

show. Tickets: showclix.com. 9p.m.

SOUND SERIES: Jessica Meyer and Seth Josel

Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Wild Child

Fungus (Grateful Dead Tribute Band)

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guests Pearl and the Beard & James Tillman. All Ages Show.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-206-9719. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

WARHOL THEATER - ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol. org. 8p.m.

Pig Destroyer ALTAR BAR Strip District.

WPTS Presents SANDY Alex G

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

TUESDAY 37

Jonny Craig presents The Blueprint SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

EAST

2015 USA REGIONAL QUALIFIER

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BAMBOO / DJ BONICS / DJ CHARLIE WHITE / DJ MIDAS / DJ PETEY C

REX THEATER

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HOSTED BY MIKE JAX / JUDGED BY MAT THEW LAW, FOUR COLOR ZACK & ENFERNO

W

JANUARY 31, 2015 RSVP AT REDBULLTHRE3ST YLE.COM

21+ / DOORS 9:00PM / SHOW 10:00PM #3ST YLE @REDBULLPGH N E W S

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DRAWN WELL {BY AL HOFF}

THE WINNER FOR ME WAS HU WEI’S DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE “BUTTER LAMP”

Musing on the passage of time runs through this year’s group of Oscarnominated animated shorts. “A Single Life” (Netherlands, 2 min.), co-directed by Marieke Blaauw, Joris Oprins and Job Roggeveen, wittily makes its point about how we can — or cannot — control life’s unfolding, using the clever gimmick of a 45 record.

SHORT AND SWEET

“A Single Life”

CP APPROVED

You may have caught Patrick Osborne’s “Feast” (U.S.A., 6 min.) when it opened before Big Hero 6; it relates the relationship between a man and his dog, and how domestic milestones affect what tidbits (and time) the man has for his pooch. In “Me and My Moulton” (Canada-Norway, 14 min.), director Torill Kove ruminates on a 1960s Swedish childhood where her design-obsessed architect parents made her family’s life just that much different from that of her friends. But in hindsight, there is much affection for her dad’s mustache and her mom’s affinity for Finnish fabrics.

“Me and My Moulton”

More than 8,000 paintings make up “The Dam Keeper” (USA, 18 min.), Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi’s original fable about a friendless young pig who has the thankless task of keeping a mill running so the town doesn’t suffocate from ash. A new student in school complicates the pig’s view of life. And finally there is death, in Daisy Jacob’s “The Bigger Picture” (U.K., 7 min.), which tells the darkly humorous story of two brothers and their dying mother, using life-sized animated characters interacting via stop-motion with real sets. Four additional animated works round out the 77-minute program. Starts Fri., Jan. 31. Regent Square

{BY AL HOFF}

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OU’RE PERHAPS already bored hearing about the feature films nominated for this year’s Academy Awards, but there are still the largely undiscovered short films in contention. Here’s your chance to catch them before the golden men are handed out on Feb. 22. Pittsburgh Filmmakers will be presenting all the short films, in three programs. On Fri., Jan. 30, through Feb. 12, Regent Square will screen the contenders for Best Live Action and Best Animated, in two programs. (On Feb., 13, both programs will move to the Harris for another week.) The Documentary shorts will screen weekends in February at the Melwood. Below is a review of the live-action program. (The animated films are reviewed on the left.) This year’s selection of live-action shorts all fit comfortably together — five smallscale, warm stories about the mundane that nonetheless illuminates some of the better aspects of humanity. In “Aya” (Israel-France, 39 min.), from Mihal Brezis and Oded Binnun, a woman waiting at the Tel Aviv airport makes an impulsive decision to pose as the hired

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In contention (clockwise from top): “Butter Lamp,” “Aya,” Boogaloo and Graham” and “The Telephone Call”

driver assigned to transport a Danish musician, and the subterfuge lets a heretofore impossible relationship develop between the two. It’s the relationship between two chickens, two brothers and their parents that gets the comic tweaking in Michael Lennox’s “Boogaloo and Graham” (U.K., 14 min.). Set in 1978 Belfast, the political troubles are no match for the enthusiasm the two lads have for their pet birds.

OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORTS ANIMATED AND LIVE ACTION (TWO PROGRAMS)

In English, and various languages, with subtitles Starts Fri., Jan. 30. Regent Square

CP APPROVED It’s a sweet coming-of-age tale in Talkhon Hamzavi’s “Parveneh” (Switzerland, 25 min.), which depicts a teenage girl, a recent Afghani immigrant who is overwhelmed and confused by her new home in Switzerland. But on an errand to Zurich, she

befriends a punky Swiss girl, literally lets her hair down and catches a glimpse of the young modern woman she has every right to be. Working at a suicide hotline sounds gloomy, but Mat Kirkby’s “The Telephone Call” (U.K., 21 min.) finds the silver lining in the sad but hopeful conversation between the kind worker (Sally Hawkins) and the distraught caller (voice of Jim Broadbent). The two British acting pros easily sell the story. The winner for me was Hu Wei’s deceptively simple “Butter Lamp” (France-China, 15 min.). Before a motionless camera, we watch as an itinerant photographer works with several sets of Tibetan families, posing them in front of scenic backdrops (Tiananmen Square, the Great Wall). The chatter is incidental, as your eye takes in the odd moments of contrast between the Tibetans in their traditional dress and elements of modernity (a motorcycle, an Olympic torch prop). To say more is to ruin the film’s effortless exposition of cultural, generational, political and even temporal tensions. See for yourself. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Jan. 29 Pittsburgh premiere is sold out. Next screening: 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 21 (Chatham University, admission price TBD). www.powerofonevoicefilm.com (Bill O’Driscoll)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

GROUNDHOG DAY. In this neo-classic 1993 charmer from Harold Ramis, Bill Murray plays a Pittsburgh weatherman who gets trapped in a time loop while covering the annual festivities in Punxsutawney. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 30; 9:45 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31; 4:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 1; and 7:30 p.m. Mon., Feb. 2. Hollywood

NEW THIS WEEK BLACK OR WHITE. Mike Binder directs this melodrama about a custody battle for a little girl, which is complicated by her bi-racial heritage. Kevin Costner and Octavia Spencer star. Starts Fri., Jan. 30. BLACK SEA. Things that seem like a bad idea: Getting into a mothballed Soviet sub, with a crew of angry Brits and boozy (and also angry) Russians, and secretly searching for lost Nazi gold at the bottom of the Black Sea. But Capt. Robinson (Jude Law) is undaunted, and so we have the predictably harrowing events of Kevin Macdonald’s underwater thriller. And despite some stock characters and ludicrous science, Black Sea is a pretty decent, compact B-movie, by turns gritty, tense and nearly always entertaining. (It even has a splash of socio-economic commentary.) It breaks little ground in submarine drama — you can bring a checksheet of what will go wrong — but doubles down on mechanical problems by adding lots of money for the men to fight over as well. Starts Fri., Jan. 30. (Al Hoff) THE LOFT. Five guys share a loft that they use for their respective secret assignations. A perfect plan, until a dead body shows up, suggesting one of them is a killer. Erik van Looy directs this thriller, a remake of his 2008 Belgian film. Starts Fri., Jan. 30. A MOST VIOLENT YEAR. In J.C. Chandor’s new drama, set in New York City in 1981, Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) is embroiled in a dispute between heating-oil companies. Morales is expanding his own heating-oil operation, but he’s juggling sabotage from competitors, a federal investigation and blowback from shady financial partners. There’s a bit of violence in the story, but the title more likely refers to the general state of New York, as well as the upheaval in Morales’ plans. Mostly what Chandor (Margin Call) offers is a downbeat but fascinating character study of Morales, a methodical striver, who is determined to pilot his American Dream craft through rough waters without incident. Isaac racks up another great performance as the rattled but steady Morales, and Jessica Chastain is his match as his hard-edged, scheming wife and business partner. For a work set essentially in the 1970s, Chandor echoes the tenor of some of that decade’s slow-burning, gritty crime dramas, like Serpico and The French Connection, which pit flawed but determined men against a seemingly unending wave of crime and corruption. Starts Fri., Jan. 30. (AH)

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FED UP. Stephanie Soechtig’s recent documentary looks at poor eating habits in America, and the relationship between the government and food corporations. Screens as part of Duquesne University’s Human Rights Film Festival. 7 p.m. Mon., Feb. 2. College Hall (Room 105), 600 Forbes Ave., Uptown. 412-396-6415 or www.duq.edu. Free

A Most Violent Year personally contact her 16 co-workers and convince them, in uncomfortable face-to-face encounters, to give up the bonus. Over the course of these visits, the fragile state of the middle class is laid bare, as is the unpleasant truth about how even a relatively small amount of money can affect relationships presumed to be mutually supportive. But the real misery is saved for Sandra, who must fight through her own hopelessness and guilt simply to summon the energy to save her job, identity and even her family. Cotillard, in an Academy Awardnominated performance, delivers a naturalistic portrayal that, like Sandra’s own jagged emotional state, finds moments ranging from infuriating and heartbreaking to even heartwarming, in one woman’s struggle to reclaim herself. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Jan. 30. Harris (AH)

TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT. Belgian filmmakers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne (The Kid With a Bike) put their low-key, but no less devastating, spin on the wobbly European economy in this lean drama. Sandra (Marion Cotillard) learns that her co-workers have voted to eliminate her job — she has been on medical leave for depression — thus guaranteeing themselves a bonus of 1,000 euros. Sandra appeals to management, and a second vote is scheduled for Monday. That leaves her the weekend to

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(stylish 1982 Ridley Scott classic about men and replicants), Jan. 30-Feb. 5. Terminator 2: Judgment Day (he said he’d be back, and so it was in this 1991 actioner), Jan. 30-Feb. 1 and Feb 3-4. Iron Giant (1999 animated tale about a boy and his alien robot buddy), Jan. 30-Feb. 3 and Feb. 5. Plan 9 From Outer Space (amusingly dreadful 1959 alien-zombie-vampire tale from Ed Wood), 2:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31, only. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com The Power THREE THE HARD WAY. of One Voice Jim Brown, Fred Williamson and Jim Kelly star in this 1974 blaxpoitation feature from Gordon Parks Jr. in which the ass-kicking trio defeats a group of white supremacists. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 28. Hollywood WEEKEND. A gargantuan traffic accident is just the beginning of the end times in Jean-Luc Godard’s satire, which tracks a Parisian couple en route through the countryside during the collapse of civilization. Infuriating, searing, funny, experimental and provocative, this 1967 film is a classic of the arthouse canon. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Jan. 28. Melwood

PROJECT ALMANAC. Teens find a time machine — what could go wrong? Looks like plenty, in Dean Israelite’s sci-fi thriller. Starts Fri., Jan. 30.

CP

DR. ZHIVAGO. Not wedding vows, not the devastating First World War, not even the Russian Revolution can keep the sensitive poet/ doctor Zhivago (Omar Sharif) from his true love, Lara (Julie Christie). An enjoyable, sprawling 1965 romance from epic-master David Lean, complete with gorgeous vistas and beautiful wide-screen cinematography. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 4. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

CP

Two Days, One Night

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. John Waters Films: Hairspray (1988 comedy about 1960s kids and a Baltimore TV show they love), Jan. 28. Pink Flamingos (1972 comic shocker starring Divine as the “world’s filthiest person”), Jan. 28-29. Cry-Baby (Johnny Depp stars in this 1990 homage to 1950s juvenile-delinquent flicks), Jan. 28-29. Polyester (1981 satire of suburban living, shot in scratchand-sniff Odorama), Jan. 29. Sci-Fi Fest: Children of Men (2006 thriller about a childless, dystopian future). Jan. 30-Feb. 2 and Feb. 4-5. Blade Runner

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TOWERING TURRETS OF TOMORROW LAND: THE FILMS AND WRITING OF GEORGE KUCHAR. Andrew Lampert, curator at Anthology Film Archives, presents an evening dedicated to the work of underground filmmaker George Kuchar. Lampert will read from Kuchar’s notebooks and screen a 75-minute program of five of Kuchar’s rarely seen 16 mm shorts. 6:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 5. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org. Free TIME BANDITS. It’s timejumping and looting and other hijinks in Terry Gilliam’s 1981 fantasy adventure. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 29; 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 30; 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31; 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 1; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Feb. 3. Hollywood

THE POWER OF ONE VOICE. Rachel Carson is probably the 20th century’s most well-known environmentalist. But as this new, 51-minute documentary exploring her legacy argues, the radicalism of her insight in books like Silent Spring remains widely unappreciated. In interviews with everyone from Roger Christie, Carson’s adopted son, to her biographer, Linda Lear, locally based filmmaker Mark Dixon portrays a biologist determined to make a case for nature to a post-war society convinced of better living through chemistry, even when that chemistry gave us DDT. Carson, says U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service historian Mark Madison, was “probably the first voice to question whether we should totally control nature and modify the environment to better meet our ends.” As emphasized by Patricia DeMarco (former curator of the Rachel Carson Homestead, and this film’s executive producer), Carson understood nature not as a collection of replaceable parts, but as a system we could easily damage without thinking. But a litany of environmental woes demonstrates we’ve yet to fully embrace most of her lessons. The

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Three The Hard Way (1974) - 1/28 @ 7:30pm Jim Brown, Fred Williamson, and Jim Kelly shoot, kick, and karate chop everything in their path to stop a threat to the country’s water supply. All seats $5!

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Time Bandits (1981) - 1/29 @ 7:30pm, 1/30 @

10:00pm, 1/31 @ 7:00pm, 2/1 @ 7:00pm, 2/3 @ 7:30pm - Terry Gilliam’s remarkable timetravel fantasy.

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Groundhog Day (1993) - 1/30 @ 7:30pm, 1/31

@ 9:45pm, 2/1 @ 4:30pm, 2/2 @ 7:30pm A weatherman finds himself living the same day over and over again. Smart, sweet, and inventive. Starring Bill Murray, directed by Harold Ramis.

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[COMEDY BRIEFS]

“HOW DOES HE GO ON AFTER THE WORST HAS HAPPENED?”

COMEDY BRIEFS

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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A new standup showcase, Comedy Sauce (www.pghcomedy.com), launches Mon., Feb. 2, at Bloomfield’s Pleasure Bar & Restaurant (4729 Liberty Ave.). The first show, called Big Sauce, features a cross-section of such top local comics as Bill Crawford (of WDVE), T-Robe, Terry Jones, Mike Travers, Matt Wohlfarth, Sally Brooks, Mike Wysocki and Sean Collier. The show, hosted by Aaron Kleiber, is free and starts at 9 p.m. It will continue with 10 comics every Monday. ... Nationally touring Lachlan Patterson visits the Pittsburgh Improv (The Waterfront, West Homestead). A favorite at comedy festivals and on Comedy Central, the Comedy Network and Last Comic Standing, Patterson brings his observational humor for five shows, Thu., Jan. 29-Sat., Jan. 31. Tickets are $17-20 (www.pittsburgh.improv.com).

A GREAT SCOTT [BO OKS ]

Davon Magwood is a standup comedian, but don’t let him fool you: While he’s lately been something of a social activist, his stage persona is quite distinct from the fairly earnest fellow who’s become a notable local voice in anti-racism and anti-homophobia efforts. Indeed, the Pittsburgh native’s new live comedy album, I’d Rather Be Napping (Rooftop Comedy), finds him as an allpurpose misanthrope — the kind of guy who professes bafflement when his friends tell him “it’s not cool to bring money for an abortion to a baby shower.” Who knew? Not Magwood, who in the midst of these 18 tracks notes, “I obviously have a hard time finding work because I hate everything.” Of one terrible gig, he says, “I made a game because of that job. It’s called ‘Kill Yourself or Go to Work.’” Napping was recorded at the Rex Theater this past March, at Magwood’s final headlining gig here before he transitioned to living part time in New York City. That was after he drew national attention for comically calling out the homophobes of the Westboro Baptist Church (in part with “God Hates Jags” T-shirts), but before his involvement in recent Black Lives Matter protests in Pittsburgh. On record, he recounts his days as a Pokemon-loving nerd child; explores the foibles of OKCupid; and explains, “I’m not the best boyfriend because I don’t like communicating. I think it’s stupid.” Magwood’s delivery is distinctive. His deceptively conversational repertoire of false starts, hesitations and I’m-tooticked-to-talk vocalisms is well-honed, and he has it down to a personal jazz he uses to great effect.

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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HESE DAYS, even major authors don’t routinely get book tours. But Stewart O’Nan’s publisher, Viking, has sent him on a 16-city jaunt with his new novel, West of Sunset. “It’s like the ’90s again,” quips O’Nan by phone, from Boston. While it’s the 14th novel by the critically acclaimed, Pittsburgh-based author, the book’s appeal leans heavily on its subject matter. In West of Sunset, O’Nan compellingly imagines F. Scott Fitzgerald’s final years, when, perpetually broke, he moved to Hollywood. From 1937 to 1940, with the Nazis rising overseas, the once-famous Jazz Age author of The Great Gatsby was hanging with folks like Dorothy Parker and Humphrey Bogart, and writing screenplays and the book that became The Last Tycoon. Meanwhile, his wife, Zelda, was confined to an asylum, and his daughter, Scottie, a schoolgirl back East. Fitzgerald’s Tinseltown sojourn has been documented before, notably in memoirs by Sheila Graham, the gossip columnist who became his lover there and is a principal character in West of Sunset. But, says O’Nan, “We’ve never experienced Fitzgerald’s life in Hollywood from his point of view before.” And O’Nan believes Fitzgerald’s last days are misunderstood, as he dramatizes in the book and explains in an interview with CP.

WHAT DREW YOU TO THIS TIME IN FITZGERALD’S LIFE? He was a fish out of water. Here he is, he’s dead broke, things have been going really badly, and he’s in bad health. He goes from hanging around outside of [Zelda’s] asylum in North Carolina, to sort

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Getting closer to F. Scott Fitzgerald: Stewart O’Nan

of the center of glamour and success and power, in Hollywood, and he’s penniless.

