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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

RAW, TENDER, INTIMATE: CHUCK CONNELLY’S AMERICA, AT THE WARHOL 36


EVENTS 1.2 – 5-10pm FREE GOOD FRIDAYS PRESENTED BY UPMC HEALTH PLAN Each Good Friday in January Cash bar and Pittsburgh’s own DJ Huck Finn. FREE admission

1.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AMERNET STRING QUARTET WITH PIANIST AMY WILLIAMS Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

1.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: KEN VANDERMARK / NATE WOOLEY DUO Warhol Theater FREE Parking in Warhol Lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

1.30 – 7pm EXHIBITION OPENING: SOMEDAY IS NOW: THE ART OF CORITA KENT Sponsored by UPMC FREE

1.31 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JESSICA MEYER AND SETH JOSEL Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVɉ JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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It’s True.

You can now track your bus in real-time.*

Go to PortAuthority.org to learn more about TRUETIME, the routes currently available and which real-time apps use Port Authority information for mobile access on your smart phone. *If you don’t see your route, don’t worry. More routes will be rolling out soon.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015


{EDITORIAL}

12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Edit CHARLIE DEITCH Editor Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Mus Associate Editor AL HOFF Asso Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Mu Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Listi Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assi Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, Staf ALEX ZIMMERMAN ALE Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Staf Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD Inte {COVER ILLUSTRATION BY JOE WOS}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 53

[NEWS]

continuous closures and 08 “After Tunnel, it’s re-closures of the Fort Pitt Tunnel decided to just turn it into a bike lane.” — A prediction for the new year by Pittsburgh City Councilor Natalia Rudiak

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we all work to make 22 “I2015propose the Year of the 20-Minute Set.”

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[SCREEN]

isn’t another film about an 33 “There Iranian teenage girl vampire out there.” — Al Hoff reviews A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

[LAST PAGE]

I was 6 my mother took me 54 “When into the voting booth. I didn’t wait for

her — I hit the lever.”— Wilkinsburg Councilor Marita Garrett on the start of her community activism

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 15 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 STUFF WE LIKE 51 +

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

TA S T E

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“It’s as if Connelly understands deeply that we are, each of us, always at the precipice between life and death, triumph and disaster.” — Nadine Wasserman on the exhibit Chuck Connelly: My America

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015


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INCOMING

“DUE TO A MINUTE TYPO ON HIPSTER BLOGS, PITTSBURGH WILL NOW BE THE ‘MOST LOVABLE CITY’ FOR 2015”

RE: 12 Stories of Note: A look back at a dozen tales that shaped Pittsburgh in 2014 (Dec. 24) Editor, Even as the man is on his way out the door, City Paper remains relentless in its criticism of Gov. Tom Corbett, the latest slap being the cover of the Dec. 24 edition, in which a cartoon character depicting the governor is holding a sign which reads, “Will Cut Education Funding for Food.” Once again, Gov. Corbett did not “cut” education funding. Federal stimulus spending expired and the governor declined to request a tax increase to replace it. Those who “cut” education spending are in the White House and Congress, but apparently it is easier to blame someone who had nothing to do with it if an “R” follows his name. Tom Corbett did what he said he would do when he inherited a $4.2 billion budget deficit from his spendthrift predecessor. Although the current budget is balanced through sleight of hand, he generally enabled spending to equal revenue without increasing any broad-based tax throughout his four years in office, a rather remarkable accomplishment given what he faced. As he said, he did not go to Harrisburg to win friends, and obviously he has made many enemies by keeping his promises. Can we blame the governor for poor communication: failing to establish important relationships with members of the General Assembly and neglecting to keep the public “in the loop”? Can we hold him accountable for failing to secure pension reform to successfully address a gaping $50 billion hole and to bring about privatization of alcohol sales, which would have brought Pennsylvania into the modern era? Certainly, but I believe history will be a kinder judge of Gov. Corbett than those who wish to tar and feather him today. It will be interesting to learn how the affable, well-intentioned Tom Wolf will deal with huge problems facing him from the moment he takes office, challenges which may be exacerbated by an even greater Republican majority in the State House and Senate than exists currently. Lots of luck, Mr. Governor-Elect! No doubt you will need it! — Oren Spiegler Upper St. Clair

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Joe Wos, cartoonist, culture contributor for WESA and former director of ToonSeum

COMING ATTRACTIONS What’s on tap for 2015? Your guess is as good as theirs {BY CITY PAPER STAFF}

F

OR YEARS, someone — mother,

significant other, mental-health professional, probation officer — has been telling you to stop living in the past and to look to the future. The problem, of course, is that the future is cold, scary and full of unknown catastrophic dangers — bottomless potholes, cast-aside parking chairs and Daryl Metcalfe’s latest bugaboo. Well, fear no more, dear reader. We asked some notable Pittsburghers to give us some predictions for the region in 2015. We’re sure most of them are bound to come true, because if it’s in the paper, it has to be true.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Natalia Rudiak, City Councilor District 4 Pittsburgh hipsters adopt the new “Undercover Boss Peduto” look. And after continuous closures and re-closures of the Fort Pitt Tunnel, it’s decided to just turn it into a bike lane.

Scott Bricker, director, BikePgh Local news outlets disable their comments sections en masse.

Dr. Karen Hacker, director, Allegheny County Health Department This is the year that Pittsburghers throw away their deep fryers, maintain their gym membership beyond February and switch to spandex. Live well, Allegheny! CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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COMING ATTRACTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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Greg Brown, Pittsburgh Pirates play-by-play announcer If the Pirates stay healthy, they can win the NL Central. I love what Clint Hurdle has been saying this off season— that we have tried the Wild Card game two years in a row; it was fun, but we’re looking to do better things now. We’ve outgrown it, is what he said. I also pay close attention to the national baseball programs and prognosticators, and it’s heartening to hear these individuals talk about the Pirates and the Cardinals being the teams to beat in the division. Their pitching staff is going to be stronger than it has been in years, and that’s the way to win these days — strong pitching.

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The Pittsburgh region is about as well positioned for sustainable prosperity as it has been at any time since I moved here in 1982. Total employment is at an all-time high, more people are moving in than moving out — especially younger people. We’re home to one of the best-educated workforces in the country … when it comes to the concentration of young people with advanced degrees. At the same time, we shouldn’t expect an economic boom any time soon. As the national economy has begun heating up, our job-growth rate has been slowing, and our workforce is aging, making it harder for many employers to find skilled workers. So, in 2015, look for continued modest, but steady, improvement for our economy, supporting an enviable balance between economic opportunity and quality of life.

will win a MacArthur “genius” award. Either Pennsylvania or Pittsburgh will see the start of a “green bank” (a nonprofit lender focused on renewable energy and energy efficiency).

Craig Davis, president and CEO, VisitPITTSBURGH

Joylette Portlock, President, Communitopia

Sue Kerr, blogger, Pittsburgh Lesbian Correspondents blog Twenty-four years after serving as an intern for Rick Santorum, I will be hitting the campaign trail — culminating in a re-creation of my iconic internship graduation photo — with Dan Savage bringing his best Santorum to the U.S. Capitol steps. Proceeds from sales of the official Savage-Sue-Santorum Sweater Vest will benefit Planned Parenthood.

Things in Pittsburgh keep getting With city-wide conventions like the better, and a big part of that is Fraternal Order of Police and our renewed commitment the VFW, and events like to environmental the NCAA Men’s Basketball awareness and action. tournament, 2015 Shayontani Banerjee, There are so many will be a record local musician fantastic local year for meetings, projects slated for conventions and Due to a minute typo on hipster 2015 already — wins events in Pittsburgh. blogs, Pittsburgh will now be the for our communities, In addition, we “Most Lovable City” for 2015. economy and expect that several New residents will include only environment that I’d new blockbuster puppies, kittens and baby snakes. love to shamelessly attractions and Also, steamed dumplings promote, but that exhibitions will be will be trending, and I hear we would take more space announced that will than I’ve got! Suffice might get street food draw media attention it to say, stay tuned — and leisure travelers to past 8:45 p.m. 2015 is going to be green! our area, so the outlook for tourism is a very vibrant and exciting year for the region. Janera Solomon, executive

Mike Schiller, CEO, Green Building Alliance Every law firm in Pittsburgh will stop using Styrofoam cups. Mayor Peduto will have a not-so-small cameo role in a major motion picture filmed here. Some significant realestate development will occur in the Hamilton Avenue/Frankstown Avenue corridor. The Energy Innovation Center will gain national recognition for its renovation and its mission. More than one person living in Pittsburgh

director, Kelly-Strayhorn Theater

A new hip-hop/funk lounge opens in East Liberty — and closes just five days later. Word on the street? The lounge was either a trendy pop-up or one of “those loud dance parties” at Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. Theater dance parties become the next big thing. KST already hosts post-performance, impromptu dance parties, and the last one became so successful it turned into a three-day “dance festival.” CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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COMING ATTRACTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

Jason Baldinger, poet and mainstay of the Pittsburgh literary scene Bill Peduto finally decides that a minimumwage increase would better serve the residents of Pittsburgh, and pushes through an increase to $12 hourly. Most of the city’s writers breathe a sigh of relief, secure that for the first time in a decade, they don’t have to decide between eating and paying their rent. The Pittsburgh Pirates end a 36-year drought with a World Series win! In the last weekend of the season, they secure the division over the Cardinals and skip the wild-card game. They take down the Cards in the division series and the Dodgers in the NL championship series. They meet the Orioles in a much-delayed rematch of 1979 and win the series in six games. All four pierogies are arrested for streaking across the Roberto Clemente Bridge in the aftermath.

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State Rep. Ed Gainey I think we’ll pass medical-marijuana next year. I think both sides — the Democrats and Republicans — are on board with helping these families. I think the myths out there are coming to an end. There’s enough evidence that says this will help families.

Linda Lane, Pittsburgh Public Schools Superintendent My prediction is that over 100 nonprofits, city organizations and supporters of public schools in Pittsburgh will come together in 2015 to develop a model for collective impact to make this a better city to support our children. CONTINUES ON PG. 14

Photo credit: Linda Mitzel

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Ben Roethlisberger

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Dejan Kovacevic, columnist, DKonPittsburghSports.com, on Pittsburgh sports in 2015: Our city’s sports fans once again will experience a year in which the Steelers, Penguins and Pirates all will be contenders. Our city’s sports fans once again will enjoy watching at least two legit MVP candidates on each team: Ben Roethlisberger, Le’Veon Bell, Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, Andrew McCutchen and Josh Harrison. Our city’s sports fans once again will know across-the-board success, from the team and individual standpoints, at a scale perhaps unmatched in North America. And man, will we be ticked off about it. We’ll complain, we’ll curse, we’ll stomp out of the stadium or arena early, we’ll toss the remote across the living room, and, only if we’re feeling generous, we’ll spare the poor dog. We’ll blame Todd Haley for all that goes awry. Or Marc-Andre Fleury. Or Bob Nutting. We’ll “obviously” groan at every Mike Tomlin cliché, we’ll point back to Dan Bylsma for everything Mike Johnston butchers, and we’ll second-guess every bullpen guy summoned by Clint Hurdle … but only after the home run is given up, of course. We’ll focus not nearly as much on our own triumphs as on the collectively blissful misery of the Ravens, Flyers and Brewers. And Harbaughs — all the Harbaughs. We’ll tear into NFL commissioner Roger Goodell because he hates us, NHL referees because they really hate us and Major League Baseball’s lack of a salary cap that might as well hate us. It’s who we are. And hey, maybe it’s why we’re pretty good at this stuff.


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COMING ATTRACTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

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Erin Ninehouser, Pennsylvania Health Access Network While outgoing Gov. Tom Corbett finally succumbed to pressure from advocates, hospitals, and members of his own party to stop blocking the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Expansion, his alternative — Healthy PA — comes with extra expense, new layers of bureaucracy, and severe benefit cuts for Pennsylvania’s most vulnerable citizens. We expect this unnecessarily complex and costly system to be dismantled by incoming Gov. Tom Wolf.

Matthew Newton, writer and journalist

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Charlie

for social justice — a clear rejection of the repressive “shut up and play” attitude that has pervaded American sports (and entertainment) for the past several decades.

Grace Miller, Beers of the Burgh co-founder

There’ll be a few new breweries, and we’ll see some old favorites expanding. There are a number of specialty breweries pretty well established here, and I’m hoping to see people embrace a wider variety of styles. It’ll be great to see how all these local brewers are able to work together to really put Pittsburgh craft beer on the map. Humphrey,

With its influx of pioneers, executive director, Jeff Betten, owner, prospectors and Pittsburgh Filmmakers/ speculators in recent Wild Kindness Records Pittsburgh Center for the Arts years, Pittsburgh has An ascendant indie pop/ In 2015, the beginning quickly become the Wild rock scene will redefine of the end of football West of the Rust Belt, Pittsburgh’s image will occur when horrified with every variety of throughout the world. TV viewers see an NFL schemer and huckster Footage from a local player torn in two during hoping to strike gold gig will be used as a a routine play during the city’s current cutaway during the Steelers from scrimmage. state of post-industrial 2015 Monday Night Football prosperity. Amid the hordes appearance in lieu of the usual of row-house flippers, digital shot of a Primanti’s sandwich. evangelists and would-be restaurateurs, however, a more troubling reality continues Cindy Howes, Morning Mix host, to emerge — the yawning class divide 91.3 FM WYEP between the haves and the have-nots. I predict even more artists and musicians

Brett Kashmere, director of From Deep, a recent film about the intertwined cultures of basketball, race and hip hop Not since the 1960s have we seen professional athletes express their political opinions so prominently. 2015 will mark a continuation of this synergy between sports and the struggle

choosing to live in Pittsburgh, further securing the city as a hub for creativity. Streaming music services will be taken to task and forced to re-evaluate how they compensate artists for their work. (Thank you Erin Mckeown, David Lowery, Billy Bragg, Taylor Swift, Aloe Blacc.) Also, maybe they will cancel The Voice, finally (apologies to Chris Jamison)?

