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RAISING AWARENESS: NEW RESOURCE CENTER WILL FOCUS ON THE B IN LGBT 06


EVENTS 12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND ASSISTANT CURATOR OF FILM AND VIDEO GREG PIERCE Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

12.29 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 29 from 10am to 5pm.

1.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AMERNET STRING QUARTET WITH PIANIST AMY WILLIAMS Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

1.30 – 7pm EXHIBITION OPENING: SOMEDAY IS NOW: THE ART OF CORITA KENT Sponsored by UPMC FREE

Ken Vandermark / Nate Wooley Duo

1.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JESSICA MEYER AND SETH JOSEL Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

1-21 – 8pm Warhol theater | Tickets $15/$12 Members & students | Parking in Warhol Lot visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes back saxophonist Ken Vandermark to the museum’s intimate theater, this time with fellow experimental jazz composer Nate Wooley, who Time Out New York has dubbed “an iconoclastic trumpeter”. The two are touring together in support of a new duo release on Pleasure of the Text, Wooley’s own label. This unique evening will feature two solo sets, followed by a duo set. Vandermark’s current projects include Made To Break, The Resonance Ensemble, and duos with Paal Nilssen-Love and Tim Daisy. Wooley performs regularly with such icons as John Zorn and Anthony Braxton.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


12.10/12.17.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 50

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

[NEWS]

are certain people who 06 “There literally don’t believe bisexuality exists.” — Paula Brewer on the need for the new eBIcenter

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

THE HOTTEST ENTERTAINMENT

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

the tandoor comes an 16 “From unusually large selection of Indian breads.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Bangal Kebab

[MUSIC]

kind of just hardcore kids 20 “They’re that have been doing it forever.”

— Alex Kerns of Lemuria on the folks behind the band’s label, Bridge 9

[SCREEN]

re-creation of the plagues is 34 “The far more interesting than Moses

fretting.” — Al Hoff reviews Exodus: Gods and Kings

[ARTS]

is a frequent expectation that 36 “There famous architects are prima donna artistes who care only about the oddball aesthetics of their works.” — Charles Rosenblum on the exhibit Maggie’s Centres

[LAST PAGE]

to the streets to protest 55 Taking police violence

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 STUFF WE LIKE 52 N E W S

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ROCK • COUNTRY • POP • DANCE

DECEMBER 12 // JIMBO & THE SOUPBONES DECEMBER 13 // BON JOURNEY DECEMBER 19 // AIMEE JANE WILLER BAND DECEMBER 20 // VELVEETA DECEMBER 26 // RADIO TOKYO DECEMBER 27 // HOUSE OF SOUL

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“A LOT OF PEOPLE ACCUSE US OF BEING CONFUSED, IN A DEROGATORY WAY.”

INCOMING Protesters take to Pittsburgh streets in wake of police violence (Dec. 4, online only)

PLAN B

“Thank you, protesters, for taking the time to call our attention to this serious problem in our country. We all need to think long and hard about this issue. Time for a hard, honest look at […] ourselves. No single answer, but we aren’t going to solve it by ignoring it.” — Web comment from “Dottyeyes” “There is all too often the use of excessive force by the police. The psychological testing is apparently insufficient; far too many policemen do not have the needed temperament.” — Web comment from “Concerned Citizens” “I agree with everyone who believes that police brutality/killings should stop. Concerned Citizen has an interesting comment about psychological testing and those who do not have the needed temperament to show restraint. While these things are true, I’m 99 percent sure that those most vehemently protesting have never been in a shoot-or-don’t-shoot situation. Our civil servants volunteer their lives to defend citizens. It is not only their own life they are protecting, but those of people in communities and homes around them. If someone is acting suspicious with a gun in hand, how are public protectors supposed to interpret this? Would you prefer they disregarded this? Ignored it? This person could be a threat to you or your children. One has to assume a gun is loaded and act accordingly. Every human life is impossible to replace and therefore priceless. Most people do not understand the difficulty of the decisions that a policeman has to make, and would not make better ones if put in those positions themselves. I speak from the experience of a combat medic with a tour of duty in Iraq. There is much to consider. Hopefully, these protests will serve the purpose of considering all angles and sides of argument and thought.” — Web comment from “Medic”

Undercover Boss is a cleverly crafted PR campaign for our corporate overlords but this should be rad. — Dec. 5 tweet from “Ben Knudman” (@WorkingClas0) on the announcement that Mayor Bill Peduto will appear on the CBS show

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

eBIcenter founder Paula Brewer and center client David Hines

I

N AN ERA when same-sex marriage is

legal in 35 states and even corporate heads are coming out, Paula Brewer says bisexuals are still questioned by their own LGBT community. “Even they can’t wrap their heads around it,” she says. “We make everybody uncomfortable.” Brewer, of Observatory Hill, is helping to run the new eBIcenter out of the Gay and Lesbian Community Center Downtown as a place for bisexuals to connect and to find resources that, she says, have too rarely been focused on the B in LGBT. eBIcenter sounds like, and is meant to symbolize, an “epicenter” for local bi people. It holds meetings on the first Sunday of every month, working as both a peer support group and a social group, with about a dozen people in attendance. It’s a place to trade stories and resources, Brewer says, but its full mission of promoting understanding and acceptance of bisexuals is still being formulated.

The effort has gotten a lot of support from GLCC head Lyndsey Sickler, Brewer says, but too often “within our own community we’re supposed to shut up and stay in the background. There are certain people who literally don’t believe bisexuality exists.”

New center will provide resources, support for bisexual community {BY MARTY LEVINE} Some, including members of the LGBT community, view bisexuality as a behavior, not a sexual identity — a phase instead of a lifelong preference, or some sort of gateway to less commitment and a greater temptation to cheat in relationships. Brewer admits that “for some people it is a transition,” an experiment that fails to stick. Not for Brewer, now in her mid-40s. She grew up in rural Butler County and wasn’t

even exposed to the idea of bisexuality until college. But, “just like every other person,” she says, when she was younger she knew her own feelings. “Bisexuals tend to come out much later in life. It’s a little more complicated. A lot of people accuse us of being confused, in a derogatory way: ‘Either pick heterosexual or homosexual. You’re sitting on the fence.’ Because, in our society, if you’re attracted to the same sex at all, you’re gay.” She’s been married to a man for 17 years, but that changes nothing, she says. “People will argue with bi people: ‘Hey, if you’re a woman and married to a man, you’re a heterosexual.’ If I had never had sex, I would still be a bisexual. I think I know who I am.” She’s even experienced jealousy from gays and lesbians who say, Look, you’ve got acceptance by society. There’s practically a fetish for bisexual women in porn. “It appears on the surface to be positive,” Brewer says. “It’s not positive.” It’s just another form of sexual objectification — CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PLAN B, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

“very hostile, very negative. “If we were accepted by the community, we wouldn’t be killing ourselves at the rate we are.” INDEED, STATISTICS show that bisexuals

have a higher rate of suicide attempts than their LGBT peers or straights, and that they experience poorer health and tougher lives in other areas. The Williams Institute, a UCLA-based think tank focused on gender identity issues, estimates that there are nine million LGBT people in the U.S.; slightly more than half say they are bisexual. But according to the Movement Advancement Project (MAP), bisexuals are also six times more likely than others in the LGBT community to be closeted. The Pew Charitable Trust’s survey of LGBT Americans found that more than 70 percent of gay men and lesbians are out to most of their loved ones and closest friends, while fewer than 30 percent of bisexuals report the same thing, including just 12 percent of bisexual men. And nearly half of bisexuals say they don’t feel free enough to be out at work, as compared to 24 percent of gays and lesbians. This hidden status has apparently led to a disproportionate amount of stress, worse health and higher rates of poverty among bisexuals. MAP found that bisexuals are four times more likely to have attempted suicide than heterosexuals — twice the rate of lesbians and gays. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, still ongoing, has thus far found that more than half of bisexual women, as opposed to a third of lesbians and a quarter of straight women, have experienced some physical violence in relationships. The same proportions have experienced what the CDC classifies as

“severe physical violence,” while twice as many bisexual women (20 percent) as straight women have been raped by a partner. The incidence of stalking is also double for bisexual women compared to straight women. These incidents are more than twice as likely to be hate crimes, as classified by law enforcement, as are such incidents against other LGBT people. Bisexuals have higher rates of everything from hypertension, smoking and alcohol abuse to women’s cancer. Studies in other countries have even turned up a higher incidence — four times greater — of post-traumatic stress disorder in bisexual women than in straight women. In 2010, Funders for LGBTQ Issues, which aims to prompt financial support for gender causes and research, charted the amount of grant money given to specific groups in the LGBT community since 1970. They found that, of the total of more than $487 million, $34 million went specifically to help gay men, $30 million targeted lesbian issues and nearly $17 million aided transgender or gender-nonconforming people — but just over $84,000 went to bisexuals, representing only 19 grants out of 21,794.

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WHILE GAY men and lesbians are increas-

ingly accepted in the mainstream, Paula Brewer’s partner in founding the eBIcenter is still concerned enough to ask that only her first name, Carla, be used in the media. “This is the first organization I have been involved with specifically for bisexuals, though I have been involved in the LGBT community for several years,” Carla says. Not only is there prejudice in society against her sexual identity, she adds, but there is “bi-erasure and bi-denial.” “Bi-erasure occurs when someone who is bisexual is listed as either heterosexual or CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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homosexual, usually based on the gender of their current partner, but it can happen in other situations as well. Bi-denial is the talk of bisexuality being just a phase or not being real.” She hopes eBIcenter will “become a resource in the greater Pittsburgh community for bisexuals and a community organization where everyone feels welcome. I think it is important to create a space and events where discussion, education and acceptance can happen.” Ellyn Ruthstrom, president of the national Bisexual Resource Center in Boston, says curing “bi-invisibility” is crucial. “It’s really important for bisexual people to find support groups and to find a sense of community. A lot of time people feel isolated in their own experiences.” “I thought I was straight until I was about 20,” she says. “That’s not that uncommon. Sexuality really is something that is not as cut and dry as most people like to think.” It is a spectrum, she adds, and can be fluid: “The feelings you have when you’re 13 might not be the feelings you have when you’re 30, 40, 50. The people you meet might affect how you feel.” In 2013, she was one of the organizers of the first White House roundtable on bisexual issues. Organizing a local group, such as Pittsburgh’s eBIcenter, should involve the entire GLCC, she advises, and eBIcenter members should in turn be involved in running broader LGBT activities. “Don’t just let the bi community take care of itself,” she says.

WHEN DAVID HINES of Ambridge was

growing up in conservative Somerset County, he remembers hearing “how sick or evil it was” to be gay. When his family moved to Florida in his 10th- and 11th-grade years, he discovered his attraction to boys. “But I was still very seriously turned on by girls,” he says. Then his family moved back to the Pittsburgh area before he had a chance to explore his identity. At 25, he had his first relationship with a man. “This is it,” he realized. “I am bisexual. I am very comfortable with that.” Still, he says, it wasn’t until he attended an eBIcenter meeting that he realized others’ experiences were less positive. “I didn’t really know how much of a blind eye is turned toward a bisexual orientation, particularly in the gay and lesbian community. After that, I decided to stick around and hear other people’s stories.” “I guess I have a bit of a mission” now, he says. “Allowing people to be who they are, love who they want to love … I’m going to help. It’s nice to know that there is a support for it. I don’t want to see anyone not accepted for who they truly are.” Concludes Paula Brewer: “The gay and lesbian community for a long time said not coming out, staying in the closet, is the equivalent of death. We encourage anyone who can safely come out to come out. It’s a healthier way to live. But you have to have community before you can come out in a safe way.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LOCAL CONCERT PROMOTER CATCHES HEAT FOR COMMENTS ABOUT ANTI-VIOLENCE PROTESTS {BY ANDY MULKERIN AND REBECCA NUTTALL} A SOCIAL-MEDIA firestorm that started

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Saturday night with a local music promoter’s Facebook post mocking anti-policebrutality protesters has led to the resignation of the new kitchen manager at Altar Bar, calls for a boycott and the cancelation of February’s Anti-Flag show at the venue. It has also led to plans, however, for events to be held with the promoter’s support, including a town-hall meeting on community-police relations, and a benefit for a local victim of police violence. On Saturday night, Brian Drusky, president of Drusky Entertainment, posted a series of status updates on his personal Facebook page making reference to protests in which participants lay down on local streets, a tactic activists call a “die-in,” to call attention to lives lost at the hands of police. One post read: “Man i got pulled over last week and got a ticket because I was speeding. I’m going to go lay down in the middle of giant eagle as a protest! just just just because!” Another made reference to lying down in protest over a botched McDonald’s order, and another to a Steelers loss. Drusky Entertainment promotes shows at Altar Bar as well as a number of other local venues, including the Smiling Moose and Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead. A barrage of criticism began on Facebook and Twitter after Elizabeth Kivowitz, a local music manager and publicist who was Facebook friends with Drusky, screen-

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captured the comments and spread them to artists and activists. “His comments made it seem like he was making fun of Eric Garner, a black man who got killed,” says Kivowitz. “And he’s equating it with McDonald’s. I don’t think he should be able to profit from the people he’s demeaning.” “I do hip-hop shows and I care very much about the hip-hop community, so I wanted them to see what they’re dealing with,” she adds “This isn’t funny to a lot of people.” Drusky Entertainment promotes hip-hop shows on a regular basis at Altar Bar and occasionally at the Smiling Moose, and recently co-promoted the three-night Wiz Khalifa concert event at Mr. Small’s Theatre. By about 9 p.m. Sunday, Drusky had issued an apology and scheduled a meeting with Davon Magwood, a local comedian who has been active in recent protests and who was vocal in promoting the Drusky boycott on Twitter. “I was just frustrated” at the time of the original posts, Drusky later told City Paper. “I made a couple of comments.” He says he realized what waves he had made when he saw that Twitter was abuzz about his comments. “There was a lot of Twitter movement and people talking about it. I was like, ‘Wow, I didn’t realize what I did.’” In his lengthy apology posted to Facebook and promoted on Twitter, Drusky wrote: “My remarks were an attempt to be funny. However, they were not funny to a lot of people because I made light of something that I didn’t understand fully. […] I am getting a crash course today in why my words were taken as comments that people did not like or were very offended by. I can’t apologize enough.” Magwood says he was exasperated when he read the Facebook comments. “It’s really frustrating,” he says. “There’s so much ignorance going on; it’s scary how people in Pittsburgh have no idea what it’s like to be black in Pittsburgh.” Calls to boycott Drusky events continued through Sunday, with supporters of the boycott using the hashtag #BoycottDrusky on social sites. On Facebook, a “Boycott Drusky” event page got more than 800 RSVPs, and a “Boycott Drusky

Entertainment” page grew to more than 700 likes. On Sunday evening, Justin Strong, former owner of Shadow Lounge and AVA, who had recently taken over kitchen service at Altar Bar, announced he would no longer be working at Drusky’s flagship venue because of his discomfort over Drusky’s comments. He first spoke with Drusky directly about the comments. “He didn’t understand the scope” of the protests and what they — and specifically the “die-in” action Drusky referenced in the posts — stood for, Strong told City Paper. The reason for lying down in protest “is not equivalent to your McDonald’s order getting messed up, or the Steelers losing.” Strong says Drusky told him he had been stuck in traffic as a result of protests Friday night, and was airing his frustration in the Facebook posts the next day. After the meeting Monday afternoon, Magwood told CP he felt that Drusky was genuine in wanting to advance a discussion about police violence and race in Pittsburgh. Magwood said the two had begun to plan events including a town-hall meeting — which Strong had first suggested to Drusky, to take place at a neutral site — and a benefit event for Leon Ford, the East Liberty man paralyzed after being shot by police during a traffic stop in Highland Park in 2012. Via phone Monday afternoon, Drusky confirmed those plans to City Paper. While Magwood said he’s no longer pursuing a boycott of Drusky Entertainment — in part because of the progress made at the meeting, and in part out of concern for the other employees of Drusky Entertainment who would be affected by a boycott — some acts have canceled their participation in Drusky shows in the wake of the controversy. Pittsburgh -based, internationally recognized political punk band Anti-Flag, known for vocally opposing police brutality, canceled a show planned for February in which it was to play its album The Terror State in its entirety at Altar Bar. “While we believe in people’s ability to change and become educated, there must be consequences for the things that he said,” Anti-Flag wrote in a statement. “This is an instance where we can

“WHETHER HIS APOLOGY IS SINCERE OR NOT DEPENDS ON HIS ACTIONS.”


exercise our power by not working with Brian Drusky.” Local singer-songwriter Roger Harvey also announced late in the afternoon Monday that he would pull out of the Strip District Music Festival, a Drusky event scheduled for January, in the wake of the comments. (Full disclosure: City Paper is a sponsor of the festival.) Others with ties to the Pittsburgh arts community also aren’t ready to accept Drusky’s apology. Artist Christina Springer, a former Pittsburgher who now lives in San Jose, Calif., says that even though there is a long history of activism in the music industry, Drusky’s comments were unsurprising. “His comments dismissed and demeaned and make frivolous the death of real people and not just one real person,

but a continuous, repetitive, unrelenting list of real people,” Springer says. “I believe Mr. Drusky can make a change.” Despite the apology and planned outreach, there is still reluctance by some to call off the boycott. “Actions speak louder than words, and whether his apology is sincere or not, depends on his actions,” says activist Julia Johnson. “I want people to boycott any company and any business that perpetuates the inequality and oppression we are experiencing today.” For his part, Strong says he truly believes Drusky is genuine in his desire to make amends, and he doesn’t necessarily call for a full-out boycott. But, Strong says, he won’t be returning to work at Altar. “My business caught some shrapnel,” he says, “but this is about more than business.”

ALL DRESSED UP AND NOWHERE TO GO?