… How does he go on after the worst has happened? That’s the question I’m always asking of my characters. WHERE WAS HIS LITERARY REPUTATION IN 1937? Totally vanished. He’s out of print, nobody’s reading him, he’s totally passé. What he stands for is long, long gone. YOU DEPICT HIM AS DEDICATED TO HIS CRAFT, EVEN WHILE WORKING ON SILLY SCRIPTS. He was a consummate professional. From age 22 forward, he didn’t have any other job. He had no other way to make money. And he had a lifestyle that needed a lot of money. … He can’t pay. He can’t pay his bills. He can’t pay his rent. And this goes on for years. He borrows money from his agent, thinking, “I’m going to somehow make a comeback. I’m going to somehow do this.” And in fact he pulls it off in Hollywood.


YOUR RESEARCH INCLUDED HIS LETTERS? There’s thousands and thousands of his letters, and also letters from Zelda to him, and from Scottie to him. His letters between him and [his editor,] Max Perkins, his letters between him and [agent] Harold Ober. They really let you know where he is at certain points in his life. And those gave me the jumping-off places, where I could do full scenes from those. Those were my guideposts.

STEWART O’NAN

BOOK-LAUNCH PARTY 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 7. East End Book Exchange, 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-228-2847 or www.eastendbookexchange.com

WHAT DO READERS SAY INTERESTS THEM MOST ABOUT THE BOOK? A lot of them focus on Scott and Zelda, and they focus on those weird vacations they take [when she’s institutionalized]. And Scott’s position within the family as being that middleman between Scottie and Zelda, whose relationship is very, very fraught. [Readers] always thought of him as the wastrel: He’s the one who’s screwing everything up because of his drinking. When he’s trying to really hold

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

it all together. The other thing is, a lot of people will say they didn’t realize he did so much work when he was in Hollywood. They’d been told by the biographies that this was all wasted time. That writing for the movies was beneath him, that he failed at it, and that it killed him.

WATCH: TrustArts.org/Evidence

YOU DISAGREE? I kind of think he regains his powers of writing. … I think part of the reason he died is that he overworked himself. But that’s because he was trying to do the [short] stories, and the novel and the screenplays all at once. The success he has out there — the Pat Hobby stories [spoofing Hollywood] are hilarious, and hold up to this day. The Last Tycoon, even unfinished, is widely seen as the best novel ever about Hollywood. His writing for Margaret Sullavan in Three Comrades wins her the best-actress award. And his writing for Vivien Leigh [in Gone With the Wind], at least some of it, helps her win the best-actress award. IS THIS A REVISIONIST PORTRAIT, THEN? It’s just more revealing. Getting a little bit closer. And getting the reader to feel it, and to really try to understand it from his point of view.

SAT, FEB 7 TH 2015 • 8 PM • BYHAM THEATER Featuring dancers from the Pittsburgh community.

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

TICKETS START AT $19 • TrustArts.org/dance • 412.456.6666

DRI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Opening Night January

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(through Feb. 22)

BRAHMAN/I a one-hijra stand-up comedy show

A compelling and hilarious show examining identity, curiosity, courage, and the assigned roles in which we often find ourselves trapped. “Temple of Comedy” Quantum’s pop-up club, 113 N. Pacific Avenue, Garfield For tickets, directions, and special events visit quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

ADITI BRENNAN KAPIL DIRECTED BY SHISHIR KURUP

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

[DANCE]

GOING BIG {BY STEVE SUCATO}

IN HIS 18 YEARS as Pittsburgh Ballet

Theatre’s artistic director, Terrence Orr has seen the company through myriad ups and downs. They ranged from rough financial periods and a Pittsburgh Musicians Union strike, in 2005, to onstage triumphs, including the first-ever sensoryfriendly production of The Nutcracker and the recent expansion of PBT’s Strip District facility. In its 45th season, Orr feels, the company is better than ever. With perhaps its deepest pool of dancer talent during his tenure, Orr says PBT finally has the chops to take on repertory usually reserved for ballet’s big boys, like the Bolshoi Ballet and Paris Opera Ballet. While the troupe opened its 45th season with two repertory ballets (The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker), the remainder of the season is all company premieres, including its first ever full-length production of the classic La Bayadère, in April. “What I am trying to do is step out and do things we really haven’t done,” says Orr. “Ballets that set us apart from other companies our size.” That’s great news for area audiences

Amanda Cochrane and Robert Moore are among the dancers in Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s Beauty and the Beast.

— and even for dance writers, who have been longing for the company to stretch its wings. In addition to La Bayadère, in March the company will premiere its very first Jerome Robbins ballet, “The Concert” (1956), along with Mark Morris’ “Sandpaper Ballet” (1999) and Jiří Kylián’s 1991 masterpiece “Petite Mort.” Orr calls PBT Premieres “perhaps the best repertory program we have ever mounted.” Such a program demonstrates the level PBT has reached, in both Orr’s eyes and the regard of folks like Morris and the Robbins Rights Trust, who historically have been highly selective about who performs their works. “It’s a testament to how good we are that we get to do these works,” says Orr. Up first, however, is the company premiere of legendary choreographer Lew Christensen’s Beauty and the Beast, with 10 performances Feb. 6-15 at the Benedum Center. The work was originally choreographed in 1958, and reworked in 1982 with new characters, sets and costumes. PBT recently purchased the production from San Francisco Ballet. The two-act, 90-minute ballet, which has rarely been performed, is loosely based on Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s 1756 version

of the traditional fairy tale, which has its roots in Greek mythology. Set to various compositions by Tchaikovsky culled by Christensen, the ballet has a romantic feel. “One of the things I love about Christensen’s ballets is that he is so musical,” says former San Francisco Ballet dancer Leslie Young, who is setting the ballet on PBT. “It has been said that while you are watching it, you feel like the music has been written for the ballet.” Orr also has a history with the production, having danced in it early in his career, when he was with San Francisco Ballet. In his restaging of the ballet, he says, he omitted a few sections he felt extraneous to the ballet and has had some of the ballet’s set pieces and costumes redone, including the Beast’s mask. Forget the 1991 Disney movie, with its dancing candelabra and dishware. Christensen’s ballet is a full-on fairy tale, with magical forest creatures such as stags and nymphs. It tells the story of young Belle, who though imprisoned by the Beast, grows to love him, a love that transforms him back into his princely self. Dancing the role of Belle opening night is nine-year principal dancer Alexandra Kochis. She says that compared to other versions of the ballet she’s seen, in this, Belle has a harder time getting past the Beast’s appearance. “What really brings her closer to him is the love she has for her family that she sees in him,” says Kochis. Kochis’ partner is Alejandro Diaz, as the Beast.

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE PERFORMS

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Feb. 6-15 (includes sensory-friendly Feb. 13 matinee). Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $27-107. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

Christensen packs a lot of technical difficulty into the ballet’s main roles, especially in the climatic grand pas de deux, which Diaz says is rife with daring tossing lifts and powerful jumps. “The male variation in it has an incredible amount of difficult beating jumps,” he says, noting a step where the dancer’s calves strike sharply together during a jump. In rehearsals, the ballet’s group sections had the feel of an old Hollywood production number, with groups of dancers sweeping across the studio into geometric formations. “The ballet has an old-world charm,” explains Young. “You are transported to another time and place that is very magical.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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I’ve got a little TWIST NEW YORK GILBERT & SULLIVAN PLAYERS

It’s where The Mikado meets The Music Man! Celebrate the legacy of Gilbert & Sullivan in American musical theater, featuring twists from Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sondheim, Lerner & Loewe, and many more!

Alex Bergeret, Artistic Producer; David Auxier, Director & Creator

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000 {PHOTO COURTESY OF ROCKHAN PHOTOGRAPHY}

Larissa Overholt (left) and Jeremy Czarniak (with fork) in Pittsburgh Musical Theater’s The Little Mermaid

[PLAY REVIEW]

SOMETHING TO SEA {BY TED HOOVER}

SO THE HOLIDAYS are over, nothing but

a couple of months of winter left staring you in the face, and the question on everyone’s lips: “What do I do with these damn kids now?” You could do worse than taking them to see the Pittsburgh Musical Theater production of The Little Mermaid. Based on the 1989 Disney film (which in turn was based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale about a young mermaid who longs to become human), the Broadway musical opened in 2008. Coming after blockbusters Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King, Disney had high hopes. The public, however, was less than enchanted and the show closed. In 2012, a retooled version premiered in the Netherlands; the audience response was more hospitable, and this is now the Little Mermaid produced around the country. Though a few national tours have made their way to our fair city, this Pittsburgh Musical Theater outing is the first locally sourced production. Director Colleen Petrucci and musical director Melissa Yanchak have, all things considered, put up a very solid and respectable Mermaid. Kim Brown has come up with some fairly eye-popping costumes, though I will say that spending a bit more on the set could pay bigger dividends than what’s on display now. But where Petrucci and Yanchak have outdone themselves is in showcasing some amazingly talented local singers. Larissa Overholt plays our heroine, Ariel. Much is made in the story about the char+

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PalacePA

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

acter having a glorious voice, and Overholt’s singing makes that the foundation of the show. Truth be told the character, not to say the script, is a little drippy, but Overholt’s commitment to role and the astonishing voice she unfurls on these songs, written by Alan Menken, Howard Ashman and Glen Slater, manages to bring it all home. And speaking of drippy, Prince Eric — the love interest — is about as cardboard as the set … even by Disney standards, where the princes are fairly shallow. But in the role, Tom Kolos strides the stage with a powerful voice and an unyielding sincerity. The show’s never better than when Overholt and Kolos are going at it … musically speaking, I mean.