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

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A SECOND CUP {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} On Jan. 10, Zeke’s Coffee will close the doors of its café and bakery at 6012 Penn Ave., in East Liberty. But later this month, it hopes to open the doors of a new location right across the street, at 6015 Penn. Zeke’s Coffee was started in Baltimore, Md., by local owner Chris Rhodes’ grandfather. The Pittsburgh business roasts natural fair-trade and single-origin coffee. “I think it’s our approach to coffee that makes us different,” explains Rhodes. “We’re one of the only people in the city who use a fluid-bed coffee roaster. It brings out different notes in the coffee.” Last fall, Zeke’s opened a new roasting facility, at 6314 Broad St. (behind the East Liberty Target), which will eventually feature a drive-through. “We were roasting in house, we were baking in house and we had the café, all at one place,” says Rhodes. “This allows us to grow the roaster, the café and the bakery individually. We were roasting one pound at a time — now we’re roasting 12 pounds at a time.” At the new café, Rhodes plans to expand the menu to include light breakfast and lunch options. “There’s so much happening here,” says Rhodes, who has lived in East Liberty since 2006. “We started out from nothing, and East Liberty supported us and helped us grow.” Rhodes says the new café will be up and running in January. He estimates the drive-through could be open in three months. Keep up at www.zekescoffeepgh.com. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FEED

January is a great time for a pantry cleanse. Set a time — a week, 10 days — and commit yourself to only eating what’s been amassing in the fridge, freezer and cupboard. You might eat some wacky meals — pancakes with a side of chili beans — but you’ll save money and free up shelf space. Advanced cooks can pretend they are on Chopped.

W E N H FRES TH GROW {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

HEN WE FIRST went to Willow, almost 10 years ago now, it was at the vanguard of a trend that’s become so commonplace, it isn’t even trendy anymore: upscale, urbane restaurants in the far suburbs. Willow has now changed ownership. S+P Restaurant Group, whose portfolio includes Spoon, Grit & Grace and BRGR, has remodeled what we once called Willow’s “enchanted forest of dining rooms” without changing its essential, warmly contemporary ambience. The original custom ironwork still evokes the pliant branches of the restaurant’s namesake, while au courant updates like glass tiles and walled patios update the restaurant’s aesthetics and overall dining experience. And, where the old guard threw some bones to old-school Pittsburgh dining with items like steak salad with fries, the new has a menu that is resolutely up-to-date, if not quite cutting-edge. Steak frites and roasted Brussels sprouts are — deservedly, in our opinion — enjoying their moment, but we can’t pretend that they’re news at this point. That shouldn’t be taken as criti-

Mexican War Streets cocktail, spiced nuts, Castelvetrano olives, deviled eggs and beef tartare

cism: Willow’s kitchen has assembled a one-page menu, divided among snacks and salads, small plates and large, that is almost universally appealing. It is the kind of menu that tempts us to simply ask our server to bring us half-a-dozen dishes, whatever they might be.

WILLOW 634 Camp Horne Road, North Hills. 412-847-1007 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. 4-9 p.m. PRICES: Snacks, salads, sandwiches and small plates $14-16; large plates $16-29 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED The snacks were mostly bar food — spiced mixed nuts, deviled eggs, olives. We were tempted by the steak tartare, but began instead to order from the small-plates section. In our dish of roasted Brussels sprouts, the sizes varied, meaning that some were crisped and others a tad underdone. Variety is nice, but the span here may

have been a bit too wide. Willow isn’t parsimonious with ingredients, and the sprouts came with apple, sage, pecans and bacon vinaigrette. This classic fall combination of flavors got along very well, but the pecans, chopped fine, predominated: A mound was left in the bottom of the bowl when all the rest was gone. We had the exact same comment about our entrée of agnolotti — stuffed pasta similar to ravioli — which were filled with ricotta and served in autumnal sage brown-butter sauce with gently wilted spinach, earthy kabocha squash and too many pecans. There was nothing left but shells once we polished off the mussels. The shellfish were plump and tender and the coconutcurry broth, flavored with seafood-friendly lemongrass, lime and cilantro, and studded with bold rings of Fresno chiles, was good enough to eat with a spoon. Our server helpfully brought a second basket of garlic toasts. Marked with grill lines and sprinkled with fresh parsley, these were good enough to deserve a spot on the snack list themselves. CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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FRESH NEW GROWTH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

Willow’s salads relied on classic ingredients in careful proportion. The kale salad featured more pecans, fluffy chevre, lightly grilled red grapes and a dressing that balanced balsamic vinegar with sweet local maple syrup. The obligatory fancy burger (three cuts of ground beef, brioche bun) was quite pricy, but did come with a choice of cheese and two toppings from a short but enticing list. We picked bacon-whiskey jam and crispy pork belly. One slice of pork belly offered that addictive contrast between succulent flesh and crisp surface, but another was, essentially, crispy bacon. We loved the jam, which was perfectly balanced between smoky, boozy and sweet. A good thing, because the burger itself, while juicy and tender, was a bit under-seasoned, perhaps in anticipation of all those richly flavorful toppings.

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

WHAT’S NEW AT SHU BREW Shu Brew brings bold flavor and small-town charm

In a small wooden cabin on Zelienople’s Main Street, every stool at Shu Brew’s bar is filled. It’s cozy, with a Cheersstyle atmosphere, and it’s easy to spend an hour or two enjoying the everrotating selection of beers created by brewmaster Zach Shumaker. As a recently certified cicerone, he has completed an extensive examination, and demonstrated expertise in beer service. Shu’s new three-barrel brew system sits just behind the microbrewery’s bar, shiny with the promise of meeting increasing customer demand.

THIS MICROBREWERY PLANS TO KEEP EXPANDING. Curry mussels

Hanger steak, however, was practically perfect in every way: rosy slices with hefty, well-seasoned crust that offered just a hint of chew. Bearnaise sauce was thick and intense, possibly to a fault, but we appreciated it on the side. The accompanying garlic-herb frites offered a similar textural range to the sprouts, but in potatoes, it was more appealing. Jason was a bit concerned when the two options for his pork chop were medium or medium well, but the kitchen knew what it was doing: His medium chop remained slightly pink inside, and the meat was tender and moist. The surface wasn’t deeply crusted, but some char had formed, adding another layer of flavor beneath a delicious apple-and-fennel kraut that floated between fresh-tasting and a pleasingly fermented brine. In a surprising move, grain mustard was mixed with the deeply browned roasted potatoes on the side, resulting in the mustard flavor getting a touch muddled. In all, Willow’s new ownership has pulled off a neat trick. In refreshing a minor local landmark, it has maintained its enchanting character, while raising its culinary offerings to the highest level yet. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Erika and Zach Shumaker opened the place in September 2013; after a successful first year, they plan to keep expanding. Just last week, they began distributing kegs to a local restaurant and Cranberry’s Giant Eagle. In the next few years, Shu Brew hopes to start bottling. After months of hearing whispers about the great beer out in Zeli, I was excited to sit down with Erika Shumaker and a flight from Shu Brew. All the beers’ titles play on the couple’s surname, and feature bottle art by Brentwood High School art teacher Benny Miller. “Cindy Lou Shu,” the brewery’s nod to Christmas ale, ignores the standard clove-and-cinnamon approach. This Belgian Strong Dark Ale begins smoothly with fig flavors and finishes with a malty sweetness from brown Salvadoran sugar. Jungleboot, the flagship IPA brewed with six kinds of hops, is clean, grassy and simple. It’s difficult to stop drinking, even for someone who usually opts out of hoppy beers. Mosaic Marathon, a session IPA with 100 percent Mosaic hops, starred on the rotating tap. Citrusy with hints of pineapple and honey, it lingered just long enough to make me wish for a hot summer day. The new year holds exciting changes, and new beers. In early 2015, look for No Woman, No Rye, a 750 mL release, as part of Shu’s bottle program. This rye IPA, produced in Wigle Whiskey barrels, is a beer to look forward to from the Shumakers — surely one of many. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

$ 2 DRINKS

1844 RESTAURANT. 690 State Route 66, Leechburg. 724-845-1844. This restored 19th-century farmhouse offers a classic fine-dining menu with intriguing updates suited to 21st-century tastes. Thus, prime rib sits alongside tempura shrimp with orange cayenne, cucumbers and bleu cheese, and the stalwart shrimp cocktail is now dressed with sofrito lemon sauce. LE BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-4319313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE BRGR. 5997 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-than-average fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pear-andbleu-cheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-and-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard Chinese-

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Meat and Potatoes {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} American menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BZ Bar and Grill

DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a nowfamiliar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent macand-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donutsized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfast-andlunch diner ought to be. The food

is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J

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2328 EE. Carson St St. SOUTHSIDE

IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JOHNNY’S. 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. This Wilmerding institution offers well-prepared Italian-American cuisine and a welcoming atmosphere around a horseshoe bar. The menu offers the expected standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories. But overall, the preparations are fairly up-todate: exceptionally bright and slightly chunky marinara, fluffily battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. KE JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Carmi’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE

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considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE PROPER BRICK OVEN AND TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-281-5700. This cozy Downtown spot offers a menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can be. Some cheeses and pasta are housemade, and many starters are closer to tapas or antipasti than to pub grub. More than 30 beers are on tap, as well. KE

MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. staples of the American pantry, 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail 412-247-4848. A neighborhood cooking, all in a lively Downtown pizza place and more, Salvatore’s space. Expect everything offers something even rarer from marrow bones to than good pizza: fast burgers, flatbreads and food of the finest chicken pot pie, as quality. “Fresh” is the well as pots of rhubarb watchword, and the jam and hand. w ww per large, full-color takeout crafted cocktails. LE a p ty ci h pg menu has dozens of .com dishes in a score of THE MINTT. 3033 categories. Shellfish Banksville Road, Banksville. are prominently featured, 412-306-1831. This casual eatery and worth trying. K successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., with dishes such as gongura Downtown. 412-281-4345. chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented Step into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart with dosas, curries and tandoori looks and tasty, updated bar fare. specialties. For an appetizer, “The Farm” entree featured try Chicken 555, dressed with sliders made with chicken, pulled peanuts, curry leaves and a BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a traditional pickle. KF potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., come with a basil-garlic aioli, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At and the robust Yuengling this storefront restaurant, diners beer-cheese sauce was the can explore the depths of Syrian perfect complement to cuisine as well as a few Middle “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. fish”), shawarma served with rice 724-591-5688. This suburban pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. other culinary influences. 1445 Washington Road, North Besides the wide sushi selection Strabane. 724-223-1837. This and tempura offerings, restored mansion provides a try squid salad or entrees charming setting for fine dining. incorporating udon, Japan’s The menu is primarily Italian, buckwheat noodles. KF with traditional but thoughtfully

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

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LOCAL

SHORTER SETS AND MORE FUNK, PLEASE.

BEAT

{BY MICHAEL CRANDLE}

NO LIMITS Young Junne, like most young hip-hop artists, started with a dream of being noticed by a hip-hop mogul and signed to a major label. Unlike most, Junne has made it a reality. Using his socialmedia presence to reach out to fans and hip-hop bloggers, Junne launched a campaign and got the title track of his album Visionary, with its Jordan Beckham-directed video, noticed in and outside of Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh-based rapper premiered the track on WorldStarHipHop. com just after being fired from a job at GetGo; the making of the video was an all-in effort that took the last of his money. “I took my last little check and put [the video] on Worldstar,” he says. Soon he was contacted by a music exec Shaun Ross, who flew him out to Los Angeles; as a result of the trip, Young Junne met Master P. Getting an opportunity to meet up with one of the most notable figures in hip hop is one that Junne will never forget. The fact that they both have a basketball background worked in Junne’s favor. “He’s been through what I’ve been through, we both hoop and we have similar interests,” Junne notes. After that meeting, Young Junne was quickly signed to a contract with Master P’s revived No Limit label. Now focusing all his attention on the upcoming project God’s Gift, Junne has his eyes locked on the prize. After a successful mansion party that was also a video shoot for up-and-coming R&B singer M. Tomlin, Junne flew back to California to put the finishing touches on his album. God’s Gift is due out in early 2015, and Junne plans to continue to drop videos after the mixtape is released “We’ve got a lot of stuff coming up: recorded a track with Nipsey Hussle, Jerimiah, Ace B and, of course, Master P,” Junne says. Although he’s spending a lot of his time in California, Junne wants to help other artists in Pittsburgh once he gets his feet firmly grounded in the industry. “I want to make my own record label and put on top talent from Pittsburgh,” Junne explains. And that just might be one of the big music stories of 2015.

“I TOOK MY LAST LITTLE CHECK AND PUT THE VIDEO ON WORLDSTAR.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Listen to Young Junne: www.soundcloud.com/youngjunne

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IN WITH

THE NEW {BOAZ PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

L

AST WEEK, we looked at what was good and unique in music in 2014. This week, some of our music writers look ahead at 2015: What trends will emerge? What trends should emerge? What local artists are poised to have a breakout year? What should just … stop?

Boaz (left) is shooting for the top of the charts this year. Hardo is out of jail and ready for a big 2015.

FIVE PITTSBURGH HIP-HOP ARTISTS TO WATCH IN 2015 Tairey Mars Jackson Hardo Devin Miles Boaz

MORE FUNK, PLEASE I hope to see more funk in 2015. New brass band Beauty Slap is bringing us some, but I hope to see some other performing Pittsburgh groups emerge. People like to dance, and some of us are definitely getting sick of electronic music dominating that market. I want some horns, some bass and a James-Brown-type figure shouting at me to “get on up” in 2015. — SAMANTHA WARD

MUSIC WHERE YOU LEAST EXPECT IT Pittsburgh could use some more unlikely venues. It would be exciting to see some experimentation about where and how music can be accessible to the attentive audience we have here. Let’s make some new small venues. Are you bummed that Garfield Artworks is shutting down? In 2015, let’s make at least three more functioning DIY venues.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

— SAMAN THA WARD

FIVE PITTSBURGH PRODUCERS TO WATCH IN 2015 No Sleep Ricky P Stevie B. Christo Sam Conturo — MICHAEL CRANDLE

SETS THAT AREN’T SO EPIC Dear bands, Consider every show you saw in 2014. Consider every show you’ve seen in the last decade. When was the last time you really, truly walked away thinking, “Man, I wish that had gone on longer”? If you possess a superhuman level of patience, you might have a handful of examples. But if so, you’re in the minority. Which is why I propose we all work to make 2015 the Year of the 20-Minute Set. I get why one might be tempted to overstay their onstage welcome: Some musicians want to give the audience more bang for their buck, others want to make their own gear-lugging a little more worthwhile. Still others have a lot (a lot) of music to share with the world. But let’s face it: You’re (probably?) not Bruce Springsteen, and you’re probably not selling out football stadiums (and even if you are, that’s still no excuse to play for three hours). This year, leave your fans wanting more, and they won’t be able to resist showing up the next time you play. — MARGARET WELSH

CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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IN WITH THE NEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

LET’S PUT SOME OF PITTSBURGH’S BEST ON ONE STAGE There are plenty of rock bands that are Pittsburgh darlings that maybe don’t get a ton of attention outside of the area. Conversely, there are hip-hop artists (Devin Miles, Boaz) getting national attention, and hardcore acts (Code Orange, Hounds of Hate) touring internationally. Can we get a good sampling of what’s great about Pittsburgh music — across genres — together on one show, preferably in one venue, not a neighborhood crawl?