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Christmas Eve Worshipp

December 19 8:00 PM FREE CONCERT

December 24 5:00 PM Family Service 11:00 PM Candlelight Service (Prelude Music begins at 10:30 pm)

Holiday music featuring organ & Brass Roots ensemble

City Paper Listings Editor Margaret Welsh is here to save your weekend, sharing her picks for the best events going on around town with our BRAND NEW 1 1 6 S H I G H L A N D AV E N U E

C AT H E D R A L O F H O P E . O R G

CP Weekend

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Cavacini Garden Center

www.pghcitypaper.com/blogh

Christmas Trees Wreaths Poinsettias Christmas Cactus Garlands ... and much more! 100 51st St / Lawrenceville

412-687-2010

New content daily at www.pghcitypaper.com

Off Butler Street /Across from Goodwill

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Welcome to Craft Beer 101. Over the next 3 weeks we will be featuring and educating you on the top craft beers of the week. Spend the holidays with your favorite craft beer.

Named for the naval officer and War of 1812 hero who battled the British enemy on Lake Erie, our Commodore Perry India Pale Ale has a pretty dry sense of humor.

This was Lagunitas first seasonal way back in 1995. The recipe was formulated with malt and hops working together to balance it all out on your ‘buds so you can knock back more than one without wearing yourself out. Big on the aroma with a hoppy-sweet finish that’ll leave you wantin’ another sip.

A robust Porter made with chocolate malt. This malt Beverage is brewed with coffee beans with Natural Flavor added (Vanilla Extract), and we balance it with U.S. Golding Hops. Our award winning brew is sure to please! Open it!

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


proudly presents

WATCH THEIR FACES LIGHT UP WINTER LIGHT GARDEN AND FLOWER SHOW

Now Open

Be immersed in a live laser light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects!

Let the magic of Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens enchant you as you walk in a winter wonderland filled with glowing lights, vibrant blooms and other wondrous sights. The only thing brighter will be the smiles on their faces. To plan your holiday adventure, visit phipps.conservatory.org.

Don’t miss Laser Holiday Magic! Now through Jan. 4, 2015.

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

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BEYOND PAD THAI {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} For nearly 20 years, customers knew what they were getting when they walked into Oakland’s Spice Island Tea House. But after foot surgery left 15-year veteran chef Hai Jing Leong unable to work for a few months, co-owner Ron Lee decided to both temporarily reconfigure the menu and give it a new name: Hawker Stand. Lee, who is now doing much of the food prep, says he has some cooking chops: “I’m just not a kung-fu master.” That’s partly why the menu is changing. “Instead of a change in consistency, we’re just going to do something completely different,” he explains. Named for the street vendors popular in Singapore and Malaysia (where Lee’s father owned a Hawker Stand), the restaurant is moving away from popular stir-frys and pad Thai. “We’re focused more on braised curries and more slow-cooked meat [and] street foods.” One popular Thai snack he’s trying out is fried chicken wrapped in pandanus leaves, “which sort of imparts a vanilla flavoring,” and helps insulate the marinated meat so it remains tender. And while Lee is hoping to expose Pittsburghers to Singaporean and Malaysian influences — instead of the locally “dominant” Thai cuisine — he’s having trouble attracting customers. Chef Leong is expected to be back in the kitchen early next year, though it’s not yet clear what the menu will look like. “We may not serve what you’re looking for,” Lee says, “but I think there’s always room to expand your food palate, your cultural awareness. It’s more than pad Thai.” AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

253 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-687-8826

the

FEED

Stop by a holiday

tea party arty

courtesy of Tea Pittsburgh/ gh/ Margaret’s Fine ne Imports at the Christine Frechard echard Gallery (5871 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill). The free event features holiday tea blends, European Christmas cakes and cookies, tea-leaf readings, live music and even an Ugly Christmas Sweater contest. 2-5 p.m. Sun., Dec. 14. Register at 412-422-1606 or www.teapittsburgh.com.

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BANGAL KEBAB FEATURES AN UNUSUALLY LARGE SELECTION OF INDIAN BREADS

A HOME FOR

INDIAN FOOD

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

TWOOD STREET, where town and gown meet for inexpensive food from foreign lands, seems to observe a special Law of Conservation of Indian Restaurants: If one closes, another will surely replace it. So when the venerable India Garden shut down a few months ago, it was hardly surprising to spy a new sign not long thereafter heralding the establishment of Bangal Kebab, this time in the th smaller, more intimate, former TokyoBurma space down the block. Bu Decor is spare, to say the least, consisting in mainly of turmeric-orange paint. Tallback ba booths seem a little large for the tiny space, but once we were seated in one, we sp had ha the pleasingly cozy feeling of being ensconced in our own private dining cabin. en Service was prompt and friendly, and our Se server was especially solicitous of our children, splitting their sweet lassi and serving them a surprise platter of hard candy — before their dinner! Bangal Kebab’s menu isn’t limited to kebabs, and unlike the menus at many

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Tandoori mixed grill

other newer Indian establishments, it isn’t region-specific. But nor is it the dizzying sub-continental survey that has stymied us at other restaurants. The menu consists of a fairly typical Northern Indian selection, updated to include items recently “discovered” by Indian-foodloving Pittsburghers, such as chicken and meat samosas and that nacho-like street snack, chaat.

BANGAL KEBAB 320 Atwood St., 412-605-0521 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $3-6; entrees $8-14 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Actually, Bangal’s aloo chana chaat did not resemble nachos as much as a chunky potato salad. Chick peas and chopped cucumber and onion were also part of the mix, while a cold dressing of spicy tamarind

sauce cut with cool, creamy yogurt bound it all together. Crunchy puffs of fried dough played the role of croutons, garnishing rather than grounding this substantial, satisfying dish. Paneer “fingers” were two thin discs of fresh cheese sandwiched around a smear of cilantro chutney, then battered, fried, cut into long wedges and served atop a little green salad. The layer of chutney was thin enough to be subtle, but bold enough not to get lost in this fried cheese fritter. The entrée pages of the menu consist of several dishes each in the chicken, seafood, and lamb and mutton categories; a sizable vegetarian list; a biryani corresponding to each of these main ingredients; and tandoor specialties. A final section, “Fresh off the Grill,” features chicken tawook (marinated, grilled chicken chunks) and lamb kebab alongside burgers and gyros for those still shy of authentic Indian food. We’re not shy, but we did order up some


old friends and favorites, lamb biryani and chana masala. The latter would be a good dish to introduce someone to Indian food, actually; its combination of chick peas steamed with tomatoes, ginger, garlic and onions is deeply flavorful but not especially exotic. Though the flavors of Indian spices are present, they don’t dominate the dish, but serve to add flavor to the chick peas’ texture. Bangal’s version was less tomatoe-y than some we’ve had, and dense with chick peas in a thick, subtly spicy gravy. Lamb biryani featured fluffy, nutty basmati rice, studded with plenty of tender lamb and awakened with the flavors of chilis, cloves and warm spices. It was a good dish for a cold night. Chicken makhni was a beguiling dish of tandoori chicken, cut from the bone and simmered in a rosy, creamy tomato sauce. Its creaminess, traditionally derived from butter, yogurt and cream, was complex, both tangy and slightly sweet, and slightly chunky with coarsely puréed tomatoes.

Bangal Kebab owner Mohammad Abu makes naan bread in the tandoor.

Chicken tawook was grilled on a skewer, then served on a sizzling platter; the breast meat, green peppers and onions were all flavored with a simple, lemony marinade that took on extra depth thanks to the heat. The chicken could have been a tad moister, but it was far from dried out, and the charred edges were delicious. From its tandoor, Bangal Kebab also features an unusually large selection of Indian breads. Naan, kulcha, roti, poori or paratha can be had plain or with a variety of toppings (garlic, onions) and fillings (peshwari naan is stuffed with nuts, raisins, cherries and herbs; aloo paratha with mildly spiced mashed potatoes). The basic naan flatbread was excellent: slightly buttery outside, soft and flaky inside, and steaming hot when torn. We also liked the Bombay naan, stuffed with tiny bits or onion, pepper and paneer cheese. With a menu that is accessible in both flavor and price point, Bangal Kebab is a worthy representative of Indian cuisine on Atwood Street.

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

RUM BUSINESS Maggie’s Farm earns Distillery of the Year honors and more

In distilling, the tails are the last bits to come out of the still. Full of unwanted compounds and, as Maggie’s Farm’s owner Tim Russell puts it, “bitter, wet-dog flavors,” the tails seem more fit for the slop sink than your rocks glass. Luckily for us, Russell knows better. He holds on to those flavorful tails and, through a second round of distillation, transforms them into the Queen’s Share, a complex, high-proof rum. Last year, on a whim, Russell aged a small batch of that rum in virgin oak barrels, then threw it in casks that previously held Stonewall, a colonial rum made by Glenshaw’s Pennsylvania Pure Distilleries. The results were good. So good, in fact, that Russell entered the 10-month-aged “double barrel” rum in the New York International Spirits Competition. In November, it took home a silver medal — the highest award given to any rum in the competition — and Maggie’s Farm was named Pennsylvania’s Distillery of the Year. Russell is hardly basking in the glow of the big win, however. Besides experimenting with a variety of finishes for Queen’s Share, Maggie’s Farm recently debuted a pear eau de vie, a brandy made from 300 gallons of New York pear cider. Though this first run is extremely limited, Russell plans to distill more fruit brandies. And there are other new products on the horizon. “Soon I’ll finally be able to lay down some white rum,” announces Russell happily. Using barrels from Brooklyn’s Van Brunt Stillhouse, Russell hopes to have his first-ever batch of aged rum ready by mid-2015. For now, though, he’s scrambling to meet the demand for his flagship white and spiced rums. And now that they’re being sold in a dozen state stores throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania, that demand is greater than ever. Maggie’s Farm marked its one-year anniversary last month. And at this rate, it looks like it’ll have plenty more reasons to celebrate in the months to come.

OWNER TIM RUSSELL’S PLANS INCLUDE MORE FRUIT BRANDIES.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE THE BLIND PIG TAVERN. 2210 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-5936. This South Side bar, whose name derives from Prohibition slang, offers a satisfying, pig-centric menu of pub grub. Look for the pig in pulled-pork sliders and pepperoni rolls. Or branch out with pizza, grilled cheese sandwich (add bacon!) and other popular bar fare. Wash it all down with legal beverages. JE BURGATORY. Multiple locations. www.burgatorybar.com. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE

Piacquadio’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} elaborate as seared scallops with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, and truffled pumpkin seeds. KF ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656. This multi-leveled venue (with balcony) perched on the edge of The Strip is noted for its innovative, contemporary American cuisine. Dishes are prepared with fresh, local ingredients and served in a classy modern space, to be complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE

E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as

LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-481-4414) and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530). Because fish lends itself to endless preparations and dressings, the menu here is copious (and that’s not including the daily specials). The Mount Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, is a popular venue for special occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE

CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slow-roasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE

falafel, instead offering sophisticated preparations such as lamb osso bucco and salmon in sharmoula. Worthy starters include harira (meat and lentil soup), eggplant zaalouk (similar to ratatouille) and grilled sardines. KF

Red Orchid {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE KOUS KOUS CAFÉ. 665 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-563-5687. This small Moroccan restaurant mostly eschews clichés like kebab and

PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake baked-noodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in old-fashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and


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o c o L o r o T El Grille & ull” “The Crazy B

$ 2 DRINKS Monday & Thursday The Blind Pig Tavern {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze. 412-441-3334. This cozy neighborhood bistro reflects a concerted effort to translate the European neighborhood café — warm, welcoming, unpretentious yet delicious — to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of Asian fusion, the selections are classic Low Country fare such as Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of mostly tried-and-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” and Thai toast make for excellent starters, and the kitchen shows skill in balancing the flavors of more complex curries and meat entrees. KF

SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet just-right blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF

TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. This immensely popular . www per THE RED RING. Bloomfield institution, a p ty ci pgh m 1015 Forbes Ave., set in an old .co Uptown. 412-396-3550. neighborhood corner This Duquesne University bar, has built its reputation venue is a decided cut above on enormous wood-fired student dining. The hamburgers: choice meat, ground dining room is spacious, with in-house; fresh rolls; and a variety a handsome fieldstone bar. of toppings. Regulars sit at the bar, The fare is contemporary and, on busy weekends, diners American cuisine, with a line up to get in. KE thoughtful selection of internationally inflected classics VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., like chipotle barbecue pork Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare tenderloin and blackened chicken is contemporary American with alfredo. Artisanal touches like a vaguely European accent, a side dish of “chef’s grains” featuring elegantly simple complete the picture. KE preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn such as roasted mushrooms with Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. gorgonzola or scallops with The menu here groups food and blood-orange sauce. Flavorings selected wines (mostly Californian, such as lemon, garlic and of course) under such oenophilic fennel reflect the kitchen’s summaries as “jammy” and Mediterranean heritage. LE “muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South selection. The restaurant’s Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique offerings include tapas, hearty décor you can buy and a massive, meat dishes with an array of convivial Sunday brunch make this international seasonings, and a a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For mix-n-match, create-your-own the tea snob, the multi-page list section for mixed grill. KE is not to be missed. FJ

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Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

FULL LIST ONLINE

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China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

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140 Federal St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212 • 412.323.2924 M U S I C

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LOCAL

“OH, COOL, SOMEBODY WANTS TO KNOW MORE ABOUT WHAT WE JUST DID.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

UNORTHODOX CHRISTMAS Robert Cook has always loved holiday music: The first LP he ever bought was a collection of classical pieces which featured the Nutcracker Suite. “I’d always wanted to write a Christmas song,” he says. That eventually turned into an entire Christmas record, It’s Christmas for Christ’s Sake: Holiday Songs for the Misbegotten. “This was an opportunity for me to write some songs that were a little off-center, to say the least.” In other words, you’d be unlikely to hear any of these songs at the mall, and that’s a good thing. Cook, in his 60s, has been playing music for decades and writes between 30 and 40 songs a year, but, being selftaught, always considered himself a kind of “closeted songwriter.” Then, just a couple years ago, while somewhat reluctantly playing at an open stage, he befriended Michael Hickman, owner of Electric Eye Recorders in Polish Hill. Hickman produced It’s Christmas, as well as another full-length — also released this year — called Tomorrow’s Yesterdays. (“I can’t believe I’ve made two CDs after going on Medicare,” Cook says with a laugh.) Tomorrow’s Yesterdays is full of catchy, loose Neil Young-esque rockers, and It’s Christmas follows in a similar vein. The record is bookended with a melancholy song about Thanksgiving (“November Sky”), and a more cheerful one about the miseries of winter (“January in Pittsburgh”), giving it a less specific vibe: One could listen to this in March without feeling too silly. And, unlike nearly every holiday album in history, It’s Christmas is made up entirely of originals. “A friend once said, ‘You should play covers!’” Cook says with a grin. “But I’m not very good at taking advice.” True to his 1960s roots, Cook doesn’t shy away from serious social and political issues — “Five Minutes to Midnight,” for one, warns of impending ecological collapse. Even his more explicitly Christmas-themed tracks touch on some of the darker aspects of the season. In the hands of a less honest musician, all of this might seem heavy-handed, but Cook approaches his songwriting with a kind of un-fake-able sincerity. After all, he notes, “Christmas isn’t necessarily a happy time for a lot of people. But it’s also a time of hope.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROBERT COOK CD RELEASE, part of PITTSBURGH SONGWRITERS CIRCLE CHRISTMAS SHOW. 7 p.m. Sat., Dec. 13. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, 4412 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free with canned-good donation. 412-682-8611 or www.pittsburghsongwriterscircle.org

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LIFE IN LEMURIA {BY ZACH BRENDZA}

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HEN GUITARIST Sheena Ozzella

and drummer Alex Kerns started Buffalo-based indierock band Lemuria in 2004, one of their goals was to tour Europe. In the decade since, the band has played over 900 shows on four continents, all while playing bigger and bigger stages — but working to stay true to their nature. “We started the band as a way to go travel and hang out with friends and stuff like that,” says Kerns. “You know, for most of the [band’s] life we were playing a lot of house shows. Staying on people’s floors — and we still do. “The band today, even though we’ve been a band for 10 years, is still kind of run the same way it was run 10 years ago where it was based on a community of friends. People helping each other out.” It doesn’t necessarily feel like a decade to them. For the first five or six years, the band was just “getting their feet wet,” learning their instruments and figuring out how everything works, Kerns says: learning along the way.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

An unexpected decade: Lemuria

“We would drive 20 hours through the night and risk our lives to play a show that didn’t even happen because someone offered us a show and we get there and they’re like, ‘Oh, I forgot,’” Kerns says. “When you’re a band for a long time, you build your friends and eventually find all the people in different cities that you trust and want to work with.”

LEMURIA

WITH PRINCE, KHEES, FAKE GRAVE 6 p.m. Tue., Dec. 16. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10-12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

Almost a thousand shows later, Lemuria has played Australia, Indonesia, Russia and elsewhere, exceeding the expectations of a band that just wanted to try new cuisine and coffee. Lemuria played this year’s Riot Fest in Chicago, and has made an appearance at the punk family reunion known as The Fest, in Florida, every year since 2006. The

band supported Against Me! on its 2011 summer tour and has played with the likes of The Both, Best Coast, Titus Andronicus, and Laura Stevenson and the Cans. The band even opened for indie kings Superchunk and punk supergroup Off! at a free show in Brooklyn. Lemuria is the middle point between “generations” of emo, if those exist. The band’s sound is the median between ’90s-era (The Promise Ring, Mineral) and post-2000s (Tigers Jaw and Joyce Manor). Ozzella takes the mic more often, offering poppy vocals with range, with Kerns providing back-up, giving a lower voice to complement. In 2010, the band signed with prominent hardcore label Bridge 9, whose clientele has included Defeater, the U.K. Gallows, and straight-edge legends Have Heart. Although it’s a big indie label, Kerns says Bridge 9 isn’t exactly a faceless entity. “It’s a big label but they’re kind of just … hardcore kids that have been doing it forever,” Kerns says. “They’re still excited about new ideas.” Now, the band is at a strange place in


the industry, keeping things DIY while on a bigger label. Kerns has an a email list he utilizes to contact fans on the day of show, instead of relying solely on social media. They respond to their own emails, wanting to give fans a “prompt and accurate response to something that is true to the band.” “We get people sometimes asking for tabs on guitar and stuff like that. They’ll ask what the meaning of some line of a song is. That’s one of the most fun parts of being in a band,” Kerns says. “Not only to share songs at face value, but actually [to] be able to connect with people and elaborate. ‘Oh, cool, somebody wants to know more about what we just did.’ It’s exciting to provide that.” Lemuria released two full-lengths, Pebble (2011) and The Distance is So Big (2013), along with number of singles and 7-inches with Bridge 9. In total, the band has 20 releases, with its most recent, Turnstile Comix #3, released Dec. 9. Created by artists Mitch Clem and Nation of Amanda (Amanda Kirk), each edition of the Turnstile Comix series pairs a 7-inch record with a 40-page comic written and drawn about the band. Lemuria’s installment features new tracks “Christine Perfect” and “Foggy Smoke,” which create different feels for each side of the release.