- world premiere -

Prussia: 1866 aGAB CODY kKIM MARTIN

FEBRUARY 6-22

RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

EARL HUGHES, PRODUCING PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM ORDIRECTOR 412.392.8000

THE LITTLE MERMAID

pittsburghplayhouse.com 412.392.8000

continues through Sun., Feb. 1. Pittsburgh Musical Theater at the Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $12.75-49.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghmusicals.com

February 13 - February 22 Scuttle, the goofy meddling seagull, is written for an old-fashioned song-anddance man, and PMT is lucky to get Pittsburgh’s personification of same: Jeremy Czarniak. Here’s a guy who can sell a song and a gag like nobody’s business. Tim Hartman’s on hand with his own booming baritone as Triton, and Trumaine “Tru” Verret-Fleming is a lot of fun as Sebastian. I would like to re-emphasize the children’s nature of the show; adorable little moppets are running up and down the aisles waving glow sticks and singing along with the performers on stage. But to complain that this is a hideous distraction (which it is) really misses the point. This production is designed for them, not the rest of us. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FRIOrchestra • FEB 6 • 8PM $30, $22; Loge $30

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Thursday - Saturday 7:30PM Saturday & Sunday Matinees at 3PM (No Matinee on February 22)

Falk School Auditorium University of Pittsburgh 4060 Allequippa Street (Oakland) Pittsburgh, Pa 15261

Tickets: $15, $20 For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records or Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com For more information visit newhorizontheater.org Fascinating and dramatically compelling, this eloquent play depicts the supposed meeting of two of the most important men of modern times: Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Differing in their philosophies, but alike in their mutual respect, the two men debate their varying approaches to the same grave social problems, both prepared to die for their beliefs. This production is funded in part by grants from Advancing Black Arts in Pittsburgh Program, a partnership of The Pittsburgh Foundation and The Heinz Endowments, Allegheny Regional Asset District, Chris Moore Communications, Inc., The Heinz Endowments, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts/Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.2902.05.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

We will keep you warm!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ARCADE COMEDY THEATER}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

+ THU., JAN. 29 {ART}

NEW Winter Hours: THURSDAY 5PM-2AM Bachata Night with DJ Bobby D

FRIDAY 4PM-2AM

Happy Hour 4-6PM DJ starts at 9:30PM 9:30PM

SATURDAY 5PM-2AM DJ starts at 9:30PM

*Email info@perlepgh for all bottle service and private party inquiries

25 Market Square • DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH • 412-471-2058

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Just a few years ago, Vanessa German was best known for her riveting spoken-word performances and her “Stop Shooting We Love You” yard-sign campaign. But now she’s similarly acclaimed for her visual art, like the work in the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts’ 2012 Emerging Artist of the Year exhibit. Her latest exhibition, Vanessa German: The Ordinary Sacred, opens tonight with a free reception at Concept Gallery. Her new found-object pieces continue her explorations of AfricanAmerican history, racism, the impact of violence and more. Bill O’Driscoll 6-8 p.m. 1031 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. Free. 412-242-7443 or www.conceptgallery.com

JAN. 29

Sketchville

A four-performance run at Carlow College’s Antonian Theater opens tonight. Zacchiaus McKee 7 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 1. The Antonian Theater, 3333 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $15-38. 412-422-7919 or www.undercroftopera.org

{STAGE} A reprise worth catching opens tonight at Off the Wall. Underneath the Lintel is Glenn

{OPERA} With full costuming, staging and orchestra, Undercroft Opera performs Strauss’ classic operetta Die Fledermaus. In a true comedy of errors, the opera follows Eisenstein, a man of questionable character; his clever wife, Rosalinda; their chambermaid, Adele; and friend-turnedadversary Dr. Falke as they attend a New Year’s Eve ball in disguise. Set in the 1970s, this far-out production is performed with a groovy flair and features all local talent.

JAN. 31

Alba Flamenca

Berger’s critically acclaimed one-man play about a timid librarian who’s sent on a world-girdling journey by the anonymous return of a book 113 years overdue. The show premiered locally a year ago at 12 Peers Theater; seasoned actor Randy Kovitz returns in the title role for three performances. Wrote CP critic Ted Hoover of last year’s staging: “There’s not a second of this 80-minute intermissionless play that you’re not swept up in the journey.” BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 30, and 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-30. 888-718-4253 or www.insideoffthewall.com

{COMEDY} While improv normally predominates at The Arcade Comedy Theater, this weekend spotlights an entirely different form of comedy. In its first-ever festival, Arcade hosts Sketchville, boasting sets from eight different local sketch-comedy troupes and dozens of new, original scenes in six shows over three days. Featured troupes include


sp otlight {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The title of Quantum Theatre’s new show, Brahman/i, a one-hijira stand-up comedy show, requires some explanation. “Brahman” and “Brahmani” are the male and female names, respectively, of the main character, the child of immigrants from India who was born an hijira, or intersex person. But the play, part one of playwright Aditi Brennan Kapil’s “Displaced Hindu Gods” trilogy (here, cosmic spirit Brahma), is indeed structured like a nightclub routine exploring history, mythology and gender as “B.” grows from childhood to adulthood. The production’s Los Angeles-based director, Shishir Kurup — himself Indian-born and partly Kenyaraised — was drawn both to Brahman/i’s form and content. He’s intrigued by standup both as a cultural outlet for truth-telling and social criticism, and as a “high-wire act.” And he’s fascinated by the opportunity afforded his New York-based star, Sanjiv Jhaveri (pictured), to tell stories as the chameleonic B. During the 90-minute show at a Garfield community center — a former church temporarily repurposed by Quantum as the Temple of Comedy (complete with complementary Indian beer and snack) — B. will embody a dozen diverse characters, inspiring us to rethink our identities: national, ethnic, gender. “One of the powerful things about tthis piece,” says Kurup, “is the questioning of labels.” Bill O’Driscoll Jan. 30-Feb. 22. Bloomfield-Garfield Community Center, 113 N. Pacific Ave., Garfield. $18-49. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com

Som Someday Is Now is the first major museum show to survey majo Sister Corita’s entire 30-year Siste career. The free opening caree reception is tonight. ZM recep 7-10 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 19. 117 thro Sandusky St., North Side. 412San 237-8300 or www.warhol.org 237

Secondhand Sketch, The Big Deal, all-female troupe e Frankly Scarlett (pictured) and Super Uber Mega Ultra, ra, composed of graduates from om Arcade’s sketch-writing classes. ZM 8 and 10 p.m. Also 8 and 10 p.m. nightly Fri., Jan. 30, and Sat., Jan. 31. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. BYOB. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com m

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+ FRI., JAN. 30 {STAGE} It’s always about love, isn’t it? In a fully immersive multimedia performance, Chipping Smooth tells the story of the he growth and change of a boy and girl in love amidstt life’s emotional transitions.. Combining spoken word, poetry, video projections, Shakespeare and live music, c, the show is an experience in narrative and performance. e. Future Tenant, in partnership with Pinnacle Productions, hosts three intimate performances starting tonight, with locals Julia Maxwell and John McGovern in the main roles. ZM 8 p.m. Also 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31. 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. $10 suggested donation. 412-325-7037 or www.futuretenant.org

JAN. 29

Vanessa German: The Ordinary Sacred Art by Vanessa German

pop culture to evoke messages of peace and love. Combining themes of politics and faith, her work helped establish printmaking as a medium. While other exhibitions have focused on her graphics,

JAN. 30

Someday Is Now: The Art of Corita Kent

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refreshments, door prizes, discounts for Heinz Hall concerts and more. Tonight’s free kick-off, at Franktuary in Lawrenceville, features performances by two small ensembles, including a bass duet. Forthcoming dates, both ticketed, are Feb. 17 (Livermore, $10) and March 3 (Wigle Whiskey, North Side, $10). BO 5-7 p.m. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. www.pittsburghsymphony.org

{MUSIC} Don’t get to the symphony? The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra brings a little of itself to you. Play N’ At, a Tuesday chamber-music series set for happy hours at local gathering spots, premieres tonight. Play N’ At includes special classical-musicthemed cocktails and other

{WORDS}

“It felt like a really big jetliner had passed through the creative-writing program at Pitt,” says Michael Schneider, recalling the year when Galway Kinnell was a visiting professor at the school. That was 1983, the same year Kinnell won the Pulitzer Prize and shared the National Book Award, both for his Selected Poems. But following Kinnell’s death this past October, at age 87, Schneider most remembers the acclaimed poet’s impact on students like him. The influence was a product of his teaching and writing, but also of the character of a man who in the 1960s had been jailed in Louisiana for his civil-rights activism, and who, among other causes, had been a passionate voice against the Vietnam War. “I have always intended to live forever; / but not until now, to live now,” wrote Kinnell in “The Seekonk Woods.” Kinnell’s Pittsburgh connections also included a 1967 residency at the International Poetry Forum, and three readings there over the years. Tonight, Schneider presents a who’s-who of local poets in the Galway Kinnell Memorial Reading, at East End Book Exhchange. Reading from Kinnell’s work are 10 poets, including Terrance Hayes, Jan Beatty, Lynn Emanuel, Ed Ochester and Michael Wurster. BO 7-9 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-228-2847 or www.eastendbookexchange.com