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Dazzletine left for Brooklyn, but is poised to rep Pittsburgh this year.

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The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

THREE PITTSBURGH ARTISTS TO WATCH IN 2015

Hardo: After beating a drug charge, which brought out the support of Wiz Khalifa and T.I., the Wilkinsburg rapper has set his sights on success with his new project, Trapnati. Hardo has a lot of insight on what it means to grow up in urban environment surrounded by drugs and violence, and he exposes all of that in his music. Choo Jackson: Choo will release

Choodini in February, and with the backing of Mac Miller, he is likely heading for some higher plateaus. Pittsburgh hip-hop fans would be wise to take notice.

Dazzletine: The glam-rock band has relocated to Brooklyn, but cut its teeth here in the Steel City, so it’s included on this list. 2015 will showcase a new EP, Lajos, and the band’s first full-length, Organomee. — SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT

A YEAR-BEGINNING WISH FOR NEXT YEAR’S YEAR-END LISTS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Full-length from the local singer-songwriter. Simple arrangements, mostly just guitar and Wilson’s voice, both of which shine — his vocals at times recall James Taylor. While the minimal arrangement works, it also brings to mind the question of what these songs would sound like with a full band — after a few songs, solo acoustic guitar can start to beg for accompaniment. Wilson’s folky writing often feels like it’s on the verge of greatness: He’s got clear talent, but often on this album, he falls back on folk-rock tropes and generalities. What would really put his writing over the edge is going more specific and emotional, or else more abstract — either would be good, it’s trying to stay in between that can make music, especially in the crowded singer-songwriter field, fall flat. All that having been said — a really good effort, from a promising young musician who we’ll be hearing plenty more from.

I have a suggestion for improving best-of-the-year lists: Let’s open up eligibility to all years. As in, what non-2014 music had the biggest impact in 2014? Music doesn’t age predictably, influences bleed past January, and re-releases find new audiences years after the fact. Rodriguez’ Cold Fact (1971) found a second life in 2012. Downloads for “Don’t Stop Believing” (1981) increased 150 percent in the week after The Sopranos series finale in 2007. Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up” soared after “Blurred Lines.” The songs didn’t change; they were just given a new context. I want a year-end list that celebrates the music that connected with audiences that year, regardless of copyright date. We might learn some stuff. — ALEX GORDON

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{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

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STOP CALLING POP MUSIC A “GUILTY PLEASURE” MARTIN D-28

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Can we get hardcore bands like Code Orange on a stage with top local rappers and rock bands in 2015?

MIKE CALI MIKE CALI (SELF-RELEASED) SOUNDCLOUD.COM/MIKECALI

New EP from the rock singer-songwriter with full band — heartthrobby love songs written and performed quite well. Cali’s silky voice and laidback tunes put him in the slacker-rocker category with guys like John Mayer and Jason Mraz, albeit maybe a little more genuine than them. The highlight of this one is “Wronged Heart Right,” with its folk-guitar-picking vibe and steel guitar; not far behind is the aspirational rocker “Chase Tomorrow.” Good stuff from Cali! AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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It’s Time for Something Difference in 2015. Have you Found that every exercise program you’ve tried...BORING? Let me ask You a Second Question...

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Hi! I’m Master Rothrock and I’m offering a great New Year’s Special for people just like you that want a better way to get back into shape and improve their flexibility, strength and power. It’s 3 Kung Fu Fit Classes, a Free Outfit and Tote Bag for just $19.99. I challenge you to try something different this year that will change your life or a loved one for the better. Just call me at 888-434-0104. Or register online at WeLoveKungFu.com/Trial. You will love this place it is just like a playground… except we just play hard! Every class is run by professional Black Belt coaches that will keep you motivated and on track. However, I do have a membership cap and only have space for an additional 15 motivated people. So register as soon as possible to hold your spot. Kung Fu Fit is comprised of three programs in one: Traditional Kung Fu for Strength and Extraordinary Power. Kickboxing a Heart-Pounding Aerobic class for endurance and building muscles and Self Defense for developing the Combat Skills for Protection against any Attacker. Based on the 2000 year old Chinese art of Kung Fu that kept the monks in the Shaolin Monastery healthy and free from disease. A total energizing body and mind workout all in one class. Out of Shape? Don’t fret! Our beginner classes, run by professional black belt coaches, make learning these simple techniques fun and it’s never boring. You’ll be amazed in just a few short weeks… Guaranteed!

NOT CONVINCED? Then Call or Go Online to Get My Free Informational Packet and DVD

Rothrock’s Kung Fu & Tai Chi Pittsburgh Wexford

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Duryea

CRITICS’ PICKS

The Point

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., JAN 03 Start the year off by reminding yourself that you can still see world-class rock for $5, and not even end up spending $20 on drinks, if you drop by The Mr. Roboto Project. Tonight’s feature: Shellshag, the longtime raggedy, poppy garage-rock duo from Brooklyn. Think Pavement but with only two people, one of whom stands and contributes backing vocals while playing the drums. Opening: Brian DiSanto, Roulette Waves, Coyotes By the Way and Secret Paper Moon. If you’re smart, you’ll make it a resolution to drop by dry, DIY Roboto more often. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. www. therobotoproject.org

[ELECTRONIC POP] + TUE., JAN. 06

The Point sounds little like its members’ other bands (for Michael O’Neill, The Men and Ladybug Transistor, and for Sammy Tunis, The Lisps), and even less like the Nilsson album of the same name. But those touchstones all denote a certain quality and taste level, and the Brooklyn duo doesn’t disappoint in that sense. Its latest, a full-length called Pretty Marsh, is 12 tracks of down-tempo, trip-hoppy pop with beautiful vocals from Tunis, recorded partly in Pittsburgh by Alexis Gideon. (Buried in there somewhere is even a Grateful Dead cover, tastefully transformed.) As they make their way to Los Angeles to set up shop there, the couple stops at Howlers tonight for what’s sure to be one of the top shows in town this week. The

Hi-Frequencies and Naked Arcade open. AM 9 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $6. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

[ALT ROCK] + TUE., JAN. 06

Mae has been making music since 2001, and now wants to reach out to fans and hear their stories. The quintet released its second studio album, Everglow, in 2005, an album that told the story of the members’ journey from small-towndom into the broader world. Now, 10 years later, Mae is on a Northeast tour commemorating the LP, and offering a special VIP ticket package to fans. Each night the group invites the small collection of VIPs backstage for a pre-show acoustic concert and conversation. Catch Mae at Mr. Small’s Theatre tonight with Young Fox. Lyndsey Samantha Ward Smith & Soul 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18. All Distribution ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[SOUL] + THU., JAN. 08 Come get out of the cold and into the heat tonight on the South Side: After a couple of years of gaining in popularity, Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution are currently on fire. Powerhouse singer Smith, two backup vocalists and a six-piece band propagate a big R&B/soul sound … and fill up a stage with instruments and personnel. The group will be joined tonight at Club Café by fellow R&B songstress Rachel B, a Michigan native now living in Pittsburgh. SW 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


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Thanks... for Drinking Responsibly this Holiday Season! Happy Holidays from 28

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JOIN US FOR

NEW YEARS EVE

We can help!

THURSDAY JAN 15/10PM

THE PARK PLAN, MURDER FOR GIRLS, GRAND BELL ALL DAY, EVERY DAY

ROCK/POP

DJS

FRI 02

THU 01

HAMBONE’S. The Shapes BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ of Things, The Royal Shakes, DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Greg Cislon. Lawrenceville. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. 412-681-4318. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. Isaac Merz, Bad Custer, 412-969-0260. Partly Sunny. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Drowning Clowns, Kick off 2015 w/ Resident Lone Wolf Club, Pandemic Pete & Dan These Lions, Working Dabber. Bloomfield. Breed, The Black 412-621-4900. Six, Guy Russo, THE CLOAKROOM. www. per a p Tom Pappas. Millvale. DJ SMI. East Liberty. pghcitym o .c 866-468-3401. 412-779-2624. PARK HOUSE. Locks DRUM BAR. VDJ Rambo. & Dams North Side. North Side. 412-231-7777. 412-224-2273. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. SMILING MOOSE. Honey, Hank D. Lawrenceville. The John Trumaine Show, 412-682-6414. Crisscross Albatross. Honey ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ CD release show. Witch Rider, Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. The Spectral Type, Onyx Eye. 412-874-4582. South Side. 412-431-4668. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

THURSDAY JAN 29/10PM

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

FRI 02

ALLINALINE, THE MOLECULE PARTY TWO MUFFIN RABBIT

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

Coolvapes.com 412-358-0200 7206 McKnight Rd Near Ross Park Mall

SAT 03 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Leftover Blue. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Impossible Colors. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 360. Nightlife. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. LEVELS. Aristree. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Blue Sky Band. Ross. 412-364-8166. SMILING MOOSE. Shadow of The Flag, RJ & The Dirty Boys. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Fletcher’s Grove. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 05 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Suzie, AM Faces, The Holy Sea. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

South Side. 412-431-2825.

RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 03

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. GUS’S CAFE. Pittsburgh Caribbean/International Saturdays. Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

WED 07

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES THU 01 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

MP 3 MONDAY KINETIC

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL CANTON}

WEDNESDAY, DEC 31

New Year’s Resolution to quit smoking?

TUE 06 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Point, The Hi-Frequenices, Naked Arcade Hearts. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Totally 80s. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Everglow, Young Fox, Mike Mains & the Branches Mae. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 07 SMILING MOOSE. Hivelords, Dreadeth. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Kinetic; stream or download “Waiting for Giving” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


Pittsburgh’s

SAT 03 BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Gringo Zydeco. West Homestead. 614-296-2655.

JAZZ

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

THU 01 CAVO. Carlton Leeper, Lito Corpuz Victoria Brady, Patrick Whitehead. Strip District. 412-610-1384. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 02 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Velvet Heat. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Live Music Scene!

Tickets at www.jergels.com

PHILADELPHIA {SUN., JAN. 11}

THURSDAY, JANUARY 15

ICP Orchestra FringeArts

CLEVELAND

SAT 03 THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty.

{THU., JAN. 15}

Watain with Misery

MON 05

Agora Ballroom

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

TUE 06

{THU., MARCH 08}

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Meghan Trainor The Fillmore Silver Spring

WED 07 THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. CREAMY CREATIONS & MORE. Hump Day Jazz Jam w/ Rodney McCoy. East Liberty. RIVERS CLUB. Roger Barbour Jessica Lee & Friends. Downtown. 412-391-5227. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Dante’ Soulsville Project. West End. 412-458-0417.

ACOUSTIC THU 01 ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

FRI 02 ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1181.

SAT 03 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 07 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD SUN 04 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Klezlectic: Music for a Modern

N E W S

KENT, OHIO {FRI., MARCH 09}

Justin Townes Earle

Kent Stage

World. Oakland. 412-622-3116.

North Side. 412-231-7777.

REGGAE

FRI 02

FRI 02 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY SAT 03 HARVEY WILNER’S. The Eldorado Band. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. Christian Beck Band. Strip District. 412-720-1396.

LEVELS. Scott & Pete Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 04 MEMORIAL PARK CHURCH. Clarinet Sunday. An open invitation clarinet choir comprised of passionate musicians from amateurs to professional, playing inspiring arrangements of classical & sacred favorites. Allison Park. 412-364-9492.

MON 05

SAT 03

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Showtunes, Jazz Standards & Blues by Ian Kane. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THE SUMMER SINGERS: VOCES SOLIS. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

HOLIDAY MUSIC

OTHER MUSIC

FRI 02

CLASSICAL

THU 01 LEVELS. Backseat Driver.

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What to do Dec 31 - Jan 6

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist.

WEDNESDAY 31

Back to the 90's NYE: TEN (Pearl Jam Tribute) & RATM2 ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. Through Jan. 4.

FRIDAY 2 JERGEL'S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. $9 cover charge. 9p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 9p.m.

Lava Game

$9 cover charge. 9p.m.

Nightlife LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8:15p.m.

MONDAY 5

Winter Light Garden and Flower Show

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY LATITUDE 360 Robinson Oakland. For more info visit Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa.. phipps.conservatory.org. latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa Through Jan. 11. 8:15p.m.

NYE Bash in Latitude Live featuring VJ Rambo

SWON BROTHERS HIGHMARK'S FIRST NIGHT DECEMBER 31 DOWNTOWN

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 10:30p.m.

ROUND CORNER CANTINA Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. Over 21 event. Tickets:

Motown

Phase IV

NYE Comedy Show featuring Sally Brooks

No Mames New Years Eve 2015

THURSDAY 1

newbalancepittsburgh.com

showclix.com. 5p.m.

"A Grateful New Years Eve" feat. theCause REX THEATER South Side.

412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Free show. 8p.m.

Highmark's First Night 2015

CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. 412-456-6666. For info & schedules visit trustarts.org/firstnightpgh. 6p.m.