“Christine Perfect” is brighter sounding, with poppy bass and Ozzella showcasing the higher end of her vocal range. Conversely, the B-side is mellower, sounding more like ’90s grunge. Meanwhile, the comic portion tells the “story” of the band’s 2011 tour of Russia, with run-ins with violent Nazis, crooked cops and mobsters. “I like how it brings different aspects of art together. You got your comic artists and musicians and you got your labels and everybody all working together to create something,” Kerns says. “It was more involved than most things we’ve had to do; it took a lot more planning. It’s definitely been a pretty wild experience.” Before the band disappears in the new year to write a new LP for 2015, Lemuria will finish up its current tour and play Pittsburgh for the ninth time. Having played everything from DIY shows to bigger venues, the band has been a frequent visitor to the city. Kerns’ most vivid memory: The O, the hot-dog shop in Oakland. “We would always be so excited, so excited to go there,” he says with a laugh. “And then we’d get there and just remember, ‘Wait, what are we doing? This ruined our night. We just ate this bag of fries, French fries bigger than our torsos.’ Every time we played there, we would kill our night with that.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Home for the holidays: Stephen Kellogg

IN THE MIDDLE {BY ANDY MULKERIN} STEPHEN KELLOGG has been in music for two decades, most prominently as the frontman of Stephen Kellogg and the Sixers. That band called it quits in 2012, after almost a decade together, and Kellogg released his first post-Sixers album, Blunderstone Rookery, last year. His current tour brings him to Club Café, on Thu., Dec. 11. He talked with CP last week about his current crowdfunding campaign, touring and being a moderate in a polarized political world.

home the day before Christmas Eve, and this year [at Thanksgiving], I was out of there right after the last piece of turkey got eaten. One thing we’ve learned to do as a family is, rather than just make the day the big thing, we do make it up. When we have to celebrate a birthday a week early, we just do it. We don’t make a big deal about that. Thanksgiving is about having a day when you sit down with your family or friends, make a list of what you’re grateful for. It’s not really the fourth Thursday in November; it doesn’t have to be.

STEPHEN KELLOGG WITH BEN FIELDS

7 p.m. Thu., Dec. 11. Club Café, 56 S. HALFWAY THROUGH YOUR 12th St., South Side. $20. 412-431-4950 PLEDGEMUSIC CAMPAIGN, HOW ARE or www.clubcafelive.com YOU FEELING ABOUT IT? It’s going very well! My whole thing is, I’m trying to have some real fun with it. THERE’S A SONG, “THE BRAIN IS A For better or worse, I put records out on BEAUTIFUL THING,” ON THE LAST labels for the past 10 years. There’s a part ALBUM, WHERE YOU LAY OUT SOMETHING of me that loves this because it’s so much OF A POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. IT’S NOT REALLY HARD LEFT OR RIGHT; YOU more personal. We can tailor it, and it’s ALMOST COME OFF LIKE AN really exciting when a fan you OUTSPOKEN MODERATE. HOW don’t even know comes in and WOULD YOU DESCRIBE WHERE buys some big package to help READ A ION VERS LONGER TERVIEW YOU STAND POLITICALLY? you make music, or sends you IN OF THIS R MUSIC I do feel passionately about a letter. The bad part is that ON OU W>>, BLOG, FF w. the things I care about, but you’re planning a record and at ww er ap I tend to read and try to give you feel like you’re constantly pghcityp .com an opportunity to both sides of NPR fundraising. the traditional aisle. And when it comes to viewpoints, there’s things YOU HAVE A NEW CHRISTMAS SONG that I don’t really care a lot about, certain YOU’RE RELEASING, AND YOUR LAST social issues, and I’m just always like, ALBUM HAD A SONG CALLED “THANKSwhy are these in the political discussion? GIVING.” IS THE HOLIDAY SEASON A I don’t get it. And I feel like most of the SPECIAL TIME FOR YOU? WHAT’S IT LIKE people I hang out with fall in this middle BEING ON TOUR DURING THOSE WEEKS? Obviously, the holidays are really special, ground. But unfortunately, for politicians and I have four young kids; it’s strange to to win elections, you’re not allowed to sometimes not be there. Last time I got be moderate. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS Exit Verse

[HIP HOP] + FRI., DEC. 12

It’s a holiday tradition that’s grown over time — and supports a good cause. The annual WYEP Holiday Hootenanny and Pajama Jam returns to Stage AE for tonight’s show, featuring local talent doing classic and offbeat holiday tunes. Curated this year by man-about-town Nathan Zoob (of Wreck Loose) and his all-star house band, the show promises names like Billy Price, Joy Ike and Kai Roberts; a pajama drive (new kids’ pajamas and books accepted at the door) benefits local kids’ charities. Those with little ones show up early for the 7 p.m. family set with Josh & Gab; the Hoot itself, broadcast live Yelawolf on WYEP, begins at 8 p.m. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $15-20, kids under 12 free. 412-381-9131 or www.wyep.org

Michael Wayne Atha, a.k.a. Yelawolf, comes from the small town of Gadsden, Ala. After a somewhat nomadic childhood with his mother (whom he’s described in interviews as “wild” and “rock and roll”), Yelawolf made a name for himself as an underground rapper via Myspace and mixtapes. In 2011 he signed with Eminem’s Shady label, and a year later paired with Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker for his EP Psycho White. Yelawolf challenges himself to blend musical influences that normally wouldn’t integrate with his unique style of hip hop. You can see him tonight with Rittz, Big Henry and DJ Klever at Altar Bar. SW 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20. All ages. 412206-9719 or www. thealtarbar.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MCCLISTER}

[HOLIDAY] + THU., DEC. 11

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

Tickets at www.jergels.com

[BLUES] + SUN., DEC. 14

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., DEC. 12 Ex-Karate singer/ guitarist Geoff Farina got together with drummer John Dugan and bassist Pete Croke to form Exit Verse in early 2013; he had broken up his early emo-indie group Karate in 2005 after the years of loud performances began causing him serious hearing damage. During his rock hiatus, Farina focused on playing more acoustic music. Now, the formation of Exit Verse marks his arrival back into a louder sound. Let’s hope his hearing holds up. Exit Verse will stop in at Club Café tonight to promote its self-titled debut. Samantha Ward 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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While having a kind of shitty Christmas could be grounds for writing a few good blues tunes, nobody wishes that upon a kid — the blues can wait a few years. That’s why the Blues Society of Western Pennsylvania put together today’s Blues for Toys Christmas Party at Moondog’s, to benefit Toys for Tots: to help ensure that kids who might not otherwise get gifts this holiday season will be taken care of. Donations of new toys will be accepted for Toys for Tots, and The Nighthawks and Eugene and the Nightcrawlers will be playing. AM 4 p.m. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. $8-10. 412-828-2040 or www.moondogs.us

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THU 11 31ST STREET PUB. The Skull, Derketa, Molasses Barge. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Crowbar, Unearth, Black Crown Initiate, Eternal Sleep. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Natalie Merchant. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Stephen Kellogg, Ben Fields. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Anicon, Yellow Eyes, Dendritic Arbor. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Big Gypsy, Beauty Slap, Guides. South Side. 412-431-5282. LEVELS. Chris Higbee. North Side. 412-231-7777. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Red Dog Run, The Shelf Life String Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 12 CLUB CAFE. Scott Blasey (Early) Exit Verse, Orange Mammoth (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Them Labs, Andre Costello, Grandpa Egg. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MOONDOG’S. Squeazen the Shaman , Stucco Pyramid. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Singer-Songwriter Revival Series: Vox Lumina, Jasmine Tate, Brad Yoder, Live To Love Band, Jere & Michelle Bucek. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PARK HOUSE. Verity’s Lie. North Side. 412-224-2273. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Totally 80s. Greensburg. 724-799-8333. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. SMILING MOOSE. Zach Bellas & the Company Band, The Super Break String Band. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bloody Seamen, Jayke Orvis, Mickey & the SOBs, Bryan McQuaid. Calendar Comp Release. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. The Lunatics, Carney Stomp, Umalaut. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Finally Free. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Kyle Lawson & Henry Bachorski. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sun Hound, Union Rye, The Shelf Life String Band. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 360. Totally 80s. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Show, Thrift, Johnny & the Razorblades, Sylvania, Cats In Congress. Millvale. 866-468-3401. NORTH PARK CLUBHOUSE. Austin Drive Band. Robinson. 412-787-2252. PIZON’S. Bad Mother Trucker/LIZE. Benefits Toys for Tots. 724-677-2737. THE R BAR. Norm Nardini. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SMILING MOOSE. Seplophile, Incinerate Creation, Egality, Steel City Firm. Pittsburgh Metal Community’s Toys for Tots drive. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Crew of the Half Moon. 724-433-1322. TEDDY’S. King’s Ransom. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Big Mean Sound Machine. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. The Clock Reads. North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 14 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Guy Russo Music, Memphis HIll, Ghost Guts. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Traitor. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 16 CLUB CAFE. Trio+, Stranger Convention. South Side. 412-431-4950.

MP 3 MONDAY TARRA LAYNE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DEREK TULL}

ROCK/POP

SAT 13 31ST STREET PUB. Whiskey Daredevils, Porno Tongue, $4 Mistake. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Kill Paris. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. JD Eicher & the Goodnights, The Speedbumps (Early) Alive In The Underground, Vineyard Junction (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Pittsburgh expat Tarra Layne, who brings us her new single, “Cherry Moonshine.” Stream or download it for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. CONTINUES ON PG. 31

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


CITY LIVING RENT • LEASE • BUY YOUR GUIDE TO PITTSBURGH’S AT ITS BEST HOTTEST PLACES TO LIVE! The city of Pittsburgh has a place for everyone when it comes to luxurious living. After all, Pittsburgh was voted America’s most livable city by the Economist Intelligence Unit. Each neighborhood in this city has something unique to offer. Downtown provides close proximity to the Cultural District and the bustling business world. The exciting South Side shows just how much fun Pittsburghers have, while neighborhoods like Shady Side, Squirrel Hill and Lawrenceville are trendy and vibrant. But these are just a few of the exciting neighborhoods that you have to choose from in Pittsburgh. Bakery Living, across from Bakery Square

201 Stanwix 201 Stanwix Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-584-4072 www.201stanwix.com

This former Bell Telephone Building now features 158 luxury one-two-bedroom apartments in downtown Pittsburgh and is part of the National Register of Historic Places.

900 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-688-7200 www.trekdevelopment.com

This former printing factory is now 25 luxury-loft apartments located in the heart of the Cultural District.

The Carlyle 306 Fourth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-325-1190 www.carlylecondo.com

Choose from six unique floor plans at this classic 1920s

downtown building. With a completely renovated interior, the charm does not stop when you walk through the door.

The Chalfont Apartments

Carson Street Commons

You’ve seen the rest, now live at the best! The Chalfont Apartments offers luxury living with all the comforts and conveniences you deserve. Make The Chalfont Apartments your new home!

2529 East Carson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-1183 www.morgancommunities.com

Situated side-by-side with the South Side shops and restaurants, the Carson Street Commons has a 24-hour fitness center, walking trails and is petfriendly.

Century Building 130 Seventh Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-688-7200 www.centuryon7th.com

This restored 1907 building located in the Cultural District has 60 residential lofts, commercial, retail and amenity spaces.

900 Penn offers the City’s finest apartment living right in the heart of Downtown’s Cultural District!

4742 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15213 412-683-8683 www.chalfontapartments.com

We offer 1&2 bedroom apartment homes which include; stainless steel appliances, hardwood flooring, exposed wood beams, washer and dryer in your unit, pet friendly, a spacious, open floor plan, an unmatched rooftop view, short walk to PNC Park, Heinz Field, 14 theaters, and the best restaurants in the city.

Chatham Tower Condominiums 112 Washington Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-391-8040 www.chatham-tower.com

Located just across from the Consol Energy Center, Chatham Tower is surrounded by the pulse of the city and defines downtown living.

Call us to schedule a tour TODAY! Call 900 Penn your home TOMORROW!

412-688-7200

Continued >> A D V E R T I S I N G

If you are looking for a new place to call home, flip through these pages and you will find what you are looking for.

S U P P L E M E N T


walnut capital We can’t wait to help you find the perfect place!

The new Bakery Living community offers studio, one and two bedroom units equipped with top of the line appliances including in-unit washer and dryer. A large variety of floor plans are available – to meet your expectations and budget. Many apartments offer balconies or patios. A swimming pool, fitness center, movie theater/gaming room, and stunning views are just a few features. Onsite there is a bike/walking path that will lead you straight to the heart of Shadyside. The apartments have a smokefree and pet-friendly environment.

Bakery Living Amenities: • On-Site Management and Maintenance • Online Service Request • Courtesy Package acceptance and storage • Walnut Perks – Resident Discount Program • Common area Wi-Fi • Parking garage with direct access to all floors and two EV car charging stations • Smoke-free building • 24 hour fully equipped fitness center with direct access to bike path • Secure indoor bike storage room and repair station • Three distinct, stylish lounges complete with a fireplace, billiard table and bar • Sun Deck, outdoor bar & grilling stations • Pet-friendly community • Business Center • Conference facilities

• Spectacular indoor/ outdoor swimming pool for year round use • Meditative courtyard with water and fire elements • Movie theater and gaming room with comfortable seating • Convenient access to parks, bike paths, coffee shops & retail technology-related employers • Stunning gourmet kitchens include Quartz countertops, Kohler faucets, Whirlpool ICE line appliances and dark Espresso cabinets • Nine-foot ceilings in most residences • In unit washer and dryer • Fully operational TRACO energy efficient windows • Many residences have spacious private balconies or private walk out patios

We can’t wait to help you find the perfect place! To speak with a leasing specialist or to make an appointment please call 412-683-3810. A D V E R T I S I N G

CITY LIVING The Cork Factory Lofts 2349 Railroad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-552-3176 www.thecorkfactory.com

This historic Strip District structure is one of Pittsburgh’s most popular urban residences due to unmatched building amenities and services. It is complemented by beautiful landscape, a pool deck and spectacular views of the city.

Crane Village Apartments 651 Oaklynn Court Pittsburgh, PA 15220 877-292-8321 www.cranevillageapts.com

Choose from a studio, one-two-three-bedroom apartment homes, or a two-bedroom townhome on this 15-acre property.

Doughboy Apartments 3400 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-683-3230 www.desmone.com/project/ doughboy-square-apartments

Doughboy Apartments is an urban infill project in Lawrenceville. Units will range in size from 850-square-foot one-bedroom units to 1600-square-foot two-bedroom units.

The Encore on Seventh 100 Seventh Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-200-1237 www.theencoreon7th.com

Located in the heart of the Cultural District, The Encore on Seventh has picture windows featuring the most breathtaking views of Pittsburgh and its three rivers.

S U P P L E M E N T

Ecocraft 1-800-274-6198 www.ecocraft-homes.com

Inspired by West Coast modern architecture, the EcoMod Home harmonizes energy efficiency and modern urban design. Its advanced Systems-Built approach allows virtually any home plan to be built in as little as 90 days.

Franklin West 272 Shady Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15206 412-661-1151 www.franklinwest.com

Franklin West has superior apartments and townhouses in Shadyside, Butler, Oakmont and Gibsonia.

Gateway Towers Condominiums 320 Fort Duquesne Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-471-3400 www.gatewaytowerspittsburgh.com

Experience a neighborhood in a high-rise at Gateway Towers, in downtown Pittsburgh. Here you will find all the amenities that include fine living at its best.

Grandview Pointe 1411 Grandview Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15211 412-481-1112 www.grandviewpointe.com

Enjoy a breathtaking view of the city of Pittsburgh while living in a spectacular Grandview Pointe Apartment! The only thing we overlook is the city!

Heinz Lofts 300 Heinz Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 877-821-7207 www.heinzlofts.com

Heinz Lofts offer a majestic view of the Allegheny

River and downtown Pittsburgh. Expect apartments that are expansive-feeling, with up to 16-foot ceilings and generous square footage.

Kenmawr Apartments 401 Shady Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-361-2774 www.kenmawrapartments.com

Located in vibrant Shadyside, the recent multi-million-dollar renovation has left these fine apartments better than ever.

The Locomotive Lofts 4840 Harrison Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-621-1133 www.locomotivelofts.com

With a prime location adjacent to vibrant Butler Street in Lawrenceville, these one-two-bedroom apartments are great for anyone looking for an exciting, greener urban lifestyle.

Lot 24 2404 Railroad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-552-3186 www.lot24inthestrip.com

This newly renovated 96unit apartment property is located in the Strip District and boasts sustainable living. The amenities do not fall short as they have a terrace, club room, heated pool and much more.

Market Square Place Lofts 222 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-281-7675 www.marketsquareplace.com

The 46 loft-style rental apartments define “urban chic” with the open floor plan, huge windows and exposed bricks and


AT ITS BEST beams that date back to the turn of the century.

Morgan at North Shore Apartments 100 Anderson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-321-2300 www.morgancommunities.com

This riverfront location offers spectacular views of the city, private balconies and entrances, a 24-hour fitness center and a heated swimming pool.

Morgan Communities – The Waterfront 611 E. Waterfront Drive Munhall, PA 15120 412-476-3377 www.morgancommunities.com

This pet-friendly community lies along the Monongahela River in the historic Homestead area. The river view and trails create ample green space.

Mountvue Apartments 5 Grandview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15211 412-488-6863

Mountvue Apartments is located in the beautiful Mount Washington with a view of the entire city.

Penn Garrison Lofts 915 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-227-0959 www.penngarrison.com

Located in the heart of downtown’s Cultural District, these stylish lofts have 117 units ranging from studios to two-floor penthouses.