Serigrapher Corita Kent was not your typical artist; she might have been the world’s only hippie Catholic nun printmaker. The Andy Warhol Museum launches its latest exhibition, Someday Is Now: The Art of Corita Kent. Gaining prominence in the 1960s, Sister Mary Corita mixed bold imagery and provocative text drawn from

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Sta warm with some Stay Latin flair from PittsburghLa based dance troupe Alba ba Flamenca. In its annual Fla showcase, the ensemble sh celebrates traditional cel Spanish folk song and dance. Spa Co-founder and troupe Co director Carolina Loyoladir Garcia describes the Ga culture of flamenco as cul “very full of feeling and “ve experience, of human joy exp and suffering.” Flamenco an Pittsburgh students will Pit also perform in this als evening of North African eve rhythms, Middle Eastern h h melodies and European harmonies tonight at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. ZM 8 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF BOBBIE BRISTOL}

{ART}

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Art by Corita Kent

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+ THU., FEB. 05 {SCREEN} When George Kuchar died, in 2011, John Waters told the New York Times that Kuchar and his twin brother, Mike, were “the people who made me want to make movies.” While Waters eventually went mainstream, the Kuchars remained happily underground; George’s hundreds of no-budget Hollywood spoofs and other films and videos helped define camp and diary films starting in the 1960s. Tonight, Anthology Film Archives’ Andrew Lampert visits the Carnegie Museum of Art to read from Kuchar’s notebooks and to screen four of his rarely seen 16 mm shorts, including “Eclipse of the Sun Virgin” (1967) and 1981’s “Yolanda.” Towering Turrets of Tomorrow Land: The Films and Writings of George Kuchar is free. BO 6:30-8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

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IT’S BACK! The Voice of Southside Karaoke Contest. $200 Cash Prize 2 Winners each week ADVANCE TO FINALS! Starts February 5th FINALS on March 19th Sponsored byy

$2.50 Fireball shots

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AUDITION FOR MURDER. A film director is holding auditions for extras in an upcoming film & audience members are recruited to read for roles. The director is trying keep the dueling stars from killing each other before someone ends up dead. Sat., Jan. 31, 7 p.m., Sat., Feb. 14, 7 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 28, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. CATCH ME IF YOU CAN. Based on the film about the high-flying adventures of a globetrotting con-artist. www.comtratheatre.org Fri, Sat. Thru Feb. 7. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. DIE FLEDERMAUS. Johann Strauss’ opera fully staged in English by Undercroft Opera. Jan. 29-31, 7 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 1, 2 p.m. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-422-7919. HAIR. Classic counter-culture musical presented by Split Stage Productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 7. Greensburg Garden

and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. MOTOWN THE MUSICAL. The story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson & more. Thru Dec. 3, 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. MR. JOY. What happened to Mr. Joy? A Harlem community is disrupted when the Chinese immigrant’s shoe repair shop, a neighborhood pillar, does not open its doors. By Daniel Beaty. Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Feb. 11. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. MY FAIR LADY. A musical about Eliza Doolittle & her teacher Henry Higgins, as she transforms from a Cockney flower girl to the fairest lady of them all. Performed w/ a live orchestra. Wed, Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 p.m. and Thu., Feb. 19,

Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. WELCOME TO SKETCHVILLE. Arcade Comedy Theater’s sketch comedy festival: Sketchville. Show feat. original sketch comedy from Super Uber Mega Ultra, Secondhand Sketch, & The Big Deal. BYOB. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

COMEDY THU 29

FRI 30

“BEST OF THE BURGH” COMEDY SHOWCASE. Come out and see Pittsburgh’s best comedians every Friday. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 6 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. NORLEX BELMA, GIO ATTISANO, KYLE KARMELITA, COURTNEY REYNOLDS. 9:30 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603.

w paper pghcitym .co

COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 29 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

THU 29 - SAT 31 LACHLAN PATTERSON. 8 p.m., Fri., Jan. 30, 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 31, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

2 p.m. Thru Feb. 21. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. RODELINDA. G.F. Handel’s opera about love & betrayal starring the company’s Resident Artists, w/ special guest musicians Chatham Baroque. In Italian w/ English text. Sat., Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 1, 2 p.m. CAPA Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 30 - SAT 31 FRANKLY SCARLETT. Dketch comedy festival continues w/ the all-female sketch troupe, Frankly Scarlett. Also feat. Justin & Jerome Experience & The Cut Scenes. BYOB. Jan. 30-31, 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JAMES YON. 8 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 31, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SPINSTER COMEDY. Jan. 30-31, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 30 - SUN 01 BRAHMAN/I. A one hijra comedy show. In this play set as a stand-up comedy routine, the title character explores history, mythology, gender.. & high school. Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 22 Temple of Comedy, Garfield. 412-362-1713.

SAT 31 BILLY ELMER. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6311. JOE BRONZI, MATT STANTON, DAVID KAYE. 6 p.m. Cardinal Wuerl North Catholic High School, Cranberry. LISA DAPPRICH & CHUCK KREIGER. 565 LIVE, Bellevue. 412-522-7556. CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015


Research Study of

Borderline Personality Disorder

VISUAL LART

The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMÄJ\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUÅPJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y` Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z :VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490

For more information, call 412-246-5367.

Pittsburgh’s Indie Video Game Store

“Remnants of Autumn,” by Nancy Koch, from the Pittsburgh Society of Artists’ show Unjuried, at the Spinning Plate Gallery, in Friendship

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent. A full-scale survey covering more than 30 years of work by American artist Corita Kent; a designer, teacher, feminist, activist for civil rights & anti-war causes. Opening reception Jan. 30, 7-10pm, feat. live music by DJ Huck Finn. North Side. 412-237-8300. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Sketch to Structure. Sketches, plans, blueprints, renderings, & models from the Heinz Architectural Center collection, showing architectural design from initial concept to client presentation. Opens Jan 31. Oakland. 412-622-3131. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. UNJURIED. Pittsburgh Society of Artists 50th Anniversary show. Artist reception Feb. 7, 6-8 p.m. Closing reception/ People’s Choice Awards Feb. 27, 6-7:30 p.m. Friendship. 412-441-0194.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2014: AIR’s 3rd Annual National Juried Exhibition. North Side. 412-321-8664. BE GALLERIES. untitled iii. Work by Jeremy Boyle &

Mark Franchino. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Pasquale Pristera & Zivi Aviraz. Feat. artworks by the “wood zipper artist,” Pasquale Pristera & Zivi Aviraz. Squirrel Hill. 412-421- 8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. Snap Judgments: Capturing the Architecture of the Allegheny County Courthouse. Work by David Aschkenas. By appointment. Downtown. 412-297-4900. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Photo Section. Exhibit celebrating the 130th Anniversary of the Pittsburgh Photo Section. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American

artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Attention. Rising Star! Works on paper by Charity Baker & Dorthy Forman. Jewerly by Masha Archer. Artists’ reception Feb. 6, 5:30-8pm. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Quintessence. Paintings, prints & sculptures from the Collection of Gallery 4. Quintessence. 5th anniversary show feat. Mark Ryden, Scott Hove, Joe Sorren, Jeremy Fish, Glenn Barr, Audrey Kawasaki, Camille Rose Garcia, James Jean, Sam Flores, John Puglisi, more. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Headliners. New paintings, mixed media works, glass & ceramics. Feat. Christine Aaron, Eileen Braun, Claire Cotts, Jamie Harris, Ben Johnson, Micheal Madigan, Susan Morosky & Scott Turri. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. CONTINUES ON PG. 39

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Gamers Wanted!

Sega, Nintendo, Xbox, Playstation & more! We specialize in Japanese imports and hard-to-find titles for new and old systems! We replace batteries in carts and repair your retro consoles too! facebook.com/pennhillsgames 431 RODI ROAD

PENN HILLS

412.371.0386

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

FILM SCREENING:

FREDRICK LAW OLMSTED: DESIGNING AMERICA Frederick Law Olmstead was an American landscape architect, and a pioneer among his peers, when the idea arose that landscape architecture ought to be considered as a fine art. One of the most successful landscape architects of his time, his influence the sense of American urban life and design can still be seen in some of his work portfolio which includes the designing of great green spaces like New York City’s Central Park, the U.S. Capitol Grounds, and the National Register-listed parkway system in Buffalo, New York, among other places. Join us for this screening, and discussion of Olmstead’s life and work to preserve nature, which also helped establish the idea of a park as both a work of art and a necessity of urban life. Moderator: Evaine Sing, operations and program director, GTECH Strategies. Evaine is a registered landscape architect with a BLA from Virginia Tech University and a Master’s in Public Policy & Management at the Heinz College of Carnegie Mellon University. An adjunct faculty member in Chatham University’s landscape architecture program, her work focuses on community and economic development as it relates to the issue of vacant land management within the urban context, creating sustainable solutions that serve as a catalyst to larger transitional changes.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 • 6PM - 8PM This screening is free and open to the public. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny at 412-471-5808 ext. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

[POLITICS]

SUN 01 FIVE MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC & ART EXHIBIT. 9 p.m. Gus’s Cafe, Lawrenceville. 412-290-9652. IMPROV HOUSE TEAMS. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

The 114th Congress is one of the most diverse in American history, but that’s not saying much: Just 17 percent of its members are non-white, and around 20 percent are women. If you’re a woman who would like to bring more balance to those numbers, sign up for Ready to Run Pennsylvania, a bipartisan political-training conference hosted by the Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics at Chatham University. The event features a keynote by Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz and a pre-conference titled Women of Color in Pennsylvania Politics. 6-8 p.m. Fri., Jan 30, and 8 a.m.- 6 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31. 1 Woodland Rd., Shadyside. $25-65. 412-365-1878 or www.chatham.edu

MON 02 BIG SAUCE KICKOFF PARTY. Feat. Bill Crawford, T-Robe, Mike Wysocki, Aaron Kleiber, Sean Collier & more. 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. COMEDY SAUCE. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TFM IMPROV COMEDY. Full throttle improv every Monday night starring our resident house teams. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 03 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 04 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m.