SATURDAY 3

Fletcher's Grove Band

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Off the Hook

JERGEL'S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUESDAY 6

Mae - The Everglow 10th Anniversary Tour MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH DISCOVER MORE AT THE NEW BALANCE® PITTSBURGH STORE At your local New Balance Store, you’ll find a lot more than just footwear. We have a wide range of hard-to-find widths and sizes, the latest in shoe design and one-on-one consultations with Fit Specialists-all adding up to a more comfortable fit. Stop by today and discover the expertise you’ve been looking for. ©2014 New Balance Athletic Shoe, Inc.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


RUNNING THROUGH THE DREAMLIKE GIRL IS A PALPABLE SENSE OF LONELINESS

ON THE SLATE {BY MIKE WATT}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

See a list of locally produced films set to open in 2015 on page 35. N E W S

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DARK Foxcatcher was shot in the Pittsburgh area.

Last summer, things were looking uncertain for the Pittsburgh-based film industry. Locals who work on movie productions anxiously awaited word from Gov. Tom Corbett on whether he would renew the state’s $60 million Film and Television Production Tax Credit. Corbett renewed the tax credit through 2018, but left it capped at its present amount. And while the local film industry is doing well, things could always be better. “[Corbett] keeping the tax-credit program capped was disappointing,” says Dawn Keezer, president of the Pittsburgh Film Office. According to its website, since 1990, the Film Office has “assisted more than 124 feature films and television productions” locally, generating “an economic impact of more than $800 million for the region.” “We’re hopeful that [incoming Gov. Tom Wolf] will see the worth in uncapping the tax credit,” she says. Recently, Pittsburgh has hosted major Hollywood productions, including Jack Reacher, The Dark Knight Rises and Perks of Being a Wallflower. Also shot locally, the just-released drama Foxcatcher, which is receiving award nominations and Oscar buzz. While that kind of acclaim doesn’t hurt, it doesn’t factor highly into attracting future productions. “Film tax credits are the number-one reason anyone comes to Pennsylvania,” Keezer says. “High-profile, recognized and ‘critically acclaimed’ help tell the story that [Southwestern Pennsylvania] is a great place to shoot.” Others see Pittsburgh as offering more than just financial benefits for film companies. “Western Pennsylvania has so much to offer a filmmaker,” explains Mami Stein, who has worked in the art department on several major films produced here. “Our varied landscapes and neighborhoods can portray everything from a turn-of-the-century New York neighborhood to a slick modern urban center. [Directors of photography] have frequently remarked on how much they love filming our grey winter skies. We also have a large, experienced pool of crew members and talent, not to mention the services of a fantastic film office.” But, Stein adds, “filmmaking is a business. Without the film tax credit, our film industry and the money it brings to Pennsylvania would not be a fraction as successful as it is now.”

A girl (Sheila Vand), out for a bite

{BY AL HOFF}

A

NA LILY AMIRPOUR’S new film, A

Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, is a late holiday stocking for film fans, stuffed as it is with a jumble of genres, homages and arresting images. That said, it is wholly original: There isn’t another film about an Iranian teenage girl vampire out there. Amirpour used Southern California locations to depict life in “Bad City,” a lonesome small Iranian town marked by rusted industrial sites, empty streets and — in the film’s opening scene — a gully full of dead bodies. The film, shot in a wide ratio and high-contrast black and white, moves at the languid pace of a European arthouse feature. The spare plot is presented in a series of vignettes, and focuses on a few of Bad City’s demi-monde: a petty criminal named Arash (Arash Marandi), his junkie dad, a prostitute and a drug dealer. Intersecting their lives is an unnamed teenage girl (Sheila Vand), the aforementioned vampire.

The girl lives in a basement room festooned with posters of 1980s pop stars, and glides the nighttime streets, clad in a black chador (resembling, of course, a traditional “Dracula” cape) and a striped boater T-shirt (recalling Jean Seberg, in Breathless). She kills, but she also aids — you could almost add “riot grrl” to the list of Girl’s influences. (Did I mention she skateboards, too?)

A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT DIRECTED BY: Ana Lily Amirpour STARRING: Sheila Vand, Arash Marandi In Farsi, with subtitles Starts Fri., Jan. 2. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Throughout, the film is beautifully shot and composed. Its wide-screen framing resembles a Western, an allusion further underscored by spaghettiWestern style music. (Other scenes are

set to jaunty 1960s-ish pop music.) Nods to classic cinema are rife — from the sexualized vampire attack, composed of close-ups of mouths, eyes and fingers, to the slow-motion Fellini-esque entr’acte in which a drag-queen cowgirl dances with a balloon. Running through the dreamlike Girl is a palpable sense of loneliness — from the boarded-up suburban houses and scrubby landscapes to the failure of its characters to make meaningful connections. But Girl also adds “romance” to its mash-up bag, sketching out a relationship of sorts for the girl and the equally lonely and yearning Arash. After a fateful encounter — the night they meet, Arash is dressed as Dracula for a costume party — the two find a purpose in escaping Bad City. “You don’t know me … I’ve done bad things,” the girl warns Arash. But who hasn’t, the film suggests, and if one is condemned to the darkness, why not have a companion? A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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“ATMOSPHERIC, GRIPPING AND BEAUTIFULLY DRAMATISED.” -THE GUARDIAN

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK

INSIDE THE MIND OF

LEONARDO DA VINCI

STARRING PETER CAPALDI insidethemindofleonardo.com

3D

AMC LOEWS STARTS FRIDAY, WATERFRONT 22 Exit 5 Off 376 East JANUARY 2 888-AMC-4FUN

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

Blade Runner (1982)

THE GAMBLER. In Rupert Wyatt’s drama, literary professor and novelist Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) repeatedly tells anyone who will listen that he is not, in fact, a gambler. That’s a tough line to swallow from a guy we see wager and lose somewhere in the neighborhood of $500,000 over the course of the film. Bennett is a depressed ne’er-do-well with daddy issues, whom we see at the start of this film grieving the loss of his grandfather (a cameo by veteran actor George Kennedy), “the 17th-richest man in California.” Bennett has gambling debts, and his grandfather has left him out of the will. A standard gambling addiction isn’t Bennett’s issue; he gambles only with the intention of losing, and sucking up the consequences that come along with it. But while you see this occurring, the film is too disjointed to successfully explain why. (Try to fill in the gaps in your head and you come up with a pretty entertaining picture.) So despite good performances from Wahlberg and underutilized stars like John Goodman and Jessica Lange, The Gambler fails to pay off. (Charlie Deitch)

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12/31 @ 7:00pm - A visually remarkable, achingly human sci-fi masterpiece. New DCP transfer!

They Live (1988)

1/1 @ 7:30pm, 1/2 @ 9:15pm, 1/3 @ 8:45pm, 1/4 @ 4:15pm, 1/6 @ 7:30pm - A drifter discovers a pair of sunglasses that allow him to wake up to the fact that aliens have taken over the Earth. Directed by John Carpenter.

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Shock Value: The Movie

(2014) 1/2 @ 7:30pm, 1/3 @ 7:00pm, 1/4 @ 2:30pm, 1/5 @ 7:30pm - A film showcasing the newly rediscovered student films of John Carpenter, Dan O’Bannon and others.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$10 Double Feature! and

Shock Value They Live! Rec4: Apocalypse (2014)

1/2 @ 11:15pm, 1/3 @ 11pm, 1/4 @ 7:00pm, 1/7 @ 7:30pm The fourth and final installment of the REC Spanish horror film series!

The Gambler THE INTERVIEW. If you loved the other CP two films in the Seth Rogen/James Franco canon — Pineapple Express and This Is the End — and are a fan of quality fart/dick/ vagina jokes, this film is for you, regardless of the geopolitical drama and “terrorist” threats surrounding its release. The film, directed by Rogen and his writing partner, Evan Goldberg, depicts the attempted assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (wonderfully played by Randall Park) by bumbling entertainment journalist Dave Skylark (Franco) and his producer (Rogen). The film falls back on some gags we’ve seen before, but there’s plenty of original and surprisingly funny material here as well. And while the ensemble is great, nobody plays the role of handsome-but-moronic man-child better than Franco; his Dave Skylark is the star here. This film isn’t a historically important piece of political satire (although some will try to paint it as such). But it is a really good inappropriate buddy comedy from two giants of the genre. (CD) [REC]4: APOCALYPSE. Jaume Balaguero’s Spanish horror film picks up where [Rec]3 left us — after a wedding overrun by crazed flesh-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

The Interview eaters — and finds its few survivors safely at sea on a boat. Well, “safe” until the virus gets loose again and turns the ship into a death trap of crazed flesheaters. Standard fare, but well executed and with a minimum of filler: Get on board and get killing! This is the fourth [Rec] film, but it wisely eschews the played-out found-footage gimmick that gave the series its original title. Manuela Velasco is back as the plucky TV reporter, Angela, but no previous experience with the earlier films is necessary to enjoy this nautical bloodbath. In Spanish, with subtitles. 11:15 p.m. Fri., Jan. 2; 11 p.m. Sat., Jan. 3; 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 4; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 7. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

the visual into the emotional — in painting, so as in film. And in this regard, Wiseman’s film is a rather sly house of mirrors, in which we watch a film and, within that film, we watch others gaze at a painting, while also joining them in that act. Harris (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Must-See Films: Casablanca (guy runs a bar in Morocco during World War II; romance, espionage, comedy and many quotable lines), Dec. 31-Jan. 1. Old Boy (twisty 2003 Korean thriller, with revenge, suspense and octopus), Dec. 31-Jan. 1. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 thriller, set in San Francisco and starring Jimmy Stewart

SHOCK VALUE: HOW DAN O’BANNON AND SOME USC OUTSIDERS HELPED INVENT MODERN HORROR. This new anthology compiles some of the student film work done at University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts in the late 1960s and ’70s, with an emphasis on horror and sci-fi-ish films. The title argues that these short features presaged and were influential on the horror films of the late 1970s and early ’80s, but you’ll have to bring your own knowledge. There is no narrator, or any explanatory material. Thus, horror fans will most appreciate these recently uncovered short films, including works by Dan O’Bannon (known as screenwriter for Alien, Total Recall), John Carpenter (director of The Fog, Halloween) and Charles Adair. Some films are better than others — Adair’s desert-set spooker “The Demon” was clearly influenced by N ight of the Living Dead — and one short by Terence Winkless will be familiar to even the most casual horror fan: A babysitter is menaced by a knife-wielding psychopath. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 2; 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 3; 2:30 p.m. Sun., Jan. 4; and 7:30 p.m. Mon., Jan. 5. Hollywood (AH) THE WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH. Eel Marsh House is still haunting visitors, this time a group of London children seeking refuge from the bombs of World War II. Tom Harper directs this sequel to the 2012 horror film. Starts Fri., Jan. 2.

ONGOING CP

NATIONAL GALLERY. As expected from a director fascinated with how institutions work, parts of Frederick Wiseman’s three-hour documentary about Britain’s National Gallery do go behind the scenes of this world-class art museum. But perhaps half the film is having some engaging art historian guide you through a painting, be it its construction, provenance or interpretation. It is all about looking, looking together, and processing

The Woman in Black 2: Angel of Death and Kim Novak; one of Hitch’s best), Dec. 31-Jan. 1. Fight Club (if there were a fight club, it might look like David Fincher’s psychological thriller from 1999, starring Ed Norton and Brad Pitt), Dec. 31-Jan. 1. Actors From Pittsburgh Area: Beetlejuice (1988 ghost comedy starring Michael Keaton), Jan. 2-6 and Jan. 8. An American in Paris (1951 romantic comedy with great dancing from Gene Kelly), Jan. 2-4, and Jan. 6-7. Jurassic Park (giant re-created dinosaurs vs. Jeff Goldblum, in this 1993 actioner), Jan. 2-8. The Magnificent Seven (1960 adaptation of Kurosawa’s The Seven Samurai, starring Charles Bronson), Jan. 2-5 and Jan. 7-8. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com


THE HILARIOUS TRUE STORY OF THE BIGGEST ART CON IN HISTORY GOLDEN GLOBE ® AWARD NOMINATIONS ORIGINAL SONG BEST ACTOR BEST ACTRESS BEST “ ” CHRISTOPH WALTZ

AMY ADAMS

BIG EYES Music and Lyrics by Lana Del Rey

, CHRIS NASHAWATY

“TIM BURTON’S BEST FILM IN YEARS! THE RADIANT AMY ADAMS IS PERFECT!” “A TIM BURTON FILM THROUGH-AND-THROUGH.”* “AMY ADAMS AND CHRISTOPH WALTZ ARE SUPERB!”

AMY ADAMS

Jake Gyllenhaal, in Southpaw

PITTSBURGH ON FILM

CHRISTOPH WALTZ ALTZ

Locally shot and produced films set for 2015 release include:

FATHERS AND DAUGHTERS. Gabriele Muccino directed Russell Crowe, Aaron Paul, Jane Fonda and Amanda Seyfried in this domestic drama. JUDY’S DEAD. Local actor Tom Atkins heads the cast of this dark drama about family relations. Written and directed by Dave Rodkey. THE LAST WITCH HUNTER. Directed by Breck Eisner and starring Vin Diesel; Pittsburgh subs for NYC. ME & EARL & THE DYING GIRL. Alfonso Gomez-Rejon directs this adaptation of Jesse Andrews’ novel about a teenager befriending a classmate with leukemia. THE OTHER SIDE. Chris Niespodzianski wrote and co-directed (with Raymond Mongelli III) this tale of a Pittsburgh-based zombie apocalypse. SOUTHPAW. Jake Gyllenhaal stars in this boxing drama, directed by Pittsburgh native Antoine Fuqua. SURVIVAL KNIFE. More hometown horror, this knife-attack drama is directed by Mike McKown. THE BARN. Independent horror movie involving an ancient evil, directed by Justin M. Seaman. Also, currently or soon-to-be shooting: Concussion, the Will Smith vehicle about football head injuries, and American Pastoral, Phillip Noyce’s adaptation of Phillip Roth’s 1997 novel.