Piatt Place 301 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-434-1181 www.piattplace.com

Situated downtown,

the Piatt Place is a majestic redesign of the former Lazarus department store. Private access to the upper levels reveal luxury rooftop condos with outdoor terraces.

River Vue 300 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412- 434-5700 www.rivervuepgh.com

Located at the Point, this sophisticated downtown residence features 218 unique one-two-bedroom apartments, as well as two-story homes.

Sherwood Towers 230 N. Craig Street Pittsburgh PA 15213 412-683-8683 www.sherwoodtowers.com

Pittsburgh’s Downtown area and Shadyside are just minutes away! Sherwood Towers boasts magnificent 1, 2 and 3 bedroom floor plans with exquisite details and features for those who deserve luxury.

Starr Lofts 4115 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-450-0053 www.boterodevelopment.com

This green renovation of a historic Lawrenceville building features air-conditioning, in-unit laundry, exposed brick and 11-foot ceilings.

University Commons 382 S. Bouquet Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com

University Commons is located in the heart of Oakland and features one-two-three-bedroom apartments.

Walnut Capital 5500 Walnut Street, Suite 300 Pittsburgh PA 15232 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com

Walnut Capital is one of Pittsburgh’s largest and fastest growing real-estate management companies. When you are ready to buy or sell a home, the professionals here have the expertise and sales tools to help.

Walnut on Highland 121 S. Highland Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com

Walnut on Highland is an urban housing and retail complex in heart of revitalized East End featuring gourmet kitchens, breathtaking views, custom-wood cabinets and so much more.

COME SEE FOR YOURSELF THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER DOWNTOWN RESIDENCE

Walnut Towers at Frick Park 7070 Forward Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com

Walnut Towers, in Squirrel Hill, offers an urban location nestled near the beautiful green space of Frick Park.

Washington Plaza Luxury Apartments 1420 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-391-9833 www.washingtonplaza.com

This high-rise features tennis and volleyball courts, a swimming pool, 24-hour fitness center, sauna/tanning beds, floor-to-ceiling windows and shuttle services.

A D V E R T I S I N G

10 YEAR TAX ABATEMENT ENORMOUS WINDOWS IN ALL ROOMS FITNESS ROOM • CINEMA ROOM • OUTDOOR TERRACE WITH DOG WALK

412-325-1190

WWW.CARLYLECONDO.COM S U P P L E M E N T


rethink home

1 and 2 bedroom upscale urban rentals

BakeryLiving

Coming Soon at Bakery Square - Pre-leasing now

412-683-3810 • BAKERYLIVING.COM THE BEST IN CITY LIVING A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. In Heat, Tropical Trash, Bugs & Rats, Night Vapor, Lakshmeesingh. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Every Time I Die, The Ghost Inside, Architects, Hundredth, Backtrack. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Lemuria, Prince, KHeeS, Fake Grave. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 17 CLUB CAFE. Avi Diamond, Wreck Loose. Avi Diamond CD release party. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Locusta. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 11 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 13 ROCK ROOM. Benny Beyond & The Archaeologist, Stillborn Identity, Shad Ali, Shaggy Rogers, Doomshark & Vegas Gold, DJ Noetik 5,000. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418.

BLUES FRI 12 565 LIVE. The Blues Orphans w/ Lou Schreiber. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. IRON CREEK BAR & GRILLE. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Billy Price. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

w paper pghcitym .co

FRI 12 BRILLOBOX. Lazercrunk w/ Spank Rock, Cutups & Keeb$. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DRUM BAR. DJ NIN. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Noetic. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 13 BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. DJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777. GUS’S CAFE. Pittsburgh Caribbean/International Saturdays. Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. NO MAMES: Latin Bass Night w/ King Louie (Peligrosa)& Pandemic Pete. Lawrenceville. 412-251-6058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. W/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

SAT 13

THE HOP HOUSE. Sweaty Betty. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. JIMMY Z’S PLACE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bellevue. 412-766-3110. MOONDOG’S. The Sauce Boss. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. WILSON AMERICAN CITIZENS CLUB. GRW’s Blues Experience w/ Tim Woods. Clairton.

SUN 14 MOONDOG’S. The Nighthawks. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

TUE 16 SLOPPY JOE’S. The Fabulous Mr. B. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

JAZZ THU 11 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAVO. Carlton Leeper, Lito Corpuz Victoria Brady, Patrick Whitehead. Strip District. 412-610-1384. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. GIANT EAGLE WATERWORKS. RML Jazz. Aspinwall. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 12 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band, Don Aliquo Sr. Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. John Sarkis. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

ELWOOD’S PUB. Erin Burkett, Virgil Walters, Eric Susoeff. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Horn Guys. North Side. 412-904-3335. NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Kenny Garrett. North Side. 412-322-0292. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 14 EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Blink. North Side. 412-904-3335. LATITUDE 360. Elan Trotman. North Fayette. 412-567-2804.

MON 15

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ALL DAY WEDNESDAY ALL YOU CAN EAT WINGS & CHIPS

ACOUSTIC THU 11 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Zig Daniels. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 12 ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181.

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$

A SPECIAL HOLIDAY GIFT TO OUR LOYAL CUSTOMERS. Receive a complimentary

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 17

M U S I C

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COORS LIGHT DRAFT with everyy AYCE Wingg order.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834.

*Offer only valid the first three Wednesdays in December AT THE MT. WASHINGTON LOCATION ONLY

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

+

THURSday

---------------------------------------------------

ANDYS. Paul Consentino. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. CREAMY CREATIONS & MORE. Hump Day Jazz Jam w/ Rodney McCoy. East Liberty. LEMONT. Steve Tori. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-471-9100. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Dante’ Soulsville Project. West End. 412-458-0417.

SAT 13

TA S T E

$3 Mini Beers

WED 17

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty.

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We’re here for you with Wine, Beer, Cocktails & Gift Cards!

SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE. Richie Cole w/ Ron Wilson, Mark Perna & Vince Taglieri. Lawrenceville. 412-874-7379. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ 4th Call. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 13

N E W S

WEDNEsday

Tuesday

TUE 16

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. North Side. 412-323-2924.

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

The Holidays Are Officially Upon You!

---------------------------------------------------

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 16

WED 17

Wine & Cheese Bar

S C R E E N

WWW.REDBEARDSPGH.COM +

A R T S

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E V E N T S

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C L A S S I F I E D S

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Photo by Greta Rybus

WORLD SAT 13 DOBRA TEA. Other Worldly Music. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

REGGAE FRI 12 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

DECEMBER 13 8PM • $$10

Max Garcia Conover Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

EARLY WARNINGS

PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

An Evening of Music

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

Kevin Devine

COUNTRY SAT 13

{TUE., MARCH 03}

HARVEY WILNER’S. Dallas Marks. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

North Mississippi All Stars

with Anders Osbourne

CLASSICAL

Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall

SUN 14 ST. PAUL CATHEDRAL CHOIR. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

{FRI., MARCH 06}

G. Love & Special Sauce

MON 15

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-596-4172.

{FRI., MARCH 27}

Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band

WED 17 THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-596-4172.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 12 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Bill Jasper Acoustics CD Release Party w/ Bottle Rat, Playoff Beard, No Movement. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side

STAGE AE. WYEP Holiday Hootenanny. Josh Verbanets & Guy Russo, Joy Ike, Essential Machine, Billy Price, Morgan Erina, Zak Kane, Brooke Annibale, Kai Roberts, more. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FRI 12

BOWER HILL COMMUNITY CHURCH. Three Rivers Ringers Hand Bell Ensemble. Mt. Lebanon. LEMONT. Mark & Donna Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Tribute Symphony Orchestra: Highmark to Dean Martin feat. Holiday Pops. Downtown. “Coz”. 412-487-6259. 412-392-4900. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Christmas with New www. per OAKLAND. Sunday pa York Voices. North Side. pghcitym Afternoon Music Series: .co 412-322-1773. Slipped Disc. Oakland. MT. LEBANON UNITED 412-622-3151. LUTHERAN CHURCH. The Pittsburgh Camerata. Recounting the Nativity. HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Mt. Lebanon. 412-421-5884. Showtunes, Jazz Standards & Blues by Ian Kane. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CONSOL ENERGY CENTER.

SAT 13

SUN 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 15

SAT 13

WED 17 HEINZ HALL. Gene Chandler, Tommy Mara, Sonny Turner. Downtown. 412-392-4819.

HOLIDAY MUSIC THU 11 HEINZ CHAPEL. OvreArts Presents: “Solstice: New Carols for the Season”. Oakland. 412-624-4157.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Uptown. 412-642-1800. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir. East Liberty. 412-345-1722. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra: Highmark Holiday Pops. Downtown. 412-392-4900. SHADYSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Pittsburgh School for the Choral Arts. pghchoralarts.org. Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

SUN 14 ANDYS. Holiday “Sing-ALong Session”. Downtown. 412-773-8884. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra: Highmark Holiday Pops. Downtown. 412-392-4900. SIXTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. The Pittsburgh Camerata. Recounting the Nativity. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5884. ST. BRENDAN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Messiah Sing Along. Sewickley. 412-364-5974. ST. MARY OF THE MOUNT. Music on the Mount: Christmas Brass. Feat. the Mary Pappert School of Music’s Brass Ensemble. Mt. Washington. 412-381-0212. ST. STEPHEN’S CHURCH. Three Rivers Ringers Hand Bell Ensemble. Sewickley.

MON 15 HEINZ HALL. B.E. Taylor. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 16 THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett, Virgil Walters, Eric Susoeff, Eric Defade & Victor Garzotto. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. HEINZ HALL. B.E. Taylor. Downtown. 412-392-4900. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Jingle Bell Jazz feat. Mike Tomaro & friends. Shadyside.


What to do

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

December 10-16

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WEDNESDAY 10

FRIDAY 12

pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Dec. 16.

RAUH THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com or 412-392-8000. Through Dec. 14.

BRICOLAGE Downtown. Tickets: bricolagepgh.org or 412-471-0999. Through Dec. 19.

blessthefall

Urinetown

THURSDAY 11 Holiday Hootenanny

STAGE AE North Side. For info and tickets visit wyep.org. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Crowbar ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Stephen Kellogg 'Every Night's A Little Different Tour' CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

It's a Wonderful Life MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 6:45p.m.

Yelawolf "The Slumerican.Made.Tour"

The 1975

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Highmark Holiday Pops DECEMBER 12-21 HEINZ HALL

Burlesque-A-Pades: A Christmas Shimmy!

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Pennsylvania Powersport Show West

MONROEVILLE CONVENTION CENTER Monroeville. Tickets: $8 at the door. Through Dec. 14.

Switch

latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa 9:15p.m.

SATURDAY 13

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Dec. 21.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8:15p.m.

Tyler Oakley: Tyler's Slumber Party

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

NEW HAZLETT THEATER

Highmark Holiday Pops

Totally 80's

Every Time I Die / The Ghost Inside

Lemuria

B.E. Taylor Christmas Concert

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 18 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

TUESDAY 16 MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 6:30p.m.

MONDAY 15

Kill Paris

Kenny Garrett Quintet

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets:

SUNDAY 14

North Side. Tickets: kentearts.org or 888-718-4253. 8p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets:

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33


TOWN GOES BOOM

THE RE-CREATION OF THE PLAGUES IS FAR MORE INTERESTING THAN MOSES FRETTING

{BY AL HOFF} North Dakota’s oil and gas fields have made the small prairie hamlet of Williston a modern-day boomtown. But as thousands of workers — mostly men from the South and the West — pour in, hoping to snag high-paying manual-labor jobs, there’s nowhere to house them. Thus, Jay Reinke, a local pastor, institutes a program to put the “overnighters” up in the church, to the discomfort of neighbors and church members.

Pastor Jay Reinke is troubled.

CP APPROVED

That sounds vaguely heartwarming, but Jesse Moss’ documentary, The Overnighters, instead casts light on deep cracks in the American Dream, as well as the disconnect between how we see ourselves and how we really are. Moss profiles a few of the workers — stories that begin in hardship, and are briefly buoyed by hope, before ending badly. But the workers are a feint — the heart of The Overnighters is pastor Reinke. His story, gradually revealed as the battle against the town chips away at his cheery, calm exterior, is a shattering journey into the soul. Most accounts of the renewed oil-andgas industry focus on the environmental costs or the economic benefits, but few examine the effect on a community and the individuals within it. The Overnighters uncovers nothing that didn’t exist before or was lying dormant, but it took the boom to bring such desperation, ugliness and heartbreak to the surface. Starts Fri., Dec. 12. Regent Square AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM HOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In our hybridized bridized times, of course Charles arles Dickens’ classic holiday iday tale of redemption can n be acted out by fuzzy zy pig and frog puppets. ets. Catch

The Muppet ppet pp Christmas tmas Caroll, with Muppets and with Michael Caine aine playing Scrooge. ge. 6:45 p.m. Sun., un., Dec. 14. Parkway rkway Theater, McKees Rocks

POWER

PLAY

{BY AL HOFF}

I

T’S A STORY you’ll remember from your Bible or The Ten Commandments: Moses, who lived among the Egyptian royals, is banished into the desert, where he receives a message from God that he is to lead the enslaved Hebrews out of Egypt and into the Promised Land. So, it’s not fresh narrative that’s the draw of Ridley Scott’s Exodus: Exodu Gods and Kings (spoiler alert: and locusts!), but whether this journey l is depicted interestingly. dep From the beginning, Scott casts one Fr aspect aspec of the epic as a broken bromance between betwe best buds Moses (Christian Bale) and Ramses (Joel Edgerton), the soonR to-be pharaoh. They save each others’ lives, but their relationship cannot be sustained over the larger struggle each susta leader leade embodies. Ramses (Joel Edgerton) draws strength from tangible powers, such as wealth, institutions and armies, and for f his own gain, while Moses is fueled solely by faith and hope in service of such community ideals as freedom su and homeland. h

Moses (Christian Bale), with fellow warriors (Aaron Paul and Ben Kingsley)

Coming between the men is God, played here by a small English boy (Isaac Andrews). Despite his winsome looks, the little lad is straight-up Old Testament: He’s openly derisive of Moses, and smites an unholy number of Egyptians.

EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS DIRECTED BY: Ridley Scott STARRING: Christian Bale, Joel Edgerton Starts Fri., Dec. 12 In 3-D, in select theaters

Continuing the duality, Scott too splits the difference between semi-serious drama and spectacle, and the film’s two halves are frequently at odds with each other. Bale’s Moses is broody and sincere, even when kee-razy supernatural things are happening. (In an unintentionally funny line, Ramses pooh-poohs the rain of amphibians in his bedroom: “It’s just frogs.”) The film is more enjoyable when it opts to just be entertaining: It opens

with a huge battle; doubles down on kitschy Egyptian décor and fashion (no expense spared in the guyliner and manwig budget); and the re-creation of the plagues is a million times more interesting than Moses fretting about his place in the world. The digital effects are obviously so, but they also deliver the most fun scenes in Exodus. Armies swarming over vast landscapes like bugs. The various plagues (hailstones, fish kills, actual bugs). A spectacular chariot traffic jam on a mountain road. However, I’m sorry to say that the much-anticipated Red Sea scenes are disappointing: The parting is merely an ebbing, and when the water rushes back in, it assumes the form of a single wall-like wave. I envision Scott at the counter of SFX-R-Us, while a clerk shrugs and says, “Christopher Nolan bought all the really spectacular waves for Interstellar, and all I have left is this one kind of boring wave. But I can put some giant tornados on top of it …” A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


Loews ($5). Also, Thu., Dec. 18, through Mon., Dec. 22, at Regent Square (free).

FILM CAPSULES CP

FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE. Clint Eastwood rides again in Sergio Leone’s 1965 film, which continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series — patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 18. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@yahoo.com.

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES. Peter Jackson’s super-extended threepart adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s novel is nearing the end. (Only two-and-half more hours to go!) Now it’s up to Bilbo Baggins and assorted others to defeat the dragon Smaug and win a series of battles. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Wed., Dec. 17.

CP

THE HOMESMAN. Hilary Swank and Tommy Lee Jones strike out across the prairie, transporting a wagon of troubled pioneer women back east, in this not-really-a-Western. Jones directs. See full review at www.pghcitypaper.com. Starts Fri., Dec. 12. TOP FIVE. Chris Rock writes, directs and stars in this comedy about a comedian who turns to acting when his fiancée decides to make their upcoming wedding into a reality-TV show. Starts Fri., Dec. 12.