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Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

EXHIBITS ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. A window display & artist product series feat. Daniel Pillis. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Tough Art. An

annual exhibition of original, interactive artworks “tough” enough to withstand kid handling. Take a walk through a prism forest, create cracks on kinetic stained glass, reach for a sky of 600 LEDs, & explore the inner workings of an intergalactic sheep. North Side. 412-322-5058. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards

from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and

American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. www. per OLD ST. LUKE’S. pa pghcitym Pioneer church .co features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. Colorful orchids curated in collaboration

FULL LIST ONLINE


w/ the Orchid Society of Western Pennsylvania& displayed throughout the glasshouse. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items.Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Armin Hoffman: Farbe/Color. Celebrating our Armin Hofmann exhibition of silkscreens &emerging talent from CMU School of Design 2014 Seniors. Oakland. 412-268-3618. PANZA GALLERY. Dave Klug & Friends. The work of Dave Klug, George Schill, Stacy Innerst & Wayno. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN STATE NEW KENSINGTON. Photo Jazz. Photo exhibit by Ronald Jones, Kenan Foley & Nelson Harrison.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 31 JOSHUA MALINA. Actor from Scandal & the West Wing. Hors d’oeuvres, drinks, & dessert. Benefits the Youth Adult Division

Artists reception Feb. 7, 5:30-8 p.m., call or email tms57@psu.edu to RSVP. New Kensington. 724-334-6056. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos on Glass. Lantern slides: 1880 to 1920, hand-painted, sometimes with a single hair to color a small line. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3 Guild Shows. 3 different shows presented at PCA: Women of Vision presents “Storytellers: Truth be Told”, Craftsmen Guild presents “Illusions” & Fiberarts Guild presents “Construct”. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. REVISION SPACE. Terry Boyd “Pins & Needles” Solo Exhibition. Drawing & embroidery techniques, incorporating drama, abstraction & performance into multi-faceted & intense pieces. Open weekends & weekdays by appt. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201.

of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh 7:30-10:30 p.m. Circuit Center and Ballroom, South Side. 412-992-5204. WINTERFEST. Food, music, local vendors, photo booth & kid friendly activities. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food

SALT OF THE EARTH. Slate Series: Stephanie Armbruster. As part of the Slate Series, a Pittsburgh artist will transform our floor to ceiling slate wall into a piece of chalk art. This month features Stephanie Armbruster. Garfield. 412-441-7258. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 15: Projects by Christopher Meerdo & Matthew Conboy. Feat. work by Christopher Meerdo showcasing work from his projects Iceland & Cataphote & Matthew Conboy, presenting work from his project “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear”. Both artists will give a brief gallery talk describing the scope & inspiration of their work. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, &

Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Interior open for special occasions. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. West Hills Art League Exhibition. A sampling of the wide array of West Hills Art League members’ artistic styles ranging from traditional watercolors & oil paintings to acrylics, pastels, clay, paper, & more. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Thrust Excavation. Work by Chris McGinnis. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

Bank. 1-5 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg.

Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

SUN 01

POLITICS

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em!

FRI 30 - SAT 31 READY TO RUN

PITTSBURGH. Presented by the Center for Women & Politcis, Ready to Run™ Pennsylvania provides bi-partisan political training to encourage women to run for government leadership positions. The day-long program targets women considering or recently deciding to run for political office, providing training & mentoring by campaign professionals, political women, & officeholders. Feat. trainer Chris Jahnke & keynote speaker Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1878.

LITERARY THU 29 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. JOSHUA MARIE WILKINSON & JEN BERVIN. Authors of The Book of Whispering in the Projection Booth & The Gorgeous Nothings: Emily Dickinson’s Envelope Poems, respectively. Part of the Pittsburgh

Images: Lorcan O'Herlihy, Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects, Formosa1140, 2010. Gift of Lorcan O'Herlihy, 2014.67.7 © 2007 Lorcan O'Herlihy. Bottom Photo: © Lawrence Anderson/Esto

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

OPENING JANUARY 31

Building curiosity. Sketches, plans, blueprints, renderings, models. Architectural design is anything but straightforward. An in-depth look at the process, featuring work from CMOA's collection.

the heinz architectural center

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Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125.

FRI 30 PURE POETRY DESTRUCTION. Poetry by Jason Baldinger, John Thomas Menesini, & Don Wentworth; prose by Olivia Rose Mancing. BYOB. All donations go to Light of Life Mission. 8 p.m. Cyberpunk Apocalypse, Lawrenceville. 412-687-1780.

SAT 31 FREE MONSTER POEMS ABOUT MONSTERS. Readings by Margaret Bashaar, Cherri Baum, Juliet Cook, Rachael Deacon, Penny Delapoison, The Devilz in the Detailz, Shawn Maddey, & Requiem. Presented by Hyacinth Girl Press 7-11 p.m. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. IMAGE TO WORD W/ AUTHOR SHERRIE FLICK. Writer’s workshop. Novice & experienced writers welcome. Create short stories & poems. Group discussion & one-on-one guidance. Sat, 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Thru Feb. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SUN 01 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of

every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 02 OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. SUSAN SOFAYOV. Signing copies of her debut novel, Defective 7:30 p.m. Rickert & Beagle Books, Dormont. 412-344-7444.

TUE 03 CRAIG BERNIER & SCOTT SILSBE. Fiction & poetry reading. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble Duquesne University, Uptown. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library. 412-622-3151. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

WED 04 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library. 412-622-3151.

EVENT: Launch Party for The Book of Zane,

KIDSTUFF

by Tess Almendarez Lojacono, Classic Lines Bookstore, Squirrel Hill

THU 29 - WED 04 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. Interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Thru March 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

CRITIC: Maria Barron, 60, a college professor from the North Hills WHEN: Sat.,

SAT 31 It was a great way for a relatively new author and a relatively new bookstore to promote each other with some interesting people at an interesting event. The reading sounded very appealing, and we wanted to support this small, local bookstore in Squirrel Hill. From what I can tell, it sounds like [Lojacono’s] style has been evolving. Her first book [Milagros] was a much more serious bio-pic. This sounds like it has a lot of fun and humor in it. I found the passages I heard very interesting; it intrigues me even more. There was a dialogue going on between several characters over the chapters she read and it gave really great insight into what the book is about and the inspiration for it. I’m going to buy the book because it sounds like it’s going to be really fascinating, and I hope many others do as well.

FRI 30 YOUTH COOK: PIZZA PARTY. Guest chef Larry Neskey will demonstrate how to make a pizza from scratch. Using microscopes, explore the beneficial bacteria that make sourdough delicious. 5-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058 x 240.

SAT 31 CHUGGINGTON LIVE! THE GREAT RESCUE ADVENTURE. Wilson, Brewster & Koko take on exciting challenges & learn new skills through teamwork, courage & determination. 3 & 6 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LEARN TO ICE SKATE. Teaching basic skating fundamentals of balance, edge control & stopping. Classes for all ranges of expertise. All ages. Schenley Park Ice Rink. Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 28 Schenley Park, Oakland. 703-597-6905. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

B Y Z AC C HI AU S M C K E E

OUTSIDE TUE 03 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 04 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 29

2ND ANNUAL ROBBIE BURNS SUPPER. Celebrate the life & poetry of Scotland’s unofficial national poet,Robert Burns w/ BEAUTY & THE BEAST. Scottish food & drinks. 6-8:30 p.m. Based on the classic story, Marty’s Market, Strip District. an interactive musical 412-391-1709. production. Sat, Sun, 1 F7: ADULT SPELLING & 3:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 8 BEE. Open to the Gemini Theater, Point public. Feat. prizes & Breeze. 412-243-5201. music by slowdanger. www. per Presented by Shift pa pghcitym Collaborative. MAKER STORY TIME. .co shiftcollaborative.com/ Explore tools, materials rsvp. 6 p.m. The Space and processes inspired Upstairs, Point Breeze. by books. Listen to stories read INTERNATIONAL by librarian-turned-Teaching WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. OF PITTSBURGH. Social, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, cultural club of American/ North Side. 412-322-5058. international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. HOMEWORK HELP. For iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. LATIN AMERICA: THE Assemble, Garfield. UNNOTICED GIANT SOUTH OF