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BLADE RUNNER. In this season of forgiveness, let’s put aside Ridley Scott’s recent Exodus, and focus on his stylish 1982 sci-fi noir that eerily predicted some of the future we’re living in now. It’s an urban dystopia, set in 2019 Los Angeles, in which men, men-machine combos and giant corporations struggle for self-determination. Its neon-lit nights, dark alleys and smoggy drizzle look best on a big screen, so grab this opportunity. 7 p.m. Wed., Dec. 31. Hollywood (AH) THEY LIVE. A working-class dude named Nada (Roddy Piper) discovers the truth behind people’s infuriating complacency: They’re being continually brainwashed into submission to serve the needs of an elite class of aliens. John Carpenter’s campy 1988 sci-fi thriller (with fisticuffs!) has since gained status as a trenchant observation on class, consumerism and why we so eagerly do as we’re told by corporate entities. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 1; 9:15 p.m. Fri., Jan. 2; 8:45 p.m. Sat., Jan. 3; 4:15 p.m. Sun., Jan. 4; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Jan. 6. Hollywood (AH)

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THE 39 STEPS. A wise-cracking Canadian, visiting Britain, finds himself scrambling across

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*FORBES *FOR BE BES WRITTEN BY

SCOTT ALEXANDER & LARRY KARASZEWSKI

DIRECTED BY

TIM BURTON

NOW PLAYING AT THEATERS EVERYWHERE CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES • NO PASSES ACCEPTED

the Scottish moors while being pursued by criminals and police alike, in Alfred Hitchcok’s 1935 film. The 39 Steps was the director’s first international success, and its entertaining mix of light comedy, romance, intrigue and action would become familiar. The film opens a month-long, Sunday-night series of Hitchcock films. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 4. Regent Square (AH)

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DR. STRANGELOVE, OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB. The Cold War was never funnier than in Stanley Kubrick’s pitch-black satire. From the brilliant Peter Sellers’ three roles (including the titular doctor with a problematic artificial arm) to Sterling Hayden’s muttering about “precious bodily fluids” to Slim Pickens’ greatest ride, this mad rush to annihilation manages to be a sharply defined time capsule of early-’60s paranoia while remaining a hilarious all-purpose general indictment of military madness. The 1961 film continues a year-long look at Kubrick’s films. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 8; 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 9; 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 10; 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 11; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Jan. 13. Hollywood (AH)

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[DANCE REVIEW]

LOOKING AT SOME OF HIS PAINTINGS IS LIKE PEEKING INTO HIS CANTANKEROUS SOUL

DANCED WORDS {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

fireWALL Dance Theater’s UPROAR continues through Jan. 11. Off the Wall, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-25. 888718-4253 or www.insideoffthewall.com

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FAILING BEAUTIFULLY [ART REVIEW]

Left to right: Glenna Clark, Elisa-Marie Alaio and Jenna Rae Smith in fireWALL Dance Theater’s Uproar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

For its sophomore effort, fireWALL Dance Theater embarked on a unique project. The resident dance company at Carnegie’s Off the Wall performing-arts center created a companion dance-theater piece to the Liz Duffy Adams play Or,, now being staged by Off the Wall’s acting troupe. Adams’ Or, tells a fictional story of 17thcentury British poet, spy and playwright Aphra Behn’s efforts to write a play while constantly being interrupted by a trio of lovers. fireWALL’s Uproar turns that premise inside-out using a similar setting and characters to tell the tale in dance of an author whose fictional characters complicate her efforts to write their stories. Uproar, conceived by Erika Cuenca and fireWALL artistic director Elisa-Marie Alaio, who also choreographed the work, is set to original music by Ryan McMasters. The Dec. 18 opening-night performance began with Alaio, as the author, engrossed in her writing and taking some pleasure in its outcome. On a one-room set with several doors and furnishings, the author was interrupted by the appearance of dancer Taylor Quinn in a French maid’s costume running into the room on tiptoes in small quick steps. Her arms spun in rapid circular movements in front of her as if to steady her balance while angling to catch a glimpse of what Alaio was writing. The first of many quirky characters sprung from the author’s mind, Quinn was a delight as the perky blonde maid whose curiosity led to several humorous moments throughout the intermissionless 50-minute work. The author’s other characters first appeared in nondescript leotards, then as the work progressed donned costumes, hinting at their station and their relationship to the author, who doubled as the heroine in her own story. A royal lover, a lesbian lover and a long-lost lover all vied for the heroine’s affections, leading to a few heated makeout sessions that sent pulses racing. Uproar’s primary allure however, came from Alaio herself. The Point Park grad’s vibrantly athletic choreography was thick with gesture and beautifully nuanced, and her passionate acting and dancing in the role of the author/heroine was a triumph. Also notable was the over-thetop performance of Luke Paulina in drag as a flamboyant dramaturge come to help the struggling author. A solid effort by all involved, Uproar proved an unexpected holiday treat.

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

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N TODAY’S overheated and unregu-

lated art market, it seems like artists are more like brands than cultural producers. Art seems more than ever to be a consumer good like any other. And just like every other commodity, marketing is essential to making a sale. This must be incredibly frustrating for many artists, but in reality it has always been this way. Patrons, dealers and institutions promote the lucky ones while many others, often of equal talent, are marginalized or under-recognized. While some artists are purposefully anti-establishment or experimental, most artists just want to be acknowledged, if not paid, for the work they are doing. Such seems to be the case with Chuck Connelly, who in an Emmy Award-winning documentary about him called The Art of Failure: Chuck Connelly Not For Sale, exclaims in one of his rants: “I don’t even want you to buy it, I just want you to pay attention. That’ll keep me alive. Just look! I can FEEL when you look.” And you want to look because both Connelly and his work are a beautiful, unfathomable, intense and compelling mess. As part of the Pittsburgh Biennial, Chuck Connelly: My America is a small painting exhibition curated by Jes-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

In flight: Chuck Connelly’s “Ascending Man” (1986)

sica Beck at The Andy Warhol Museum. Very little of Connelly’s backstory is revealed in this exhibition, which is really a shame. Connelly’s paintings are actually enriched by his biography. And in this, the age of over-sharing, what better place to tell it than at The Warhol?

CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA

continues through Sun., Jan. 4. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

If you haven’t seen the exhibition yet, do yourself a favor and visit Connelly’s website, where there are reproductions of his paintings and links to clips from the documentary. You might also

want to search online for interviews in which, for example, he talks about his music, a secret passion, which he wants to keep pure. And for sure you will want to check out an Internet TV show called Stream of Thought, where you can watch him paint. An artist’s background information is not always essential, but Connelly puts so much of himself — physically, psychically and emotionally — into his work that looking at some of his paintings is like peeking into his cantankerous soul. The paintings are raw, intense, violent, angry, tender, ironic, intimate, passionate and comic. Take “Edge of Heaven,” a brooding vision of a village beset by massive, swirling Van Gogh clouds that are at once ominous and benevolent. It’s as if Connelly, who was born in Pittsburgh in 1955, understands deeply CONTINUES ON PG. 38


MUST-SEE EVENTS TO KICK OFF THE NEW YEAR! Hilarious Pittsburgh Comedy

The Most Loverly Musical Ever

JANUARY 6 –10

JANUARY 22 – FEBRUARY 22 LERNER & LOEWE’S

DIRECTED BY

 Fair L r LLad addyy

TED PAPPAS PRESENTED BY

SIX SHOWS ONLY

Eliza Doolittle gets the ultimate makeover and is transformed from Cockney flower girl to the fairest lady at the ball. This acclaimed musical features favorite songs including “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “On the Street Where You Live,” “The Rain in Spain” and many more.

The Second City is back with a fast-paced sketch comedy and improv show loaded with local flavor. TUES 6 7:00 pm

WED 7 8:00 pm

THUR 8 8:00pm

FRI 9 SAT 10 8:00pm 5:30 pm 9:00pm

BEST SEATS AVAILABLE TUES., WEDS. & THURS.!

At the O’Reilly Theater, in the Heart of the Cultural District

Years of Artistic Excellence

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FAILING BEAUTIFULLY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

YOU WANT TO LOOK BECAUSE BOTH CONNELLY AND HIS WORK ARE A BEAUTIFUL, UNFATHOMABLE, INTENSE AND COMPELLING MESS. As a painter committed to his personal vision and to his craft, Connelly is well versed in art history and he uses it to great advantage. You’ll find references both in subject and style to any number of artists and movements, including Peter Paul Rubens, Chaim Soutine, Balthus, James Ensor, Jasper Johns, Fauvism, German expressionism, surrealism, pop, street art and the symbolists, all jumbled together. Billed as Connelly’s first solo museum show, this exhibition tries to survey the whole of his career over the past 40 years. It’s a noble effort, but it doesn’t really work in such a small space. His paintings seem to be all of one “structural” whole, as one critic put it, but some of them just need more room. “Ascending Man” and “St. George and the Dragon” are large, dramatic and bold in subject matter and brush stroke. They command the room and overshadow nearby work like “My America” and “Couple in Bed.” All in all, the exhibition is an important one in that it recognizes an artist who has stayed true to himself and to his medium. Connelly has persevered, and in the end he has achieved his ultimate goal: to make us not just look, but to see. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[ART REVIEW]

OUTLAWS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

Andy Warhol’s “Most Wanted Men No. 2, John Victor G” {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM}

that we are, each of us, always at the precipice between life and death, triumph and disaster. In the 1980s, Connelly was among the rising stars of neo-expressionism that included Julian Schnabel and JeanMichel Basquiat. In a videotaped conversation with the curator, Connelly explains that he felt like in New York he had arrived in the right place at the right time. He had opportunities early on but, whether by design or not, he managed to alienate and piss off many of his supporters. According to one dealer in the documentary, Connelly told the naked truth and disregarded the consequences. As a result, he has struggled on the periphery for much of his career. But who can blame him? The art world, like many businesses, can be unsavory, and Connelly’s ornery candor is truly refreshing.

Before moving to Pittsburgh, I lived in the shadow of the Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza in Albany, N.Y. Out my window I could see Corning Tower, the largest building in a complex of New York state government buildings. Built between 1959 and 1976, the plaza bespeaks Rockefeller’s outsized ego and is by most accounts a Modernist fiasco. Nonetheless, its outlandish presence houses an impressive public-art collection. As a collector, Rockefeller recognized New York as a center of artistic innovation in the 1960s and ’70s. He assembled the Empire State Plaza Art Collection as a snapshot of talented artists of the time. His focus on abstract work was also political. Abstraction would not only complement the architecture, it would be provocative without relying on controversial subject matter. Controversy and the political animal that was Rockefeller are at the root of the story behind 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair, at The Andy Warhol Museum. This little gem of a show is full of the conspiratorial tidbits that make the story of art so intriguing. The mostly archival material is good gossipy fun, a reminder that art is seldom far removed from its socio-cultural and political milieu. Philip Johnson designed the New York State pavilion for the 1964 World’s Fair, in Queens. Its observation towers were the fair’s tallest (as Rockefeller requested), and the façade of the circular building called the Theaterama displayed newly commissioned works by 10 artists, including Warhol. Warhol’s mural, “13 Most Wanted Men,” was inspired by the painter Wynn Chamberlain, who suggested that he create a series of paintings based on headshots of the FBI’s most wanted. However, once executed the mural was quickly painted over because of its scandalous content. In 1970, Johnson finally revealed that it was Rockefeller who had ordered the piece removed: The governor did not want to alienate voters, because seven of the 13 surnames were Italian. In the gallery, a Warhol portrait of Rockefeller from 1967 hangs near several of the mug-shot paintings that have been reassembled for this exhibition. Their presence acts a backdrop to a complex story that intertwines key developments in Warhol’s career with political, artistic and underground events taking place around the city. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

13 MOST WANTED MEN: ANDY WARHOL AND THE 1964 WORLD’S FAIR continues through Sun., Jan. 4. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org


{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID RASEL, TMS}

The Captain America exhibit in Comic-Tanium

[ART]

SCIENTIST-MAN {BY NICK KEPPLER} COMIC BOOKS are well-known violators

of the laws of science. It’d be impossible to consume the calories necessary to run at the speed of The Flash. An infant Superman wouldn’t still be an infant after traveling the light years from Krypton. And an onslaught of radiation as a source of superpowers? Cancer is much more likely.

COMIC-TANIUM

continues through Sun., Jan. 4. ToonSeum, 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

Nonetheless, the ToonSeum is using the colorful world of comics as a gateway to lessons about real science. The exhibit Comic-Tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes features seven modules, each containing a replica of a well-known superhero’s gear, created by the Warrendale-based Minerals, Metals and Materials Society. Alongside is actual science info about the iconic character’s abilities, presented science-fair-style in digestible tidbits. The exhibit is the brainchild of Su-

veen Mathaudhu, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Riverside, and a comic-book fanatic. As a Department of Defense scientist, Mathaudhu became a real-world equivalent of childhood idols like Bruce Banner, the Hulk’s alter ego, and Tony Stark, the man beneath Iron Man’s armor. “I am aware of the pseudoscience in comics,” says Mathaudhu in a phone interview. “Still, they got me interested [in science].” A few years ago, he was in Pittsburgh for a conference and stopped by the ToonSeum. He later suggested the concept. His favorite module showcases a replica of Captain America’s shield. It’s made of a nimble but indestructible metal called “vibranium,” and the side text discusses the military’s search for an actual strong, lightweight alloy for vehicles. “The [U.S.] military is the largest consumer of fuel on the planet,” says Mathaudhu, “so they’ve been very interested [in] finding some strong material that can provide better fuel economy.” (Mathaudhu also says the shield provides one of the most flagrant examples of comicbook pseudo-science: The military scientist who created it had no idea how to forge another, thus explaining its uniqueness. “There’s no reason why a

“I AM AWARE OF THE PSEUDOSCIENCE IN COMICS.”

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scientist would forget his own research,” he scoffs.) The Spider-Man module focuses on his web-shooters, and inspires a lesson on how industrial scientists are trying to replicate useful materials from nature, investigating abalone shells’ remarkable ability to absorb impact and trees’ century-spanning strength. Batman and his array of high-tech equipment provided an entry into how computers aid research, and the X-Men’s frenemy Magneto was an obvious segue into magnetic materials. Each module spotlights a member of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society who is doing related research. “From my perspective, these are the actual ‘heroes’ of Comic-Tanium,” says Lynne Robinson, the show’s designer and a contributing editor for the Society. She says that, even if comic-book physics aren’t perfect, the stories relay the importance of science to young minds. “In Iron Man 3 for instance, Tony Stark describes himself as an ‘engineer,’” she points out. “That’s really his power and it’s what actually saves the world at the end of the movie.” Even if that “extremis” exploding gunk made no sense.

pghcitypaper

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CLO ACADEMY ADEMY

Register Today for the

New Semester e er

OPEN HOUSE!