ONGOING CP

THE BABADOOK. Jennifer Kent directs this unsettling indie horror film about a stressed-out single-mom, her troubled young son and the possible monster that lurks in their house. A smart take on the is-it-madness-or-is-ita-monster dilemma, as filtered through a frayed parent-child relationship. 10 p.m. Fri., Dec. 12; 8 and 10 p.m. Sat., Dec. 13; and 6 p.m. Sun., Dec. 15. Regent Square (Al Hoff) HAPPY VALLEY. Amir Bar-Lev’s new documentary examines how footballcrazed State College, home of Penn State, reacted in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky childrape scandal. After the program was tarnished, the community was left confused and defensive. Even if you’re tired of everything related to the Penn State scandal, Bar-Lev’s film is worth the time for the questions it raises about the limits and perils of our excessive sports fandom. Starts Fri., Dec. 12. Manor (Charlie Deitch)

CP

The Homesman 12-16. A Cat in Paris (a housecat leads a double-life as a burglar’s assistant in this 2012 French comedy), Dec. 12-14 and Dec. 16-18. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com

York cop John McLane (Bruce Willis) makes it look fun. John McTiernan directs this 1988 actioner that made Willis a big-time movie star. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Dec. 12; 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 13; 7:30 p.m. Mon., Dec. 15; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Dec. 17. Hollywood

THE CRT CANVAS: TELEVISION AND MATERIALITY, 1969-1983. This screening and discussion program features video-art works from the archives of the Long Beach Museum of Art and the City of Long Beach, in California. These include early works from artists who worked with or exploited the physical materials of television, such as Bill Viola, William Wegman, Alan Kaprow and Wolfgang Stoerche. Conservator Jonathan Furmanski will screen two rare tapes: Cynthia Maughan’s “Gone With the Wind” (1976) and a fragment from Dan Graham’s 1974 installation Continuous Present Past(s). 6:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 11. Carnegie Museum of Art Theater, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www.cmoa.org

THE OTHER SIDE. Sad that the flesh-eating on The Walking Dead is on hiatus? Try this locally-produced zombie film, plus live musical performances by Fist Fight in the Parking Lot, Homicide Black, Supervoid and Venue in Furs. 6 p.m. Sun., Dec. 14. Hollywood

N E W S

+

KEY LARGO. In John Huston’s 1948 film noir, Humphrey Bogart — playing a bitter veteran — turns up at a rundown Florida hotel to pay a courtesy visit to his dead war buddy’s widow, Lauren Bacall. He finds the joint under siege by brutish gangster Edward G. Robinson. Based on Maxwell Anderson’s play, the film is a trifle talky, but strong performances keep it bristling. Claire Trevor won an Oscar for her performance as Robinson’s boozy mistress. This is the second film of a two-part, Sunday-night Bogey-and-Bacall celebration. 8 p.m. Sun., Dec. 14. Regent Square (AH) C

BLACK CHRISTMAS. A psycho killer terrorizes sorority girls during the Christmas break. This 1975 Canadian screamer from Bob Clark predates the late-1970s slasher films with some of that genre’s conventions — the killer POV-cam with heavy breathing; “The call is coming from inside the house!”; the bad girls getting killed first; and a surprising ending. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 18; 10:15 p.m. Fri., Dec. 19; 9:30 p.m. Sun., Dec. 21; and 9:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 23. Hollywood (AH) ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE. Frank Capra’s beloved 1946 holiday classic, in which a harried man (Jimmy Stewart) re-discovers the simple joys of life. Tell ’em Clarence sent you. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 16, at AMC

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. World War II International Reflections: a look at the war’s impact from the perspective of non-Americans. Hope and Glory (John Boorman’s partly autobiographical 1987 dramedy about British life on the homefront), Dec. 5-9. Europa Europa (Jewish boy in Nazi Germany hides his identity by joining the Hitler Youth, in Agnieszka Holland’s 1990 film), Dec. 5-11. Come and See (Elem Klimov’s 1985 film depicts the experiences of a young soldier who joins the Soviet Army), Dec. 58, and Dec. 10-11. Devils on the Doorstep (Chinese villager takes in two Japanese prisoners of war in Wen Jiang’s 2000 film), Dec. 5-7, and Dec. 9-11. International Animation: Nocturna (a young boy plunges into the secret world of Nocturna, inhabited by curious creatures; Spain, 2007), Dec. 12-15 and Dec. 18. Wrinkles (residents of a senior-care home rebel in this 2011 Spanish comedy), Dec. 12-14, Dec. 16 and Dec. 18. The Tale of the Princess Kaguya (new from Japan’s Studio Ghibli, and adapted from a 10th-century folk tale; Pittsburgh premiere), Dec. 12-13 and Dec. 15-17. From up on Poppy Hill (Hayao Miyazaki’s 2011 tale about youth in post-World War II Japan), Dec. 12-14 and Dec. 17-18. Chico and Rita (two Cuban musicians chase love and careers from Havana to New York and Paris, in this 2010 musical romance), Dec.

CP

CHRISTMAS VACATION. For my money, the funniest entry in the “Vacation” franchise because it taps a universal truth: Other people’s behavior ruins your holidays, while your behavior contributes to other people’s misery. It’s all about giving and getting! Everyman Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) tries to lay on the perfect Christmas, but is undercut by his low-rent cousin (Randy Quaid), uptight neighbors, demanding elderly relatives, his boss, a squirrel and a tangle of Christmas lights. Jeremiah S. Chechik directs this 1989 neo-classic holiday comedy, penned by John Hughes. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 18. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

It’s A Wonderful Life A CHRISTMAS STORY. Guess what Ralphie wants for Christmas? An official Red Ryder Carbine Action 200-shot air rifle. Will he get it? Discover this and other small wonders of holidays past in Bob Clark’s 1983 holiday film. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 11. AMC Loews

CP

LOLITA. In 1962, Stanley Kubrick dared to adapt Vladimir Nabokov’s scandalous novel about a middle-aged professor who has an affair with a teenage girl, a relationship that runs the gamut from exhilarating to boring to disastrous. James Mason portrays the smitten professor, Humbert Humbert; Sue Lyon is his obsession, Lolita; and the great Peter Sellers plays his nemesis, Clare Quilty. The film continues a year-long celebration of Kubrick films. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 11, and 10:15 p.m. Fri., Dec. 12. Hollywood (AH) DIE HARD. It’s pretty much the worst way to spend Christmas Eve, single-handedly defending a Los Angeles skyscraper from a dozen terrorists. But New

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Jingle Bell Rocks (2014) - 12/10 @ 7:30pm Great new doc on the fascinating world of alternative Christmas music.

-Lolita --------------------------------------Die- - -Hard- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Polar- - - - -Express - - - - - - -Charity - - - - - - -Event -------------------

(1962) - 12/11 @ 7:30pm, 12/12 @ 10:15pm - Starring James Mason and Shelley Winters, directed by Stanley Kubrick. (1988) - 12/12 @ 7:30pm, 12/13 @ 7:00pm & 9:30pm, 12/15 @ 7:30pm, 12/17 @ 7:30pm - 40 stories, 12 terrorists, one cop.

TWO SHOWS IN DECEMBER!!

December 13th December 27th HAT SHOW! (Cast members will pull roles out of hat before showtime!)

The Hollywood Theater in Dormont AT MIDNIGHT!

- 12/13 @ 11am. - Caroling, crafts, and a screening of the film to benefit Western PA Police Athletic League. Bring a toy for the toy drive to gain free admission, or $10 donation.

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The Other Side Concert and a Movie - 12/14 @ 6:00pm - The zombie film with a twist returns to the big screen with four live bands!

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[DANCE REVIEW]

THERE IS A GREAT PLEASURE IN SEEING CONTEMPORARY MASTERS WORK ON A SMALLER SCALE

LOVE STORY

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Conservatory Dance Company’s ROMEO AND JULIET continues through Sun., Dec. 14. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

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[EXHIBIT REVIEW]

(GETTING)

BETTER

BUILDINGS Cassidy Burk (right) in the Conservatory Dance Company’s Romeo and Juliet {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

It’s sometimes easy to forget that Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company is a student troupe. The company so easily appears like a professional one in contemporary and modern dance works. In its latest production, Nicolas Petrov’s Romeo and Juliet, the unforgiving nature of classical ballet technique was a reminder that CDC’s dancers are indeed still students. Nonetheless, as a student production, the company’s opening-night performance was solidly entertaining, with wonderful sets and colorful costumes. Originally choreographed for Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre in 1971, Petrov’s two-hour ballet in three acts is a traditional telling of Shakespeare’s iconic tale of star-crossed lovers. Credited as the first Romeo and Juliet ballet in the U.S. to use Prokofiev’s marvelously sweeping and romantic score, Petrov’s choreography for it was nicely paced and dense, with lively, folk-influenced group dances and sword-play. The ballet’s storyline plays out as most do, with the first act setting up the bitter rivalry between the Capulets and Montagues. A fiercely angry Nick Fearon, as Tybalt, led the charge, with former PBT dancer Ernest Tolentino as the Duke, demanding calm between the rival camps. The large cast of knights, lords, ladies and citizens appeared at times a bit sandwiched on the smallish Rockwell Theatre stage, which might have hampered some of the group dancing but did little to stall the sprightly performance of Sean Daly as Romeo’s sidekick Mercutio. Daly’s portrayal was more mischievous Puck than the usual charismatic rogue, but it lent spark to the production. Also of note was the powerfully serious and emotive performance of dancer Rachel Shirley, looking like a dead ringer for Bette Davis. While much of the cast did their best navigating Petrov’s challenging choreography and emphasis on acting skills, dancer Cassidy Burk as young Juliet shone on both counts. The bright-eyed and endearing dancer had all eyes riveted on her from the moment she stepped onstage. Her brilliant performance alone was worth the price of admission. Burk and partner Hunter Mikles, as Romeo, provided much of the ballet’s meaty dancing. From their initial meeting at the Capulet ball, through emotional pas de deuxs during the balcony and bedroom scenes and suicidal deaths, the pair — though they could have danced with a bit more passion and abandon — were thoroughly engaging.

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

V

ITRUVIUS, THE ancient Roman architect and treatise-writer, said one of the most lasting motifs of classical architecture was inspired by an offering at a maiden’s grave. A mourner left votive objects in a basket covered with a flat tile. Soon, an acanthus plant grew from beneath, with leaves enveloping the basket. At least in legend, it inspired the Greek architect Callimachus to create the first Corinthian capital. The theme of architecture promising memory, even life, after the premature death of a young woman is compelling. Surely this is part of why the buildings presented in the Carnegie Museum of Art exhibit Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care engage the viewer so assuredly. Maggie’s Centres are a network of currently 16 small buildings — most in Britain, one in Hong Kong — commissioned to provide spaces for “free practical, emotional and social support” for cancer sufferers and their families during times of

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RAF MAKDA}

Sufficiently quaint, quintessentially Gehry-esque: Frank Gehry’s Maggie’s Dundee

treatment. Maggie Keswick Jencks, for whom Maggie’s Centres are named, was a distinguished landscape designer and historian. She died of breast cancer in 1995 at age 53, but not before leveling a critique of current medical architecture as experienced through cancer treatment. “Overhead (sometimes even neon) lighting, interior spaces with no views out and miserable seating against the walls all contribute to extreme mental and physical enervation,” she wrote.

MAGGIE’S CENTRES continues through Jan. 5. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

She began the project for the homey and comforting drop-in centers as a response. Located on the grounds of major hospitals, they are owned and operated independently. They are also explicitly critical of the

bloated technocratic atmosphere of contemporary medicine and its architecture. She envisioned and oversaw the first one, in Edinburgh, by architect Richard Murphy, but did not live to see it completed. Her widower, Charles Jencks, has continued the project. He is among the most influential architectural theorists and historians of the past several decades, known particularly for his work defining postmodern architecture and creating vivid timeline diagrams of changing aesthetic styles in the field. Notably, the Jenckses met at London’s prestigious Architectural Association in 1978, when a particularly remarkable generation of architects, including Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas and Steven Holl, was studying or beginning teaching careers there. These architects, also including Piers Gough, Richard Rogers and Frank Gehry, have works in this Heinz Architectural Center show. There is a frequent expectation, exemplified by the pejorative “starchitect” label


[ART REVIEW]

VISITATIONS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

Becky Slemmons wears her Gatherings garment.

and not always false, that famous architects are prima donna artistes who care only about the oddball aesthetics of their works, and that issues of humanity and comfort, utility and durability fall by the wayside. Yet Maggie’s Centres — as represented in this exhibit’s photos, drawings and models, with cozy furniture to emphasize the feeling of physical comfort — work to disprove this negative stereotype, to counter with an assertion that the world’s best architects can produce work that palpably improves the human condition. One of the best is the Rogers Stirk Harbour (Richard Rogers) version in London. Tucked in a heavily trafficked neighborhood, it is enclosed by a rectangular, but not sealed, salmon-colored wall that gives the sense of an abstracted Roman villa. The building is designed on a surprisingly straightforward grid that allows a breezy and domestic floor plan, enhanced by balconies and overlooks, to be open so that its functions are permeable. The roof is a flattened truss, perforated with diamondshaped openings, that further modulates architectural experience by covering a different area than the walls enclose. The building received the Royal Institute of British Architects’ Stirling Prize in 2009. In a recent public lecture at the Carnegie, Charles Jencks tantalizingly raised the question of which of the Maggie’s Centres was better and more popular than the others. A group of cancer survivors toured several and indicated their preference. But Jencks coyly avoided saying which. Perhaps he has a different preference than the tour group did. Is it Frank Gehry’s version in Dundee? The building is sufficiently quaint in its compact size, plaster walls and stubby tower, with a quintessentially Gehry-esque roof of crenelated metal. Or is it the Rem Koolhaas/OMA version at Gartnavel Hospital in Glasgow, where L-shaped rooms connected at irregular angles enclose a leafy and contemplative central court? Here, as in a number of the projects, the landscape is designed by Lily Jencks, daughter of Maggie and Charles, a key figure in the humanization of these works. In Maggie’s Centres, organized by the New York School of Interior Design and curated by the Carnegie’s Raymund Ryan, there is a great pleasure in seeing these contemporary masters work on a smaller scale than usual. And there is a palpable but unquantifiable sense that a personal, poignant relationship results in especially compelling architecture. In current times, architecture can further perpetuate the health of the living, even as it memorializes the dead. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Becky Slemmons began work on Gatherings not with sketch pad or chisel, but with visits to places of worship. Over the course of 13 months (starting in 2010), she went to 100 of the more than 1,500 churches, mosques, temples and other spiritual houses in the Pittsburgh area. Included were places devoted to Catholicism, Islam, Krishna Consciousness, Orthodox Judaism, Hinduism and Presbyterianism, and one Pagan Pride Day. Her purpose was to investigate the ritual of attending service and explore its connection to the ritual of creating art. The project is represented in the 707 Penn Gallery through video, sketches and a garment created for congregational wear. The garment is the most complete and complex element representating the project in the gallery. At the onset, as seen in the video as well as in photos documenting its progress, it’s a simple sheath, no sleeves, buttons down the front, unadorned. Through the experience of religious practice it becomes heavy, weighed with appliques, additions, embroidery, beading, lace and panels — a wearable passport bearing the stamps of spiritually driven travels. Slemmons’ wall-mounted sketches combine precise ink and rough pencilings on a single page for each visit. Some are very specifically intricate renderings of objects within the holy places, or the places themselves. Others are more abstract, either visually or symbolically. A handout provides details on the location and date of each visit, but nothing is posted otherwise. The video, composed of segments lasting a few seconds each, is a static interior shot of the Pittsburgh-based artist’s front door. We see her mundane preparations to leave — donning various coats and patting a lovely, sweet dog — then her later homecomings with grocery bags or handfuls of mail in tow, lovely sweet dog offering welcome. Her countenance and composure are unvaried, and if her investigations have affected her, it’s not discernible. While it doesn’t lessen the work as a whole, it provides little insight. Still, what’s here is a scant representation of the complexity of Slemmons’ efforts. While worth a look on its own, the gallery show, curated by Murray Horne, is best followed by a visit to www.gatherings pittsburgh.blogspot.com, where a fuller examination of the project is available. The gallery show is intriguing, but only a starting point both for the viewer and the artist. It’s worth expanding with the larger, more in-depth online exhibition.

DECEMBER D ECEMBER 5-28, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER TICKE TICKETS E TS CALL: 412.456.6666 VISIT: PBT.ORG Groups of 8+ 412.454.9101 call: 412.4 454.9101

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Artist: A Alexandre lexandre Silva Photo: L ois Greenfield Lois

GATHERINGS continues through Dec. 31. 707 Penn Gallery, 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org +

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Brett Goodnack (left), Jason McCune and Andrea Weinzlierl in It’s a Wonderful Life, at Bricolage

[PLAY REVIEWS]

SIMPLY WONDERFUL {BY TED HOOVER}

DATELINE HOLLYWOOD, 1946: RKO Pictures

releases the Frank Capra comedy/drama It’s a Wonderful Life. Though initially a box-office disappointment, this story about a man learning the impact he’s had on others will become, according to the American Film Institute, the “Most Inspiring Movie” of all time. Dateline Connecticut, 1997: Playwright Joe Landry adapts the film into a 1940sstyle radio play that is, according to American Theater magazine, one of the 10 most produced plays in America.

MIDNIGHT RADIO: IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE continues through Dec. 20. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. 412-471-0999 or www.webbricolage.com

Dateline Pittsburgh, 2008: Local company Bricolage introduces Midnight Radio: staged readings presented as radio shows with actors working from scripts and creating live sound effects. 2014: It all comes together with Bricolage’s production of Landry’s adaptation, which (and this came as a surprise) made me very happy to see George Bailey redeemed one more time. The temptation to have camped up this well-worn classic must have been unbearable, but director Alex Tobey and his cast never once condescend to mug or

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wink at the audience. This simple, honest story, with all its sentimentality, is given a simple, honest airing — with music director Jason Coll and musicians Kira Bokalder and Rasa Mahmoudian providing supple, defining underscoring. My sole complaint might be that this five-actor cast could have used a sixth; while the doubling and tripling of roles can sometimes add fun to the proceedings, on several occasions there was confusion as to who was saying what to whom. Wali Jamal and Jason McCune employ a tremendously impressive host of vocal characterizations as Mr. Potter and Clarence respectively, as well as most of the Bedford Falls citizens. There aren’t many female roles in the show, but Elena Alexandratos and Andrea Weinzlierl play them with moving understatement and sincerity. And the big plaudits go to Brett Goodnack as George Bailey. While avoiding the easy trap of turning in a Jimmy Stewart impression he manages to, in a deft bit of tightrope walking, allow just enough Stewart to add a sort of Americana sheen to an already charming performance. I’ll never be known as someone who would describe life as wonderful, but this is a wonderful It’s A Wonderful Life. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

DICKENS LITE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

LET’S SKIP THE obvious jokes that beg

for a put-down of anything titled Great Expectations. PICT Classic Theatre’s production, under the direction of its


artistic director, Alan Stanford, succeeds in pulling off one huge show: big in scope, cast, timeline — if not quite in expectations. The late and highly respected Hugh Leonard, prolific but sentimental playwright, has cleaned up Charles Dickens’ original in his 1995 adaptation. No “Dickensian” slums. No horrors of rapacious capitalism. No real villains. Poor Miss Haversham is to be pitied, not reviled. Lesser personages border on the twee, and my Anglophilia can take only so much. Mr. Pumblechook embodies a Punch cartoon (though actor Ken Bolden does his bombastic best as the buffoon). It’s all so embarrassingly cheerful I could just spit. The design team and crew do yeoman jobs, notably production manager/technical director George DeShetler Jr., with Michael Thomas Essad and Joan Markert on set and costumes, respectively. Stage manager Cory F. Goddard, his assistants and crew seamlessly move from Holborn to the middle of the Thames. The greatest virtue of Leonard’s adaptation is his retention of Dickens’ first-person narrative. Pip exists as both adult and child, narrating each other’s progress and, at times, arguing with himself. Dylan Marquis Meyers handles the smooth gentle-

man, but the most pleasant surprise is Simon Colker keeping pace in the unusually demanding child role. (Colker alternates with Elliott Pullen.) The large cast is filled with jewels: Karen Baum as shrewish matron and as helpful maiden; Lily Davis as the unreachable Estella; Martin Giles strong as the steadfast smithy; David Whalen prickly as the lawyer Jaggers; Larry John Meyers gruff as the grateful convict; James FitzGerald as the cutely careful clerk; and the inimitable Mary Rawson sympathetic as the muchwronged “spinster.”