SAT 31 - SUN 01

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month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PSYCHIC WORKSHOP W/ DR. NINA PADOLF. Learn ways to tap into the intuitive, creative self using various methods. Feat. world renowned investigative psychics, The Vincent Sisters. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cube Creative Space, East Liberty. 412-656-6993.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THE BORDER. A lecture by Luis Bell. Porter Hall, Rm. 100. 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-6094. LUNCH & LEARN: GETTING STARTED IN GENEALOGY RESEARCH. Come learn about free library resources that can aid you in your own genealogical research. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. THE MYTH OF MCDONALDIZATION: GLOBALIZATION & CULTURE IN A JAPANESE COMMUNITY, 1961-2014. Talk presented by the Japan-America Society of PA. 6-8 p.m. U.S. Steel Tower, Downtown. 412-433-5021. THE POWER OF ONE VOICE: A 50-YEAR PERSPECTIVE ON THE LIFE OF RACHEL CARSON. Screening of film by local filmmaker Mark Dixon. 7 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 30 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every

PRE-BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2015 OPENING EVENT. Enjoy a fun & family-friendly afternoon of food, crafts & the largest library flash mob in history! Learn the Dignity and Respect Hustle & perform it with us to kick off Black History Month Celebrations at the Carnegie Libraries! 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TRIBUTE TO LEAD BELLY W/ JOSH WHITE JR., REV. ROBERT B. JONES & RADOSLAV LORKOVIC. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-361-1915. VALENTINE DANCE LESSON & WINE SESSION. S beginner ballroom class followed by dancing to celebrate Valentines Day. Food will be provided, BYOB. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

SUN 01 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CHINESE II. Chinese II is geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of the language and are interested in increasing oral and written proficiency, as well as enhancing their understanding of Chinese culture. First Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Third Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Thru April 19 Carnegie Library. 412-622-3151. LOW COST VACCINE CLINIC. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Western


Pennsylvania Humane Society, North Side. 412-321-4625. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223. SUPER BOWL SUNDAY. Free bowling until midnight. 21 + 9 p.m. Arsenal Bowling Lanes, Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993.

SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library. 412-622-3151. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

MON 02

AUDITIONS 56TH ANNUAL DOLLAR

RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPARKING HOPE TEACHING AS A CATALYST TO LAUNCHING GREAT LEARNING. Lecture by Sean McComb. 3-5 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-648-8213.

BANK THREE RIVERS ART FESTIVAL. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust is accepting applications for participants in the 56th annual Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. The Festival seeks visual & performing artists of all disciplines. The open application period ends on February 1, 2015. Submit application online. Festival theme is Unseen/Unheard. Information session on Jan. 10 at 10-11:30am in the Big Room of the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council.

McKeesport. 412-673-1100. MODEL CASTING CALL. Casting for the Aman Rock The Mic Talent Showcase. Feb. 1, 3-6 p.m. Open to men & women, w/ or w/out experience. Bring photo & bio. Call or email cgcpalace@hotmail. com for information. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-606-2826. SEWICKLEY AREA THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for “25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”, Feb. 2 & 3, 6-9pm. Prepare 32 bars of uptempo musical theatre song or ballad & a short monologue, as well as a headshot & resume. St. James Parish, Sewickley. 412-879-0355. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for James and the Giant Peach. Men, women & children ages 8 & up. Cold reading from the script. Bring resume & picture. Jan. 31, 12-4 pm. 724-374-9200. THROUGHLINE. Prepare a 1-2 minute monologue, headshot & acting resume. Schedule auditions online or

at the

David L. Lawrence Convention Center

Local Music & Local Food

TUE 03 DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PITTSBURGH MOOD PROUD. Pittsburgh Mood Disorder Support Group is a peer sponsored group and is LGBTQIA friendly. Get focused about mental health topics & make new friends. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 24 Crazy Mocha Baum, Friendship. 412-465-0381. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 04 AFTERNOON TEA DANCE. Lessons offered to beginners. Wed, 12-2:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

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SPONSORED BY:

See our ad on PAGE 7 for more details!

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

PITTSBURGH ACTION AGAINST RAPE Since its founding in 1972, PAAR has provided services for victims of sexual violence as well as education for the general public. Volunteers are needed in a range of capacities, from providing support via the 24-hour crisis helpline and working as an in-person advocate in local emergency rooms to helping with education projects. For information, email volunteer@paar.net or visit www.paar.net.

THE AMAN ROCK THE MIC TALENT SHOWCASE. Seeking hip hop, vocalist & spoken word artists. Jan 31, 3-6 p.m. Bring a clean show mix, bio, photo & $25 audition fee. Call or email cgcpalace@ hotmail.com for information. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-403-3189. CREATE FESTIVAL. Individuals & companies working at the intersection of creativity and technology are encouraged to: submit recent projects for the annual CREATEfest Awards; propose compelling workshops, talks or panels to raise awareness of creative technology trends in this year’s theme of “Interconnectivity;” & propose ideas for engaging arts & technology experiences throughout the festival. Submissions due Feb. 1. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions Jan. 28 & Feb. 1, 2-4pm for “Charley’s Aunt”. Men & women ages 18-50 needed. Come prepared w/ a 2-minute comedic monologue, preferably in British accent.

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by email for Feb. 7, 1-4pm & Feb. 8, 6-9pm. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744.

SUBMISSIONS AGAINST THE GRAIN THEATER FESTIVAL STUDENT PLAYWRITING COMPETITIONS. Looking for original play submissions from high school, college & graduate students. THE AUGUST WILSON EDUCATION PROJECT 11TH PLAY COMPETITION. Inviting high school students to write plays & monologues about their communities & submit them for competition. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 2. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems or one recording of yourself reciting poetry, not more than 2 minutes long. The theme of this issue is mistakes. Deadline: March 20. blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit Thru March 20.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I have a dildo that I loooooove, and I was wondering if it’s safe for me to use it in both my ass and my cunt. I would clean it in between uses/orifices, of course, and it has a flared base, so it’s safe for anal play. Can I do this or do I need to get separate toys for ass and cunt? ASS/CUNT TIMESHARE

“First off, never use a toy in the butt and then go straight into vaginal play, because that could result in a nasty bacterial infection,” said Jeneen Doumitt, co-owner of She Bop (sheboptheshop. com), an awesome sex-toy shop in Portland, Ore. But there is an option for multiple-hole-havin’ people who aren’t coordinated or organized enough to use two toys — one in the ass and another in the cunt — during a single masturbatory session. “ACT could stack multiple condoms on that beloved dildo,” said Doumitt, “and then peel off a used condom before switching orifices.” If you don’t have a lot of money to spend on condoms, ACT, or if you’re allergic to latex, your dildo will have to be cleaned — and cleaned properly — before you move from one hole to the other. But can your dildo be cleaned? That depends on what it’s made of. “Best-case scenario, ACT’s beloved dildo is medical-grade silicone, which is nonporous and can be completely disinfected,” said Doumitt. “To clean a 100 percent silicone toy, ACT can use antibacterial soap, or a light bleach solution, or pop it on the top rack of the dishwasher. ACT can even boil it — up to 10 minutes. Worst-case scenario, the dildo is made of jelly rubber. Jelly toys not only contain toxic phthalates, they’re also porous, which means they can never be fully disinfected. “It’s generally a good idea to use a condom with any toy if you’re unsure of the material.” Follow She Bop on Twitter @SheBopTheShop.

more interested in swinging than he is in having sex with you. As for fucking other people: That “go for it” may have been a one-time thing, or it may have been a whenever-you-want thing, but you’ll have to check in with your husband to find out which. It’s possible that your husband is interested in cuckolding and knowing you’re messing around with other men will awaken his libido, and it’s possible that he’s neither interested in sex nor threatened by the prospect of his spouse getting it elsewhere. Have a conversation with your husband about what is and isn’t allowed going forward — talk about what you want, talk about what he wants, talk about safety and respect and primacy — but have that conversation when (1) you haven’t been drinking and (2) there’s not a gentleman caller with a boner waiting outside the front door.

“IF YOU’RE ALLERGIC TO LATEX, YOUR DILDO WILL HAVE TO BE CLEANED — AND CLEANED PROPERLY — BEFORE YOU MOVE FROM ONE HOLE TO THE OTHER.”

I’m a 32-year-old woman with two young kids, married five years. My husband and I never had an overly exciting sex life, but after the last baby, sex became very, very infrequent. I’m a pretty sexual person, I masturbate regularly, and I have a good sexual imagination. I tried to spice things up by suggesting toys and a bit of light kink, but he wasn’t interested. He seems pretty asexual to me these days, and now I just fantasize about other men. Last week, a mutual friend came over to have a drink. When we stepped outside to smoke a cig — just me and the other guy — he kissed me and said, “I’m going to ask your husband if I can fuck you.” He did, and surprisingly enough, my husband said go for it! What a night! I got permission to fuck someone else. Now I’m not sure if I want to swing or just fuck other people. Advice, please. HORNY MARRIED CHICK

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.28/02.04.2015

Swinging would theoretically involve you and your husband fucking other people, HMC, and if your husband isn’t interested in sex, if he’s lowto-no-libido or actually asexual, he won’t be any

What would you say to a woman who was forcing you to choose between her and the photos of your late first wife? A YOUNGISH WIDOWER

“Good-bye and good riddance, you cruel and psychotic piece of shit.”