January 4 ‡ 12:00-2:00pm Try FREE classes! Including Acting, Musical Theater, and Creative Theater. Visit pittsburghCLO.org for a complete schedule

CLASSES AVAILABLE for ages 3-18 Next semester begins January 12 ENROLL ONLINE or call 412-281-2234

Did You Know?

Since 1989, Pittsburgh CLO Academy has provided early training to many successful theater, television, and movie stars.

S C R E E N

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ZACHARY QUINTO

COURTNEY MAZZA

The Voice

TV/Film: Heroes, Star Trek, American Horror Story

Theater: Cry Baby, The Little Mermaid

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.0101.08.15

We want to wish everyone a

JAN. 01

Messfest

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

{COMEDY}

+ THU., JAN. 01 {FESTIVAL}

Coming this Spring... AEGEAN ESTIATORIO IN THE HEART OF MARKET SQUARE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

conveyed to three breweries and dispensaries, where a guide will provide information while you “study” craft-beer samples. There’s even a cooler to store your purchased beverages. Al Hoff Food: 10 a.m. (starts at PPG Place; $80). Beer: 11:30 a.m. Sat. Jan. 3 (starts at Beer Hive, Strip District; $55). Tours repeat throughout the year. 412-323-4709 or www.pghtoursandmore.net

Hangovers aside, Pittsburgh’s sloppiest New Year’s Day tradition has to be Messfest. For the eighth year running (down your arm), Carnegie Science Center offers a one-day-only set of hands-on activities centered on all things slimy, sticky and gooey — and substances like oobleck, which lives somewhere between solid and liquid states. Visitors are also invited to engineer a container for raw eggs that will keep them from breaking during the Egg Drop; do finger-painting; make their own sidewalk chalk; and watch high-energy (and possibly icky) theater programs like “It’s Alimentary, Watson” and “Kaboom!” Old clothes are advised; clean-up is on the Science Center. Bill O’Driscoll 10 a.m.-5 p.m. One Allegheny Ave., North Side. Free with regular admission ($11.9519.95). 412-237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

Culture. Cuisine d’Burgh is on the national radar, and this three-hour tour will visit iconic local eateries, as seen on TV (Man vs. Food; Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives) and profiled in magazines. You’re bound to get thirsty, so tomorrow, check out the PA Brew Tours: Pittsburgh Brewery Tours. You’ll be safely

If tasked with describing Donnell Rawlings’ performance style in just a few words, “shot out of a cannon” quickly comes to mind. Formerly a supporting player on the critically acclaimed Chappelle’s Show, Rawlings has spent more than a decade honing his craft as a standup comedian. Like this bit on civil rights: “All them dogs that bit them motherfuckers on them marches? ... I’d have been like, ‘I ain’t marching today, this dog just bit the shit out of

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DALE MCNUTT}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ FRI., JAN. 02 {FOOD} Honestly, by today, you’ve already given up the eat-kale resolution, so hop on board Pittsburgh Tours and More’s The Flavor of Pittsburgh Food Tour: Pittsburgh’s Popular Food

JAN. 04

Gia ia a T Presents Pres Pr esen entt


sp otlight

Our abiding fascination with how Pittsburgh ranks on numbered lists suggests we’re obsessed with what outsiders think of us. A fresh take arrives Jan. 6-10, when The Second City makes its annual stop at Pittsburgh Public Theater with six performances of N’at’s All Folks! The evening of comedy and songs is the troupe’s first Pittsburgh-specific show since 2008. The program includes Second City’s trademark improv, plus archival sketches from the vaults of the storied company that trained talents like Stephen Colbert, Bill Murray and Gilda Radner. This time, says performer Liz Reuss in a phone interview, the sketches include one that a then-unknown Tina Fey helped originate, back in the 1990s. Reuss says the Pittsburgh content includes a song about Pittsburgh winters, and fun with local language quirks. (She now knows what “yinz” means.) The troupe (pictured) — one of three touring Second City units — also includes Marlena Rodriguez, Alan Linic, Lisa Beasley, John Thibodeaux, Scott Morehead and music director and onstage accompanist Dane Halvorson. Reuss, a Louisville native, is a freelance journalist who began studying at Second City as a writer, and got hooked on performing, too. She’s been touring for a year. “This is probably the most city-specific show we’ve done in my time [here],” she says. “I’m really excited to see how it goes.” Bill O’Driscoll Tue., Jan. 6-Sat., Jan. 10. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-50. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

me, King. I’ll follow you on Twitter, but I ain’t marching, man!’” His shows at the Pittsburgh Improv, at the Waterfront, this week continue through Sunday. Charlie Deitch 8 and 10:30 p.m. Also, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 3, and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 4. 166 E. Bridge St., Homestead. $20. 412-462-5233 or pittsburgh. improv.com

+ SAT.,

Let Them Get Away With Murder,” a new mural by the visiting artists of 1Hood in collaboration with Artists Image Resource and Westinghouse High School students. Following the police-shooting deaths of

Idasa Tariq and Blak Rapp M.A.D.U.S.A. BO 5-8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF PARADISE GRAY / 1 HOOD MEDIA}

JAN. 03

“Don’t Let Them Get Away With Murder”

{DANCE}

JAN. 02

Donnell ll Rawlings

JAN. 03 {MUSIC}

Following its successful inaugural performance last year, Voces Solis is back at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. The large vocal ensemble, an offshoot of The Summer Singers choral group, offers another free Yuletide Concert. The hour-long show ranges from a selection from Bach’s “Magnificat” to songs from the American choral tradition and a contemporary composition by Abbie Betinis. And because you probably haven’t had enough to eat lately, the afternoon show is followed by a dessert reception. BO 2 p.m. 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. Free. 412-276-3456 or www.carnegiecarnegie.org

Michael Brown, Tamir Rice and others, the mural comments on media representation of young black men. This new “Most Wanted Men” is the centerpiece of a free after-hours program blending art, art-making activities, social justice and food, and includes performances by Jasiri X,

stereotype: As the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council points out, being an artist is itself a full-time job, one that often doesn’t leave time for scouring the books. GPAC wants to help with Art Cents: Accounting for Artists. The 90-minute class is led by Katie Bowie, whose Bowie & Co. is an alternative accounting firm specializing in artists, creative organizations, startups and the like. Tonight’s session covers things like

composition are derived from “four specific mind and body states.” BO 6:30 p.m. 5824 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. $15 (includes light refreshments). RSVP at giatc3@yahoo.com.

+ TUE., JAN. 06 {CLASS} Artists, as a group, aren’t known for financial acuity, and there’s something to the

{WORDS}

+ SUN., JAN. 04

While still a student at Mount Lebanon High School, Benny Zelkowicz took some classes at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. In college, his love of film — especially animation —won out over his neuroscience studies. Zelkowicz went on to big things, including animated series like Lunar Jim; an Emmy for the Cartoon Network’s Robot Chicken; and even the end-credits stop-action sequence in The Lego Movie. This year, Zelkowicz branched out yet again when he and old college pal Cam Baity published their co-written children’s book The First Book of Ore The Foundry’s Edge (Disney-Hyperion). The story is set in a half-retro, half-high-tech alternate universe where a young girl and her friend find themselves in an adventure “down the rabbit hole,” as Zelkowicz says in a phone interview, to a fantastic world where metal is alive. Compared to filmmaking, he says, “Writing gave us an opportunity to tell a story as big as we wanted to tell.” The book, the first in a planned trilogy (www.booksofore.com), has gotten positive reviews. Today, Los Angeles-based Zelkowicz returns to Pittsburgh for a talk and signing at the Mount Lebanon Public Library. BO 2 p.m. 16 Castle Shannon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. Free. 412-531-1912

{ART} In 1964, Andy Warhol’s World’s Fair mural based on FBI mugshots, “The 13 Most Wanted Men,” was painted over to prevent controversy; the Andy Warhol Museum exhibit about the incident is reviewed elsewhere in this issue. Tonight, the museum hosts the unveiling of “Don’t

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Gia T Presents begins its 2015 season with a studio performance featuring three new short works by three different choreographers. The program, at The Bodiography Center for Movement, spotlights Wendell Cooper (a.k.a. Mx. Oops), from New York City, who will incorporate contemporary urban dance, rap and video projection as he performs tracks from his forthcoming album EXILE, which is inspired by the science fiction of Octavia Butler. Pittsburghbased Gia Cacalano performs “Recollections of a Future Lullaby,” an improvised dance in collaboration with musician and composer Ricardo Iamuuri. And Amsterdam-based Vincent Cacialano offers “Crescendo,” whose choreography and

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identifying what type of business you have, prepping for tax filings and analyzing your business operations. BO 6-7:30 p.m. 810 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30. www.pittsburghartscouncil.org

+ THU., JAN. 08 {DANCE}

Those Dancing With the Stars types don’t just live on your TV. A few of them have embarked on a seven-week national tour that hits the Benedum Center tonight. Dancing With the Stars: Live! features names like Mark Ballas, Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovsky, Emma Slater, Kym Johnson, Leo Motsepe and Sasha Farber. The glitzy 90-minute program features both brand-new numbers and recreations of faves from the ABC show. The Pittsburgh stop is presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. BO 8 p.m. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $50-85. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER MOTOWN THE MUSICAL.

Available Now at Better Beer Retailers

The story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson & more. Thu, 7:30 p.m., Jan. 2-Dec. 3, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 4, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 1. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. MURDER FOR TWO. 1 actor investigates the crime, the other plays all of the suspects & they both play the piano. Wed-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 18. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. OR. One night in the life of Aphra Behn, poet, spy, first professional female playwright, in a plot full of love, intrigue, murder & career making decisions.Presented by off the Wall Productions. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 4, 3 p.m. Thru Jan. 10. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 1-888-71-TICKETS.

COMEDY

MON 05

COMEDY SAUCE. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Pleasure Bar, “BEST OF THE BURGH” Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. COMEDY SHOWCASE. TFM IMPROV COMEDY. Come out and see Pittsburgh’s Full throttle improv every best comedians every Friday. Monday night starring our Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 6 resident house teams. Corner Cafe, South Side. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru 412-488-2995. Feb. 23 The Maker MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN Theater, Shadyside. EXTREME MICHAEL 412-404-2695. GIGLIOTTI. Amazing www. per UNPLANNED pa pghcitym strolling magic & COMEDY’S .co comedy. Fun for the JAMBONE. Mon, whole family feat. Caesars 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Palace award winning Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Master Magician 412-681-4318. MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869. CHICKSBURGH COMEDY. 8 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. N’AT’S ALL FOLKS! This Second MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. City show includes Steel City Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 22 The Maker politics, Pittsburgese, sports, & local Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. humor. In addition to the local

FRI 02

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 06

SUN 04

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

TUE 06 - WED 07

angle, they will perform favorites from their repertoire of sketch comedy, wacky songs, & trademark improv. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theatre. 7 p.m., Jan. 7-9, 8 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 10, 5:30 & 9 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

WED 07 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. A window display & artist product series feat. Daniel Pillis. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Carnegie Trees 2014: Winter Wonders. The Hall of Architecture w/ several towering 20-foot Colorado spruce trees, each adorned w/ handcrafted ornaments. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015


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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Tough Art. An annual exhibition of original, interactive artworks “tough” enough to withstand kid handling. Take a walk through a prism forest, create cracks on kinetic stained glass, reach for a sky of 600 LEDs, & explore the inner workings of an intergalactic sheep. North Side. 412-322-5058. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows.

Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2015 New Years Ne Year E Eve Dinner Package $75 per person - includes 5 courses

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$100 per person - All-Inclusive includes full bar menu w assorted bourbons, scotches, wine, craft drafts and craft cocktails. Sponsored by Tito’s Vodka.

Call 412-965-5684 for details. 1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Winter Flower Show & Light Garden. Feat. a variety of festive poinsettias, showy amaryllis & aromatic paperwhites, Winter Flower Show showcases illuminated glass art & evergreens glowing with thousands of LED lights. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

[ART]

books. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 05

Eastern deities, ancient stone idols, blissed-out modern teenagers, and dinosaurs and tigers rampaging on the open ocean — it all comes together in the collagestyle art of Joel Brown. The Pittsburgh native blends “a tad of surrealism and psychedelia here with a tad of minimalism, text and philosophy there.” Hitherto:

A Mini-Retrospective in Dream, Demons and Divinity, an exhibit sampling his mixed-media works from over the years, opens Saturday afternoon with a reception at Constellation Coffee. 1-4 p.m. Sat., Jan. 3. 4059 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. Free. www.constellationcoffeepgh.com

ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN PRISONERS WORK PARTY. CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Read & code letters, pick books, Vanka Murals. Mid-20th pack ‘em or database ‘em! century murals depicting war, Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. social justice and the immigrant Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. experience in America. Millvale. 412-361-3022. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain GREEN PARTY OF America, & other comic ALLEGHENY COUNTY characters use real-world MEETING. Monthly minerals, metals, & meeting of materials science Allegheny area & engineering to . Green Party. First www per boost their powers & a p ty ci pgh m Thu of every month, save their worlds. .co 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 5 Downtown. 412-232-0199. Citizen Power, WEST OVERTON Squirrel Hill. 412-323-1884. MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

FUNDRAISERS SUN 04

POLITICS THU 01

FULL LIST ONLINE

LITERARY

DANCE SAT 03 - SUN 04

UPROAR. A revealing glimpse into the “creative process” of our heroine, who experiences all the typical ups & downs, rejected ideas, & writers’ block. Presented by fireWALL dance theatre. Sun, 7 p.m., Sat., Jan. 3, 4 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 10, 3 p.m. Thru Jan. 11 Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 1-888-71-TICKETS.