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! D E D D A 3DERCDEMSBHEOR W 30 • 7:30PM

GREAT EXPECTATIONS continues through Dec. 20. Charity Randall Theatre (Stephen Foster Memorial), 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

To appreciate the play, it helps to have a taste for Dickens. And since so much of American “Christmas tradition” stems from stylized images of his era, Great Expectations is a likely holiday treat. So let us turn away from current arguments over income inequality and the loss of the American Dream with a play that tells you that true happiness is found only in the class you were born into.

30 ARTISTS 300 COSTUMES 20 ACTS

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We offer

Aerial Silks & Circus Classes for Youth & Adult. Live...Love...Soar! 412.681.0111 PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER.COM PITTSBURGHAERIALSILKS.COM N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

12.1112.18.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

and to all...

A GOOD BITE Buy $100 in Gift Cards and receive a complimentary $20 GIFT CERTIFICATE*

DEC. 11 Puppet Making

+ THU., DEC. 11 {CRAFTS} You know those giant puppets in the big annual First Night parade? Well, they don’t make themselves. This week brings two chances to try your hand at crafting these papier-mâché spectacles, with the theme “special delivery.” Tonight’s a 21-and-over Puppet Making Happy Hour, with food, drinks and DJ SMI. Saturday, it’s the daytime Family Puppet Making Workshop. Both of these Pittsburgh Cultural Trust workshops at the Trust Arts Education Center are free, with materials provided, and they’re led by local puppetmistress Cheryl Capezzuti. Bill O’Driscoll Happy Hour: 5:30-8 p.m. Family Workshop: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. 805-807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free; registration recommended at 412-471-6079 or www.trustarts.org.

portfolios containing 12 compositions, which he considered an account of his teaching, in addition to 16 studies for the prints. Tonight is the opening reception in Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery. Danielle Fox 6-8 p.m. Purnell Center for the Arts, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-268-3618 or www.millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu

{STAGE} If you’re seeking holidaythemed stage fare that’s both new and homegrown, look no further than Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. Tonight, the troupe opens Christmas Star, the full-length version of local playwright Ray Werner’s one-act entry in the

2013 Theatre Festival in Black and White. The play, directed by Monteze Freeland, is the story of a Christmas Eve gathering between an Iraq War veteran, his Vietnam-vet father and his mother. Tonight’s opening-night performance is sold out, but the show continues throughout December — and starting Dec. 19, it’s joined at Playwrights by Kim El’s Ubuntu Holiday, a comedy set at a Kwanzaa celebration. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25. www. pittsburghplaywrights.com

{STAGE}

Translations is performance artist Jennifer Myers’ theatrical

DEC. 12 Farbe / Color

+ FRI., DEC. 12 {ART}

*Promotion is valid for in-person purchases only, online gift card purchases excluded. Expires 12/31/14.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

Paying homage, internationally known graphic designer April Greiman curates Farbe / Color, a showcase of work by her former teacher, Armin Hofmann. A legendary Swiss graphic designer and educator whose career began in the 1940s, Hofmann is known for his bold, clean typesetting and restrained approach to color. The exhibit includes one of his silkscreen

Art by Armin Hofmann


sp otlight

“Ghosts of Johnston County” is a new 35-minute documentary about an unlikely corner of the “war on terror.” Since 2005, activists have targeted Aero Contractors, Ltd., whose nondescript terminal at Johnston County Airport, in rural North Carolina, has been home base for dozens of the CIA’s “extraordinary rendition” flights. Operating in the Middle East, Central Asia and Northern Africa, the chartered flights take terrorism suspects to black sites, where they are interrogated and routinely tortured. Filmmakers Eric Juth and Michele Ferris-Dobles depict groups like North Carolina Stop Torture Now protesting Aero, and exposing cases like that of Abou El-Kassim Britel (pictured), an Italian-Moroccan citizen who, though never charged with any crime, was detained and tortured, and spent nine years in prison in Morocco. Also interviewed is Col. Morris Davis, former lead prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, who resigned to protest torture. “We can’t keep pretending that we’re this exceptional country that’s on the moral high ground when we torture people and pretend it didn’t happen,” says Morris. On Dec. 12, Juth, a Beaver County native who teaches at Wake Forest University, visits the Melwood Screening Room for Pittsburgh Filmmakers Documentary Film Salon. To the activists, “[i]t was shocking to discover their neighbors involved in this kind of practice,” says Juth. “That’s what compels them to be involved, knowing that it’s right down the road from them.” Bill O’Driscoll 6:30 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. www.pittsburgharts.org

TheatriQ, a local queer youth acting ensemble, explores power dynamics in its original fantasy production The Lavender Spell. In the show, a young witch from the Fey — a world without race, gender or class — and a high school gay-straight alliance set out to create a better world, but at what cost? The production at Alloy Studios is presented by Dreams of Hope, an artsfocused organization for queer and allied youth. A discussion follows the curtain at each of this weekend’s three performances, starting tonight. DF 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 15, and 2 p.m. Sun., Dec.14. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $5-10. 412-316-2065 or www.dreamsofhope.org

+ SAT., DEC. 13 {MARKETPLACE} OK, so experts know it’s not

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Particle Falls

{MUSIC}

really the “last minute” for shopping until, oh, Dec. 24 (and-a-half). But today’s Last Minute Holiday Market is another opportunity to spread seasonal cheer among local artists and crafters. The Super Friends artist collective’s “12 Days Til Christmas” event that began as an impromptu affair last year has expanded; this year, the Commonwealth Press Warehouse hosts 15 vendors, with everything from T-shirts and jewelry to screenprints, ceramics and other visual art. The event will also be accepting donations for Project Bundle Up and the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. BO Noon-6 p.m. 2315 Wharton St., South Side. Free. www.superfriendsmarket.com

{ART}

Mendelson Gallery opens an exhibit featuring two of the gallery’s old favorites. David Lewis, Terry Shutko and Friends includes new work by Lewis, the famed urban-design pioneer and architect who’s also well known for his

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distinctively angular paintings and metal sculptures of birds, trees and lizards. There’s also new work by Shutko and gallery artists. Today’s reception is free. BO 2-5 p.m. 5874 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-361-8664

{TALK}

midnight, through Dec. 31. BO 4-6 p.m. 805-807 Penn Ave., Downtown. Registration requested at www.publicart pittsburgh.org.

{ASTRONOMY} Instead of hosting your own, possibly disappointing, attempt to catch one of the

Unlike in hell-with-the-lid-offdays, you can’t usually “see the air” in Pittsburgh any more. But our air remains among the worst in the nation for particulate matter, or soot — a form of pollution caused by diesel emissions, power plants and such, and linked to asthma, heart disease and cancer. Particle Falls is a Downtown artwork (sponsored by the Heinz Endowments’ Breathe Project) that provides real-time visualization of air-quality data by projecting dots of light on the Penn Avenue face of the Benedum Center. Today, Particle Falls’ creator, New Mexico-based artist Andrea Polli, visits for an artist talk and panel discussion. Particle Falls runs daily, dusk through

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Called “the most important alto saxophonist of his generation” by The Washington Post, Kenny Garrett began his threedecades-and-counting career with a Duke Ellington Orchestra gig. He went on to play with other greats like Freddie Hubbard and Miles Davis. A Grammy-winning alto saxophonist from Detroit, Garrett leads the Kenny

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Garrett Quintet at The New Hazlett Theater tonight as part of the Kente Arts Alliance series Alto Madness. DF 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $35. 412-3220292 or www.kentearts.org

+ THU., DEC. 18 {EXHIBIT} Pittsburgh’s night owls and bird-lovers have somewhere to roost at the National Aviary at Night. Falling on every third Thursday, the 21+ event coincides this month with Wings in Winter, the Aviary’s seasonal program. A musical, free-flight holiday show will get you up close to the birds. For those who prefer to observe from afar, the Aviary offers a cash bar and refreshments from Atria’s Kookaburra Kitchen. Just keep your smoked-salmon grilled cheese to yourself, rather than tempting the Aviary’s 16 African penguins. DF 5-9 p.m. 700 Arch St., Northside. $6-7. 412-323-7235 or www.aviary.org

DEC. 12 Translations {PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIFER MYERS}

{STAGE}

DEC. 13

year’s best meteor showers, get out of the city and let some experts guide your stargazing. Jennings Environmental Education Center staff and the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh will have telescopes and binoculars set up at Jennings. The yearly Geminids meteor shower, first viewed in 1862, gets its name from the constellation Gemini. Tonight’s program begins with an indoor presentation about the importance of early astronomy. DF 7-10 p.m. 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock. Free. 724-794-6011 or www.dcnr.state.pa.us

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT GOLDSMITH}

debut, which asks, “What is this world that destroys the sacred and then defends that violence, again and again?” The hour-long, six-act show (adapted from Myers’ streetperformance works) has an intriguing cast and character list. Dancers Jil Stifle and Jasmine Hearn, for instance, play The Extinction, while Scott Andrew is The Unreliable Narrator and Ricardo Iamuuri portrays The Weather. Other notable local talents include musician Mimi Jong, dancer Gia Cacalano and vocalist Anqwenique Wingfield; the cast numbers 17, not counting a Mystery Choir. Myers directs tonight’s performance as part of the New Hazlett Theater’s CSA Performance Series. BO 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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THEATER A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Dickens’ classic Christmas tale. www.comtratheatre.org Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 20. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Charles Dickens’ classic. Presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m., Tue., Dec. 16, 10 a.m., Wed., Dec. 17, 2 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A LIVE RADIO PLAY. The American holiday classic comes to life as a live 1940’s radio broadcast. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 14. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. THE LAVENDAR SPELL. Presented by Queer Youth Arts & theatriQ. In this magical dramedy, join the adventure of a young witch & a high school GSA as they try to create a better world at the risk of destroying two. Can they learn the

true cost of power before it’s too late? Dec. 12-13, 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 14, 2 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321. L’HOTEL. Sarah Bernhardt, Jim Morrison, Oscar Wilde, Victor Hugo, Isadora Duncan & Gioachino Rossini meet in the world premier of Ed Dixon’s comedy. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 14. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. MURDER FOR TWO. 1 actor investigates the crime, the other plays all of the suspects & they both play the piano. Wed-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 18. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. A MUSICAL CHRISTMAS CAROL. Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 12, 4 & 8 p.m. and Thru Dec. 21, 2 & 6 p.m. Thru Dec. 20. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. AN OZARK COUNTRY CHRISTMAS. A salute to HEE HAW, presented by Pohl

COMEDY THU 11

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PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru Dec. 13. admission for one of humanity’s most basic needs. Thru Dec. 13, Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 14, 2 & 724-746-1178. 8 p.m. Pittsburgh Playhouse, SMART BLOND. Born Yesterday Oakland. 412-392-8000. star Judy Holliday lays down a series of tracks about her rise to fame amidst the politics of the 1950s. Tue-Sun. Thru Dec. 21. City Theatre, South COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED Side. 412-431-2489. BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, THE GIFT OF THE ICE QUEEN. 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 29 Hambone’s, Original Gemini Theater musical Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru NEO TRASH “RIFFS” Dec. 28. Gemini Theater, DEADLY PREY LIVE. Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. Comedy riff group A TUNA CHRISTMAS. Neo Trash Video will Radio personalities, be screening & Thurston Wheelis & riffing the great Arles Struvie, report B movie action flick: www. per on the Yuletide pa Deadly Prey. Coffee pghcitym activities of all the o .c & pastries. BYOB. good folks in Tuna, Hors oeuvres 6pm, show Texas. Thru Dec. 13, 8 p.m. 7:30pm. 7:30 p.m. Brew Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. on Broadway, Beechview. 724-745-6300. 724-312-4098. URINETOWN. With the OPEN STAGE COMEDY Earth’s water supply diminished, NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, a government ban on private Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. toilets has sprung forth an evil PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, corporate empire that charges 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

Sample Straub —12/13 Saturday, 5-7PM— 5-7PM—

ZOE’S BEER 4102 SAW MILL RUN BLVD.

FRI 12 “BEST OF THE BURGH” COMEDY SHOWCASE. Come out and see Pittsburgh’s best comedians every Friday. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 6 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. CAFE AU LATE NIGHT. A night of comedy music feat. Bait & Switch, Jessie LE, Eric & the Electric MP3, & Uke & Tuba. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. COMEDY ROYALE. An cutthroat short-form improv competition between four performers. Hosted by Matt Hartman. BYOB. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 12 - SAT 13 LEVEL ONE IMPROV SHOW. Level One improv students show their skills. Dec. 12-13, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 13 AMISH MONKEYS. A holiday song w/ an improvised twist. The troupe performs a series of CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


Work by Patrick Schmidt, from Everything at Once, at ModernFormations, in Garfield

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. In Discussion: 13 Most Wanted Men. A discussion w/ John Giorno, Chief Archivist Matt Wrbican, &Assistant Curator of Film and Video Greg Pierce. Dec. 12, 7pm. North Side. 412-237-8300. BE GALLERIES. Ron Copeland: Illuminations. Opening reception Dec. 13, 5-8pm. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Holiday Celebration. A group exhibition feat. new works by the gallery’s stable of artists. Opening Dec. 12, 6-9pm. South Side. 412-431-3337. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Armin Hoffman: Farbe/Color. Celebrating our Armin Hofmann exhibition of silkscreens &emerging talent from CMU School of Design 2014 Seniors. Opening reception Dec. 12, 6-8pm. Oakland. 412-268-3618. THE NIGHT GALLERY. Creature Feature Showcase. Feat. various local artists, including 30 original creature paintings by Cheryl Holford. Refreshments, DJ Samurai & movie projection. Dec. 13th, 6-10pm. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. REVISION SPACE. Terry Boyd “Pins & Needles” Solo Exhibition. Drawing & embroidery techniques, incorporating drama, abstraction & performance into multi-faceted & intense

pieces. Reception Dec. 12, 6-10pm. Refreshments & tattoos of Boyd’s work. Open weekends & weekdays by appt. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. REX THEATER. The Pancakes & Booze Art Show. A pop up art show feat. over 50 emerging artists showcasing their work in a Warhol-style, anything-goes, massive warehouse environment. All-you-can-eat pancakes, live music, body painting & multimedia displays. South Side. 412-381-6811. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. The Fiery Part of Fire. Films by Cameron Gibson. South Side. 412-431-1810. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Particle Falls: Artist Lecture & Panel. Digital-media artist Andrea Polli, the creator of Particle Falls, an artwork & visualization of real-time air-quality readings, will discuss the process & technology behind the project. Refreshments & drinks. Registration requested. Downtown. 412-391-2060 ext. 237.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Becky Slemmons: Gatherings. Exploring what happens when an artist enters the religious realm, pursuing a performative project, in an environment where conformity often dominates. Downtown. 412-456-2962. 709 PENN GALLERY. Recent Works by Sheila Cueller-Shaffer.

Each abstract work represents a part of a narrative of an immigrant’s journey where anything can become the subject: a memory, a photo, or a change in landscape through time. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley. Commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Emily Newman & the New Chelyuskinites. Modeled on the 1933-34 Russian sea expedition that trapped 111 people on arctic ice for two months after their Chelyuskin sank w/ equal parts social documentary, tableaux & oral history. Squirrel Hill. 412-697-3231. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2014: AIR’s 3rd Annual National Juried Exhibition. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Post-Impressionism to Abstract. Artwork by Vickie Schilling & Nadya Lapets. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BAR MARCO. Studio Direct. New Work by Seth Clark. Strip District. 412-471-1900. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Boulevard Gallery’s Annual Holiday Event. Pottery, jewelry, sculptures, cards, photography, watercolor, oils, & acrylics. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Shop Small at Boxheart on Nov. 29 for original artwork & gifts while enjoying holiday goodies. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, CONTINUES ON PG. 44

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

outrageous sketches & games based on audience suggestion. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. BILLY ELMER. 565 LIVE, Bellevue. 412-522-7556. A FESTIVUS IMPROV MIRACLE. A night of improv comedy featuring 8-Bit Classic & an improvised Christmas special. BYOB. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. A VERY ARCADE COMEDY SPECIAL. A variety show that blends sketch comedy, music, & improv for the whole family. Hosted by Missy Moreno. BYOB. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

EVENT: Black Nativity, presented by the Shona Sharif African Dance and Drum Ensemble in Alumni Hall, Oakland CRITIC: Thelma Grace, 70, a retiree from McKees Rocks WHEN: Sun.,

Dec. 07

It was all about the birth of Christ and the life that he lived and died on the cross. Then, the show [traveled] up to 2014, where we are still praising God, and we’re still blessing his name and celebrating his birth. It had a whole lot of dancing and creativity and singing, and this is how we sing in our modern churches now, with the choir and praise team. It’s gospel. It’s very inspirational, and if you are going through something, it will help you get through it. Pittsburgh needs this kind of show because so many things are happening now amongst the black and white communities. Something like Black Nativity is good for our city, and more people need to come out and see this and do what we need to do for Christ and ourselves. It’s getting through to a lot of people. That’s why it’s [been] able to run for 25 years.