I’m a straight man with a bisexual wife, married a little over two years. She got me started listening to your podcast and opened up my mind to alternative relationships. Our arrangement at present is a semi-open kind of thing. She gets some female action on the side, and I, in theory, get a happier, lustier wife who will, if her “friend” is game, include me in threesomes. Our first threesome is happening soon. An old friend/sex buddy and my wife are mutually attracted, and plans are being made. There are some red flags: My wife, who had previously gotten off on the idea of seeing me with another woman, has decreed penetration off-limits. She really doesn’t seem all that thrilled about my having any contact with the other woman at all. Meanwhile, the friend has told my wife that she can include me if she wants, but it’s my wife that the friend wants. What do I do? I seem to be the only one who wants me to even be involved in this threesome. Do I just keep all my attention on my wife? Do I just watch or even stay out completely? I love my wife and don’t want to create conflict, but I feel like I’m getting the short end of the stick here. UNCERTAIN IN CANADA

I would skip this particular threesome, UIC, if I were you — there’s no bigger boner-killer than knowing you’re not wanted. And you signed off on her being with other women on the condition that you, in the context of the occasional threesome, would get to be with other women, too. If your wife isn’t into that — if she’s too threatened by the prospect of seeing you with/inside another woman to keep up her end of the bargain — you need to renegotiate your agreement about openness, and reverting to a closed relationship should be on the table.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

01.28-02.04

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1899, the king of the African nation of Swaziland died while dancing. His only son, Sobhuza, was soon crowned as his successor, despite being just four months old. It took a while for the new king to carry out his duties with aplomb, and he needed major guidance from his grandmother and uncle. Eventually he showed great aptitude for the job, though, and ruled until his death at age 83. I’m getting a Sobhuza-type vibe as I meditate on you, Aquarius. New power may come to you before you’re fully ready to wield it. But I have confidence you will grow into it, especially if you’re not shy about seeking help.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the 1951 animated movie version of Alice in Wonderland, Alice says to herself, “I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it.” I hope you won’t be like her, Pisces. It’s an excellent time for you to heed your own good advice. In fact, I suspect that doing so will be crucial to your ability to make smart decisions and solve a knotty problem. This is one of those turning points when you really have to practice what you preach. You’ve got to walk your talk.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you have an entourage or posse that helps you work magic you can’t conjure up alone? Is there a group of co-conspirators that prods you to be brave and farseeing? If not, try to whip one up. And if you do have an inspirational crew, brainstorm about some new adventures for all of you to embark on. Scheme and dream about the smart risks and educational thrills you could attempt together. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you especially need the sparkle and rumble that a feisty band of allies can incite.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The cosmos seems to be granting you a license to be brazenly ambitious. I’m not sure how long this boost will last, so I suggest you capitalize on it while it’s surging. What achievement have you always felt insufficiently prepared or powerful to accomplish? What person or club or game have you considered to be out of your league? What issue have you feared was beyond your understanding? Rethink your assumptions. At least one of those “impossibilities” may be more possible than usual.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When I attended the University of California at Santa Cruz, my smartest friend was Gemini writer Clare Cavanagh. She headed off to Harvard for her graduate studies, and later became a pre-eminent translator of Polish poetry. Her work has been so skillful that Nobel Prize-winning Polish poet Czselaw Milosz selected her as his authorized biographer. Interviewing Milosz was a tough job, Clare told blogger Cynthia Haven. He was demanding. He insisted that she come up with “questions no one’s asked me yet.” And she did just that, of course. Formulating evocative questions is a Gemini specialty. I invite you to exercise that talent to the hilt in the coming week. It’s prime time for you to celebrate a Curiosity Festival.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Somewhere someone is traveling furiously toward you,” writes poet John Ashbery, “at incredible speed, traveling day and night, through blizzards and desert heat, across torrents, through narrow passes. But will he know where to find you, recognize you when he sees you, give you the thing he has for you?” This passage might

not be literally true, Cancerian. There may be no special person who is headed your way from a great distance, driven by a rapt intention to offer you a blessing. But I think Ashbery’s scenario is accurate in a metaphorical way. Life is, in fact, working overtime to bring you gifts and help. Make sure you cooperate! Heighten your receptivity. Have a nice long talk with yourself, explaining why you deserve such beneficence.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1768, Britain’s Royal Society commissioned navigator James Cook to lead a long naval voyage west to Tahiti, where he and his team were supposed to study the planet Venus as it made a rare transit across the face of the sun. But it turned out that task was a prelude. Once the transit was done, Cook opened the sealed orders he had been given before leaving England. They revealed a second, bigger assignment, kept secret until then: to reconnoiter the rumored continent that lay west of Tahiti. In the coming months, he became the first European to visit the east coast of Australia. I foresee a comparable progression for you, Leo. The task you’ve been working on lately has been a prelude. Soon you’ll receive your “sealed orders” for the next leg of your journey.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): According to computer security company Symantec, you’re not in major danger of contracting an online virus from a porn website. The risk is much greater when you visit religious websites. Why? They’re often built by inexperienced programmers, and as a result are more susceptible to hackers’ attacks. In the coming weeks, Virgo, there may be a similar principle at work in your life. I suspect you’re more likely to be undermined by nice, polite people than raw, rowdy folks. I’m not advising you to avoid the do-gooders and sweet faces. Just be careful that their naiveté doesn’t cause problems. And in the meantime, check out what the raw, rowdy folks are up to.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Talking will be your art form in the coming week. It’ll be healing and catalytic. You could set personal records for most engaging phone conversations, emails, text messages and faceto-face dialogs. The sheer intensity of your selfexpression could intimidate some people, excite others and generate shifts in your social life. Here are a few tips to ensure the best results. First, listen as passionately as you speak. Second, make it your intention to communicate, not just unload your thoughts. Tailor your messages for

your specific audience. Third, reflect on the sometimes surprising revelations that emerge from you. They’ll give you new insights into yourself.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let’s say you want to buy an 18-karat gold ring. To get that much gold, miners had to excavate and move six tons of rock. Then they doused the rock with poisonous cyanide, a chemical that’s necessary to extract the good stuff. In the process, they created toxic waste. Is the gold ring worth that much trouble? While you ponder that, let me ask you a different question. What if I told you that over the course of the next five months, you could do what’s necessary to obtain a metaphorical version of a gold ring? And although you would have to process the equivalent of six tons of raw material to get it, you wouldn’t have to use poison or make a mess. Would you do it? What’s the most important thing you’ve never done? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on! new year. new you. classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Life has a big, tough assignment for you. Let’s hope you’re up for the challenge. There’s not much wiggle room, I’m afraid. Here it is: You must agree to experience more joy and pleasure. The quest for delight and enchantment has to rise to the top of your priority list. To be mildly entertained isn’t enough. To be satisfied with lukewarm arousal is forbidden. It’s your sacred duty to overflow with sweet fulfillment and interesting bliss. Find ways to make it happen!

now accepting applications for our teacher training program!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You may have never sampled the Southeast Asian fruit called durian. It’s controversial. Some people regard it as the “king of fruits,” and describe its taste as sweet and delicious. Naturalist

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Alfred Russel Wallace said it was like “a rich custard highly flavored with almonds.” But other people find the durian unlikable, comparing its aroma to turpentine or decaying onions. TV chef Anthony Bourdain asserts that its “indescribable” taste is “something you will either love or despise.” I foresee the possibility that your imminent future will have metaphorical resemblances to the durian, Scorpio. My advice? Don’t take things personally.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

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{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $50 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

Beauty Slap This up-and-coming local six-piece — four horns, electric guitar, beats by Jakeisrain — lays down serious jazzy instrumental funk. Playing outdoors at the frigid First Night celebration Downtown, they even had the kids dancing, and not just to keep warm.

DO YOU HAVE CHRONIC CONSTIPATION? YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN OUR VIBRATING CAPSULE STUDY

Cheap h seats at Pittsburgh Public Theater Empire It’s not too late to jump aboard Fox’s hiphop showcase/soap opera/gangster tale/ King Lear remake/booty parade/whatever hybrid. The guilty pleasure we didn’t even know we needed. 9 p.m. Wednesdays

If you’re 26 and under, tickets to any show at the Public are $15.75. Upcoming shows include My Fair Lady and August Wilson’s How I Learned What I Learned. See website for details. www.ppt.org/ studentstudentticketoffer

You may be eligible to participate if you • Are 18 years or older • Have Chronic Idiopathic Constipation not relieved by current available therapies • Are willing to come to the clinic twice a week Compensation may be provided for your time and travel

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For additional information contact: Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC 201 South Highland Avenue, Suite 102 Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-363-1900 Contact: Kristy

A book of short stories by fantasy and science-fiction writers on the topic of dangerous women. Edited in part by Games of Thrones author George R.R. Martin.

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The score of Birdman Straub Groundhog Altbier This seasonal offering from the St. Mary’s-based brewery is a tasty German-style ale. Plus, it’s named for a local rodent celebrity.

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The Michael Keaton movie has gotten plenty of buzz and award nominations, but its improvised drum-kit score, by Antonio Sanchez, makes the film. (Sadly, it was snubbed by the Academy, which cited its use of snippets of other composers’ works in disqualifying it.)

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January 28, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 4

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