SAT 03

ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SUN 04 AUTHOR TALK W/ BENNY ZELKOWICZ. Benny Zelkowicz, co-author of The First Book of Ore The Foundry’s Edge (The Books of Ore), will talk about his book, answer questions & sign

OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

TUE 06 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 07 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Tova Mirvis, the best-selling author of “Outside World” & “Ladies Auxiliary”, reviews her new novel “Visible City.” 7:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

KIDSTUFF FRI 02 - WED 07 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CONTINUES ON PG. 46


Work by Ron Copeland, from Illuminations, at be Galleries, in Lawrenceville

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Don’t Let Them Get Away With Murder. Join #1hood & the Andy Warhol Museum for the unveiling of our mural, “Don’t Let Them Get Away With Murder”. An evening of arts, social justice, food & performance. Jan. 3, 5-8:30pm. North Side. 412-237-8300. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos on Glass. Lantern slides: 1880 to 1920, hand-painted, sometimes with a single hair to color a small line. North Side. 412-231-7881. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Confronting Art: Writes come Close to Home. Sat. Jan 3 & Jan. 10, 1-3pm, join Silver Eye to witness & write about art work. Jan. 3, guides you in the ancient art of Ekphrasis by meditating on & addressing the images in writing. Meet David Oresick & learn about putting this show together. On Jan. 10, participants previous week’s writing will read their work. South Side. 412-431-1810.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Recent Works by Sheila Cueller-Shaffer. Each abstract work represents a part of a narrative of an immigrant’s journey where anything can become the subject: a memory, a photo, or a change in landscape through

time. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Emily Newman & the New Chelyuskinites. Modeled on the 1933-34 Russian sea expedition that trapped 111 people on arctic ice for two months after their Chelyuskin sank w/ equal parts social documentary, tableaux & oral history. Squirrel Hill. 412-697-3231. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2014: AIR’s 3rd Annual National Juried Exhibition. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. PostImpressionism to Abstract. Artwork by Vickie Schilling & Nadya Lapets. Downtown. 412-325-6768.

BE GALLERIES. Ron Copeland: Illuminations. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Pasquale Pristera & Zivi Aviraz. Feat. artworks by the “wood zipper artist”, Pasquale Pristera & Zivi Aviraz. Squirrel Hill. 412-421- 8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. Snap Judgments: Capturing the Architecture of the Allegheny County Courthouse. Work by David Aschkenas. By appointment. Downtown. 412-297-4900. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Artwork by Crystala Armagost. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Along the Path II. A solo exhibition by Christopher Boring. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Sparkle Plenty. New work by Carlos Sanchez Vegas w/ Laura Lee Junge, Chiz Turnross, Barbara Yerace, & more. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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ALL DRESSED UP AND NOWHERE TO GO?

City Paper Listings Editor Margaret Welsh is here to save your weekend, sharing her picks for the best events going on around town with our BRAND NEW

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PODCAST www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/ CPWeekendPodcast/Page

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

VISUAL ART

SAT 03 FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LEARN TO ICE SKATE. Teaching basic skating fundamentals of balance, edge control & stopping. Classes for all ranges of expertise. All ages. Schenley Park Ice Rink. Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 28 Schenley Park, Oakland. 703-597-6905. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art & committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. North Side. 412-322-1773.

SUN 04 CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. Picture book read-aloud of Penguin & Pinecone by Salina Yoon & winter-themed arts & crafts project. 1 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve. 724-593-6105.

TUE 06

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 07 WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed ofevery month, 10 a.m. Penguin

CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE

MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. David Lewis, Terry Shutko & Friends. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Armin Hoffman: Farbe/Color. Celebrating our Armin Hofmann exhibition of silkscreens &emerging talent from CMU School of Design 2014 Seniors. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200.

Boyce-Mayview Park, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1099.

TUE 06

SAT 03 WINTER WELLNESS DASH. 1 mile walk/run. 12 p.m.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Jan. 5, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3 Guild Shows. 3 different shows presented at PCA: Women of Vision presents “Storytellers: Truth be Told”, Craftsmen Guild presents “Illusions” & Fiberarts Guild presents “Construct”. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Terry Boyd “Pins & Needles” Solo Exhibition. Drawing & embroidery techniques, incorporating drama, abstraction & performance into multifaceted & intense pieces. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201.

WED 07 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF FRI 02

SHAW GALLERIES. Sincronia. Work by 6 contemporary artists from Venezuela. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPACE. Obsessions. Showcasing six artists from across the U.S., exploring the nature of obsession through painting, sculpture, site-specific installation, video & performance. Ft. artists: Jeremiah Johnson, Jason Lockyer, Nathan Margoni, Mary Ivy Martin, Becky Slemmons & Laurie Trok. Downtown. 412-325-7723. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Restrike: Uncovering the Life and Work of Gertrude Quastler. Feat. the artistic styles of Gertrude Quastler from printmaking to sculpture. Oakland. 412-648-2423.

Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

THE FLAVOR OF PITTSBURGH! On the Pittsburgh’s Popular Food Culture Tour visit iconic ‘Burgh eateries featured in Man vs. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Food; Diners, Drive-Ins and www.pittsburghtaichi.com Dives; Food & Wine magazine; Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting Huffington Post & more. House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. Fri, 10 a.m., Fri., Feb. 27, DROP-IN TOURS. A tour of 10 a.m., Fri., March 13, the Mattress Factory’s current 10 a.m., Fri., April 17, 10 a.m. exhibits led by a museum and Wed, Fri, 10 a.m. Thru educator. 12-1pm, May 8 Crazy Mocha Dec. 20 & Jan. 3. Coffee Company, Mattress Factory, Downtown. North Side. 412-323-4709. 412-231-3169 ex 536. FREE GOOD . KOREAN II. Sat, www per FRIDAYS. Free a p ty pghci m 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. admission, bar, & DJ .co Thru Jan. 31 Carnegie Huck Finn. Presented by Library, Oakland. UPMC Health Plan. Fri, 412-622-3116. 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy LIGHTS, CAMERA, Warhol Museum, North Side. PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL 412-237-8300. PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA TOUR. Interactive tour through DANCE. A social, traditional city backdrops of movies such American dance. No partner as The Dark Knight Rises, needed, beginners welcome, Perks of Being a Wallflower, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Flashdance, more. Meet at Swisshelm Park Community Duquesne Incline. 10 a.m., Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. Sat., Jan. 24, 10 a.m., Sat., Feb. 7, FRIDAY NIGHT CREATURE 10 a.m. and Fri., Feb. 20, 10 a.m. FEATURE. A creature painting 412-323-4709 & a creature movie. Fri, THE PITTSBURGH BREWERY 7-11 p.m. Thru Jan. 22 TOUR. Visit the three most The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. iconic breweries in Pittsburgh. 412-969-7197. Tour includes safe transportation GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price to all locations, an entertaining regular museum admission guide, craft beer samples & & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m.

SAT 03

FULL LIST ONLINE

guided tours at each brewery. 11:30 a.m., Wed., Jan. 14, 11:30 a.m., Sat., March 28, 11:30 a.m., Sat., May 9, 11:30 a.m. and Sat., June 20, 11:30 a.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-323-4709. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 04 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Learn Argentine Tango w/ the Pittsburgh Tangueros. All levels. No partner required. Sun, 5-7 p.m. Thru Feb. 1 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Class & conversation. 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 18, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

MON 05 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.


[VISUAL ART]

Locally based artist Terry Boyd was trained as a painter, but his current show — Pins & Needles, at Revision Space — showcases his movement toward drawing and embroidery techniques. This selection of recent efforts features a wide variety of installations, fiber works and two-dimensional pieces. Boyd, who’s shown work in Chicago, Portland, Washington, D.C., and other cities (and has a couple more local solo shows coming in 2015), focuses on repetitive lines and imagery. And because free tattoos of Boyd’s work were offered at the show’s opening, his lines and imagery can now be seen repeated on some of your neighbors. Exhibit continues through Jan. 31. 5262 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201 or www.revisionspace.com

SAHAJA MEDITATION. Dimple meditation techniques, which will improve your physical, emotional, psychological, social, and spiritual health Mon, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 5 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 06 DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

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MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PITTSBURGH MOOD PROUD. Pittsburgh Mood Disorder Support Group is a peer sponsored group and is LGBTQIA friendly. Get focused about mental health topics & make new friends. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 24 Crazy Mocha Baum, Friendship. 412-465-0381.

WED 07 AFTERNOON TEA DANCE. Lessons offered to beginners. Wed, 12-2:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna

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House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OPEN HOUSE + MEMBER MARKETPLACE & COFFEE HOUR. Come meet our staff, facilitators, & past participants while learning about all of our services for women business owners & women in business. Lodge dining room. Registration requested. 8:30-10 a.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1253. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

Audition appts. Jan. 5, 10am-6pm. Bring a photograph & resume, stapled together. Sides from the script will be provided. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8141. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for “Lend Me A Tenor”. Jan. 3, 5-9 pm, & Jan. 4, 12-4 pm. Seeking 4 men & 4 women ages 20 & up; Prepare 2 min. comedic monologue, cold reading from

THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Audition call for “Electra”. Jan. 11, 7pm at The Seton Center & Jan. 12, 7pm at Schoolhouse Arts Center. www.bphp.org R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for production of “Do Not Disturb”, Jan. 3 & Jan. 4, 1:30–3:30pm. Seeking 3 men & 3 women. Will be asked to read from the script. Headshot & resume appreciated. 724-775-6844.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS

Since its founding more than 100 years ago, Big Brothers Big Sisters has helped underprivileged children thrive by partnering them with professionally supported one-onone mentors. Volunteers enrich the lives of their “littles” simply by making a commitment to spend time with them. An interview, background check and training required. Call 412-363-6100 or visit www.bbbspgh.org for information.

the script. Men be prepared to sing. Bring picture & resume. 724-374-9200. THE VALLEY PLAYERS OF LIGONIER. Auditions for “Lend Me A Tenor” by Ken Ludwig on Jan. 4, 5-8 pm & Jan.5, 6-8pm Ligonier Theater. 724-238-6514.

THE REP PROFESSIONAL THEATRE COMPANY. Point Park University’s professional theatre company, is accepting Equity Principal auditions by appointment for the production of the world premiere of “Endless Lawns” by Anthony McKay.

SUBMISSIONS 2014-2015 WALDMAN INTERNATIONAL ARTS & WRITING COMPETITION. Seeking creative writing, short film & visual arts submissions from middle & high-schoolers exploring the theme of Real Life Superheroes in the Face of Persecution. Submissions accepted through Jan 15, 2015. 412-421-1500. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.

AUDITIONS 2015 TRIB TOTAL MEDIA YOUNG ARTISTS COMPETITION. The competition is open to classical instrumentalists & vocalists who are residents of either Westmoreland or Fayette County or take private music lessons in either of those two counties & are have not graduated high school. Participants compete for performance opportunities. Cash prizes. The postmarked registration deadline is January 9, 2015 for recorded auditions. Live auditions are Sunday, February 1. 724-837-1850. BOBCAT PLAYERS. Auditions for the 2015 season. Jan. 10, 15 & 17. For appointments call or email bobcatplayers@gmail.com. Visit www.bobcatplayers.com for information. 412-953-0237. CREATE FESTIVAL. Individuals & companies working at the intersection of creativity and technology are encouraged to: submit recent projects for the annual CREATEfest Awards; propose compelling workshops, talks or panels to raise awareness of creative technology trends in this year’s theme of “Interconnectivity;” & propose ideas for engaging arts & technology experiences throughout the festival. Submissions due Feb. 1.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

What is your stance on maintenance sex? I’d never thought about the issue until reading Amy Poehler’s new memoir. I didn’t find anything she said controversial, and was surprised when this quote blew up in the feminist blogosphere: “You have to have sex with your husband occasionally, even though you’re exhausted. Sorry.” I’d never realized many people firmly believe one should have sex with their partner only when they are in the mood! Some articles even made it sound like maintenance sex is a form of nonconsensual sex. I have sex with my husband pretty often when I’m not in the mood. I’d say about 25 percent of the time we are having sex, I am doing it for maintenance purposes. I always enjoy it and I get off the majority of the time, but I don’t always go in wanting it or needing it. Is this wrong? Am I not the feminist I thought I was? MAINTENANCE SEX SUPPORTER

I’m pro maintenance sex, MSS. Sometimes I sex my husband when I’m not feeling it; sometimes he sexes me when he’s not feeling it. We take care of each other. But maintenance sex is not the same thing as enthusiastic sex. The person asking for maintenance sex — the horny partner who’s being indulged/milked/sexed by the non-horny partner — shouldn’t expect mind-blowing, toe-curling, sheet-shredding sex. Maintenance sex is mellow sex, it’s low-impact and low-stress, it’s sex that requires minimal effort, and it’s likely to be non-penetrative sex — and gratitude is the only appropriate response. Another important note: Being pro maintenance sex doesn’t obligate a person to have sex whenever their partner wants it. Proponents and practitioners of maintenance sex still get to say no. There’s a difference between indulging your partner when you’re not feeling it — when you could take it or leave it — and forcing yourself to have sex (or being guilted/ pressured/forced) when you’re too exhausted, too sick or too angry for sex. And as you’ve discovered, MSS, and I can also attest, sometimes you go into sex “not wanting or needing it” and then you start to enjoy it, too, i.e., not in the mood when you started but definitely in the mood before you finished.

question: Have I become one of those perverted panty sniffers from those old “Chester the Molester” comics? SINGLETON NOW INHALING FUNKY FUNK

First answer: technically, yes. But a case could be made that you’re reusing and recycling. If there were a Green Building Certification program for kinks, SNIFF, yours would qualify. Second answer: “Chester the Molester” was a comic strip about a guy, Chester, “who was interested in sexually molesting women and prepubescent girls,” says my old friend Wikipedia. This vile comic strip, which ran in Hustler (of course), made child rape look like harmless and hilarious fun. Dwaine Tinsley, the creator of the strip, wound up going to prison for molesting his daughter — I’m guessing she would argue that child rape was neither harmless nor hilarious. Since you are not interested in prepubescent boys, SNIFF, I don’t think you’re a pervert in the “Chester the Molester” mold. But a case could be made that your actions have a whiff of the nonconsensual about them — your coworkers would most likely object to how you’re reusing and recycling their abandoned underpants — and you should probably knock it off. Vanilla straight guy here. As a fellow Washingtonian, I feel proud to live in a state that was among the first to legalize marriage equality by a popular majority vote of the people. I avidly follow the NFL and eat fried bologna sandwiches and do lots of other manly things. However, I have always loved musical theater. Whenever I go to New York, I have to see at least two or three big shows. My question: Is it socially acceptable for me to goodnaturedly say, “I’m totally gay for musical theater”? Or is it a slur that I shouldn’t say, no matter how playful or well intended?