SUN 14 MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 28 The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 15 COMEDY SAUCE. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TFM IMPROV COMEDY. Full throttle improv every Monday night starring our resident house teams. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

BY DANIELLE FOX

TUE 16

Wonders. The Hall of Architecture w/ several towering 20-foot Colorado spruce trees, each adorned w/ handcrafted ornaments. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Tough Art. An annual exhibition of original, interactive artworks “tough” enough to withstand kid handling. Take a walk through a prism forest, create cracks on kinetic stained glass, reach for a sky of 600 LEDs, & explore the inner workings of an intergalactic sheep. North Side. 412-322-5058. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 17 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. A window display & artist product series feat. Daniel Pillis. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Carnegie Trees 2014: Winter

the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Winter Flower & Light Show Feat. a variety of festive poinsettias, showy amaryllis & aromatic paperwhites. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

HOLIDAY THU 11 WYEP HOLIDAY HOOTENANNY. Hosted by Cindy Howes. Live music, holiday treats, refreshments, & a chance to help those in need. Lineup feat. Joy Ike, Billy Price, Mark Dignam, Chet Vincent & more. A Pajama Drive for The Pajama Program will take place at the event. 6:30 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. 412-697-2939.

HOLIDAY CONCERT. Friends in Harmony will present Christmas & Chanukah music. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. A PITTSBURGH CHRISTMAS CAROL TOUR-DOWNTOWN. Tour includes a visit to two historic churches, an organ recital, & light brunch. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Wed, 10 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 13, 10 a.m. Thru Dec. 17 Nicholas Coffee and Teas, Downtown. 412-323-4709. SHOP SMALL, SHOP HANDMADE. I Made It! Market & Think Shadyside present a pop up shop ft. 20 artists each week. Above Shady Grove. Sat, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 Shady Grove, Shadyside. 412-697-0909. SUPER FRIENDS 12 DAYS TIL CHRISTMAS LAST MINUTE HOLIDAY MARKET. Handmade marketplace feat. screenprints, visual art, t-shirts, jewelry, ceramics, original art, more. 12-6 p.m. Commonwealth Press, South Side.

SUN 14 BREAKFAST W/ SANTA & ELSA. Each child will have their picture taken w/ Santa, meet Queen Elsa from Frozen, receive special gifts & complete holiday crafts. Benefits the Children’s Tumor Foundation. To purchase tickets, call or email. 9 a.m.2 p.m. St. Bernadette Church, Monroeville. 724-205-1115. CRESCENT HILLS HOLIDAY HOUSE TOUR. Include homes on Crescent Hills & Spring Grove Roads, Springdale, Glenfield & McCurdy Drives, & Hathaway Court. Visit www.ch-ca.org for information. 1-5 p.m. 412-798-4471. MARGARET S FINE IMPORTS HOLIDAY TEA PARTY. Tastings, tea leaf readings, music, more. Call to register. 2-5 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606.

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FIRST NIGHT OF CHANUKAH CELEBRATION. Music, candle lighting, refreshments, more. 4:45 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010.

VISUAL ART

drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. New Art by Tom & Carol Norulak. Fine art prints, handmade silks & jewelry. Open during campus hours at the Boyce Campus Art Gallery. Monroeville. 724-327-1327. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Selections of The Michael Berger Foundation’s Private Collection. Painting & prints from the 200 piece collection. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Artwork by Crystala Armagost. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor

w paper pghcitym .co

FRI 12 - SAT 13 THE OLD ALLEGHENY VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS HOUSE TOUR. Guided tour ft. 6 restored Victorian homes in the Old Allegheny neighborhood plus the Calvary United Methodist Church, famous for its Tiffany stained glass windows, & Holmes Hall, home of one of the world’s largest toy train museums. www.alleghenywest.org Dec. 12-13 1-888-718-4253.

SAT 13 ANNUAL CHRISTMAS ETHNIC FOOD FESTIVAL. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Holy Virgin Russian Orthodox Church, Carnegie.

WED 17 CAHAL DUNNE’S WONDERFUL WORLD OF CHRISTMAS. Lunch & Christmas show. 11:30 a.m.3 p.m. Ferrante’s Lakeview, Greensburg. 724-853-4050. A PITTSBURGH CHRISTMAS CAROL TOUR-DOWNTOWN. Tour includes a visit to two historic churches, an organ recital, & light brunch. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Wed, 10 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 13, 10 a.m. Thru

CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

Dec. 17 Nicholas Coffee and Teas, Downtown. 412-323-4709.

DANCE THU 11 - SUN 14 THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. The classic story of Clara & her Nutcracker Prince w/ scenes from Pittsburgh. Opens Dec. 5. Thu, Fri, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7 p.m., Sun, 12 & 4:30 p.m., Tue., Dec. 23, 7 p.m. and Wed., Dec. 24, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 28 Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-454-9109.

FRI 12 BURLESQUE-A-PADES: A CHRISTMAS SHIMMY! The cast of Burlesque-A-Pades

settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. THE GALLERY 4. Trip In / On Neon. Work by Pittsburgh based painter & illustrator Gabe Felice. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art & committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. North Side. 412-322-1773.

presents their version of A Christmas Carol. 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 12 - SUN 14 THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by the Carnegie Performing Arts Center. The magical dream of a little girl named Clara & her Nutcracker Prince. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 Carnegie Performing Arts Center, Carnegie. 412-279-8887. ROMEO & JULIET. Prokofiev’s ballet, presented by the Conservatory Dance Company. Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

MASER GALLERIES. Burton Morris: One Man Show. Paintings, serigraphs, pop-outs, posters. Shadyside. 412-687-0885. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. David Lewis, Terry Shutko & Friends. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. DELIVERABLES: CMU Design Winter Show. The work featured in the show reflects the unique identity, both of individuals & of the CMU senior design class. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. I Just Want The Paper. Homewood. 412-370-6916. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Dave Klug & Friends. The work of Dave Klug, George Schill, Stacy Innerst & Wayno. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3 Guild Shows. 3 different shows presented at PCA: Women of Vision presents “Storytellers: Truth be Told”, Craftsmen Guild presents

SAT 13 A CELEBRATION OF PARTNERSHIP AND THE COLLEGE PREPARATORY DANCE PROGRAM. Presented by Bodiography Center for Movement & LaRoche College. Feat. new work by Karen Dacko, Greer Reed & a performance by Czarniak Tap. Zappala College Center Square. 7:30 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 412-536-1300.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 13 A VINTAGE CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE. Relive the holidays of the 60s, 70s, & 80s.

“Illusions” & Fiberarts Guild presents “Construct”. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SHAW GALLERIES. Sincronia. Work by 6 contemporary artists from Venezuela. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Obsessions. Showcasing six artists from across the U.S., exploring the nature of obsession through painting, sculpture, site-specific installation, video & performance. Ft. artists: Jeremiah Johnson, Jason Lockyer, Nathan Margoni, Mary Ivy Martin, Becky Slemmons & Laurie Trok. Downtown. 412-325-7723. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Restrike: Uncovering the Life and Work of Gertrude Quastler. Feat. the artistic styles of Gertrude Quastler from printmaking to sculpture. Oakland. 412-648-2423. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

Benefit for Catholic Charities of Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. 412-456-6999.

SUN 14 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS THU 11 “FAIR TRADE”: RACIAL JUSTICE & THE HANDMADE MOVEMENT. 2-5 p.m. Ujamaa Collective, Hill District. 412-391-2060. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

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LITERARY THU 11 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

FRI 12

THURSDAY, DEC 11/10PM

BIG GYPSY, BEAUTY SLAP, GUIDES THURSDAY DEC 18/10PM

THE COMMON HEART, ROUND BLACK GHOSTS,COOKIE $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

REBECCA CLEVER, CHRISTINE STROUD, CAROLYNE WHELAN. Readings, live music, more. 7 p.m. Tin Front Cafe, Homestead. 412-461-4615. VALERIE BACHARACH & CJ COLEMAN. MadFridays Reading Series. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030.

SAT 13 IMAGE TO WORD W/ AUTHOR SHERRIE FLICK. Writer’s workshop. Novice & experienced writers welcome. Create short stories & poems. Group discussion & one-on-one guidance. Sat, 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. and Sat, 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Thru Feb. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

SUN 14 BAH HUMBUG: WRITERS WRESTLE THE HOLIDAY SPIRIT. Ten Pittsburgh writers share their stories of working in customer service during the holidays. Music from Steve Pellegrino & Mary Shea. 8 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. BOOK SIGNING W/ DAVID RULLO. Meet author David Rullo as he signs his published poetry collection “Tired Scenes From A City Window”. 1 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220. MEET A LOCAL PITTSBURGH AUTHOR. 13 local authors will be in the bookstore signing copies of their new book. Authors include Kathleen George, Sara Law, Thomas Sweterlitsch, Joshua David Bellin & more. 1-5 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220.

TUE 16 DAN ROONEY & CAROL PETERSON’S “ALLEGHENY CITY’. Discussion & book signing. Byer’s Hall. 4:30 p.m. CCAC North Campus, McCandless. 412-383-2493. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

OTHER STUFF THU 11

Art by Rei Chikaoka

Pittsburgh Glass Center’s current exhibit, Emerge/Evolve, is the first in its Hodge Gallery devoted to kiln-glass work. And what, exactly, is kiln glass? It’s all right there in the name. Pieces made by this method are fused in an oven in such a way that allows for a wide range of results, giving artists extra freedom to incorporate mediums like painting, drawing and printmaking. PGC’s group show features winners from the Portland, Ore.-based Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, Evolve 2014. Exhibit continues through Jan. 18. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-365-2145 or www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

KIDSTUFF THU 11

LEARN TO ICE SKATE. Teaching basic skating fundamentals of balance, edge control & stopping. Classes for all ranges of expertise. All ages. Schenley Park Ice Rink. Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 28 Schenley Park, Oakland. 703-597-6905. LET’S MOVE! WINTER FAMILY DANCE PARTY. Music, crafts & seasonal treats. 11 a.m.2 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. MINI FACTORY. Am interactive learning program designed BACKYARD EXHIBIT. specifically for children ages Musical swing set, sandbox, 3-5 years old & their parents solar-powered instruments, or caregivers that uses more. Ongoing Children’s contemporary installation Museum of Pittsburgh, art as the basis for North Side. 412-322-5058. enabling parents & BOUNCE. An educators to explore interactive exhibit big ideas. Reservations celebrating the world’s required. 10-11 a.m., www. per most amazing ball. a p Sat., Dec. 13, 10-11 pghcitym Experience how it .co a.m. and Sat., Dec. 27, moves, how it looks & 10-11 a.m. Mattress Factory, the story of how it came to North Side. 412-231-3169. be. Ongoing Children’s Museum PENNY ARCADE: KIDS of Pittsburgh, North Side. COMEDY SHOW. Ft. crafting 412-322-5058. & collaboration stations & an improv show inspired by audience suggestions. Second FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS Sat of every month, 1 p.m. Thru OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Jan. 10 Arcade Comedy Theater, Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Downtown. 412-339-0608. 412-681-4318. MINI FACTORY. An interactive learning program designed specifically for children ages 3-5 years old & their parents or caregivers that uses contemporary installation art as the basis for enabling parents & educators to explore big ideas. Reservations required. 10-11 a.m., Sat., Dec. 13, 10-11 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 27, 10-11 a.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169.

THU 11 - WED 17

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 13

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

POLAR EXPRESS STORY TIME. 12-1 p.m. The University Store on Fifth, Oakland. 412-648-1455. SATURDAYS W/ THE SUGAR PLUM FAIRY. A 30-minute creative movement dance classes and story time sessions w/ a dancer in costume in collaboration w/ Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Sat, 10:30-11 a.m. Thru Dec. 13 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914.

TUE 16 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE SAT 13 JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK FOR ARTHRITIS. a 5K run/ walk benefiting the Arthritis Foundation, Great Lakes Region, Western Pennsylvania. A kids’ Tinsel Trot w/ a one-mile run/walk set to start at 9:30 a.m. Festivities include dog & person costume contests, complimentary refreshments, & door prizes. Pre-register online or by phone. Starts on the North Shore’s Art Rooney Ave. 7:30 a.m. 412-250-3342.

CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512.

FRI 12 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. “EMBRACING RISKS, FILLING A VOID, KNOWING WHEN TO WALK AWAY: THE MAKINGS OF THE SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS”. Presented by Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series. Feat. speaker Deb Mortillaro, Partner, Dreadnought Wines. Networking & breakfast. James Laughlin Music Hall. 8-9:30 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. FRIDAY NIGHT CREATURE FEATURE. A creature painting & a creature movie. Fri, 7-11 p.m. Thru Jan. 22 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197.


GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. THE OPEN MIC COFFEE HOUSE. Music, poetry, dance, drama, more. 7:30-9 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: STAINED GLASS WINDOWS OF DOWNTOWN. 12 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x237.

SAT 13 BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. DINNER & A MEDIUM. A 3 course meal & group readings from medium Kitsy Higgins. 5-7 p.m. Anchor Inn, Natrona Heights. 412-422-8447. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Interactive tour through city backdrops of movies such as The Dark Knight Rises, Perks of Being a Wallflower, Flashdance, more. Meet at Duquesne Incline. 10 a.m., Sat., Jan. 3, 10 a.m., Sat., Jan. 24, 10 a.m., Sat., Feb. 7, 10 a.m. and Fri., Feb. 20, 10 a.m. 412-323-4709.

TYLER OAKLEY’S SLUMBER PARTY. Skits & interactive audience segments by the YouTube personality & LGBT advocate. 7 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225.

SUN 14 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SUNDAY ART & FOOD MARKET. Local artists & foodies. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

PITTSBURGH GAY UNSCENE

Pittsburgh Gay UnScene is a social group that hosts all kinds of events throughout the city with the goal of creating safe spaces and strengthing the local LGBTQIA community. Volunteers are needed to help with everything from social networking and print and web outreach to event planning. Email vinnymarconi@yahoo. com or visit www.gayunscene.com for information.

SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TUGBOAT PRINTSHOP OPEN HOUSE. Open studio for holiday shopping. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tugboat Print Shop, Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

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MON 15 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 17 AFTERNOON TEA DANCE. Lessons offered to beginners. Wed, 12-2:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345.

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LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

AUDITIONS HIGHMARK FIRST NIGHT PITTSBURGH’S ANNUAL SING-OFF. Seeking musically talented students. Enter at www.TrustArts.org/FirstNightPGH & include a link to a YouTube video of a performance recording. Each applicant must choose one song by Smokey Robinson, and one of their own choice. Deadline: midnight, Dec. 12. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Open stage & vocal auditions for spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred) or standard musical theater, or classical. No a’capella. Accompanist provided. Resume & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. THE RAGE OF THE STAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for “BLOODY HELL,” A postapocalyptic stage adaptation of “Dracula.” Call or email rageofthestage@yahoo.com for more information. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 724-292-8427.

PITTSBURGH 3100 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-281-3110

SUBMISSIONS 2014-2015 WALDMAN INTERNATIONAL ARTS & WRITING COMPETITION. Seeking creative writing, short film & visual arts submissions from middle & high-schoolers exploring the theme of Real Life Superheroes in the Face of Persecution. Submissions accepted through Jan 15, 2015. 412-421-1500. BLAST FURNACE. Call for submissions: volume 4, issue 4. Seeking poems w/ theme of resolutions, as well as original poetry outside of this theme. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems, or an audio recording of yourself reciting your poetry (send only 1 file attachment no more than 2 minutes) blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit. Deadline Dec 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com

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Looking for the perfect gift?

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

You may not be the right person to answer this, but your commenters might be able to help. I love and support my friends who are transgender, but I don’t understand all the 18- to 21-year-olds among my friends who are declaring themselves “gender-neutral.” I am a bit older and have always been interested in queer culture and history. But it feels like they have forgotten, or never knew, that butch lesbians who wear strap-ons are still women, or that it is very common for straight men to wear lacy underwear. They don’t seem to know that they can be gendernonconforming without having to discard gender. Because they’re so young and all of them have decided this at the same time, it seems to be some kind of trend. Some may be on their way to coming out as trans, which is fair enough, but I strongly suspect some of them will be completely conventional in a couple of years. It would be rude and dismissive of me to tell them that it’s just a phase, so I would never do that, but I don’t really understand the point of being gender-neutral. What has changed in the last few years that this is suddenly a thing? LONGTIME READER

Pick up City Paper ’s 2014 Gift Guide Magazine

AVAILABLE NOW

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Ah, gender identities — you need an Excel spreadsheet to keep track these days. Some folks are gender-neutral, some are bigender, some are agender. Then there’s pangender, genderless, genderfluid and genderqueer. There’s also gender-nonconforming, gender-questioning and gender-variant, as well as genderfuck, trigender and intergender. (Who gets a hyphen and who doesn’t? Who the fuckknows?) Add in every genderblueplatespecial’s very own set of random and unpredictable and ever-shifting pronoun preferences, and you’ve got a blizzard of special snowflakes, each one primed to take offense at some real or imagined microaggression so they can dash to Tumblr for some macro-venting. What has changed in the past few years? There’s more discussion about gender now, LR, and that’s a good thing. Culturally enforced gender norms are ridiculous, and the policing of gender expression/identity is oppressive and often violent. This critical and necessary discussion about gender has sparked a great deal of interest in — and, in some quarters, generated a lot of sympathy for — people who aren’t just talking about gender but struggling with it, doing something about it and redefining it. But “interest in” and “sympathy for” have a way of attracting poseurs and attention-seekers. That’s nothing new. Pay sympathetic attention to a plate of tater tots long enough, and it’ll attract poseurs and attention-seekers, too. But since it’s (almost always) impossible to tell the attention-seeking poseurs from the actual items, LR, your best course of action when someone declares themselves to be gender-neutral — or bi-gender or pangender or etceteragender — is to smile, nod, inquire about pronoun preferences, make a mental note not to use pronouns around that person (easier than committing multiple sets to memory) and then change the genderfucking subject. I recently “friended” someone online whose bio mentions that their preferred pronoun is “their.” They are not a transgender person. I’ve been told that they are “genderfluid,” but it is commonly under-

stood in our friend group that they are female. Questions: (1) If you’re genderfluid, are you suddenly not male or female? Does anyone really need to say that they’re genderfluid? Aren’t we all a bit fluid where gender is concerned? (2) Does someone who is cisgender take away from the “trans experience” by taking on pronouns like “they/their” or “ze/zir,” or are they being helpful by normalizing these pronouns? (3) Am I a jerk for asking these questions? I want to be sensitive to gender issues, but I’m worried that I can’t keep up. OBSERVANT ONE PREFERS SHE

1. A genderfluid person is someone “whose gender identity shifts,” says the Washington Post. Wikipedia defines genderfluidity like this: “Moving between genders or with a fluctuating gender identity.” An actual genderfluid person — named Astrophy — put it this way in a post at Jezebel: “I am genderfluid, though I was assigned female at birth. … What does this mean? For me, it means that sometimes I am a woman, sometimes I am a man, and sometimes I am androgynous. I do not mean that sometimes I feel manly; in every internal sense, I am a man in those moments.” So someone who is genderfluid isn’t a mélange of stereotypically male and female traits, OOPS, but someone who is a man sometimes and a woman at other times. 2. Helpful, I suppose, but nevertheless exhausting, potentially attention-whoring, and doubtless contributing to the extinction of pronouns altogether. 3. There’s being sensitive to gender issues, and then there’s being so sensitive to gender issues that you’re practically allergic. But rest assured: You are not a jerk, OOPS, as there are so many new gender identities out there that no one can keep up. My intelligent, lovely, in-all-ways-phenomenal 18-year-old daughter just came out to me: as asexual! I am struggling with my reaction to this. If she had said she was a lesbian, I would have been fine with it, except for all that discrimination and stuff. I will always support her, but I can’t help but think that (1) something bad happened to her that (despite my near-helicopter parenting) I don’t know about, and/or (2) she’ll miss out! Is asexuality really a thing? Can it be some sort of opt-out-of-this-sex-stuffuntil-later thing? ’Cause that I get. PARENTING ASEXUAL UNDERGRAD SINCE EVENING

Asexuality is a real thing, PAUSE, and your daughter could be an intelligent and phenomenal example. That said … for some, asexuality has functioned as an opt-out-of-this-sex-stuff-until-later thing. But just as some gay men identifying as bisexual before coming out as gay doesn’t mean bisexuality is a phase (or nonexistent), the fact that some people identify as asexual before ultimately coming out as — here we go — heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, pansexual, graysexual, demisexual, autosexual, antisexual, hyposexual, etc., etc., etc. isn’t proof that asexuality isn’t a real thing. Keep listening to your daughter, PAUSE, and learn more about asexuality at the Asexuality Visibility and Education Network (asexuality.org). On the Lovecast, the science is in on teen sexting: Listen at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

12.10-12.17

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Harper Lee was born and raised in Alabama. At the age of 23, she relocated to New York City with hopes of becoming a writer. It was a struggle. To support herself, she worked as a ticket agent for airline companies. Finding the time to develop her craft was difficult. Seven years went by. Then one Christmas, two friends gave her a remarkable gift: enough money to quit her job and work on her writing for a year. During that grace period, Lee created the basics for a book that won her a Pulitzer Prize: To Kill a Mockingbird. I don’t foresee anything quite as dramatic for you in the coming months, Sagittarius. But I do suspect you will receive unexpected help that provides you with the slack and spaciousness you need to lay the foundations for a future creation.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the ancient Greek epic poem The Odyssey, Odysseus’s wife, Penelope, describes two kinds of dreams. “Those that pass through the gate of ivory,” she says, are deceptive. But dreams that “come forth through the gate of polished horn” tell the truth. Another ancient text echoes these ideas. In his poem the Aeneid, Virgil says that “true visions” arrive here from the land of dreams through the gate of horn, whereas “deluding lies” cross over through the gate of ivory. Judging from the current astrological omens, Capricorn, I expect you will have interesting and intense dreams flowing through both the gate of ivory and the gate of horn. Will you be able to tell the difference? Trust love.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your chances of going viral are better than usual. It’s a perfect moment to upload a YouTube video of yourself wearing a crown of black roses and a V for Vendetta mask as you ride a unicycle inside a church and sing an uptempo parody version of “O Come All Ye Faithful.” It’s also a favorable time for you to create a buzz for you and your pet causes through less spectacular measures. Promote yourself imaginatively.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): At age 80, author Joan Didion has published five novels, 10 works of nonfiction and five screenplays. When she was 27, she wrote, “I have already lost touch with a couple of people I used to be.” That wasn’t a good thing, she added: “We are well-advised to keep on nodding terms with the people we used to be, whether we find them attractive company or not. Otherwise they turn up unannounced and surprise us, come hammering on the mind’s door and demand to know who deserted them, who betrayed them, who is going to make amends.” I recommend her counsel to you in the coming months, Pisces. Get reacquainted with the old selves you have outgrown and abandoned.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Lord Byron (1788-1824) was an English poet who loved animals. In the course of his life, he not only had dogs and cats as pets, but also monkeys, horses, peacocks, geese, a crocodile, a falcon, a crane and a parrot. When he enrolled in Trinity College at age 17, he was upset that the school’s rules forbade students from having pet dogs, which meant he couldn’t bring his adored Newfoundland dog, Boatswain. There was no regulation, however, against having a tame bear as a pet. So Byron got one and named it Bruin. I think it’s time for you to find a workaround like that, Aries. Be cunning. Try a gambit or two. Find a loophole.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Whenever I lost one of my baby teeth as a kid,

I put it under my pillow before I went to sleep. During the night, the Tooth Fairy sneaked into my room to snatch the tooth, and in its place left me 25 cents. The same crazy thing happened to every kid I knew, although for unknown reasons my friend John always got five dollars for each of his teeth — far more than the rest of us. I see a metaphorically comparable development in your life, Taurus. It probably won’t involve teeth or a visit from the Tooth Fairy. Rather, you will finally be compensated for a loss or deprivation or disappearance that you experienced in the past. I expect the restitution will be generous, too — more like John’s than mine.

German army might invade and occupy England, as it had done to France. To protect his financial assets, he converted everything he owned into bars of silver, then buried them underground in the countryside north of London. When the war ended, he decided it was safe to dig up his fortune. Unfortunately, he couldn’t recall where he had put it, and never did find it. Let’s draw a lesson from his experience, Virgo. It’s fine if you want to stash a treasure or protect a secret or safeguard a resource. That’s probably a sensible thing to do right now. But make sure you remember every detail about why and how you’re doing it.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Through the scientific magic of grafting, a single tree can be altered to grow several different kinds of fruit at the same time. One type of “fruit salad tree” produces apricots, nectarines, plums and peaches, while another bears grapefruits, lemons, oranges, limes and tangelos. I’m thinking this might be an apt and inspiring symbol for you in the coming months, Gemini. What multiple blooms will you create on your own metaphorical version of a fruit-salad tree?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): No other structure on the planet is longer than the Great Wall of China, which stretches 3,945 miles. It’s not actually one unbroken span, though. Some sections aren’t connected, and there are redundant branches that are roughly parallel to the main structure. It reminds me of your own personal Great Wall, which is monumental yet permeable, strong in some ways but weak in others, daunting to the casual observer but less so to those who take the time to study it. Now is an excellent time to take inventory of that wall of yours. Is it serving you well? Is it keeping out the influences you don’t want but allowing in the influences you do want? Could it use some renovation? Are you willing to reimagine what its purpose is and how you want it to work for you in the future?

Even if you are not formally enrolled in a course of study or a training program, you are nevertheless being schooled. Maybe you’re not fully conscious of what you have been learning. Maybe your teachers are disguised or unwitting. But I assure you that the universe has been dropping some intense new knowledge on you. The

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You now have a special ability to detect transformations that are happening below the threshold of everyone else’s awareness. Anything that has been hidden or unknown will reveal itself to your gentle probes. You will also be skilled at communicating your discoveries to people who are important to you. Take full advantage of these superpowers. Don’t underestimate how pivotal a role you can play as a teacher, guide and catalyst. The future success of your collaborative efforts depends on your next moves. Forget what Time magazine thinks. Who is your “Person of the Year?” Tell me at Truthrooster@ gmail.com.

get your yoga on! give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Arctic Monkeys are British rockers who have produced five studio albums, which together have sold almost five million copies. Rolling Stone magazine called their first album, released in 2003, the 30th greatest debut of all time. Yet when they first formed in 2002, none of them could play a musical instrument. I see the current era of your life, Leo, as having a similar potential. How might you start from scratch to create something great?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Alan Turing (1912-1954) was a British mathematician and pioneering computer scientist. After World War II broke out, he got worried that the

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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coming week will be an excellent time to become more conscious of the lessons you have been absorbing. If you have intuitions about where this educational drama should go next, be proactive about making that happen.

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Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800978-6674 (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

EAST FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION

CLASSES

REHEARSAL

AUTO SERVICES

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! \www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Dean of Shadyside Hair Salon seeks

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads . TV . Film . Fashion 40% OFF TUITION - SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-9779537 (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION

CLASSES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

AUTO SERVICES

STORAGE

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

Individual seeks short term loan. Good income. 724-583-2253

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

RESTAURANT/BAR

ADOPTION

CLASSES

WANT TO BUY

AUTO SERVICE

ADOPTING YOUR BABY IS OUR DREAM!

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

WWII ITEMS

Rent -A- Bay

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Hair Stylist Assistant Call 412-621-7900 or email: deanoffice@aol.com

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

Now Hiring

as an Independent Contractor with Uber.

ALL POSITIONS

Make up to $25/hour driving your own car.

SIGN UP TODAY

Apply In Person 125 W. Station Square Drive

T.UBER.COM/PGHDRIVE

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF! We are currently seeking staff for IMMEDIATE openings to support an adult 1:1 in the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off! Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org or call 724-933-5100 ext.142

CAR HAULERS/OWNER OPERATORS WANTED CDL and 2 years of car hauling experience required Brand new trucks available, ask about our lease program. Contact Doug Fellows at 303-809-3976 or dfellows@supremeauto.biz.

U.S. Census Bureau is hiring

Field Representatives in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties for the American Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07 to $15.68 per hour. Please call (800) 563.6499 for more information and to be scheduled for testing. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities.

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Successful Musician & Exec yearn for 1st baby. Expenses Paid 1-800-997-1720 Katherine & Mike

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

Uniforms, Helmets, Etc. Highest Prices Paid!!!

Call 412-657-5558

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on January 6, 2015, until 2:00p.m., local prevailing time for: • Pittsburgh Montessori Pre K-8 Replace Walk-in Cooler HVAC and Electrical Primes

FUN PART-TIME JOB Looking to make some extra holiday cash? Work the final Steeler Games at Heinz, Pitt and Duquesne basketball games, and get the opportunity to work next year’s Heinz summer concert series. Landmark Event Staffing, an industry leader in event staffing and security, is looking to hire enthusiastic, customer-service oriented people to work events in and around the city of Pittsburgh. You must be at least 18 yrs. of age and able to pass a criminal background check. Veterans, students, retirees and those looking for an n exciting first OR second income are ALL welcome to apply. Call our Pittsburgh office to set up an appointment.

412-321-2707

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

Northwood Realty Services 412-521-5100 Mark cell 412-606-8134.

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Overbrook 135 Aidan Court • Cul-de-sac townhome community just minutes to City of Pittsburgh. • Stylish, spacious and open 3 bedroom floor plan with loads of upgraded finishes • Large center island kitchen serviced by Butler’s pantry with glass doors • Vaulted MBR and Finished daylight game room w/ composite wood grain floor. Maintenance free living at it’s best!

$224,900 Call The Karen Marshall Group 412-551-2124

412-403-6069

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Squirrel Hill

3BR, 1BA. Beechwood Blvd across from Frick Park. $1,350/mo.

SOUTH FOR SALE

• Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Boiler Replacement HVAC and Asbestos Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on December 8, 2014, at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am

only on www.pghcitypaper.com WITH SPECIAL GUEST

former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday


CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD 2015 MEETING DATES AND HOST NEIGHBORHOODS The following calendar maintains the tradition of meeting at 6:00 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of every calendar month except as noted. The several meetings proposed for Council Chambers attempt to respond to the public recommendation that meeting at a centralized location may encourage increased public attendance. All Meetings Scheduled to Begin at 6:00 p.m. DATE

ADDRESS

NEIGHBORHOOD

January 27, 2015

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg 414 Grant Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-255-2142 - office

February 24, 2015

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

March 24, 2015

Allegheny Center Alliance Church

250 East Ohio Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-321-4333

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

April 28, 2015

May 26, 2015

Z1

720 Sherwood Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15204

Sheridan Senior Center

Z6 2201 Wylie Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-434-0922 - office 412-471-1313 - fax

Freedom Unlimited, Inc. Director: Alma Speed Fox

June 23, 2015

July 28, 2015

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Council Chambers

August 2015

Combined with September

Combined with September

September 22, 2015

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

October 27, 2015

Community Empowerment Association Director: Rashad Byrdsong

7120 Kelly Street Pittsburgh, PA 15208 412-371-3689

November 2015

Z5

Combined with December

Combined with December

December 1, 2015

Z2

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Council Chambers

(The public will be notified of any change of date or location through media publication.) For Further Information: 412-765-8023 Confidential TipLine: 412-255-CPRB N E W S

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FAV R

STUDIES

Overactive Bladder? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

*Stuff We Like

412-650-6155

Do us a favor and share your Flu with us. Please. Most of the time, nothing good comes from having the u. Except now. If you get the u, OR have the u already, you can help evaluate an investigational medication that may help end u symptoms more quickly. Local doctors are currently conducting the FAVOR medical research study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an investigational u medication for its ability to manage symptoms of the u. To pre-qualify for the FAVOR study, you must: k C@CRUCCL?LBWC?PQMD?ƓC k &?TC?DCTCPMD?RJC?QR {$GDMTCPWC?PQMD ?ƓC ?RJC?QR {$ k &?TCMPKMPCMDRFCDMJJMUGLƓQWKNRMKQ - Cough, sore throat, headache, nasal congestion, body aches and pains, or fatigue All study-related care is provided at no cost and payment for your time and travel will be provided.

To learn more about the FAVOR study, please visit www.favorustudy.com or contact: 07242013

412-650-6155

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Street Protests

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

Pittsburghers, including teens, are standing in solidarity with other cities around the country.

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. Evening Appointments Available For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

Are you a woman between 45 and 65 years old? The University of Pittsburgh Center for Family Planning Research is looking for postmenopausal women who want to help women through an important research safety study of a vaginal ring to prevent HIV. Women will have 5 visits at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC and complete 2 phone calls over approximately 5 months. Call 412-641-5496 today to see if you are eligible or visit www.birthcontrolstudies.org Eligible participants will be compensated up to $500 for their time an travel.

Alternate Histories Subscription Local artist Matthew Buchholz makes kick-ass prints, seamlessly mashing historic images with sci-fi monsters. Subscribe to his new mailing service — or gift one to a friend — and get artwork delivered each month. Available in two-, four- or six-month packages. www.alternatehistories.com

Chris Rock’s conversation with Frank Rich In the Dec. 1 New York magazine, the comedian takes on race in America frankly and tactfully, in addition to discussing his career and plenty more. www.nymag.com

Free champagne at The Livermore Indecisive drinkers rejoice! This East Liberty bar offers a free small glass of champagne to loosen you up while you choose from a great booze selection. The $6 cocktails can’t be beat. 124 S. Highland Ave.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ZIA ANGER}

Help Women Around the World

Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part reseach project. To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health, and speak uent English • Be willing to ďŹ ll out questionnaires, and to not smoke before two sessions Earn $150 for completeing this study. For more information, call (412) 624-8975 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

The Nostalgia Trap Podcast The very charming David Parsons interviews a variety of leftist and Marxist academics, journalists and artists. Recommended listening: Episode 8, in which activists Eljeer Hawkins, Cora Bergantinos and James Hoff discuss the minimum wage. www.nostalgiatrap.libsyn.com

Angel Olsen’s “May As Well� The singer-songwriter released a special deluxe edition of her breathtaking record, Burn Your Fire For No Witness, featuring five bonus tracks. Check this new song at www.jagjaguwar.com and prepare for Ms. Olsen to break your heart.


Xin Sui Bodyworks

MASSAGE

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

724-519-2950

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STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951 MASSAGE

Asian 888 Massage

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

MASSAGE

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish Credit Cards Accepted

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

724-519-7896

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

330-373-0303

Judy’s Oriental Massage

MASSAGE

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

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412-595-8077

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Positive Recovery Solutions

JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS

R

Suboxone

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Acute Partial Program Individual and Group Counseling

Outpatient Program Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient 306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

MONROEVILLE, PA

We can treat you!

412-380-0100

For more information, call 24 hours

www.myjadewellness.com

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com

South Side Outpatient 2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922

1-888-694-9996

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com 54

Recovery Without Judgement™

Immediate Appointments Available

Pregnant?

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

GRAND RE-OPENING! Specializing in Roor, Hisi, Pulse, Pyrology, Hitman, Medicali, Sky

J&S GLASS

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.10/12.17.2014

Water Pipes, Glass And Vapes Best Service, Selection and Prices in Town! 20% off Glass with this Ad 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg JANDSGLASS

J&S Glass

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY


{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

TAKING TO THE STREETS

Protesters call attention to police violence against African Americans IN PITTSBURGH and across the country, multiple protests over the death of unarmed

{PHOTO BY DANIEL BARNHILL}

African Americans at the hands of police have been numerous. There were several in Pittsburgh alone last week in the wake of a New York grand jury’s decision not to indict a police officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner. There were protest marches and die-ins held Downtown and at the suburban Ross Park Mall to call attention to the violence. City Paper reporters and photographers captured scenes of the protests both locally and in New York City last week. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

{PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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Ring In 2015 With Us!

UN D E R THE BIG TOP

SALES ARE LIMITED!

A MAGICAL 2015 Magicians, Caricature Artists, Live Entertainment & So Much More!

$75,000 New Year’s Eve Drawings Let Rivers pay for YOUR year!

Fun House Package LOCATED IN OUR BANQUET ROOM | $479 PER COUPLE

GAS FOR A YEAR • FREE SLOT PLAY FOR A YEAR CABLE FOR A YEAR

AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Greatest Party Package Includes:

• • • •

Spectacular Dinner for Two Main Event Includes Entertainment by: In the Mood Overnight Accommodations at The Westin Hotel Pittsburgh New Year’s Day Brunch

Please call 412-231-7777 or visit RIVERSCASINO.COM to purchase your package today!

All Tier Wild Card Drawings | 1:30AM TOP PRIZE

$10,000 CASH

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

December 10, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 50

December 10, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 50