“I LOVE SOMETHING THAT MANY GAY MEN ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT — AND I’M NOT TALKING ABOUT COCK.”

I’ve recently discovered that I am a panty sniffer. Though since I’m a gay man, maybe I’m a briefs breather? Whatever. The smell gets me hard and gets me off. I discovered this when a fuck-buddy left his shorts behind, and for the next few days I jerked off sniffing his shorts. That brings me to the young millennial techie guys at my work. They are fucking slobs, and they’re always leaving their underwear and socks on the floor of the company’s gym in our office. I started checking the lost-andfound bin, and no one ever claimed their shorts. So I started taking a pair every now and then. At home, I fantasize about who they belong to, and when I’m done with them, I just toss them. First question: Am I stealing? Second (and more important)

THE CAUTIOUS JOKER

When someone says, “That’s so gay,” but means, “That’s so stupid,” they’re being homophobic. Obviously. But a straight guy who says he’s gay for musicals isn’t saying he’s stupid for them, TCJ, he’s saying, “I love something that many gay men are passionate about — and I’m not talking about cock.” Not all gay men are passionate about musical theater, of course, just as not all straight men are into football. But a man with a passion for musical theater is likelier to be gay; if not, he’ll at least be comfortable around gay people. I’ve heard gay guys who avidly follow the NFL describe themselves as straight for football. Likewise, a man with a passion for football is likelier to be straight. You saying, “I’m gay for musical theater,” or a gay guy saying, “I’m straight for football,” amounts to a humorous acknowledgment that the majority of people interested in musicals or football are gay or straight, respectively. In neither case is it an insult or a put-down. But while I think you can continue to say that you’re gay for musicals, TCJ, some gay men (or some of our more annoying “allies”) may take offense. You don’t have to pay attention to those people — they’re just gay for taking offense.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

12.31-01.07

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Even in normal times, you are a fount of regeneration. Your ever-growing hair and fingernails are visible signs of your nonstop renewal. A lot of other action happens without your conscious awareness. For example, your tastebuds replace themselves every two weeks. You produce 200 billion red blood cells and 10 billion white blood cells every day. Every month the epidermis of your skin is completely replaced, and every 12 months your lungs are composed of a fresh set of cells. In 2015, you will continue to revitalize yourself in all these ways, but will also undergo a comparable regeneration of your mind and soul. Here’s my prediction: This will be a year of renaissance, rejuvenation and reinvention.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Sometimes I can feel my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I’m not living,” says a character in Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. If you have ever felt that way, Aquarius, I predict that you will get some relief in 2015. Your bones won’t be straining as much as they have in the past because you will be living at least one of the lives you have wanted to live but haven’t been able to before. How you will handle all the new lightness that will be available?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Erotomania” is a word for the erroneous fantasies people entertain when they imagine that a celebrity is in love with them. Laughable, right? Just because I have dreams of Game of Thrones actress Lena Headey texting me seductive notes doesn’t mean that she genuinely yearns for my companionship. And yet most of us, including you and me, harbor almost equally outlandish beliefs and misapprehensions about all kinds of things. They may not be as farfetched as those that arise from erotomania, but they are still out of sync with reality. The good news, Pisces, is that in 2015 you will have the best chance ever to become aware of and shed your delusions — even the long-running, deeplyrooted kinds.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Most salamanders reproduce by laying eggs, but the alpine salamander doesn’t. Females of that species give birth to live young after long pregnancies that may last three years. What does this have to do with you? Well, I expect you to experience a metaphorical pregnancy in the coming months. Even if you’re male, you will be gestating a project or creation or inspiration. And it’s important that you don’t let your the incubation period drag on and on and on, as the alpine salamanders do. I suggest you give birth no later than July.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Maybe you have had a dream like this: You’re wandering around a house you live in, and at the end of a long hallway you come to a door you’ve never seen before. How could you have missed it in the past? It must have been there the whole time. You turn the knob, open the door and slip inside. Amazing! The room is full of interesting things that excite your imagination. What’s more, on the opposite wall there’s another door that leads to further rooms. In fact, you realize there’s an additional section of the house you have never known about or explored. Whether or not you have had a dream like that, Taurus, I’m betting that in 2015, you will experience a symbolically similar series of events in your waking life.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Greek god Zeus had seven wives. Themis, Leto, Eurynome and Hera were among them. Another was his older sister Demeter, and a sixth was his aunt Mnemosyne. Then there was the sea nymph Metis. Unfortunately, he ate Metis — literally devoured her — which effectively ended their marriage. In 2015, Gemini, I encourage you to avoid Zeus’ jumbled, complicated approach to love and intimacy. Favor quality over quantity. Deepen your focus rather than expanding your options. Most importantly, make sure your romantic adventures never lead to you feeling fragmented or divided against yourself. This is the year you learn more than ever before about what it’s like for all the different parts of you to be united.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here are three of my top wishes for you in 2015: You will have a clear, precise sense of what’s yours and what’s not yours … of what’s possible to accomplish and what’s impossible … of what will be a good influence on you and what won’t be. To help ensure that these wishes come true, refer regularly to the following advice from Cancerian author Elizabeth Gilbert: “You need to learn how to select your thoughts just the same way you select your clothes every day. That’s a power you can cultivate. If you want to control things in your life so bad, work on the mind. That’s the only thing you should be trying to control.”

interested in its potential role in your future, not because of a nostalgic attachment.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Nothing brings people closer than business,” said composer Arnold Schoenberg. You could be living proof of that hypothesis in 2015, Libra. Your drive to engage in profitable activities will be at a peak, and so will your knack for making good decisions about profitable activities. If you cash in on these potentials, your social life will flourish. Your web of connections will expand and deepen. You will generate high levels of camaraderie by collaborating with allies on productive projects.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Deathwatch beetles have a peculiar approach to the mating game. Their seduction technique consists of smacking their heads against a hard object over and over again. This generates a tapping sound that is apparently sexy to potential partners. I discourage you from similar behaviors

as you seek the kind of love you want in 2015. The first rule of romantic engagement is this: Sacrificing or diminishing yourself may seem to work in the short run, but it can’t possibly lead to lasting good. If you want to stir up the best results, treat yourself with tenderness and respect.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707) was a German composer whose organ music is still played today. He was a major influence on a far more famous German composer, Johann Sebastian Bach (16851750). When Bach was a young man, he decided it was crucial for him to experience Buxtehude’s music first-hand. He took a leave of absence from his job and walked over 250 miles to the town where Buxtehude lived. There he received the guidance and inspiration he sought. In 2015, Sagittarius, I’d love to see you summon Bach’s determination as you go in quest of the teaching you want and need. Send me a list of your top five New Year’s resolutions. I’m at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Author Robert Moss has published 27 books. When he talks about the art of launching and completing big projects, I listen attentively. There’s one piece of advice he offers that would be particularly helpful for you to keep in mind throughout the first half of 2015. “If we wait until we are fully prepared in order to do something, we may never get it done,” he says. “It’s important to do things before we think we are ready.” Can you handle that, Leo? Are you willing to give up your fantasies about being perfectly qualified and perfectly trained and perfectly primed before you dive in?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The fish known as the coelacanths were thought to have become extinct 66 million years ago. That was when they disappeared from the fossil record. But in 1938 a fisherman in South Africa caught a live coelacanth. Eventually, whole colonies were discovered in the Indian Ocean off the east coast of Africa and near Indonesia. I foresee a comparable phenomenon happening in your life during the coming months, Virgo. An influence you believed to have disappeared from your life will resurface. Should you welcome and embrace it? Here’s what I think: Only if you’re

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

ROOMMATES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

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NOW HIRING: CNC Machinists and Skilled Assemblers in RIDC Park, O’Hara Township • Competitive pay and excellent benefits • Clean, climate-controlled facility • Winner of Pittsburgh Business Times Manufacturer of the Year 2011 and 2012

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PHEAA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

Our goal is to give our residents peace of mind, freeing them from burdens so that they may enjoy life… and live it to the fullest.

Resident Assistant

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Schenley Gardens

We are currently hiring for the

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Superior Chinese Massage

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• All shifts • part/full time Per diem • Free covered parking. Stop by and join the Schenley Gardens Team! 3890 Bigelow Blvd. PGH, PA 15213 Previous experience with Dementia/Alzheimer’s preferred

To complete an application or visit, call 412-621-4200


ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

*Stuff We Like Brick Sidewalk Snow-Relief Sculpture

Act 235 Courses Basic Class: February 21, 22, 26, 27, 28 2015 Renewal Classes: February 26, 2015

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The magical grid patterns along this Manchester walkway look great in early-morning light.

www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required 724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Findlay Township Christmas Light-up Reyna Foods Basement Restaurant A (literally) buried treasure in the Strip District, directly beneath the city’s best-known Mexican grocer. There, Reyna successfully combines gringo expectations with authentic preparations.

So, the Christmas lights aren’t back at Hartwood Acres. The display at the Clinton Community Park (600 Clinton Park Drive), just north of the airport, might not be as big, but it’s plenty festive and open nightly until Jan. 4. Proceeds benefit local charities.

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

Rock Star: The Making of Music Icons From Elvis to Springsteen

Innovative Approach. Shared Vision

CMU professor David Shumway examines the history of the rock star as a concept in this new book — a ride through the mid-20th century as a new kind of celebrity emerged.

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF Looking for a non-traditional schedule? Work a FT block shift! Work 2 ½ days and be a full-time employee with a once a week commute—have 4 ½ days off every week! Provide 1:1 care in our residential homes throughout the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties! -FT Block Shifts -PT Support Staff

Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off!

Gridlock Lacquer Why not market nail polish using the unique colors of Rust Belt cities, like silvery Buffalo: Blizzard of ’77 or taupe Cleveland: 10-Cent Beer Night. Now it’s Pittsburgh’s turn to shimmer, starting with the pink Chipped Ham. store.gridlocklacquer.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARITA GARRETT}

SENSE OF COMMUNITY Freshman Wilkinsburg city councilor working toward change {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

IT’S A BLUSTERY NIGHT at the Church of Christ Scientist, Eastridge

Center, on the suburban edge of Wilkinsburg. Scurrying out of the cold, people shed overcoats and scarves, pile plates high with wings ’n’ veggies ’n’ seasonal cookies. Bustling about, meeting and greeting, bestowing hugs, freshman Wilkinsburg Councilor Marita Garrett surfs the crowd. Tall, regal, an absolute natural, she seems to know everyone in the room. “Thank you for coming out,” she beams, “for braving the elements. For another of our Community Conversations. For fighting blight. For making Wilkinsburg a better borough.” Only a year into office, Garrett’s set about tackling Wilkinsburg’s myriad woes head-on, along the way building a powerful, activist constituency. “I’ve always been active,” Garrett says. “When I was 6 my mother took me into the voting booth. I didn’t wait for her — I hit the lever. That started it for me. I knew then that voting had power.”

“I saw so many things that I wanted to do,” she says. “I told people, ‘This is a two-way open conversation. You need to let me know what’s happening. Your voice must be heard.’“ Elected, she’s proved tireless, working with the new leadership on the school board and council, seeking ways to collect delinquent taxes, create viable data on abandoned and vacant properties, improve the Penn Avenue business corridor. And, of course, fight crime. For fear of stray bullets, one family told her, they sleep every night on the floor. “That is not the way it should be,” Garrett says. She’s had her frustrations, finding that many in government don’t tackle problems. Worse, they stand in the way. From unscrupulous landlords to callous public officials to apathetic residents — she’s met the entire Dickensian cast. And is not daunted. “Politics is every day,” Garrett says. “It’s all about effectiveness and being at the table. Right now, we need change and change-

“I SAW SO MANY THINGS THAT I WANTED TO DO.” Moving from Akron a dozen years ago when Mom took a job at Duquesne University, Garrett enrolled at Sewickley Academy. Bright and bored, she jumped early to Pitt. Taking a psych degree, and a job in UPMC’s Alzheimer’s outreach, Garrett “found it applicable to political life,” she says. “I have to listen to all sides — and not react. And I have to think, ‘What made this person say this thing or act that way?’ That skill’s aided me to hear all sides.” Moving to Wilkinsburg five years ago, she became frustrated with the problems that seemed to fester: weed-choked vacant lots; dilapidated abandoned houses — breeding grounds, she says, “for crime and critters.” With a full 8 percent of the 10,000unit housing stock abandoned, and 40 percent of properties not generating taxes, clearly something needed to be done. Last year, with seats up for school board and borough council, Garrett showed up one day intending merely to pass out fliers and make calls for this or that candidate. Discovering that no one was rushing headlong to run in her ward — First Ward, one of three in the borough — she said, sure, why not? Lining up signatures to get on the ballot, pounding the pavement for eight weeks, March through May, canvassing, she and her surrogates knocked on every door — 6,000 of them — in the district, asking for support.

makers. We need more young people. We need more diversity, in both gender and race.” Filling all those requirements, Garrett’s in for the long haul. Taking as her role model the late Shirley Chisholm, a seven-term New York City Congresswoman, and the first African-American woman so elected, Garrett would like to play on a national stage. “Service is the rent we pay here on Earth,” she says. “Everyone needs to give back in some way. I ask myself, ‘How can I help the community I live in? How can I empower it?’” But Washington is some 250 miles and, by her own timetable, a good decade away. Garrett is sufficiently wise — and patient — to understand that change comes hard. Right now, Wilkinsburg has rabid raccoons and wandering sewage, and something’s got to be done. Something is another cold night out, another Community Conversation. The racially mixed crowd at Eastridge Center, five dozen or so, are generally a bit grayer, gray enough to own their homes and be concerned about investments and upkeep. “Tonight’s topic,” Garrett gestures, “is Building a Better Community Through Code Enforcement.” Wise, an enabler, a sponsor, she introduces Daniel Friedson, the borough’s code-enforcement director, and steps offstage. INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.31.2014/01.07.2015


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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

December 31, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 53

December 31, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 53